WorldWideScience

Sample records for australia trans-disciplinary research

  1. A Review of the Urban Development and Transport Impacts on Public Health with Particular Reference to Australia: Trans-Disciplinary Research Teams and Some Research Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Black

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization and transport have a direct effect on public health.A trans-disciplinary approach is proposed and illustrated to tackle the general problem of these environmental stressors and public health. Processes driving urban development and environmental stressors are identified. Urbanization, transport and public health literature is reviewed and environmental stressors are classified into their impacts and which group is affected, the geographical scale and potential inventions. Climate change and health impacts are identified as a research theme. From an Australian perspective, further areas for research are identified.

  2. Interdisciplinary research and trans-disciplinary validity claims

    CERN Document Server

    Gethmann, C F; Hanekamp, G; Kaiser, M; Kamp, G; Lingner, S; Quante, M; Thiele, F

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity has seemingly become a paradigm for modern and meaningful research. Clearly, the interdisciplinary modus of deliberation enables to unfold relevant but quite different disciplinary perspectives to the reflection of broader scientific questions or societal problems. However, whether the comprehensive results of interdisciplinary reflection prove to be valid or to be acceptable in trans-disciplinary terms depends upon certain preconditions, which have to be fulfilled for securing scientific quality and social trust in advisory contexts. The present book is written by experts and practitioners of interdisciplinary research and policy advice. It analyses topical and methodological approaches towards interdisciplinarity, starting with the current role of scientific research in society. The volume continues with contributions to the issues of knowledge and acting and to trans-disciplinary deliberation. The final conclusions address the scientific system as substantial actor itself as well as the...

  3. Methodological challenges of trans-disciplinary research: Some systemic reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Ison, Ray

    2008-01-01

    This essay was written in response to an invitation by the editors of NSS issued after the author had reviewed the paper entitled 'Methodological challenges of trans-disciplinary research' submitted by Christian Pohl and Gertrude Hirsch-Hadorn (see Pohl and Hirsch Hadorn, 2008). The essay provides an accounting for the transformation in my emotioning as I read the submitted paper by introducing three sets of distinctions: (i) a model of research practice; (ii) an explication of the nature of ...

  4. A Trans-disciplinary Hydrogeological Systems Analysis Approach for Identifying and Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Options: Example from the Darling River Floodplain, N.S.W., Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, K.; Brodie, R. S.; Tan, K. P.; Halas, L.; Magee, J.; Gow, L.; Christensen, N. B.

    2013-12-01

    Surface water availability and quality generally limits managed aquifer recharge (MAR) opportunities in inland Australia's highly salinized landscapes and groundwater systems. Economic factors also commonly limit MAR investigations to shallow freshwater groundwater systems near existing infrastructure. Aquifer opportunities lie mainly in zones of fresh groundwater in relatively thin fluvial sedimentary aquifer systems with highly variable hydraulic properties. As part of a broader strategy to identify water savings in the Murray-Darling Basin, the Broken Hill Managed Aquifer Recharge (BHMAR) project was tasked with identifying and assessing MAR and/or groundwater extraction options to reduce evaporative losses from existing surface water storages, secure Broken Hill's water supply, protect the local environment and heritage, and return water to the river system. A trans-disciplinary research approach was used to identify and assess MAR options across a broad area of the Darling River floodplain. This methodology enabled the team to recognise fundamental problems in discipline approaches, helped identify critical data gaps, led to significant innovation across discipline boundaries, was critical in the development of a new hydrogeological conceptual model, facilitated development of new models of landscape, geological and tectonic evolution of the study area, and enabled completion of pre-commissioning maximal and residual MAR risk assessments. An airborne electromagnetics (AEM) survey, acquired over a large (>7,500 sq km) area of the Darling Floodplain, enabled rapid identification of a multi-layer sequence of aquifers and aquitards, while a phased assessment methodology was developed to rapidly identify and assess over 30 potential MAR targets (largely in fresh groundwater zones within palaeochannels and at palaeochannel confluences). Hydraulic properties were confirmed by a 7.5 km drilling program (100 sonic and rotary mud holes), and complementary field

  5. Uncovering the Boundary-spanning Role of Information Systems Research in Trans-Disciplinary Knowledge Advancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fei; Lim, Eric T. K.; Tan, Chee-Wee

    2017-01-01

    an algorithmic historiographic citation analysis on 114767 articles in four distinct research areas, including technology acceptance, IT system success, trust, and knowledge management, extracted from ISI Web of Science database. 64 central articles in main paths of liquidization and crystallization were...

  6. The Cultural: Trans-disciplinary Looks in Plastic and Visual Arts Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Cortés Garzón

    2011-01-01

    The article carries out an approach to some theoretical positions that draw near cultural studies, cultural history and its relationship with plastic and visual arts, in the historiographical analysis of contemporary thinkers that undertake trans-disciplinary looks, to elaborate new theories that sustain index research in plastic and visual arts.

  7. The Cultural: Trans-disciplinary Looks in Plastic and Visual Arts Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Cortés Garzón

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article carries out an approach to some theoretical positions that draw near cultural studies, cultural history and its relationship with plastic and visual arts, in the historiographical analysis of contemporary thinkers that undertake trans-disciplinary looks, to elaborate new theories that sustain index research in plastic and visual arts.

  8. MATERIAL/HISTORIC REALITY: CATCHING THE TRANSFORMATION. FROM A CASE OF APPLIED RESEARCH TO THE TRANS-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PRESERVE ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aveta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at dealing with some issues of knowledge of the architectural heritage. Given the increasing use of the innovative technologies in the field of the cultural heritage it is important to focus on their usefulness and potentialities in order to the conservation project management. The role of the new survey techniques and the accurate representations of the dimensional, structural and material consistency of the historic buildings and their context is mandatory and can influence the restoration choices. Starting from a recent applied research concerning a significant and symbolic monument of Naples, Castel Nuovo, the paper intends to highlight not only the importance of the integration of the specialist surveys, but also the role of the critical interpretation. The results of the different disciplines involved in the knowledge process have to be evaluated critically in view of the conservation of the tangible and intangible values. Furthermore, catching the complexity of architecture of the past depends on the capacity to maintain a close and constant contactwith the building physicality and also on a complex methodology which is inclusive of new interpretative instruments which could increase a virtuous hermeneutic circle.

  9. Material/historic Reality: Catching the Transformation. From a Case of Applied Research to the Trans-Disciplinary Approach to Preserve Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveta, A.; Marino, B. G.; Amore, R.

    2017-05-01

    The present paper aims at dealing with some issues of knowledge of the architectural heritage. Given the increasing use of the innovative technologies in the field of the cultural heritage it is important to focus on their usefulness and potentialities in order to the conservation project management. The role of the new survey techniques and the accurate representations of the dimensional, structural and material consistency of the historic buildings and their context is mandatory and can influence the restoration choices. Starting from a recent applied research concerning a significant and symbolic monument of Naples, Castel Nuovo, the paper intends to highlight not only the importance of the integration of the specialist surveys, but also the role of the critical interpretation. The results of the different disciplines involved in the knowledge process have to be evaluated critically in view of the conservation of the tangible and intangible values. Furthermore, catching the complexity of architecture of the past depends on the capacity to maintain a close and constant contactwith the building physicality and also on a complex methodology which is inclusive of new interpretative instruments which could increase a virtuous hermeneutic circle.

  10. Ultrashort particle sources: innovating advances for chemistry and trans-disciplinary domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malka, V.; Faure, J.; Glinec, Y.; Gauduel, Y.A.

    2005-01-01

    High-energy laser interaction with matter (gaseous and solid targets) provides electric fields going beyond the limit of one tera-volt per meter (1 TV = 10 12 V) and permit efficient acceleration of particles in the relativistic regime, typically with MeV energy. Exceptional properties of these new particle sources (shortness, charge, emittance) may conjecture trans-disciplinary researches such as physics' accelerators, pre-thermal reactivity in soft matter, radiobiology and radiotherapy, imaging. The challenge of high-energy femto-chemistry is broached in the framework of water, 'the life's solvent'. (authors)

  11. Solving challenges in inter- and trans-disciplinary working teams: Lessons from the surgical technology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Werner; Geißler, Norman; Strauß, Gero

    2015-03-01

    Engineering a medical technology is a complex process, therefore it is important to include experts from different scientific fields. This is particularly true for the development of surgical technology, where the relevant scientific fields are surgery (medicine) and engineering (electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, computer science, etc.). Furthermore, the scientific field of human factors is important to ensure that a surgical technology is indeed functional, process-oriented, effective, efficient as well as user- and patient-oriented. Working in such trans- and inter-disciplinary teams can be challenging due to different working cultures. The intention of this paper is to propose an innovative cooperative working culture for the interdisciplinary field of computer-assisted surgery (CAS) based on more than ten years of research on the one hand and the interdisciplinary literature on working cultures and various organizational theories on the other hand. In this paper, a retrospective analysis of more than ten years of research work in inter- and trans-disciplinary teams in the field of CAS will be performed. This analysis is based on the documented observations of the authors, the study reports, protocols, lab reports and published publications. To additionally evaluate the scientific experience in an interdisciplinary research team, a literature analysis regarding scientific literature on trans- and inter-disciplinarity was performed. Own research and literature analyses were compared. Both the literature and the scientific experience in an interdisciplinary research team show that consensus finding is not always easy. It is, however, important to start trans- and interdisciplinary projects with a shared mental model and common goals, which include communication and leadership issues within the project teams, i.e. clear and unambiguous information about the individual responsibilities and objectives to attain. This is made necessary due to differing

  12. Nuclear and sustainable development - A trans-disciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, Gaston

    2001-01-01

    Never before in history has society been so thoroughly permeated by Science and Technology in all aspects of human life, ranging from economic progress to warfare, often resulting in huge environmental problems. Nuclear science can easily be seen as an exponent of this evolution. Numerous beneficial technologies for medicine and energy were developed, but mostly against the background of the Cold War culture of military secrecy - thus contaminating the public perception of nuclear technology as a whole from the early beginning. Moreover, these developments were accompanied by the threat of cancer risks. Gradually, the contours of a new societal paradigm seem to materialise, driven by the often cited dynamics of social change: globalisation, the pace of technological change (notably biotechnology and information technology), changing social identities, mistrust in 'big science' and expert systems and often, an alienation from politics. In 'the age of risk', people feel insecure about the future. In this social context of uncertainty, a new concept for policy making at the global and local level has emerged : Sustainable Development. At present, the nuclear expert is struggling with society, and he paradoxically lacks a scientific approach and insight in complex human behaviour and societal interaction. The restoration of trust will require the integration of humanities and social sciences in a transdisciplinary problem solving approach, far beyond the technical dimension. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN already built up experience with multidisciplinary projects (e.g. extending the research on nuclear complexity to economics and liability), but in 1998 the board of directors decided to integrate social sciences in a more co-ordinated way. The four existing projects are: Legal Aspects and Liability, Sustainability and Nuclear Development, Transgenerational Ethics related to the Disposal of long-lived Rad waste, and Emergency Communication and Risk

  13. Ultrashort particle sources: innovating advances for chemistry and trans-disciplinary domains; Les sources de particules ultra-breves. Des developpements innovants pour la chimie et les domaines transdisciplinaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Glinec, Y. [Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. d' Optique Appliquee (LOA), CNRS UMR 7639, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Gauduel, Y.A. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-12-01

    High-energy laser interaction with matter (gaseous and solid targets) provides electric fields going beyond the limit of one tera-volt per meter (1 TV = 10{sup 12} V) and permit efficient acceleration of particles in the relativistic regime, typically with MeV energy. Exceptional properties of these new particle sources (shortness, charge, emittance) may conjecture trans-disciplinary researches such as physics' accelerators, pre-thermal reactivity in soft matter, radiobiology and radiotherapy, imaging. The challenge of high-energy femto-chemistry is broached in the framework of water, 'the life's solvent'. (authors)

  14. Measuring Research Impact in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Andrew; Mintrom, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of the national Research Engagement and Impact Assessment in Australia provides a timely opportunity to review attempts to improve the non-academic impact of academic research. The impact agenda represents a new phase in academic research evaluation and funding, characterised by a heightened need to demonstrate a return on…

  15. Parametric design strategies : Robotic building in academic architectural research and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    Parametric design strategies employing design-to-robotic-production (D2RP) approaches are relative new in architecture. They require trans-disciplinary research that at Hyperbody, TUD is experimentally tested in academic education and research. This paper presents and discusses trans-disciplinary

  16. New research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.

    1992-01-01

    HIFAR, Australia's major research reactor was commissioned in 1958 to test materials for an envisaged indigenous nuclear power industry. HIFAR is a Dido type reactor which is operated at 10 MW. With the decision in the early 1970's not to proceed to nuclear power, HIFAR was adapted to other uses and has served Australia well as a base for national nuclear competence; as a national facility for neutron scattering/beam research; as a source of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment; and as a source of export revenue from the neutron transmutation doping of silicon for the semiconductor industry. However, all of HIFAR's capabilities are becoming less than optimum by world and regional standards. Neutron beam facilities have been overtaken on the world scene by research reactors with increased neutron fluxes, cold sources, and improved beams and neutron guides. Radioisotope production capabilities, while adequate to meet Australia's needs, cannot be easily expanded to tap the growing world market in radiopharmaceuticals. Similarly, neutron transmutation doped silicon production, and export income from it, is limited at a time when the world market for this material is expanding. ANSTO has therefore embarked on a program to replace HIFAR with a new multi-purpose national facility for nuclear research and technology in the form of a reactor: a) for neutron beam research, - with a peak thermal flux of the order of three times higher than that from HIFAR, - with a cold neutron source, guides and beam hall, b) that has radioisotope production facilities that are as good as, or better than, those in HIFAR, c) that maximizes the potential for commercial irradiations to offset facility operating costs, d) that maximizes flexibility to accommodate variations in user requirements during the life of the facility. ANSTO's case for the new research reactor received significant support earlier this month with the tabling in Parliament of a report by the Australian Science

  17. Type and extent of trans-disciplinary co-operation to improve food security, health and household environment in low and middle income countries: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Gaihre

    2016-10-01

    clear that very little trans-disciplinary research has been done with the majority of studies still being discipline specific. It also appears that certain low and middle income countries seem to focus on domain-specific interventions. The review emphasizes the need to develop holistic, cross-domain intervention packages. Further investigation of the data is being conducted to determine the effectiveness of these interventions and whether interdisciplinary interventions provide greater benefit than those that address single health or community problems.

  18. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  19. Nuclear fusion research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the recently formed National Plasma Fusion Research Facility centred around the H-1NF Heliac, located at the Australian National University, the Institute of Advanced Studies is described in the context of the international Stellarator program and the national collaboration with the Australian Fusion Research Group. The objectives of the facility and the planned physics research program over the next five years are discussed and some recent results will be presented. The facility will support investigations in the following research areas: finite pressure equilibrium and stability, transport in high temperature plasmas, plasma heating and formation, instabilities and turbulence, edge plasma physics and advanced diagnostic development

  20. Research reactor developments in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) operates the 10 MW research reactor, HIFAR, at the Lucas Heights site approximately 30 kilometres south of Sydney. Although recent reviews and inspections have confirmed that HIFAR operates safely by an adequate margin and has minimal impact, it was concluded that the reactor design and age places limitations on its operation and utilization, and that HIFAR is approaching the end of its economic life. In September 1997, a decision was made by the Australian Government to found ANSTO for the construction of a replacement research on the existing Lucas Heights site, subject to the requisite environmental assessment process. A draft EIS has been prepared and is currently undergoing public review. A design specification is in preparation, and a research reactor vendor pre-qualification process has been initiated. Spent fuel shipments have been made to Dounreay and to the Savannah River Site, and discussions are continuing regarding the disposition of the existing spent fuel and that arising form HIFAR's remaining operation. (author)

  1. Artificial Intelligence Research in Australia -- A Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Elizabeth; Whitelaw, John

    1987-01-01

    Does the United States have a 51st state called Australia? A superficial look at the artificial intelligence (AI) research being done here could give that impression. A look beneath the surface, though, indicates some fundamental differences and reveals a dynamic and rapidly expanding AI community. General awareness of the Australian AI research community has been growing slowly for some time. AI was once considered a bit esoteric -- the domain of an almost lunatic fringe- but the large gover...

  2. Travel and Health Research in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks; Grenfell

    1997-06-01

    Travel and tourism is a major industry in Australia, employing 6.9% of the nation's workforce (535,600 persons) and generating AUS$46.9 billion in 1993-94.1 While economic and marketing analyses have traditionally dominated the field of tourism research in Australia, health and safety issues that impact on the business of tourism are now emerging.2 Travel medicine is still a small specialty area, though it has established a legitimate role within the tourism industry by providing services in prevention and treatment. To date, little attention has been given to empirical research, even though field studies are a critical component in the provision of accurate medical advice for patients. This paper reviews the Australian research that is available and identifies areas where further work should be conducted.

  3. New Focus for Space Research in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver

    Australia was the fourth nation to launch a spacecraft into orbit from its own territory, in 1967. Its second satellite followed 35 years later, when FedSat was launched in December 2002. Australia had and continues to have world experts in many areas of space science and technology. Several of these have participated in international missions, even sometimes with government support and funding to collaborate on designing and building an instrument for an international mission (e.g., AATSR on ESA's Envisat). Despite this Australia has no coordinated national space effort or dedicated funding for space research. Few linkages existed between Universities, Government units, and industry or across the field. This talk describes efforts to change this situation by developing the first Decadal Plan for Australian Space Science. The Plan's vision is "World-leading innovative space science and technology, strong domestic capability, and international collaborations that build Australia a long term, productive presence in Space". The talk describes the process and summarises the recommendations of the Australian space science community. These include creation of a national coordination committee (ACCSS), scientific themes and goals, and the science, education, and outreach projects necessary to accomplish them. The science projects involve ground-based assets, spacecraft missions, theory/modelling programs, and technology development and testing.

  4. A New Era for Research Education in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Helene; Smith, Bradley; King, Max; Evans, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Use of the Australian research assessment exercise, Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) to influence the policy and practice of research education in Australia will undoubtedly have many consequences, some of them unintended and potentially deleterious. ERA is a retrospective measure of research quality; research education is prospective.…

  5. The Perceptions of Commoditisation and Internationalisation of Higher Education in Australia: An Interview Study of Chinese International Students and Their Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrohon, Mark; Nyland, Berenice

    2018-01-01

    This paper examined domestic educator and Chinese international student (CIS) perspectives on their experience of the commoditisation of international higher education in Australia. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews with academic and student participants. A Trans-disciplinary Framework derived from grounded theory and the Auditable…

  6. A trans-disciplinary approach to the evaluation of social determinants of health in a Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, Michael F; Tapp, Hazel; Smith, Heather A; de Hernandez, Brisa Urquieta; Coffman, Maren J; Ludden, Tom; Sorensen, Janni; Furuseth, Owen J

    2012-09-11

    Individual and community health are adversely impacted by disparities in health outcomes among disadvantaged and vulnerable populations. Understanding the underlying causes for variations in health outcomes is an essential step towards developing effective interventions to ameliorate inequalities and subsequently improve overall community health. Working at the neighborhood scale, this study examines multiple social determinates that can cause health disparities including low neighborhood wealth, weak social networks, inadequate public infrastructure, the presence of hazardous materials in or near a neighborhood, and the lack of access to primary care services. The goal of this research is to develop innovative and replicable strategies to improve community health in disadvantaged communities such as newly arrived Hispanic immigrants. This project is taking place within a primary care practice-based research network (PBRN) using key principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Associations between social determinants and rates of hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) use, and ED use for primary care treatable or preventable conditions are being examined. Geospatial models are in development using both hospital and community level data to identify local areas where interventions to improve disparities would have the greatest impact. The developed associations between social determinants and health outcomes as well as the geospatial models will be validated using community surveys and qualitative methods. A rapidly growing and underserved Hispanic immigrant population will be the target of an intervention informed by the research process to impact utilization of primary care services and designed, deployed, and evaluated using the geospatial tools and qualitative research findings. The purpose of this intervention will be to reduce health disparities by improving access to, and utilization of, primary care and preventative services. The results

  7. Opportunities for physics research at Australia's replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has 'space' for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in January 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 6 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries ∼15% contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments. In December 2002, ANSTO formed the Bragg Institute, with the intent of nurturing strong external partnerships, and covering all aspects of neutron and X-ray scattering, including research using synchrotron radiation. I will discuss the present status and predicted performance of the neutron-beam facilities at the Replacement Reactor, synergies with the synchrotron in Victoria, in-house x-ray facilities that we intend to install in the Bragg

  8. Mapping Research Capacity in North-Western Tropical Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen T. Garnett; Jennifer Haydon

    2005-01-01

    Research capacity in two jurisdictions in tropical northwestern Australia was mapped to a searchable website. The website provides ready access to all research organisations in the region with the underlying database providing a baseline against which developments in research and research networks can be measured. Of 202 research entities entered into the database, 38 were businesses, 12 civil society organisations, five cooperative research centres, 10 government research institutes, 64 gove...

  9. Australia's Research Quality Framework and Gender Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    This article presents quantitative evidence that shows that the introduction of a research assessment scheme similar to the proposed Research Quality Framework (RQF) is likely to exacerbate gender inequity in the Australian university sector. It contributes new measures of gender differences in the publications records of Australian academics. It…

  10. Ethik als transdisziplinärer Ansatz für Geschlechterforschung Ethics as a Trans-Disciplinary Approach to Gender Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Harzer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available „Ethik“ hat Hochkonjunktur, theoretisch und praktisch. Tierethik, Medizin- und Bioethik, Rechtsethik und Neuroethik, um nur einige aktuelle Auseinandersetzungen mit rekonstruierten und modernisierten Moralphilosophien zu nennen. „Ethikräte“ schießen wie Pilze aus dem Boden: Im Bereich des Sports ebenso wie im Rahmen kulturell-religiöser Gegenwartsdiskurse. Von daher verwundert es nicht, dass auch die Kategorie „Geschlecht“ ethischen Überprüfungen unterzogen wird. Im vorliegenden Sammelband werden Grundanliegen der feministischen Ethik aber nicht nur anhand feministischer Einzelbeschreibungen untersucht, sondern in den Kontext von unterschiedlichen Disziplinanforderungen gestellt. Deshalb präsentiert sich das Buch auch als Gang durch die Wissenschaften selbst.“Ethics” is enjoying a theoretical and practical boom: Animal ethics, medical and bioethics, legal ethics, and neuroethics, to name a few of the current discussions that use reconstructed and modernized moral philosophies. “Ethics advisors” are springing up like weeds in the arena of sports as well as in the framework of current cultural and religious discourses. It is therefore no wonder that the category of “gender” is now undergoing ethical examination. In the collected volume at hand, the basic concerns of feminist ethics are examined not only by presenting individual feminist descriptions but also by considering the context of the demands of differing disciplines. The book therefore represents a tour of the sciences themselves.

  11. Research funding systems in Australia, New Zealand and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny; Ross, S

    2011-01-01

    . This article reports on a study involving interviews with 274 academics at universities in Australia (Melbourne), New Zealand (Auckland) and the UK (Birmingham). Perceptions of the three research funding systems demonstrated significant differences across universities, and some interesting gender and seniority...

  12. No impediments to introducing LTCC to Australia: researchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-15

    China has achieved significant production improvements in coal mining as a result of development and application of the Longwall Top Coal Caving (LTCC) method. The University of New South Wales has reviewed potential sites in Australia where LTCC could find application and is currently conducting research aimed at better geotechnical site characterization. Major benefits of the method include: operating cost reductions; resource recovery, mine financial performance and mine safety. The geological factors considered to be most important for implementation of LTCC in Australia are: coal seam capability/fragmentation; the effect of massive strata units in immediate/near seam roof; and the effect of high horizontal stress ratios. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  13. Australia's new high performance research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.; Abbate, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    A contract for the design and construction of the Replacement Research Reactor was signed in July 2000 between ANSTO and INVAP from Argentina. Since then the detailed design has been completed, a construction authorization has been obtained, and construction has commenced. The reactor design embodies modern safety thinking together with innovative solutions to ensure a highly safe and reliable plant. Also significant effort has been placed on providing the facility with diverse and ample facilities to maximize its use for irradiating material for radioisotope production as well as providing high neutron fluxes for neutron beam research. The project management organization and planing is commensurate with the complexity of the project and the number of players involved. (author)

  14. Meteorological research studies at Jervis Bay, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.H.; Bendun, E.O.K.

    1974-07-01

    A climatological study of the winds and temperature from the Jervis Bay region which commenced in October 1970 has shown the presence of a coastal sea breeze and secondary bay breeze circulation system. In an attempt to define the influence of the Murray's Beach site on the local atmospheric dispersion, special smoke plume photography studies were conducted in the lower atmosphere. In June 1972 a meteorological acoustic sounding research programme was initiated at the Jervis Bay settlement. The aims of the research are to calibrate the sounder in terms of surface wind, turbulence and temperature measurements pertinent to a description of the lower atmospheric dispersion potential. Preliminary results on six months' data have shown encouraging correlations between the acoustic sounder patterns and particularly the wind direction turbulence traces. (author)

  15. Research on medical applications of radioisotopes and radiation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) produces and distributes commercially in Australia and abroad a range of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The AAEC carries out research and development on new and improved processes and procucts is collaboration with medical specialists in hospitals and research workers in other organisations. Examples of these processes and products are: a gel generator for production of 99m Tc; radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of tumours and brain disease and therapy for arthritis; 64 Cu for study of copper metabolism; and monoclonal antibodies for tumour diagnosis and therapy. New medical applications in Australia of neutron irradiation include the measurement of total body nitrogen and neutron capture in boron-labelled compounds in vivo for melanoma therapy. (author)

  16. A short history of radiopharmaceutical research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.

    1989-01-01

    A brief summary is given of radiopharmaceuticals research carried out in Australia. Historically, a number of the larger hospital radiopharmacies have been, and still are, involved with 99m Tc-cold kit production. Originally, this scenario evolved because the nuclear medicine community was denied access to state-of-the-art products available overseas. Although the situation has improved in recent times, most such departments continue kit production, having made a large capital investment in sterile facilities, equipment and staff. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has a leading role in radiopharmaceutical research and some of the topics which have occupied its scientists over the last few years are outlined

  17. Neutron beam facilities at Australia's replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has 'space' for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in January 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 6 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries ∼15% contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments. In December 2002, ANSTO formed the Bragg Institute, with the intent of nurturing strong external partnerships, and covering all aspects of neutron and X-ray scattering, including research using synchrotron radiation. I will discuss the present status and predicted performance of the neutron-beam facilities at the Replacement Reactor, and the opportunities that all of this presents for scientific research in Australia, with particular

  18. Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    The smallest continent and one of the largest countries, Australia is a country of diverse geographical conditions and differing cultures of people unified by one predominant language and political system. Mountains, desert and rivers are some of the varying landscape features of Australia, although the climate and condition for most of the country is tropical. Original Australians, a hunting-gathering people called Aborigines, came to Australia over 38,000 years ago. Today the Aborigines compose about 1% of the population and live in traditional tribal areas as well as cities. The 1st European settlement came in 1788 from Great Britain. After World War II, the population doubled. Although the population is primarily composed of British and Irish immigrants, immigrants from other European countries such as Italy and Greece as well as refugees from Indochina, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos are a significant factor to the growing Australian population. Australian and Aboriginal culture has took hold and took notice in the areas of opera, art, literature and film. The Australian Commonwealth is based on a constitution similar to that of the United States government. The National Parliament is bicameral with both the Senate and the House of Representatives having a select number of elected officials from each state and territory. The Australian economy is predominantly reliant on the sale of mineral and agricultural exports. History, economic changes, defense, international relations and notes to the traveler are also discussed in this overview of Australia.

  19. Applying for, reviewing and funding public health research in Germany and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerhardus, Ansgar; Becher, Heiko; Groenewegen, P.P.; Meyer, Thorsten; Mansmann, Ulrich; Pfaff, Holger; Puhan, Milo; Razum, Oliver; Rehfuess, Eva; Sauerborn, Rainer; Strech, Daniel; Wissing, Frank; Zeeb, Hajo; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Public health research is complex, involves various disciplines, epistemological perspectives and methods, and is rarely conducted in a controlled setting. Often, the added value of a research project lies in its inter- or trans-disciplinary interaction, reflecting the complexity of the research

  20. Applying for, reviewing and funding public health research in Germany and beyond.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerhardus, A.; Becher, H.; Groenewegen, P.; Mansmann, U.; Meyer, T.; Pfaff, H.; Puhan, M.; Razum, O.; Rehfuess, E.; Sauerborn, R.; Strech, D.; Wissing, F.; Zeeb, H.; Hummers-Pradier, E.

    2016-01-01

    Public health research is complex, involves various disciplines, epistemological perspectives and methods, and is rarely conducted in a controlled setting. Often, the added value of a research project lies in its inter- or trans-disciplinary interaction, reflecting the complexity of the research

  1. The 10 m-resolution TINITALY DEM as a trans-disciplinary basis for the analysis of the Italian territory: Current trends and new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquini, Simone; Nannipieri, Luca

    2017-03-01

    The increasing availability of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) is changing our viewpoint towards Earth surface landforms. Nevertheless, large-coverage, intermediate-resolution DEMs are still largely used, and can be the ideal choice in several applications based on the processing of spatially-integrated information. In 2012 the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia opened a website for the free download of the "TINTALY" Digital Elevation Model (DEM), which covers the whole Italian territory. Since then, about 700 users from 28 different countries have been accredited for data download, and a report of 4 years of data dissemination and use is presented. The analysis of the intended use reveals that the 10 m-resolution, seamless TINITALY DEM is of use for an extremely assorted research community. Accredited users are working in virtually any branch of the Earth Sciences (e.g. Volcanology, Seismology, and Geomorphology), in spatially integrated humanities (e.g. History and Archaeology), and in other thematic areas such as in applied Physics and Zoology. Many users are also working in local administrations (e.g. Regions and Municipalities) for civil protection or land use planning purposes. In summary, the documented activity shows that the dissemination of seamless, large coverage elevation datasets can fertilize the technological progress of the whole society providing a significant benefit to stakeholders.

  2. Theorising children's participation: Trans-disciplinary perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspectives in Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 29, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. A research and evaluation capacity building model in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Roanna; Crawford, Gemma; Hallett, Jonathan; Laing, Sue; Mak, Donna B; Jancey, Jonine; Rowell, Sally; McCausland, Kahlia; Bastian, Lisa; Sorenson, Anne; Tilley, P J Matt; Yam, Simon; Comfort, Jude; Brennan, Sean; Doherty, Maryanne

    2016-12-27

    Evaluation of public health programs, services and policies is increasingly required to demonstrate effectiveness. Funding constraints necessitate that existing programs, services and policies be evaluated and their findings disseminated. Evidence-informed practice and policy is also desirable to maximise investments in public health. Partnerships between public health researchers, service providers and policymakers can help address evaluation knowledge and skills gaps. The Western Australian Sexual Health and Blood-borne Virus Applied Research and Evaluation Network (SiREN) aims to build research and evaluation capacity in the sexual health and blood-borne virus sector in Western Australia (WA). Partners' perspectives of the SiREN model after 2 years were explored. Qualitative written responses from service providers, policymakers and researchers about the SiREN model were analysed thematically. Service providers reported that participation in SiREN prompted them to consider evaluation earlier in the planning process and increased their appreciation of the value of evaluation. Policymakers noted benefits of the model in generating local evidence and highlighting local issues of importance for consideration at a national level. Researchers identified challenges communicating the services available through SiREN and the time investment needed to develop effective collaborative partnerships. Stronger engagement between public health researchers, service providers and policymakers through collaborative partnerships has the potential to improve evidence generation and evidence translation. These outcomes require long-term funding and commitment from all partners to develop and maintain partnerships. Ongoing monitoring and evaluation can ensure the partnership remains responsive to the needs of key stakeholders. The findings are applicable to many sectors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  4. Perceptions of Australia as a Postgraduate Research Destination. Go8 Backgrounder 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the Group of Eight (Go8) commissioned market research to examine the attitudes, perceptions and experiences of Australia as a destination for study at the Higher Research Degree level. This backgrounder highlights some of the positive aspects of the Australian experience. The top five aggregated strengths of Australia as a research…

  5. Learner Contribution to English Language Learning: Chinese Research Students' Agency and Their Transitional Experiences in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the role of agency for the English language development of three Chinese research students with high English proficiency sojourning in Australia. The focus is on the various approaches the learners employed to strengthen their sense of confidence in their language use in Australia. The data were obtained through in-depth…

  6. Heterogeneity of Human Research Ethics Committees and Research Governance Offices across Australia: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth De Smit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Conducting ethically grounded research is a fundamental facet of all investigations. Nevertheless, the administrative burdens of current ethics review are substantial, and calls have been made for a reduction in research waste. Aims To describe the heterogeneity in administration and documentation required by Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs and Research Governance Offices (RGOs across Australia. Methods In establishing a nationwide study to investigate the molecular aetiology of Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA, for which archived pathological specimens from around Australia are being recruited, we identified variation across separate HREC and RGO requirements. Submission paperwork and correspondence from each collaborating site and its representative office for research were reviewed. This data was interrogated to evaluate differences in current guidelines. Results Twenty-five pathology departments across seven Australian States collaborated in this study. All states, except Victoria, employed a single ethics review model. There was discrepancy amongst HRECs as to which application process applied to our study: seven requested completion of a “National Ethics Application Form” and three a “Low Negligible Risk” form. Noticeable differences in guidelines included whether electronic submission was sufficient. There was variability in the total number of documents submitted (range five to 22 and panel review turnaround time (range nine to 136 days. Conclusion We demonstrate the challenges and illustrate the heavy workload involved in receiving widespread ethics and governance approval across Australia. We highlight the need to simplify, homogenise, and nationalise human ethics for non-clinical trial studies. Reducing unnecessary administration will enable investigators to achieve research aims more efficiently

  7. Research Update 2010: Outdoor Education Fatalities in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part of an on-going project to examine outdoor education related deaths in Australia since 1960. It records 17 incidents not previously recorded in papers in this series (Brookes, 2003a, 2003b, 2004, 2007), in which 15 participants, two supervisors or teachers, and one member of the public died. Eleven of the incidents occurred since…

  8. Biodiversity and Climate Change Adaptation in Australia: Strategy and Research Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Many countries are developing national strategies and action plans aimed at minimising the negative impacts of climate change on biodiversity. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview not only of strategies and plans that have been developed in Australia, but also of research that has been carried out in Australia by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Climate Adaptation Flagship to assist the development of future strategies and plans. Maj...

  9. Applying for, reviewing and funding public health research in Germany and beyond.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhardus, A.; Becher, H.; Groenewegen, P.; Mansmann, U.; Meyer, T.; Pfaff, H.; Puhan, M.; Razum, O.; Rehfuess, E.; Sauerborn, R.; Strech, D.; Wissing, F.; Zeeb, H.; Hummers-Pradier, E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Public health research is complex, involves various disciplines, epistemological perspectives and methods, and is rarely conducted in a controlled setting. Often, the added value of a research project lies in its inter- or trans-disciplinary interaction, reflecting the complexity of the research questions at hand. This creates specific challenges when writing and reviewing public health research grant applications. Therefore, the German Research Foundation (DFG), the largest independ...

  10. Socio-Cultural Adaptation, Academic Adaptation and Satisfaction of International Higher Degree Research Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Baohua; Wright, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    The number of international higher degree research students has grown at a significant rate in recent years, with Australia becoming a hub for attracting such students from around the world. However, research has identified that international higher degree research students often encounter a wide range of academic and socio-cultural challenges in…

  11. Renewable energy technologies in Australia: research, status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    In support of environmental goals - principally reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector - Australian Federal and State governments have put in place a range of measures to support the deployment of increasing levels of renewable energy products and services. These market-making mechanisms complement Australia's leadership in a wide range of technologies for stationary energy applications of renewable energy, including photovoltaics, electricity storage, concentrating solar power, small wind turbines, energy efficiency products, hot dry rock geothermal and wave power. Industry is responding to these market and technology opportunities, and associated policy measures to support their growth, with the aim of growing a sizeable renewable energy sector that delivers economically competitive solutions for Australian and export markets. (author)

  12. Which bank? A guardian model for regulation of embryonic stem cell research in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, A

    2007-08-01

    In late 2005 the Legislation Review: Prohibition of Human Cloning Act 2002 (Cth) and the Research Involving Human Embryos Act 2002 (Cth) recommended the establishment of an Australian stem cell bank. This article aims to address a lack of discussion of issues surrounding stem cell banking by suggesting possible answers to the questions of whether Australia should establish a stem cell bank and what its underlying philosophy and functions should be. Answers are developed through an analysis of regulatory, scientific and intellectual property issues relating to embryonic stem cell research in the United Kingdom, United States and Australia. This includes a detailed analysis of the United Kingdom Stem Cell Bank. It is argued that a "guardian" model stem cell bank should be established in Australia. This bank would aim to promote the maximum public benefit from human embryonic stem cell research by providing careful regulatory oversight and addressing ethical issues, while also facilitating research by addressing practical scientific concerns and intellectual property issues.

  13. Review of Selected Research in Applied Linguistics Published in Australia (2008-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rhonda; Chen, Honglin; Moore, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the significant and diverse range of research in applied linguistics published in Australia in the period 2008-2014. Whilst acknowledging that a great deal of research by Australian scholars has been published internationally during these seven years, this review is based on books, journal articles, and conference proceedings…

  14. Australia's bio-regulatory framework: leading the way for stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Biotechnology in Australia has flourished over the past five years. During this time the number of companies has doubled to over 370, and over 40 companies are now publicly listed. The total market capitalization of the biotechnology companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) in 2003 was US$1.5 billion. Total market capitalization of the health and biotech companies on the ASX was US$13 billion. The size of the total Australian pharmaceutical market in 2003 was US$9 billion. This article highlights the role of Australia in advancing stem cell research and its contribution to biotechnology research, development and commercialization.

  15. HIV cure research: print and online media reporting in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jennifer; Fileborn, Bianca; Dowsett, Gary W; Lucke, Jayne; Brown, Graham; Ellard, Jeanne; Lewin, Sharon R; Tucker, Joseph D; Slavin, Sean; Sugarman, Jeremy; Hill, Sophie

    2017-10-01

    While still in its early stages, recent scientific research towards a cure for HIV has generated widespread media interest. The aim of this paper was to explore the ways in which this research has been represented in Australian print and online media and discuss implications of this. A search of databases from four selected media outlets was conducted to identify published articles that directly discussed HIV cure research. Content analysis was used to explore the discursive framing of HIV cure research and identify the presence or absence of people living with HIV in articles. In total, 95 articles were identified that had been published in print or online between 2007 and 2015. Media reports tended to focus on research breakthroughs or the future potential of HIV cure research, rather than more immediate implications of research findings. While not inaccurate, this focus often implied the field of HIV cure research was more advanced than was generally the case. There was a notable absence of commentary from people living with HIV or community advocates in media reporting. Media reporting may generate unrealistic expectations of HIV cure research. This raises ethical concerns that media reporting may inadvertently contribute to therapeutic or curative misconceptions among potential participants in HIV cure-related trials. To address this, scientists, HIV advocates and people living with HIV will need to work collaboratively to engage with reporters and media outlets to provide more consistent input and guidance into reporting about research towards a cure for HIV.

  16. Music Education Research in Australia 2012-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This report captures the variety of music education research between 2012-2014 and covers a range of topics and events such as the International Society for Music Education (ISME) 2012, Australian Society for Music Education (ASME) 2013 and Australian and New Zealand Association for Research in Music Education (ANZARME) 2014.

  17. Funding for cerebral palsy research in Australia, 2000–2015: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R; Novak, I; Badawi, N

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the funding for cerebral palsy (CP) research in Australia, as compared with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Design Observational study. Setting For Australia, philanthropic funding from Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (CPARF) (2005–2015) was compared with National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC, 2000–2015) and Australian Research Council (ARC, 2004–2015) and CPARF and NHMRC funding were compared with NIH funding (USA). Participants Cerebral Palsy researchers funded by CPARF, NHMRC or NIH. Results Over 10 years, total CPARF philanthropic funding was $21.9 million, including people, infrastructure, strategic and project support. As competitive grants, CPARF funded $11.1 million, NHMRC funded $53.5 million and Australian Research Council funded $1.5 million. CPARF, NHMRC and NIH funding has increased in real terms, but only the NIH statistically significantly increased in real terms (mean annual increase US$4.9 million per year, 95% CI 3.6 to 6.2, p<0.001). The NHMRC budget allocated to CP research remained steady over time at 0.5%. A network analysis indicated the relatively small number of CP researchers in Australia is mostly connected through CPARF or NHMRC funding. Conclusions Funding for CP research from the Australian government schemes has stabilised and CP researchers rely on philanthropic funding to fill this gap. In comparison, the NIH is funding a larger number of CP researchers and their funding pattern is consistently increasing. PMID:27798026

  18. Cross-Cultural Research on the Creativity of Elementary School Students in Korea and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyunghwa, Lee; Hyejin, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand cultural differences and similarities in children's creative characteristics in Korea and Australia. In this cross-cultural research, the Integrative Creativity Test (K-ICT, [13]) with identified validity and reliability for measuring elementary school students' creative ability and creative personality,…

  19. Climate change and infectious diseases in Australia: future prospects, adaptation options, and research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, David; Bi, Peng; Hall, Gillian; Swaminathan, Ashwin; Tong, Shilu; Williams, Craig

    2011-03-01

    Climate change will have significant and diverse impacts on human health. These impacts will include changes in infectious disease incidence. In this article, the authors review the current situation and potential future climate change impacts for respiratory, diarrheal, and vector-borne diseases in Australia. Based on this review, the authors suggest adaptive strategies within the health sector and also recommend future research priorities.

  20. History of Education Research in Australia: Some Current Trends and Possible Directions for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The history of education as a distinct field has been the focus of study, research and writing in Australia for over a century. It achieved maturity with the establishment of the Australian and New Zealand History of Education Society in 1970 and the subsequent establishment of the Society's journal, "History of Education Review." Since…

  1. The Future of the Research Workforce: Estimating Demand for PhDs in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    As the developed world becomes more reliant on knowledge as a vital part of economic growth and development, the importance of highly skilled workers who can create, disseminate and use new knowledge becomes integral. Within Australia, recent policies relating to higher education and research have prompted new thinking about the extent to which…

  2. Research Report-Introduction of 'Servis' (Shoes Brand) in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Rob T. Rosales

    2017-01-01

    There are many things that companies need to be considered when entering into the international market. Banalieva and Dhanaraj (2013) stated that when making an entry into the international market, it is important to set up the development process and conduct a thorough market research so as to maximize everything into account and analyzed before the first delivery of the goods to the warehouse of the company (Banalieva & Dhanaraj, 2013, pp. 89-116). To be successful you must adhere to a spec...

  3. Are LGBT populations at a higher risk for suicidal behaviors in Australia? Research findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Delaney M; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the Australian literature about suicidality in minority sexual identity and/or behavior groups in order to determine the evidence base for their reported higher vulnerability to suicidal behaviors than heterosexual and non-transgendered individuals in the Australian context, as well as to identify the factors that are predictive of suicidal behaviors in these groups in Australia. A literature search for all available years (until the end of 2012) was conducted using the databases Scopus, Medline, and Proquest for articles published in English in peer-reviewed academic journals. All peer-reviewed publications that provided empirical evidence for prevalence and predictive factors of suicidal behaviors among LGBT individuals (or a subset thereof) in Australia were included. Reference lists were also scrutinized to identify "gray" literature for inclusion. The results revealed that there is only limited research from Australia. Nevertheless, although no population-based studies have been published, research indicates that sexual minorities are indeed at a higher risk for suicidal behaviors. In order to further the understanding of suicidal behaviors and potential prevention among LGBT groups in the Australia, further research is needed, particularly on fatal suicidal behaviors.

  4. The Ethics of Traditional Chinese and Western Herbal Medicine Research: Views of Researchers and Human Ethics Committees in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growth of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and western herbal medicine (WHM research in Australia, little is known about how ethics committees (HRECs assess the ethics of TCM or WHM research. The objectives of this study were to examine the experiences of TCM and WHM researchers and HRECs with the evaluation of ethics applications. Two cross-sectional surveys were undertaken of HRECs and TCM and WHM researchers in Australia. Anonymous self-completion questionnaires were administered to 224 HRECs and 117 researchers. A response confirming involvement in TCM or WHM research applications was received from 20 HRECs and 42 researchers. The most frequent ethical issues identified by HRECs related to herbal products including information gaps relating to mode of action of herbal medicines and safety when combining herbal ingredients. Researchers concurred that they were frequently requested to provide additional information on multiple aspects including safety relating to the side effects of herbs and herb-drug interactions. Overall adherence with the principles of ethical conduct was high among TCM and WHM researchers although our study did identify the need for additional information regarding assessment of risk and risk management.

  5. A research perspective on stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management State of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaston Meskens; Erik Laes; Gilbert Eggermont

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Our modern society is increasingly faced with challenges and problems that cannot be solved by a purely technical, political or social approach. Radioactive waste disposal site selection and management can be characterised as one of these challenges that require a trans-disciplinary approach, integrating social, philosophical and ethical aspects in a 'technical' practice. Along the spirit of this trans-disciplinary approach, and in order to ensure the necessary public support for a policy decision regarding this practice, stakeholder involvement is more and more seen as a necessary policy element in the decision making process. The aim is to achieve the broad involvement of individuals from civil society, with significant representation from local communities, elected representatives and NGO's, as well as scientists from outside radioactive waste management organisations, together with established players in the field, such as the implementers of radioactive waste management, public authorities, experts and waste producers. Several initiatives regarding stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management have been taken already in Europe, as well in the research era as in 'the real world'. The presentation will give a state of the art by examining some representative examples on both national and European level. The focus will be on the main social, philosophical and ethical aspects of the problem at stake, seen through a trans-disciplinary research lens. The presentation will conclude with some ideas that could inspire as well theoretical researchers as stakeholders-in-the-field. (authors)

  6. Construction of the Neutron Beam Facility at Australia's OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed for high quality neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for eighteen neutron beam instruments to be located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The new neutron beam facility features a 20 litre liquid deuterium cold neutron source and supermirror neutron reflecting guides for intense cold and thermal neutron beams. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, where criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. The lecture will outline Australia's aspirations for neutron science at the OPAL reactor, and describe the neutron beam facility under construction. The status of this project and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed. This project is the culmination of almost a decade of effort. We now eagerly anticipate catapulting Australia's neutron beam science capability to meet the best in the world today. (author)

  7. The New Zealand experience of varroa invasion highlights research opportunities for Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Jay M; Barratt, Barbara I P; Lord, Janice M; Mercer, Alison R; Dickinson, Katharine J M

    2015-11-01

    The Varroa mite (Varroa destructor) is implicated as a major disease factor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations worldwide. Honey bees are extensively relied upon for pollination services, and in countries such as New Zealand and Australia where honey bees have been introduced specifically for commercial pollinator services, the economic effects of any decline in honey bee numbers are predicted to be profound. V. destructor established in New Zealand in 2000 but as yet, Australia remains Varroa-free. Here we analyze the history of V. destructor invasion and spread in New Zealand and discuss the likely long-term impacts. When the mite was discovered in New Zealand, it was considered too well established for eradication to be feasible. Despite control efforts, V. destructor has since spread throughout the country. Today, assessing the impacts of the arrival of V. destructor in this country is compromised by a paucity of data on pollinator communities as they existed prior to invasion. Australia's Varroa-free status provides a rare and likely brief window of opportunity for the global bee research community to gain understanding of honey bee-native pollinator community dynamics prior to Varroa invasion.

  8. Research partnerships with local communities: two case studies from Papua New Guinea and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almany, G. R.; Hamilton, R. J.; Williamson, D. H.; Evans, R. D.; Jones, G. P.; Matawai, M.; Potuku, T.; Rhodes, K. L.; Russ, G. R.; Sawynok, B.

    2010-09-01

    Partnerships between scientists and local communities can increase research capacity and data delivery while improving management effectiveness through enhanced community participation. To encourage such collaboration, this study demonstrates how these partnerships can be formed, drawing on two case studies in coral reef ecosystems in very different social settings (Papua New Guinea and Australia). In each case, steps towards successfully engaging communities in research were similar. These included: (1) early engagement by collaborating organizations to build trust, (2) ensuring scientific questions have direct relevance to the community, (3) providing appropriate incentives for participation, and (4) clear and open communication. Community participants engaged in a variety of research activities, including locating and capturing fishes, collecting and recording data (weight, length and sex), applying external tags, and removing otoliths (ear bones) for ageing and elemental analysis. Research partnerships with communities enhanced research capacity, reduced costs and, perhaps more importantly, improved the likelihood of long-term community support for marine protected areas (MPAs).

  9. Australia's TERN: Building, Sustaining and Advancing Collaborative Long Term Ecosystem Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEld, A. A.; Phinn, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    TERN is Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (www.tern.org.au) is one of several environmental data collection, storage and sharing projects developed through the government's research infrastructure programs 2008-2014. This includes terrestrial and coastal ecosystem data collection infrastructure across multiple disciplines, hardware, software and processes used to store, analyse and integrate data sets. TERN's overall objective is to build the collaborations, infrastructure and programs to meet the needs of ecosystem science communities in Australia in the long term, through institutional frameworks necessary to establish a national terrestrial ecosystem site and observational network, coordinated networks enabling cooperation and operational experience; public access to quality assured and appropriately licensed data; and allowing the terrestrial ecosystem research community to define and sustain the terrestrial observing paradigm into the longer term. This paper explains how TERN was originally established, and now operates, along with plans to sustain itself in the future. TERN is implemented through discipline/technical groups referred to as "TERN Facilities". Combined, the facilities provide observations of surface mass and energy fluxes over key ecosystems, biophysical remote sensing data, ecological survey plots, soils information, and coastal ecosystems and associated water quality variables across Australia. Additional integrative facilities cover elements of ecoinformatics, data-scaling and modelling, and linking science to management. A central coordination and portal facility provides meta-data storage, data identification, legal and licensing support. Data access, uploading, meta-data generation, DOI attachment and licensing is completed at each facility's own portal level. TERN also acts as the open-data repository of choice for Australian scientists required to publish their data. Several key lessons we have learnt, will be presented

  10. An exploration of nursing research perceptions of registered nurses engaging in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gemma; Duggan, Ravani; Boldy, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions about nursing research of registered nurses (RNs) who were engaged in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia. In order to improve RNs' research engagement and promote evidence-based practice, Nurse Research Consultants (NRCs) were appointed jointly by the study hospital and a local university. This joint appointment commenced in 2004 in the hospital's emergency department. Early findings indicated that the NRC role was effective in assisting registered nurses with research activities and hence the NRC role was expanded to all areas of the hospital. However, no formal investigation had been carried out to explore the effect of the NRC role on RNs' engagement with nursing research across the hospital. A qualitative interview process. Ten RN participants from the adult and paediatric wards were interviewed. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Four main themes were identified, namely: perceptions of nursing research, perceived enablers, perceived barriers and improving research engagement. There was some overlap with some sub-themes being linked with more than one theme. This appeared to be due to differing levels of research education and research engagement. 6pc some of the RNs that participated in this study were experienced in the conduct of research, finding adequate support from NRCs in the workplace, whilst others experienced barriers limiting their involvement in nursing research activities. These barriers could be reduced with additional education, support, improved communication, time and opportunities to undertake research activities.

  11. Data linkage capabilities in Australia: practical issues identified by a Population Health Research Network 'Proof of Concept project'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Cameron, Cate M; McClure, Rod J; Williamson, Ann M

    2015-08-01

    To describe the practical issues that need to be overcome to conduct national data linkage projects in Australia and propose recommendations to improve efficiency. Review of the processes, documentation and applications required to conduct national data linkage in Australia. The establishment of state and national data linkage centres in Australia has placed Australia at the forefront of research linking health-related administrative data collections. However, improvements are needed to reduce the clerical burden on researchers, simplify the process of obtaining ethics approval, improve data accessibility, and thus improve the efficiency of data linkage research. While a sound state and national data linkage infrastructure is in place, the current complexity, duplication and lack of cohesion undermines any attempts to conduct research involving national record linkage in a timely manner. Data linkage applications and Human Research Ethics Committee approval processes need to be streamlined and duplication removed, in order to reduce the administrative and financial burden on researchers if national data linkage research is to be viable. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. Pain Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Australia: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Charlie C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. Objectives This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. Methods PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration and National Health and Medical Research Council databases were searched for human studies yet to be completed. Predefined search terms and selection criteria were used for data identification. Results Of 204 studies selected, 54% were on chiropractic, 27% on Chinese medicine, 15% about multitherapy, and 4% on osteopathy. Chronic spinal pain was the most studied condition, with visceral pain being the least studied. Half of the articles in Chinese medicine or multitherapy were systematic reviews or randomized control trials. In comparison, only 5% of chiropractic and none of osteopathy studies were in these categories. Government funding was rare, and most studies were self-funded or internally funded. All chiropractic, osteopathic, and Chinese herbal medicine studies were conducted by the researchers of the professions. In contrast, half of the acupuncture studies and all t'ai chi studies were conducted by medical doctors or physiotherapists. Multidisciplinary collaboration was uncommon. Conclusions The quantity and the quality of CAM pain research in Australia are inconsistent with the high utilization of the relevant CAM therapies by Australians. A substantial increase in government funding is required. Collaborative research examining the multimodality or multidisciplinary approach is needed. PMID:22891634

  13. Pain research in complementary and alternative medicine in Australia: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L

    2013-02-01

    Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration and National Health and Medical Research Council databases were searched for human studies yet to be completed. Predefined search terms and selection criteria were used for data identification. Of 204 studies selected, 54% were on chiropractic, 27% on Chinese medicine, 15% about multitherapy, and 4% on osteopathy. Chronic spinal pain was the most studied condition, with visceral pain being the least studied. Half of the articles in Chinese medicine or multitherapy were systematic reviews or randomized control trials. In comparison, only 5% of chiropractic and none of osteopathy studies were in these categories. Government funding was rare, and most studies were self-funded or internally funded. All chiropractic, osteopathic, and Chinese herbal medicine studies were conducted by the researchers of the professions. In contrast, half of the acupuncture studies and all t'ai chi studies were conducted by medical doctors or physiotherapists. Multidisciplinary collaboration was uncommon. The quantity and the quality of CAM pain research in Australia are inconsistent with the high utilization of the relevant CAM therapies by Australians. A substantial increase in government funding is required. Collaborative research examining the multimodality or multidisciplinary approach is needed.

  14. Environmental reporting and accounting in Australia: progress, prospects and research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Albert; Mount, Richard; Gibbons, Philip; Vardon, Michael; Canadell, Pep

    2014-03-01

    Despite strong demand for information to support the sustainable use of Australia's natural resources and conserve environmental values and despite considerable effort and investment, nation-wide environmental data collection and analysis remains a substantially unmet challenge. We review progress in producing national environmental reports and accounts, identify challenges and opportunities, and analyse the potential role of research in addressing these. Australia's low and concentrated population density and the short history since European settlement contribute to the lack of environmental data. There are additional factors: highly diverse data requirements and standards, disagreement on information priorities, poorly measurable management objectives, lack of coordination, over-reliance on researchers and businesses for data collection, lack of business engagement, and short-term, project-based activities. New opportunities have arisen to overcome some of these challenges: enhanced monitoring networks, standardisation, data management and modelling, greater commitment to share and integrate data, community monitoring, increasing acceptance of environmental and sustainability indicators, and progress in environmental accounting practices. Successes in generating climate, water and greenhouse gas information appear to be attributable to an unambiguous data requirement, considerable investment, and legislative instruments that enhance data sharing and create a clearly defined role for operational agencies. Based on the analysis presented, we suggest six priorities for research: (1) common definitions and standards for information that address management objectives, (2) ecological measures that are scalable from local to national level, (3) promotion of long-term data collection and reporting by researchers, (4) efficient satellite and sensor network technologies and data analysis methods, (5) environmental modelling approaches that can reconcile multiple data

  15. The use of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research, Australia 1947-73

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszniak, N

    1994-12-01

    On March 31, 1994, an article appeared in the Melbourne Age claiming that after the Second World War `hundreds of people were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s. Similar reports subsequently appeared in other newspapers and on the television and radio news. The archival records held at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) pertaining to the medical uses of radioisotopes during the period 1947-1973 have been examined to ascertain the nature of radioisotope use, and in the case of experimental procedures, any ethical considerations. The material examined indicates that the distribution and medical use of radioactive isotopes was stringently controlled by the Radio-isotope Standing Committee (established by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 1947 to oversee this area) until its disbandment in 1973, when the responsibility for regulation of the use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes in Australia passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. A database, showing details of over 500 radioisotope use in Australia between 1947-1973 is given in Appendix III . (author) refs., tabs.

  16. The use of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research, Australia 1947-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korszniak, N.

    1994-12-01

    On March 31, 1994, an article appeared in the Melbourne Age claiming that after the Second World War 'hundreds of people were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s. Similar reports subsequently appeared in other newspapers and on the television and radio news. The archival records held at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) pertaining to the medical uses of radioisotopes during the period 1947-1973 have been examined to ascertain the nature of radioisotope use, and in the case of experimental procedures, any ethical considerations. The material examined indicates that the distribution and medical use of radioactive isotopes was stringently controlled by the Radio-isotope Standing Committee (established by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 1947 to oversee this area) until its disbandment in 1973, when the responsibility for regulation of the use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes in Australia passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. A database, showing details of over 500 radioisotope use in Australia between 1947-1973 is given in Appendix III . (author)

  17. Continental Scale research of the coupled carbon and water cycles in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleugh, Helen; van Gorsel, Eva; Held, Alex; Huete, Alfredo; Karan, Mirko; Liddell, Michael; Phinn, Stuart; Prentice, Colin

    2013-04-01

    It is essential to understand the drivers and processes that regulate uptake and release of carbon and water by the terrestrial biosphere to quantify the sink and source strengths under current climatic conditions. In addition, understanding the consequences of a changing climate on the capacity of the biosphere to sequester carbon by using a certain amount of water and the impacts of disturbances on resilience and thresholds of the terrestrial biosphere is critical. Recently there has been increasing general interest in how human activities may be affecting Australia's natural carbon cycles. Quantification of carbon and water exchanges requires process understanding over long temporal and large spatial scales, but at fine levels of detail. This requires integration of long term, high frequency observations, models and information from process studies and can only be achieved through research infrastructure that can provide easy access to meta-data and data that have been collected in a systematic and standardized way. The Australian Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) provides such nationally networked infrastructure, along with multi-disciplinary capabilities and end-user-focused products to deliver better ways of measuring and estimating Australia's current and future environmental carbon stocks and flows. Multiple Facilities in TERN are studying carbon and water dynamics across a range of distance and time scales. OzFlux, the Australasian arm of the global initiative Fluxnet, is the most obvious deployment of field hardware in TERN with close to 30 flux towers and their associated micrometeorological instrumentation in place around the country, from Central Australia to the Alps, covering ecosystems ranging from rainforest to alpine grasslands to mulga. Intensive monitoring is carried out at the 10 TERN Supersites which carry a suite of environmental instrumentation and perform standardised vegetation, faunal, soil and water monitoring.TERN Aus

  18. Training Needs of Nurses in Public Hospitals in Australia: Review of Current Practices and Future Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Joanna; Bhanugopan, Ramudu; Fish, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide an overview of the concept of training needs analysis (TNA), current practice, models and the impact that training needs analysis currently has on nurses in public hospitals in Australia. Thus, the paper should aid future research in the area of TNA of nurses through helping researchers to clarify the…

  19. Electronic Commerce publications and research in Australia: Implications of the Research Quality Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helana Scheepers

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Australian universities and academics will soon see a major change in the way research is reported and funded. It is expected that by 2008, according to the most recent timetable (Bishop 2006, the Research Quality Framework (RQF will be implemented. The result of the announcement has been an increased activity within universities focusing on the proposed criteria. The proposed RQF will seek to have research assessed according to quality and impact. Part of both quality and impact relates to where research is published. For academics it will be increasingly important to target high quality journals if the research is to be rated as high quality. The question this raises for Information Systems academics is where do we publish for maximum impact? The Information Systems (IS field is diverse with researchers working in many areas and a publication outlet for one area may not be relevant for another. One area where many Australian IS researchers have focused their research interest is the field of electronic commerce (e-commerce. The research reported in this paper identified the publication outlets that would be regarded as amongst the highest quality for researchers wishing to publish e-commerce research. The authors analysed e-commerce research papers by Australian researchers published in the period 2000 to 2005. The results describe where Australian researchers are publishing in this field. The paper also provides guidance to those working in the e-commerce field on which journals and conferences to target to ensure their work rates highly in terms of the RQF.

  20. Participatory action research opens doors: Mentoring Indigenous researchers to improve midwifery in urban Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sophie D; Maidment, Sarah-Jade; Heinemann, Kayla M; Roe, Yvette L; Kildea, Sue V

    2017-11-08

    There is increasing demand for capacity building among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) maternal and infant health workforce to improve health outcomes for mothers and babies; yet few studies describe the steps taken to mentor novice Indigenous researchers to contribute to creating a quality evidence-base in this space. The Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting study is a partnership project aimed at improving maternity services for Indigenous families in South East Queensland. To describe our experience setting up a Participatory Action Research team to mentor two young Indigenous women as research assistants on the Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting study. Case study reflecting on the first six months. Participatory Action Research was a very effective method to actively mentor and engage all team members in reflective, collaborative research practice, resulting in positive changes for the maternity care service. The research assistants describe learning to conduct interviews and infant assessments, as well as gaining confidence to build rapport with families in the study. Reflecting on the stories shared by the women participating in the study has opened up a whole new world and interest in studying midwifery and child health after learning the difficulties and strengths of families during pregnancy and beyond. We encourage others to use Participatory Action Research to enable capacity building in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander midwifery workforce and in health research more broadly. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Probiotic research in Australia, New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, R; Bird, A R; Gopal, P; Henriksson, A; Lee, Y K; Playne, M J

    2005-01-01

    Although the epicentres of probiotic research in the past decade have been Japan and Europe, researchers in the Asia-Pacific region have actively contributed to the growing understanding of the intestinal microbial ecosystem, and interactions between gut bacteria, diet and health of the human host. A number of new probiotic strains have been developed in the region that have been demonstrated to have beneficial impacts on health in animal and human trials, including improved protection against intestinal pathogens and modulation of the immune system. Probiotics targeted to animals, including aquaculture, feature heavily in many Asian countries. Developments in probiotic technologies have included microencapsulation techniques, antimicrobial production in fermented meats, and synbiotic combinations. In particular, the impact of resistant starch on the intestinal environment and fermentation by intestinal bacteria has been intensively studied and new probiotic strains selected specifically for synbiotic combinations with resistant starch. This paper provides an overview of probiotic research within Australia, New Zealand and a number of Asian countries, and lists scientists in the Asia-Pacific region involved in various aspects of probiotic research and development.

  2. Environmental reporting and accounting in Australia: Progress, prospects and research priorities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Albert van, E-mail: albert.vandijk@anu.edu.au [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Mount, Richard [Bureau of Meteorology, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Gibbons, Philip [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Vardon, Michael [Australian Bureau of Statistics, Belconnen, ACT (Australia); Canadell, Pep [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2014-03-01

    Despite strong demand for information to support the sustainable use of Australia's natural resources and conserve environmental values and despite considerable effort and investment, nation-wide environmental data collection and analysis remains a substantially unmet challenge. We review progress in producing national environmental reports and accounts, identify challenges and opportunities, and analyse the potential role of research in addressing these. Australia's low and concentrated population density and the short history since European settlement contribute to the lack of environmental data. There are additional factors: highly diverse data requirements and standards, disagreement on information priorities, poorly measurable management objectives, lack of coordination, over-reliance on researchers and businesses for data collection, lack of business engagement, and short-term, project-based activities. New opportunities have arisen to overcome some of these challenges: enhanced monitoring networks, standardisation, data management and modelling, greater commitment to share and integrate data, community monitoring, increasing acceptance of environmental and sustainability indicators, and progress in environmental accounting practices. Successes in generating climate, water and greenhouse gas information appear to be attributable to an unambiguous data requirement, considerable investment, and legislative instruments that enhance data sharing and create a clearly defined role for operational agencies. Based on the analysis presented, we suggest six priorities for research: (1) common definitions and standards for information that address management objectives, (2) ecological measures that are scalable from local to national level, (3) promotion of long-term data collection and reporting by researchers, (4) efficient satellite and sensor network technologies and data analysis methods, (5) environmental modelling approaches that can reconcile multiple

  3. Environmental reporting and accounting in Australia: Progress, prospects and research priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Albert van; Mount, Richard; Gibbons, Philip; Vardon, Michael; Canadell, Pep

    2014-01-01

    Despite strong demand for information to support the sustainable use of Australia's natural resources and conserve environmental values and despite considerable effort and investment, nation-wide environmental data collection and analysis remains a substantially unmet challenge. We review progress in producing national environmental reports and accounts, identify challenges and opportunities, and analyse the potential role of research in addressing these. Australia's low and concentrated population density and the short history since European settlement contribute to the lack of environmental data. There are additional factors: highly diverse data requirements and standards, disagreement on information priorities, poorly measurable management objectives, lack of coordination, over-reliance on researchers and businesses for data collection, lack of business engagement, and short-term, project-based activities. New opportunities have arisen to overcome some of these challenges: enhanced monitoring networks, standardisation, data management and modelling, greater commitment to share and integrate data, community monitoring, increasing acceptance of environmental and sustainability indicators, and progress in environmental accounting practices. Successes in generating climate, water and greenhouse gas information appear to be attributable to an unambiguous data requirement, considerable investment, and legislative instruments that enhance data sharing and create a clearly defined role for operational agencies. Based on the analysis presented, we suggest six priorities for research: (1) common definitions and standards for information that address management objectives, (2) ecological measures that are scalable from local to national level, (3) promotion of long-term data collection and reporting by researchers, (4) efficient satellite and sensor network technologies and data analysis methods, (5) environmental modelling approaches that can reconcile multiple data

  4. Implementing Knowledge Translation Strategies in Funded Research in Canada and Australia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Moore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging literature describing the use of knowledge translation strategies to increase the relevance and usability of research, yet there are few real-world examples of how this works in practice. This case study reports on the steps taken to embed knowledge translation strategies in the Movember Foundation's Men’s Mental Health Grant Rounds in 2013–14, which were implemented in Australia and Canada, and on the support provided to the applicants in developing their knowledge translation plans. It identifies the challenges faced by the Men’s Mental Health Program Team and how these were resolved. The strategies explored include articulating knowledge translation requirements, ensuring a common understanding of knowledge translation, assessing knowledge translation plans, methods of engaging end users, and building capacity with applicants. An iterative approach to facilitating knowledge translation planning within project development was rolled out in Australia just prior to Canada so that lessons learned were immediately available to refine the second roll out. Implementation included the use of external knowledge translation expertise, the development of knowledge translation plans, and the need for internal infrastructure to support monitoring and reporting. Differences in the Australian and Canadian contexts may point to differential exposure to the concepts and practices of knowledge translation. This case study details an example of designing and implementing an integrated knowledge translation strategy that moves beyond traditional dissemination models. Lessons learned point to the importance of a long lead-up time, the use of knowledge translation expertise for capacity building, the need for flexible implementation, and the need for efficiencies in supporting applicants.

  5. Laser Hydrography in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    r#00-Ails 584 ELECTRONICS RESEARCH LAO ADELAIDE IAUSTRALIA) F/S B/10 LASER HYDfiORAPHY IN AUSTRALIA . (U) FEB 82 M F PENNYJIJNCLASSIFIED ERLO Z B 9...RESEARCH CENTRE SALISBURY SOUTH AUSTRALIA TECHNICAL REPORT ERL-0229-TR LASER HYDROGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIA M.F. PENNY LJ--.I LA. Approved for Public Releae...ERL-0229-TR LASER HYDROGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIA M.F. Penny SUMMARY In response to a Royal Australian Navy requirement, the Electronics Research Laboratory

  6. Equity, Quality, and Cost in Higher Education: Research Study on Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Education.

    Equity, quality, and cost in higher education is examined as it exists in Australia. The first chapter provides a broad overview, both current and historical, of the complex structure of higher education in Australia and identifies issues and concerns. Chapter 2 examines enrollment trends in different fields of study. The third chapter looks at…

  7. Veld management and research philosophy in arid Australia. | G.J. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The arid rangelands (veld) of Australia which comprise almost 75 per cent of Australia are described in terms of area occupied, climate, topography, vegetation types, and history of settlement by man. The effect of climatic constraints on economic factors is considered and the various alternatives to the predominantly ...

  8. Adherence: a review of education, research, practice and policy in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krass I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Community pharmacists are well placed to deliver adherence support services as well as other pharmaceutical services to patients. They are often the last point of contact with patients collecting medicines in the healthcare chain, and they tend to be visited by patients on a regular basis to collect prescription medicines. They have the opportunity to reinforce information already received from other health practitioners, provide further information and monitor adherence to therapy.The past decade has seen an increase in focus on the importance of adherence to therapy, not only in the higher education sector, but also in government policy and community pharmacy practice. Adherence monitoring and promotion has not only become the foundation of courses taught in pharmacy schools, but has become an essential component of disease management and pharmaceutical services delivered by community pharmacists.Aims: This article aims to describe the education, research, practice and policy in the area of adherence to therapy in Australia with a focus on community pharmacists.Methods: A search of MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts as well as hand searches of the bibliographies of retrieved articles was conducted for the period 2000-2008. All pharmacy schools in Australia were also contacted to obtain information on the patient adherence to therapy content of their courses.Results: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. Only one study had a specific adherence focus, with the remainder including adherence support and monitoring as part of the overall interventions delivered by the community pharmacists. In the majority of cases the interventions resulted in an improvement in patients’ adherence to therapy. The research was supported by government and pharmacy professional organisation initiatives in the area of cognitive pharmaceutical services. All universities which responded delivered specific patient adherence courses. Conclusions

  9. Mental health research and evaluation in multicultural Australia: developing a culture of inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cultural and linguistic diversity is a core feature of the Australian population and a valued element of national identity. The proportion of the population that will be overseas-born is projected to be 32% by 2050. While a very active process of mental health system reform has been occurring for more than two decades - at national and state and territory levels - the challenges presented by cultural and linguistic diversity have not been effectively met. A key area in which this is particularly an issue is in the collection, analysis and reporting of mental health data that reflect the reality of population diversity. The purpose of this study was to examine: what is known about the mental health of immigrant and refugee communities in Australia; whether Australian mental health research pays adequate attention to the fact of cultural and linguistic diversity in the Australian population; and whether national mental health data collections support evidence-informed mental health policy and practice and mental health reform in multicultural Australia. Methods The study consisted of three components – a brief review of what is known about mental health in, and mental health service use by, immigrant and refugee communities; an examination of national data collections to determine the extent to which relevant cultural variables are included in the collections; and an examination of Australian research to determine the extent to which immigrant and refugee communities are included as participants in such research. Results The review of Australian research on mental health of immigrant and refugee communities and their patterns of mental health service use generated findings that are highly variable. The work is fragmented and usually small-scale. There are multiple studies of some immigrant and refugee communities and there are no studies of others. Although there is a broadly consistent pattern of lower rates of utilisation of specialist public mental

  10. Mental health research and evaluation in multicultural Australia: developing a culture of inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minas, Harry; Kakuma, Ritsuko; Too, Lay San; Vayani, Hamza; Orapeleng, Sharon; Prasad-Ildes, Rita; Turner, Greg; Procter, Nicholas; Oehm, Daryl

    2013-10-07

    Cultural and linguistic diversity is a core feature of the Australian population and a valued element of national identity. The proportion of the population that will be overseas-born is projected to be 32% by 2050. While a very active process of mental health system reform has been occurring for more than two decades - at national and state and territory levels - the challenges presented by cultural and linguistic diversity have not been effectively met. A key area in which this is particularly an issue is in the collection, analysis and reporting of mental health data that reflect the reality of population diversity. The purpose of this study was to examine: what is known about the mental health of immigrant and refugee communities in Australia; whether Australian mental health research pays adequate attention to the fact of cultural and linguistic diversity in the Australian population; and whether national mental health data collections support evidence-informed mental health policy and practice and mental health reform in multicultural Australia. The study consisted of three components - a brief review of what is known about mental health in, and mental health service use by, immigrant and refugee communities; an examination of national data collections to determine the extent to which relevant cultural variables are included in the collections; and an examination of Australian research to determine the extent to which immigrant and refugee communities are included as participants in such research. The review of Australian research on mental health of immigrant and refugee communities and their patterns of mental health service use generated findings that are highly variable. The work is fragmented and usually small-scale. There are multiple studies of some immigrant and refugee communities and there are no studies of others. Although there is a broadly consistent pattern of lower rates of utilisation of specialist public mental health services by immigrants

  11. A Select Bibliography of Published Research by Staff of the Reserve Bank of Australia: 1991–2001

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hornby; Ivan Roberts

    2001-01-01

    This bibliography provides a list of the major items of published research produced by staff of the Reserve Bank of Australia since 1991. It is a sequel to the bibliography compiled by Suzanna Chiang and Michael Power (1990), which listed work published over the period 1969–1990. The bibliography includes Research Discussion Papers, Occasional Papers, Conference Volumes, and other publications in books and economics journals.

  12. Views on equine-related research in Australia from the Australian equestrian community: perceived outputs and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K; Clarkson, L

    2016-04-01

    The extension of research into public practice is enhanced by communication and behaviour change strategies that are consistent with consumer needs and perspectives. To gain support for equine research (or to appreciate the perspectives contributing to disagreement), it is necessary to determine how aware consumers are of research, what research means to them, how they perceive its benefits (if at all) and how they engage with (or resist) it. Because of a surprising dearth of research evaluating consumer perceptions of research in any sector, our aim was to identify the perceived outputs and benefits of research from the perspective of the Australian horse owner. We analysed the data for 930 participants in an online survey. Participants' understanding of research was associated with a broad terminology. Slightly more than half were aware of equine research that had taken place in Australia, with almost half reporting gaining some benefit, notably in relation to equine health. Although comments demonstrated an awareness of the collective benefit of research, research was made meaningful in relation to local conditions and participants' own equestrian disciplines. There is a significant opportunity for increasing awareness of Australia-based equine research and its value to owners of horses. The critical engagement with research by some owners suggests the need for communicators to present research in terms suitable for an intelligent lay audience, with clear identification of the personal and collective benefits for owners, horses and the equestrian community. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  13. The scientific and technical requirements for biology at Australia's Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    A Symposium and Workshop on Neutrons for Biology was held in the School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne, under the auspices of AINSE, Univ of Melbourne and ANSTO. Invited talks were given on the subjects of Genome, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a critical framework for understanding bio-molecular, neutron diffraction at high and low resolution, and the investigation of viruses and large-scale biological structures using neutrons. There were also talks from prominent NMR practitioners and X-ray protein crystallographers, with substantial discussion about how the various methods might fit together in the future. Significant progress was made on defining Australia's needs, which include a strong push to use SANS and reflectometry for the study of macromolecular complexes and model membranes, and a modest network of supporting infrastructure in Brisbane, Melbourne and the Sydney Basin. Specific recommendations were that the small-angle neutron scattering and reflectometry instruments in the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) be pursued with high priority, that there be no specific effort to provide high-resolution protein-crystallography facilities at the RRR, but that a watching brief be kept on instrumentation and sample-preparation technologies elsewhere. A watch be kept on inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering capabilities elsewhere, although these methods will not initially be pursued at the RRR and that should be input from this community into the design of the biochemistry/chemistry laboratories at the Replacement Research Reactor. It was also recommended that a small number of regional facilities be established (or enhanced) to allow users to perform deuteration of biomolecules. These facilities would be of significant value to the NMR and neutron scattering communities

  14. Towards a new understanding of cohabitation: Insights from focus group research across Europe and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brienna Perelli-Harris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Across the industrialized world, more couples are living together without marrying. Although researchers have compared cohabitation cross-nationally using quantitative data, few have compared union formation using qualitative data. Objective: We use focus group research to compare social norms of cohabitation and marriage in Australia and nine countries in Europe. We explore questions such as: what is the meaning of cohabitation? To what extent is cohabitation indistinguishable from marriage, a prelude to marriage, or an alternative to being single? Are the meanings of cohabitation similar across countries? Methods: Collaborators conducted seven to eight focus groups in each country using a standardized guideline. They analyzed the discussions with bottom-up coding in each thematic area. They then collated the data in a standardized report. The first and second authors systematically analyzed the reports, with direct input from collaborators. Results: The results describe a specific picture of union formation in each country. However, three themes emerge in all focus groups: commitment, testing, and freedom. The pervasiveness of these concepts suggests that marriage and cohabitation have distinct meanings, with marriage representing a stronger level of commitment. Cohabitation is a way to test the relationship, and represents freedom. Nonetheless, other discourses emerged, suggesting that cohabitation has multiple meanings. Conclusions: This study illuminates how context shapes partnership formation, but also presents underlying reasons for the development of cohabitation. We find that the increase in cohabitation has not devalued the concept of marriage, but has become a way to preserve marriage as an ideal for long-term commitment.

  15. Integrating local knowledge with experimental research: case studies on managing cropping systems in Italy and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Allan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable development of agricultural systems is currently challenged by many complex agro-environmental issues. These are characterized by an incomplete understanding of the situation and the problems that arise, and the conflicting opinions that result, issues over boundaries that are often difficult to define, and controversy over the multiple goals and uncertain outcomes. Added to these characteristics, we also have the slow and often inadequate uptake and implementation of research outcomes in this complex, real world. In order to improve sustainability of agro-ecosystems, agronomic research must move away from the linear research approaches and extension practices adopted so far that have focused purely on biophysical agroecosystems. The theoretical operational space of agronomic research must be transformed by considering agronomic issues as part of a broader social-agro-ecosystem. One aspect of this transformation is the inclusion of knowledge collected on a local level with the participation of farmers on the ground. The integration of local experiential knowledge with traditional agronomic research is by necessity based on the participation of many different stakeholders and there can be no single blueprint for how best to develop and use the input received. However, agronomists and policy advisors require general guidelines drawn up from actual experience in order to accelerate positive agronomic change. We address this need through a comparative analysis of two case studies; one involves multi-stakeholder research in a cropping system in the dairy district of Arborea, Sardinia, Italy. The central question was: How can high crop production be maintained while also achieving the EU target water quality and minimizing the production costs? The second case is a multi-stakeholder soil health project from south-eastern Australia. Here the central question was: How can soil decline be prevented and reversed in this district, and soils

  16. Health informatics research in Australia: retrospective analysis using PubMed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumara Mendis

    2007-01-01

    Discussion Australian HI publications in PubMed increased consistently throughout the period 1970-2005, which is on a par with world trends in HI publications. In Australia, most HI publications are in general medical journals. Lack of consistency in author names and failure to include the country name and even the state are the main obstacles to PubMed bibliometric analysis.

  17. The Role of Qualifications in Foreign Labour Mobility in Australia. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, Josie

    2012-01-01

    Australia has had a long history of using migrants to fill skill gaps and labour shortages, and continues to target skilled foreign workers for permanent and temporary migration. The purpose of this report is to investigate the role of qualifications in the labour mobility of these foreign workers, especially as those who do not have employer…

  18. Small Employer Decision-Making with Australia's New Apprenticeship System: Process-Oriented Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Bruce; Chappell, Clive

    2002-01-01

    A qualitative study examined 18 small and medium-sized business owners' decision to adopt or reject Australia's new apprenticeship system. Participation was based on three interconnected processes: psychological commitment, financial justification, and operational choice. Contextual elements in the internal and external environment influenced…

  19. Qualitative Research to Design Sustainable Community-Based Surveillance for Rabies in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Victoria J; Kennedy, Emma; Dhagapan, Phillipa; Ward, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    Given the proximity and recent spread of rabies in Indonesia, effective rabies surveillance in dogs is a priority in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea (PNG). Reporting of potential cases requires community engagement; therefore, the value and acceptability of such a system is critical to ensure sustainable surveillance. We used qualitative research methods to identify factors that influence the acceptability and value of community-based rabies surveillance. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with informants in 16 communities in East Arnhem, the Northern Peninsula Area, the Torres Strait in Australia, and in Western Province, PNG. Thematic analysis identified common themes including the importance of verbal communication, particularly via radio, community meetings, and direct conversation. We also found that dogs have high value to community members through connection to culture, economic (especially hunting), and companionship. The greatest barrier to the reporting of sick dogs was insufficient veterinary services and the subsequent lack of treatment response. In some regions, acceptance that sick dogs are a normal daily occurrence and lack of trust of authorities were also barriers to reporting. The findings from this study will be used to design sustainable rabies surveillance in Northern Australia and PNG by utilizing traditional communication channels and building on existing and valued animal-management services. The methods and findings of this study complement previous quantitative research, so as to target surveillance to high-risk areas within these regions.

  20. Safe sex practices of Indian immigrant men living in Australia: an exploratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Vijayasarathi; Sitharthan, Gomathi

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of scientific information about safe sex practices of Indians immigrants living in popular multicultural nations such as Australia. An online survey of adult Indian men living in Australia was conducted to measure the frequency of use of safe sex practices using the Safe Sex Behavior Questionnaire (SSBQ). Among the respondents of the SSBQ (n = 184), 16.8% (n = 31) reported that never insist on condom use, when having sexual intercourse. One in two men surveyed, agreed that it is difficult for them to discuss safe sex issues with their sexual partners. One in two men said that they used alcoholic beverages prior to or during sexual intercourse. There were no significant differences in SSBQ data among Indian men based on their relationship status. The current study has assessed a range of safe sex practices by involving a community sample of Indian men, and provides baseline data for further evaluation and comparison.

  1. The complex nature of mixed farming systems requires multidimensional actions supported by integrative research and development efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-García, E; Gourdine, J L; Alexandre, G

    2012-01-01

    and animal systems and finally increasing opportunities in rural livelihoods. Focusing our analysis and discussion on field experiences and empirical knowledge in the Caribbean islands, this paper discusses the opportunities for a change needed in current MFS research–development philosophy. The importance...... the requirement for a change in research strategies and initiatives through the development of a complex but necessary multi-/inter-/trans-disciplinary teamwork spirit. We stress as essential the collaboration and active participation of local and regional actors, stakeholders and end-users in the identification...

  2. Women in medical physics: a preliminary analysis of workforce and research participation in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, S B; Kairn, T

    2016-06-01

    Although the participation of women within the science, technology, engineering and mathematics workforces has been widely discussed over recent decades, the recording and analysis of data pertaining to the gender balance of medical physicists in Australia and New Zealand remains rare. This study aimed to provide a baseline for evaluating future changes in workforce demographics by quantifying the current level of representation of women in the Australasian medical physics workforce and providing an indication of the relative contribution made by those women to the local research environment. The 2015 Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) member directory and list of chief physicists at ACPSEM-accredited radiation oncology and diagnostic imaging training centres were interrogated to identify the gender balance of medical physicists working in Australia and New Zealand. A specific investigation of the employment levels of all medical physicists in Queensland was undertaken to provide an example of the gender balance at different levels of seniority in one large Australian state. Lists of authors of medical physics presentations at ACPSEM annual conferences and authors of publications in the ACPSEM's official journal, were used to provide an indication of the gender balance in published research within Australia and New Zealand. The results of this study showed that women currently constitute approximately 28 % of the medical physics workforce in Australia and New Zealand, distributed disproportionally in junior roles; there is a decrease in female participation in the field with increasing levels of seniority, which is particularly apparent in the stratified data obtained for the Queensland workforce. Comparisons with older data suggest that this situation has changed little since 2008. Examination of ACPSEM conference presentations suggested that there are similar disparities between the gender-balance of proffered and

  3. Need for global partnership in cancer care: perceptions of cancer care researchers attending the 2010 australia and Asia pacific clinical oncology research development workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, H Kim; Abernethy, Amy P; Stockler, Martin R; Koczwara, Bogda; Aziz, Zeba; Nair, Reena; Seymour, Lesley

    2011-09-01

    To understand the diversity of issues and the breadth of growing clinical care, professional education, and clinical research needs of developing countries, not typically represented in Western or European surveys of cancer care and research. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the attendees at the 2010 Australia and Asia Pacific Clinical Oncology Research Development workshop (Queensland, Australia) about the most important health care questions facing the participant's home countries, especially concerning cancer. Early-career oncologists and advanced oncology trainees from a region of the world containing significant low- and middle-income countries reported that cancer is an emerging health priority as a result of aging of the population, the impact of diet and lifestyle, and environmental pollution. There was concern about the capacity of health care workers and treatment facilities to provide cancer care and access to the latest cancer therapies and technologies. Although improving health care delivery was seen as a critical local agenda priority, focusing on improved cancer research activities in this select population was seen as the best way that others outside the country could improve outcomes for all. The burden of cancer will increase dramatically over the next 20 years, particularly in countries with developing and middle-income economies. Cancer research globally faces significant barriers, many of which are magnified in the developing country setting. Overcoming these barriers will require partnerships sensitive and responsive to both local and global needs.

  4. Collaborating with consumer and community representatives in health and medical research in Australia: results from an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartu Anne E

    2011-05-01

    consumer representatives and researchers. The National Health and Medical Research Council in Australia expects researchers to work in partnership and involve consumer and community representatives in health and medical research, and to evaluate community and consumer participation. It is important to demonstrate whether consumer and community participation makes a difference to health and medical research.

  5. Collaborating with consumer and community representatives in health and medical research in Australia: results from an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; D'Antoine, Heather A; France, Kathryn E; McKenzie, Anne E; Henley, Nadine; Bartu, Anne E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol

    2011-05-14

    Medical Research Council in Australia expects researchers to work in partnership and involve consumer and community representatives in health and medical research, and to evaluate community and consumer participation. It is important to demonstrate whether consumer and community participation makes a difference to health and medical research.

  6. Trends in research about postgraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galindo-Cárdenas, Leonor Angélica

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was framed in the research: Characterization of professional competency-based model in medical education developed in twelve clinical and nine surgical specializations at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Antioquia. Its aim was to inquire about the state of the art in medical postgraduate education. The guiding question was: Where is present-day research headed in medical postgraduate education. For this descriptive, nonexperimental work, 12 bibliographic databases were reviewed and 28 research articles related to graduate medical formation were selected. The findings were compared, analyzed and interpreted. The tendency in research on graduate medical education points to the need of having multi-inter-trans-disciplinary and humanistic proposals based on constructivism; to consider evaluation as a process emphasizing on learning and the participation of students, and to build systems of pedagogical formation of tutors and interactive and flexible curricula. The lack of studies that promote competencies-based training in postgraduate medical education is notorious.

  7. Child protection and out of home care: Policy, practice, and research connectionsAustralia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an outline of the early development of care and protection in Australia and New Zealand as a backdrop to an overview of child protection systems and policies and the current childprotection profile in both countries. Key issues that have become the focus of policy reform are canvassed and legislative and policy initiatives to promote child safety as well as strengthen families are elaborated. An overview of trends in relation to out of home care, including routes into care, care arrangements and permanency policies is provided. The article profiles selected research studies from Australia focusing on outcomes of care: stability of care, mental health and educational outcomes of looked after children, abuse in care, and routes out of care through reunification and aging out. Other issues treated are the overrepresentation of indigenous children in care systems in both countries and the challenges of maintaining cultural connections. The article concludes with a brief comparative analysis identifying similarities and differences in child welfare systems in both countries.

  8. Cooperation Agreement between the Government of Australia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in the research projects of CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This agreement was concluded on 1 November 1991 for five years and is renewable. Australia will participate in the CERN research projects in the field of experimental and technical physics, accelerator and detector engineering. (NEA)

  9. CCS Research Development and Deployment in a Clean Energy Future: Lessons from Australia over the Past Two Decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Cook

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is widespread, though by no means universal, recognition of the importance of carbon capture and storage (CCS as a carbon mitigation technology. However, the rate of deployment does not match what is required for global temperatures to stay well below 2 °C. Although some consider the hurdles to achieving the widespread application of CCS to be almost insurmountable, a more optimistic view is that a great deal is now known about CCS through research, demonstration, and deployment. We know how to do it; we are confident it can be done safely and effectively; we know what it costs; and we know that costs are decreasing and will continue to do so. We also know that the world will need CCS as long as countries, companies, and communities continue to use fossil fuels for energy and industrial processes. What is lacking are the necessary policy drivers, along with a technology-neutral approach to decrease carbon emissions in a cost-effective and timely manner while retaining the undoubted benefits of ready access to reliable and secure electricity and energy-intensive industrial products. In this paper, Australia is used as an example of what has been undertaken in CCS over the past 20 years, particularly in research and demonstration, but also in international collaboration. Progress in the large-scale deployment of CCS in Australia has been too slow. However, the world’s largest storage project will soon be operational in Australia as part of the Gorgon liquefied natural gas (LNG project, and investigations are underway into several large-scale CCS Flagship program opportunities. The organization and progress of the Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC Otway Project, which is currently Australia’s only operational storage project, is discussed in some detail because of its relevance to the commercial deployment of CCS. The point is made that there is scope for building on this Otway activity to investigate

  10. Clinical supervision: outsider reports of a research-driven implementation programme in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Edward; Winstanley, Julie

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore substantive issues related to the implementation of Clinical Supervision (CS). Historically, the treatment of mental illness in Australia has been inadequate. CS has shown promise as a positive contribution to the clinical governance agenda, as a structured staff support mechanism. Within the wider context of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of CS, semi-structured interviews (n = 17) were conducted with staff who worked alongside colleagues that attempted to implement CS. Senior managers embraced CS and were disappointed when junior managerial colleagues did not hold a similar conviction, when tested by the realities of CS implementation. If CS was regarded as an additional activity, it stretched human resources and created inter-staff tensions. The personal testimony of these 'outsiders' spoke about the practicalities of implementing CS and the prevailing culture into which they were introduced. When perceived as a tour de force for culture change, CS was polarized as an opportunity by many, but also as a threat by some. A single, cohesive and explicit management position on CS in each Health Service entity may obviate some of the impediments to CS implementation. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Online Training in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzic, Joze

    2013-01-01

    On-line training is becoming an interesting phenomenon in Australia and has attracted a lot of interest across many industries and businesses (Chan and Ngai, 2007). The research reported here looks at the use of online training in corporations in Australia. It focuses on two aspects of online training, the factors that "warrant" its…

  12. Visualising the Interdisciplinary Research Field: The Life Cycle of Economic History in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Claire; Ville, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research is frequently viewed as an important component of the research landscape through its innovative ability to integrate knowledge from different areas. However, support for interdisciplinary research is often strategic rhetoric, with policy-makers and universities frequently adopting practices that favour disciplinary…

  13. Thinking Big Picture: Meeting the Needs of Researchers in Northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtora, Jayshree

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increase in research activity at Charles Darwin University in recent years, the Library created the position of Research Services Coordinator to meet researcher needs. Eighteen months after the new staff member was in place, an online survey was carried out to gauge the success of the new services and resources provided, and thereby…

  14. Using a research framework to identify knowledge gaps in research on food marketing to children in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kathy; Kelly, Bridget; King, Lesley

    2009-06-01

    Research in the field of food marketing to children requires a better understanding of the research gaps in order to inform policy development. The purpose of this paper was to propose a framework for classifying food marketing research, using Australian research on food marketing to children to demonstrate how this framework can be used to determine knowledge gaps. A literature review of research databases and 'grey' material was conducted to identify research from the previous 10 years. Studies were classified according to their research focus, and media type, as either: exposure, including content analyses; effects of exposure, including opinions, attitudes and actions resulting from food marketing exposure; regulations, including the type and level of regulation that applies to food marketing; or breaches of regulations, including instances where marketing regulations have been violated. The majority of Australian research on food marketing to children has focused on television advertising and exposure research. Research has consistently shown that the content of food marketing directed at children is predominately for unhealthy foods. There is a lack of research on the effects of food marketing, which would be valuable to inform policy. The development of a logical framework for food marketing research allows for the identification of research gaps and enables research priorities to be identified.

  15. The Picture Talk Project: Starting a Conversation with Community Leaders on Research with Remote Aboriginal Communities of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, E F M; Macdonald, G; Martiniuk, A L C; D'Antoine, H; Oscar, J; Carter, M; Lawford, T; Elliott, E J

    2017-05-11

    Researchers are required to seek consent from Indigenous communities prior to conducting research but there is inadequate information about how Indigenous people understand and become fully engaged with this consent process. Few studies evaluate the preference or understanding of the consent process for research with Indigenous populations. Lack of informed consent can impact on research findings. The Picture Talk Project was initiated with senior Aboriginal leaders of the Fitzroy Valley community situated in the far north of Western Australia. Aboriginal people were interviewed about their understanding and experiences of research and consent processes. Transcripts were analysed using NVivo10 software with an integrated method of inductive and deductive coding and based in grounded theory. Local Aboriginal interpreters validated coding. Major themes were defined and supporting quotes sourced. Interviews with Aboriginal leaders (n = 20) were facilitated by a local Aboriginal Community Navigator who could interpret if necessary and provide cultural guidance. Participants were from all four major local language groups of the Fitzroy Valley; aged 31 years and above; and half were male. Themes emerging from these discussions included Research-finding knowledge; Being respectful of Aboriginal people, Working on country, and Being flexible with time; Working together with good communication; Reciprocity-two-way learning; and Reaching consent. The project revealed how much more there is to be learned about how research with remote Aboriginal communities should be conducted such that it is both culturally respectful and, importantly, meaningful for participants. We identify important elements in community consultation about research and seeking consent.

  16. The Leaking Pipeline: Women Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kate

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the "leaking pipeline" in women's participation rates from Bachelor to postgraduate research programmes. In examining projects at two Australian universities to identify and implement strategies to improve women's participation in research higher degrees, it focuses on three points of "leakage" between…

  17. Researching Youth Political Participation in Australia: Arguments for an Expanded Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The distinct political lives and lifestyles of young people provide a rich arena for social research. This paper traces the origins of contemporary definitions of political participation, which are often at odds with the real experiences and aspirations of young citizens. Despite a growing body of empirical evidence in this field, researchers are…

  18. Doing water research differently for innovation in regional water productivity in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayre, Margaret; Nettle, Ruth; Erazo Bobenrieth, Manuela; Klerkx, Laurens

    2016-01-01

    Research in innovation studies suggests that appropriate starting conditions are required if alignment of research to practice and policy is to be enabled. To achieve this alignment, a scoping exercise is required and must involve those people and institutions that have an interest in the

  19. Translating Research about Domestic and Family Violence into Practice in Australia: Possibilities and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarzia, Laura; Humphreys, Cathy; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    The volume of research being conducted into domestic and family violence is increasing, yet knowledge translation in this area lags behind other fields such as healthcare. Little is known about how to effectively harness and implement research findings in the "real world," and there continue to be barriers to the use of rigorous research…

  20. Does the Law on Compensation for Research-Related Injury in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand Meet Ethical Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Joanna M

    2017-08-01

    Despite a consensus that society owes an ethical obligation to compensate for research-related injury, and that no-fault is the best ethical response, an assessment of the compensation arrangements in place in the UK, Australia and New Zealand shows that in general compensation arrangements fall below this ethical expectation. Most subjects rely on ex gratia payment or an unenforceable assurance of payment in the event of injury. It is also likely that, given significant deficiencies in participant information about compensation arrangements in place for trials recommended by the supervisory ethics agencies in each jurisdiction, subjects only find out about their financial exposure in the event of injury. Industry-drafted guidelines governing compensation in commercially sponsored trials do not protect subjects' interests, but operate primarily to protect the interests of industry. The article considers potential solutions to the ethical deficiency of the compensation arrangements, and argues that the ethical corollary of the fact that society is the ultimate beneficiary of its members' participation in clinical research, is that society as a whole should bear the cost of participant injuries, through establishment of a central no-fault compensation fund financed either by the state or those directly involved in biomedical research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Indigenous Engagement in Tropical River Research in Australia: The TRaCK Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue E. Jackson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The literature on scientific-Indigenous ecological knowledge collaborations rarely analyses programmatic efforts undertaken by multi-disciplinary research groups over very large geographic scales. The TRaCK (Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge research program was established to provide the science and knowledge needed by governments, industries, and communities to sustainably manage northern Australia’s rivers and estuaries. A number of policies and procedures were developed to ensure that the needs of Indigenous people of the multi-jurisdictional region were addressed and to enhance the benefits they might derive from participating in the research. An overarching Indigenous Engagement Strategy undergirded the program’s engagement activities, providing guidance on matters relating to the protection of intellectual property, negotiation of research agreements, remuneration for Indigenous expertise, and communications standards. This article reviews the achievements and shortcomings of the TRaCK experience of Indigenous engagement and highlights lessons for researchers and research organisations contemplating applied environmental science initiatives of this scale and scope.

  2. Policy Fuzz and Fuzzy Logic: Researching Contemporary Indigenous Education and Parent-School Engagement in North Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Tess; Thompson, Helen; McRae-Williams, Eva; Wegner, Aggie

    2011-01-01

    "Engagement" is the second of six top priorities in Australia's most recent Indigenous education strategy to "close the gap" in schooling outcomes. Drawing on findings from a three-year ethnographic analysis of school engagement issues in the north of Australia, this article situates engagement within the history of Indigenous…

  3. Partnership in Knowledge Creation: Lessons Learned from a Researcher-Policy Actor Partnership to Co-Produce a Rapid Appraisal Case Study of South Australia's Social Inclusion Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Lareen; Biedrzycki, Kate; Patterson, Jan; Baum, Fran

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a partnership between researchers and policy actors that was developed within a short timeframe to produce a rapid appraisal case study of a government policy initiative--South Australia's "Social Inclusion Initiative"--for the Social Exclusion Knowledge Network of the international Commission on Social Determinants…

  4. A case for the expansion of effort and the adoption of a modified approach in Australia to education and research on the engineering and technology of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.W.K.

    1981-11-01

    A positive initiative needs to be taken to place more emphasis on undergraduate education in the field of nuclear engineering in Australia. Excellent facilities exist at the AAEC to aid tertiary institutions. Many excellent opportunities also exist for developing post-graduate research projects in nuclear technology

  5. Refuting tobacco-industry funded research: empirical data shows decline in smoking prevalence following introduction of plain packaging in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal A Diethelm

    2015-11-01

    A significant decline in smoking prevalence in Australia followed introduction of plain packaging after adjustment for the impact of other tobacco control measures. This conclusion is in marked contrast to that from the industry-funded analysis.

  6. A bibliometric review of drug and alcohol research focused on Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Anton; Shakeshaft, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States experience a disproportionately high burden of harms from substance misuse. Research is therefore required to improve our understanding of substance use in Indigenous populations and provide evidence on strategies effective for reducing harmful use. A search of 13 electronic databases for peer-reviewed articles published between 1993 and 2014 focusing on substance use and Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Relevant abstracts were classified as data or non-data based research. Data-based studies were further classified as measurement, descriptive or intervention and their trends examined by country and drug type. Intervention studies were classified by type and their evaluation designs classified using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) data collection checklist. There was a statistically significant increase from 1993 to 2014 in the percentage of total publications that were data-based (P Indigenous drug and alcohol field are required. The dominance of descriptive research in the Indigenous drug and alcohol field is less than optimal for generating evidence to inform Indigenous drug and alcohol policy and programs. [Clifford A, Shakeshaft A. A bibliometric review of drug and alcohol research focused on Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:509-522]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Australia's uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampson, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: structure of the uranium industry in Australia (export policies; development of mining programme; table of export contracts approved by Australian government, 1972; government policy towards the industry 1972-75 and since 1975); reserves (table of Australia's major uranium deposits; estimated world resources of uranium, excluding USSR, Eastern Europe and China; comparison of exploration expenditures and discovery of uranium in Australia and the USA); enrichment; resource potential; future demand (table of nuclear power reactors above 30 MW in operation or under construction, mid-1979; projection of Australian uranium production to 1990); government and union action. (U.K.)

  8. Intensive Care Research Coordinators in Australia and New Zealand: a cross-sectional survey of demographics, responsibilities, job satisfaction and importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brigit; Eastwood, Glenn M; Raunow, Heike; Howe, Belinda; Rickard, Claire M

    2011-11-01

    The achievement of successful clinical research projects depends on multiple team members including Research Coordinators (RCs), who are the link between the researcher and the trial participants. The RCs main responsibility is to ensure that all research is conducted according to the appropriate protocols, regulations and guidelines. Description of demographics, the role and associated responsibilities and assessment of items of importance to, and satisfaction with, various job related items. An observational web-based cross-sectional study of RCs working in Intensive Care Units (ICU) across Australia and New Zealand. Fifty-six participants completed the survey. Forty percent had more than 6 years experience in ICU research and one-third held a Masters Degree. Most respondents performed research related tasks including ethics submission, patient screening, education and data collection. Autonomy and work hours were the most satisfying job characteristics reported and aspects relating to autonomy were most important for the RCs. Inadequate remuneration was of great concern to the participants. Research Coordinators in Australia and New Zealand have many and varied roles with a significant workload. Unfortunately, the RCs do not feel their employers are adequately remunerating the demand on their time and efforts. The results indicate that RCs enjoy high levels of satisfaction with general conditions and facets of their work and its environment and they remain passionate about their role in the ICU setting. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toward the Defence of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    i~li tr - _y- ----Q QD . New York: Random House , 1987. Kerr, Pauline, " Australia -Indonesian Relations Developing.- FlifRi s_] rc~h, August 1989, pp...AD- A234 907Ol? RESEARCH REPORT 8 T(WILRD TVF DEFENCE OF AUSTRALIA O)T IC VZA P R 24 1 GROUP CAPTAIN BRENTON J. ESPELAND, AM ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR... AUSTRALIA by Group Captain B.J. Espeland, AM, RAAF A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY IN FULFILLMENT OF THE RESEARCH REQUIREMENT Research Advisor

  10. Measuring research impact in Australia's medical research institutes: a scoping literature review of the objectives for and an assessment of the capabilities of research impact assessment frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Simon; Searles, Andrew; Reeves, Penny; Nilsson, Michael

    2017-03-21

    Realising the economic potential of research institutions, including medical research institutes, represents a policy imperative for many Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development nations. The assessment of research impact has consequently drawn increasing attention. Research impact assessment frameworks (RIAFs) provide a structure to assess research translation, but minimal research has examined whether alternative RIAFs realise the intended policy outcomes. This paper examines the objectives presented for RIAFs in light of economic imperatives to justify ongoing support for health and medical research investment, leverage productivity via commercialisation and outcome-efficiency gains in health systems, and ensure that translation and impact considerations are embedded into the research process. This paper sought to list the stated objectives for RIAFs, to identify existing frameworks and to evaluate whether the identified frameworks possessed the capabilities necessary to address the specified objectives. A scoping review of the literature to identify objectives specified for RIAFs, inform upon descriptive criteria for each objective and identify existing RIAFs. Criteria were derived for each objective. The capability for the existing RIAFs to realise the alternative objectives was evaluated based upon these criteria. The collated objectives for RIAFs included accountability (top-down), transparency/accountability (bottom-up), advocacy, steering, value for money, management/learning and feedback/allocation, prospective orientation, and speed of translation. Of the 25 RIAFs identified, most satisfied objectives such as accountability and advocacy, which are largely sufficient for the first economic imperative to justify research investment. The frameworks primarily designed to optimise the speed of translation or enable the prospective orientation of research possessed qualities most likely to optimise the productive outcomes from research. However

  11. Unsettling Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    This book is a critical intervention into debates on Australia's cultural history. The book demonstrates the interconnectedness of themes commonly seen as separate discursive formations, and shows the fruitfulness of bringing a combined cultural studies and postcolonial approach to bear on a number...

  12. Fundamental elements in examining a child’s right to education: A study of home education research and regulation in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda JACKSON

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Home education provides valuable educational and developmental opportunities for children. An examination of Australia’s research indicates many best educational practices, including more informed mediation, contextualised learning, and opportunities to exercise autonomy. Key features include learning embedded in communities and program modification in response to students’ needs. Current state and territory legal requirements are examined within the context of this research and Australia’s obligations to international human rights treaties. All jurisdictions accept home education as one way to meet compulsory education requirements. The extent to which respective laws then reflect understanding of home education research and practice varies. Most jurisdictions allow for a varietyof educational approaches. Some oversight regulation could however be modified to reflect a better understanding of home education. Consultation with home educators and reference to research would assist the development of more uniform legislation and policy across Australia, and enable better regulatory practice.

  13. Global health education: a pilot in trans-disciplinary, digital instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Heather; Press, David J; Kuhn, Virginia

    2013-05-02

    The development of new global health academic programs provides unique opportunities to create innovative educational approaches within and across universities. Recent evidence suggests that digital media technologies may provide feasible and cost-effective alternatives to traditional classroom instruction; yet, many emerging global health academic programs lag behind in the utilization of modern technologies. We created an inter-departmental University of Southern California (USC) collaboration to develop and implement a course focused on digital media and global health. Course curriculum was based on core tenants of modern education: multi-disciplinary, technologically advanced, learner-centered, and professional application of knowledge. Student and university evaluations were reviewed to qualitatively assess course satisfaction and educational outcomes. 'New Media for Global Health' ran for 18 weeks in the Spring 2012 semester with N=41 students (56.1% global health and 43.9% digital studies students). The course resulted in a number of high quality global health-related digital media products available at http://iml420.wordpress.com/. Challenges confronted at USC included administrative challenges related to co-teaching and frustration from students conditioned to a rigid system of teacher-led learning within a specific discipline. Quantitative and qualitative course evaluations reflected positive feedback for the course instructors and mixed reviews for the organization of the course. The development of innovative educational programs in global health requires on-going experimentation and information sharing across departments and universities. Digital media technologies may have implications for future efforts to improve global health education.

  14. The role of trans-disciplinary skills in environmental education and science - 5/2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past four decades there have been tremendous changes in how environmental scientists address issues relating to societal needs. In the early 1980s, interdisciplinary work involved one or two related science disciplines in combination to evaluate national issues. As the s...

  15. The role of trans-disciplinary skills in environmental education and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past three decades there have been tremendous changes in how environmental scientists address issues relating to societal needs. In the early 1980s interdisciplinary work may have involved one or two related disciplines such as limnology, statistics and biogeochemistry in...

  16. Global health education: a pilot in trans-disciplinary, digital instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Wipfli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of new global health academic programs provides unique opportunities to create innovative educational approaches within and across universities. Recent evidence suggests that digital media technologies may provide feasible and cost-effective alternatives to traditional classroom instruction; yet, many emerging global health academic programs lag behind in the utilization of modern technologies. Objective: We created an inter-departmental University of Southern California (USC collaboration to develop and implement a course focused on digital media and global health. Design: Course curriculum was based on core tenants of modern education: multi-disciplinary, technologically advanced, learner-centered, and professional application of knowledge. Student and university evaluations were reviewed to qualitatively assess course satisfaction and educational outcomes. Results: ‘New Media for Global Health’ ran for 18 weeks in the Spring 2012 semester with N=41 students (56.1% global health and 43.9% digital studies students. The course resulted in a number of high quality global health-related digital media products available at http://iml420.wordpress.com/. Challenges confronted at USC included administrative challenges related to co-teaching and frustration from students conditioned to a rigid system of teacher-led learning within a specific discipline. Quantitative and qualitative course evaluations reflected positive feedback for the course instructors and mixed reviews for the organization of the course. Conclusion: The development of innovative educational programs in global health requires on-going experimentation and information sharing across departments and universities. Digital media technologies may have implications for future efforts to improve global health education.

  17. Australia: US Redoubt in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-04-08

    security, maternity and child care, sickness and unemployment benefits, and for the Health Service. There is no question that Australia today...THE COLLEGE FOR SUCH BENEFIT TO THE USER AS MAY ACCRUE. STUDENT RESEARCH PAPER HIH1P3 8 April 1966 AUSTRALIA : US REDOUBT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA By...LOG # of 8 Copies 66-4-136 U « • USAWC RESEARCH ELEMENT (Research Paper) Australia : US Redoubt in Southeast Asia by Lt Col William W. Gist III

  18. A review of the use of radio-isotopes in medicine and medical research in Australia (1947-73).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korszniak, N

    1997-05-01

    Recent reports in the Australian media have claimed that after the Second World War 'hundreds of (Australians) were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s'. These claims prompted a review of archival records of the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) that are held by the Australian Archives pertaining to the medical uses of radio-isotopes during the period 1947-73. The material examined indicates that the procurement, distribution, and therapeutic and diagnostic uses of radio-isotopes were stringently controlled by the Radio-isotopes Standing committee (RSC) until 1973, when the responsibility of regulation of medical uses of radio-isotopes passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. On the basis of available information it appears that the claims made by the media that many Australians were subjected to unconscionable medical experiments are unjustified. A full report has been released by the Commonwealth Minister for Human Services and Health. The following is an abridged version of that report, detailing some of the more contentious uses of radio-isotopes for medical purposes in Australia during the period 1947-73.

  19. The Impact of Ethics Review on a Research-Led University Curriculum: Results of a Qualitative Study in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, L L

    2016-04-01

    In the human sciences, a student research-centered pedagogy is constrained by institutional ethics review, yet there is little research on the impact of ethics review on research-led teaching. This article documents a range of ways that Australian universities are responding to ethics review of undergraduate human research. Forty teachers and administrators were interviewed at 14 universities using purposive sampling to document the range of ways teachers are avoiding ethics review or incorporating it into their curriculum. Some reported halting undergraduate research or evading ethics review, regarding it as meaningless bureaucracy divorced from actual ethical thinking. Those who incorporated ethics review into student research did so by collaborating with administrators. Institutions can facilitate research-led teaching by designing dedicated forms and decentralized review procedures for student research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Implications of Eligibility Criteria on the Generalizability of Alcohol and Drug Treatment Outcome Research: A Study of Real-World Treatment Seekers in Sweden and in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbjörk, Jessica; Garfield, Joshua B B; Larner, Andrew

    2017-03-21

    Clinical studies of alcohol and drug treatment outcomes frequently apply participant eligibility criteria (EC), which may exclude real-world treatment seekers, impairing the representativeness of studied samples. Some research exists on the impact of EC on alcohol treatment seekers. Little is known about drug treatment and country differences. We tested and compared the degree to which commonly used EC exclude real-world treatment seekers with problem alcohol and drug use in Sweden and Australia, and compared the impact of EC on outcomes. Two large naturalistic and comparative service user samples were used. Respondents were recruited in Stockholm County (n = 1,865; data collection 2000-2002), and Victoria and Western Australia (n = 796; in 2012-2013). Follow-up interviews were conducted after 1 year. Cross-tabulations, Chi-square (χ 2 ) tests and logistic regressions were used. Percentages of the samples excluded by individual EC ranged from 5% (lack of education/literacy) to 70% (social instability) among Swedish alcohol cases and from 2% (low alcohol problem severity) to 69% (psychiatric medication) among Australian counterparts; and from 2% (age 60+ years) to 82% (social instability) among Swedish drug cases and from 1% (age 60+ years) to 67% (psychiatric medication) among Australian counterparts. Country differences and differences across substances appeared independent of country effect. Co-morbid psychiatric medication, noncompliance, poly drug use, and low education EC caused positive 1-year outcome bias; whereas female sex and old age introduced negative outcome bias. Conclusions/Importance: Commonly used EC exclude large proportions of treatment seekers. This may impair generalizability of clinical research, and the effects of many EC differ by country and drug type.

  1. Psychiatry in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Kaplan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry has been practised in Australia in one form or another since the peopling of the continent, originally with the practices of the Aboriginal shamans, and later with the psychiatric treatment necessitated by convict transportation. Over most of the last half-century psychiatry has been administered by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. There are over 2 000 psychiatrists in Australia, and num- bers are expected to increase in future. As in many other countries, there is ongoing pressure between the private and public sectors, with endemic under- funding of public and community services. Despite its small number of practitioners and relative isola- tion from major centres, Australian psychiatry has a distin- guished record in the field of research. The most famous dis- covery, by John Cade, was the use of lithium for treatment of mania. Recently governments at state and federal level have acknowledged the effect of psychiatric illness on patients and their families. This has led to the development of pro- grammes to improve public information and eliminate preju- dice. It is anticipated that the practice of psychiatry will flourish in Australia and that the country will remain a leading centre of excellence in psychiatric research and training.

  2. Australia's nuclear safeguards agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a compilation of the bilateral agreements concluded by Australia concerning co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The publication also includes the agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the agreement with EURATOM on transfers of nuclear materials from Australia to the European Atomic Energy Community. The other agreements were concluded with the following countries: Canada, Egypt, Finland, France, Japan, Republic of Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, USSR, United Kingdom and United States. They concern transfers of nuclear materials and equipment, research and development, exchange of information, etc. All contain provisions on safeguards, physical protection and restrictions on exports to third countries [fr

  3. Collaborative Research on the Ecology and Management of the ‘Wulo’ Monsoon Rainforest in Wunambal Gaambera Country, North Kimberley, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Vigilante

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous groups are increasingly combining traditional ecological knowledge and Western scientific approaches to inform the management of their lands. We report the outcomes of a collaborative research project focused on key ecological questions associated with monsoon vine thickets in Wunambal Gaambera country (Kimberley region, Western Australia. The study mapped monsoon rainforests and analysed the environmental correlates of their current distribution, as well as the historical drivers of patch dynamics since 1949. Remote sensing was used to chart the effectiveness of an intervention designed to re-instate Aboriginal fire regimes according to customary principles. We identified the most vulnerable patches based on size, distance from neighbouring patches, and fire frequency. More than 6000 rainforest patches were mapped. Most were small (<1 ha, occurring predominantly on nutrient-rich substrates (e.g., basalt and fire-sheltered topographic settings (e.g., slopes and valleys. Rainforests with low fire frequency and no cattle were more likely to expand into surrounding long-unburnt savannas. Frequent fires and cattle did not cause substantial contraction, although the latter affected rainforest understories through trampling. Fire management performed by Aboriginal rangers effectively shifted fire regimes from high-intensity late dry season fires to early dry season fires, particularly in areas with clusters of vulnerable rainforests. The remote sensing methods developed in this project are applicable to the long-term monitoring of rainforest patches on Aboriginal-managed land in North Kimberley, providing tools to evaluate the impacts of fire management, feral animal control, and climate change. The study confirmed the importance of the cattle-free and rarely burnt Bougainville Peninsula as one of the most important rainforest areas in Western Australia.

  4. ASPIRE: A multi-site community-based participatory research project to increase understanding of the dynamics of violence against immigrant and refugee women in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Cathy; Murdolo, Adele; Murray, Linda; Davis, Erin; Chen, Jasmin; Block, Karen; Quiazon, Regina; Warr, Deb

    2015-12-23

    One in three women around the world are or have been subjected to violence. This includes in Australia, where violence against women is an urgent public health and human rights issue. Immigrant and refugee women who have resettled in Australia are known to face barriers accessing services aimed at preventing and responding to family violence. However there is little evidence about the contexts, nature and dynamics of violence against immigrant and refugee women to inform appropriate responses to enhance their safety and well-being. The ASPIRE project will address this gap by identifying opportunities for the development of responsive local and community-based interventions for family violence against immigrant and refugee women, contributing to the currently limited Australian research in this area. This participatory research project will work with communities in eight geographic locations (two inner-city, three outer-suburban, and three regional) across two states (Victoria and Tasmania), to generate evidence about immigrant and refugee women's experiences in a range of settings. The project will engage stakeholders and communities through extensive consultation prior to data collection and by facilitating community members' participation in generating and analysing data. A mix of qualitative methods will be used to generate rich data about the family, cultural and place-based contexts that shape the prevalence and dynamics of violence against immigrant and refugee women; women's prevention and help-seeking efforts; and community attitudes about and responses to violence across a range of cultural groups. Methods include in-depth interviews with women who have experienced family violence, key informant interviews with local community service providers, focus group discussions with men and women from predominant cultural groups that have migrated to areas covered by the research sites, and Photovoice with community leaders. Bilingual health educators will

  5. Re-analysing tobacco industry funded research on the effect of plain packaging on minors in Australia: Same data but different results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal A. Diethelm

    2017-11-01

    Our findings suggest a decline of smoking prevalence in minors following the introduction of plain packaging in Australia. They differ substantially from those presented in an industry-funded study on the effects of plain packaging on smoking prevalence in minors in Australia, which used the same data.

  6. End-of-Life care in a community garden: Findings from a Participatory Action Research project in regional Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Pauline; Gartrell, Gabrielle; Egg, Gwen; Nolan, Andrew; Cross, Merylin

    2017-05-01

    This article presents findings from research that explored how a community garden might function as a place of end-of-life and bereavement support. Adopting Participatory Action Research (PAR) methods, and informed by Third Place theory and notions of therapeutic landscape, creative consultations were held in the Garden and people's homes. The findings provide insights into the nature of informal care as it is played out in the liminal garden space, between home and institution. The results illuminate the therapeutic landscape of community gardens, and contribute new understandings to the fields of PAR, health geography and end-of-life care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using a participatory action research framework to listen to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia about pandemic influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adrian; Massey, Peter D; Judd, Jenni; Kelly, Jenny; Durrheim, David N; Clough, Alan R; Speare, Rick; Saggers, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of the participatory action research (PAR) framework to better understand community members' perceptions and risks of pandemic influenza. In 2009, the H1N1 influenza pandemic affected Indigenous populations more than non-Indigenous populations in Oceania and the Americas. Higher prevalence of comorbidities (diabetes, obesity, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) as well as pregnancy in Indigenous communities may have contributed to the higher risks of severe disease. Social disparity, institutionalised racism within health services and differences in access to culturally safe health services have also been reported as contributors to disadvantage and delayed appropriate treatment. Given these factors and the subsequent impact they had on Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, the authors set out to ensure that the Australian national, state and territory pandemic plans adequately reflected the risk status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and promoted meaningful engagement with communities to mitigate this risk. A national study explored the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their experiences with H1N1 and used a qualitative PAR framework that was effective in gaining deep understandings from participants. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled organisations and health services were involved in the implementation, interpretation and monitoring of this project. As a result, important features of the implementation of this PAR framework with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations emerged. These features included the importance of working in a multidisciplinary team with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers; the complexities and importance of obtaining multi-site human research ethics approval processes; the importance and value of building the research capacity of both experienced and

  8. Australia's atomic conspiracy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnie, A.

    2001-01-01

    The author questions claims by the Newcastle University historian Wayne Reynolds in his book 'Australia's Bid for the Bomb', that the impetus behind the Snowy Mountains Scheme was to provide a secure source of power for the enrichment of uranium and production of heavy water so that Australia could produce its own atomic bombs. Reynolds also argued that the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) was set up so that Australia had a trained scientific workforce to produce plutonium for the bomb. While the book is well researched, Reynolds does not seem to understand the principles of basic science and engineering. After the Second World War, a manufacturing and industrial base with a skilled and trained workforce was needed so it could be converted to war or defence manufacturing when the need arose. This new manufacturing community would require electrical power to sustain it. Hydroelectricity and atomic energy could help provide these needs. Even though war was still raging, Prime Minister John Curtin looked ahead and set up a Department of Post-War Reconstruction. It was through this department that the Snowy Mountains Scheme would be established. Curtin did not live to see this. He died in 1945 but his successor, Ben Chifley, continued the vision. The author believes, an understanding of the science behind these developments and an appreciation of how how humans interact with each others when it comes to getting something they want is likely to give a more balanced view of the past

  9. The Issue of Research Graduate Employability in Australia: An Analysis of the Policy Framing (1999-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Tebeje; Cuthbert, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent knowledge economy discourse has direct implications for higher education policies and practices. It is expected that the higher education sector supports national economic competitiveness mainly through promoting scientific research, supporting technological transfer and innovation, and producing "knowledge workers" such as…

  10. Socialization of scientific and technological research: further comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Research systems are increasingly required to be more practically oriented and to address issues which appear more promising in economic and social results, with special reference to trans-disciplinary research fields, such as nanotechnology or ICTs; policy makers show a sharp tendency to establish research priorities and to drive research systems; universities and research institutions are asked to be more transparent and open to dialogue with social actors on contents, impacts, ethical implications and practical applications of scientific and technological research. These transformations affecting both the ways in which science and technology are produced and their relationships with society pose new challenges to European research. All the aspects of research activities are concerned, including the life of the research groups, the approaches to scientific evaluation, the development of European research policies and the interaction between researchers with their social environment. Continuing a reflection started in the last issue of JCOM, Luisa Prista, Evanthia Kalpazidou-Schmidt, Brigida Blasi, Sandra Romagnosi and Miguel Martínez López offered their contribution in identifying some of the key implications and risks which these changes are bringing about, mainly in the perspective of the construction of the European Research Area.

  11. Establishing and Governing e-Mental Health Care in Australia: A Systematic Review of Challenges and A Call For Policy-Focussed Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurk, Carla; Leung, Janni; Hall, Wayne; Head, Brian W; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-01-13

    Growing evidence attests to the efficacy of e-mental health services. There is less evidence on how to facilitate the safe, effective, and sustainable implementation of these services. We conducted a systematic review on e-mental health service use for depressive and anxiety disorders to inform policy development and identify policy-relevant gaps in the evidence base. Following the PRISMA protocol, we identified research (1) conducted in Australia, (2) on e-mental health services, (3) for depressive or anxiety disorders, and (4) on e-mental health usage, such as barriers and facilitators to use. Databases searched included Cochrane, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, ProQuest Social Science, and Google Scholar. Sources were assessed according to area and level of policy relevance. The search yielded 1081 studies; 30 studies were included for analysis. Most reported on self-selected samples and samples of online help-seekers. Studies indicate that e-mental health services are predominantly used by females, and those who are more educated and socioeconomically advantaged. Ethnicity was infrequently reported on. Studies examining consumer preferences found a preference for face-to-face therapy over e-therapies, but not an aversion to e-therapy. Content relevant to governance was predominantly related to the organizational dimensions of e-mental health services, followed by implications for community education. Financing and payment for e-services and governance of the information communication technology were least commonly discussed. Little research focuses explicitly on policy development and implementation planning; most research provides an e-services perspective. Research is needed to provide community and policy-maker perspectives. General population studies of prospective treatment seekers that include ethnicity and socioeconomic status and quantify relative preferences for all treatment modalities are necessary.

  12. Australia's radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In Australia, public exposure to ionizing radiation above background is considered to be negligible. Average occupational exposures are about 0.5 millisievert per year, although there are some specialized industries and professions where they are much higher. The National Health and Medical Research Council has therefore adopted a position similar to that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. For the moment, no revision of exposure limits is recommended, but users are remined of their responsibility to ensure that exposures are kept low, particularly in those workplaces where significant exposures take place

  13. The new energy technologies in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gleuher, M.; Farhi, R.

    2005-06-01

    The large dependence of Australia on the fossil fuels leads to an great emission of carbon dioxide. The Australia is thus the first greenhouse gases emitter per habitant, in the world. In spite of its sufficient fossil fuels reserves, the Australia increases its production of clean energies and the research programs in the domain of the new energies technology. After a presentation of the australia situation, the authors detail the government measures in favor of the new energy technologies and the situation of the hydroelectricity, the wind energy, the wave and tidal energy, the biomass, the biofuels, the solar energy, the ''clean'' coal, the hydrogen and the geothermal energy. (A.L.B.)

  14. Update on the Health Services Research Doctoral Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, James F; Menachemi, Nir; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2018-03-13

    To present revised core competencies for doctoral programs in health services research (HSR), modalities to deliver these competencies, and suggested methods for assessing mastery of these competencies. Core competencies were originally developed in 2005, updated (but unpublished) in 2008, modestly updated for a 2016 HSR workforce conference, and revised based on feedback from attendees. Additional feedback was obtained from doctoral program directors, employer/workforce experts and attendees of presentation on these competencies at the AcademyHealth's June 2017 Annual Research Meeting. The current version (V2.1) competencies include the ethical conduct of research, conceptual models, development of research questions, study designs, data measurement and collection methods, statistical methods for analyzing data, professional collaboration, and knowledge dissemination. These competencies represent a core that defines what HSR researchers should master in order to address the complexities of microsystem to macro-system research that HSR entails. There are opportunities to conduct formal evaluation of newer delivery modalities (e.g., flipped classrooms) and to integrate new Learning Health System Researcher Core Competencies, developed by AHRQ, into the HSR core competencies. Core competencies in HSR are a continually evolving work in progress because new research questions arise, new methods are developed, and the trans-disciplinary nature of the field leads to new multidisciplinary and team building needs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities (CanDAD)-developing an Advanced Cancer Data System for Aboriginal people in South Australia: a mixed methods research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerrell, Paul Henry; Roder, David; Cargo, Margaret; Reilly, Rachel; Banham, David; Micklem, Jasmine May; Morey, Kim; Stewart, Harold Bundamurra; Stajic, Janet; Norris, Michael; Brown, Alex

    2016-12-23

    In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People carry a greater burden of cancer-related mortality than non-Aboriginal Australians. The Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities Project aims to develop and test an integrated, comprehensive cancer monitoring and surveillance system capable of incorporating epidemiological and narrative data to address disparities and advocate for clinical system change. The Advanced Cancer Data System will integrate routinely collected unit record data from the South Australian Population Cancer Registry and a range of other data sources for a retrospective cohort of indigenous people with cancers diagnosed from 1990 to 2010. A randomly drawn non-Aboriginal cohort will be matched by primary cancer site, sex, age and year at diagnosis. Cross-tabulations and regression analyses will examine the extent to which demographic attributes, cancer stage and survival vary between the cohorts. Narratives from Aboriginal people with cancer, their families, carers and service providers will be collected and analysed using patient pathway mapping and thematic analysis. Statements from the narratives will structure both a concept mapping process of rating, sorting and prioritising issues, focusing on issues of importance and feasibility, and the development of a real-time Aboriginal Cancer Measure of Experience for ongoing linkage with epidemiological data in the Advanced Cancer Data System. Aboriginal Community engagement underpins this Project. The research has been approved by relevant local and national ethics committees. Findings will be disseminated in local and international peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. In addition, the research will provide data for knowledge translation activities across the partner organisations and feed directly into the Statewide Cancer Control Plan. It will provide a mechanism for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the recommendations in these documents. Published by the

  16. The socialisation of scientific and technological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, production of science and technology as well as science-society relationships started changing rapidly. Research is asked to be more effective, fast, accountable, trans-disciplinary, result-oriented, policy-driven and able to generate benefits for people and firms in the short and middle run. While a strong intensification of science-society relationships is occurring, an increasing number of actors and stakeholders are involved in research production. At the same time, pervasiveness of technology is rendering users an active part in technological development; economic and social interests on science and technology are growing on a global scale; new democratic and ethical issues emerge. Despite the European institutions’ efforts, all those trends and phenomena are occurring in an extremely fragmented way. In this scenario, a fairly balanced and consistent co-evolution between science and society can no longer be taken for granted. This is just the starting point of the following comment section that, through the Luciano d’Andrea, Sally Wyatt, Erik Aarden, Jos Lejten and Peter Sekloča’s writings, aims to analyse the different aspects and questions around the socialisation of science and technology’s matter.

  17. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  18. Australia needs nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A matter of increasing concern in Australian society is the absence of a Commonwealth Government policy on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The lack of University level teaching facilities in nuclear energy engineering is also perceived to be an issue of national importance which must be addressed. More and more Australians deeply regret the lack of informed realism and scientific integrity which goes into endless debates on the technical, environmental and societal aspects of nuclear energy. Within the Australian community such important issues as uranium mining in Kakadu National Park, research reactor operation at Lucas Heights, the establishment of an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia or the domestic use of nuclear electricity generation to minimise Australia's greenhouse emissions are still being debated at the intellectual level of radio talkback programs. Decision making in such areas deserves the disciplines of appropriate tertiary education. The Australian community has a right to know the relative risks and the environmental impacts of various fuel cycles as well as the technical limitations, true costs and energy audits of the 'alternative' energy technologies. Presently the Commonwealth of Australia is without a single School of Nuclear Engineering operating at a University level. Such a situation is believed to be unprecedented amongst the developed countries of the world. It is viewed with a measure of incredulity by the academic, diplomatic and political communities of the 'developing' countries of East Asia and the Pacific Basin. Many of these have a massive investment in the growth of peaceful nuclear energy and nuclear science and technology within their borders. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Energy News

  19. Practice nursing in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley

    2007-08-01

    Rural Australia faces unique issues in workforce management and health care delivery. This paper provides an integrated review of the existing literature describing the work of practice nurses in rural Australia and the perceptions of consumers. Distinct differences are evident in the role of the practice nurse between rural and metropolitan practices. A key difference is that the rural practice nurse is known within the community and plays an important role in care coordination. Findings from two studies of consumer perceptions of the role of PN in rural areas suggest that the more remotely located the consumer, the greater is their perception that the nurse works under the direct supervision of the doctor. Currently, remotely located residents do not support an expanded autonomous role for the nurse. Greater research is required to develop the role of the practice nurse in rural Australia.

  20. The Price We Pay: Young People, Poverty & Long-Term Unemployment in Australia. A Report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Mary L.; Webb, Marcia; Forster, Jacinda

    A study was conducted of the social and economic costs of persistently high youth unemployment in Australia. The impact of youth unemployment and education, training, and employment policies that might help the situation were also studied. Data were obtained from 13 focus groups, involving 102 young people who were not employed or were from…

  1. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergas H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Henry Ergas1,2, Francesco Paolucci31University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 2Deloitte Australia, Brindabella Business Park, Canberra Airport, ACT, Australia; 3Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health, The Australian National University, Acton, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop.Keywords: aged care, long-term care, sustainability, residential care, community care

  2. Pain management practices in paediatric emergency departments in Australia and New Zealand: a clinical and organizational audit by National Health and Medical Research Council's National Institute of Clinical Studies and Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, David W; Babl, Franz E; Gilhotra, Yuri; Huckson, Sue

    2009-06-01

    To audit pain management practices and organization in paediatric ED across Australia and New Zealand. Retrospective audit of pain management practices in Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative ED in 20 cases each of migraine, abdominal pain and femoral shaft fracture. Review of organizational status of pain management at Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative sites. Of 14 ED, 10 participated in the clinical audit. A total of 196 migraine, 197 abdominal pain and 177 femur fracture cases were reviewed. Less than half had degree of pain measured or had pain score documented on triage. Migraine received analgesia in 62% of cases (opioids in 11%). Abdominal pain received analgesia in 62% of cases (opioids in 14%). Fractured femurs received analgesia in 78% of cases (opioids 49%, femoral nerve blocks 40%). Median minutes to enteral medication were 100, 85 and 75, and for parenteral medication (mainly opiates) 103, 137 and 26, for migraine, abdominal pain and femur fracture, respectively. Thirteen hospitals participated in the organizational audit. Of all ED, 92% had pain management policies or guidelines, 92% taught pain management topics in education programmes and 62% used mandatory pain competencies. Only 15% had quality improvement programmes for pain reduction. We found a notable lack of pain assessment documentation and delays to analgesia. There is a need to improve pain assessment and management, although a majority of paediatric ED surveyed had important organizational and educational structures in place. Issues to explore include use of opioids in migraine and the underuse of femoral nerve blocks.

  3. Environmental research concept for the period 2000 - 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document published by the Swiss Agency for the Environment, Forests and Landscape (SAEFL) describes the concept for environmental research in Switzerland during the period 2000 - 2003. In a first part, the general state of environmental research is examined and the various public and private institutions involved are introduced. In the second part, the priorities for the period 2000 - 2003 are stated. The main points of focus, including the protection of the diversity of biological and landscape resources and their sustainable use, the protection of mankind and the environment from harmful substances and organisms, human behaviour, economical incentives and teaching systems, are discussed. Also, the targets of international agreements on environmental protection and the instruments to be used to implement them are examined. Finally, the report discusses the implementation of the declared research priorities and introduces the commission that is to watch over these activities. Figures are quoted on the funding necessary for the work and the importance of interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary co-operation is stressed

  4. Energy in Australia 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas-Cubria, C.; Schultz, A.; Petchey, R.; Beaini, F.; New, R.

    2011-04-01

    Securing access to affordable, reliable and clean energy is one of the great challenges facing governments around the world. The Australian Government is committed to ensuring the security of Australia's domestic energy systems as a fundamental part of Australia's social and economic prosperity. Energy in Australia 2011 is a key reference for anyone with an interest in Australian energy issues. It provides a detailed overview of energy in Australia from production to consumption, and serves as a useful resource to inform industry, government and the community.

  5. Handbook on Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    A study unit on Australia for secondary students is divided into eight sections. Section 1 introduces students to the states, territories, and capitals of the country. Section two, land and people, discusses the size, location, geology, climate, flora and fauna, and population of Australia. Sections 3 and 4 outline Australian history and include…

  6. OPERATION GASLIGHT IN AUSTRALIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    seeking explanations of these phenomena. The reasons for wishing to make measurements in Australia are: (a) the trajectory of Black Knight provides a...other suitable firings in Australia provide better opportunity for optical observation than do firings on American ranges. (Author)

  7. Neutron scattering in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains

  8. Neutron scattering science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Neutron scattering science in Australia is making an impact on a number of fields in the scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a wide range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans are in progress to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor to offer the most advanced neutron scattering facilities. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. (author)

  9. Neutron scattering science in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Robert [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    1999-10-01

    Neutron scattering science in Australia is making an impact on a number of fields in the scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a wide range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans are in progress to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor to offer the most advanced neutron scattering facilities. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. (author)

  10. Cogeneration in Australia. Situation and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Research Paper is mainly concerned with the status and prospects for cogeneration in Australia. An introductory chapter reviews the fundamentals of cogeneration, covering both technical and institutional aspects. A range of technologies are employed in cogeneration: these technologies and their efficiency and environmental impact effects are discussed in Chapter 2. The economics of cogeneration are a major factor in the profitability of current and potential plants. Potential factors affecting cogeneration economics are discussed .The status of cogeneration in Australia is reviewed for each State and Territory, and includes a number of case studies of existing plants. Government (federal, state, territory) policies that have a significant impact on the attractiveness of cogeneration are reviewed. Finally, the future prospects for cogeneration in Australia, drawing on the preceding chapters and a review of estimated potentials for cogeneration in Australia are presented

  11. Access to essential medicines in Pakistan: policy and health systems research concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehla Zaidi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Inadequate access to essential medicines is a common issue within developing countries. Policy response is constrained, amongst other factors, by a dearth of in-depth country level evidence. We share here i gaps related to access to essential medicine in Pakistan; and ii prioritization of emerging policy and research concerns. METHODS: An exploratory research was carried out using a health systems perspective and applying the WHO Framework for Equitable Access to Essential Medicine. Methods involved key informant interviews with policy makers, providers, industry, NGOs, experts and development partners, review of published and grey literature, and consultative prioritization in stakeholder's Roundtable. FINDINGS: A synthesis of evidence found major gaps in essential medicine access in Pakistan driven by weaknesses in the health care system as well as weak pharmaceutical regulation. 7 major policy concerns and 11 emerging research concerns were identified through consultative Roundtable. These related to weaknesses in medicine registration and quality assurance systems, unclear and counterproductive pricing policies, irrational prescribing and sub-optimal drug availability. Available research, both locally and globally, fails to target most of the identified policy concerns, tending to concentrate on irrational prescriptions. It overlooks trans-disciplinary areas of policy effectiveness surveillance, consumer behavior, operational pilots and pricing interventions review. CONCLUSION: Experience from Pakistan shows that policy concerns related to essential medicine access need integrated responses across various components of the health systems, are poorly addressed by existing evidence, and require an expanded health systems research agenda.

  12. Attitudes towards mathematics as a subject and mathematics learning and instruction in a trans-disciplinary engineering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Misfeldt, Morten; Timcenko, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This article explores student attitudes and preferences in learning and teaching of mathematics in engineering studies that transcend the division between technical, scientific and artistic disciplines. For observing such attitudes, we have developed a model that relates the attitude towards...... mathematics as a subject with the attitude towards mathematics learning and instruction. Data comes from a study at the Media technology educational program of Aalborg university. The study used attitude and preference questionnaires, and observations and interviews with students. The results show that media...... technology students are not confident in mathematics and consider mathematics to be a difficult subject. Nevertheless, they recognize the importance of mathematics both in their studies and in general. Moreover, students favour learning on their own or together with their peers over learning supported...

  13. Environmental radioactivity in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, John [Environmental Science Division, ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    2002-06-01

    Environmental research mainly carried out at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) related to nuclear activities in Australia such as uranium mining, transfer factor studies related to U- and Th-series radionuclides, dose assessment modelling, radiation monitoring, and nuclear waste repository, is outlined. Many aspects of radioecology, marine and freshwater geochemistry and radiochemical dating techniques; bioaccumulation including archival monitoring and kinetics, ground water studies, atmospheric issues including climate change and geomorphology are being studied with the help of a high neutron flux reactor, a cyclotron and a tandem accelerator as well as modern analytical equipment. Only a very small number of examples of radioactivity applications are presented: Microbiotic crusts covering up to 50% of the soil surface at Maralinga nuclear test site where more than 80% of the residual Am-241 was found to retain within the top 5 mm after 30 years. SIMS analysis of crocodile bones indicating that the only metal affected by U mining in Kakadu region was lead (Pb). In mineral sands such as zircon, U(VI) is more stable than U(IV) as evidenced by ion beam and SEM imaging and XANES analysis. Use of radioisotopes in atmospheric and climate studies, terrestrial studies particularly in dating techniques, and aquatic-continental and aquatic-ocean waters, and in biological studies such as biokinetics of copper metabolism in rainbow fishes living downstream of a mine are presented. (S. Ohno)

  14. Radiation processing in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    2003-01-01

    Australia is a true pioneer in commercial irradiation processing as the first commercial irradiation processing plant in the world was commissioned in Melbourne in 1959. This talk will briefly discuss the establishment of the process in Australia. Steritech's three irradiation plants will be discussed in detail, especially the different engineering aspects and the effect that those differences have on irradiation performance and flexibility of operation.Steritech's new state of the art 'pallet irradiator' will be featured. The transportation and loading of Cobalt 60 into the plants will be demonstrated, and public opposition, and security issues since September 11th 2001, will be highlighted. The wide variety of products that are routinely processed at Steritechs plants will be revealed including some 'world firsts' for Australia. Finally, the talk will address the future of irradiation processing in Australia including the potential, or otherwise, of the irradiation of food items

  15. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  16. Uranium production in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    The history of uranium mining and milling in Australia is briefly outlined, particular attention being given to the development of Australia's only two operating mills, Nabarlek and Ranger, and its only operating mine, Ranger. The latter project is used to illustrate the prerequisites for development of the industry and the complex roles of the various parties involved in establishing a new mine: equity holders, customers, financiers, the securities industry, trade unions, and the public. The moves currently being taken to resolve the future of the industry in Australia, particularly the examination of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle being conducted by the Australian Science and Technology Council, preclude any firm conclusions being drawn, but the various options open to the government are reviewed and the record of Australian governments and unions and the attitude of the Australian public are described. (Author) (3 tabs., fig.)

  17. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  18. Environmental research concept for the period 2000 - 2003; Forschungskonzept Umwelt fuer die Jahre 2000 bis 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This document published by the Swiss Agency for the Environment, Forests and Landscape (SAEFL) describes the concept for environmental research in Switzerland during the period 2000 - 2003. In a first part, the general state of environmental research is examined and the various public and private institutions involved are introduced. In the second part, the priorities for the period 2000 - 2003 are stated. The main points of focus, including the protection of the diversity of biological and landscape resources and their sustainable use, the protection of mankind and the environment from harmful substances and organisms, human behaviour, economical incentives and teaching systems, are discussed. Also, the targets of international agreements on environmental protection and the instruments to be used to implement them are examined. Finally, the report discusses the implementation of the declared research priorities and introduces the commission that is to watch over these activities. Figures are quoted on the funding necessary for the work and the importance of interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary co-operation is stressed.

  19. Australia's uranium export policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    In developing the policy framework for the export of uranium, successive governments have been keenly aware that, in Australia, as in most countries, there has been considerable community interest and controversy surrounding the subject of uranium. When the Australian Labor Government was elected in 1983, it commissioned the Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) to report on Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. In particular, the report examined: (i) Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements, giving particular attention to the effectiveness of the bilateral and multilateral agreements and to the scope for strengthening these agreements, (ii) the opportunities for Australia through the conditions of its involvement in the nuclear fuel cycle to further advance the cause of nuclear non-proliferation having regard to the policies and practices of recipient countries, (iii) the adequacy of existing technology for the handling and disposal of waste products by consuming countries, and the ways in which Australia could further contribute to the development of safe disposal methods. (orig./UA) [de

  20. Water Recycling in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Young

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and, more importantly, experiences the most variable rainfall of all the continents on our planet. The vast majority of Australians live in large cities on the coast. Because wastewater treatments plants were all located near the coast, it was thought that large scale recycling would be problematic given the cost of infrastructure and pumping required to establish recycled water schemes. This all changed when Australia experienced a decade of record low rainfall and water utilities were given aggressive targets to increase the volume of water recycled. This resulted in recycled water being accepted as a legitimate source of water for non-drinking purposes in a diversified portfolio of water sources to mitigate climate risk. To ensure community support for recycled water, Australia lead the world in developing national guidelines for the various uses of recycled water to ensure the protection of public health and the environment. Australia now provides a great case study of the developments in maximizing water recycling opportunities from policy, regulatory and technological perspectives. This paper explores the evolution in thinking and how approaches to wastewater reuse has changed over the past 40 years from an effluent disposal issue to one of recognizing wastewater as a legitimate and valuable resource. Despite recycled water being a popular choice and being broadly embraced, the concept of indirect potable reuse schemes have lacked community and political support across Australia to date.

  1. Geoscience Education Research, Development, and Practice at Arizona State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.; Reynolds, S. J.; Johnson, J.; Baker, D. R.; Luft, J.; Middleton, J.

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience education research and professional development thrive in an authentically trans-disciplinary environment at Arizona State University (ASU), benefiting from a long history of mutual professional respect and collaboration among STEM disciplinary researchers and STEM education researchers--many of whom hold national and international stature. Earth science education majors (pre-service teachers), geoscience-education graduate students, and practicing STEM teachers richly benefit from this interaction, which includes team teaching of methods and research courses, joint mentoring of graduate students, and collaboration on professional development projects and externally funded research. The geologically, culturally, and historically rich Southwest offers a superb setting for studies of formal and informal teaching and learning, and ASU graduates the most STEM teachers of any university in the region. Research on geoscience teaching and learning at ASU is primarily conducted by three geoscience faculty in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and three science-education faculty in the Mary Lou Fulton Institute and Graduate School of Education. Additional collaborators are based in the College of Teacher Education and Leadership, other STEM schools and departments, and the Center for Research on Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (CRESMET). Funding sources include NSF, NASA, US Dept Ed, Arizona Board of Regents, and corporations such as Resolution Copper. Current areas of active research at ASU include: Visualization in geoscience learning; Place attachment and sense of place in geoscience learning; Affective domain in geoscience learning; Culturally based differences in geoscience concepts; Use of annotated concept sketches in learning, teaching, and assessment; Student interactions with textbooks in introductory courses; Strategic recruitment and retention of secondary-school Earth science teachers; Research-based professional

  2. Survey report for fiscal 1998 on research and development and its staff training. Towards cooperation among Japan, Australia and developing nations in Asia; Kenkyu kaihatsu to sono jinzai ikusei 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Nippon, Australia oyobi Asia no hatten tojokoku no kyodo wo mezashite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper makes an analysis on the characteristics of R and D concerning Australia, one of the core nations in the cooperation, on the basis of the idea that 'establishment of new comparative superiority through cooperation' can be realized by joint work among Japan, Australia and Asian nations. In Australia, it was found that R and D was often promoted through a new idea obtained by recruiting heterogeneous persons and communicating mutually internally. It was also found that in Australia an affinity exists to such persons of different nature. Accordingly, Australia was presumably quite suitable for the place to bring up the persons of developing nations. On the basis of these analytical results, proposal was made to promote three programs; namely, preparation of a data base for R and D organizations and the staff, commencement of a partnership program, and opening of a needs searching conference. (NEDO)

  3. Solar battery power supply: A reliable power supply system for nursing clinic in Australia`s remote areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahedi, A. [Monash Univ., Caulfield (Australia). Div. of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Design and performance investigation of a new solar-battery system to power health clinics in Australia`s remote and isolated areas is a research project being conducted in the Department. The objective of this paper is to present the solar-battery system and to discuss the design factors of the system.

  4. Psychiatry in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    resurgence of cultural pride in Tasmanian Aboriginal descen- dants). The 20th century. By the start of the 20th ... administered by the Royal Australian and New Zealand. College of Psychiatrists. There are over 2 000 ... psychiatry in Australia followed suit, picking up new ideas and trends. After World War I this included fever ...

  5. Mathematical Sciences in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jan; Muchatuta, Michelle; Wood, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates enrolment trends in mathematical sciences in Australian universities. Data has been difficult to extract and the coding for mathematical disciplines has made investigation challenging. We show that the number of mathematics major undergraduates in Australia is steadily declining though the number studying…

  6. Australia: a continuing genocide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Damien

    2010-01-01

    Debates about genocide in Australia have for the most part focussed on past frontier killings and child removal practices. This article, however, focuses on contemporary culturally destructive policies, and the colonial structures that produce them, through the analytical lens of the concept of genocide. The article begins with a discussion of the meaning of cultural genocide, locating the idea firmly in Lemkin's work before moving on to engage with the debates around Lemkin's distinction between genocide and cultural 'diffusion.' In contrast to those scholars who prefer the word 'ethnocide,' the underlying conceptual contention is that the term 'cultural genocide' simply describes a key method of genocide and should be viewed, without the need for qualification, as genocide. While direct physical killing and genocidal child removal practices may have ceased in Australia, some indigenous activists persuasively contend that genocide is a continuing process in an Australia that has failed to decolonise. Concurring with these views the article argues that the contemporary expression of continuing genocidal relations in Australia can be seen principally, and perversely, in the colonial state's official reconciliation process, native title land rights regime and the recent interventionist 'solutions' to indigenous 'problems' in the Northern Territory.

  7. Economy Profile of Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Aust...

  8. Creating White Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  9. Dream house in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Asgaard

    2004-01-01

    This first book in the Utzon Library, which deals with Utzon's own houses, contains a number of drawings that have not previously been published. This is especially true of the four projects for his house in Bayview, Sydney, which unfortunately never got past the drawing stage, as Utzon had left ...... Australia when the authorities finally got around to approving the project....

  10. Lexicography in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: This paper describes the current setting for lexirography in Australia by reviewing the place of English since the first British settlement began in 1788. The emergence of Australian. English as the national language is traced, and its relations with the Australian Aboriginal lan- guages touched on. The greatest ...

  11. Banknote Quality in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Arianna Cowling; Monica Howlett

    2012-01-01

    The Reserve Bank aims to keep the quality of banknotes in circulation high to ensure that they meet the needs of the public and to make it more difficult for counterfeits to be passed or remain in circulation. This article discusses the quality of banknotes in Australia and Reserve Bank initiatives that have improved the quality of banknotes in recent years.

  12. Addressing migration-related social and health inequalities in Australia: call for research funding priorities to recognise the needs of migrant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, Andre; Polonsky, Michael; Mellor, David; Cyril, Sheila

    2016-02-01

    Migrants constitute 26% of the total Australian population and, although disproportionately affected by chronic diseases, they are under-represented in health research. The aim of the present study was to describe trends in Australian Research Council (ARC)- and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)-funded initiatives from 2002 to 2011 with a key focus on migration-related research funding. Data on all NHMRC- and ARC-funded initiatives between 2002 and 2011 were collected from the research funding statistics and national competitive grants program data systems, respectively. The research funding expenditures within these two schemes were categorised into two major groups: (1) people focused (migrant-related and mainstream-related); and (2) basic science focused. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise the data and report the trends in NHMRC and ARC funding over the 10-year period. Over 10 years, the ARC funded 15 354 initiatives worth A$5.5 billion, with 897 (5.8%) people-focused projects funded, worth A$254.4 million. Migrant-related research constituted 7.8% of all people-focused research. The NHMRC funded 12399 initiatives worth A$5.6 billion, with 447 (3.6%) people-focused projects funded, worth A$207.2 million. Migrant-related research accounted for 6.2% of all people-focused initiatives. Although migrant groups are disproportionately affected by social and health inequalities, the findings of the present study show that migrant-related research is inadequately funded compared with mainstream-related research. Unless equitable research funding is achieved, it will be impossible to build a strong evidence base for planning effective measures to reduce these inequalities among migrants.

  13. The future of astronomy in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Elaine M.

    2017-09-01

    Australian astronomy has a bright future, thanks largely to recent government investments in major new telescopes, instruments and research centres. There are some short-term challenges as Australia's focus continues to shift from the current (mainly) national facilities for radio and optical astronomy to new multinational and global facilities.

  14. Recommendations for an energy policy for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Over the next few years, Australia must modify its dependence on natural oil and place greater reliance on other fossil fuels and renewable energy sources. The recommendations contained in this report are the result of two years of study, and the long term energy prospects for Australia and energy resource policies for coal, liquid fuels, nuclear energy, solar energy and natural gas are considered in detail. Energy conservation policies and the identification of areas where energy research, development and demonstration need to be undertaken are also covered. (J.R.)

  15. Reengineering in Australia: factors affecting success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Murphy

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Business process reengineering (BPR is being used in many organisations worldwide to realign operations. Most of the research undertaken has been focused on North American or European practices. The study reported here replicates a US reengineering study in an Australian context by surveying large public and private sector Australian organisations. The study makes three main contributions by: (1 presenting a picture of BPR practices in Australia, (2 clarifying factors critical to the success of reengineering projects in Australia, and (3 providing a comparison of factors leading to success in Australian BPR projects with those found in the US.

  16. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  17. Climate Change. Solutions for Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, T.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Karoly, D.; Lowe, I.; McMichael, T.; Mitchell, C.; Pearman, G.; Scaife, P.; Reynolds, A. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    The Australian Climate Group was convened in late 2003 by WWF Australia and the Insurance Australia Group (IAG) in response to the increasing need for action on climate change in Australia. This group proposes a set of solutions to lower the risk that climate change will reach a dangerous level.

  18. Tick-borne infectious diseases in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Stephen R; Stenos, John

    2017-04-17

    Tick bites in Australia can lead to a variety of illnesses in patients. These include infection, allergies, paralysis, autoimmune disease, post-infection fatigue and Australian multisystem disorder. Rickettsial (Rickettsia spp.) infections (Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever and Australian spotted fever) and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) are the only systemic bacterial infections that are known to be transmitted by tick bites in Australia. Three species of local ticks transmit bacterial infection following a tick bite: the paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is endemic on the east coast of Australia and causes Queensland tick typhus due to R. australis and Q fever due to C. burnetii; the ornate kangaroo tick (Amblyomma triguttatum) occurs throughout much of northern, central and western Australia and causes Q fever; and the southern reptile tick (Bothriocroton hydrosauri) is found mainly in south-eastern Australia and causes Flinders Island spotted fever due to R. honei. Much about Australian ticks and the medical outcomes following tick bites remains unknown. Further research is required to increase understanding of these areas.

  19. No Frills: Refereed Papers. National Vocational Education and Training Research Conference (24th, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Jul 6-8, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Laura, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The 24th National Vocational Education and Training Research Conference, colloquially known as "No Frills", was held in July 2015.The conference highlighted research across three major themes:(1) youth: engaging, inspiring and supporting students to realise their potential; (2) pathways: transitioning through education and training into…

  20. Knowledge Types Used by Researchers and Wool Producers in Australia under a Workplace Learning Typology: Implications for Innovation in the Australian Sheep Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lyndal-Joy; Reeve, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the learning aspects of adopting integrated parasite management practices for sheep (IPM-s) applying a workplace learning framework. An analysis of four primary data sources was conducted; a postal survey of Australian wool producers, a Delphi process with IPM-s researchers, focus groups and interviews with wool…

  1. Fundamental elements in examining a child’s right to education: A study of home education research and regulation in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Glenda JACKSON; Sonia ALLAN

    2010-01-01

    Home education provides valuable educational and developmental opportunities for children. An examination of Australia’s research indicates many best educational practices, including more informed mediation, contextualised learning, and opportunities to exercise autonomy. Key features include learning embedded in communities and program modification in response to students’ needs. Current state and territory legal requirements are examined within the context of this research...

  2. Solid Organ Transplantation in Older Adults: Current Status and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecassis, M.; Bridges, N.D.; Clancy, C.J.; Dew, M.A.; Eldadah, B.; Englesbe, M.J.; Flessner, M.F.; Frank, J.C.; Friedewald, J.; Gill, J; Gries, C.; Halter, J.B.; Hartmann, E.L.; Hazzard, W.R.; Horne, F.M.; Hosenpud, J.; Jacobson, P.; Kasiske, B.L.; Lake, J.; Loomba, R.; Malani, P.N.; Moore, T.M.; Murray, A.; Nguyen, M-H; Powe, N.R.; Reese, P.P.; Reynolds, H.; Samaniego, M.D.; Schmader, K.E.; Segev, D.L.; Shah, A.S.; Singer, L.G.; Sosa, J.A.; Stewart, Z.A.; Tan, J.C.; Williams, W.W.; Zaas, D.W.; High, K.P.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of patients older than 65 years are referred for and have access to organ transplantation, and an increasing number of older adults are donating organs. Although short-term outcomes are similar in older versus younger transplant recipients, older donor or recipient age is associated with inferior long-term outcomes. However, age is often a proxy for other factors that might predict poor outcomes more strongly and better identify patients at risk for adverse events. Approaches to transplantation in older adults vary across programs, but despite recent gains in access and the increased use of marginal organs, older patients remain less likely than other groups to receive a transplant, and those who do are highly selected. Moreover, few studies have addressed geriatric issues in transplant patient selection or management, or the implications on health span and disability when patients age to late life with a transplanted organ. This paper summarizes a recent trans-disciplinary workshop held by ASP, in collaboration with NHLBI, NIA, NIAID, NIDDK, and AGS, to address issues related to kidney, liver, lung, or heart transplantation in older adults and to propose a research agenda in these areas. PMID:22958872

  3. Royal Commissions into Policing: Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Beckley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Royal Commissions and Inquiries have investigated every police force in Australia in relation to their integrity, accountability and effectiveness—a factor of major importance to every citizen in maintaining their freedom, safety and security. The crucial question this paper poses is whether such tribunals are effective or otherwise in terms of the benefits and outcomes accrued from their findings. The paper is in the form of a critical discussion which investigates and analyses the Inquiries using the method of desk research of official documents over the last 50 years from which it identifies common findings and recommendations contained in the official discourse. The research concludes that lessons have not been learned in relation to policing operations, accountability and integrity in a number of cases and highlights a variety of adverse issues that persist into current policing practice.

  4. White House Office of the Vice President Announces New Memorandum of Understanding in Clinical Proteogenomics Between the United States and Australia | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White House Office of the Vice President has announced the signing of three Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) that will make available an unprecedented international dataset to advance cancer research and care.

  5. Power auxiliaries and research reactors. Section 3 of Symposium on the peaceful uses of atomic energy in Australia, 1958, held in Sydney, in June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-10-15

    The problems of disposing of the large amounts of highly-radioactive waste resulting from a large-scale nuclear power program are reviewed. The Canadian research reactor NRX is discussed. The DIDO reactor is briefly described and operating experience for the first year at high flux is summarized. The core of the High Flux Australian Research Reactor (HIFAR) is described, and some reactivity balance data are given (T.R.H.)

  6. Addressing gender blindness in research on international education: an analysis of the education experience and career outcomes of Malaysian graduates from Monash University Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Boey, Janice Yean Mei

    2017-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, when Australian universities witnessed unprecedented growth in the levels of international student enrolments, there has been extensive scholarship and research examining the international student experience in its various dimensions. The more recent research by educators and policy makers reflects a growing recognition of the diversity in the international student population. The cultural, social, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds of international students have been r...

  7. Internet advertising of artificial tanning in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Markovic, Milica

    2006-08-01

    Artificial tanning, defined as deliberate exposure to ultraviolet rays produced by artificial tanning devices, is a new and emerging public health issue in Australia and globally. Epidemiological research suggests that artificial tanning may contribute to the incidence of melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as other health problems. Given that Australia has a high incidence of skin cancer, we have undertaken a study to explore how artificial tanning has been promoted to its users. The aim was to analyze the completeness and accuracy of information about artificial tanning. A content analysis of web sites of tanning salons and distributors of tanning equipment in Australia was conducted. A total of 22 web sites were analyzed. None of the solarium operators or distributors of equipment provided full information about the risks of artificial tanning. Fifty-nine percent of web advertisements had no information and 41% provided only partial information regarding the risks of artificial tanning. Pictures with the image of bronze-tanned bodies, predominantly women, were used by all web advertisers. In light of the success of sun-safety campaigns in Australia, the findings of future epidemiological research on the prevalence of artificial tanning and sociological and anthropological research on why people utilize artificial tanning should be a basis for developing effective targeted health promotion on the elimination of artificial tanning in the country.

  8. Rural male suicide in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    The rate of suicide amongst Australia's rural men is significantly higher than rural women, urban men or urban women. There are many explanations for this phenomenon including higher levels of social isolation, lower socio-economic circumstances and ready access to firearms. Another factor is the challenge of climate transformation for farmers. In recent times rural areas of Australia have been subject to intense climate change events including a significant drought that has lingered on for over a decade. Climate variability together with lower socio-economic conditions and reduced farm production has combined to produce insidious impacts on the health of rural men. This paper draws on research conducted over several years with rural men working on farms to argue that attention to the health and well-being of rural men requires an understanding not only of these factors but also of the cultural context, inequitable gender relations and a dominant form of masculine hegemony that lauds stoicism in the face of adversity. A failure to address these factors will limit the success of health and welfare programs for rural men. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neonatal research in India: current status, challenges, and the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shuchita; Chaurasia, Suman; Sankar, M Jeeva; Deorari, Ashok K; Paul, Vinod K; Agarwal, Ramesh

    2014-11-01

    The present article systematically reviews the current status of neonatal research in India by examining the research articles published by Indian authors in the last 10 years. It also enlists the major challenges and proposes a few potential solutions to improve the status of neonatal research in the country. The systematic review of 574 eligible articles indicates that majority of the studies were observational in nature, facility-based, and primarily investigator-driven with no external funding, had small sample size, and were published in journals with low impact factor. Only a few select government and non-government academic institutions contributed to most studies. The major challenges include shortage of faculty, no provision for dedicated research time, inadequate knowledge/skills in research methods, lack of funding opportunities, limited access to literature, non-existence of research administrative cell, inappropriately low perks to research staff, and poor support for data management and statistical analysis. The recently revised guidelines on clinical trials involving drugs have further increased the researcher's dilemma. The potential solutions are to increase the faculty strength in medical colleges, allow dedicated research time to them, appoint dedicated research cadre with emoluments at par with clinical faculty, initiate formal training in research methods, create nationwide free portal for access to literature, facilitate development of good protocols through technical guidance at all stages, make the process of funding quick and transparent, and to promote collaborative trans-disciplinary research. Experts from different domains should come together and formulate evidence based research priorities. Regulatory mechanisms should be kept proportionate to plausible risks of research, and detailed ethical guidelines for research in children should be formulated. And last but not least, harnessing postgraduate thesis potential to answer simple and

  10. Use of the My Health Record by people with communication disability in Australia: A review to inform the design and direction of future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Georgiou, Andrew; Carter, Rob; Hill, Sophie; Higgins, Isabel; van Vliet, Paulette; Balandin, Susan

    2016-12-01

    People with communication disability often struggle to convey their health information to multiple service providers and are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes related to the poor exchange of health information. The purpose of this article was to (a) review the literature informing future research on the Australian personally controlled electronic health record, 'My Health Record' (MyHR), specifically to include people with communication disability and their family members or service providers, and (b) to propose a range of suitable methodologies that might be applied in research to inform training, policy and practice in relation to supporting people with communication disability and their representatives to engage in using MyHR. The authors reviewed the literature and, with a cross-disciplinary perspective, considered ways to apply sociotechnical, health informatics, and inclusive methodologies to research on MyHR use by adults with communication disability. This article outlines a range of research methods suitable for investigating the use of MyHR by people who have communication disability associated with a range of acquired or lifelong health conditions, and their family members, and direct support workers. In planning the allocation of funds towards the health and well-being of adults with disabilities, both disability and health service providers must consider the supports needed for people with communication disability to use MyHR. There is an urgent need to focus research efforts on MyHR in populations with communication disability, who struggle to communicate their health information across multiple health and disability service providers. The design of studies and priorities for future research should be set in consultation with people with communication disability and their representatives. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Mineral industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parbo, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.) [de

  12. Pleistocene Paleoart of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pleistocene rock art is abundant in Australia, but has so far received only limited attention. Instead there has been a trend, begun over a century ago, to search for presumed depictions of extinct megafauna and the tracks of such species. All these notions have been discredited, however, and the current evidence suggests that figurative depiction was introduced only during the Holocene, never reaching Tasmania. Nevertheless, some Australian rock art has been attributed to the Pleistocene by direct dating methods, and its nature implies that a significant portion of the surviving corpus of rock art may also be of such age. In particular much of Australian cave art is of the Ice Age, or appears to be so, and any heavily weathered or patinated petroglyphs on particularly hard rocks are good candidates for Pleistocene antiquity. On the other hand, there is very limited evidence of mobiliary paleoart of such age in Australia.

  13. WAVFH delegates' reports: Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation measuring and control before Chernobyl: Continuous measurements of fallout in different parts of Australia, including the food producing areas, have been made since the mid 1950s. Levels have decreased rapidly since the cessation of atmospheric nuclear tests in the Southern Hemisphere in 1974 and in the Northern Hemisphere in 1980. Measurements of concentrations of radionuclides arising from fallout were made for the major groups of foods affected by the radioactive contaminants, starting in the 1950s and continuing until concentrations were so low that further effort in measurement was not warranted, i.e., less than 0.1 Bq/kg or 0.1 Bq/l. Changes in the concentrations of radionuclides in foods follow the same trends as the fallout levels. Based on the low levels of fallout measured in Australia since the 1950s, and taking into account the extremely low levels during the past decade, the concentrations of radionuclides arising from fallout in foods grown and processed in Australia are extremely small. Results from the fall-out from Chernobyl. Since the Chernobyl accident, measurements of the concentrations of 137 Cs in a variety of foodstuffs grown in Australia have been made, mainly for export purposes. A summary of the results of these measurements is given in Table 111 of Attachment 2. No 134 Cs has been detected, nor is it likely to be. By taking into account these measurements, the earlier measurements of foodstuffs, predictive modelling values and the very low levels of fall-out in deposit and in air, it is concluded that the concentrations of 137 Cs in all foodstuffs grown in Australia are extremely small. Accordingly, their consumption would result in no significant risk to the health of a population. With world atmospheric conditions being as they are, it will probably be 12 to 18 months before any fallout reaches Australia. Even if some fall-out does occur, it will be minimal and should not significantly increase our very low natural levels

  14. Australia Online; Borderless University

    OpenAIRE

    ERDINC, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Around the world distance education is playing an important roll in the education sector. Many countries are in the process of developing and improving their distance education projects. One of the projects being online education has improved information delivery and development op International education. Distance education has been available in Australia for many years. More than 30 higher education institutions within the country now use the program. The purpose of the development of di...

  15. Australia's energy profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, A.

    1999-01-01

    Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE)'s biennial fuel and electricity survey provides a comprehensive database with which is possible to examine recent trends and developments in Australia's energy market. Some key development are outlined in this article. While energy consumption in Australia has been increasing steadily since 1973-74, substantial changes have occurred 'behind the scenes' in terms of the states and sectors in which energy is consumed and the overall fuel mix. Historically, the south-eastern states of New South Wales and Victoria have accounted for the largest shares of total energy consumption In recent years, however, the dominance of New South Wales and Victoria (and particularly New South Wales) has come under pressure from the states of Queensland. Western Australia, and to a lesser extent, the Northern Territory. Each of these states has experienced rapid growth in energy consumption, due mainly to a number of strongly growing energy intensive industries, particularly in the mining and minerals processing sectors. High economic and population growth over this period were also important factors. An increase in the share of natural gas- and a corresponding decline in the share of crude oil - is the most evident change to have occurred in the fuel mix since 1973-1974. However, since 1993, the trend has changed, the share of coal (and particularly brown coal) increased strongly, making it the primary fuel source for thermal electricity generation. This recent shift has been driven by developments in Queensland and Victoria

  16. Applying for, reviewing and funding public health research in Germany and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardus, Ansgar; Becher, Heiko; Groenewegen, Peter; Mansmann, Ulrich; Meyer, Thorsten; Pfaff, Holger; Puhan, Milo; Razum, Oliver; Rehfuess, Eva; Sauerborn, Rainer; Strech, Daniel; Wissing, Frank; Zeeb, Hajo; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2016-06-13

    Public health research is complex, involves various disciplines, epistemological perspectives and methods, and is rarely conducted in a controlled setting. Often, the added value of a research project lies in its inter- or trans-disciplinary interaction, reflecting the complexity of the research questions at hand. This creates specific challenges when writing and reviewing public health research grant applications. Therefore, the German Research Foundation (DFG), the largest independent research funding organization in Germany, organized a round table to discuss the process of writing, reviewing and funding public health research. The aim was to analyse the challenges of writing, reviewing and granting scientific public health projects and to improve the situation by offering guidance to applicants, reviewers and funding organizations. The DFG round table discussion brought together national and international public health researchers and representatives of funding organizations. Based on their presentations and discussions, a core group of the participants (the authors) wrote a first draft on the challenges of writing and reviewing public health research proposals and on possible solutions. Comments were discussed in the group of authors until consensus was reached. Public health research demands an epistemological openness and the integration of a broad range of specific skills and expertise. Applicants need to explicitly refer to theories as well as to methodological and ethical standards and elaborate on why certain combinations of theories and methods are required. Simultaneously, they must acknowledge and meet the practical and ethical challenges of conducting research in complex real life settings. Reviewers need to make the rationale for their judgments transparent, refer to the corresponding standards and be explicit about any limitations in their expertise towards the review boards. Grant review boards, funding organizations and research ethics committees

  17. Centre for Education, Training, & Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE) of Malaysia: Educating the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi; Hilme, Khairur Rahim Ahmad

    2007-10-01

    Centre for Education, Training, and Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE), was established in the year 2000, in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). CETREE is a not-for-profit organization that was part of the Malaysian Government's continuous effort in promoting sustainable development. The centre's main task is to tackle issues and problems that are slowing the potential growth of RE & EE utilizations in Malaysia. CETREE and the Government of Malaysia, with funding and supports from Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA) and USM, has been working together closely in applying trans-disciplinary educational methods and approaches for the teaching of RE & EE that are compatible with Malaysian. Through association with various entities such as Energy Centre of Malaysia (PTM), Energy Commission of Malaysia (ST), Malaysia Electricity Supply Industry Trust Account (MESITA); CETREE was able to successfully promote sustainable development through education and training. Significant accomplishments made by CETREE include introducing RE and EE as part of Malaysian secondary schools and universities education; conducting energy related courses for professionals; and generating awareness via campaign in the mass media and CETREE's mobile-exhibition-unit road-tour.

  18. Australia's polio risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolee; Paterson, Beverley J; Durrheim, David N

    2014-06-30

    Australia, like all polio-free countries and regions, remains at risk of a wild poliovirus importation until polio is eradicated globally. The most probable route of importation will be through a traveller arriving in Australia either by air or sea from a polio-endemic or re-infected country. While the overall risk of an imported wild poliovirus infection leading to transmission within Australia is assessed as being low, some areas of the country have been identified as at increased risk. Local areas with relatively high arrivals from polio endemic countries, areas of low vaccination coverage and the potential for transmission to occur when these 2 factors are combined, were identified by this review as Australia's main polio risk. The risk of an importation event leading to locally acquired cases is mitigated by generally high polio vaccination coverage in Australia. This high coverage extends to residents of the Torres Strait Islands who are in close proximity to Papua New Guinea, a country identified as at high risk of poliovirus transmission should an importation occur. In 2012, all states and territories had vaccination coverage of greater than 90% at 1 year of age and all exceeded 93% at 2 years of age. Population immunity to wild poliovirus type 1, which remains the major cause of paralysis globally, has been estimated at 82%. This is sufficient to prevent outbreaks of this type in Australia. Of the 211 eligible non-polio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases classified between 2008 and 2011, 91% (193) were vaccinated against polio at least once. High quality surveillance for AFP, which is supplemented by sentinel enterovirus and environmental surveillance activities, gives confidence that an imported case would be detected and appropriate public health action would ensue. This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for

  19. Australia's approach to monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Sneddon Little

    2002-01-01

    According to Australia's Reserve Bank Act, the central bank's broad policy objectives include maintaining the stability of the currency, full employment, and the economic prosperity and welfare of the people of Australia. In 1993 the Reserve Bank of Australia adopted a specific, and thus transparent, inflation target as its operating objective; it aims to keep overall inflation between 2 percent and 3 percent on average over the business cycle.

  20. Australia and Gondwanaland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, C.

    1959-01-01

    Along the western margin of the Australian continent there exist four major sedimentary basins, filled with predominantly marine rocks from Cambrian to Tertiary in age, and up to 40,000 feet thick. Seaward these basins continue into depressions recognizable in the continental shelf and even the continental slope. Their very presence, the nature of their sediments and the composition and relationships of their fossil faunas indicate the existence of an open ocean to the west of Australia since early Paleozoic time. Composition of the Australian fossil land vertebrate faunas suggests isolation of the Australian continent since at least Permian time. ?? 1959 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  1. Japan-Australia co-operative program on research and development of technology for the management of high level radioactive wastes. Final report 1985 to 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, K.; Vance, E.; Lumpkin, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Mitamura, H.; Banba, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The overall aim of the Co-operative Program has been to promote the exchange of information on technology for the management of High-Level Wastes (HLW) and to encourage research and development relevant to such technology. During the 13 years that the Program has been carried out, HLW management strategies have matured and developed internationally, and Japan has commenced construction of a domestic reprocessing and vitrification facility for HLW. The HLW management strategy preferred is a national decision. Many countries are using vitrification, direct disposal of spent fuel or a combination of both to handle their existing wastes whereas others have deferred the decision. The work carried out in the Co-operative Program provides strong scientific evidence that the durability of ceramic waste forms is not significantly affected by radiation damage and that high loadings of actinide elements can be incorporated into specially designed ceramic waste forms. Moreover, natural minerals have been shown to remain as closed systems for U and Th for up to 2.5 b y. All of these results give confidence in the ability of second generation waste forms, such as Synroc, to handle future waste arisings that may not be suitable for vitrification 87 refs., 15 tabs., 22 figs.

  2. Tay-Sachs disease: current perspectives from Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew RM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Raelia M Lew,1,7 Leslie Burnett,2,3,4 Anné L Proos,2 Martin B Delatycki5,6 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, QEII Research Institute for Mothers and Infants, The University of Sydney, Australia; 2NSW Health Pathology North, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Australia; 3SEALS, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Australia; 4Sydney Medical School-Northern, Royal North Shore Hospital E25, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 5Department of Clinical Genetics, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Australia; 6Bruce Lefroy Centre for Genetic Health Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, Australia; 7Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Abstract: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD is a fatal, recessively inherited neurodegenerative condition of infancy and early childhood. Although rare in most other populations, the carrier frequency is one in 25 in Ashkenazi Jews. Australian high-school-based TSD preconception genetic screening programs aim to screen, educate, and optimize reproductive choice for participants. These programs have demonstrated high uptake, low psychological morbidity, and have been shown to result in fewer than expected Jewish TSD-affected births over 18 years of operation. The majority of Jewish individuals of reproductive age outside of the high school screening program setting in Australia have not accessed screening. Recent recommendations advocate supplementing the community high school screening programs with general practitioner- and obstetrician-led genetic screening of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals for TSD and other severe recessive diseases for which this group is at risk. Massively parallel DNA sequencing is expected to become the testing modality of choice over the coming years. Keywords: Tay-Sachs disease, genetic screening, Australia

  3. Politics, policies and processes: a multidisciplinary and multimethods research programme on policies on the social determinants of health inequity in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Fran; Friel, Sharon

    2017-12-21

    The development and implementation of multisectoral policy to improve health and reduce health inequities has been slow and uneven. Evidence is largely focused on the facts of health inequities rather than understanding the political and policy processes. This 5-year funded programme of research investigates how these processes could function more effectively to improve equitable population health. The programme of work is organised in four work packages using four themes (macroeconomics and infrastructure, land use and urban environments, health systems and racism) related to the structural drivers shaping the distribution of power, money and resources and daily living conditions. Policy case studies will use publicly available documents (policy documents, published evaluations, media coverage) and interviews with informants (policy-makers, former politicians, civil society, private sector) (~25 per case). NVIVO software will be used to analyse the documents to see how 'social and health equity' is included and conceptualised. The interview data will include qualitative descriptive and theory-driven critical discourse analysis. Our quantitative methodological work assessing the impact of public policy on health equity is experimental that is in its infancy but promises to provide the type of evidence demanded by policy-makers. Our programme is recognising the inherently political nature of the uptake, formulation and implementation of policy. The early stages of our work indicate its feasibility. Our work is aided by a Critical Policy Reference Group. Multiple ethics approvals have been obtained with the foundation approval from the Social and Behavioural Ethics Committee, Flinders University (Project No: 6786).The theoretical, methodological and policy engagement processes established will provide improved evidence for policy-makers who wish to reduce health inequities and inform a new generation of policy savvy knowledge on social determinants. © Article author

  4. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indigenous species of actinorhizal plants of Casuarinaceae, Elaeagnaceae and Rhamnaceae are found in specific regions of Australia. Most of these plants belong to Casuarinaceae, the dominant actinorhizal family in Australia. Many of them have significant environmental and economical value. The other two families with ...

  5. Building nuclear skills in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for nuclear skills in Australia has traditionally been met by recruitment but as the nuclear industry grows worldwide, such skills are in demand. This paper discusses he likely numbers of skilled people needed for a nuclear industry in Australia and what initiatives have been, or could be in, taken to address the needs

  6. Lexicography in Australia | Delbridge | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergence of Australian English as the national language is traced, and its relations with the Australian Aboriginal languages touched on. The greatest change in the language setting came with Australia's immigration policy in its post-World War II form. This resulted in the government's eventual recognition of Australia ...

  7. The practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development and practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia. Clinical Neuropsychology has shown rapid growth in Australia over the past three decades. Comprehensive and specialized training programs are producing high quality graduates who are employed in a broad range of settings or private practice. Australia now has a substantial number of clinical neuropsychologists with specialist training. Whilst the majority of Australian clinical neuropsychologists still undertake assessment predominantly, there are growing opportunities for clinical neuropsychologists in rehabilitation and in a broad range of research contexts. Cultural issues relating to the assessment of Indigenous Australians and immigrants from many countries present significant challenges. Some major contributions have been made in the realms of test development and validation across various age groups. Australian clinical neuropsychologists are also contributing significantly to research in the fields of traumatic brain injury, aging and dementias, epilepsy, memory assessment, rehabilitation, substance abuse, and other psychiatric disorders. Expansion of roles of clinical neuropsychologists, in domains such as rehabilitation and research is seen as essential to underpin continuing growth of employment opportunities for the profession.

  8. Astronomy in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, F.; Couch, W.

    2017-12-01

    Australians have watched the sky for tens of thousands of years. The nineteenth century saw the foundation of government observatories in capital cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. While early twentieth-century astronomy focused largely on solar physics, the advent of radio astronomy at the end of the Second World War enabled Australia to take a leading role in the new science, with particular emphasis on low-frequency studies. Today, the radio quietness of its outback interior provides an excellent location for the Australian core of the Square Kilometre Array. Australian optical astronomy has flourished since the 1960s, with the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope becoming the principal national facility in 1974. Access to ESO’s facilities at the La Silla Paranal Observatory is warmly welcomed by all Australian astronomers.

  9. South Australia, uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The Report sets out the salient data relating to the establishment of a uranium processing centre at Redcliff in South Australia. It is conceived as a major development project for the Commonwealth, the South Australian Government and Australian Industry comprising the refining and enrichment of uranium produced from Australian mines. Using the data currently available in respect of markets, demand, technology and possible financial return from overseas sales, the project could be initiated immediately with hexafluoride production, followed rapidly in stages by enrichment production using the centrifuge process. A conceptual development plan is presented, involving a growth pattern that would be closely synchronised with the mining and production of yellowcake. The proposed development is presented in the form of an eight-and-half-year programme. Costs in this Report are based on 1975 values, unless otherwise stated. (Author)

  10. Warragamba. Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri, B.

    1959-02-01

    Full Text Available El pantano de Warragamba, cuyo objeto es el de producir energía hidroeléctrica en su primera fase de explotación y solamente agua potable cuando las necesidades de ésta así lo requieran, se haya situado en las proximidades de Sydney (Australia. Su extensa cuenca está constituida por una serie de ríos en cuyas cabeceras se han construido diques de retención, que no solamente almacenan grandes cantidades de agua, sino que sirven parcialmente para la regularización de caudales, función de gran interés en esta zona donde las avenidas, seguidas de extensas inundaciones, se hacen sentir con relativa frecuencia.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and dental students from the late 1940s to 2014. A recent article by Ajjawi et al.[1] identified the marginalisation of dental students in a combined medical curriculum at a university in. Australia. Similarly, a US study showed that dental students felt like. 'second-class citizens' in their joint curriculum and that its relevance.

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-26

    Mar 26, 2018 ... be difficult to achieve in any other way for the analysis and understanding of their experience with the ..... Mitchell B, Armour C, Lee M, et al. Diabetes medication assistance service: The pharmacist's role in supporting patient self-management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in Australia. Patient Educ Couns 2011 ...

  13. Doing Research on Student Voice in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, John

    2012-01-01

    The Australian school context has been something of a failed test case of trying to organise schooling around the tenets of the market as a regulating mechanism. The result has been an intensification of social stratification as the already "disadvantaged" miss out yet again in education. This short paper argues that what is needed to…

  14. Australia's TERN: Advancing Ecosystem Data Management in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinn, S. R.; Christensen, R.; Guru, S.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, there is a consistent movement towards more open, collaborative and transparent science, where the publication and citation of data is considered standard practice. Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) is a national research infrastructure investment designed to support the ecosystem science community through all stages of the data lifecycle. TERN has developed and implemented a comprehensive network of ';hard' and ';soft' infrastructure that enables Australia's ecosystem scientists to collect, publish, store, share, discover and re-use data in ways not previously possible. The aim of this poster is to demonstrate how TERN has successfully delivered infrastructure that is enabling a significant cultural and practical shift in Australia's ecosystem science community towards consistent approaches for data collection, meta-data, data licensing, and data publishing. TERN enables multiple disciplines, within the ecosystem sciences to more effectively and efficiently collect, store and publish their data. A critical part of TERN's approach has been to build on existing data collection activities, networks and skilled people to enable further coordination and collaboration to build each data collection facility and coordinate data publishing. Data collection in TERN is through discipline based facilities, covering long term collection of: (1) systematic plot based measurements of vegetation structure, composition and faunal biodiversity; (2) instrumented towers making systematic measurements of solar, water and gas fluxes; and (3) satellite and airborne maps of biophysical properties of vegetation, soils and the atmosphere. Several other facilities collect and integrate environmental data to produce national products for fauna and vegetation surveys, soils and coastal data, as well as integrated or synthesised products for modelling applications. Data management, publishing and sharing in TERN are implemented through a tailored data

  15. Asian student migration to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, J; Hawthorne, L

    1996-01-01

    "This paper presents an overview of Asian student migration to Australia, together with an analysis of political and educational aspects of the overseas student programme. It focuses on some significant consequences of this flow for Australia. The characteristics of key student groups are contrasted to provide some perspective of the diversity of historical and cultural backgrounds, with the source countries of Malaysia, Indonesia and PRC [China] selected as case studies. Since the issue of PRC students in Australia has attracted considerable public attention and policy consideration, particular focus is placed on their experience." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) excerpt

  16. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  17. Australia's unresolved nuclear problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines three acts of monumental incompetence which have all but destroyed Australia's once great potential to play a leading role in nuclear technology in South East Asia. Political chicanery and monumental technological and economic foresight, professional weakness and vacillation in the engineering community and the vicious pseudo scientific propaganda of most branches of the media, the teaching profession and sadly, even the politicisation of our churches, has all but destroyed a potential Australian ''sunrise industry''. Over the next forty years the population of planet Earth will approximately double. Unless Australians realise that their children and grand-children, and future generations of our neighbouring third world countries will require nuclear technology for an equitable and acceptable shared life-style, they will continue to allow taxpayers' money to be wasted on costly, technically unacceptable and environmentally undesirable attempts to develop ''alternative'' or ''renewable'' energy sources. These are neither alternative nor renewable but politically trendy. The tragedy of such projects is that their limited applicability and suitability for small scale energy production by wealthy users in limited geographical locations will only increase the need for base load energy supplies of the conventional type. Unless this is nuclear, planet Earth faces environmental despolation of monumental proportions. (J.P.N.)

  18. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  19. Sustainability: Australia at the crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodirsky, Benjamin L.; Popp, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    A modelling study argues that comprehensive policy change could limit Australia's environmental pollution while maintaining a materials-intensive path to economic growth. But other paths are worth considering. See Article p.49

  20. Tax Policy Formulation in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Rob Heferen; Nicole Mitchell; Ian Amalo

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the tax policy making process in Australia. It outlines the role of key agencies in this process and highlights some of the key developments in governance and consultation arrangements that have occurred over the past decade.

  1. Research in Science Education. Volume 21. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (22nd, Surfers Paradise, Queensland, Australia, July 11-14, 1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgasz, Helen, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This annual publication contains 43 research papers on a variety of issues related to science education. Topics include the following: mature-age students; teacher professional development; spreadsheets and science instruction; the Learning in Science Project and putting it into practice; science discipline knowledge in primary teacher education;…

  2. An integrated genome research network for studying the genetics of alcohol addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanagel, Rainer; Bartsch, Dusan; Brors, Bendikt; Dahmen, Norbert; Deussing, Jan; Eils, Roland; Ende, Gabriele; Gallinat, Jürgen; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter; Heinz, Andreas; Kiefer, Falk; Jäger, Willi; Mann, Karl; Matthäus, Franziska; Nöthen, Markus; Rietschel, Marcella; Sartorius, Alexander; Schütz, Günther; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Sprengel, Rolf; Walter, Henrik; Wichmann, Erich; Wienker, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    Alcohol drinking is highly prevalent in many cultures and contributes to the global burden of disease. In fact, it was shown that alcohol constitutes 3.2% of all worldwide deaths in the year 2006 and is linked to more than 60 diseases, including cancers, cardiovascular diseases, liver cirrhosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, injuries and foetal alcohol syndrome. Alcoholism, which has been proven to have a high genetic load, is one potentially fatal consequence of chronic heavy alcohol consumption, and may be regarded as one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric diseases afflicting our society today. The aim of the integrated genome research network 'Genetics of Alcohol Addiction'--which is a German inter-/trans-disciplinary life science consortium consisting of molecular biologists, behavioural pharmacologists, system biologists with mathematicians, human geneticists and clinicians--is to better understand the genetics of alcohol addiction by identifying and validating candidate genes and molecular networks involved in the aetiology of this pathology. For comparison, addictive behaviour to other drugs of abuse (e.g. cocaine) is studied as well. Here, we present an overview of our research consortium, the current state of the art on genetic research in the alcohol field, and list finally several of our recently published research highlights. As a result of our scientific efforts, better insights into the molecular and physiological processes underlying addictive behaviour will be obtained, new targets and target networks in the addicted brain will be defined, and subsequently, novel and individualized treatment strategies for our patients will be delivered. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Health workforce policy and industrial relations in Australia: ministerial insights into challenges and opportunities for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrò, Silvana

    2014-09-01

    Since the Productivity Commission released its research report Australia's Health Workforce in 2005, there has been a significant increase in government funding and policy capacity aimed at health workforce reform and innovation in Australia. This research paper presents the results of semistructured interviews with three key stakeholders in health policy formation in Australia: (1) The Honourable Lindsay Tanner, former Federal Minister for Finance and therefore 100% shareholder of Medibank Private on behalf of the Commonwealth; (2) The Honourable Daniel Andrews, former Victorian Minister for Health and current Victorian Opposition Leader; and (3) The Honourable Jim McGinty, former Minister for Health and Attorney General of Western Australia and current inaugural Chair of Health Workforce Australia. The paper examines key issues they identified in relation to health workforce policy in Australia, particularly where it intersects with industrial relations, and conducts a comparative analysis between their responses and theoretical methodologies of policy formation as a means of informing a reform process.

  4. Australia: uranium and nuclear policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crick, R.

    1991-01-01

    Australia's uranium and nuclear policies have gone through several stages of development since the commercialisation of the industry. The early stages laid the foundations and built the superstructure of Australia's uranium development, export and safeguards policies. The uranium industry and other governments have understood the nature and operation of these policies. An important aim of this paper will be to explain the design and current construction stage of policies. This needs to be done against the background of broader industry developments. Within the past twelve months (1989/90) there have been dramatic changes, both within Australia and internationally, which have affected the uranium market. Internationally, we have seen the spot price indicators for uranium fall to an all time low. Within Australia, we have seen the removal of the fixed floor price requirement for the sale of Australia uranium. This was replaced by a requirement that contract prices reflect the market. This change in policy allowed the outcome of several major long-term contract renegotiations to be approved. It also allowed Australian producers to secure several new long-term contracts, despite the overall depressed state of the market. The 'three mines' policy remains in place although only two, Ranger in Northern Territory and Olympic Dare in Southern Australia are currently operating. The biggest unknown is the extent of future uranium demand. (author)

  5. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... and low levels of irrigation, soil degradation, soil erosion, inadequate agricultural research and extension, and constraints in market development. (Alemayehu ..... farm's primary asset. Printed in Australia by BPA Print. Group. Pp. 191. Hazelton Pam and Brian Murphy. (2007). Interpreting Soil. Test Results.

  6. The Security Environment in Southeast Asia and Australia, 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    CRM 95-212/March 1996 The Security Environment in Southeast Asia and Australia , 1995-2010 Lyall Breckon 19960408 091 Cleared for Public Release...Asia’s successful mainstream .• 10 Vietnam 20 Other Southeast Asian countries 27 Australia 29 New Zealand 34 Trends in Southeast Asia with...Asia-Pacific Region (APR) between now and 2010. This research memorandum focuses on the most probable trends relating to Southeast Asia and Australia

  7. Media and Australia's replacement reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keenan, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    In September 1997, the Commonwealth Government of Australia announced a proposal to build a replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights in Sydney. Extensive public consultation, parliamentary debate and independent reports were prepared to ensure that the new facility would meet strict international requirements, national safety and environmental standards, and performance specifications servicing the needs of Australia - for decades to come. On 6 June 2000, Argentine company INVAP SE was announced as the preferred tenderer. In July 2000 contracts were signed between INVAP and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation for the construction the replacement reactor, due to be completed in 2005. In order to retain a strong local presence, INVAP undertook a joint venture with two of Australia's foremost heavy construction businesses. Briefly the new research reactor will be a replacement for the ageing Australian Reactor (HIFAR). Nuclear science and technology, in Australia, is no stranger to media controversy and misinformation. Understandably the announcement of a preferred tenderer followed by the signing of contracts, attracted significant national and international media attention. However in the minds of the media, the issue is far from resolved and is now a constant 'news story' in the Australian media. Baseless media stories have made claims that the project will cost double the original estimates; question the credibility of the contractors; and raise issues of international security. The project is currently linked with Australia's requirements for long term nuclear waste management and there has been an attempt to bring national Indigenous People's issues into play. Some of these issues have been profiled in the press internationally. So, just to set the record straight and give you an appropriate impression of what's 'really happening' I would like to highlight a few issues, how ANSTO dealt with these, and what was finally reported

  8. Factors influencing midwifery migration from the United Kingdom to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, M; Ahern, K

    2011-12-01

    Within the current literature on the globalization of the healthcare workforce, it is difficult to separate the migration experience of nurses from that of midwives. As more countries are moving to offer direct entry educational programmes and provide separate registration for midwives, information specific to that professional group will be required to guide workforce planners and inform employment practice. This qualitative study tracks the migration experience of midwives moving between the UK and Australia. A purposeful sample of 18 midwives who had migrated from the UK to one state in Australia was interviewed within a descriptive phenomenological framework. Data were analysed using thematic coding within Nvivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). The strongest motivator for migration was to improve the family's lifestyle. Push factors included disillusionment with working conditions, standard of living in the UK and national politics. The majority of midwives had organized their own entry visa and employment. Most midwives had occupied senior positions in the UK but accepted employment initially within entry-level positions in Australia. Despite both countries offering similar standards of living, the majority of midwives expected to achieve an improvement in family lifestyle in Australia. Midwives indicated they were prepared to lose professional status and seniority of position to gain a better overall lifestyle for their family. To examine the long-term sustainability of international recruitment processes, further research is indicated to examine the ongoing experience and integration of migrant midwives into the workforce in Australia. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Commercialisation of science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.

    2003-01-01

    Major changes are occurring across the science and technology (S and T) landscape in this country. Messages from Federal and State Governments in recent times could not have been clearer - in return for 'taxpayer $ into ideas' (in other words, funding for front end basic research) there is an expectation that 'ideas will be translated into $' (in other words, commercialisation will be pursued aggressively). As we in Australian S and T are constantly reminded, with part justification only, Australian researchers (especially in the life sciences) are good at generating a wealth of ideas but not much wealth from ideas. It is claimed that despite scientific excellence, many in the sector are risk averse, immobile, prone to academic snobbery, better employees than employers, not entrepreneurial etc, etc. Regardless of the veracity of any of this, the 1990s has seen a change with many more scientists interested in pursuing the progression of ideas to research to invention to intellectual property to competitive advantage to commercialisation to wealth, jobs and social development to profits and tax dollars to increased support for innovation, R and D, basic research etc. In regard to biomedical research, it has been said that '... medical biotechnology was the first business with enough glamour to persuade eminent scientists that the entrepreneurial spirit and academic respectability are not mutually exclusive. Maybe it's OK to be a science-literate businessman and to make money from science. Successful biotech companies emerge when good science meets excellent management and that combination, in an enabling environment, attracts informed investors and partners. Biotech companies may focus on a single product, a portfolio, or a technology platform and the majority are destined not to become, and have no intention of becoming, an integrated biopharmaceutical or agrochemical company. Their capacity to raise funds is influenced by 'signals' that the technology, the people

  10. Arctic Risk Management (ARMNet) Network: Linking Risk Management Practitioners and Researchers Across the Arctic Regions of Canada and Alaska To Improve Risk, Emergency and Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Through Comparative Analysis and Applied Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Risk Management Network (ARMNet) was conceived as a trans-disciplinary hub to encourage and facilitate greater cooperation, communication and exchange among American and Canadian academics and practitioners actively engaged in the research, management and mitigation of risks, emergencies and disasters in the Arctic regions. Its aim is to assist regional decision-makers through the sharing of applied research and best practices and to support greater inter-operability and bilateral collaboration through improved networking, joint exercises, workshops, teleconferences, radio programs, and virtual communications (eg. webinars). Most importantly, ARMNet is a clearinghouse for all information related to the management of the frequent hazards of Arctic climate and geography in North America, including new and emerging challenges arising from climate change, increased maritime polar traffic and expanding economic development in the region. ARMNet is an outcome of the Arctic Observing Network (AON) for Long Term Observations, Governance, and Management Discussions, www.arcus.org/search-program. The AON goals continue with CRIOS (www.ariesnonprofit.com/ARIESprojects.php) and coastal erosion research (www.ariesnonprofit.com/webinarCoastalErosion.php) led by the North Slope Borough Risk Management Office with assistance from ARIES (Applied Research in Environmental Sciences Nonprofit, Inc.). The constituency for ARMNet will include all northern academics and researchers, Arctic-based corporations, First Responders (FRs), Emergency Management Offices (EMOs) and Risk Management Offices (RMOs), military, Coast Guard, northern police forces, Search and Rescue (SAR) associations, boroughs, territories and communities throughout the Arctic. This presentation will be of interest to all those engaged in Arctic affairs, describe the genesis of ARMNet and present the results of stakeholder meetings and webinars designed to guide the next stages of the Project.

  11. Spent fuels transportation coming from Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Maritime transportation of spent fuels from Australia to France fits into the contract between COGEMA and ANSTO, signed in 1999. This document proposes nine information cards in this domain: HIFAR a key tool of the nuclear, scientific and technological australian program; a presentation of the ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization; the HIFAR spent fuel management problem; the COGEMA expertise in favor of the research reactor spent fuel; the spent fuel reprocessing at La Hague; the transports management; the transport safety (2 cards); the regulatory framework of the transports. (A.L.B.)

  12. First ceratosaurian dinosaur from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Carrano, Matthew T.; Holland, Timothy; Wagstaff, Barbara E.; Pickering, David; Rich, Thomas H.; Vickers-Rich, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    The basal theropod dinosaur clade Ceratosauria, and its subclade Abelisauroidea, is characteristic of late Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate faunas in western Gondwana (South America, Africa, Madagascar, and India) and Europe. Yet unambiguous records of ceratosaurs have hitherto been absent from Australia, where the theropod assemblage appears to include several typically Laurasian clades. Here, we report the first evidence of ceratosaurs (and potentially abelisauroids) from eastern Gondwana--a diagnostic astragalocalcaneum from the Aptian (121-125 Ma) of Victoria, Australia. Ceratosauria thus occurred in both western and eastern Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous. This fossil adds to the poorly known dinosaur fauna of Australia, a major clade of basal theropods, emphasising that its mid-Cretaceous theropod diversity was surprisingly cosmopolitan despite relative geographic isolation, including clades that have been thought to be typical of both Gondwana and Laurasia--Ceratosauria, Spinosauridae, Carcharodontosauria, Tyrannosauroidea, and Deinonychosauria. Such a contemporaneous association of theropod clades is unknown from other Gondwanan continents and questions the views that the late Mesozoic dinosaur fauna of Australia was dominated by Gondwanan or Laurasian elements, extreme isolation, relictualism, and/or novelty as a `centre of origin'. The cosmopolitan theropod fauna of Australia probably reflects the global distribution of these clades early in their history, prior to significant continental breakup.

  13. The nuclear industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The history of the development of the nuclear industry in Australia is essentially the history of uranium mining. Australia is a significant exporter of uranium concentrate yellowcake, but no other nuclear power or fuel cycle activity exists on a commercial scale. Industrial radiation processing and the production of radioisotopes and radio-pharmaceuticals are the only other endeavors. The uranium mining in early years and the second discovery period, the policy formulation in 1970s and the recent policy development are described. Australia's low cost reserve has risen to 474,000 t U, and in 1984, three mines produced around 4,400 t U as yellowcake. Once the Jervis Bay nuclear power plant with 500 MWe capacity was planned, but the project was postponed indefinitely. The Uranium Enrichment Group of Australia planned to build an enrichment plant as a joint venture with URENCO Ltd., but also this plan was interrupted. The lack of expansion into nuclear power and fuel cycle activities has been due to favorable fossil fuel resources and their distribution, population density and distribution, social factors and government policy in Australia. (Kako, I.)

  14. ASA24-Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Australian project, led by Associate Professor Sarah McNaughton of The Institute for Nutrition and Physical Activity (IPAN) at Deakin University, brought together 5 national institutions with major research programs in nutrition.

  15. Australia's uranium policy: an examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, K.A.W.; Derborough, M.A.; Diesendorf, M.; Inall, E.K.; Peaslee, D.C.; Taylor, S.R.

    1974-12-01

    The mining and export of Australian Uranium poses problems for the safety of the world that any responsible government is bound to consider. The following note lists the major problems, attempts to assess their importance, and to suggest what lines may be relevant to Australia for their solution. These problems were examined because of the concern about the appropriateness of attempting to fulfill projected world energy needs by any means; and their fulfillment, by using nuclear fuels carries special problems of biological, social and political hazards. Any development of Australia's uranium resources should be considered in this light. (author)

  16. Remembering the Battle for Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rechniewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available For the last two years, Australia has commemorated, on the first Wednesday in September, the ‘Battle for Australia Day’, to mark the role of Australian forces fighting the Japanese in the Pacific in WWII. The aim of this article is to identify the agents involved in the campaign for the gazetting of this day and the justifications advanced; to trace the conflicting narratives and political and historical controversies surrounding the notion of a ‘Battle for Australia’; and to outline the shifts in domestic and international politics and generational change that provide the context for the inauguration of this day.

  17. L’italiano in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Campolo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} L’articolo ricostruisce sinteticamente la storia della immigrazione italiana in Australia dai primi anni del 1800 ad oggi e descrive i tratti fondamentali che caratterizzano la presenza dell’italiano nel paese. Nonostante le prime difficoltà, rappresentate soprattutto dalla diffidenza e dall’ostilità con cui erano stati accolti i primi migranti, nel corso degli anni la comunità italiana è riuscita ad integrarsi  e a fondersi con quella australiana non solo nell’ambito del lavoro e dell’economia, ma anche sul piano sociale, linguistico e culturale, dando vita ad una vera e propria comunità italo-australiana con una sua specifica identità. Nel processo d’integrazione, pur rimanendo fedeli alle proprie origini linguistiche e culturali, gli immigrati italiani, soprattutto di seconda e terza generazione, si sono avvicinati all’inglese nella varietà linguistica chiamata italo-australiano, di cui si descrivono alcuni aspetti fondamentali messi in luce dalla ricerca linguistica.  Normal 0 14 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} The article briefly reconstructs the history of Italian emigration to Australia from the beginning of 1800 up to the present and describes the basic features that have marked the presence of Italian

  18. HIV criminalisation and sex work in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffreys, Elena; Matthews, Kane; Thomas, Alina

    2010-05-01

    In 2008, Scarlet Alliance, the Australian Sex Workers Association, carried out a needs assessment among sex workers living with HIV in Australia. The research showed that HIV positive sex workers experience discrimination from within the community, are criminalised for sex work and subject to disclosure laws in some states and territories, and face stigma perpetrated by the media. Supported by legislation, they have an almost insurmountable lack of access to policy development due to disclosure and confidentiality issues, and have expressed ongoing frustration at the lack of leadership on the intersecting issues of HIV and sex work. A high profile prosecution of a sex worker living with HIV coincided with the duration of the needs assessment project. The research gave a voice to sex workers living with HIV and highlighted the levels of institutionalised marginalisation and stigmatisation they experience. Criminalisation of sex work, of people living with HIV, and of sex workers living with HIV is at the core of this discrimination and must be challenged. Scarlet Alliance advocates for the decriminalisation of sex work across all jurisdictions in Australia. This will deliver rights to sex workers living with HIV and create a more equitable and productive environment for HIV prevention and public health generally. Copyright 2010 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... Australia, increasing the soil fertility and the area of wild life habitat (including endangered species). Whether these improved clones ..... plants in the Australian scenario and possess excellent attri- butes typical of the ..... rainforests: Past, present, and future (eds) E Bermingham,. CW Dick and C Moritz ...

  20. Contextualising Multilingualism in Australia Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper will begin by looking at globalisation, education and transnationalism in the context of Australia's post-war immigration history leading to a brief examination of the international literature surrounding second and third generation immigration. A brief review of international educational trends in English language teaching in recent…

  1. Improving Reading in Australia's Outback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharratt, Lyn; Hayes, Peter; Coutts, James

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, six teachers established a program of literacy intervention and professional learning in remote northwestern Australia based on the Reading Recovery principles. This group of teachers was determined to learn what had to happen in order for them to make a difference with students and then to make it happen. Their work led to getting…

  2. Early College Entrance in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup; Young, Marie; Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2015-01-01

    Early college entry is an educational intervention that is being increasingly used in Australia. Following a review of the current Australian literature on early college entry, an overview is provided of the characteristics of, and the procedures associated with, one formal Australian early college entry program (the Early Admission for…

  3. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... the pioneer succession species in areas such as land dis- turbed due to mining and earthquakes. ... Australia is one of the oldest land masses of the earth. As the smallest continent, it still has large .... some of them are rare and come under endangered category. Although species of this genus are found in ...

  4. Afrikaans Language Maintenance in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoss, Aniko; Starks, Donna; van Rensburg, Henriette Janse

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the political climate in the home country have resulted in the emigration of South Africans to English speaking countries such as Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Despite the scale of movement of the South African population, language maintenance in these diasporic contexts has received little consideration. This paper…

  5. Governing International Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravinder

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses the international education sector in Australia as a case study to argue against understanding globalization as an exogenous force. It introduces the notion of globalization as a governmentality and discusses alternative interpretations which take into account notions of subjectivity, positionality and space/time. The paper…

  6. Constructing an Academic Identity in Australia: An Autoethnographic Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the process of academic identity construction experienced by a Chinese PhD student in an Australian university from 2010 to 2014. The researcher draws on his diaries written in Australia and uses some stories of the relationships with his supervisors and other scholars to unfold the process of his academic identity construction…

  7. Transition to School Practices: Comparisons from Iceland and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Perry, Bob; Dockett, Sue

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the result of collaboration among early childhood education researchers from different cultures on opposite sides of the globe. The project sought to identify what practitioners in both preschool and primary school settings in Iceland and Australia regarded as successful transition to school practices. Independently developed surveys…

  8. Adult Retraining and Reskilling in Australia and South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Katrina; Lee, Young-Hyun; Phan, Oanh; Ra, Young-Sun

    A study explored the mechanisms used by adults in Australia and Korea to keep their skills current or to enhance their range of skills. Data were gathered through recent research reports and unpublished unemployment and training data. The study identified areas of the vocational education and training systems in the two countries that are…

  9. Australia's new nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.

    2007-01-01

    On 19 and 20 April 2007, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) celebrated the recent commissioning of its new, world-class, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater) research reactor at the Lucas Heights. On the 19th, scientists, business leaders and academics were introduced to the reactor and its technical capacity for the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals, its material science applications, its environmental services and its neutron scattering facilities for business applications. The formal OPAL opening function took place that evening and, on the 20th, Prime Minister John Howard visited ANSTO to be briefed about OPAL and to be shown the work being carried out at Lucas Heights

  10. Coral reproduction in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Conrad W.; Babcock, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Larval production and recruitment underpin the maintenance of coral populations, but these early life history stages are vulnerable to extreme variation in physical conditions. Environmental managers aim to minimise human impacts during significant periods of larval production and recruitment on reefs, but doing so requires knowledge of the modes and timing of coral reproduction. Most corals are hermaphroditic or gonochoric, with a brooding or broadcast spawning mode of reproduction. Brooding corals are a significant component of some reefs and produce larvae over consecutive months. Broadcast spawning corals are more common and display considerable variation in their patterns of spawning among reefs. Highly synchronous spawning can occur on reefs around Australia, particularly on the Great Barrier Reef. On Australia’s remote north-west coast there have been fewer studies of coral reproduction. The recent industrial expansion into these regions has facilitated research, but the associated data are often contained within confidential reports. Here we combine information in this grey-literature with that available publicly to update our knowledge of coral reproduction in WA, for tens of thousands of corals and hundreds of species from over a dozen reefs spanning 20° of latitude. We identified broad patterns in coral reproduction, but more detailed insights were hindered by biased sampling; most studies focused on species of Acropora sampled over a few months at several reefs. Within the existing data, there was a latitudinal gradient in spawning activity among seasons, with mass spawning during autumn occurring on all reefs (but the temperate south-west). Participation in a smaller, multi-specific spawning during spring decreased from approximately one quarter of corals on the Kimberley Oceanic reefs to little participation at Ningaloo. Within these seasons, spawning was concentrated in March and/or April, and October and/or November, depending on the timing of

  11. Home care in Australia: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesy, Debra; Jakimowicz, Samantha; Saunders, Carla; Lewis, Joanne

    2018-01-01

    The home care sector comprises one of Australia's fastest growing workforces, yet few papers capture the overall landscape of Australian home care. This integrative review investigates home care with the aim of better understanding care recipients and their needs, funding, and regulation; care worker skills, tasks, demographics, employment conditions, and training needs. Over 2,700 pieces of literature were analyzed to inform this review. Results suggest sector fragmentation and a home care workforce who, although well-placed to improve outcomes for care recipients, are in need of better training and employment support. Suggestions for future research regarding Australian home care include studies that combine both aged and disability aspects of care, more research around care recipients, priority needs and strategies for addressing them, and how best to prepare home care workers for their roles.

  12. Australia - a nuclear weapons testing ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, Michael.

    1993-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1958 Britain conducted five separate nuclear weapons trials in Australia. Australia had the uninhabited wide open spaces and the facilities which such tests need and Britain was able to use its special relationship with Australia to get agreement to conduct atomic tests in Australia and establish a permanent test site at Maralinga. Other non-nuclear tests were conducted between 1953-1963. The story of Britain's involvement in atomic weapons testing in Australia is told through its postal history. Both official and private covers are used to show how the postal communications were established and maintained throughout the test years. (UK)

  13. Contamination of freezing soils: Australia's Antarctic opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.

    2002-01-01

    Last month, the Federal government announced that millions of dollars were to be spent cleaning up Antarctica, for which Australia has special responsibilities. Australia's largesse is especially interesting in a world context. Antarctica, by international agreement, is free of any industrial development - mining, storage of wastes, or any other profit-making activity that would disturb the environment (tourism is allowed under increasingly controlled conditions). The importance of the more or less pristine frigid environment lies in the wide range of scientific research that is carried out there. Sophisticated techniques to improve environmental quality are evidently in the early development stage. That cold-loving organisms can thrive in frozen ground in Antarctica and the Arctic was a discovery so unexpected that few people could grasp its importance. Only later was it found that these bugs can eat up contaminants - and the discovery assumed enormous practical significance. Little is known about how to clean up contamination in freezing soils even though there is a pressing need to solve the growing problem with military, industrial and nuclear waste in the Northern Hemisphere

  14. Firearms and suicide in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, C H; Lewin, T

    1990-12-01

    Australia has a moderate overall suicide rate but an extremely high male firearm suicide rate. Using data covering the years 1961-1985, a series of multiple regression based analyses were performed. During this period, overall suicide rates fell but firearm suicides remained constant with a resulting increase in the proportion of suicides by firearms. There has been an increase in suicides in the young offset by a decline in the elderly. Young males showed the greatest proportional increase in the use of firearms. A limited regional analysis supported the hypothesis that lack of legislative restrictions on long guns in Queensland with a greater household prevalence of such weapons and different cultural attitudes were associated with higher overall and firearm suicide rates. Such findings are consistent with reports from North America, although trends in Australia are more modest. Reducing the availability and cultural acceptance of firearms is likely to decrease suicide rates, especially in males.

  15. Observing urban forests in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson

    2009-01-01

    From February 13 to 28, 2009 I had the good fortune of visiting Australia, and touring urban forests in Sydney, Canberra, Brisbane, and Melbourne. My visits were only a day or two in each city, so in no case did I get an in-depth view of the urban forest resource or its management. The following observations are based on rather superficial field assessments and brief...

  16. Radiological terrorism and Australia's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, D.

    2003-01-01

    A terrorist attack in Australia involving dispersal of radioactive material is different from conventional terrorist attacks involving explosives. The trauma experienced by victims during an explosive incident includes cuts, broken limbs, burns and shock. When an explosive device involving radioactive materials is involved, there are a number of additional characteristics including the contamination of victims and the surrounding area and the potential requirement for ongoing monitoring and decontamination. Response actions may require additional complex emergency response measures including immediate protective actions to protect those potentially exposed to contamination, mass casualty care, and public and mental health. There are concerns that terrorist organizations are showing increasing interest in acquiring radiological material that could be used with explosive. A dirty bomb or technically known as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a device designed to spread radioactive contamination over a wide area and pose a health and safety threat to those within the contaminated area. The radioactive material could be in the form of a large chunk of material, fine powder, a liquid mist, or a gas. The material may also be spread in other ways, such as by simply emptying a container over the desired area. As RDD's do not require large amounts of explosives, there is unlikely to be a large numbers of casualties, however the areas contaminated by the radiological material may cause immediate and long term health risks to those exposed. An RDD is a weapon of Mass Disruption rather than destruction. While the likelihood of RDD's being employed by terrorist in Australia is still considered remote, Australia's emergency response organizations are developing plans to ensure a rapid and comprehensive response occurs should such an event occur in this country, The presentation will outline Australia's response arrangements at the local/state level and the type of federal

  17. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This detailed view of the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (19.5S, 149.5E) shows several small patch reefs within the overall reef system. The Great Barrier Reef, largest in the world, comprises thousands of individual reefs of great variety and are closely monitored by marine ecologists. These reefs are about 6000 years old and sit on top of much older reefs. The most rapid coral growth occurs on the landward side of the reefs.

  18. Atomic Australia: 1944-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawte, Alice.

    1992-01-01

    This book tells how successive Australian governments pursued the elusive uranium dream. With Australian uranium committed to the West's atomic arsenals, Australia seemed set to become a nation powered by the atom. But by the mid-1950 the Australian government learnt that their expectations were premature, if not unrealistic. The background of the creation of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission is also given along with the examination of the uranium controversies of the 1970s and 1980s. 150 refs

  19. Taxation of Gambling in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Alchin, T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines taxation of gambling in Australia and shows the proportions of taxation that each State receives. An interstate comparison of the components of gambling taxes is undertaken and some reasons for the differences between States are given such as the contributions to hospitals and the staid nature of residents of some other States. Taxation of gambling in NSW is examined in some depth and lottery revenue is used as an illustration of the growth, decline and resurgence of this ...

  20. Australia: Approaching an energy crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Jim; Settle, Domenica

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers energy policy in Australia in the context of its considerable energy resources, climate change and a recent change in government. It examines the possible paths that future energy use and policy in Australia could take, including published projections based largely on a 'business as usual' approach and projections based on a dramatic shift towards more efficient use of energy and renewable energy technologies. It also considers the various factors affecting future policy direction, including energy security, the advocacy in Australia for establishing nuclear electricity generation and other parts of the nuclear fuel-cycle, responses to climate change, and carbon sequestration. It concludes that while the Australian Government is currently reluctant to move away from a dependence on coal, and unlikely to adopt nuclear energy generation, a low-emissions future without waiting for the deployment of carbon capture and storage and without resorting to nuclear power is within reach. However, in the face of strong pressure from interest groups associated with energy intensive industry, making the necessary innovations will require further growth of community concern about climate change, and the development of greater understanding of the feasibility of employing low carbon-emissions options.

  1. Karst and agriculture in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillieson David

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of the development and degradation of karst lands in Australia has occurred in the last two centuries since European settlement. Recent prolonged El Nino events add further climatic uncertainty and place real constraints on sustainable agriculture. The lower southeast of South Australia is perhaps the one area in Australia where karst, and particularly karst hydrology, impinge on the daily lives of the community in that pollution and overexploitation of the aquifer are readily apparent to the local population. Effluent from intensive dairy farms, piggeries and cheese factories enters the karst and has caused concern over pollution of water supplies. Human impacts on the Mole Creek karst of Tasmania have been well documented. The principal recent impacts on the karst arc associated with land clearance for farmland, forest cutting for timber, road building, refuse disposal and associated hydrological change. There is similar evidence of agricultural impacts un karst in central New South Wales, with clear evidence of vegetation clearance and soil stripping on the limestones at Wellington, Orange and Molong.

  2. Veterinary parasitology in Australia--a short history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, I; Besier, R B

    2013-08-01

    As an important producer and exporter of livestock products, animal health has always been of major significance to the Australian economy, and research into efficient parasite control has continued since the 1800s. With substantial research achievements also involving parasites of companion animals and wildlife, Australian parasitologists have made numerous contributions of global significance. This summary outlines the development of investigations into parasite biology and parasitic disease in Australia. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Chinese Communist National Strategy Toward Western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overstreet, Lewis D

    1966-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to determine what the Red Chinese strategy is toward the nations of Western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand and to propose what it may be for the next 15 years...

  4. Identity, capital and community language schooling: teenagers at a weekend Chinese school in Melbourne, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cunzhen

    2017-01-01

    Community languages schools (also known as ethnic or heritage languages schools) in Australia have not received much attention from sociologists and educational researchers, even though these schools are important and supplementary to mainstream schooling. This research explores the identity practices of a group of teenage Chinese-Australian students attending Huawen School (pseudonym), a weekend community language school in Victoria, Australia. The conceptual framework of this study draws on...

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-09-09

    Sep 9, 2015 ... Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Adiyaman University, 02040 Adiyaman, Turkey,3Department of Orthopedics and. Traumatology, Umraniye Research and Education Hospital, 34899 Istanbul, Turkey, 4Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Umraniye. Research and Education ...

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research methodology module was reviewed as part of the overall revision of the undergraduate physiotherapy curriculum of ... Structuring the research methodology module using an EBP teaching framework prepares students to formulate a research question, effectively ... manage, and organise bibliographic citations.

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-13

    May 13, 2015 ... Systems (SEEDS)-INDEPTH Network Accra, Ghana, 3KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Research Programme, The Centre of Geographical Medicine Research-. Coast, Kilifi, Kenya, 4Population Health Sciences/Research Support Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aga Khan University- East Africa, Nairobi,. Kenya ...

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... this program provided short-term and long-term research training to. US infectious disease fellows who would work on collaborative research projects with Kenyan trainees. Since the program began in. 1988, there have been 56 US trainees, and 13 of these continue to collaborate with Kenyan researchers.

  10. Radioisotope production and distribution in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brough, J.

    1986-01-01

    The high quality of radioactive products and services, provided by the Commercial Products Unit of Australian Atomic Energy Agency for industrial and medical applications are discussed. The production program has changed from research driven to being market driven. The Commission in fact not only manufactures radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals but also acts as a Centralized Dispensing Service for over sea products. The advantages associated with centralize distribution are discussed. The delivery arrangements and the existed problems are explained. With the unique experience, assistance and advice are provided for many years now to Nuclear Energy Unit at PUSPATI via staff training programs and many visits by the Commission staff to assist in the commissioning of the facilities in which enables PUSPATI to provide Malaysia and surrounding neighbour countries (on a smaller scale) with the similar type of service that the Commission does within Australia. (A.J.)

  11. Coral reproduction in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gilmour

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Larval production and recruitment underpin the maintenance of coral populations, but these early life history stages are vulnerable to extreme variation in physical conditions. Environmental managers aim to minimise human impacts during significant periods of larval production and recruitment on reefs, but doing so requires knowledge of the modes and timing of coral reproduction. Most corals are hermaphroditic or gonochoric, with a brooding or broadcast spawning mode of reproduction. Brooding corals are a significant component of some reefs and produce larvae over consecutive months. Broadcast spawning corals are more common and display considerable variation in their patterns of spawning among reefs. Highly synchronous spawning can occur on reefs around Australia, particularly on the Great Barrier Reef. On Australia’s remote north-west coast there have been fewer studies of coral reproduction. The recent industrial expansion into these regions has facilitated research, but the associated data are often contained within confidential reports. Here we combine information in this grey-literature with that available publicly to update our knowledge of coral reproduction in WA, for tens of thousands of corals and hundreds of species from over a dozen reefs spanning 20° of latitude. We identified broad patterns in coral reproduction, but more detailed insights were hindered by biased sampling; most studies focused on species of Acropora sampled over a few months at several reefs. Within the existing data, there was a latitudinal gradient in spawning activity among seasons, with mass spawning during autumn occurring on all reefs (but the temperate south-west. Participation in a smaller, multi-specific spawning during spring decreased from approximately one quarter of corals on the Kimberley Oceanic reefs to little participation at Ningaloo. Within these seasons, spawning was concentrated in March and/or April, and October and/or November, depending

  12. Nuclear power options for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Australia is slowly transitioning to low emissions technologies for electricity generation. International pressure for greenhouse gas reductions and community expectations are starting to speed up this process. Nuclear power would make a useful contribution to low emissions generation in Australia, as it does in more than 30 countries, but deployment will have to take into account local factors. 1) Australia does not have any experience of nuclear power. For many people the image they have of nuclear is the explosion at Fukushima. Safety is a concern and a modern reactor type with full natural (passive) safety features using only gravity and natural circulation for ultimate cooling is more likely to be acceptable. 2) The unit size will have to be compatible with the existing generation system. The largest single unit in the NEM (National Electricity Market) is 750 MWe (Kogan Creek, Queensland) and in many States even 750 MWe is too large. A 600 MWe single unit could probably be accommodated in certain areas but Small Modular Reactor (SMR) units of up to 200 MWe would allow more choice of location. 3) The nuclear power plant will have to be capable of backing up the increasing non-scheduled generation from renewable energy sources particularly wind and solar. The turbine generator of a nuclear power plant provides the rotating inertia necessary for frequency control. SMRs can load follow at typically 10%/min. 4) Australia does not have experience of licensing a nuclear power plant. The time to complete the licensing process will be minimised if the nuclear power plant was of a type that has been extensively licensed worldwide, e.g. a PWR or BWR. It would also assist licensing if the reactor had a generic design approval. Molten salt reactors or fast neutron reactors have attractive features, but licensing in an Australian context would be more difficult. 5) The nuclear power plant has to be economically viable in the Australian electricity market. Due to the current

  13. Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Sue

    Designed for intermediate grade students, this 4-week unit contains 11 lessons on Australian culture and geography. Topics covered are: the map, history, geography, climate, economy, people, education, religion, recreation, government, cities, transportation, communication, wildlife, and plantlife. Each lesson includes text and questions on the…

  14. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    Australia's economic, demonstrated resources of uranium (U) at the end of 1996 amounted to 622,000 tonnes U, the largest of any country. Uranium is currently produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Government policies have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 6000 tonncs (t) U 3 O 8 to approximately 12 000 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF CLIMATIC MAPS FOR AUSTRALIA,

    Science.gov (United States)

    AUSTRALIA , *CLIMATE), (*METEOROLOGICAL CHARTS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), AIR MASS ANALYSIS, CLOUDS, CYCLONES, ANTICYCLONES, EARTHQUAKES, FLOODS, FOG, TROPICAL CYCLONES, HUMIDITY, OCEAN CURRENTS, ICE, RAIN, HAIL, WIND, THUNDERSTORMS

  16. Population dynamics in rural South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, G J; Smailes, P J

    1992-01-01

    The authors examine recent trends in Australia in turnaround migration, or the movement of the population from urban to rural areas. "The paper assesses the major changes which have occurred in population trends within the non-metropolitan sector of the nation, South Australia and, in particular, a study area in the lower north region of South Australia. The analysis of the case study region draws upon a survey undertaken in 1968-1970 and partially replicated in 1980 and 1990. It appears that for Australia in general and for the study area the turnaround is continuing but at a slower pace and in a more spatially concentrated pattern." excerpt

  17. Panis populi--bread and public health in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J

    1998-04-01

    The 'standard loaf, 680 gm, white, supermarket-purchased' as expressed in the Consumer Price Index, is but the basic form of bread sold to the Australian public. In the public health context, three themes have been intimately associated with bread--quality control, price control and bread used as a vehicle for supplementary nutritive agents important in preventive medicine. Price control, through assizing, has been a feature of bread marketing in western communities for seven centuries; and bread remains the last item on which price control (although seldom enforced) exists in Australia. Quality control, for public health, is determined both by regulation and by the force of increasingly literate consumers, of whom women occupy the most important determinant. From the preventive medicine point of view, important themes in bread quality, such as its use to reduce laxative sales on the one hand and to reduce the demographic incidence of colonic cancer on the other, remains outside formal regulation. Australia is a relatively conservative nation in the context of nutritional additives. It was not until 1953 that the National Health and Medical Research Council approved the addition of extra B vitamins to bread. Currently, folic acid is added as a discretion to selected high-premium breakfast cereals in Australia in one attempt to reduce the incidence to neural tube defects. The addition of such ingredients to bread remains an unrealised, but potentially important aspect of preventive medicine in Australia.

  18. A Review of Roof Harvested Rainwater in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirhakarhula E. Chubaka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To address concern regarding water sustainability, the Australian Federal Government and many state governments have implemented regulatory mechanisms and incentives to support households to purchase and install rainwater harvesting systems. This has led to an increase in rainwater harvesting in regional and urban Australia. This review examines the implementation of the regulatory mechanisms across Australia. In addition, the literature investigating the potential health consequences of rainwater consumption in Australia was explored. Studies demonstrated that although trace metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and iron were present in Australian rainwater, these metallic elements were generally found below the health limit guideline, except in high industrial areas. In addition, pathogenic or indicator microorganisms that include, but are not limited to, Escherichia coli, total and faecal coliforms, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Legionella, Pseudomonas, Cryptosporidium, Enterococci, Giardia, Aeromonas, and Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC have been detected in rainwater collected in Australia. However, epidemiological evidence suggests that drinking rainwater does not increase the risk of gastrointestinal disease. It was also identified that there is a need for further research investigating the potential for rainwater to be a source of infection for opportunistic pathogens.

  19. A Review of Roof Harvested Rainwater in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, Harriet; Edwards, John W.; Ross, Kirstin E.

    2018-01-01

    To address concern regarding water sustainability, the Australian Federal Government and many state governments have implemented regulatory mechanisms and incentives to support households to purchase and install rainwater harvesting systems. This has led to an increase in rainwater harvesting in regional and urban Australia. This review examines the implementation of the regulatory mechanisms across Australia. In addition, the literature investigating the potential health consequences of rainwater consumption in Australia was explored. Studies demonstrated that although trace metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and iron were present in Australian rainwater, these metallic elements were generally found below the health limit guideline, except in high industrial areas. In addition, pathogenic or indicator microorganisms that include, but are not limited to, Escherichia coli, total and faecal coliforms, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Legionella, Pseudomonas, Cryptosporidium, Enterococci, Giardia, Aeromonas, and Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) have been detected in rainwater collected in Australia. However, epidemiological evidence suggests that drinking rainwater does not increase the risk of gastrointestinal disease. It was also identified that there is a need for further research investigating the potential for rainwater to be a source of infection for opportunistic pathogens.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... in Cameroon. This study aimed at examining the sexual risk behaviours of high school female learners in Mbonge subdivision of rural Cameroon. ... Despite a wealth of research on youth, little research has been done on the sexual ..... Behavior, and Mental Health: a study of University Students in. Uganda.

  1. researchers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Sociological Review, 7, (2), 2003, pp.149-161. RESEARCH REPORTS. Revisiting “insiders' and 'outsiders' as social researchers. Marlize Rabe .... use of knowledgeable fieldworkers is then examined by focussing on the work ... A study by Russell (1995:p.95–97) on the long-term effects of incestuous abuse.

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In-depth telephonic interviews were voice recorded and transcribed. Through an inductive ... Two research assistants conducted the research to ..... Assistant Nutritionist. 1.25. M. 30.5. Single. BSc Food Science and Technology. Dietitian. 6. M. 25.6. Single. BSc Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Dietitian. 1. M. 29.6. Single.

  4. Changing Research Practices and Research Infrastructure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, John W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines changing research practices in the digital environment and draws out implications for the development of research infrastructure. Reviews of the literature, quantitative indicators of research activities and our own field research in Australia suggest that there is a new mode of knowledge production emerging, changing research…

  5. Uranium production economics in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorentino, C.M.R.; Butler, R.D.; Thomas, C.M.; McIlveen, G.R.; Huxlin, M.E.

    1990-02-01

    This review of the economics of production of uranium in Australia provides a detailed description of eleven important uranium deposits including capital and production costs estimates and supply curves. For each mine a detailed assessment has been made of its potential production capacity to the year 2000. Socio-economic factors that play an all-too-important role in the Australian uranium industry are extensively reviewed to provide an insight into the factors affecting Australia's ability to supply. The study is based on a detailed computer-based economic engineering model where all major costs such as labor, consumables and capital recovery charges are analyzed for each mine, and levellised break-even prices determined. It is argued that at the present low market prices, the three on-going operations are profitable, and at least three other deposits could be brought to viable production, given the necessary Government approval. Several other deposits appear to be marginal at the set Australian export floor price of US$26 per pound. Annual production could be raised from about 6,000 tonnes of U 3 O 8 to 16,000 tonnes by the turn of century, with the development of three additional deposits. It is concluded that, if Australian producers were allowed to compete freely on the international market, annual production would pass the 10,000 tonne/annum mark between 1995 and 2000. 35 figs., 38 tabs., 81 refs

  6. World salinization with emphasis on Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Pichu

    2006-01-01

    Salinization is the accumulation of water-soluble salts in the soil solum or regolith to a level that impacts on agricultural production, environmental health, and economic welfare. Salt-affected soils occur in more than 100 countries of the world with a variety of extents, nature, and properties. No climatic zone in the world is free from salinization, although the general perception is focused on arid and semi-arid regions. Salinization is a complex process involving the movement of salts and water in soils during seasonal cycles and interactions with groundwater. While rainfall, aeolian deposits, mineral weathering, and stored salts are the sources of salts, surface and groundwaters can redistribute the accumulated salts and may also provide additional sources. Sodium salts dominate in many saline soils of the world, but salts of other cations such as calcium, magnesium, and iron are also found in specific locations. Different types of salinization with a prevalence of sodium salts affect about 30% of the land area in Australia. While more attention is given to groundwater-associated salinity and irrigation salinity, which affects about 16% of the agricultural area, recent investigations suggest that 67% of the agricultural area has a potential for "transient salinity", a type of non-groundwater-associated salinity. Agricultural soils in Australia, being predominantly sodic, accumulate salts under seasonal fluctuations and have multiple subsoil constraints such as alkalinity, acidity, sodicity, and toxic ions. This paper examines soil processes that dictate the exact edaphic environment upon which root functions depend and can help in research on plant improvement.

  7. Regulation of alcohol advertising: Policy options for Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C. Jones

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A systematic search of academic databases was conducted to identify all refereed papers published between 1990 and 2012 on the regulation of alcohol advertising in Australia and three comparison countries (New Zealand, Canada and the UK. This paper reviews the codes that apply to alcohol advertising in each of the four countries, research into the effectiveness of these codes, and the small body of research into consumer attitudes towards alcohol advertising regulation. This review adduces considerable evidence that alcohol advertising influences drinking behaviours, and that current regulatory systems based on co-regulation and voluntary regulation (as is the case in Australia are ineffective. Recommendations are provided regarding the three pillars of regulation: volume restrictions, content restrictions, and infrastructure to support the regulatory environment.

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    Research Team in Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition, Mohammed V. University, Rabat, Morocco. Key words: Breast cancer, risk factor, case-control study. Received: 04/01/2016 - Accepted: 17/03/2016 - Published: 06/05/2016. Abstract.

  9. Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their academic performance, capabilities and functionings. At a tertiary educational level ... Research indicates that academic stressors, living circumstances, working conditions and where students undertake leisure activities affect academic performance .... Insufficient sleep, mild exhaustion, poor eating habits and little ...

  11. Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance

  12. Examining the Average Citation Index of "Education in Rural Australia" (Now the "Australian and International Journal of Rural Education")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Aaron; Halsey, R. John

    2013-01-01

    The journal "Education in Rural Australia" (now the "Australian and International Journal of Rural Education") has been in existence since 1991. During the Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) period, the journal maintained a B ranking, indicating that it was a quality journal within a specialised field. With the abolishment…

  13. Private protected areas in Australia: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Fitzsimons

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recognised importance of private land for biodiversity conservation, there has been little research into systems of private protected areas at a country-wide level. Here I look at definitions, legislation, ownership, management approaches and effectiveness, distribution and incentives provided to private protected areas in Australia. The term ‘private protected areas’, although increasingly used, still suffers from a lack of a clear and concise definition in Australia. Australian states and territories have legislation enabling the application of conservation covenants over private land; covenants being the primary mechanism to secure conservation intent on the title of the land in perpetuity. If considering all ‘in perpetuity’ conservation covenants under a dedicated program to be private protected areas and land owned by non-government organisations and managed for the purpose of biodiversity conservation, there were approximately 5,000 terrestrial properties that could be considered private protected areas in Australia covering 8,913,000 ha as at September 2013. This comprises almost 4,900 conservation covenants covering over 4,450,000 ha and approximately 140 properties owned by private land trusts covering approximately 4,594,120 ha. Most conservation covenanting programs now seek to complement the comprehensiveness, adequacy and representativeness of the public reserve system, either stating so explicitly or by aiming to protect the highest priority ecosystems on private land. There are a range of incentives offered for private land conservation and requirements of owners of private protected areas to report on their activities vary in Australia. However, there are a number of key policy challenges that need to be addressed if private protected areas are to achieve their full potential in Australia, including managing broad-scale ecosystem processes, protection and tenure reform, improved financial incentives, and

  14. Australia's uranium policy - produce for export only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Australia's uranium policy is that the mining and export of uranium only be permitted from the Nabarlek, Ranger and Olympic Dam Mines subject to strict safeguard conditions. In addition, the government has decided against the development of further stages of the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia, resulting in all uranium production being for export only

  15. Feasibility of uranium enrichment in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The Council considered that provided the balance between costs and markets was found to be acceptable, there was no valid reason against the Government proceeding with a study on the feasibility of, and perhaps participating in the establishment of a commercial uranium enrichment industry in Australia. Areas covered include technical expertise and industrial structure in Australia, environmental aspects and safeguards

  16. Focus on: Hendra virus in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kristopher

    2014-11-29

    Cases of Hendra virus infection in horses in Australia have been seen regularly since the virus was first isolated in 1994. Kristopher Hughes, associate professor of equine medicine at Charles Sturt University in Australia, gives an overview of how knowledge of the virus has developed in the past 20 years. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Action toward wilderness protection in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Muir

    2007-01-01

    In 1992, a National Forest Policy Statement created a political opportunity to protect wilderness across Australia. The following decade saw over a million hectares of wilderness reserved in the state of New South Wales (NSW) but, until recently, little progress was made elsewhere in Australia. The success in NSW, as opposed to other states, can largely be attributed...

  18. Skilled Migration: Australia. Working Paper No. 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chandra; Burke, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Migration patterns to and from Australia are becoming complex with migration programmes increasingly targeted towards meeting the needs of the labour market and regional development. This paper provides an analysis of the permanent and temporary movements of people to and from Australia in the last three years and their impact on the skilled…

  19. The British Show in Australia, 1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bond

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984–85, The British Show, an exhibition largely made up of New British Sculpture, was curated for Australia and New Zealand. This essay discusses the context and effects of the exhibition on art in Australia. It also seeks to define the sources of originality and innovation of the artists included.

  20. Australia: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-08

    white powder that was thought CRS-13 54 “Indonesia Ambassador Recalled Early from Australia ,” Dow Jones News, June 14, 2005. 55 Mathew Moore...relations between Australia and Indonesia, which had been recovering since Australia’s involvement in East Timor in 1999. The East Timor intervention was...

  1. Psycho-oncology in Australia: a descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butow, P; Dhillon, H; Shaw, J; Price, M

    2017-01-01

    Australia has a thriving Psycho-Oncology research and clinical community. In this article, the Australian health system in which Psycho-Oncology is embedded is described. Clinical Psycho-Oncology services are outlined, in terms of their composition, processes and reach. The development of the internationally ground-breaking Australian Psychosocial guidelines for the care of adults with cancer is described. Two large Psycho-Oncology organisations which are strongly linked to mainstream Oncology organisations are discussed: the Australian Psycho-Oncology Society (OzPos, a primarily clinician-led and focused organisation) and the Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG, a national cancer clinical trial group). OzPos is a special interest group within the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, while PoCoG is one of 14 cancer clinical trial groups funded by the national government. It is these strong connections with major multidisciplinary cancer organisations, and a culture of collaboration and co-operation, that have made Psycho-Oncology grow and thrive in Australia. Examples of large collaborative programs of Psycho-Oncology research are provided, as well as the mechanisms used to achieve these outcomes.

  2. Tourism Organization and Coordination in Australia and the Managerial Strategy for Tourism Development

    OpenAIRE

    Simoni Smaranda; Mihai Daniela

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents synthetically the organisation of tourism activities in Australia, harmoniously integrated within the functional unit of the economy, as well as the relations between the components of this system, so that they function as real motors of accomplishing the national strategy of tourism development. This paper also deals with sustainable tourism and tourism ecolabelling programs in Australia. The opinions expressed are based on the research of the cited bibliographic sources ...

  3. Pengaturan Kewenangan, dan Tanggung Jawab Direksi dalam Perseroan Terbatas (Studi Perbandingan Indonesia dan Australia)

    OpenAIRE

    Kusumawardani, Shinta Ikayani

    2013-01-01

    Research on: The Rules Regarding  The Powers and Responsibilities Of Directors In A Limited Liability Company (Comparative Study of Indonesia and Australia). As for the issues discussed in this study related to the application of the authority of the board of directors in the management of a limited liability company under the principle of fiduciary duty Australia comparison of Indonesia can not be separated from the authority granted will cause responsibility that must be borne by the compan...

  4. Measuring Minimum Award Wage Reliance in Australia: The HILDA Survey Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Wilkins; Mark Wooden

    2011-01-01

    An important group of interest for industrial tribunals in Australia is those workers who are reliant on awards for their pay and other employment conditions. Research on award reliance and its consequences, however, has long been hampered by the lack of good quality microdata. Most obviously, there are relatively few data sets in Australia that identify the method by which pay is set and also provide detailed information about individuals and the households in which they live. The HILDA Surv...

  5. Uranium exploration and mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wutzler, B.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in Australia in the years 1850 to 1900 already, but most of them were not recognised as such. It was not until 1894 that the first significant uranium find was made in Carcoar, west of Sydney. At that time, the uranium output of the world, which only amounted to a few hundred cwts, was for the most part obtained from mining areas close to the border between Saxony and Bohemia. In South Australia, uranium ore was mined experimentally for the production of radium at Radium Hill from 1906 onwards and at Mt. Painter from 1910 onwards. It was not until World War II, however, that uranium gained importance as a valuable raw material that could also be used for military purposes. The second phase of uranium mining in Australia commenced in 1944. Within ten years Australia's presumed uranium potential was confirmed by extensive exploration. The development of uranium mining in Australia is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  6. Collaborative Development of e-Infrastructures and Data Management Practices for Global Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samors, R. J.; Allison, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    An e-infrastructure that supports data-intensive, multidisciplinary research is being organized under the auspices of the Belmont Forum consortium of national science funding agencies to accelerate the pace of science to address 21st century global change research challenges. The pace and breadth of change in information management across the data lifecycle means that no one country or institution can unilaterally provide the leadership and resources required to use data and information effectively, or needed to support a coordinated, global e-infrastructure. The five action themes adopted by the Belmont Forum: 1. Adopt and make enforceable Data Principles that establish a global, interoperable e-infrastructure. 2. Foster communication, collaboration and coordination between the wider research community and Belmont Forum and its projects through an e-Infrastructure Coordination, Communication, & Collaboration Office. 3. Promote effective data planning and stewardship in all Belmont Forum agency-funded research with a goal to make it enforceable. 4. Determine international and community best practice to inform Belmont Forum research e-infrastructure policy through identification and analysis of cross-disciplinary research case studies. 5. Support the development of a cross-disciplinary training curriculum to expand human capacity in technology and data-intensive analysis methods. The Belmont Forum is ideally poised to play a vital and transformative leadership role in establishing a sustained human and technical international data e-infrastructure to support global change research. In 2016, members of the 23-nation Belmont Forum began a collaborative implementation phase. Four multi-national teams are undertaking Action Themes based on the recommendations above. Tasks include mapping the landscape, identifying and documenting existing data management plans, and scheduling a series of workshops that analyse trans-disciplinary applications of existing Belmont Forum

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-03-24

    Mar 24, 2016 ... national non-governmental organization (NGO) ”Arc en Ciel„. This. NGO, which is familiar with research activities, identified the MSM community leaders in the .... whom there is an emotional attachment) in both homosexual and heterosexual populations [14, 19]. Like other reports from. Cameroon [19] and ...

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2012-01-11

    Jan 11, 2012 ... 1MPH Programme, Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe, 2Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control,. Ministry ... Pan African Medical Journal. 2012; 11: ..... Mufuta Tshimanga: Had oversight of all the stages of the research and critically reviewed the final draft for.

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-08-25

    Aug 25, 2011 ... euthanasia were also queried. Data was analyzed using Epidata, SPSS 16.0 and Microsoft Excel. Results: Thirty-eight (97.4%) of thirty-nine institutions reported using animals for education and/or research. Thirty (76.9%) institutions reported using analgesics or anesthetics on a regular basis. Thirteen ...

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark, 3Center for Global Health, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000. Odense .... BHP is a Danish-Guinean Demographic Surveillance Site with a study-area .... variables such as age groups, previous military duty, history of.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. May 2016, Vol. 8, No. 1 AJHPE 37. Students who enrol in occupational therapy (OT) at the. University of Kwa Zulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa ... The latter may include becoming familiar with the disintegrating social systems in primary .... They also lacked the skills needed to adapt sessions and failed to ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... skills through hands-on application of epidemiology to real public health issues. For the most part, residents carry out research projects in priority areas of the districts they are attached, often under direct supervision of the local or provincial health leaders [2]. In Africa, these programs formed a networking ...

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-03-21

    Mar 21, 2014 ... Published in partnership with the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET). (www.afenet.net). Research ... were intervention strategies for primary health care delivery at the district and community levels ..... to be a gap between policy formation and implementation as only immunization services are.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-03-05

    Mar 5, 2013 ... food market) [10]. There are few studies that provide data on NCDs from Africa and these are mainly from South Africa [11]. In the same vein, research efforts in The .... males, in view of the relationships between obesity, physical inactivity and .... pronged intervention strategies-epidemiological surveillance,.

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-11-23

    Nov 23, 2015 ... 1Amref Health Africa, P.O Box 2773 Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2Kilimanjaro Reproductive Health Program, Moshi, Tanzania, 3Population Services. International, Nairobi .... testing, HIV testing history and HIV test results. ..... due to differences in the research designs, nature of population and sample size ...

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... collaboration with Makerere University, School of Public Health. We acknowledge The Family Health Research and Development Centre. (FHRDC) Uganda. Supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for. Population & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, ...

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Methods. Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] was employed. Settings: The study was based on data from the midterm evaluation that was conducted between August-December 2012 involving ...

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study followed a qualitative research design using semi-structured interviews with full-time SA- or foreign-qualified specialists at. Kimberley Hospital ... average number of weekly hours spent on undergraduate student training ... The best place to learn is at the bedside; a student should see the patient, read up and ...

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the importance of the learning setting (curriculum context), a capability approach to learning (the process), and the production of expert generalists. (the outcome) .... including communication, learning transfer, teamwork, self-confidence, and reciprocal and effective practice.[6-8] Research also shows that PAL provides a.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... Data were collected between February and March 2010 using a questionnaire, designed by the researcher. It comprised two sections; the ..... Bazant ES, Koenig MA, Fotso J-C, Mills S. Women's Use of Private and Government Health Facilities for Childbirth in Nairobi's Informal. Settlements. Stud Fam Plann ...

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. This article provides a detailed description of the development of an evaluation matrix that represents the organising structure for evaluating the impact of the interdisciplinary health-promotion course on multiple stakeholders. The evaluation was designed to answer the questions relating to the perceptions and ...

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-18

    Mar 18, 2017 ... promote CPD by working in partnership with employers, academic institutions ... SORK, employers and institutions of higher education all have a responsibility towards the culture of lifelong learning. As the ... further approved by the Higher Degrees and Research Ethics Committees of the University of ...

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-08-29

    Aug 29, 2014 ... Page number not for citation purposes ... Pan African Medical Journal – ISSN: 1937- 8688 (www.panafrican-med-journal.com). Published in partnership with the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET). (www.afenet.net). Research .... and education, hence a higher risk of morbidity and mortality and a.

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tions as their reality.[14]. Research context. At Stellenbosch University (SU), Cape Town,. SA, final-year physiotherapy students each spend. 6 weeks at a community site learning to integrate and apply the principles of PHC and community- based rehabilitation. Approximately 5 - 10 clients are seen in their homes per week.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the classroom.[9] Cognitive learning is achieved when students can make connections among and interpret different aspects of a subject to apply what they have learned in other fields of ... the effect of the field trips on the students' perceptions. ... researcher in higher education teaching and learning facilitated the data-.

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... It is an important aspect of quality of life which is often neglected by people in this age group, attending physicians and the society as a whole. The study was aimed at determining ... or a trained research assistant for those who could neither read nor write. Consenting individuals above this age who have ...

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... by Hazarika in a population-based study in India. The researcher noted that patients' preference to the private health facilities was due mainly to their dissatisfaction with the services in the public health facilities [11]. Furthermore, the quality of the services in the private health facilities could also be a major ...

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-11-30

    Nov 30, 2017 ... Authors' contributions. All the authors have read and agreed to the final manuscript. Acknowledgments. The author was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship awarded by the South African National Research Foundation (NRF). The content of this manuscript does not necessarily represent the official views.

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... work is properly cited. Pan African Medical Journal – ISSN: 1937- 8688 ... an unfinished business as dozens of studies reveal millions of children worldwide have not yet benefited from the .... regions included in the research site [24]. Results. In the final analysis, three working themes were generated.

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Workshop on {topic}; research project; clinical practical experience. Outputs. Tangible products/by-products of activities (but not whether students learned anything). Certificates of completion; records of actions by participants (i.e. log books); number of students at clinical site. Intermediate outcomes Learning connected to ...

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... available to populations of developing countries [2-5]. In 2013, in. Western and Central Europe and ..... initiation among the infected persons in the community. Addressing stigma and educating ... Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (P30AI042853). Tables. Table 1: Baseline characteristics of ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-18

    May 18, 2014 ... Research. Practice within the clinical arena is recognised as the best means of socialising students into the physiotherapy profession[1-5] and is known to ..... A ect. Intervention. Overall preparedness. Fig. 1. Means and 95% CIs of the mean scores of each component (n=58; 9 missing). There is a significant ...

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    YouTube, TED and other podcast websites. Other researchers have also documented their procedures. Corl et al.[5] describe the basic process of producing a podcast, and Jham et al.[6] list a number of universities actively doing podcasts. Besides the lecture podcasts, we have also captured numerous clinical.

  14. Diabetes MILES Youth-Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Trawley, Steven; Hendrieckx, Christel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 1 diabetes is a complex and demanding condition, which places a substantial behavioural and psychological burden on young people and their families. Around one-third of adolescents with type 1 diabetes need mental health support. Parents of a child with type 1 diabetes are also...... at increased risk of psychological distress. A better understanding of the motivators, behaviours and psychological well-being of young people with diabetes and their parents will inform improvement of resources for supporting self-management and reducing the burden of diabetes. The Diabetes MILES (Management...... and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Youth-Australia Study is the first large-scale, national survey of the impact of diabetes on the psychosocial outcomes of Australian adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods/design: The survey was web-based to enable a large-scale, national...

  15. Atomic test site (south Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godman, N.A.; Cousins, Jim; Hamilton, Archie.

    1993-01-01

    The debate, which lasted about half an hour, is reported verbatin. It was prompted by the campaign by the Maralinga people of South Australia to have their traditional lands restored to them. Between 1953 and 1957 the United Kingdom government carried out of atomic tests and several hundred minor trials on the lands. A clean-up programme had taken place in 1967 but further decontamination was needed before the area is safe for traditional aboriginal life and culture. A small area will remain contaminated with plutonium for thousands of years. The cost and who would pay, the Australian or UK government was being negotiated. The UK government's position was that the site is remote, the health risk is slight and the clean-up operation of 1967 was acknowledged as satisfactory by the Australian government. (UK)

  16. Skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, C; Foley, P

    2009-11-01

    Australia has one of the highest skin cancer incidence and mortality rates in the world. The reason for these high rates is due in part to the high ambient UV radiation levels, combined with a predominantly susceptible fair-skinned population. To address this problem, since 1980 Australians have been exposed to social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of skin cancer prevention. These campaigns have used mass media alongside interventions in schools, workplaces, and in community and leisure settings to motivate sun protective behaviour. As a result of these interventions it can be demonstrated that social marketing campaigns can be a very effective method to not only motivate behaviour change, reduce sunburn, and increase awareness but more importantly, reduce melanoma rates and bring positive economic returns to government. However long term investment in this area is required otherwise any population gains in behaviour are very likely to be quickly eroded.

  17. Ageing Holocaust survivors in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Katz, Benny

    2011-02-21

    In recent years, a phenomenon of "late effects of the Holocaust" has emerged, with impacts on the psychological and physical health of ageing Holocaust survivors. As Holocaust survivors age, they may experience heightened anxiety around normal processes of ageing, worsened post-traumatic stress disorder with cognitive decline, and fear of the medical system. Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of osteoporosis, cardiometabolic disease due to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction, cancer, and sequelae of Nazi medical experiments. From existing medical literature on this topic, practical principles of management are derived to create a framework for sensitive medical management of Holocaust survivors in Australia. The issues discussed are also relevant to the wider geriatric refugee or prisoner-of-war experience.

  18. Youth in Transition: The Challenges of Generational Change in Asia. Proceedings of the Biennial General Conference of the Association of Asian Social Science Research Councils (15th, Canberra, Australia, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Fay, Ed.; Fahey, Stephanie, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book originates from a conference of the Association of Asian Social Science Research Councils and contains writings and research reports on Youth in Transition in the Asia and Pacific region. The definition of "youth" varies from country to country and ranges between the ages of 10 to 35. The publication summarizes issues in the…

  19. Studying women nurse academics: exposing workplace violence in Australia: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Nel

    2003-04-01

    This article is the first in a two part series on research investigating the lived experiences of women nurse academics in Australia. This is part of a larger research study involving participants from Australia, New Zealand, the United States of America and the United Kingdom. The aim of this research was to investigate the participants' professional experiences and progression within their respective school of nursing and university. This article focuses on the literature on workplace violence and research methodology. The importance of storytelling and the relationship between emotional safety and sensitive disclosures is also addressed.

  20. Developing an agenda for research about policies to improve access to healthy foods in rural communities: a concept mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donna B; Quinn, Emilee; Sitaker, Marilyn; Ammerman, Alice; Byker, Carmen; Dean, Wesley; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Kolodinsky, Jane; Pinard, Courtney; Pitts, Stephanie B Jilcott; Sharkey, Joseph

    2014-06-12

    rural communities, improve access to federal food and nutrition assistance programs, improve food retail systems, and increase the personal food production capacity of rural residents. Respondents also prioritized the development of valid and reliable research methodologies to measure variables associated with rural food access. This collaborative, trans-disciplinary, participatory process, created a map to guide and prioritize research about polices to improve healthy, affordable food access in rural communities.

  1. Developing an agenda for research about policies to improve access to healthy foods in rural communities: a concept mapping study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    build economic viability in rural communities, improve access to federal food and nutrition assistance programs, improve food retail systems, and increase the personal food production capacity of rural residents. Respondents also prioritized the development of valid and reliable research methodologies to measure variables associated with rural food access. Conclusions This collaborative, trans-disciplinary, participatory process, created a map to guide and prioritize research about polices to improve healthy, affordable food access in rural communities. PMID:24919425

  2. Climate adversity and resilience: the voice of rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fiona Y; Wilson, Leigh A; Veitch, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, Australia has experienced prolonged drought and extensive flooding. It is argued that such events impact more significantly on rural communities than urban. Although there is a body of research investigating the effects of drought on mental and physical health in rural Australia, little research has examined the effects of flood and drought on wellbeing. This article explores the influence of drought and flood on the wellbeing of rural residents in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Forty-six individuals living in four rural communities in NSW were recruited and asked their experience of flood and drought using in-depth semi-structured face to face interviews or focus groups. The study used a grounded hermeneutic approach to contextualise participants' experiences within a rural social and cultural construct. Weather was found to be at the core of rural life, with flood and drought contributing to decreased wellbeing from stress, anxiety, loss and fear. Social connectedness was found to promote resilience in rural communities buffering the effects of flood and drought. Flood and drought have negative impacts on an individual's wellbeing. Although these negative effects were seen to be buffered by individual and community resilience, the long term emotional impact of flood and drought on rural communities needs to be further considered.

  3. Increased Severity and Spread of Mycobacterium ulcerans, Southeastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Alex Y C; Athan, Eugene; Friedman, N Deborah; Hughes, Andrew; Walton, Aaron; O'Brien, Daniel P

    2018-01-01

    Reported cases of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) have been increasing in southeastern Australia and spreading into new geographic areas. We analyzed 426 cases of M. ulcerans disease during January 1998-May 2017 in the established disease-endemic region of the Bellarine Peninsula and the emerging endemic region of the Mornington Peninsula. A total of 20.4% of cases-patients had severe disease. Over time, there has been an increase in the number of cases managed per year and the proportion associated with severe disease. Risk factors associated with severe disease included age, time period (range of years of diagnosis), and location of lesions over a joint. We highlight the changing epidemiology and pathogenicity of M. ulcerans disease in Australia. Further research, including genomic studies of emergent strains with increased pathogenicity, are urgently needed to improve the understanding of disease to facilitate implementation of effective public health measures to halt its spread.

  4. Mapping Progress : Human Rights and International Students in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in international student numbers in Australia in the first decade of the  2000s was accompanied by a series of public crises. The most important of these was the outbreak in Melbourne Victoria and elsewhere of physical attacks on the students. Investigations at the time also pointed to cases of gross exploitation, an array of threats that severely compromised their human rights. This paper reviews and pursues the outcomes of a report prepared by the authors in 2010 for Universities Australia and the Human Rights Commission. The report reviewed social science research and proposed a series of priorities for human rights interventions that were part of the Human Rights Commission’s considerations.  New activity, following the innovation of having international students specifically considered by the Human Rights Commission, points to initiatives that have not fully addressed the wide range of questions at state.

  5. History of immunology in Australia: events and identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, I R

    2006-06-01

    Immunology originated in Europe during the latter 1900s, and applications can be discerned in colonial Australia. The actual beginnings of immunology in Australia followed Burnet's enunciation of two fundamental principles: natural immune tolerance as an acquired characteristic in 1948 and clonal selection theory in 1957. Laboratory and clinical immunology flourished at various centres from the 1950s. The Australian Society of Immunology was founded in 1971. The merger of clinical immunology with allergy in 1991 created the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, exemplary for the reamalgamation of these related specialties. Australian immunology over the past 50 years has become recognized nationally and abroad as a highly visible component of the academic, research and biomedical scene and is still on a rising trajectory.

  6. HEALTH COVER, THE CASE OF MARTIN AND CAROLINA IN AUSTRALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano E KORSTANJE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research examines, from a qualitative perspective, some public opinion related to issues associated with the management of a tensed situation. In that process, it identifies some of the subtle differences in the Anglo-Latino cultural expectations. Martin, an Argentine tourist, contracted the Gullien-Barre syndrome in Australia, while enjoying his honeymoon vacation on a Tasmanian island with his partner Carolina. With the passing of days, Martin lost his mobility and was finally hospitalized in emergency. Doctors induced Martin into a coma temporarily because his muscles were paralyzed by the action of the virus. Health costs were more expensive than the family could absorb in Australia. The family had to request the intervention of the Argentine embassy and chancellery for help. In other words, this incident contrasts two world views: hospitality as the institution that historically developed to care and protect travelers versus hospitality as the commercial practice of exploitation.

  7. Oil and Australia: forecasts 1995-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This edition of Oil and Australia summarises the industry's forecasts of demand for petroleum products to the year 2004 and estimates the extent to which demand can be met from domestic production of crude oil, condensate and naturally occurring liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The demand forecasts represent the average of forecasts prepared for forward planning purposes, of the five refining and marketing company members of the Australian Institute of Petroleum Ltd - Ampol Ltd, BP Australia Limited, Caltex Australia Limited, Mobil Oil Australia Ltd and The Shell Company of Australia Limited. The assumptions underlying the forecasts are also presented. The forecasts are a long term, directional view and assume no major policy changes will occur over the forecast period. A section on natural gas is included to provide a broader picture of the outlook for hydrocarbon energy needs, supply and export potential for Australia. natural gas is an important and growing energy source, and provides an opportunity for Australia to increase its exports and improve its balance of payments situation. 26 tabs., 14 figs

  8. Women and Ultramodern Buddhism in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Halafoff

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Buddhists started arriving in Australia in large numbers during the mid-1800s, and the first Buddhist societies and centres began to be formed in the mid-late 1900s. This paper examines the role of women in bringing Buddhism to and establishing it in Australia. Women have featured prominently in a small amount of scholarship, including Paul Croucher’s (1989 Buddhism in Australia: 1848–1988 and Cristina Rocha and Michelle Barker’s (eds. 2011 edited volume on Buddhism in Australia: Traditions in Change. This paper draws on these sources, but primarily on more recent digital oral histories of prominent Buddhist women and men in Australia, recorded as part of the first stage of the Buddhist Life Stories of Australia project in 2014–2015. These first-hand accounts bring the early female pioneers of Buddhism in Australia to life and provide a rich re-telling of this history with emphasis on women’s contributions to it. We also argue that these women’s experiences can best be understood through a framework of ‘ultramodern Buddhism,’ built upon theories of modern and post-modern Buddhism, as many of these women were trailblazers bridging dualisms of tradition and modernity, Asia and the West, and adhering to both feminist and Buddhist principles.

  9. The new energy technologies in Australia; Les nouvelles technologies de l'energie en Australie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gleuher, M.; Farhi, R

    2005-06-15

    The large dependence of Australia on the fossil fuels leads to an great emission of carbon dioxide. The Australia is thus the first greenhouse gases emitter per habitant, in the world. In spite of its sufficient fossil fuels reserves, the Australia increases its production of clean energies and the research programs in the domain of the new energies technology. After a presentation of the australia situation, the authors detail the government measures in favor of the new energy technologies and the situation of the hydroelectricity, the wind energy, the wave and tidal energy, the biomass, the biofuels, the solar energy, the ''clean'' coal, the hydrogen and the geothermal energy. (A.L.B.)

  10. Living in a 2.2 World: From Mapping to Strategic Capacity Building for Australian Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil; Seddon, Terri

    2013-01-01

    The results of Australia's first national research assessment, excellence for research in Australia, provoked considerable discussion about the state of educational research in Australia. Understanding the nature of this field of research became the focus for empirical research and analysis that was intended to inform strategic planning. This…

  11. Critical issues in the historical and contemporary development of forensic anthropology in Australia: An international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Xanthé; Evison, Martin P

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this brief critical qualitative analysis is to examine the development of forensic anthropology in Australia, at a time of significant change in the discipline. It will briefly summarise its historical establishment, making comparative reference to other regions-particularly the United Kingdom and United States, and the influence of the Bali Bombings of 2002, Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami of 2004 and Black Saturday Bushfires of 2009. The analysis goes on to consider key factors in research in forensic anthropology in the United States, and the development of standards and regulation in the US and UK. The significance of research in post-mortem diagenesis in Brazil-a country sharing aspects of climate, soil types and demography with Australia-is also considered, as well as the significance of patterns of casework encountered in Australia compared with those of other jurisdictions. While forensic anthropology as a discipline has grown remarkably in recent years, this analysis suggests that research and training tailored to the specific pattern of casework encountered in Australia is now essential to support the development of national standards in science, education, and professional regulation. The significance of the establishment of the first taphonomy research facility outside of the US-the Australian Facility for Taphonomic Experimental Research-is briefly considered with reference to what this facility may offer to the development of forensic anthropology in Australia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Australia: The 'Good' Genocide Perpetrator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatz, Colin

    2016-01-01

    In 1949, federal parliamentarians were indignant when asked to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (hereafter, UNGC). We could not in any way be associated with ‘the unthinkable’ crime, senior members claimed, because we are ‘a moral people’ with a ‘clean record'. This essay assesses the ‘decent’ Australian democrats who, as the indelible records show, set out to kill the Aboriginal people they deemed ‘vermin’ and then later, decided to engage in a eugenicist fantasy to rid Australia of Aborigines by intermarriage or, failing that, forcibly removing their children in large numbers. The colonial frontier killings were justified as ‘dispersing kangaroos'. Child removals were done ‘in their best interests'. This essay attempts to gain an insight into the mindset of those who did commit ‘the unthinkable’ crime of genocide: killing, removal of children, and ‘causing serious bodily and mental harm'. Subsequent policies infantalised the Aboriginal and Islander population and denied them basic human rights.

  13. Mesothelioma in Australia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, Arthur Bill W; de Klerk, Nicholas; Brims, Fraser J

    2017-11-20

    The incidence of malignant mesothelioma in Australia is among the highest in the world as a result of widespread use of asbestos by industry and in construction throughout the 20th century. The risk of developing malignant mesothelioma after asbestos exposure is dose-related; a transient, low dose exposure confers a correspondingly very low risk of disease. Malignant mesothelioma is a heterogeneous disease, partly explaining the limited role of biomarkers in screening and diagnosis. The prognosis remains poor, and early advice on medico-legal compensation and a collaborative team approach to managing malignant mesothelioma are both essential. Chemotherapy can have a modest treatment effect in some people. New therapies, such as immunotherapy, do not yet have a defined role in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. As treatment options for malignant mesothelioma are limited and no cure is available, there is no established role for early detection or screening of at risk populations. A multidisciplinary approach to caring for patients with malignant mesothelioma and their carers is vital.

  14. Pycnogonida from south-eastern Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, Jan H.

    1973-01-01

    Twenty species of Pycnogonida are recorded from shallow waters of the Australian states of Victoria and South Australia. Eight of these are new to science : Ammothea (Lecythorhynchus) ovatoides, Achelia transfugoides, Nymphon dubitabile, N. conirostrum, Pallenoides stylirostrum, Stylopallene

  15. PET joint SPECT in Australia nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the scientific merit, clinical use and some historical aspects of the introduction and development of the positron emission tomography as a diagnostic technique in Australia. 4 refs

  16. Australia: uranium giant limps on export front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselhurst, D.

    1983-01-01

    Australia has large uranium reserves and uranium is now the country's tenth largest export earner. The two operating projects, at Ranger and Nabarlek, produce approximately 4000 t per year. Details are given of the extent of the copper/uranium/gold/silver deposit at Roxby Downs, South Australia. Trade is now moving in favour of the suppliers, but there is still opposition to the mining and export of uranium. The Australian Labor Party platform includes phasing out uranium mining

  17. The Transmission of Chinese Medicine in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores some of the issues concerning the transmission of Chinese medicine in Australia, its practitioner training and the future of Chinese medicine as a distinct medical discipline in the Australian context. In China over the last century Chinese medicine was overhauled in order to align it with the biomedical perspective prevalent in the West. These changes, in turn, had important consequences for the transmission of CM in Australia and the West. But while the biomedicalisation ...

  18. Migrant Families in Australia. Working Paper 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Des

    Since 1947, some 3.5 million migrants have entered Australia, giving birth to 2.2 million children. Whereas, in 1947 only 9.8% of Australia's populace were of overseas birth and less than 3% were of non-Anglo Saxon origin, by 1976, some 20% were of overseas birth, some 39% had been born overseas or had a parent born overseas, and some 25% had been…

  19. National innovation policy and public science in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lyn

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, I have positioned myself with Kean Birch and explored some of the political-economic actors/actants of policy suites implicated in the biotechnologies and bioeconomy. In particular, I have considered Australia's recent National Innovation and Science Agenda and allied documents and entities (that is, Innovation and Science Australia, the National Science Statement and the 2016 National Research Infrastructure Roadmap) as one of the National Innovation Strategies in place now in OECD countries and beyond. In overview, these policy suites utilise the same high knowledge creation/low translation and commericalisation arguments as elsewhere to press for particular ideologically based `improvements' to public science. Mapping the terrain of these entities has revealed the innovation, biotechnology and bioeconomy policy space to be inordinately complex and challenging to navigate. Reviewing Australia's position enables the type of comparative work that contributes to a closer understanding of the largely neoliberal global economic imperatives shaping contemporaneity. Moreover, while these policy suites attempt to constitute and circulate particular visions of science education, their complex nature mitigates against science teachers/educators grappling with their implications.

  20. The increasing financial impact of chronic kidney disease in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Kingsley, Michael I; Morton, R Hugh; Scanlan, Aaron T; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare current and projected expenditure associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal replacement therapy (RRT), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia. Data published by Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and World Bank were used to compare CKD-, RRT-, and CVD-related expenditure and prevalence rates. Prevalence and expenditure predictions were made using a linear regression model. Direct statistical comparisons of rates of annual increase utilised indicator variables in combined regressions. Statistical significance was set at P Dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation prior to analysis. Between 2012 and 2020, prevalence, per-patient expenditure, and total disease expenditure associated with CKD and RRT are estimated to increase significantly more rapidly than CVD. RRT prevalence is estimated to increase by 29%, compared to 7% in CVD. Average annual RRT per-patient expenditure is estimated to increase by 16%, compared to 8% in CVD. Total CKD- and RRT-related expenditure had been estimated to increase by 37%, compared to 14% in CVD. Per-patient, CKD produces a considerably greater financial impact on Australia's healthcare system, compared to CVD. Research focusing on novel preventative/therapeutic interventions is warranted.

  1. The economic impact and cost of visual impairment in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H R; Pezzullo, M L; Keeffe, J E

    2006-01-01

    Aims To quantify the total economic costs of vision loss in Australia. Methods Prevalence data of visual impairment, unpublished data on indirect costs, and national healthcare cost databases were used. Results Vision disorders cost Australia an estimated A$9.85 billion in 2004. A$4.8 billion is the loss of wellbeing (years of life lost as a result of disability and premature mortality). Vision disorders rank seventh and account for 2.7% of the national loss of wellbeing. Direct health system costs total A$1.8 billion. They have increased by A$1 billion over the last 10 years and will increase a further A$1–2 billion in the next 10 years. Cataract, the largest direct cost, takes 18% of expenditure. The health system costs place vision disorders seventh, ahead of coronary heart disease, diabetes, depression, and stroke. Indirect costs, A$3.2 billion, include carers' costs, low vision aids, lost earnings, and other welfare payments and taxes. Conclusions Even a developed economy such as Australia's cannot afford avoidable vision loss. Priority needs to be given to prevent preventable vision loss; to treat treatable eye diseases; and to increase research into vision loss that can be neither prevented nor treated. PMID:16488942

  2. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettas, Kerry

    2012-11-01

    In Australia, there are six Therapeutic Goods Administration-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories providing bacterial and fungal bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal samples sent from 10 tissue banks. Musculoskeletal swab and/or tissue biopsy samples are collected at the time of allograft retrieval and sent to bacteriology laboratories for bioburden testing, in some cases requiring interstate transport. Bacteria and fungi may be present within the allograft at the time of retrieval or contaminated from an external source. The type of organism recovered will determine if the allograft is rejected for transplant, which may include all allografts from the same donor. Bacteriology staff also provides unpaid support of tissue banks through meeting involvement, consultations, licence-related activities, validations and research funded by their organisation and not part of any contractual agreement. Bacteriology laboratories and tissue banks must be compliant to the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice - Human Blood and Tissues and regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. Clinical bacteriology laboratories also require mandatory accreditation to Standards Australia International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) 15189:2009 medical laboratories - particular requirements for quality and competence, and may also attain Standards Australia/New Zealand Standard ISO 9001:2000 quality management systems certification. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks are integral partners in providing safe allograft musculoskeletal tissue for transplant. © 2012 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. The Status of Industrial Ecology in Australia: Barriers and Enablers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen D. Corder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on current international industrial ecology thinking and experiences with Australian initiatives, this article critically overviews the current status of industrial ecology in Australia and examines the barriers and potential strategies to realise greater uptake and application of the concept. The analysis is conducted across three categories: heavy industrial areas (including Kwinana and Gladstone, mixed industrial parks (Wagga Wagga and Port Melbourne, and waste exchange networks, and identifies the past and future significance of seven different types of barriers—regulation, information, community, economic, technical, cooperation and trust, commitment to sustainable development—for each of the three categories. The outcomes from this analysis highlight that regulation, information, and economic barriers for heavy industrial area and mixed industrial parks, and economic and technical barriers for waste exchange networks are the current and future focus for industrial ecology applications in Australia. These findings appear to be consistent with recently published frameworks and learnings. The authors propose key questions that could enhance greater adoption of industrial ecology applications in Australia and acknowledge that international research and experiences, while partly providing answers to these questions, need to be adapted and refined for the Australian context.

  4. Asian Immigrants’ Vision of an Alternative Society in Australia and Canada: Impossibly Utopian or Simply Social Justice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba ZAMAN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Both Australia and Canada have adopted extensive immigration policies as well as a policy of multiculturalism to maintain “harmony” between immigrants and the wider society. Currently, the majority of immigrants to Australia and Canada are from Asia. In fact, six of the ten top-ranking migrant-sending countries for Australia and Canada are located in Asia. Building on exploratory research undertaken in Australia and Canada, this paper finds that class predominates over race in the recruiting of immigrants in both Australia and Canada. However, Asian immigrants as well as advocacy groups including left, progressive, and social activists are challenging the neo-liberal agenda. These groups have a vision for creating an alternative society based on social justice.

  5. The Development of Australia's National Training System: A Dynamic Tension between Consistency and Flexibility. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kaye; McKenna, Suzy

    2016-01-01

    This occasional paper provides an overview of the development of Australia's national training system and is a key knowledge document of a wider research project "Consistency with flexibility in the Australian national training system." This research project investigates the various approaches undertaken by each of the jurisdictions to…

  6. Scholarly Activities in Hospitality and Tourism Higher Education among Private Higher Institutions in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of scholarship and develop research and scholarship strategies among Private Higher Institutions delivering Tourism and Hospitality degree programs in Australia. In doing so, this paper confronts the traditional view of research publications as the only form of scholarship by traditional…

  7. The Resources Boom : Cash Cow or Crisis for Preservice Teacher Education in Western Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    This is a research paper describing the impact of globalisation on the provision of preservice teacher education in Western Australia. The author utilises a range of research methodologies to gather and analyse current data, finally a range of possible futuristic scenarios are presented. The paper has significance for those concerned with future…

  8. Immigration in two federations: Canada and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, J

    1988-03-01

    The need for increasingly widespread application of a policy or program, settlement, and multiculturalism is urgent in both Canada and Australia. For both countries there is a clear pattern of coalescence and divergence and the distinct growth of immigration as a federal function. While Australia has strengthened federal functions in a area of increasingly geo-political need, Canada is moving towards a looser model of federalism. By 1918 both countries were strengthening their federal functions in immigration as discussions within the British Empire on the recommendations of the 1917 Dominions Royal Commission took root. Both countries were interested in agricultural immigration and land settlement. The Great Depression caused a major reduction in population growth rates. From 1933-1948 Canada had a poor record of providing sanctuary for Jews. In Australia, however, Jewish voluntary agencies were aiding the reception of refugees by 1937. The 1st permanent embodiment of commonwealth jurisdiction over immigration was the establishment of an Immigration Branch within the Department of Interior around 1938. Australia needed extra population for defense. The major structural link between government and the immigrant communities was through the Good Neighbor Movement, which began on a nationwide basis in 1950. Both Canada and Australia are major receiving countries for refugees. In 1973 Australia reached the position of effective, practical nondiscrimination achieved by Canada in 1967. Prime Minister Trudeau's policy was multiculturalism within a framework of bilingualism. By 1978 Australia had a new federalism policy, which in all areas concerned with immigrants, refugees and ethnicity, rationalized resources allocation and imposed a political philosophy. The foci of multiculturalism in Australia are 1) community languages; 2) creation of a tolerant, non-discriminatory society; and 3) equity and participation. In 1978 Australia specified population replacement and

  9. Research Messages 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Research Messages 2014" is a collection of summaries of research published by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) in 2014 in the context of changing economic, industrial, social and education conditions, organised under the following broad categories: (1) Productivity: to sustain and build Australia's human…

  10. The design movement : Two case studies from the edge of the discipline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, R.A.; Straker, Karla

    2017-01-01

    As the boundaries of the design profession expand so must the research paradigms scaffolding them. This paper explores two trans-disciplinary PhD research projects - both broadly aimed at exploring design value in business. The first case study reports on the implementation of the design-led

  11. Maintaining an Effective Research Environment in Australia. Submission to IP Australia Patents Law Reform Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    It is widely stated that a purpose of patent law is to encourage inventors to innovate and to disclose their inventions for the benefit of society. In return for this disclosure they receive a limited exploitation monopoly defined essentially by commercial pursuits. A necessary implication of the requirement of disclosure is that knowledge…

  12. Educação: pesquisa, complexidade e contemporaneidade / Education: research, complexity and contemporaneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Costa Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Uma das principais consequências do alargamento da compreensão dos fenómenos educativos (que ocorreu no séc. XX foi a inclusão da vida escolar num processo de aprendizagem permanente e comunitário das pessoas, ao longo das suas vidas. Assim, os fenómenos educativos existem intrinsecamente ligados a todas as vertentes humanas, tratando-se de fenómenos processuais e não estáticos. Investigar em Educação na contemporaneidade não pode pois ignorar a complexidade, sendo cada vez mais necessário saber trabalhar inter e transdisciplinarmente. Tal requer, contudo, um enorme rigor epistemológico de modo a não mutilar teorias e modelos de outrem em função das nossas crenças pessoais. A contemporaneidade exige ainda, para além da pós-modernidade, a capacidade de assumirmos as nossascrenças na investigação que empreendemos, bem como a não omissão do papel observacional das descrições de quaisquer fenómenos de aprendizagem e de educação.Abstract One of the main consequences of the enlargement of the meaning of educationalfacts (which happened during the XX century was the inclusion of school time in each person’s life long learning process. Thus, educational facts are intrinsically linked to all human dimensions, characterised as processual, not static. To do research incontemporaneity cannot ignore complexity, and we have to work inter and trans disciplinary more and more. This requires, however, epistemological rigour so that we do not mutilate other’s theories and models according to our personal beliefs. Contemporaneity also requires, beyond pos-modernity, the ability to assume ourbeliefs in the research we do, as well as the non omission of the observational dimension in our description of any kind of learning and educational facts.

  13. Examining supply changes in Australia's cocaine market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caitlin E; Chalmers, Jenny; Bright, David A; Matthew-Simmons, Francis; Sindicich, Natasha

    2012-05-01

    Media attention to cocaine use and supply has increased following some of the largest cocaine seizures in Australia's history. Whether there has been an expansion in supply remains unclear. This paper examines the evidence behind assertions of increased supply in Australia and the scale and nature of any apparent increase, using proxy indicators of cocaine importation, distribution and use. Eight proxies of cocaine importation, distribution and use were adopted, including amount of importation, mode of importation and supply flows to Australia. Each proxy indicator was sourced using publicly available and Australia-wide data, including information on the total weight of border seizures, mode of detection and country of embarkation of individual seizures. Data permitting, trends were examined for up to a 12 year period (1997-1998 to 2009-2010). Since 2006-2007 there was evidence of increased cocaine importation, albeit less than between 1998-1999 and 2001-2002. There were further signs that the 2006-2007 expansion coincided with a diversification of trafficking routes to and through Australia (beyond the traditional site of entry-Sydney) and shifts in the geographic distribution of use. The congruity between indicators suggests that there has been a recent expansion in cocaine supply to and distribution within Australia, but that the more notable shift has concerned the nature of supply, with an apparent growth in importation and distribution beyond New South Wales. The diversification of cocaine supply routes may increase risks of market entrenchment and organised crime throughout Australia. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. The renewable energy market in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Australia is committed to an 8 per cent reduction in its emissions of greenhouse gases above 1990 levels as a result of the Kyoto Protocol for the period 2008-2012. At present, the emissions stand at 17.4 per cent above 1990 levels. Total electrical power in Australia resulting from renewable energy is in the order of 10.5 per cent. A mandatory renewable energy target of 9500 gigawatt hour (GWh) of extra renewable energy is to be produced annually by 2010, under the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act. An emissions trading system has been implemented, involving one renewable energy certificate (REC) created for each megawatt hour of renewable energy generated. A significant expansion of the demand for renewable energy is expected in Australia over the next ten years, according to the Australian Greenhouse Office. Increased opportunities for local and international firms operating in the field of renewable energy are being created by the Australian government through initiatives such as the Renewable Energy Commercialization Program, and the Renewable Remote Power Generation Program. Solar, biomass, and wind power are comprised in the wealth of renewable energy resources in Australia. The market remains largely undeveloped. Firms from the United States and the European Union are the leading exporters of renewable energy technology to Australia. Public utilities and independent power producers having entered the deregulated electricity market are the consumers of renewable energy technology and services. A country with minimal duties in most cases, Australia has much in common with Canada, including similar regulatory and legal systems. Australia applies a 10 per cent goods and services tax, which would apply to Canadian exports. It was advised to consult the Australian Customs Service for additional information concerning duties that might be applicable to the renewable energy industry. 28 refs., 3 tabs

  15. The fifth conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 2003. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The theme of the fifth Nuclear Science and Engineering in Australia conference was 'Building on 100 years of Nuclear Science and Technology'. During the six main sessions the following topics were presented: Nuclear research and progress on major nuclear facilities, including the ANSTO Research Replacement Reactor, the Australian synchrotron and irradiation facilities; Uranium and waste management; Radiation Protection and Nuclear safety; Safeguards and Security; Nuclear Power in the Asia/Pacific region and prospects for Australia. The opening address, given by Mr Peter McGauran, Minister for Science was followed by Dr Robin Batterham, Australian Chief Scientist's introductory address. Papers included in the handbook were separately indexed

  16. Political economy and population health: is Australia exceptional?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, Anne-marie; Short, Stephanie D

    2006-06-01

    It is accepted knowledge that social and economic conditions--like education and income--affect population health. What remains uncertain is whether the degree of inequality in these conditions influences population health and if so, how. Some researchers who argue that inequalities are important, say there is a relationship between political economy, inequality and population health. Their evidence comes from comparative studies showing that countries with neo-liberal political economies generally have poorer population health outcomes than those with social or Christian democratic political economies. According to these researchers, neo-liberal political economies adopt labour market and welfare state policies that lead to greater levels of inequality and poorer population health outcomes for us all. Australia has experienced considerable social and economic reforms over the last 20 years, with both major political parties increasingly adopting neo-liberal policies. Despite these reforms, population health outcomes are amongst the best in the world. Australia appears to contest theories suggesting a link between political economy and population health. To progress our understanding, researchers need to concentrate on policy areas outside health--such as welfare, economics and industrial relations. We need to do longitudinal studies on how reforms in these areas affect levels of social and economic inequality, as well population health. We need to draw on social scientific methods, especially concerning case selection, to advance our understanding of casual relationships in policy studies. It is important to find out if, and why, Australia has resisted the affects of neo-liberalism on population health so we ensure our high standards are maintained in the future.

  17. Consumption metrics of chardonnay wine consumers in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliba AJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthony J Saliba,1 Johan Bruwer,2 Jasmine B MacDonald1 1School of Psychology, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, 2School of Marketing, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: There is a dearth of information in the knowledge base about who the chardonnay consumer is, what their wine-consumption metrics are, what sensory characteristics they associate chardonnay with, and who influenced their perceptions. This study examines the consumer engagement with chardonnay, and contributes evidence-based research to inform future wine-business strategy. A population sample was recruited to be representative of Australian consumers. An online survey of 2,024 Australian wine consumers was conducted, 1,533 (76% of whom actually consumed chardonnay. This paper focuses only on those who consumed chardonnay. Males purchased and consumed larger quantities of chardonnay, although marginally more females consumed it. Chardonnay is considered to be characterized by full, lingering, and fruity flavors, as well as yellow color. Chardonnay is associated with dinner parties and at-home consumption. The vast majority of participants liked and had a positive perception of chardonnay. The target market for chardonnay is not only females; in fact, males appear to be the main consumers of this varietal by volume. Marketing and promotion campaigns should leverage the findings to retain current and win back other consumers. This is the first research to provide empirical explanations of consumer engagement with chardonnay, and to contribute evidence-based research in this regard.Keywords: chardonnay, consumer behavior, wine style, wine consumption, Australia

  18. Political economy and population health: is Australia exceptional?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, Anne-marie; Short, Stephanie D

    2006-01-01

    Background It is accepted knowledge that social and economic conditions – like education and income – affect population health. What remains uncertain is whether the degree of inequality in these conditions influences population health and if so, how. Some researchers who argue that inequalities are important, say there is a relationship between political economy, inequality and population health. Their evidence comes from comparative studies showing that countries with neo-liberal political economies generally have poorer population health outcomes than those with social or Christian democratic political economies. According to these researchers, neo-liberal political economies adopt labour market and welfare state policies that lead to greater levels of inequality and poorer population health outcomes for us all. Discussion Australia has experienced considerable social and economic reforms over the last 20 years, with both major political parties increasingly adopting neo-liberal policies. Despite these reforms, population health outcomes are amongst the best in the world. Summary Australia appears to contest theories suggesting a link between political economy and population health. To progress our understanding, researchers need to concentrate on policy areas outside health – such as welfare, economics and industrial relations. We need to do longitudinal studies on how reforms in these areas affect levels of social and economic inequality, as well population health. We need to draw on social scientific methods, especially concerning case selection, to advance our understanding of casual relationships in policy studies. It is important to find out if, and why, Australia has resisted the affects of neo-liberalism on population health so we ensure our high standards are maintained in the future. PMID:16737549

  19. Evaluation of strategies designed to enhance student engagement and success of indigenous midwifery students in an Away-From-Base Bachelor of Midwifery Program in Australia: A qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Paula M; Dunne, Carmel L; Burdett-Jones, Denise; Gamble, Natalie S; Kosiak, Machellee M; Neal, Joclyn M; Baker, Gail E

    2018-04-01

    A strategy to close the gap in relation to Indigenous health is the employment of more Indigenous health professionals. However, despite government reviews, research studies and educational initiatives, Indigenous students' retention and completion rates of tertiary education remains below those of non-Indigenous Australians. To evaluate two enhancements to an Away-from-Base Bachelor of Midwifery program for Indigenous students, namely the appointment of an Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife to provide academic and cultural support and an additional clinical placement in a high-volume tertiary hospital. In this qualitative study, 10 Indigenous students enrolled in the Away-from-Base Bachelor of Midwifery program participated in one of two focus groups. Focus group transcriptions were subjected to a manual thematic analysis, and key themes were identified and explored. The role of the Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife was highly valued as students had access to a resource who provided cultural and academic support, and who encouraged and advocated for them. Regular contact with the Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife enabled students to stay connected with and focussed on their study. Students were overwhelmingly positive about the opportunity to undertake the additional clinical placement, as it exposed them to complex clinical cases they may not have seen in their home communities. The introduction of an Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife and an additional clinical placement in a high-volume tertiary hospital were perceived as valuable additions to the range of support mechanisms already in place for Indigenous Away-from-Base Bachelor of Midwifery students. These interventions have had a direct impact on retention, course progression and completion rates for Indigenous students. Students expressed enhanced clinical learning and knowledge retention as a result of the additional clinical placement, and the Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife provided culturally

  20. Status of radionuclide monitoring stations in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ANSTO) first became involved in the monitoring of radionuclides in the environment in 1955 when assessing the effects on the Australian population of the radioactive releases associated with the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. (At that time ARPANSA was known as the Commonwealth X-ray and Radium Laboratory). The United Kingdom had tested weapons in Australia in 1952 and 1953 and in August 1954 entered into an agreement with the Australian Government to establish a test range at Maralinga in South Australia. The government established a Maralinga Safety Committee and through this Committee ARPANSA became involved in the surveillance of radioactive fallout over Australia. The primary function of this surveillance was to ensure that the nuclear trials would not adversely effect the health of the Australian population. A program was established to reliably assess the deposition of radioactive fallout over Australia so that exposure to the population could be estimated. This task was performed in conjunction with the Bureau of Meteorology and the Department of Supply. Measurements were made on daily samples of fallout dawn from 10 centres throughout Australia. A low level radiochemical facility was established in 1961 for the measurement of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in environmental samples so that the long term distribution of fallout could be tracked. In the 1960s the program was extended to measure fresh fission products reaching Australia from atmospheric testing in other countries, usually originating from test sites in the northern hemisphere. The sampling program that was established was designed so that it could be rapidly expanded when a new testing program started. At this time a permanent fallout monitoring network was established around Australia using high volume air samplers capable of sampling up to 10000 m 3 per week. Approximately six stations have been operated at any one time but the

  1. Does Lyme disease exist in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Peter J; Lum, Gary D; Robson, Jennifer Mb

    2016-11-07

    There is no convincing evidence that classic Lyme disease occurs in Australia, nor is there evidence that the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is found in Australian animals or ticks. Lyme disease, however, can be acquired overseas but diagnosed in Australia; most people presenting with laboratory-confirmed Lyme disease in Australia were infected in Europe. Despite the lack of evidence that Lyme disease can be acquired in Australia, growing numbers of patients, their supporters, and some politicians demand diagnoses and treatment according to the protocols of the "chronic Lyme disease" school of thought. Antibiotic therapy for chronic "Lyme disease-like illness" can cause harm to both the individual (eg, cannula-related intravenous sepsis) and the broader community (increased antimicrobial resistance rates). Until there is strong evidence from well performed clinical studies that bacteria present in Australia cause a chronic debilitating illness that responds to prolonged antibiotics, treating patients with "Lyme disease-like illness" with prolonged antibiotic therapy is unjustified, and is likely to do much more harm than good.

  2. Radioactive waste management and disposal in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A national near-surface repository at a remote and arid location is proposed for the disposal of solid low-level and short-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Australia. The repository will be designed to isolate the radioactive waste from the human environment under controlled conditions and for a period long enough for the radioactivity to decay to low levels. Compared to countries that have nuclear power programs, the amount of waste in Australia is relatively small. Nevertheless, the need for a national disposal facility for solid low-level radioactive and short-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes is widely recognised and the Federal Government is in the process of selecting a site for a national near-surface disposal facility for low and short-lived intermediate level wastes. Some near surface disposal facilities already exist in Australia, including tailings dams at uranium mines and the Mt Walton East Intractable Waste Disposal Facility in Western Australia which includes a near surface repository for low level wastes originating in Western Australia. 7 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Lexicography in Australia | Delbridge | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5788/2-1-1127 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers ...

  4. A solar fuels roadmap for Australia - study outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, James T.; McNaughton, Robbie K.; Hayward, Jennifer A.; Lovegrove, Keith

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarises the key findings and recommendations of a 3.5 year study into the research, development and demonstration priorities to establish a solar fuels industry in Australia. While Australia has one of the best solar resources in the world, it also has an abundance of conventional fuels such as coal and natural gas. The country is heavily dependent on fossil fuels for its primary energy supply and international trade, and is seeking pathways to reduce emissions intensity. While renewable electricity will be able to displace fossil fuels in the electricity sector, this only addresses about 16% of energy consumption by end use. Concentrating solar fuels (CSF) are produced either in full or in part from concentrated solar energy, and can provide either complete or partial reduction of the CO2 emissions associated with energy consumption. Our study reviewed the various potential solar thermal technology pathways and feedstocks available to produce a range of CSF products such as hydrogen, ammonia, methanol and synthetic gasoline or diesel. We conducted what we believe to be the broadest and most sophisticated evaluation of the many options to identify those that are most prospective, including an evaluation of the expected final fuel costs. The study identified the following opportunities for CSF: • Australia: substitution of imported liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) with synthetic CSF options would provide fuel security through the utilization of domestic resources. Ammonia is also a potentially attractive CSF product as it is produced in large quantities for fertilisers and explosives. • Export markets: Australia has significant trading relationships with many Asian countries in the energy domain, and CSF fuels could provide a long term future to enable such relationships to continue - or grow - in a carbon constrained world. Japan in particular is considering how to transition to a hydrogen economy, and could be a customer for CSF hydrogen or

  5. Climate change, aeroallergens, natural particulates, and human health in Australia: state of the science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Paul John; Bennett, Charmian Margaret

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically review and assess what is known about the impacts of climate change on aeroallergens and other naturally derived particulates, and the associated human health impacts, and to examine responses to these in Australia, focusing on adaptation. Prior research was searched using several general and discipline-specific research databases. The review concludes that whereas there is little original research on the impacts of climate change on aeroallergens and other naturally derived particulates in Australia, or the human health consequences of these, research from overseas suggests that these impacts may be adverse and of considerable magnitude. More research is required to assess the impacts of climate change on these airborne particles and associated diseases in Australia and other parts of the Asia-Pacific. There are important policy implications of this review. There is a need for enhanced monitoring of the atmospheric environment and associated health conditions in Australia. Education about climate change and human health in general, and air quality and related diseases specifically, is required for the community, health professionals, and others. Improvements are needed in the preparedness of infrastructure, such as health care facilities and early warning systems, particularly for aeroallergens, and all of these adaptive policy responses require further research.

  6. Prospects for the uranium industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The report covers the basic issues of the coming uranium era discussing the world supply and demand situation, the trend in uranium prices and the continuing move to nuclear power as the world's primary source of electrical energy. In Australia, unknowns such as future contract prices and quantities, production start dates, royalties and the outcome of the environmental inquiry create the speculative image of the uranium stocks. The first section of the report discusses the technical aspects of the nuclear industry but is necessarily brief because the real story is the world trend to nuclear power for economic and political reasons and the old story of supply and demand (discussed in section two). Within Australia some companies are better placed than others to benefit from the uranium era. Section three looks at prices and section four reviews the individual companies involved in the uranium industry in Australia. (author)

  7. Australia and Galicia in Transnational Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lorenzo Modia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the transnational features of narratives between Galicia and Australia from the year 1519 to the Present-day. Sailors like Pedro Fernandez de Quiros and Luis Váez de Torres, who reached Australia in the sixteenth century, will be considered as the starting point of a cultural dialogue still going on in today’s literature not only as regards the geography of the continent but also in the collective imagination of the country. Other connections between these countries are also established by contemporary novelists such as Peter Carey, Sally Morgan and Murray Bail, who use Galician history and places, filtered through British sources, to address Australia and its present-day characters and decolonizing conflicts. Finally, the works of other authors such as Robert Graves and Félix Calvino, who also deal with this literary dialogue in their fiction, are explored.

  8. Dermatology training and practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaratnam, Deshan F; Murrell, Dédée F

    2014-10-01

    Dermatology is a relatively young discipline in Australia compared to other specialities within the medical fraternity. From its humble beginnings, the profession has evolved significantly over the decades and is now represented by the Australasian College of Dermatologists which is charged with training the next generation of dermatologists and advocating for and advancing the profession. The authors reviewed and describe the history of dermatology training and practice in Australia. Despite the progress in education, there are only 415 dermatologists serving a population of 23.3 million (1 per 58 000) and yet it has the highest incidence and prevalence of skin cancer in the world. The scope of clinical practice is wide in Australia, with clinicians well versed in medical and procedural dermatology. It is hoped that Australian dermatology will continue to bolster the dermatology profession globally. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cofrancesco, Alfred

    1998-01-01

    .... This search for natural plant enemies (insects and fungal pathogens) has led researchers to the native ranges of noxious aquatic plants, located throughout the continents of Africa, Asia, Europe, and Australia...

  10. Library Research: Luxury or Necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Carmel

    2011-01-01

    The necessity of library and information research is pointed up by referring to some of important categories of research now in progress. Reasons are advanced for the necessity such research in Australia and ways suggested in which students wishing to make a career research and practitioners anxious for research opportunities may be accommodated.…

  11. Pea proteins based food products as meat replacers: the Profetas concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, W.M.F.; Meerdink, G.

    2001-01-01

    Profetas (Protein Foods, Environment, Technology and Society) is a Dutch trans-disciplinary research programme, aiming to develop more sustainable food systems. The central theme of the programme is the question: is a transition feasible from a diet based primarily on animal proteins to a diet based

  12. Healthy outdoor recreation: An integrated approach to linking physical activity with wellness goals. Chapter 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster; David M. Buchner

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the shared interest of the public health and leisure fields in promoting outdoor recreation. We describe how trans disciplinary integration of research efforts across these fields can lead to a better understanding of how outdoor recreation facilities and programs can help realize a full range of health and wellness benefits....

  13. Beyond divides: prospects for synergy between resilience and pathways approaches to sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, S.; Haider, J.; Sinare, H.; Karpouzoglou, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of rapid social, ecological and technological change, there is rising global demand from private, public and civic interests for trans-disciplinary sustainability research. This demand is fuelled by an increasing recognition that transitions toward sustainability require new modes of

  14. Innovating for solutions Annual Report

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    An external review of the past five years work concluded that IDRC had effectively helped establish a new field of trans- disciplinary research in environment and health. Some ... were also validated by external review. For example, the program ...... assurance and advice designed to add value and support the Centre in ...

  15. Towards a Psychology of Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Miika; Miloseva, Lence; Page, Tom; Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2008-01-01

    This study will introduce some of the fundamentals and rationale for the Psychology of Media Education based on Developmental Psychology. It is an important area of study of a modern teacher profession and teacher education and a new field of multi-, inter- and trans-disciplinary knowledge and research. We argue that without a doubt the different…

  16. Between Design and Anthropology: Improvising Embodied Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    pillars Segno, Mythus and Techne. Anthropological design research is trans-disciplinary, developing in the connexion between Visual Culture (signal, in/visibility, image/void, imagination, representation), Doing Culture (act, cooperation, relation, fabrication, exchange), Material Culture (object...... and practicing since the 1990s in the context of the arts, rendering it now as «Anthropo Design»....

  17. In the making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    . The conference invites contributions from researchers working internationally in universities, design schools and industry who share an interest in understanding and developing design as a trans-disciplinary practice that is always in the making. The scope of the conference reaches beyond the traditional design...

  18. Integrating biodiversity concepts with good governance to support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... between relevant governance systems related to water, as well as increased trans-disciplinary research that can better define the links between environmental governance systems and ecological systems. Keywords: biodiversity, governance, ecosystem, integrated water resource management (IWRM), hydrological cycle, ...

  19. Chinese villages and their sustainable future: the European Union-China-Research Project "SUCCESS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumreicher, Heidi

    2008-04-01

    China has 800,000 villages-one person out of seven on the globe is living in a Chinese rural settlement. Yet the global discussions about the situation in China is currently characterised by a disproportionate focus on the development of towns and until now circumstances have generally been neglected in the rural areas, where 70% of the Chinese population is still living. Within the 5 years of the SUCCESS project research, this set of actual problems has been considered and analysed under the principle of sustainability: "What to maintain?" "What to change?" were the overall research questions asked in the SUCCESS project; the researchers were looking for answers under a sustainability regime, respecting the need to raise the quality of life in the villages. Several interweaving processes were used to achieve results: the inter-disciplinary research process between many areas of expertise, the trans-disciplinary process between the researchers and the Chinese villagers, and a negotiation process that made the connection between these two processes. The introduction describes the basic sustainability definition that was orienting the whole study. The innovation lays mostly in the methodology: the inter-disciplinary research co-operation related to practice and to involving the affected communities is needed to manage the significant and growing imbalances between urban and rural areas regarding their sustainability. In the transdisciplinary work, the project developed "village future sentences" that describe the local outcome of the research as one step towards better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms that could lead to a sustainable future, and they also managed to start sustainability processes in the case study sites. The integrated approach of the project helped generating future scenarios for these villages covering all aspects of their development, including urban design issues. Out of these scenarios, the villages developed small projects that could

  20. The Creeping Blight of Islamophobia in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Briskman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the latter months of 2014, following events in faraway Iraq and Syria, Australia responded forcefully at home. The manufactured fear of a terrorist attack resulted in police raids, increased counter-terrorism legislation and scare campaigns to alert the public to 'threat'. Although Islamophobia rose in Australia after 2001 it has been latent in recent years. It is on the rise again with collateral damage from government measures including verbal and physical attacks on Australian Muslims. Vitriol is also directed at asylum seekers and refugees. Media, government and community discourses converge to promote Islam as dangerous and deviant.

  1. UV/EB curing in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, R.; Garnett, J.; Loo Teck Ng

    1999-01-01

    Progress in LTV/EB curing is reviewed in Australia. Generally the technology is used by those industries where curing is well developed in Europe and North America, however the scale is an order of magnitude lower due to the smaller market size. The Asian economic crisis does not appear to have affected expansion of the technology in Australia. EB continues to be successfully used in the packaging and foam fields whilst in UV, security devices, particularly banknotes are steadily expanding especially in export markets have been studied

  2. Rural Empowerment through the Arts: The Role of the Arts in Civic and Social Participation in the Mid West Region of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Julia Anwar

    2011-01-01

    To combat social and economic inequity in rural Australia, governments, communities, and policy makers are seeking ways to empower local residents to find local solutions to local problems. Through an exploratory review of the literature and semi-structured interviews conducted in the Mid West of Western Australia, this research examined the role…

  3. The Protective Function of Meaning of Life on Life Satisfaction among Chinese Students in Australia and Hong Kong: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jia-Yan; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Joubert, Lynette; Chan, Cecilia Lai Wan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the predictive effects of acculturative stressors and meaning of life on life satisfaction between Chinese students in Australia and in Hong Kong. Participants: In 2006, the researchers recruited 606 Chinese students studying abroad at the University of Melbourne in Australia and at 6 universities in Hong Kong.…

  4. Collaboration: the Key to Establishing Community Networks in Regional Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wal Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the promise of community involvement, cohesion and empowerment offered by local community networks (CN using Internet Technologies, few communities in regional Australia have been able to demonstrate sustainable and vibrant CN which demonstrate increased social, cultural or self-reliance capital. The Faculty of Informatics and Communication at Central Queensland University (CQU and a local council have established a formal alliance to establish the COIN (Community Informatics projects to research issues around this topic. This paper presents the initial findings from this work and draws conclusions for possible comparison with other international experience. The research focuses attention on community understanding and cohesion, local government priorities in a community with relatively low diffusion of the Internet and the competing demands in a regional university between traditional service provision in an increasingly competitive market and the needs of establishing outreach research for altruistic, industry establishment and commercial rationale.

  5. Epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Baba, Mendel; Lazzarini, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot disease is associated with major morbidity, mortality, costs, and reduction of a person?s quality of life. Investigating the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease is the backbone of diabetic foot research and clinical practice, yet the full burden of diabetic foot disease in Australia is unknown. This study aims to describe the protocol for a systematic review of the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia. Me...

  6. How will the impact of El Nino and La Nina on Australia change under global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Scott; Morgan, Adam; Moise, Aurel; Grainger, Simon; Smith, Ian; Reeder, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has a profound influence on Australia. How will this influence change under global warming? Will El Nino droughts become more frequent or more intense? Will La Nina events tend to produce more or less rainfall over Australia than they have in the past? Has ENSO already changed? Has ENSO's impact on Australia already changed? Will global warming be 'El Nino-like'? How well do current models simulate ENSO and how reliable are their projections for ENSO? Here we will provide answers to these questions drawing on the IPCC (2007) report and recent research conducted here in Australia. We will see that: ENSO and its impact on Australia varied substantially on decadal and longer time-scales over the past century; The frequency of El Nino events appeared to increase; The Walker Circulation, which is one of the most prominent and important atmospheric circulations in the world, is centred in the Pacific Ocean and is strongly modulated by ENSO. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) - which is used to track ENSO and the strength of the Walker Circulation -has trended down over the past century. The tropical Pacific - the engine room for ENSO - has warmed to unprecedented levels. The Walker Circulation weakens in some models in response to global warming. The relationship between Australian rainfall, temperature and the SOI has changed. The IPCC WG1 Report (2007) concluded that'... there is no consistent indication at this time of discernable changes in ENSO amplitude or frequency in the 21st century'. Even if ENSO variability in the tropical Pacific does not change, ENSO's impact on Australia might. Evidence supporting this hypothesis will be provided. Finally, we will discuss what this all means for Australia

  7. Flood Risk in Australia: Whose Responsibility Is It, Anyway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin van den Honert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research into four key stakeholders in flood risk management in Australia: local councils, the insurance industry, the State Emergency Service (SES, and local residents; examining the perception of their own roles and responsibilities, and those of the other stakeholders. Key informant interviews were conducted in four locations—Brisbane and Emerald, in Queensland, Dora Creek, in New South Wales, and Benalla, in Victoria. We find that understanding of the roles and responsibilities of each stakeholder varied considerably between research participants. Insurance representatives felt their concerns about increasing flood risk costs were unheeded until the 2010–2011 floods made them the “canary in the coal mine”. Councils felt they had limited options for reducing flood risk. SES representatives felt they were too relied upon for event response, with requests for assistance outstripping their capacity to assist, and many residents were uncertain how to prepare for flood, relying on emergency agencies and the local council to protect them. Key lessons for flood risk management in Australia are (a an urgent need for all stakeholders to better understand each others’ roles and responsibilities; and (b residents must take greater responsibility for their own personal protection. Only then can the vision of shared responsibility presented by the 2009 National Strategy for Disaster Resilience be achieved.

  8. History, development and future of cancer screening in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Olver

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of screening an asymptomatic population for cancer is to achieve better health outcomes, particularly a population survival benefit. Australia has three population screening programs: the National Cervical Screening Program (NCSP, BreastScreen Australia and the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP. Methods: We reviewed the history and development of the three programs. NCSP: Women have a Pap smear every 2 years from age 18–20, or 2 years after first becoming sexually active, until age 69. Since introduction of the NCSP, the cervical cancer incidence has halved, with an approximate 60% decrease in mortality. The screening participation rate approximates 57%, but is lower for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, women in remote areas, and women with lower socio-economic status. The National HPV (human papillomavirus Vaccination Program, introduced in 2007, is expected to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer by a further 70% and has already reduced the incidence of high-grade lesions in girls. In 2017, testing for HPV every 5 years starting at age 25 will replace the Pap smear as the principal screening test. BreastScreen Australia: This program targets women aged 50–74. Over 20 years, mortality from breast cancer has decreased by 32% in response to screening and treatment advances. The participation rate is 56%. The major adverse impact of breast screening is overdiagnosis, estimated in Australia to be as low as 8% of detected cancers, but with estimates of up to 30% from some research. Women should be made aware of both the potential benefits and harms from screening. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in high-risk women leads to earlier screening. NBCSP: The NBCSP uses immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT kits on stool samples to detect bleeding from the bowel. When rollout is complete in 2020, test kits will be sent every 2 years to people aged 50–74. People who test positive

  9. A Case of Language Revitalisation in "Settled" Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of language revitalisation in "settled" Australia, considers the nature of the language ecology in indigenous Australia, and advances some of the reasons for the success of this case of language revitalization. (Author/VWL)

  10. Seagrasses in tropical Australia, productive and abundant for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cymodocea serrulata; photosynthetic characteristics; seagrass production; Thalassia hemprichii; tropical seagrass; Zostera muelleri ... Margaret Greenway2. Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Nathan campus Q. 4111 Australia; School of Engineering, Griffith University, Nathan campus Q. 4111 Australia ...

  11. Implications of climate change for tourism in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelung, B.; Nicholls, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the impacts of projected climate change on Australia's tourism industry. Based on application of the Tourism Climatic Index, it investigates potential changes in climatic attractiveness for Australia's major destinations, and discusses implications for tourist flows and tourism

  12. Widening consumer access to medicines: a comparison of prescription to non-prescription medicine switch in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Natalie J; Kelly, Fiona S; Emmerton, Lynne M; Buetow, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Despite similarities in health systems and Trans-Tasman Harmonization of medicines scheduling, New Zealand is more active than Australia in 'switching' (reclassifying) medicines from prescription to non-prescription. To identify and compare enablers and barriers to switch in New Zealand and Australia. We conducted and analyzed 27 in-depth personal interviews with key participants in NZ and Australia and international participants previously located in Australia, and analyzed records of meetings considering switches (2000-2013). Analysis of both sets of data entailed a heuristic qualitative approach that embraced the lead researcher's knowledge and experience. The key themes identified were conservatism and political influences in Australia, and an open attitude, proactivity and flexibility in NZ. Pharmacist-only medicine schedules and individuals holding a progressive attitude were proposed to facilitate switch in both countries. A pharmacy retail group drove many switches in NZ ('third-party switch'), unlike Australia. Barriers to switch in both countries included small market sizes, funding of prescription medicines and cost of doctor visits, and lack of market exclusivity. In Australia, advertising limitations for pharmacist-only medicines reportedly discouraged industry from submitting switch applications. Perceptions of pharmacy performance could help or hinder switches. Committee and regulator openness to switch, and confidence in pharmacy appear to influence consumer access to medicines. The pharmacist-only medicine schedule in Australasia and the rise of third-party switch and flexibility in switch in NZ could be considered elsewhere to enable switch.

  13. Widening consumer access to medicines: a comparison of prescription to non-prescription medicine switch in Australia and New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J Gauld

    Full Text Available Despite similarities in health systems and Trans-Tasman Harmonization of medicines scheduling, New Zealand is more active than Australia in 'switching' (reclassifying medicines from prescription to non-prescription.To identify and compare enablers and barriers to switch in New Zealand and Australia.We conducted and analyzed 27 in-depth personal interviews with key participants in NZ and Australia and international participants previously located in Australia, and analyzed records of meetings considering switches (2000-2013. Analysis of both sets of data entailed a heuristic qualitative approach that embraced the lead researcher's knowledge and experience.The key themes identified were conservatism and political influences in Australia, and an open attitude, proactivity and flexibility in NZ. Pharmacist-only medicine schedules and individuals holding a progressive attitude were proposed to facilitate switch in both countries. A pharmacy retail group drove many switches in NZ ('third-party switch', unlike Australia. Barriers to switch in both countries included small market sizes, funding of prescription medicines and cost of doctor visits, and lack of market exclusivity. In Australia, advertising limitations for pharmacist-only medicines reportedly discouraged industry from submitting switch applications. Perceptions of pharmacy performance could help or hinder switches.Committee and regulator openness to switch, and confidence in pharmacy appear to influence consumer access to medicines. The pharmacist-only medicine schedule in Australasia and the rise of third-party switch and flexibility in switch in NZ could be considered elsewhere to enable switch.

  14. How to ensure that the results of climate risk analysis make a difference? - Experience from applied research addressing the challenges of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderbauer, Stefan; Zebisch, Marc; Becker, Daniel; Pedoth, Lydia; Renner, Kathrin; Kienberger, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Changing climate conditions may have beneficial or adverse effects on the social-ecological systems we are living in. In any case, the possible effects result from complex and interlinked physical and social processes embedded in these systems. Traditional research addresses these bio-physical and societal issues in a separate way. Therefore, in general, studies on risks related to climate change are still mono-disciplinary in nature with an increasing amount of work following a multi-disciplinary approach. The quality and usefulness of the results of such research for policy or decision making in practice may further be limited by study designs that do not acknowledge appropriately the significance of integrating or at least mixing qualitative and quantitative information and knowledge. Finally, the acceptance of study results - particularly when containing some kind of assessments - is often endangered by insufficient and / or late involvement of stakeholders and users. The above mentioned limitations have often been brought up in the recent past. However, despite that a certain consensus could be achieved in the last years recognising the need to tackle these issues, little progress has been made in terms of implementation within the context of (research) studies. This paper elaborates in detail on reasons that hamper the application of - interdisciplinary (i.e. natural and social science), - trans-disciplinary (i.e. co-production of knowledge) and - integrative (i.e. combining qualitative and quantitative approaches) work. It is based on the experience gained through a number of applied climate change vulnerability studies carried out within the context of various GIZ-financed development cooperation projects, a consultancy project for the German Environment Agency as well as the workshop series INQUIMUS, which tackles particularly the issues of mixing qualitative and quantitative research approaches. Potentials and constraints of possible attempts for

  15. The Hibiscus panduriformis complex (Malvaceae) in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juswara, L.S.; Craven, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Hibiscus panduriformis Burm.f. species complex in Australia is revised. Six species are recognised, of which one is the widespread H. panduriformis; one, H. austrinus, is based upon H. panduriformis var. australis; and four represent new species, H. apodus, H. calcicola, H. fluvialis, and H.

  16. Australia's South African war 1899-19021

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immediately suggest, Australia's contribution to the war was too small to be decisive, ..... They were disbanded just as hard-won experience was turning ... At least one Australian at Colesberg behaved with the brutality Merriman denounced. In November 1899 Charles Cox, a captain from Sydney, ordered a Cape policeman ...

  17. Decreasing prevalence of social drinkers in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callinan, Sarah; Pennay, Amy; Livingston, Michael

    2017-04-01

    There has been a recent decrease in population level alcohol consumption in Australia, particularly in young people. Whether this is due to increasing abstinence or a shift in the way people think about alcohol is not known. The aim of this study is to investigate trends in self-identification of drinker types in Australia from 2001 to 2013 in light of shifting patterns of alcohol consumption in Australia. Five waves of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey from 2001 to 2013 (N=118,416) were used to assess trends in self-identification as a drinker type (non-, ex-, occasional, light, social, heavy and binge drinker). Consumption patterns and demographics of the self-identified groups were also examined. The pattern of self-identification has mostly remained steady over time. The two exceptions to this are a decrease in identification as a social drinker (28% to 22%) and a corresponding increase in identification as a non-drinker (from 19% to 27%). There are few changes over time in the demographic make-up of, or consumption patterns in, the social drinker category with the exception of those over 50, who continue to identify as social drinkers at the same rate. The recent increase in abstinence in Australia seems to be matched by a corresponding decrease in self-identified social drinkers, particularly among those under 50. This indicates that the decrease in consumption is not occurring in those most likely to experience harms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Language Planning and Language Policy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    A five-year period of particular activity in Australian language policy and language planning culminated with the 1991 publication of the White Paper called Australia's Language, which outlines proposed government programs in languages until 1994. Many of the papers in this theme issue of the journal of the Applied Linguistics Association of…

  19. "Smartening Up": Ongoing Challenges for Australia's Outback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradduck, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    As the international community moves inexorably towards a "smart" future, the position of Australia's non-urban areas in that future is less certain. The (re-elected) Australian federal government made a commitment to moving Australian cities forward as part of the international "smart city" movement. However, the effectiveness…

  20. Hendra Virus Infection in Dog, Australia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Peter D; Gabor, Melinda; Poe, Ian; Neale, Kristie; Chaffey, Kim; Finlaison, Deborah S; Gu, Xingnian; Hick, Paul M; Read, Andrew J; Wright, Therese; Middleton, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus occasionally causes severe disease in horses and humans. In Australia in 2013, infection was detected in a dog that had been in contact with an infected horse. Abnormalities and viral RNA were found in the dog's kidney, brain, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Dogs should be kept away from infected horses.

  1. Australia modifies resource rent, uranium mining policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Current Australian government business and economic policies as they affect the mining industry are discussed. The distribution of constitutional and taxing powers in Australia between state and commonwealth governments and possible inappropriate taxes and other policies can have an adverse effect on resource development. The effects of these policies on both coal and uranium mining are discussed

  2. Psychiatric epidemiology and disaster exposure in Australia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reifels, L.; Mills, K.; Dückers, M.L.A.; O'Donnell, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To examine the lifetime prevalence and risk of psychiatric disorders associated with natural and man-made disaster exposure in Australia. Methods. We utilised data from a nationally representative population survey (N = 8841) which were analysed through univariate and multivariate logistic

  3. Uranium mining in Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, B.W.; Whillans, R.T.; Williams, R.M.; Doggett, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This study compared the impact of taxation on the economic viability and competitive position of uranium mining in Canada and Australia. The evaluation is based on four types of uranium deposit and four hypothetical project models. The deposits are assumed to have been discovered and delineated, and are awaiting a mine development decision. The models, initially appraised on a before-tax basis, are then subjected to taxation in each of six jurisdictions. Several taxation criteria are assessed in each case, including after-tax measures of investment incentive, discounted tax revenues, effective tax rates, intergovernmental tax shares, and comparative tax levels. The impact of taxation is shown to be both high and variable. The taxation systems in Saskatchewan and Australia's Northern Territory generate the most government revenue and provide the lowest incentive for investment. Canada's Northwest Territories and Ontario provide the best investment incentive and collect the least amount of taxes. South Australia and Western Australia tend to be positioned between these extremes. The study demonstrates that only the very best uranium mining projects have a chance of being developed under current market conditions, and even these can be rendered uneconomic by excessive taxation regimes. It follows that exceptionally good quality targets will have to be identified to provide the economic justification for uranium exploration. These realities will likely restrict uranium exploration and development activities for some time, not an unexpected response to a market situation where low prices have been caused largely by excess supply. (L.L.)

  4. Perception of Innovative Crop Insurance in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Molnar, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, extreme climate risks cause stakeholders in food supply chains to search for new risk management tools. In Australia, recently so-called crop yield simulation insurance has been introduced based on an integrated agrometeorological simulation model. Current uptake is relatively low,

  5. Doing Business 2014 Economy Profile : Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation

    2013-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. In a series of annual reports, Doing Business assesses regulations affecting domestic firms in 189 economies and ranks the economies in 10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders. This year's report data cover regulations measured from June 2012 thro...

  6. Doing Business Economy Profile 2017 : Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. To allow useful comparison, it also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2017 is the 14th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing...

  7. Developing a National Geography Curriculum for Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Australia is in the process of implementing a national geography curriculum to replace the separate state and territory curriculums. The paper describes the process of curriculum development, and identifies the different groups that were involved. These included the board and staff of the national curriculum authority, geography teachers across…

  8. The Sandalwood industry in Australia: a history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela Statham

    1990-01-01

    From its inception in 1805, when it contributed to Sydney merchant incomes from whaling ventures, until today, when it earns several million dollars in export revenue, the sandalwood industry has played a small but significant part in Australia's economic development. The history of the industry falls into three major stages: first is the off-shore exploitation of...

  9. Depression in Aboriginal men in central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Alex D.H.; Mentha, Ricky; Rowley, Kevin G.

    2013-01-01

    groups comprising of members from primary Indigenous language groups in central Australia. First, focus group participants were asked to review and select a screening measure for adaptation. Bi-lingual experts then translated and back translated the language within the selected measure. Focus group...

  10. Australia and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, K; Australian Atomic Energy Commission, Lucas Heights; Reynolds, J.; Western Mining Corporation, Western Australia

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear electricity industry based on uranium fuel is now well established in 31 countries. Nuclear's ability to provide large scale base load power at costs competitive with available and politically favoured alternatives is causing it to be increasingly selected for new capacity. The World Nuclear Association data shows that current new construction together with that planned and proposed as of December 2009, will bring world nuclear electricity generating capacity from the present 373 000 MW to 876 000 MWm an increase of 112 per cent. By comparison Australia's total generating capacity (mainly from coal) is 47 000 MW, or one eighth of existing world nuclear capacity. Nuclear growth can be expected to increase further, due to continuing world-wide energy supply security issues and politically driven climate change concerns. Australia has been mining uranium for 60 eventful years, much influenced by government policy changes. Australia's un-mined resources are now the largest in the world and it is already a major supplier to the nuclear fueld cycle, in a growing market. This situation offers long term opportunities for Australia to benefit more fully and at the same time contribute to global security by further participation in the uranium-based nuclear electricity industry fuel cycle

  11. Documentation--Refugees and Mass Migration: Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    Since World War II, Australia has been a major country of refugee settlement. This article traces its immigrant policy and resulting population from its interest in encouraging immigration for its own population growth and development to its current commitment to help refugees and Special Humanitarian Program (SHP) cases. (ETS)

  12. Atomic energy: agreement between Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This agreement provides for the exchange of nuclear materials and equipment between Canada and Australia and specifies the safeguards and other protective measures that shall be employed to ensure the peaceful use of the nuclear technology shared between the two countries

  13. In Australia: Multiple Intelligences in Multiple Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, Wilma

    1997-01-01

    In Australia, Gardner's multiple-intelligences theory has strongly influenced primary, preschool, and special education. A survey of 30 schools revealed that teachers use two basic approaches: teaching to, and teaching through, multiple intelligences. The first approach might develop children's music skills via playing an instrument. The second…

  14. Social Inclusion and Critical Consciousness in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A.; Ortega, Lilyana

    2010-01-01

    Australia's Indigenous population is excluded from a range of opportunities, experiences and amenities that facilitate wellbeing, self-determination and social inclusion. This social exclusion constrains the career development and occupational attainment of Indigenous youth, which represent key routes to societal inclusion. Critical…

  15. Food Literacy at Secondary Schools in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronto, Rimante; Ball, Lauren; Pendergast, Donna; Harris, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food literacy can encourage adolescents to develop healthy dietary patterns. This study examined home economics teachers' (HET) perspectives of the importance, curriculum, self-efficacy, and food environments regarding food literacy in secondary schools in Australia. Methods: A 20-item cross-sectional survey was completed by 205 HETs.…

  16. Worker Education in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagglund, George

    The history of the recent development of worker education in Australia and New Zealand shows that, in just the past 15 years or so, very significant improvements have occurred in delivery of trade union education. To a very large degree these developments took place because of the existence of a close relationship between the union movement and…

  17. Medical e-commerce for regional Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D K; Mikelaitis, P

    2001-12-01

    The residents of rural and regional Australia have less access to health care services than in capital cities. There is a reluctance of General Practitioners to practice in the country. New information technology and government initiatives are now addressing this problem. High bandwidth videoconferencing is now being routinely used to provide psychiatric consultations to areas without this service. But this (like many other implementations of telecommunication technologies to health) has resulted in loss of revenue to regional Australia while benefiting capital cities. Thus, the current implementation of telecommunication technology to health has resulted in loss of revenue of the regions while increasing the bias towards the cities. Further, the system is not economically viable and requires the Government to inject funds for the smooth operation of the system. This paper proposes the use of telecommunication technology for enabling the communities of regional Australia to access health facilities via physical and virtual clinics. The proposed technique is self supporting and is based in the country with the intent to prevent the drain of resources from regional Australia. The technique attempts to eradicate the problem at the root level by providing a business opportunity that is based in and to cater for the needs of the remote communities. The proposed system would provide health services by physical and virtual clinics and while serving the communities would be profit centres- and thus attracting doctors and other resources to the remote communities.

  18. International Higher Education in Australia: Unplanned Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mahsood; Nair, Chenicheri Sid

    2011-01-01

    International education is the third largest export industry in Australia and is worth almost A$20 billion. The last ten years have witnessed significant growth in both onshore and offshore enrolments of international students in Australian universities. The offshore component of all Australian universities has been subject to scrutiny by the…

  19. Modelling the determinants of international tourism demand to Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Christine; MacAleer, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the recent Asian currency and economic crises, tourism from Asia had rapidly become Australia's major tourism export industry. Tourists from Singapore, which is Australia's fifth major market, represented 6% of international tourist arrivals to Australia in 1996. The average annual growth rate of tourist arrivals from Singapore of around 20% over 1990-96 far exceeded the 10.5% average annual percentage growth rate of all tourist arrivals to Australia over the same period (Australian ...

  20. An Oral Component in PhD Examination in Australia: Issues and Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Margaret; Holbrook, Allyson; Lovat, Terence; Fairbairn, Hedy; Starfield, Sue; Paltridge, Brian

    2018-01-01

    While there has been considerable research on doctoral examination there is little that examines the various roles of the oral component and what issues one might consider if introducing or revising that aspect of the thesis examination process. This matter is of particular importance in Australia where it is not usual to have an oral component as…

  1. The Gendered Shaping of University Leadership in Australia, South Africa and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kate; Bagilhole, Barbara; Riordan, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses career trajectories into university management in Australia, South Africa and the United Kingdom (UK), skills required to operate effectively and the power of vice-chancellors (VCs) and their impact on the gendered shaping of university leadership. It is based on qualitative research with 56 male and female senior managers.…

  2. Mixed Messages: Public Communication about Higher Education and Non-Traditional Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Collette; Lewis, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Australian Government participation targets recommended in the Review of Australian Higher Education (Bradley In Review of Australian higher education: Final report, Commonwealth of Australia 2008) presented a complex public communication challenge to higher education participation. This research discusses the content of communication messages…

  3. Plants species of the Central European flora as aliens in Australia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Phillips, M. L.; Murray, B. R.; Pyšek, Petr; Pergl, Jan; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Chytrý, M.; Kühn, I.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2010), s. 465-482 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : alien species * introduction history * Australia Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2010

  4. Monoglossic Echoes in Multilingual Spaces: Language Narratives from a Vietnamese Community Language School in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reath Warren, Anne

    2018-01-01

    This article reports on language narratives in the ecology of a Vietnamese community language school (VCLS) in Australia. The study takes a dialogical perspective, where the stories about language that informants in the research setting tell are understood to shape and be shaped by the contexts in which they are told. Systematic analysis of…

  5. Muslim Students' Cultural and Religious Experiences in City, Suburban and Regional University Campuses in NSW, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Adam; Dunn, Kevin; Hopkins, Peter; Worthington, Lisa; Amin, Faroque

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been much research about the growing ethnic and religious diversity on university campuses across the world, relatively little is known about the religious and cultural experiences of Muslim students on university campuses in Australia. We draw upon an analysis of a questionnaire that was completed by 323 Muslim students who…

  6. Language Difficulties of International Students in Australia: The Effects of Prior Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawir, Erlenawati

    2005-01-01

    Globalisation has placed a growing importance on English language speaking and listening. Prior research indicates that many international students from Asia, studying in Australia, face serious learning difficulties and lack confidence in speaking and taking a proactive role in classrooms. The paper reports on data gathered in interviews with…

  7. Developing Generic Skills through University Study: A Study of Arts, Science and Engineering in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Paul B. T.; Pattison, Philippa E.; Harris, Kerri-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This study examined relationships between important aspects of a university education and the assessment and development of generic skills. A sample of 323 students enrolled in single or double arts, engineering and/or science degrees from a research-intensive university in Australia were administered the Graduate Skills Assessment to measure four…

  8. The Role of Libraries in eHealth Service Delivery in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sarada

    2009-01-01

    eHealth is an emerging service sector which has great potential to improve health care delivery to rural and remote communities, facilitate health surveillance, and promote health education and research. Despite the critical need for eHealth services in Australia based on the challenges of distance and human resources, its utility has yet to be…

  9. The Educational Mission of the Shaliach: A Case Study in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonov, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Since the establishment of the State of Israel, the Shaliach has embodied at least one aspect of the tangible expression of the symbiotic relationship between Israel and its Diasporas. This article discusses the educational Shaliach sent from Israel to the Jewish Diaspora in Australia, and is based on a research study carried out between 2006 and…

  10. Singing and Companionship in the Hawthorn University of the Third-Age Choir, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The international University of the Third Age (U3A) embodies the principles of lifelong learning and personal fulfilment amongst members. The research reported in this article focused on the Choir of the U3A Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia and the benefits perceived by members undertaking this active music engagement in non-competitive choral…

  11. New observations on Micropleura australiensis (Nematoda, Dracunculoidea), a parasite of crocodiles in Australia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, František; Spratt, D. M.; Kay, W. R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2006), s. 273-278 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/06/0170 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Micropleura * Crocodylus * Australia Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.772, year: 2006

  12. Preparing Chinese International Business Students for the Transition to Undergraduate Study in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Geoff; Ashton-Hay, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The diverse range of academic, social and cultural challenges experienced by Asian students when studying at Western universities is well documented. This research involved a pre-departure curriculum designed to ease the intercultural transition and adjustment for Chinese international students to a new learning environment in Australia. Moving…

  13. The University-Business Nexus in Australia. Go8 Backgrounder 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    An effective innovation system requires productive interactions between all its parts. Within Australia there is a view that business-university interactions are suboptimal. Government has set a target for doubling the interactions between business and publicly funded researchers by 2020; and the Group of Eight has a strategic priority to build…

  14. Baiting Techniques for Control of Coptotermes Species Within Existing Buildings in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.R.J. French

    1991-01-01

    Baiting techniques have been developed over the years to control Coptotermes species, the most economically important termite species in Australia. Given the restrictions on organochlorines as termiticides in North America, this paper highlights research that has focussed on baiting programs against Coptotermes as alternatives to...

  15. The Impact of E-Skills on the Settlement of Iranian Refugees in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Saeed; Armarego, Jocelyn; Sudweeks, Fay

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The research investigates the impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on Iranian refugees' settlement in Australia. Background: The study identifies the issues of settlement, such as language, cultural and social differences. Methodology: The Multi-Sited Ethnography (MSE), which is a qualitative methodology, has…

  16. Using the CPGI to Determine Problem Gambling Prevalence in Australia: Measurement Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alun C.; Wynne, Harold; Dowling, Nicki A.; Tomnay, Jane E.; Thomas, Shane A.

    2010-01-01

    Most states and territories in Australia have adopted the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) of the Canadian Problem Gambling Index as the standard measure of problem gambling in their prevalence studies and research programs. However, notwithstanding this attempted standardisation, differences in sampling and recruitment methodologies and in…

  17. A Comparative Study Examining Academic Cohorts with Transnational Migratory Intentions towards Canada and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, John

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the issue of transnational academic mobility of academic staff, those choosing to migrate to higher education institutions in different countries as part of their career development, and performs a comparative study between the characteristics of academics examining Australia as a possible migratory destination with those…

  18. "The Show Must Go On": Older Entertainers Making Music in the Community in Melbourne, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Globally countries are faced with an aging population and Australia is no different. This creates challenges for the maintenance of well-being which can be enhanced by active engagement in society. There is extensive research that confirms that engagement in music by older people is positively related to individual and community well-being. Music…

  19. Primary Geography in Australia: Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Understandings of Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Recent curriculum introductions and revisions on a global scale have highlighted the importance of primary teachers' content knowledge in geography and the lack of research in this area (Catling, 2014). This has become a particular focus in Australia with the introduction of the "Australian Curriculum: Geography" in 2013 and the…

  20. Cultural Diversity, Racialisation and the Experience of Racism in Rural Australia: The South Australian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, James; Dunn, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Rural spaces in settler nations like Australia are commonly perceived as "white", with low numbers of "non-white" ethnic minorities. Perhaps because of this, although ethnic diversity is a feature of some rural communities, there is a paucity of research into issues of cultural exclusion. This is surprising in view of recent…

  1. The International School Psychology Survey. Data from Australia, China, Germany, Italy and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Graydon, Kelly; Yuen, Mantak; Lam, Shui-Fong; Thurm, Jorg-Michael; Klueva, Nadejda; Coyne, Julia H.; Loprete, Louis; Phillips, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Using the International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) this study aims to advance our knowledge of the characteristics, training, roles and responsibilities, challenges and research interests of school psychologists around the world. Data are presented from five countries; Australia, China (Hong Kong), Germany, Italy and Russia. The ISPS…

  2. Ensuring Rights: Improving Access to Sexual and Reproductive Health Services for Female International Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljski, Carolyn; Quiazon, Regina; Tran, Chau

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the research and advocacy work being conducted by the Multicultural Centre for Women's Health (MCWH), a national community-based organization in Victoria, Australia, the paper analyzes female international students' experiences with accessing sexual and reproductive health information and services. Accessibility of sexual and…

  3. Evaluation of a lateral flow immunoassay for field identification of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to improve surveillance capacity for the exotic red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFA) was recently evaluated by Biosecurity Queensland staff in Australia. The purpose of the research was to assess the ability of the fire ant LFA to discriminate S. i...

  4. The Phantom National? Assembling National Teaching Standards in Australia's Federal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Glenn C.; Lewis, Steven

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we use the development of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST) as an illustrative case to examine how national schooling reforms are assembled in Australia's federal system. Drawing upon an emerging body of research on "policy assemblage" within the fields of policy sociology, anthropology and critical…

  5. Exploring Donation Decisions: Beliefs and Preferences for Organ Donation in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Melissa K.; White, Katherine M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored common beliefs and preferences for posthumous and living organ donation in Australia where organ donation rates are low and little research exists. Content analysis of discussions revealed the advantage of prolonging/saving life whereas disadvantages differed according to donation context. A range of people/groups perceived to…

  6. Ocean to Outback: Leonie Rennie's Contribution to Science Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Grady

    2009-01-01

    In this article I initially borrow a metaphor from an art exhibition, "Ocean to Outback," as a way to express my perspective on the contribution that Leonie Rennie has made to science education in Australia. I then consider Leonie's contributions as overlapping themes. In particular, Leonie's well-known research on gender and issues of…

  7. Responses of Study Abroad Students in Australia to Experience-Based Pedagogy in Sport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard; Georgakis, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to research on the scholarship of teaching in the physical education/sport studies fields by examining the responses of study abroad students from overseas studying in Australia to a unit of study in sport studies that placed the interpretation of experience as the centre of the learning process. It draws on research…

  8. Worldwide Report, Telecommunications Policy, Research and Development, No. 236

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1982-01-01

    This report contains information concerning the telecommunications policy, research and development of the following countries: (1) Australia, (2) Argentina, (3) Madagascar, (4) South Africa, (5) Zaire, (6...

  9. Research Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. May 2014, Vol. 6, No. 1 AJHPE 33. Research. Currently, radiography students are faced with the challenge of having to learn factual information, while ... A descriptive exploratory research design was used to collect both ..... Creswell J. Research Design: Quantitative, Qualitative and Mixed Methods Approaches.

  10. Exploring the Utilisation of Stand up Paddle Boarding in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Schram

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stand Up Paddle Boarding (SUP has grown exponentially in the last few years with unprecedented participation rates globally. Despite some scientific research on physiological and performance variables, minimal information exists regarding participation and utilisation. The purpose of this study was to discover more about how and where people participate in the relatively new sport of SUP. An open-source online survey application was administered internationally to active SUP participants to capture information relevant to both demographics and participation. Of a total of 240 responses, 154 (64.2% were Australian. The average SUP rider was 42.9 ± 11.7 years, mass 80.4 ± 18.7 kg, 1.75 ± 0.10 m tall with a BMI of 26.1 ± 4.9. More males (69.5% participate in SUP than females with the majority of participants from the eastern seaboard of Australia. Participants most commonly used SUP for fun and fitness, for around 3 h per week, predominantly at the beach with friends, with around half of the respondents reporting a competitive involvement. This is the first study to date to quantify participation of SUP within Australia. Results revealed SUP is a global activity with a high representation within Australia. Key findings from this study reveal the geographical and demographic distribution of SUP use. Consequently, these findings may inform the industry about its target audience. Additionally, information regarding the ‘typical’ SUP rider may serve to further promote and grow the sport.

  11. Water: Drought, Crisis and Governance in Australia and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sousa Júnior

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite huge differences in population, household income and development levels, Australia and Brazil have some temporal convergences in their water governance systems. Over the last 20 years, both countries have significantly reformed their water policies and practices by introducing a legal foundation for more integrated and participatory catchment/basin management based on the best information available. A critical test of any water reform is how effective it is in meeting the challenges of extreme and unpredictable conditions of drought and floods, which are expected to increase under climate changes scenarios. This paper compared the contemporary water governance frameworks of Australia and Brazil in relation to three elements of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM: integration, participation, and information/knowledge. We focused on insights from Brazil’s recent drought and Australia’s fluctuating water crises to derive lessons and recommendations for future changes. Among the main recommendations, we stress the need for both systems to improve effective participation and to embrace a more comprehensive approach to cope with water scarcity in future scenarios. Furthermore, water related decisions should be based on a transparent and well informed process, and take into account the lessons from similar situations worldwide in order to avoid unnecessary or ineffective measures. As demonstrated in the Australian case during the Millennium Drought, the most effective initiatives were those involving government, the private sector and society to achieve a more sustainable consumption pattern in all sectors. There is much to learn from the Brazilian and Australia experiences in water reforms and crises, but it is imperative to understand the social, economic and environmental context within which these took place. Continuing to develop the capacity and willingness of researchers and policy makers to work together can make an

  12. Global nuclear waste repository proposal highlights Australia's nuclear energy vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The Pangea proposal is disscused and considered relevant to Australia. A five-year research program by the company has identified Australia and Argentina as having the appropriate geological, economic and democratic credentials for such a deep repository, with Australia being favoured. A deep repository would be located where the geology has been stable for several hundred million years, so that there need not be total reliance on a robust engineered barrier system to keep the waste securely isolated for thousands of years. It would be a commercial undertaking and would have dedicated port and rail infrastructure. It would take spent fuel and other wastes from commercial reactors, and possibly also waste from weapons disposal programs. Clearly, while the primary ethical and legal principle is that each country is entirely responsible for its own waste, including nuclear waste (polluter pays etc), the big question is whether the concept of an international waste repository is acceptable ethically. Political and economic questions are secondary to this. By taking a fresh look at the reasons for the difficulties which have faced most national repository programs, and discarding the preconception that each country must develop its own disposal facilities, it is possible to define a class of simple, superior high isolation sites which may provide a multi-national basis for solving the nuclear waste disposal problem. The relatively small volumes of high-level wastes or spent fuel which arise from nuclear power production make shared repositories a feasible proposition. For small countries, the economies of scale which can be achieved make the concept attractive. For all countries, objective consideration of the relative merits of national and multi-national solutions is a prudent part of planning the management of long-lived radioactive wastes

  13. Beyond White Australia: Sri Lankan-born migration to Australia since 1947

    OpenAIRE

    Sherrard, Sharmini

    2017-01-01

    This thesis examines the history of Sri Lankan-born migration to Australia, which commenced in 1947 during the height of the White Australia policy. Its objective is to increase understanding of these immigrants. It examines the reasons for their departure, the impact of changes in intake policy on the ethnicity of the immigrants, and their settlement experiences. Intake policy has favoured people with occupational skills and English language proficiency. Skills and English language ability h...

  14. Intergenerational Differences in Acculturation Orientations of Turkish Speakers in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yagmur, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, acculturation and language orientations among Turkish speakers in Australia (n = 283) are discussed. Compared to West European countries, the Turkish community in Australia is much smaller. Given the prevalent pluralism ideology in Australia, a high level of sociocultural adjustment

  15. Sex Education in South Australia: The Past and the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Joy; Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee

    2013-01-01

    In South Australia, sex education has been controversial since its inception. The Australasian White Cross league and the Family Planning Association of South Australia were the pioneers of sex education in South Australia. The framing of a national framework and the implementation of the SHARE (Sexual Health and Relationships Education) project…

  16. Internationalization in Australia and Canada: Lessons for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the internationalization of postsecondary education in Australia and Canada. The author discusses the contextual similarities and differences between the two countries, the shifting rationale "from aid to trade" behind Australia's internationalization attempts and some of the reasons for Australia's success.…

  17. 76 FR 81401 - Importation of Litchi Fruit From Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Australia AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: We are... Australia into the continental United States, except Florida. As a condition of entry, the litchi fruit... protection organization of Australia and treated with irradiation at a dose of 400 gray for plant pests of...

  18. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. Objective To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. Methods To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. Results There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Conclusions Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26878865

  19. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2016-02-15

    As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health.

  20. Physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis in Australia and New Zealand: A clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Brenda M; Wilson, Christine; Dentice, Ruth; Cox, Narelle S; Middleton, Anna; Tannenbaum, Esta; Bishop, Jennifer; Cobb, Robyn; Burton, Kate; Wood, Michelle; Moran, Fiona; Black, Ryan; Bowen, Summar; Day, Rosemary; Depiazzi, Julie; Doiron, Katherine; Doumit, Michael; Dwyer, Tiffany; Elliot, Alison; Fuller, Louise; Hall, Kathleen; Hutchins, Matthew; Kerr, Melinda; Lee, Annemarie L; Mans, Christina; O'Connor, Lauren; Steward, Ranjana; Potter, Angela; Rasekaba, Tshepo; Scoones, Rebecca; Tarrant, Ben; Ward, Nathan; West, Samantha; White, Dianne; Wilson, Lisa; Wood, Jamie; Holland, Anne E

    2016-05-01

    Physiotherapy management is a key element of care for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) throughout the lifespan. Although considerable evidence exists to support physiotherapy management of CF, there is documented variation in practice. The aim of this guideline is to optimize the physiotherapy management of people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. A systematic review of the literature in key areas of physiotherapy practice for CF was undertaken. Recommendations were formulated based on National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) guidelines and considered the quality, quantity and level of the evidence; the consistency of the body of evidence; the likely clinical impact; and applicability to physiotherapy practice in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 30 recommendations were made for airway clearance therapy, inhalation therapy, exercise assessment and training, musculoskeletal management, management of urinary incontinence, managing the newly diagnosed patient with CF, delivery of non-invasive ventilation, and physiotherapy management before and after lung transplantation. These recommendations can be used to underpin the provision of evidence-based physiotherapy care to people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. © 2016 The Authors Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.