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Sample records for aureus challenged antimicrobial

  1. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an Important agent of food poisoning. In many countries, it is the main bacterial organism responsible for diseases caused by exotoxin production and direct invasion with systemic dissemination. In poultry, S. aureus is associated with many clinical syndromes including tenosynovitis, omphalitis, ...

  2. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences, Volume 11 (Number 1). June, 2013. 51 ... Staphylococcus aureus is an Important agent of food poisoning. In many ..... enterotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the hands and nasal cavities of flight catering employees. Journal of Food. Protection, 11, 1487–1491. Hill JE ...

  3. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences, Volume 11 (Number 1). June, 2013. 52 growth promotion and prevention of colonization by pathogenic bacteria (Munoz et al., 1993; ..... isolates in a Spanish hospital. Antimicrobial. Agents and Chemotherapy, 36: 1200-1202. Okonko IO, Soleye FA, Amusan TA, Ogun AA &. Kwaga TA ...

  4. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xiu-jun; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common multidrug resistant bacteria both in hospitals and in the community. In the last two decades, there has been growing concern about the increasing resistance to MRSA of the most potent antibiotic glycopeptides. MRSA infection poses a serious problem for physicians and their patients. Photosensitizer-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) appears to be a promising and innovative approach for treatin...

  5. Genome-Wide Identification of Antimicrobial Intrinsic Resistance Determinants in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Leng, Bingfeng; Haaber, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    that confer intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents may be explored for alternative antimicrobial therapies, by potentiating the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. In this study, we identified the intrinsic resistome to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials in the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. We...

  6. Antimicrobial effect of different types of honey on Staphylococcus aureus

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    Saad B. Almasaudi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Honey exhibits antimicrobial activities against a wide range of bacteria in different milieu. This study aims to compare the effects of five types of honey (both imported and local Saudi honey against Staphylococcus aureus. The five types of honey (Manuka Honey UMF +20, Manuka Honey UMF +16, Active +10 Manuka Honey, Sidr honey and Nigella sativa honey were evaluated for their bactericidal/bacteriostatic activities against both methicillin resistant and sensitive S. aureus. The inhibitory effect of honey on bacterial growth was evident at concentrations of 20% and 10% (v/v. Manuka Honey showed the best results. Manuka Honey UMF +20 had a bactericidal effect on both methicillin resistant and sensitive S. aureus. However, Sidr and N. sativa honey exerted only a bacteriostatic effect. The efficacy of different types of honey against S. aureus was dependent on the type of honey and the concentration at which it was administered. Manuka Honey had the best bactericidal activity. Future experiments should be conducted to evaluate the effects of honey on bacterial resistance.

  7. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-jun Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most common multidrug resistant bacteria both in hospitals and in the community. In the last two decades, there has been growing concern about the increasing resistance to MRSA of the most potent antibiotic glycopeptides. MRSA infection poses a serious problem for physicians and their patients. Photosensitizer-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT appears to be a promising and innovative approach for treating multidrug resistant infection. In spite of encouraging reports of the use of antimicrobial PDT to inactivate MRSA in large in vitro studies, there are only few in vivo studies. Therefore, applying PDT in the clinic for MRSA infection is still a long way off.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus: nuevos y antiguos antimicrobianos Staphylococcus aureus: new and old antimicrobial agents

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    B. Perazzi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la sensibilidad a antiguos y nuevos antimicrobianos de aislamientos de Staphylococcus aureus resistentes a la oxacilina, de origen hospitalario (SAOR-H y adquiridos en la comunidad (SAOR-AC, y también en aislamientos sensibles a la oxacilina (SAOS. Se estudió en forma prospectiva la concentración inhibitoria mínima a diversos antimicrobianos en 118 aislamientos consecutivos por dilución seriada en agar según las indicaciones del CLSI. En los aislamientos de SAOR sin resistencia acompañante se determinó la presencia de los genes mec A, leucocidina de Panton Valentine (LPV y γ-hemolisina por PCR, y del cassette SCC mec por PCR múltiple. De los 118 aislamientos estudiados, 44 fueron SAOR-H, 16 SAOR-AC y 58 SAOS. Los aislamientos de SAOR-H presentaron resistencia simultánea a eritromicina, clindamicina, gentamicina, ciprofloxacina, levofloxacina y moxifloxacina, y todos fueron sensibles a tigeciclina (TIG, vancomicina, teicoplanina y linezolid (LZD. Los aislamientos de SAOR-AC fueron resistentes solamente a OXA y sensibles a todos los antimicrobianos ensayados. En todos ellos se detectaron los genes mec A, LPV, γ-hemolisina y el cassette SCC mec IV. En SAOS y en SAOR-AC todos los antimicrobianos no ß-lactámicos ensayados presentaron excelente actividad in vitro, mientras que en SAOR-H sólo los antiguos antimicrobianos como glucopéptidos, doxiciclina, rifampicina y trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol presentaron buena actividad in vitro, al igual que LZD y TIG entre los nuevos antimicrobianos. El fenotipo de SAOR sin resistencia acompañante fue altamente predictivo de SAOR-AC, ya que fue confirmado por presentar el cassette SCC mec IV.The objective of the study was to evaluate the susceptibility to old and new antimicrobial agents against hospital-acquired oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-ORSA, community-acquired oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-ORSA, and oxacillin-susceptible S. aureus (OSSA

  9. ANTISTAPHYBASE: database of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and essential oils (EOs) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Taieb, Malek; Lamine, Mohamed Ashraf; Cherif, Ammar; Jridi, Taoufik; Mahjoubi, Basma; Mbarek, Sarra; Fliss, Ismail; Nefzi, Adel; Sebei, Khaled; Ben Hamida, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are major pathogens. The antimicrobial peptides and essential oils (EOs) display narrow- or broad-spectrum activity against bacteria including these strains. A centralized resource, such as a database, designed specifically for anti-S. aureus/anti-methicillin-resistant S. aureus antimicrobial peptides and EOs is therefore needed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of their structure/activity associations and combinations. The database ANTISTAPHYBASE is created to facilitate access to important information on antimicrobial peptides and essential peptides against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. aureus. At the moment, the database contains 596 sequences of antimicrobial peptides produced by diverse organisms and 287 essential oil records. It permits a quick and easy search of peptides based on their activity as well as their general, physicochemical properties and literature data. These data are very useful to perform further bioinformatic or chemometric analysis and would certainly be useful for the development of new drugs for medical use. The ANTISTAPHYBASE database is freely available at: https://www.antistaphybase.com/ .

  10. Antimicrobial consumption on dairy herds and its association with antimicrobial inhibition zone diameters of non-aureus staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M; Piepers, S; Supré, K; De Vliegher, S

    2018-02-02

    The main objectives of this study were to quantify the consumption of antimicrobials on a convenience sample of dairy herds and to determine the association between herd-level antimicrobial consumption and inhibition zone diameters (IZD) of non-aureus staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus isolates from subclinical mastitis cases. Also, the association between the IZD of non-aureus staphylococci and Staph. aureus isolates within a herd was studied. Antimicrobial consumption data on 56 Flemish dairy farms were obtained between 2013 and 2014 by so-called garbage can audits and expressed as antimicrobial treatment incidence (ATI), with the unit of ATI being the number of defined daily doses animal (DDDA) used per 1,000 cow-days. The average total ATI in adult dairy cattle for all active substances was 18.73 DDDA per 1,000 cow-days and ranged from 6.28 to 42.13 DDDA between herds. The ATI of critically important (for human health) antimicrobials was 6.91 DDDA per 1,000 cow-days; that is, 37% of total antimicrobial consumption. The average ATI for intramammary therapy of (sub)clinical mastitis, intramammary dry-cow therapy, and systemically administered therapy was 5.20, 6.70, and 6.73 DDDA, respectively. The IZD of 239 non-aureus staphylococci and 88 Staph. aureus isolates originating from milk samples from cows with subclinical mastitis collected on selected dairy herds were determined using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and ranged between 6 and 42 mm. Because only a limited number of clinical breakpoints (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and epidemiological cut-off values (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) are available for mastitis-causing bacteria in bovine, IZD were used as a proxy for antimicrobial resistance. Inhibition zone diameters of non-aureus staphylococci for cefquinome, a critically important β-lactam antibiotic, were negatively associated with the ATI of critically important β-lactam for systemically administered

  11. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Cabo, Marta L; Rodríguez-Herrera, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils to remove the foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus from food-processing facilities. The effectiveness of 19 essential oils against planktonic cells of S. aureus was firstly assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration. Planktonic cells showed a wide variability in resistance to essential oils, with thyme oil as the most effective, followed by lemongrass oil and then vetiver oil. The eight essential oils most effective against planktonic cells were subsequently tested against 48-h-old biofilms formed on stainless steel. All essential oils reduced significantly (p oils were the most effective, but high concentrations were needed to achieve logarithmic reductions over 4 log CFU/cm(2) after 30 min exposure. Alternatively, the use of sub-lethal doses of thyme oil allowed to slow down biofilm formation and to enhance the efficiency of thyme oil and benzalkonium chloride against biofilms. However, some cellular adaptation to thyme oil was detected. Therefore, essential oil-based treatments should be based on the rotation and combination of different essential oils or with other biocides to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Comparison of identification and antimicrobial resistance pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Amassoma, Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeni, Funmilola Abidemi; Gbarabon, Tombari; Andersen, Camilla; Norskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is often responsible for fatal infections and recent upsurge of resistant strains has resulted in therapeutic failure. The identification of this microorganism is a major challenge to medical microbiologists in developing countries. One hundred and eighty five isolates which had been previously isolated from the nares of 185 healthy college students' volunteers in Amassoma, Bayelsa State, South Nigeria were identified by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry, and PCR amplification of the spa gene. The identified isolates were compared with presumptive identities obtained by growth on MSA, tube coagulation and slide agglutination tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of S. aureus isolates was performed by Kirby Bauer technique while MRSA was screened for by growth on chromlDTM MRSA plate and confirmed by PCR-amplification of mecA/mecC genes. From the 185 staphylococci that grew with yellow colonies on MSA, 24 were positive in the slide coagulase test, while 17 were positive in the tube coagulase test; MALDI TOF mass spectrometry and PCR amplification of the spa gene showed excellent concordance with the tube test, as all tube coagulase-positive strains were identified as S. aureus, while tube coagulase-test negative isolates in all cases were designated as other staphylococcal species by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and were spa PCR test negative. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to clindamycin, vancomycin, fusidic acid, rifampicin and linezolid, while observed resistance to penicillin and trimethoprim were high. Only one MRSA strain was detected. The study confirms that the tube coagulase test is an accurate diagnostic method for identification of S. aureus, while growths on MSA and slide agglutination tests are inaccurate. We found a low prevalence of MRSA and a high rate of trimethroprim-resistance in the studied population.

  13. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  14. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  15. A study on antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Eritrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgadas Govind Naik

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in skin and soft tissue infections. Methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA is prevalent in most of the countries wherever it is sought for. MRSA is one of the important pathogens implicated in hospital acquired infection. The main objectives of this study was to find out the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of S.aureus isolates, the prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA and nasal carriage rate in healthy hospital staff. Methods:A total of 278 S.aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and 30 anterior nares swabs from healthy hospital staff were screened for S.aureus organisms using standard methods. Results:High resistance was observed against ampicillin, penicillin and tetracycline. High sensitivity was recorded against amikasin, amoxicillin-c and ciprofloxacin. Of the 278 isolates 26 (9% isolates were methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA. 17 % of the hospital staff were positive for nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion:Our study emphasizes the need for continuous monitoring of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of S.aureus isolates including MRSA for the selection of appropriate therapy. In Eritrea, from the present findings it appears that the spread of MRSA in community and hospital settings is limited.

  16. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical Staphylococcus aureus from healthcare institutions in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egyir, Beverly; Guardabassi, Luca; Sørum, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and clonal diversity of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Ghana. A total of 308 S. aureus isolates from six healthcare institutions located across Northern, Central and Southern Ghana were......-positive S. aureus in Africa, low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and high diversity of MRSA lineages in Ghana compared to developed countries and other African countries. The detection of known pandemic MRSA clones in the absence of routine MRSA identification in most Ghanaian clinical microbiology...... characterized by antibiotyping, spa typing and PCR detection of Panton Valentine leukocin (PVL) genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were confirmed by PCR detection of mecA gene and further characterized by SCCmec and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance...

  17. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing....... Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. Results: S. aureus was isolated from 22 % of humans, 4 % of pigs and 11 % of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared...

  18. A comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for Staphylococcus aureus in organic and conventional dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikofsky, Linda L; Barlow, John W; Santisteban, Carlos; Schukken, Ynte H

    2003-01-01

    Selective pressure from antimicrobial use, mutations, or acquisition of foreign resistance determinants mediate antimicrobial resistance. If antimicrobial use is the major selective pressure encouraging the development of resistance, then reduced use should result in decreased resistance. We compared antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from milk samples from 22 organic (nonantibiotic using) dairy herds to isolates from 16 conventional dairy herds. Susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion, and zone diameters were recorded in millimeters for 144 isolates from organic farms and 117 isolates from conventional farms and were also classified as susceptible or not-susceptible (intermediate and resistant categories combined). Strength of association between high or low use and proportion susceptible was evaluated by Chi-square analysis and differences in mean zone diameter for isolates from organic farms versus isolates from conventional farms were compared by analysis of variance. Analysis was done for each antimicrobial and deemed significant at p organic and conventional herds for seven of the nine antibiotics studied. Herds that were certified organic had S. aureus isolates that were more susceptible to antimicrobials. Overall, S. aureus isolates from both organic and conventional herds showed good susceptibility to most commonly used bovine mastitis antimicrobials; however, isolates from organic herds were significantly more susceptible. Longitudinal studies of herds undergoing the transition to organic farming would help elucidate the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance and the potential return of antimicrobial susceptibility.

  19. Genome-wide identification of antimicrobial intrinsic resistance determinants in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vestergaard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antimicrobial resistance severely threatens our ability to treat bacterial infections. While acquired resistance has received considerable attention, relatively little is known of intrinsic resistance that allows bacteria to naturally withstand antimicrobials. Gene products that confer intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents may be explored for alternative antimicrobial therapies, by potentiating the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. In this study, we identified the intrinsic resistome to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials in the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. We screened the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library of 1920 single-gene inactivations in S. aureus strain JE2, for increased susceptibility to the anti-staphylococcal antimicrobials (ciprofloxacin, oxacillin, linezolid, fosfomycin, daptomycin, mupirocin, vancomycin and gentamicin. 68 mutants were confirmed by E-test to display at least two-fold increased susceptibility to one or more antimicrobial agents. The majority of the identified genes have not previously been associated with antimicrobial susceptibility in S. aureus. For example, inactivation of genes encoding for subunits of the ATP synthase, atpA, atpB, atpG and atpH, reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of gentamicin 16-fold. To elucidate the potential of the screen, we examined treatment efficacy in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Gentamicin efficacy was significantly improved, when treating larvae infected with the atpA mutant compared to wild type cells with gentamicin at a clinically relevant concentration. Our results demonstrate that many gene products contribute to the intrinsic antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus. Knowledge of these intrinsic resistance determinants provides alternative targets for compounds that may potentiate the efficacy of existing antimicrobial agents against this important pathogen.

  20. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in bulk tank milk and milk filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Bogdanovičová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in raw milk and milk filters, its antibiotic resistance and detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Samples of raw cow´s milk and milk filters were collected in the period from 2012 till 2014, from 50 dairy farms in the Czech Republic. The total of 261 samples (164 samples of raw milk and 97 milk filters were cultivated on Baird-Parker agar. Both the typical and atypical colonies were examined by plasmacoagulase test and PCR method was used for detection of species specific fragment SA442 and mecA gene. Standard disk diffusion method was used to determinate resistance to antimicrobial agents. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was detected on 25 farms (50%. The antimicrobial resistance showed differences between the farms. Total of 58 samples were positive for Staphylococcus aureus, of which were 37 (14.2% isolated from raw milk samples and 21 (8.1% from milk filters. From these samples we isolated 62 Staphylococcus aureus strains, 41 isolates bacteria S. aureus from raw milk (66.1% and 21 isolates S. aureus from milk filters (33.9%. The presence of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates was low, most of them were resistant to amoxicilin. According to the results obtained by the PCR method for the methicillin - resistant S. aureus (MRSA, the mecA gene was present in 6 strains (9.7%, 4 isolates obtained from milk samples (6.5% and 2 isolates from milk filters (3.2%.  These isolates can be considered as a possible source of resistance genes, which can be spread through the food chain. Nowadays, a globally unfavourable increasing trend of prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococci strains especially Staphylococcus aureus is being observed worldwide. The improper hygiene and poor farm management practices contributed to the presence of S. aureus in the milk. This may have contributed to the high level of S. aureus isolated

  1. Short communication: antimicrobial drug susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus from subclinical bovine mastitis in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, P; Pisoni, G; Antonini, M; Villa, R; Boettcher, P; Carli, S

    2006-08-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 68 Staphylococcus aureus isolates collected during 2004 from milk of cows affected by subclinical mastitis was examined. The antimicrobial agents tested were the beta-lactams, penicillin G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin, amoxicillin + clavulanate, cephalonium, and cefoperazone; and other drugs including lincomycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and kanamycin. Minimum inhibitory concentrations recorded show that only certain beta-lactamase-resistant penicillins (specifically cloxacillin) or penicillin combinations (amoxicillin + clavulanate) were consistently effective against Staph. aureus, whereas the other beta-lactam derivatives and drugs from other pharmacological groups were either moderately effective or ineffective. Thus, beta-lactamase-resistant penicillins are to be considered the antimicrobial agents of choice for treatment of bovine mastitis resulting from infection by Staph. aureus.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisia absinthium Against Surgical Wounds Infected by Staphylococcus aureus in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Hamid Reza; Hoseinzadeh, Hesamoddin; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Kafshdouzan, Khatereh; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

    2012-12-01

    The wound infection is one of the frequent complications in patients undergoing surgical operations. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical wounds. Artemisia absinthium has been shown to bear strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Gram-positive pathogens. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of A. absinthium against surgical wounds infected by S. aureus in a rat model. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two equal groups of treated and control rats. A circular incision was created on the dorsal inter-scapular region of each rat. After skin wounding, rats were inoculated locally with 1 × 10(4) CFU of S. aureus at sites of skin wounds. The extract was applied topically twice a day throughout the experiment. Animals of the control group were left untreated. Results have revealed that topical application of A. absinthium extract on the infected wound sites produced significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  3. Risk factors associated with the antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis

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    Daniele C. Beuron

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate herd management practices and mastitis treatment procedures as risk factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus antimicrobial resistance. For this study, 13 herds were selected to participate in the study to evaluate the association between their management practices and mastitis treatment procedures and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 1069 composite milk samples were collected aseptically from the selected cows in four different periods over two years. The samples were used for microbiological culturing of S. aureus isolates and evaluation of their antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 756 samples (70.7% were culture-positive, and S. aureus comprised 27.77% (n=210 of the isolates. The S. aureus isolates were tested using the disk-diffusion susceptibility assay with the following antimicrobials: ampicillin 10mg; clindamycin 2μg; penicillin 1mg; ceftiofur 30μg; gentamicin 10mg; sulfa-trimethoprim 25μg; enrofloxacin 5μg; sulfonamide 300μg; tetracycline 30μg; oxacillin 1mg; cephalothin 30μg and erythromycin 5μg. The variables that were significantly associated with S. aureus resistance were as follows: the treatment of clinical mastitis for ampicillin (OR=2.18, dry cow treatment for enrofloxacin (OR=2.11 and not sending milk samples for microbiological culture and susceptibility tests, for ampicillin (OR=2.57 and penicillin (OR=4.69. In conclusion, the identification of risk factors for S. aureus resistance against various mastitis antimicrobials is an important information that may help in practical recommendations for prudent use of antimicrobial in milk production.

  4. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by antimicrobial biofilms formed by competitive exclusion microorganisms on stainless steel.

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    Son, Hyeri; Park, Sunhyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2016-12-05

    The goal of this study was to develop a desiccation resistant antimicrobial surface using biofilm of competitive exclusion (CE) microorganism inhibitory to Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated 161 microorganisms from soils, foods, and food-contact surfaces that are inhibitory to S. aureus. Among them, three CE microorganisms (Streptomyces spororaveus strain Gaeunsan-18, Bacillus safensis strain Chamnamu-sup 5-25, and Pseudomonas azotoformans strain Lettuce-9) exhibiting strong antibacterial activity and high growth rates were selected for evaluation. These isolates formed biofilms within 24h on stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in Bennet's broth and tryptic soy broth at 25°C. Cells in these biofilms showed significantly (P≤0.05) enhanced resistance to a desiccation (43% relative humidity [RH]) compared to those attached to SSCs but not in biofilms. The antimicrobial activities of biofilms formed by these isolates on SSCs against S. aureus at 25°C and 43% RH were determined. Compared to SSCs lacking biofilms formed by CE microorganisms, populations of S. aureus on SSCs harboring CE biofilms were significantly lower (P≤0.05). Results indicate that persistent antimicrobial activity against S. aureus on stainless steel surfaces can be achieved by the presence of biofilms of CE microorganisms. This information will be useful when developing strategies to improve the microbiological safety of foods during storage, processing, and distribution by facilitating the development of effective antimicrobial food-contact surfaces. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Changes of Antimicrobial Resistance among Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated in 8 Consecutive Years in the First Bethune Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Chunguang; Yao, Hanxin; Xu, Jiancheng

    This study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated in 8 consecutive years in the First Bethune Hospital. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Most of 1469 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were collected from sputum 705 (18.0%), secretions 206 (14.0%), pus 177 (12.0%) during the past 8 years. The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were between 50.8% and 83.3% during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus had increased. Monitoring the antimicrobial resistance to Staphylococcus aureus should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to direct rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  6. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus strains from dairy herds in KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is 1 of the most important causes of bovine mastitis and is responsible for significant economic losses to the dairy industry worldwide. One of the principal approaches used in treating intramammary infections is the administration of antimicrobials. Due to the propensity of S. aureus to develop resistance, antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring is necessary to ensure that treatment regimens are effective. As part of this investigation, 90 S. aureus strains isolated from mastitis cases submitted to Allerton Provincial Veterinary Laboratory during 2008 and 2009 were evaluated for their susceptibility to a panel of 10 antimicrobials. Only 8 of the 90 S. aureus isolates tested (8.9%) were found to be susceptible to all of the antimicrobials evaluated. A very high level of resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics was noted: 47.8% of the isolates were resistant to penicillin and 65.6% were resistant to ampicillin. Minimal resistance to oxacillin, cephalothin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1.1%) was found. Seventeen (18.9%) of the isolates tested were found to be resistant to 3 or more antimicrobials. The need for vigilant monitoring of bacterial resistance trends in the dairy industry is warranted as the potential public health implications are significant.

  7. Antimicrobial effects of three tropical plant extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okigbo, R N; Mmeka, E C

    2008-04-10

    Antimicrobial activities of the leaf extracts of Cymbopogon citatrus (lemongrass) and Vernonia amygdalina (bitter leaf) and the seed extracts of Garcinia kola (bitter kola) were carried out. G. kola had effect only on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with no inhibition on Candida albicans. Ethanol, cold water and hot water extracts of Vernonia amygdalina and Cymbopogon citratus showed inhibition on the three organism but G. kola ethanol, cold water and hot water extracts only inhibited S. aureus and E. coli with no inhibition on Candida albicans. The organism's susceptibility varied with more inhibition to S. aureus and least to Candida albicans.

  8. Antimicrobial Mechanisms of Macrophages and the Immune Evasion Strategies of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannagan, Ronald S.; Heit, Bryan; Heinrichs, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitually professional phagocytes, including macrophages, eradicate microbial invaders from the human body without overt signs of infection. Despite this, there exist select bacteria that are professional pathogens, causing significant morbidity and mortality across the globe and Staphylococcus aureus is no exception. S. aureus is a highly successful pathogen that can infect virtually every tissue that comprises the human body causing a broad spectrum of diseases. The profound pathogenic capacity of S. aureus can be attributed, in part, to its ability to elaborate a profusion of bacterial effectors that circumvent host immunity. Macrophages are important professional phagocytes that contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune response, however from in vitro and in vivo studies, it is evident that they fail to eradicate S. aureus. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms employed by macrophages to combat bacteria and describes the immune evasion strategies and some representative effectors that enable S. aureus to evade macrophage-mediated killing. PMID:26633519

  9. Statins and Antimicrobial Effects: Simvastatin as a Potential Drug against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gilson Cesar; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; de Andrade, Eduardo Dias

    2015-01-01

    Statins are important lipid-lowering agents with other pleiotropic effects. Several studies have explored a possible protective effect of statins to reduce the morbidity and mortality of many infectious diseases. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main pathogens implicated in nosocomial infections; its ability to form biofilms makes treatment difficult. The present study observed the MIC of atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin against S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Simvastatin was the only agent with activity against clinical isolates and reference strains of methicilin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Thus, the effects of simvastatin on the growth, viability and biofilm formation of S. aureus were tested. In addition, a possible synergistic effect between simvastatin and vancomycin was evaluated. Simvastatin’s MIC was 15.65 µg/mL for S. aureus 29213 and 31.25 µg/mL for the other strains of S. aureus. The effect of simvastatin was bactericidal at 4xMIC and bacteriostatic at the MIC concentration. No synergistic effect was found between simvastatin and vancomycin. However, the results obtained against S. aureus biofilms showed that, in addition to inhibiting adhesion and biofilm formation at concentrations from 1/16xMIC to 4xMIC, simvastatin was also able to act against mature biofilms, reducing cell viability and extra-polysaccharide production. In conclusion, simvastatin showed pronounced antimicrobial activity against S. aureus biofilms, reducing their formation and viability. PMID:26020797

  10. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sofia S.; Junqueira, Elisabete; Palma, Cláudia; Viveiros, Miguel; Melo-Cristino, José; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide information on approaches useful to the assessment and characterization of efflux activity, as well as contributing to our understanding of the role of efflux to phenotypes of antibiotic resistance and biocide tolerance in S. aureus clinical isolates. The results described show that efflux is an important contributor to fluoroquinolone resistance in S. aureus and suggest it as a major mechanism in the early stages of resistance development. We also show that efflux plays an important role on the reduced susceptibility to biocides in S. aureus, strengthening the importance of this long neglected resistance mechanism to the persistence and proliferation of antibiotic/biocide-resistant S. aureus in the hospital environment. PMID:27029294

  11. Farrerol regulates antimicrobial peptide expression and reduces Staphylococcus aureus internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Ershun; Liu, Zhicheng; Song, Xiaojing; Li, Depeng; Zhang, Naisheng

    2013-12-01

    Mastitis, defined as inflammation of the mammary gland, is an infectious disease with a major economic influence on dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a common gram-positive pathogen that frequently causes subclinical, chronic infection of the mammary gland in dairy cows. Farrerol, a traditional Chinese medicine isolated from rhododendron, has been shown to have anti-bacterial activity. However, the effect of farrerol on S. aureus infection in mammary epithelium has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of farrerol on the invasion of bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) by S. aureus. The expression of antimicrobial peptide genes by bMEC were assessed in the presence or absence of S. aureus infection. Our results demonstrated that farrerol (4-16 μg/ml) reduced > 55% the internalization of S. aureus into bMEC. We also found that farrerol was able to down-regulate the mRNA expression of tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) and bovine neutrophil β-defensin 5 (BNBD5) in bMEC infected with S. aureus. The Nitric oxide (NO) production of bMEC after S. aureus stimulation was decreased by farrerol treatment. Furthermore, farrerol treatment suppressed S. aureus-induced NF-κB activation in bMEC. These results demonstrated that farrerol modulated TAP and BNBD5 gene expression in mammary gland, enhances bMEC defense against S. aureus infection and could be useful in protection against bovine mastitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antimicrobial properties of graphene-like nanoparticles: coating effect on Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivi, M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Biology and Biotechnology (Italy); Alfè, M.; Gargiulo, V. [CNR, Institute for Research on Combustion (Italy); Valle, F. [ISMN, Institute of Nanostructured Materials (Italy); Mura, F. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Di Giosia, M.; Rapino, S. [University of Bologna, Department of Chemistry “Giacomo Ciamician” (Italy); Palleschi, C.; Uccelletti, D., E-mail: daniela.uccelletti@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Biology and Biotechnology (Italy); Fiorito, S., E-mail: silvana.fiorito@ift.cnr.it [CNR, Institute of Translational Pharmacology (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    The exploitation of nanomaterials with antimicrobial properties has attracted an ever-growing interest in the recent years. Carbon-based materials, such as graphene and graphene family materials (GFMs), have gained most of the attention for application in many biomedical fields. Here, we describe the antimicrobial activity of graphene-like (GL) layers derived from the chemical demolition of carbon black, against the planktonic growth of Staphylococcus aureus cells, primary cause of hospital and community-acquired infections, often leading to bacteremia and sepsis. The inhibitory capabilities of GL layers on the formation of S. aureus biofilm are also assessed. The antimicrobial properties seem based mainly on the interaction between GL layers and bacteria surfaces. FESEM and AFM analyses suggest that the GL layers coat the cells as soon as they get in contact with them, as also indicated by the wettability of the GLs.

  13. Effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on staphylococcus aureus using phenothiazinium dye with red laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Sampaio, Fernando José P.; Zanin, Fátima Antônia A.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the bactericidal effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy - AmPDT using a phenothiazinium compound (toluidine blue O and methylene blue, 12.5 μg/mL) on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529) irradiated or not with the red laser (λ 660 nm, 12J/cm2). All tests were performed in triplicate and samples distributed into the following groups: Negative control, Laser, Photosensitizer, and AmPDT. Bactericidal effect of the Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy was assessed by counting of colony-forming units and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, pAntimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy presented in vitro bactericidal effect on Staphylococcus aureus.

  14. Enterotoxigenicity and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Retail Food in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of zoonotic agent in the world, which are attributable to the contamination of food with enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 1,150 S. aureus isolates were cultured from 27,000 retail foods items from 203 cities of 24 provinces in China in 2015 and were test for antimicrobial susceptibility. Additionally, the role of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA to SEE, methicillin resistance (mecA and the toxigenic capabilities were also assessed. The results showed that 4.3% retail foods were contaminated with S. aureus, and 7.9% retail foods isolates were mecA positive. Some 97.6% of S. aureus isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial compound, and 57.5% of these were multi drug resistant (MDR. Resistance to penicillin (83.7%, 963/1,150, was common, followed by linezolid (67.7%, 778/1,150 and erythromycin (52.1%, 599/1,150. The isolates cultured from raw meats showed high levels of resistant to tetracycline (42.8%, ciprofloxacin (17.4%, and chloramphenicol (12.0% and expressed a MDR phenotype (62.4%. A total of 29.7% S. aureus isolates harbored the classical SEs genes (sea, seb, sec, and sed. The sea and seb genes were the most frequent SEs genes detected. Of note, 22% of the SEs genes positive S. aureus harbored two or three SEs genes, and 16 isolates were confirmed with the capacity to simultaneously produce two or three enterotoxin types. Moreover, nearly 50% of the MRSA isolates were positive for at least one SE gene in this study. Therefore, it is important to monitor the antimicrobial susceptibility and enterotoxigenicity of MDR S. aureus and MRSA in the food chain and to use these data to develop food safety measures, designed to reduce the contamination and transmission of this bacterium.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretion and mucosa with respect to S. aureus colonisation in Wegener´s granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Yuan; Wohlers, Janet; Podschun, Rainer; Hedderich, Jürgen; Lamprecht, Peter; Ambrosch, Petra; Laudien, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Nasal S. aureus carrier rates are significantly higher in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) compared to healthy controls (HC), and nasal colonisation is a risk-factor for relapse. Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important defence molecules maintaining an intact barrier function. It is the aim of this study to see if there is a possible link between the nasal AMP pattern and S. aureus colonisation, a link which has not been investigated so far. ELISA was applied to quantify LL-37 and hBD-3 concentrations in nasal secretions (14 WG patients, 13 HC) with and without nasal S. aureus colonisation. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the cellular sources of AMP in the nasal mucosa. Functional analyses of primary nasal epithelial cell cultures (NEC) of these groups stimulated with S. aureus were performed. LL-37 was found in significantly higher concentrations in colonised individuals (WG: p=0.001; HC: p=0.014).Using immunohistochemistry, local cellular sources for AMP could be demonstrated. After stimulation with S. aureus, significantly higher concentrations of LL-37 and hBD-3 could be detected in the supernatant of NEC of WG patients (LL-37: p=0.001; hBD-3: p=0.001) and HC (LL-37: p=0.019; hBD-3: p=0.001). HBD-3 concentrations were significantly lower in the supernatant of stimulated NEC of WG patients compared to the NEC of HC (p=0.032), and the dynamic range of the hBD-3 answer was significantly smaller in WG compared to HC (p=0.016). The dynamic response towards challenges with microbes is dysregulated in WG, and this might be one reason for higher S. aureus colonisation rates in WG.

  16. Antimicrobial Cream Formulated with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extract of Tuberose Flowers Arrests Growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Probir Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Paramita; Das, Satadal

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial potency of herbal extracts is well known. The review of patents and research articles revealed that several herbal extracts have been employed in the formulation of topical products such as creams, exclusive of the cream reported in the present study. 0ur previous study has established antimicrobial potency of supercritical carbon dioxide extracts of tuberose flowers, better known for its sweet fragrance. The present work focuses on formulating a topical antimicrobial herbal cream with methyl eugenol (principal antimicrobial compound) rich - supercritical carbon dioxide extract of tuberose flowers, having good combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies. Supercritical carbon dioxide parameters such as temperature, pressure and time were optimized using full factorial experimental design to obtain methyl eugenol-rich extracts. A cream was formulated using the extract having the best combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies and was assayed further for in vitro antimicrobial potency; physiochemical and sensory properties. Two commercial antimicrobial cream samples were used as reference samples in the study. The extract obtained at 40°C, 10 MPa, 135 min at 1 L min-1 flow rate of gaseous C02 showed the best combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies and was used for formulation of herbal creams. The cream formulated with 5% w/w of extract arrested growth of the common human skin pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and showed stable physiochemical properties and high sensory appeal for a year. The cream could be considered as a 'finished herbal product&' in compliance with the World Health 0rganization guidelines.

  17. 3-Amino-4-aminoximidofurazan derivatives: small molecules possessing antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, M C; Paul, S; Gupta, P; Tribedi, P; Sarkar, S; Manna, D; Bhattacharjee, S

    2016-04-01

    The therapeutic treatment of microbial infections involving biofilm becomes quite challenging because of its increasing antibiotic resistance capacities. Towards this direction, in the present study we have evaluated the antibiofilm property of synthesized 3-amino-4-aminoximidofurazan compounds having polyamine skeleton. These derivatives were synthesized by incorporating furazan and biguanide moieties. Different 3-amino-4-aminoximidofurazan derivatives (PI1-4) were synthesized via protic acid catalysis and subsequently characterized by (1) H NMR and (13) C NMR spectra, recorded at 400 and 100 MHz respectively. We have tested the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of these synthetic derivatives (PI1-4) against both Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The compounds so tested were also compared with standard antibiotics namely Tobramycin (Ps. aeruginosa) and Azithromycin (Staph. aureus) which were used as a positive control in all experimental sets. All these compounds (PI1-4) exhibited moderate to significant antimicrobial activities against both micro-organisms wherein compound PI3 showed maximum activity. Biofilm inhibition of both micro-organisms was then evaluated by crystal violet and safranin staining, estimation of biofilm total protein and microscopy methods using sub-MIC dose of these compounds. Results showed that all compounds executed anti biofilm activity against both Staph. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa wherein compound PI3 exhibited maximum activity. In relation with microbial biofilm inhibition, we have observed reduction in bacterial motility, proteolytic activity and secreted exo-polysaccharide (EPS) from both Staph. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa when they were grown in presence of these compounds. While addressing the issue of toxicity on host, we have observed that these molecules exhibited minimum level of R.B.C degradation. These findings establish the antibacterial and anti biofilm properties of 3-amino-4-aminoximidofurazan

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Punicalagin Against Staphylococcus aureus and Its Effect on Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunfeng; Shi, Chao; Wu, Qian; Zheng, Zhiwei; Liu, Peifeng; Li, Guanghui; Peng, Xiaoli; Xia, Xiaodong

    2017-05-01

    Punicalagin, one of the main active compounds in pomegranate peel, has been reported to possess many properties, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral, and immunosuppressive activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effect of punicalagin against Staphylococcus aureus and possible mode of action. Growth inhibition activity was examined by the agar diffusion method. Then agar dilution method was adopted to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The effects of punicalagin on cell membrane were assessed by measuring potassium efflux. Morphological changes of S. aureus were assessed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Crystal violet assay was applied to investigate antibiofilm activity of punicalagin. Punicalagin exhibited good antistaphylococcal effect with an MIC of 0.25 mg/mL. An increase of potassium efflux was observed when cells were treated with punicalagin at 2 × MIC. Punicalagin induced morphological damages to the cell membrane. Moreover, punicalagin exerted a remarkable inhibitory effect on biofilm formation of S. aureus. These findings suggest that punicalagin has antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities against S. aureus and may have potential application to control S. aureus contamination in food industry.

  19. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates to Propolis Extract Alone or in Combination with Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław Sajewicz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess in vitro the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract of Polish propolis (EEPP against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA clinical isolates. The combined effect of EEPP and 10 selected antistaphylococcal drugs on S. aureus clinical cultures was also investigated. EEPP composition was analyzed by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC method. The flavonoid compounds identified in Polish Propolis included flavones, flavonones, flavonolols, flavonols and phenolic acids. EEPP displayed varying effectiveness against twelve S. aureus strains, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC within the range from 0.39 to 0.78 mg/mL, determined by broth microdilution method. The average MIC was 0.54 ± 0.22 mg/mL, while calculated MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.39 mg/mL and 0.78 mg/mL, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of the EEPP ranged from 0.78 to 3.13 mg/mL. The in vitro combined effect of EEPP and 10 antibacterial drugs was investigated using disk diffusion method-based assay. Addition of EEPP to cefoxitin (FOX, clindamycin (DA, tetracycline (TE, tobramycin (TOB, linezolid (LIN, trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole (SXT, penicillin (P, erythromycin (E regimen, yielded stronger, cumulative antimicrobial effect, against all tested S. aureus strains than EEPP and chemotherapeutics alone. In the case of ciprofloxacin (CIP and chloramphenicol (C no synergism with EEPP was observed.

  20. Antimicrobial Property of Hydrocolloid Impression Material Incorporated with Silver Nanoparticles Against Staphylococcus Aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangchuk Norbu Penden

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental impressions can easily become contaminated with patient’s blood and saliva which are capable of transmitting infectious diseases to dental personnel. The addition of antimicrobial agents into impression materials could be effective in reducing the chances of cross-infection. Silver nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry as a potent antimicrobial agent. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of silver nanoparticles incorporated to irreversible hydrocolloid impression material against Staphylococcus aureus. Silver nanoparticles (AgZrPO4, National Direct Network Company, Thailand at concentrations of 0.25%, 0.50%, 1.00% and 1.50% w/w were added to powder of impression materials (Kromopan, Lascod, Ilaty. Impression material samples were prepared on sterile plate in accordance with manufacturer’s instruction. After setting, a 100 microliter of S. aureus ATCC6538 suspension (106 cells/mL were inoculated on the surface of the impression sample and left for 10 minutes. The amount of S. aureus on the surface was quantified using imprint technique on Mannitol Salt agar. Impression materials incorporated with AgZrPO4 showed antimicrobial property against S. aureus (up to 95% reduction compared with control (impression material without AgZrPO4. Even though the mechanism of antimicrobial action was not clearly understood, AgZrPO4 incorporated to impression material was demonstrated to possess an inhibitory effect against pathogenic bacteria. Further studies are needed to investigate physical properties of the material and the clinical usage.

  1. EARSS: European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System; data from the Netherlands .Incidence and resistance rates for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch WG; Neeling AJ de; CIE; LIO

    2001-01-01

    In a porspective prevalence and incidence survey in The Netherlands in 1999 antimicrobial susceptibility data on invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus infections were collected sithin the framework of European Antomicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). The EARSS

  2. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Nasal Carriers

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    Hedieh Moradi-Tabriz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major virulence factors of hospital and community acquired infections. Healthcare workers can be the host of S.aureus for many months. And it is very important due to the possibility of transmission to patients. Theaim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S.aureus nasal carriers, the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and its effective factors on Sina Hospital workers in Tehran, Iran.Methods: healthcare workers from different wards of Sina Hospital were studied in Tehran, Iran in 2010. Samples were taken from both nostrils of each individual. After 18-24hr incubation, the isolates were evaluated by gram stain, catalase, coagulase, DNase and manitol salt agar bywhich staphylococci were isolated. Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility tests against oxacillin, cefoxitin and vancomycin was performed. Finally, by using PCR, the mecA gene was studied in methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA.Results: 34of the 166 workers, were nasal carriers of S. aureus and one of them was MRSA. The ratio of carriers in operating room workers was more than other wards, without significant relationship (p.value>0.05. S.aureus was found in 34.3% of operating room, 13.8% of nurses and 22.7% of licensed and other personnel. There was a significant relationship betweenoccupations and S.aureus carriage (p.value:0.03.Conclusion: According to the low prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA carriers in Sina hospital, it can be said that the role of the hospital staff as a source of infections caused by S. aureus especially is very low.

  3. Amphibian antimicrobial peptide fallaxin analogue FL9 affects virulence gene expression and DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Vestergaard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    antimicrobials. In the present study, the analogue FL9, based on the amphibian AMP fallaxin, was studied to elucidate its mode of action and antibacterial activity against the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our data showed that FL9 may have a dual mode of action against S. aureus. At concentrations around...

  4. Antimicrobial Effects of Three Tropical Plant Extracts on Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans

    OpenAIRE

    R. N. Okigbo; Mmeka, E C

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities of the leaf extracts of Cymbopogon citatrus (lemongrass) and Vernonia amygdalina (bitter leaf) and the seed extracts of Garcinia kola (bitter kola) were carried out. G. kola had effect only on Staphyococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with no inhibition on Candida albicans. Ethanol, cold water and hot water extracts of Vernonia amygdalina and Cymbopogon citratus showed inhibition on the three organism but G. kola ethanol, cold water and hot water extracts only inhibit...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus in fresh sheep cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Amatiste

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs are aromatic oily liquids extracted from different parts of specific plants, well known especially for their aromatic and antibacterial properties. Nowadays, EOs are exploited in the food sector mainly for their aromatic properties. Thanks to their antimicrobial activity, however, they could also be used as additives to increase the safety and the shelf-life of food products. Aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of Thymus vulgaris L. oil and of Origanum vulgare L. oil against Staphylococcus aureus both in vitro and on fresh cheese, and to determine whether the use of EOs can modify the microbiological and/or chemical-physical properties of the products. The antimicrobial activity against S. aureus in vitro was assessed by preparation of the aromatogram (diffusion in agar test, minimum inhibitory concentration test and minimum bactericidal concentration assessment. Raw sheep milk was experimentally contaminated with a strain of S. aureus ATCC 25922 and was used to produce three types of fresh cheese: without EOs, with thyme and oregano EOs (both EOs at a concentration of 1:1000. The samples were analysed on the day of production, after three and seven days. The results obtained from the tests showed that the concentration of S. aureus and the counts of lactic flora remained unchanged for all types of cheese. Even the chemical-physical parameters were constant. The results of inhibition tests on the cheese disagree with those relating to the in vitro tests. Most likely this is due to the ability of EOs to disperse in the lipids the food: the higher the fat content is, the lower the oil fraction will be able to exert the antimicrobial activity.

  6. Synergistic antimicrobial activity between pentacyclic triterpenoids and antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaratnam Parasakthi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been considerable effort to discover plant-derived antibacterials against methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA which have developed resistance to most existing antibiotics, including the last line of defence, vancomycin. Pentacyclic triterpenoid, a biologically diverse plant-derived natural product, has been reported to show anti-staphylococcal activities. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between three pentacyclic triterpenoid and standard antibiotics (methicillin and vancomycin against reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Methods and Results The activity of the standard antibiotics and compounds on reference methicillin-sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus were determined using the macrodilution broth method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the compounds was compared with that of the standard antibiotics. The interaction between any two antimicrobial agents was estimated by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index of the combination. The various combinations of antibiotics and compounds reduced the MIC to a range of 0.05 to 50%. Conclusion Pentacyclic triterpenoids have shown anti-staphylococcal activities and although individually weaker than common antibiotics produced from bacteria and fungi, synergistically these compounds may use different mechanism of action or pathways to exert their antimicrobial effects, as implicated in the lowered MICs. Therefore, the use of current antibiotics could be maintained in their combination with plant-derived antibacterial agents as a therapeutic option in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  7. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Quach

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP, which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and -resistant (MRSA clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71 within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS S. aureus strains (n = 20 within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from handmade sweets: Biofilm formation, enterotoxigenicity and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Isabela Schneid; Iglesias, Mariana Almeida; Sehn, Carla Pohl; Valente Gandra, Tatiane Kuka; Mata, Marcia Magalhães; da Silva, Wladimir Padilha

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the second most important pathogen involved in foodborne outbreaks in Brazil. Because of their widespread distribution and biofilm forming ability, handmade sweets are easily contaminated with S. aureus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) from handmade sweets produced in Pelotas City/Brazil. The virulence potential was checked by evaluating the presence of the staphylococcal enterotoxin genes, icaA and icaD genes, the biofilm forming potential and antimicrobial resistance of the isolates. It was find just S. aureus among the CPS isolates. All the S. aureus isolates had biofilm forming ability on stainless steel and more than half of them on polystyrene surfaces. The majority of the isolates carried the icaA (66.6%) and icaD (58.4%) genes and some of them had the genes encoding enterotoxins A (33.4%) and B (16.6%). Furthermore, the majority of the isolates (83%) were resistant to at least one of the tested antimicrobials and multidrug resistance was observed in 8.4% of the isolates. The isolates had virulence potential, and half of them were enterotoxigenic. In addition, the ability of all the isolates to produce biofilms highlights the danger posed by these potentially virulent microorganisms persisting in food manufacturing environments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Antimicrobial effects of Piper hispidum extract, fractions and chalcones against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G M; Endo, E H; Cortez, D A G; Nakamura, T U; Nakamura, C V; Dias Filho, B P

    2016-09-01

    Three chalcones, 2'-hydroxy-4,4',6'-trimethoxychalcone, 2'-hydroxy-4,4',6'-tetramethoxychalcone, and 3,2'-dihydroxy-4,4',6'-trimethoxychalcone, were isolated from the leaves of Piper hispidum in a bioguided fractionation of crude extract. The antimicrobial activity of crude extract of P. hispidum leaves was determined against bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and yeasts Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. Fractions and chalcones were tested against C. albicans and S. aureus. The checkerboard assay was performed to assess synergic interactions between extract and antifungal drugs, and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay was used to evaluate anti-biofilm effects of extract. The extract was active against yeasts, S. aureus and B. subtilis with MIC values between 15.6 and 62.5μg/mL. Synergistic effects of extract associated with fluconazole and nystatin were observed against C. albicans, with fractional inhibitory concentration indices of 0.37 and 0.24, respectively. The extract was also effective against C. albicans and S. aureus biofilm cells at concentrations of 62.5 and 200μg/mL, respectively. Thus, P. hispidum may be a possible source of bioactive substances with antimicrobial properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy with Radachlorin® on Staphylococcus Aureus and Escherichia Coli: An in Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fekrazad, Reza; Zare, Hadi; Mohammadi Sepahvand, Sara; Morsali, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is the evaluation of the effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy with Radachlorin on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. New windows are open in the antimicrobial field so-call Photodynamic therapy that incorporates a nonpoisonous photosensitizer (PS) with innocuous special wavelength photons to excite the PS.

  11. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betoni, Joyce Elaine Cristina; Mantovani, Rebeca Passarelli; Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio; Fernandes Junior, Ary

    2006-06-01

    Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts--"guaco" (Mikania glomerata), guava (Psidium guajava), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), garlic (Allium sativum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), ginger (Zingiber officinale), "carqueja" (Baccharis trimera), and mint (Mentha piperita)--against Staphylococcus aureus strains, and for this purpose, the disk method was the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed. Petri dishes were prepared with or without dilution of plant extracts at sub-inhibitory concentrations in Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA), and the inhibitory zones were recorded in millimeters. In vitro anti-Staphylococcus aureus activities of the extracts were confirmed, and synergism was verified for all the extracts; clove, guava, and lemongrass presented the highest synergism rate with antimicrobial drugs, while ginger and garlic showed limited synergistic capacity.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae from dairy cows with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, S; Hussein, H; Petrovski, K

    2014-03-01

    To determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials for common mastitis pathogens from dairy cows in New Zealand; and to assess the effect of source of the isolates, i.e. commercial veterinary laboratories or collected as part of research studies; the clinical status of the cow, i.e. subclinical or clinical mastitis; cow age and herd on the distribution of the MIC. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for Staphylococcus aureus (n=364), Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n=65) and Streptococcus uberis (n=102) isolated from milk samples from dairy cows were determined for a variety of antimicrobials using broth microdilution. Isolates of S. aureus were sourced from research studies from both subclinically (n=161) and clinically (n=104) affected cows, as well as from commercial veterinary laboratories (n=101); while all the streptococcal isolates were from commercial laboratories. Resistance was defined using the cut-points provided by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The distribution of MIC varied among the bacterial species for every antimicrobial tested (pStreptococcus isolates; therefore microbial identification and sensitivity testing would be beneficial when assessing treatment options. The source of the isolates affected the estimated MIC, suggesting that selection of isolates for monitoring of resistance requires care and that use of routine submissions to commercial laboratories to assess antimicrobial resistance patterns may result in biased estimates of prevalence of resistance.

  13. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Elaine Cristina Betoni

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts - "guaco" (Mikania glomerata, guava (Psidium guajava, clove (Syzygium aromaticum, garlic (Allium sativum, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, ginger (Zingiber officinale, "carqueja" (Baccharis trimera, and mint (Mentha piperita - against Staphylococcus aureus strains, and for this purpose, the disk method was the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed. Petri dishes were prepared with or without dilution of plant extracts at sub-inhibitory concentrations in Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA, and the inhibitory zones were recorded in millimeters. In vitro anti-Staphylococcus aureus activities of the extracts were confirmed, and synergism was verified for all the extracts; clove, guava, and lemongrass presented the highest synergism rate with antimicrobial drugs, while ginger and garlic showed limited synergistic capacity.

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Phytochemicals against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and Their Biofilms

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    Joana Monte

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be resistant to multiple antibiotics and we are fast approaching a time when antibiotics will not work on some bacterial infections. New antimicrobial compounds are urgently necessary. Plants are considered the greatest source to obtain new antimicrobials. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of four phytochemicals—7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, salicylic acid (SA and saponin (SP—against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, either as planktonic cells or as biofilms. These bacteria are commonly found in hospital-acquired infections. Some aspects on the phytochemicals mode of action, including surface charge, hydrophobicity, motility and quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI were investigated. In addition, the phytochemicals were combined with three antibiotics in order to assess any synergistic effect. 7-HC and I3C were the most effective phytochemicals against E. coli and S. aureus. Both phytochemicals affected the motility and quorum-sensing (QS activity, which means that they can play an important role in the interference of cell-cell interactions and in biofilm formation and control. However, total biofilm removal was not achieved with any of the selected phytochemicals. Dual combinations between tetracycline (TET, erythromycin (ERY and ciprofloxacin (CIP and I3C produced synergistic effects against S. aureus resistant strains. The overall results demonstrates the potential of phytochemicals to control the growth of E. coli and S. aureus in both planktonic and biofilm states. In addition, the phytochemicals demonstrated the potential to act synergistically with antibiotics, contributing to the recycling of old antibiotics that were once considered ineffective due to resistance problems.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants are susceptible to light activated antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic therapy can select for small colony variants of Staphylococcus aureus that are more resistant to antibiotics and can result in persistent infections, necessitating the development of more effective antimicrobial strategies to combat small colony variant infections. Photodynamic therapy is an alternative treatment approach which utilises light in combination with a light-activated antimicrobial agent to kill bacteria via a non-specific mechanism of action. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of 665 nm laser light and the light-activated antimicrobial agent methylene blue was able to successfully kill S. aureus small colony variants. S. aureus and isogenic stable small colony variant were exposed to varying doses (1.93 to 9.65 J/cm2) of 665 nm laser light in the presence of varying concentrations (1 to 20 μM) of methylene blue. Results The combination of 665 nm laser light and methylene blue was found to be an effective strategy for the killing of small colony variants. At the highest light dose (9.65 J/cm2) and methylene blue concentration (20 μM) tested, the number of viable bacteria decreased by approximately 6.9 log10 for the wild type and approximately 5 log10 for the small colony variant. Conclusions These results suggest that photodynamic therapy has potential for use in the treatment of superficial infections caused by small colony variants of S. aureus and supports further research in this field. PMID:24010944

  16. Delay in the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection : A prospective multicenter hospital-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasch, A. J.; Rieg, S.; Kuetscher, J.; Brodt, H. -R.; Widmann, T.; Herrmann, M.; Meyer, C.; Welte, T.; Kern, P.; Haars, U.; Reuter, S.; Huebner, I.; Strauss, R.; Sinha, B.; Brunkhorst, F. M.; Hellmich, M.; Faetkenheuer, G.; Kern, W. V.; Seifert, H.

    2013-01-01

    Early broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment reduces mortality in patients with septic shock. In a multicenter, prospective observational study, we explored whether delayed appropriate antimicrobial therapy (AAT) influences outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (SAB). Two hundred

  17. Persistent catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy.

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    Ki-Ho Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CRSAB occasionally persists despite catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of persistent CRSAB after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with CRSAB were prospectively included from over a 41-month period. We compared the clinical features, 40 bacterial virulence genes, and outcomes between patients with persistent CRSAB (i.e., bacteremia for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and non-persistent CRSAB. RESULTS: Among the 220 episodes of CRSAB, the catheter was kept in place in 17 (6% and removed in 203 (94% cases. In 43 (21% of the 203 episodes, bacteremia persisted for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance (Odds ratio [OR], 9.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05-26.61; P<0.001, non-catheter prosthetic devices (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 1.62-17.80; P=0.006, and renal failure (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.48-7.08; P=0.003 were independently associated with persistent CRSAB. Patients with persistent CRSAB were more like to experience complication than were those with non-persistent CRSAB (72% vs. 15%; P<0.001. Among all episodes due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus, persistent CRSAB isolates were associated with accessory gene regulator (agr group II (P= .04, but presence of other bacterial virulence genes, distribution of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration distribution, and frequency of vancomycin heteroresistance did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with CRSAB, bacteremia persisted in 21% of cases despite catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance, renal failure, and non-catheter prosthetic devices were independent risk factors for persistent CRSAB, which was

  18. Occurence and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. in retail fish samples in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas Onmaz, Nurhan; Abay, Secil; Karadal, Fulden; Hizlisoy, Harun; Telli, Nihat; Al, Serhat

    2015-01-15

    The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal enterotoxins, as well as Salmonella spp. and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates from fish samples. A total of 100 fish samples were analysed consisting of 30 anchovy, 35 trout and 35 sea bream. The presence of SEs was detected using ELISA and its genes confirmed by mPCR. Also, S. aureus and Salmonella spp. were detected in 9 (9%) and 5 (5%) samples, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates had SEs and SEs genes. The resistance rates of the S. aureus isolates to erythromycin, tetracycline, and penicillin G were found to be 33% while Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin and neomycine in 20%, 20% and 80%, respectively of the samples. It is of utmost important for public health that retail fish markets need to use hygienic practices in handling and processing operations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. New antimicrobial combinations: substituted chalcones- oxacillin against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Juan Manuel Talia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus, the most virulent Staphylococcus species, is also the prevalent pathogen isolated from hospitalized patients and the second most common from patients in outpatient settings. In general, bacteria have the genetic ability to transmit and acquire resistance to drugs, which are utilized as therapeutic agents. Related studies of antimicrobial activity indicate that crude extracts containing flavonoids, triterpenes and steroids have showed significative activity against several Staphylococcus aureus strains. Combination effects between flavonoids and antibiotics also have been reported. The aim of the present work was to investigate in vitro synergism between several chalcones substituted in combination with oxacillin, an antibiotic used conventionally against S. aureus ATCC 43 300 that is resistant to meticillin, using the kinetic turbidimetric method developed earlier. The results were satisfactory for all assayed combinations and in accordance with the mechanism of bacteriostatic inhibition previously proposed, except for 2´,4´-dihydroxy-3´-methoxychalcone - oxacillin. The best combination was 2´,3´-dihydroxychalcone - oxacillin (MIC: 11.2 μg/mL. Further investigations are needed to characterize the interaction mechanism with antibiotics. Thus, chalcones - oxacillin combination could lead to the development of new antibiotics against methicillin resistant S. aureus infection.

  20. Antimicrobial efficacy of Syzygium antisepticum plant extract against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and its application potential with cooked chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenqian; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2018-06-01

    For the past decades, there has been a growing demand for natural antimicrobials in the food industry. Plant extracts have attracted strong research interests due to their wide-spectrum antimicrobial activities, but only a limited number have been investigated thoroughly. The present study aimed at identifying a novel anti-staphylococcal plant extract, to validate its activity in a food model, and to investigate on its composition and antimicrobial mechanism. Four plant extracts were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in vitro, with Syzygium antisepticum leaf extract showing the strongest antimicrobial activity (MIC = 0.125 mg/mL). Relatively high total phenolic content (276.3 mg GAE/g extract) and antioxidant activities (90.2-138.0 mg TE/g extract) were measured in S. antisepticum extract. Food validation study revealed that higher extract concentration (32 mg/mL) was able to inhibit or reduce staphylococcal growth in cooked chicken, but caused color change on meat surface. By GC-MS, β-caryophyllene (12.76 area%) was identified as the dominant volatile compound in extract. Both crude extract and pure β-caryophyllene induced membrane damages in S. aureus. These results suggested good anti-staphylococcal properties of S. antisepticum plant extract, identified its major volatile composition and its membrane-damaging antimicrobial mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Typing and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Raw Milk, Cheese, Minced Meat, and Chicken Meat Samples

    OpenAIRE

    CAN,Hayriye Yeşim; Elmal?, Mehmet; Karag?z, Alper

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: i) to detect the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in raw milk, cheese, beef minced meat, and chicken meat samples; ii) to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates; and iii) to determine clonal relation among the isolates by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Therefore, a total of 160 food samples were randomly collected between August 2014 and May 2015 in Hatay province, located ...

  2. Increased survival of experimentally evolved antimicrobial peptide-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an animal host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Adam J; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as new class of antimicrobial drugs, following the increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Synthetic AMPs are functional analogues of highly evolutionarily conserved immune effectors in animals and plants, produced in response to microbial infection. Therefore, the proposed therapeutic use of AMPs bears the risk of ‘arming the enemy’: bacteria that evolve resistance to AMPs may be cross-resistant to immune effectors (AMPs) in their hosts. We used a panel of populations of Staphylococcus aureus that were experimentally selected for resistance to a suite of individual AMPs and antibiotics to investigate the ‘arming the enemy’ hypothesis. We tested whether the selected strains showed higher survival in an insect model (Tenebrio molitor) and cross-resistance against other antimicrobials in vitro. A population selected for resistance to the antimicrobial peptide iseganan showed increased in vivo survival, but was not more virulent. We suggest that increased survival of AMP-resistant bacteria almost certainly poses problems to immune-compromised hosts. PMID:25469169

  3. Antimicrobial activity of plumbagin, a naturally occurring naphthoquinone from Plumbago rosea, against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sweatha V; Baranwal, Gaurav; Chatterjee, Maitrayee; Sachu, Arun; Vasudevan, Anil Kumar; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Asoke; Biswas, Raja

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens. Despite causing a number of independent infections, both pathogens can co-infect to cause urinary tract infections, skin infections, biofilm associated infections, sepsis and pneumonia. Infections of these two pathogens especially their biofilm associated infections are often difficult to treat using currently available anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agents. In order to identify a common anti-microbial agent which could confer a broad range of protection against their infections, we screened several phytochemicals and identified plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), a phytochemical from Plumbago species as a potent antimicrobial agent against S. aureus and C. albicans, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 5μg/ml. Antimicrobial activity of plumbagin was validated using an ex-vivo porcine skin model. For better understanding of the antimicrobial activity of plumbagin, a Drosophila melanogaster infection model was used, where D. melanogaster was infected using S. aureus and C. albicans, or with both organisms. The fly's survival rate was dramatically increased when infected flies were treated using plumbagin. Further, plumbagin was effective in preventing and dispersing catheter associated biofilms formed by these pathogens. The overall results of this work provides evidence that plumbagin, possesses an excellent antimicrobial activity which should be explored further for the treatment of S. aureus and C. albicans infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of Sambucus ebulus and Urtica dioica against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Ali; Asadpour, Leila; Naeemi, Akram Sadat; Houshmand, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the emergence of drug -resistant pathogens led to the development of natural antimicrobials. In this study the antimicrobial effect of methanolic extracts of Sambucus ebulus and Urtica dioica on 16 skin and wound infections isolates of methicillin resistant S. aureus have been studied. Solvent extraction procedure was done using soxhlet apparatus for extracting antimicrobial agents from freeze dried plants. Antibacterial activity was measured using agar well diffusion method. The MIC of Sambucus ebulus and Urtica dioica extracts against the standard strain of S. aureus ATCC 6538 were determined using the micro dilution method at 15 mg and 20 mg respectively. All the test bacteria were found sensitive to the Sambucus ebulus extract and only one isolate was resistant to Urtica dioica extract. Extracts of Sambucus ebulus and Urtica dioica possess antibacterial potency against MRSA isolates and may be used as a natural antiseptics and antimicrobial agents in medicine.

  5. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    OpenAIRE

    van Bijnen, Evelien ME; Paget, W John; den Heijer, Casper DJ; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Schellevis, François G

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment gui...

  6. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; team, A.s.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. METHODS: The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment g...

  7. In vivo killing of Staphylococcus aureus using a light-activated antimicrobial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Jon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The widespread problem of antibiotic resistance in pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus has prompted the search for new antimicrobial approaches. In this study we report for the first time the use of a light-activated antimicrobial agent, methylene blue, to kill an epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (EMRSA-16 strain in two mouse wound models. Results Following irradiation of wounds with 360 J/cm2 of laser light (670 nm in the presence of 100 μg/ml of methylene blue, a 25-fold reduction in the number of viable EMRSA was seen. This was independent of the increase in temperature of the wounds associated with the treatment. Histological examination of the wounds revealed no difference between the photodynamic therapy (PDT-treated wounds and the untreated wounds, all of which showed the same degree of inflammatory infiltration at 24 hours. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that PDT is effective at reducing the total number of viable EMRSA in a wound. This approach has promise as a means of treating wound infections caused by antibiotic-resistant microbes as well as for the elimination of such organisms from carriage sites.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of photodynamic therapy (UVA/riboflavin against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tiemi Kashiwabuchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess S. aureus in vitro viability after the exposure to ultraviolet light A (UVA and riboflavin (B2. METHODS: Samples of S. aureus in 96 well plates (in triplicate were exposed to riboflavin (B2 and ultraviolet light A (365 nm wavelength at a power density of 3 mW/cm², 8 mm spot diameter, for 30 minutes. Control groups were prepared as well in triplicate: blank control, ultraviolet light A only, riboflavin only and dead bacteria Control. The bacterial viability was measured using fluorescent microscopy. In order to investigate the occurrence of "viable but non-culturable" microorganisms after treatment, the cell viability was also investigated by plate culture procedure onto a broth medium. Statistical analysis was performed using the triplicate values from each experimental condition. RESULTS: No difference was observed among the treatment group and the control samples (p=1. CONCLUSION: The combination of riboflavin 0.1% and ultraviolet light A at 365 nm did not exhibit antimicrobial activity against oxacillin susceptible S. aureus.

  9. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkyilmaz, S; Tekbiyik, S; Oryasin, E; Bozdogan, B

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains gathered from 2002 to 2006 from milk samples in Aydin region in Turkey. Among 93 S. aureus strains isolated from bovine milk with mastitis, 16 were resistant to methicillin. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains were studied further for their staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types, pulsotypes, spa and MLST types, antimicrobial susceptibilities, mechanisms of resistance and presence of Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) toxin gene. The MRSA strains were multi-drug resistant. The susceptibility rates to antimicrobials tested were 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 6.25%, 16.25% and 56.25% for erythromycin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, tetracyclin, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin, respectively. All tetracycline and gentamicin resistant strains carried tet(M) and aac(6)-aph(2) gene, respectively. Among macrolide-resistant isolates, nine had erm(A), and seven had both erm(A) and erm(B) genes. The molecular characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed presence of three pulsotypes with their variants. The pulsotype B strains were type IV with SCCmec typing, and representative of pulsotype B was t190 by spa typing and ST8 by MLST typing. The strains with pulsotype A and C were SCCmec III, and representative of these pulsotypes was t030 by spa typing. The MLST type of pulsotype A was ST239 and pulsotype C was one allele variant of ST239. None of the isolates harboured the PVL gene. Presence of hospital-related MRSA strains may indicate transmission of these strains between human and animals. In case of clonal spread beside the infected animals' treatment of MRSA carrier, farm workers should also be considered. Hygienic measures and rational antibiotic use may avoid resistance selection, clonal dissemination of resistant strains and decrease losses because of mastitis in dairy herds.

  10. Zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase-like activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iinuma K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Katsuhiro Iinuma, Isami TsuboiBML General Laboratory, Kawagoe, Saitama, JapanBackground: Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disease, and its pathogenesis is multifactorial.Objective: We examined whether the ascorbic acid derivative zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase (SOD-like activity. SOD is an enzyme that controls reactive oxygen species production. In addition, the in vitro antimicrobial activity of zinc ascorbate against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli was tested either alone or in combination with a variety of antimicrobial agents; their fractional inhibitory concentration index was determined using checkerboard tests.Methods: The SOD-like activity was measured in comparison with other ascorbic acid derivatives (ascorbic acid, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, and sodium ascorbyl phosphate and zinc. The antimicrobial susceptibility of twelve strains each of S. aureus and E. coli isolated from patients with dermatological infections was tested, in comparison to a type strain of S. aureus and E. coli.Results: Zinc ascorbate had significant (P < 0.001 SOD-like activity compared with other ascorbic acid derivatives and zinc. Moreover, it showed antimicrobial activity against a type strain of S. aureus and E. coli, and its concentration (0.064% and 0.128% for S. aureus and E. coli, respectively was sufficiently lower than the normal dose (5% of other ascorbic acid derivatives. Furthermore, combinations of zinc ascorbate with clindamycin, erythromycin, and imipenem against S. aureus (average fractional inhibitory concentration, 0.59–0.90, and with imipenem against E. coli (average fractional inhibitory concentration, 0.64 isolated from patients with dermatological infections showed an additive effect.Conclusions: Our results provide novel evidence that zinc ascorbate may be effective for acne treatment.Keywords: superoxide dismutase, reactive oxygen species, antimicrobial

  11. Incidence, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Toxin Genes Possession Screening of Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken Livers and Gizzards

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    Lubna S. Abdalrahman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Few recent outbreaks in Europe and the US involving Campylobacter and Salmonella were linked to the consumption of chicken livers. Studies investigating Staphylococcus aureus in chicken livers and gizzards are very limited. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence of S. aureus and MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in retail chicken livers and gizzards in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In this study, 156 chicken livers and 39 chicken gizzards samples of two brands were collected. While one of the brands showed very low prevalence of 1% (1/100 for S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards, the second brand showed prevalence of 37% (31/95. No MRSA was detected since none harbored the mecA or mecC gene. Eighty seven S. aureus isolates from livers and 28 from gizzards were screened for antimicrobial resistance to 16 antimicrobials and the possession of 18 toxin genes. Resistance to most of the antimicrobials screened including cefoxitin and oxacillin was higher in the chicken gizzards isolates. While the prevalence of enterotoxin genes seg and sei was higher in the gizzards isolates, the prevalence of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, and hld was higher in the livers ones. The lucocidin genes lukE-lukD was equally prevalent in chicken livers and gizzards isolates. Using spa typing, a subset of the recovered isolates showed that they are not known to be livestock associated and, hence, may be of a human origin. In conclusion, this study stresses the importance of thorough cooking of chicken livers and gizzards since it might contain multidrug resistant enterotoxigenic S. aureus. To our knowledge this is the first study to specifically investigate the prevalence of S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards in the US.

  12. Change in Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Skin-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis during Ten-Year Period

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung-Min; Jo, Ju-Hyun; Jin, Hyunju; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Jung-Min; Kim, Do-Won; Jang, Ho-Sun; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background A small subset of adolescents atopic dermatitis (AD) tends to persist. This also leads to get more antibiotics exposure with advancing years. Antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a serious problem during Staphylococcus aureus treatment, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Objective It was investigated the S. aureus colonization frequency in the skin lesions and anterior nares of adolescent AD patients and evaluated the changes in S. aureus antimicrobial suscept...

  13. Inhibition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and plant essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Jridi, Taoufik; Nefzi, Adel; Ben Hamida, Jeannette; Sebei, Khaled

    2016-12-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections cause considerable patient mortality and morbidity. The annual frequency of deaths from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has surpassed those caused by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), plant essential oils (EOs) and their combinations have proven to be quite effective in killing a wide selection of bacterial pathogens including MRSA. This review summarizes the studies in the use of AMPs, plant EOs and their combinations for coping with MRSA bacteria, and to formulate new prospects for future studies on this topic. The sources of scientific literature such as PubMed, library search, Google Scholar, Science Direct and electronic databases such as 'The Antimicrobial Peptide Database', 'Collection of Anti-Microbial Peptides' and 'YADAMP'. Physicochemical data of anti-MRSA peptides were determined by Scientific DataBase Maker software. Of the 118 peptides, 88 exhibited an activity against MRSA with the highest activity of minimum inhibitory concentration values. Various plant EOs have been effective against MRSA. Remarkably, lemongrass EOs completely inhibited all MRSA growth on the plate. Lemon myrtle, Mountain savory, Cinnamon bark and Melissa EOs showed a significant inhibition. Several of these AMPs, EOs and their combinations were effective against MRSA. Their activities have implications for the development of new drugs for medical use.

  14. An Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Synergy of Garlic (Allium sativum and Utazi (Gongronema latifolium on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eja, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the on-going search for potent and resistance-free antimicrobial medicinal plants, the antimicrobial and synergistic effects of the plants, Allium sativum (E1 and Gongronema latifolium (E2 on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated. The sensitivities of E. coli and S. aureus to E1 and E2 and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the plant extracts, individually and in combination with themselves, and with ciprofloxacin (CPX and ampicillin (AMP, were tested using standard procedures. E1 and E2 individually showed appreciable antimicrobial effect (zones of inhibition > 16mm. The combination of E1 and E2 against the test organisms was not effective due to antagonism between E1 and E2. E1 or E2 when combined with CPX, completely suppressed the effect of CPX against E. coli, and rather produced additive effect on S. aureus similar to the combination of E2 and AMP against S. aureus, although CPX alone was more effective than either E1 or E2, unlike AMP. Synergism was observed in the combination of E1 and AMP against S. aureus. It is concluded that synergism associated with the combination of medicinal plants is doubtful. However, the synergistic or additive effect between garlic and conventional drugs to some strains of bacteria which are resistant to some conventional drugs, gives hope of fighting drug resistance.

  15. Isolation, Virulence, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA Strains from Oklahoma Retail Poultry Meats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna S. Abdalrahman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one the top five pathogens causing domestically acquired foodborne illness in the U.S. Only a few studies are available related to the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in the U.S. retail poultry industry. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA in retail chicken and turkey meats sold in Tulsa, Oklahoma and to characterize the recovered strains for their antimicrobial resistance and possession of toxin genes. A total of 167 (114 chicken and 53 turkey retail poultry samples were used in this study. The chicken samples included 61 organic samples while the rest of the poultry samples were conventional. The overall prevalence of S. aureus was 57/106 (53.8% in the conventional poultry samples and 25/61 (41% in the organic ones. Prevalence in the turkey samples (64.2% was higher than in the chicken ones (42.1%. Prevalence of S. aureus did not vary much between conventional (43.4% and organic chicken samples (41%. Two chicken samples 2/114 (1.8% were positive for MRSA. PFGE identified the two MRSA isolates as belonging to PFGE type USA300 (from conventional chicken and USA 500 (from organic chicken which are community acquired CA-MRSA suggesting a human based source of contamination. MLST and spa typing also supported this conclusion. A total of 168 Staphylococcus aureus isolates (101 chicken isolates and 67 turkey isolates were screened for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 16 antimicrobials and their possession of 18 different toxin genes. Multidrug resistance was higher in the turkey isolates compared to the chicken ones and the percentage of resistance to most of the antimicrobials tested was also higher among the turkey isolates. The hemolysin hla and hld genes, enterotoxins seg and sei, and leucocidins lukE-lukD were more prevalent in the chicken isolates. The PVL gene lukS-lukF was detected only in chicken isolates including the MRSA ones. In conclusion, S

  16. Genetic characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine milk in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Said, M; Abbassi, M S; Bianchini, V; Sghaier, S; Cremonesi, P; Romanò, A; Gualdi, V; Hassen, A; Luini, M V

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of bovine mastitis in dairy herds, causing economic losses in dairy industry worldwide. In addition, milk and milk-products contaminated by Staph. aureus can cause harmful human diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize Staph. aureus strains isolated from dairy farms in Tunisia. Bulk tank milk (n = 32) and individual cow milk (n = 130) samples were collected during the period of 2013-2014. Forty-three Staph. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by spa typing, 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (RS-PCR) and multiplex PCRs for 22 virulence genes. Antimicrobial resistance was also investigated with a disc diffusion test. A selected subsample of 22 strains was additionally genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. Seventeen spa types were recovered, and t2421 (n = 10), t521 (n = 6) and t2112 (n = 5) were the most common. Fourteen different RS-PCR genotypes grouped into 11 clusters were detected in our study, with predominance of the RVI genotype (n = 24). Eight sequence types were identified and Clonal Complex 97, corresponding to RS-PCR cluster R, was the most common (n = 10), followed by CC1 (n = 4), CC15 (n = 3) and other four accounting for one or two strains. Different combinations of virulence genes were reported, and enterotoxin genes were present in few strains (seh, n = 4; sea, n = 2; sea and seh, n = 2; sec and sel, n = 2). The majority of strains were resistant only to penicillin; only one strain was found to be multiresistant and no methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus was demonstrated. Our study reported the isolation of CC97 from bovine milk in Tunisia for the first time and confirmed the relevance of this lineage in intramammary infection in cows. This paper describes the characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank and individual cow milk in Tunisia. All strains were genotyped by spa typing and RS-PCR, a method based on the amplification of the 16S-23S r

  17. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from organic and conventional poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B I; Fente, C A; Calo-Mata, P; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2008-12-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes was determined in 55 samples of organic poultry meat and in 61 samples of conventional poultry meat. A total of 220 E. coli, 192 S. aureus, and 71 L. monocytogenes strains were analyzed by an agar disk diffusion assay for their resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole (E. coli); chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, oxacillin, and sulfisoxazole (S. aureus); and chloramphenicol, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole, and vancomycin (L. monocytogenes). The results indicated a significantly higher (P organic poultry meat as compared with conventional poultry meat. E. coli isolated from organic poultry meat exhibited lower levels of antimicrobial resistance against 7 of the 10 antimicrobials tested as compared with isolates recovered from conventional meat. In the case of S. aureus and L. monocytogenes isolated from conventional poultry, antimicrobial resistance was significantly higher only for doxycycline as compared with strains isolated from organic poultry. In the case of E. coli, the presence of multiresistant strains was significantly higher (P conventional poultry meat as compared with organic poultry meat. Organically farmed poultry samples showed significantly lower development of antimicrobial resistance in intestinal bacteria such as E. coli.

  18. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Trinidad & Tobago

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    Monteil Michele

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has become increasingly prevalent worldwide since it was first reported in a British hospital. The prevalence however, varies markedly in hospitals in the same country, and from one country to another. We therefore sought to document comprehensively the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of MRSA isolates in Trinidad and Tobago. Methods All Staphylococcus aureus isolates encountered in routine clinical specimens received at major hospitals in the country between 2000 and 2001 were identified morphologically and biochemically by standard laboratory procedures including latex agglutination test (Staphaurex Plus; Murex Diagnostics Ltd; Dartford, England; tube coagulase test with rabbit plasma (Becton, Dickinson & Co; Sparks, MD, USA, and DNase test using DNase agar (Oxoid Ltd; Basingstoke, Hampshire, England. MRSA screening was performed using Mueller-Hinton agar containing 6 μg oxacillin and 4% NaCl, latex agglutination test (Denka Seiken Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan and E-test system (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by the modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method while methicillin MICs were determined with E-test system. Results Of 1,912 S. aureus isolates received, 12.8% were methicillin (oxacillin resistant. Majority of the isolates were recovered from wound swabs (86.9% and the least in urine (0.4% specimens. Highest number of isolates was encountered in the surgical (62.3% and the least from obstetrics and gynaecology (1.6% facilities respectively. Large proportions of methicillin sensitive isolates are >85% sensitive to commonly used and available antimicrobials in the country. All MRSA isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, erythromycin, gentamicin and penicillin but were 100% sensitive to vancomycin, rifampin and chloramphenicol. Conclusion There is a progressive increase in MRSA prevalence in the country but

  19. Evaluation of the in vitro antimicrobial activity of an ethanol extract of Brazilian classified propolis on strains of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Lucila Coelho Pamplona-Zomenhan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the most frequent causes of hospital acquired infections. With the increase in multiple drug resistant strains, natural products such as propolis are a stratagem for new product discovery. The aims of this study were: to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of an ethanol extract of propolis; to define the MIC50 and MIC90 (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration - MIC against 210 strains of S. aureus; to characterize a crude sample of propolis and the respective ethanol extract as to the presence of predetermined chemical markers. The agar dilution method was used to define the MIC and the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was used to characterize the samples of propolis. MIC results ranged from 710 to 2,850 µg/mL. The MIC50 and MIC90 for the 210 strains as well as the individual analysis of American Type Culture Collection (ATCC strains of Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA were both 1,420 µg/mL. Based on the chromatographic analysis of the crude sample and ethanol extracted propolis, it was concluded that propolis was a mixture of the BRP (SP/MG and BRP (PR types. The results obtained confirm an antimicrobial activity in relation to the strains of the S. aureus tested.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of four essential oils against pigmenting Pseudomonas fluorescens and biofilmproducing Staphylococcus aureus of dairy origin

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    Francesca Pedonese

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs are mixtures of secondary metabolites of plant origin with many useful properties, among which the antimicrobial activity is also of interest for the food industry. EOs can exert their antimicrobial potential both directly, in food products and active packaging, and indirectly, as sanitizing and anti-biofilm agents of food facility surfaces. Aim of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of four EOs (bergamot, cinnamon, manuka and thyme against Pseudomonas fluorescens and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from milk and dairy products. The chemical composition of EOs was evaluated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values were determined by a microplate method against 9 Ps. fluorescens from marketed mozzarella with blue discoloration defect, and 3 biofilm-producing S. aureus from milk. Reference ATCC strains were included. Pigment production activity by Ps. fluorescens was assessed both in culture and in cheese. EOs of manuka (leptospermone 23% and thyme (carvacrol 30%, pcymene 20%, thymol 15% showed the highest antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, MIC values were 0.012%-0.024% and 0.024% v/v, respectively; meanwhile EOs from thyme and cinnamon (cinnamaldehyde 55% exhibited the best activity against Ps. fluorescens with MIC values of 0.098%-0.195% and 0.195%-0.391% v/v, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of these EOs is promising and they could be exploited in the dairy production chain.

  1. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of the antimicrobial peptide plectasin against Staphylococcus aureus in infected epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Smart, Simon; Franzyk, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    intracellularly in Calu-3 epithelial cells and in THP-1 cells, whereas A549 cells did not show significant uptake of nanoparticles. Overall, encapsulation of plectasin into PLGA-based nanoparticles appears to be a viable strategy to improve the efficacy of plectasin against infections in epithelial tissues....... epithelial cells might thus be a promising approach to combat such infections. In this work, plectasin, which is a cationic AMP of the defensin class, was encapsulated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles using the double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanoparticles displayed...... high plectasin encapsulation efficiency (71-90%) and mediated release of the peptide over 24h. The antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide-loaded nanoparticles was investigated using bronchiolar epithelial Calu-3 cell monolayers infected with S. aureus. The plectasin-loaded nanoparticles displayed...

  2. Glucose Augments Killing Efficiency of Daptomycin Challenged Staphylococcus aureus Persisters

    OpenAIRE

    Prax, Marcel; Mechler, Lukas; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus in stationary growth phase with high doses of the antibiotic daptomycin (DAP) eradicates the vast majority of the culture and leaves persister cells behind. Despite resting in a drug-tolerant and dormant state, persister cells exhibit metabolic activity which might be exploited for their elimination. We here report that the addition of glucose to S. aureus persisters treated with DAP increased killing by up to five-fold within one hour. This glucose-DAP effe...

  3. Semi-quantitative MALDI-TOF for antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Tucker; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl L; Minogue, Timothy D

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections are a significant problem in the healthcare setting, in many cases requiring the rapid administration of appropriate and effective antibiotic therapy. Diagnostic assays capable of quickly and accurately determining the pathogen resistance profile are therefore crucial to initiate or modify care. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is a standard method for species identification in many clinical microbiology laboratories and is well positioned to be applied towards antimicrobial susceptibility testing. One recently reported approach utilizes semi-quantitative MALDI-TOF MS for growth rate analysis to provide a resistance profile independent of resistance mechanism. This method was previously successfully applied to Gram-negative pathogens and mycobacteria; here, we evaluated this method with the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Specifically, we used 35 strains of S. aureus and four antibiotics to optimize and test the assay, resulting in an overall accuracy rate of 95%. Application of the optimized assay also successfully determined susceptibility from mock blood cultures, allowing both species identification and resistance determination for all four antibiotics within 3 hours of blood culture positivity.

  4. pH-Dependent Antimicrobial Properties of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Tsai, Ping-Han; Lin, Kuen-Song

    2017-04-08

    The antimicrobial properties of CuO nanoparticles have been investigated, but the underlying mechanisms of toxicity remain the subject of debate. Here, we show that CuO nanoparticles exhibit significant toxicity at pH 5 against four different Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains, including Newman, SA113, USA300, and ATCC6538. At this pH, but not at pH 6 and 7, 5 mM CuO nanoparticles effectively caused reduction of SA113 and Newman cells and caused at least 2 log reduction, whereas 20 mM killed most strains but not USA300. At 5 mM, the nanoparticles were also found to dramatically decrease reductase activity in SA113, Newman, and ATCC6538 cells, but not USA300 cells. In addition, analysis of X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure confirmed that S. aureus cells exposed to CuO nanoparticles contain CuO, indicating that Cu(2+) ions released from nanoparticles penetrate bacterial cells and are subsequently oxidized intracellularly to CuO at mildly acidic pH. The CuO nanoparticles were more soluble at pH 5 than at pH 6 and 7. Taken together, the data conclusively show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles in mildly acidic pH is caused by Cu(2+) release, and that USA300 is more resistant to CuO nanoparticles (NPs) than the other three strains.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of apple cider vinegar against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans; downregulating cytokine and microbial protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Darshna; Serafin, Vlad; J Shah, Ajit

    2018-01-29

    The global escalation in antibiotic resistance cases means alternative antimicrobials are essential. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial capacity of apple cider vinegar (ACV) against E. coli, S. aureus and C. albicans. The minimum dilution of ACV required for growth inhibition varied for each microbial species. For C. albicans, a 1/2 ACV had the strongest effect, S. aureus, a 1/25 dilution ACV was required, whereas for E-coli cultures, a 1/50 ACV dilution was required (p < 0.05). Monocyte co-culture with microbes alongside ACV resulted in dose dependent downregulation of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6). Results are expressed as percentage decreases in cytokine secretion comparing ACV treated with non-ACV treated monocytes cultured with E-coli (TNFα, 99.2%; IL-6, 98%), S. aureus (TNFα, 90%; IL-6, 83%) and C. albicans (TNFα, 83.3%; IL-6, 90.1%) respectively. Proteomic analyses of microbes demonstrated that ACV impaired cell integrity, organelles and protein expression. ACV treatment resulted in an absence in expression of DNA starvation protein, citrate synthase, isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases in E-coli; chaperone protein DNak and ftsz in S. aureus and pyruvate kinase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, fructose bisphosphate were among the enzymes absent in C.albican cultures. The results demonstrate ACV has multiple antimicrobial potential with clinical therapeutic implications.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance and mecA characterization of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and non-S. aureus of beef meat origin in Egypt

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    Kamelia Mahmoud Osman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have been found in various farm animal species throughout the world. Yet, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA, methicillin-susceptible non-S. aureus (MS-NSA and methicillin-resistant non-S. aureus (MR-NSA were not investigated. Therefore, we persued to determine the diversity in theirphenotypic virulence assay, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance profile and molecular characterisation in one of the food chains in Egypt. Samples were collected during 2013 from beef meat at retail. Twenty seven isolates comprising five species (S. hyicus, S. aureus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius and S. lentus were characterized for their antibiotic resistance phenotypic profile and antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, cfr, gyrA, gyrB and grlA. Out of the 27 Staphylococcus isolates only one isolate was resistant to the 12 antibiotics representing nine classes. Raw beef meat sold across the Great Cairo zone, contains 66.7% of MRS, with highest prevalence was reported in S. aureus (66.7%, while the MRS non-S. aureus strains constituted 66.7% from which S. hyicus (60%, S. intermedius (33.3%, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans (100% and S. lentus (100% were MRS. Seven S. aureus, six S. hyicus, four S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, three S. intermedius and one S. lentus isolates although being resistant to oxacillin yet, 11/27 (40.7% carried the mecA gene. At the same time, the cfr gene was present in 2 of the nine S. aureus isolates, and totally undetectable in S. hyicus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius and S. lentus. Although global researches largely focused into MRSA and MR-NSA in animals on pigs, the analysis of our results stipulates that buffaloes and cattle could be MRSA dispersers and that this theme is not specific to pigs. Detection of MSSA virulence determinants is a must, as although oxacillin resistance may be absent yet, the MSSA may carry the virulence determinants which could

  7. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  8. Antimicrobial properties of natural coniferous rosin in the European Pharmacopoeia challenge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Arno; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2011-10-01

    Rosins (resins) are natural products of the coniferous trees. Purified rosin from the trunk of Norway spruce (Picea abies) is antibacterial against the gram-positive bacteria, but not against the gram-negative bacteria in agar plate diffusion test. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of the coniferous rosin against bacteria and yeasts using the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) challenge test. The microbes tested were Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Candida albicans. To prepare challenge media, purified rosin was mixed with a biologically inert salve in varying concentrations. The microbes were inoculated (5 × 10(5) microbes (bacteria) or 5 × 10(4) microbes (yeast, C.albicans)) into 10 g of the rosin-containing challenge medium for 14 days at maximum. Samples were taken from the media for re-cultivation of the microbes at time intervals of 1 h, 24 h, 4, 7, and 14 days. The microbicidal efficacy of the challenge media was estimated by reduction of the number of the colony forming units (CFU) of microbes in the test samples. A reduction of more than 10(3) CFU for bacteria and 10(2) CFU for fungi in 7 days was considered to indicate a significant microbicidal action. Pure rosin was antimicrobial within 24 h against all microbes tested. The 0.5% rosin-salve medium (w/w) did not differ in microbicidal effects from the rosin-free salve medium (control). A raise of the rosin concentration resulted in increase of the microbicidal effect of the rosin-salve medium against all micro-organisms tested. Rosin concentration of 10% (w/w) in the medium significantly reduced the colonization of S. aureus (including MRSA) within 24 h and significantly reduced the colonization of all other micro-organisms within 4 days. Rosin is strongly microbicidal against a wide range of microbes, against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and against C. albicans

  9. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence characterization of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci from imported beef meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kamelia; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Ruiz, Lorena; Badr, Jihan; ElHofy, Fatma; Al-Maary, Khalid S; Moussa, Ihab M I; Hessain, Ashgan M; Orabi, Ahmed; Saad, Alaa; Elhadidy, Mohamed

    2017-05-10

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the diversity and magnitude of antimicrobial resistance among Staphylococcus species recovered from imported beef meat sold in the Egyptian market and the potential mechanisms underlying the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes including harboring of resistance genes (mecA, cfr, gyrA, gyrB, and grlA) and biofilm formation. The resistance gene mecA was detected in 50% of methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus isolates (4/8). Interestingly, our results showed that: (i) resistance genes mecA, gyrA, gyrB, grlA, and cfr were absent in Staphylococcus hominis and Staphylococcus hemolyticus isolates, although S. hominis was phenotypically resistant to methicillin (MR-non-S. aureus) while S. hemolyticus was resistant to vancomycin only; (ii) S. aureus isolates did not carry the mecA gene (100%) and were phenotypically characterized as methicillin- susceptible S. aureus (MSS); and (iii) the resistance gene mecA was present in one isolate (1/3) of Staphylococcus lugdunensis that was phenotypically characterized as methicillin-susceptible non-S. aureus (MSNSA). Our findings highlight the potential risk for consumers, in the absence of actionable risk management information systems, of imported foods and advice a strict implementation of international standards by different venues such as CODEX to avoid the increase in prevalence of coagulase positive and coagulase negative Staphylococcus isolates and their antibiotic resistance genes in imported beef meat at the Egyptian market.

  10. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates in Taiwan, 2010.

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    Chih-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available The information of molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is essential for control and treatment of diseases caused by this medically important pathogen. A total of 577 clinical MRSA bloodstream isolates from six major hospitals in Taiwan were determined for molecular types, carriage of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL and sasX genes and susceptibilities to 9 non-beta-lactam antimicrobial agents. A total of 17 genotypes were identified in 577 strains by pulsotyping. Five major pulsotypes, which included type A (26.2%, belonging to sequence type (ST 239, carrying type III staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec, type F (18.9%, ST5-SCCmecII, type C (18.5%, ST59-SCCmecIV, type B (12.0%, ST239-SCCmecIII and type D (10.9%, ST59-SCCmecVT/IV, prevailed in each of the six sampled hospitals. PVL and sasX genes were respectively carried by ST59-type D strains and ST239 strains with high frequencies (93.7% and 99.1%, respectively but rarely detected in strains of other genotypes. Isolates of different genotypes and from different hospitals exhibited distinct antibiograms. Multi-resistance to ≥3 non-beta-lactams was more common in ST239 isolates (100% than in ST5 isolates (97.2%, P = 0.0347 and ST59 isolates (8.2%, P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis further indicated that the genotype, but not the hospital, was an independent factor associated with muti-resistance of the MRSA strains. In conclusion, five common MRSA clones with distinct antibiograms prevailed in the major hospitals in Taiwan in 2010. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of invasive MRSA was mainly determined by the clonal distribution.

  11. Antibiotic Exposure and Other Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Nasal Commensal Staphylococcus aureus: An Ecological Study in 8 European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bijnen, E.M.E.; Paget, J.; de Klerk, E.S.M.; den Heijer, C.D.J.; Versporten, A.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Goossens, H.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a global public health concern which threatens the effective treatment of bacterial infections. Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA) increasingly appears in individuals with no healthcare associated risks. Our study assessed risk

  12. Antibiotic exposure and other risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in nasal commensal staphylococcus aureus: an ecological study in 8 European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Lange-de Klerk, E.S.M. de; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Versporten, A.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Goossen, H.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a global public health concern which threatens the effective treatment of bacterial infections. Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA) increasingly appears in individuals with no healthcare associated risks. Our study assessed risk

  13. Antibiotic Exposure and Other Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Nasal Commensal Staphylococcus aureus: An Ecological Study in 8 European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, J.; Lange-de Klerk, E.S. de; Heijer, C.D. den; Versporten, A.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Goossens, H.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a global public health concern which threatens the effective treatment of bacterial infections. Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA) increasingly appears in individuals with no healthcare associated risks. Our study assessed risk

  14. Antibiotic-specific differences in the response of Staphylococcus aureus to treatment with antimicrobials combined with manuka honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eLiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin infections caused by antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus are a significant health problem worldwide; often associated with high treatment cost and mortality rate. Complex natural products like New Zealand (NZ manuka honey have been revisited and studied extensively as an alternative to antibiotics due to their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and the inability to isolate honey-resistant S. aureus. Previous studies showing synergistic effects between manuka-type honeys and antibiotics have been demonstrated against the growth of one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strain. We have previously demonstrated strong synergistic activity between NZ manuka-type honey and rifampicin against growth and biofilm formation of multiple S. arueus strains. Here, we have expanded our investigation using multiple S. aureus strains and four different antibiotics commonly used to treat S. aureus-related skin infections: rifampicin, oxacillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. Using checkerboard microdilution and agar diffusion assays with S. aureus strains including clinical isolates and MRSA we demonstrate that manuka-type honey combined with these four antibiotics frequently produces a synergistic effect. In some cases when synergism was not observed, there was a significant enhancement in antibiotic susceptibility. Some strains that were highly resistant to an antibiotic when present alone become sensitive to clinically-achievable concentrations when combined with honey. However, not all of the S. aureus strains tested responded in the same way to these combinational treatments. Our findings support the use of NZ manuka-type honeys in clinical treatment against S. aureus-related infections and extend their potential use as an antibiotic adjuvant in combinational therapy. Our data also suggest that manuka-type honeys may not work as antibiotic adjuvants for all strains of S. aureus, and this may help determine the mechanistic processes

  15. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F. Kong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections.

  16. Genetic characterisation of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from commercial broiler chickens in the Durban metropolitan area, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelisiwe Mkize

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in human and veterinary medicine is a serious worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus in commercial broiler chickens as well as to establish antimicrobial susceptibility and the distribution of genetic determinants conferring resistance and virulence. One hundred and ninety-four samples were aseptically collected from broiler chicken slaughterhouses and retail outlets around the Durban metropolitan area in South Africa. Microbiological and molecular methods were used to detect the presence of S. aureus as well as its resistance- and virulence-associated genes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to confirm the presence of S. aureus by amplifying the nuc gene. Approximately 54% of 194 samples were positive for S. aureus. The disc diffusion technique was used to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the S. aureus isolates to a battery of 10 antimicrobial agents, namely ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, erythromycin, cefoxitin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, vancomycin and trimethoprim. The results demonstrated that S. aureus isolates of abattoir origin had a high level (79.4% of resistance to tetracycline, followed by ampicillin, vancomycin, cefoxitin, trimethoprim, erythromycin and streptomycin with resistance rates of 65.1%, 61.9%, 60.3%, 58.7%, 57.1% and 46.0%, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus isolates of retail origin exhibited higher antimicrobial resistance prevalence rates than those of abattoir origin. Tetracycline had the highest resistance rate (100%, followed by cefoxitin (91.7%, erythromycin (83.3%, streptomycin (83.3% and kanamycin (66.7%. All isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. Out of the four virulence genes that were screened, only two were detected (coagulase and protein A; however, their prevalence rates were very low. All antimicrobial resistance genes screened were

  17. SCC mec typing and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from pigs of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkhowa, S; Sarma, D K; Pegu, S R

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens of both humans and animal. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important human pathogen that causes serious infections both in hospitals and communities due to its multidrug resistance tendency. This study was undertaken to characterize the MRSA isolates from pigs and to determine the antimicrobial resistance of these isolates. Forty nine MRSA strains (one strain per positive pig) isolated from pigs of Northeast India were characterized by SCCmec typing and antimicrobial resistance. The overall prevalence of MRSA was 7.02 % with the highest prevalence recorded in pigs aged 1-3 months (P = 0.001) and in nasal samples (P = 0.005). Two SCC mec types (type III and V) were found in Indian pigs with predominance of type V. All isolates were resistant to penicillin. Seventeen resistance groups were observed where 87.75 % isolates showed multidrug resistance (showed resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobials). The most predominant resistance pattern observed was Oxytetracycline + Penicillin + Sulfadiazine + Tetracycline accounting 12.24 % of the isolates. The present study contributes to the understanding of characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of porcine MRSA isolates which in turn will help in devising strategy for the control of this pathogen. Findings of the study also throw light on multidrug resistance MRSA and emphasize the need for judicious use of antimicrobials in animal practice.

  18. Relative efficacy of cefuroxime versus dicloxacillin as definitive antimicrobial therapy in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon Bjarke; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Arpi, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy of cefuroxime with that of dicloxacillin as definitive antimicrobial therapy in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (MS-SAB) using a Danish bacteraemia database, information on the indication for anti......OBJECTIVES: The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy of cefuroxime with that of dicloxacillin as definitive antimicrobial therapy in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (MS-SAB) using a Danish bacteraemia database, information on the indication......-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. In addition, PS matching was performed. RESULTS: A total of 691 patients with MS-SAB received either dicloxacillin (n = 368) or cefuroxime (n = 323) as definitive antimicrobial therapy. Twenty-eight different indications for empirical antimicrobial therapy...... were identified and grouped into eight categories. There was no statistically significant difference in 30 day mortality between the two groups (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.68-1.52). Definitive antimicrobial therapy with cefuroxime was associated with increased 90 day mortality in a PS-adjusted multivariate...

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of nasal Staphylococcus aureus among Dessie Referral Hospital health care workers, Dessie, Northeast Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibabaw, Agumas; Abebe, Tamrat; Mihret, Adane

    2014-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in skin and soft tissue infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is prevalent in most of the countries in which it is sought. MRSA is one of the important pathogens implicated in hospital-acquired infections. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates, the prevalence of MRSA, and the nasal carriage rate in healthy hospital staff members. A total of 118 health care workers (HCWs) were enrolled using a cross-sectional study design. Nasal swabs were collected and cultured on mannitol salt agar (MSA). The slide coagulase test was performed. Susceptibility testing was carried out on Mueller-Hinton agar using the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with 10 antibiotics. Of the 118 HCWs, 34 had S. aureus and 15 had MRSA, with overall positivity rates of 28.8% and 12.7%, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates were sensitive to penicillin. MRSA isolates were resistant to commonly available antibiotics. Only two (13.3%) of the nasal isolates were vancomycin-resistant. A high rate of nasal carriage and multidrug-resistant S. aureus was found in this study, indicating the need for standard infection control to prevent transmission in our health care setting. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bijnen, E.M.E.; Paget, W.J.; den Heijer, C.D.J.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  1. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; team, A.s.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. METHODS:

  2. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  3. An international multicenter study of antimicrobial consumption and resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from 15 hospitals in 14 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Henrik Torkil; Zinn, Christina Scheel; Rosdahl, Vibeke Thamdrup

    2004-01-01

    Antibiotic consumption during 1996 was measured in 15 large hospitals from 14 countries and 3000 consecutive Staphylococcus aureus samples were collected, allowing calculation of local resistance rates and typing of isolates. Antibiotic consumption data were converted to defined daily doses (DDD...... of therapeutical subgroups of antimicrobials varied significantly between hospitals. A positive correlation was found between S. aureus resistance to methicillin (MRSA) and consumption of beta-lactam combinations, between resistance to quinolones and consumption of beta-lactam combinations and carbapenems...... and resistance to aminoglycosides and consumption of beta-lactam combinations. The consumption of beta-lactamase-sensitive antibiotics was negatively correlated to resistance to methicillin, quinolones, and aminoglycosides. Usage of the different antimicrobial therapeutical subgroups was also correlated...

  4. Antimicrobial Analysis of an Antiseptic Made from Ethanol Crude Extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora in Wistar Rats against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

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    Thaís Honório Lins Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical site infection remains a challenge for hospital infection control, especially when it relates to skin antisepsis in the surgical site. Objective. To analyze the antimicrobial activity in vivo of an antiseptic from ethanol crude extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods. Agar drilling and minimal inhibitory tests were conducted for in vitro evaluation. In the in vivo bioassay were used Wistar rats and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990. Statistical analysis was performed through variance analysis and Scott-Knott cluster test at 5% probability and significance level. Results. In the in vitro, ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum and Eugenia uniflora and their combination showed the best antimicrobial potential against S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In the in vivo bioassay against S. epidermidis, there was no statistically significant difference between the tested product and the patterns used after five minutes of applying the product. Conclusion. The results indicate that the originated product is an antiseptic alternative source against S. epidermidis compared to chlorhexidine gluconate. It is suggested that further researches are to be conducted in different concentrations of the test product, evaluating its effectiveness and operational costs.

  5. Antimicrobial Analysis of an Antiseptic Made from Ethanol Crude Extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora in Wistar Rats against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Thaís Honório Lins; Sales Santos Veríssimo, Regina Célia; Alvino, Valter; Silva Araujo, Maria Gabriella; Evangelista Pires dos Santos, Raíssa Fernanda; Maurício Viana, Max Denisson; de Assis Bastos, Maria Lysete; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection remains a challenge for hospital infection control, especially when it relates to skin antisepsis in the surgical site. To analyze the antimicrobial activity in vivo of an antiseptic from ethanol crude extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Agar drilling and minimal inhibitory tests were conducted for in vitro evaluation. In the in vivo bioassay were used Wistar rats and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990). Statistical analysis was performed through variance analysis and Scott-Knott cluster test at 5% probability and significance level. In the in vitro, ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum and Eugenia uniflora and their combination showed the best antimicrobial potential against S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In the in vivo bioassay against S. epidermidis, there was no statistically significant difference between the tested product and the patterns used after five minutes of applying the product. The results indicate that the originated product is an antiseptic alternative source against S. epidermidis compared to chlorhexidine gluconate. It is suggested that further researches are to be conducted in different concentrations of the test product, evaluating its effectiveness and operational costs.

  6. Evaluation of the efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy using a phenothiazine compound and Laser (λ=660ηm) on the interface: macrophage vs S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Sampaio, Fernando José P.; Zanin, Fátima Antônia A.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays photodynamic inactivation has been proposed as an alternative treatment for localized bacterial infections as a response to the problem of antibiotic resistance. Much is already known about the photodynamic inactivation of microorganisms: both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains can be successfully photoinactivated and there is the additional advantage that repeated photosensitization of bacterial cells does not induce a selection of resistant strains. Staphylococcus spp. are opportunistic microorganisms known for their capacity to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. The emergence of resistant strains of bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a major challenge to healthcare. MRSA is a major cause of hospital-acquired infection throughout the world and is now also prevalent in the community as well as nursing and residential homes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phagocytic function of macrophages J774 against S. aureus in the presence and absence of AmPDT with phenothiazine compound (12.5 μg/mL) and low level laser (λ=660nm, 12 J/cm²). Experimental groups: Control group (L-P-), Phenothiazine group (L-P+) Laser group (L+P-), AmPDT group (L+P+).The tests presented in this study were performed in triplicate. This study showed that AmPDT induced bacterial death in about 80% as well as increasing phagocytic capacity of macrophages by approximately 20% and enhanced the antimicrobial activity by approximately 50% compared to the control group and enabling more intense oxidative burst.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence determinant carriage and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections

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    Fangyou Yu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the antimicrobial susceptibility, carriage of virulence determinants and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs may provide further insights related to clinical outcomes with these infections. From January 2012 to September 2013, a total of 128 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were recovered from patients with SSTIs. All 128 S. aureus SSTI isolates carried at least five virulence genes tested. Virulence genes detected among at least 70% of all tested isolates included hld (100%, hla (95.3%, icaA (96.9%, clf (99.2%, sdrC (79.7%, sdrD (70.3%, and sdrE (72.7%. The prevalence of MRSA isolates with 10 virulence genes tested (54.4%, 31/56 was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (35.2%, 25/71 (p 80.0% of sdrC and sdrD, CC59 isolates had lower prevalence of these two virulence genes. All CC59 isolates were susceptible to gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while CC5 and CC7 isolates had resistance rates to these two antimicrobials of 25.4% and 20.9%, and 40.0% and 40.0%, respectively. The resistance rates for tetracycline, clindamycin, and erythromycin among CC5 isolates were lower than among CC7 and CC59 isolates. In conclusion, the molecular typing of S. aureus SSTI isolates in the present study showed considerable heterogeneity. ST7 and ST630 became prevailing clones. Different S. aureus clones causing SSTIs were associated with specific antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of gentamicin palmitate against high concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittinger, Clemens; Marth, Egon; Windhager, Reinhard; Weinberg, Annelie M; Zarfel, Gernot; Baumert, Rita; Felisch, Susanne; Kuehn, Klaus-Dieter

    2011-06-01

    The reduction of implant related infections plays a pivotal role in orthopaedic surgery as an increasing number of people require implants (up to 200,000 per year in the United States (source: Joint Implant Surgery & Research Foundation 2010)). The aim of the current study is to prevent and thus decrease the number of bacterial infections. Both pre and post operative systemic antibiotic treatment and gentamicin containing bone cements (polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA) are commonly used strategies to overcome infections. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of gentamicin sulfate loaded bone cement was compared with titan discs coated with a new form of gentamicin, gentamicin palmitate. Adherence prevention, killing rates and killing kinetics were compared in an in vitro model, using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), which together with Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) represents 60% of bacteria found responsible for hip implant infections (An and Friedman, 1996, J Hosp Infect 33(2):93-108). In our experiments gentamicin, which was applied as gentamicin palmitate on the surface of the implants, showed a high efficacy in eliminating bacteria. In contrast to gentamicin sulfate containing bone cements, gentamicin palmitate is released over a shorter period of time thus not inducing antibiotic resistance. Another benefit for clinical application is that it achieves high local levels of active ingredient which fight early infections and minimize toxic side effects. Furthermore, the short term hydrophobic effect of gentamicin palmitate can successfully impede biofilm formation. Thus, the use of self-adhesive antibiotic fatty acid complexes like gentamicin palmitate represents a new option for the anti-infective coating of cementless titan implants.

  9. The antimicrobial effect of Octenidine-dihydrochloride coated polymer tracheotomy tubes on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The surface of polymeric tracheotomy tubes is a favourable environment for biofilm formation and therefore represents a potential risk factor for the development of pneumonia after tracheotomy. The aim of this in-vitro study was to develop octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) coated polymer tracheotomy tubes and investigate any effects on Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa colonization. Additionally the resistance of the OCT coating was tested using reprocessing procedures like brushing, rinsing and disinfection with glutaraldehyde Results Contamination with S. aureus: Before any reprocessing, OCT coated tracheotomy tubes were colonized with 103 cfu/ml and uncoated tracheotomy tubes with 105 cfu/ml (P = 0.045). After reprocessing, no differences in bacterial concentration between modified and conventional tubes were observed. Contamination with P. aeruginosa: Before reprocessing, OCT coated tubes were colonized with 106 cfu/ml and uncoated tubes with 107 cfu/ml (P = 0.006). After reprocessing, no significant differences were observed. Conclusion OCT coating initially inhibits S. aureus and P. aeruginosa colonisation on tracheotomy tubes. This effect, however, vanishes quickly after reprocessing of the tubes due to poor adhesive properties of the antimicrobial compound. Despite the known antimicrobial effect of OCT, its use for antimicrobial coating of tracheotomy tubes is limited unless methods are developed to allow sustained attachment to the tube. PMID:19630994

  10. The antimicrobial effect of Octenidine-dihydrochloride coated polymer tracheotomy tubes on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface of polymeric tracheotomy tubes is a favourable environment for biofilm formation and therefore represents a potential risk factor for the development of pneumonia after tracheotomy. The aim of this in-vitro study was to develop octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT coated polymer tracheotomy tubes and investigate any effects on Staphylococcus (S. aureus and Pseudomonas (P. aeruginosa colonization. Additionally the resistance of the OCT coating was tested using reprocessing procedures like brushing, rinsing and disinfection with glutaraldehyde Results Contamination with S. aureus: Before any reprocessing, OCT coated tracheotomy tubes were colonized with 103 cfu/ml and uncoated tracheotomy tubes with 105 cfu/ml (P = 0.045. After reprocessing, no differences in bacterial concentration between modified and conventional tubes were observed. Contamination with P. aeruginosa: Before reprocessing, OCT coated tubes were colonized with 106 cfu/ml and uncoated tubes with 107 cfu/ml (P = 0.006. After reprocessing, no significant differences were observed. Conclusion OCT coating initially inhibits S. aureus and P. aeruginosa colonisation on tracheotomy tubes. This effect, however, vanishes quickly after reprocessing of the tubes due to poor adhesive properties of the antimicrobial compound. Despite the known antimicrobial effect of OCT, its use for antimicrobial coating of tracheotomy tubes is limited unless methods are developed to allow sustained attachment to the tube.

  11. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage rate and antimicrobial susceptibility in a tertiary center, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhi, Shervin; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Zamanian, Mohammad-Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility of Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) among colonized patients in outpatient status. A total of 2000 nasal nares specimens were collected and inoculated on mannitol salt agar. MRSAs were identified based on mannitol positivity and coagulase test followed by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates was performed by E-test method for vancomycin and doxycycline as well as disc diffusion method for sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP), erythromycin, linezolid, and clindamycin. D-test was performed for detection of inducible resistance to clindamycin. Overall, nasal carrier rate of S. aureus and CA-MRSA was estimated 22% and 1.25%, respectively. Out of the 440 S. aureus isolates, 25 isolates were MRSA. All were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid, and susceptibility rates to SMX-TMP, erythromycin, levofloxacin, doxycycline, and clindamycin were 68%, 44%, 48%, 40% and 44%, respectively; furthermore, 28.5% of resistant isolates to erythromycin had inducible resistance to clindamycin. It seems susceptibility to clindamycin and SMX-TMP, recommended agents for empirical treatment of suspected CA-MRSA, are not promising. Vancomycin and linezolid are effective and reliable antibiotics for the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  12. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage rate and antimicrobial susceptibility in a tertiary center, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Shokouhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was aimed to determine frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility of Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA among colonized patients in outpatient status. Materials and Methods: A total of 2000 nasal nares specimens were collected and inoculated on mannitol salt agar. MRSAs were identified based on mannitol positivity and coagulase test followed by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates was performed by E-test method for vancomycin and doxycycline as well as disc diffusion method for sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP, erythromycin, linezolid, and clindamycin. D-test was performed for detection of inducible resistance to clindamycin. Results: Overall, nasal carrier rate of S. aureus and CA-MRSA was estimated 22% and 1.25%, respectively. Out of the 440 S. aureus isolates, 25 isolates were MRSA. All were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid, and susceptibility rates to SMX-TMP, erythromycin, levofloxacin, doxycycline, and clindamycin were 68%, 44%, 48%, 40% and 44%, respectively; furthermore, 28.5% of resistant isolates to erythromycin had inducible resistance to clindamycin. Conclusion: It seems susceptibility to clindamycin and SMX-TMP, recommended agents for empirical treatment of suspected CA-MRSA, are not promising. Vancomycin and linezolid are effective and reliable antibiotics for the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  13. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; von Deimling, Constantin; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Background Surgical sutures can promote migration of bacteria and thus start infections. Antiseptic coating of sutures may inhibit proliferation of adhered bacteria and avoid such complications. Objectives This study investigated the inhibition of viable adhering bacteria on novel antimicrobially coated surgical sutures using chlorhexidine or octenidine, a critical factor for proliferation at the onset of local infections. The medical need, a rapid eradication of bacteria in wounds, can be fulfilled by a high antimicrobial efficacy during the first days after wound closure. Methods As a pretesting on antibacterial efficacy against relevant bacterial pathogens a zone of inhibition assay was conducted with middle ranged concentrated suture coatings (22 μg/cm). For further investigation of adhering bacteria in detail the most clinically relevant Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC®49230™) was used. Absorbable braided sutures were coated with chlorhexidine-laurate, chlorhexidine-palmitate, octenidine-laurate, and octenidine-palmitate. Each coating type resulted in 11, 22, or 33 μg/cm drug content on sutures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed once to inspect the coating quality and twice to investigate if bacteria have colonized on sutures. Adhesion experiments were assessed by exposing coated sutures to S. aureus suspensions for 3 h at 37°C. Subsequently, sutures were sonicated and the number of viable bacteria released from the suture surface was determined. Furthermore, the number of viable planktonic bacteria was measured in suspensions containing antimicrobial sutures. Commercially available sutures without drugs (Vicryl®, PGA Resorba®, and Gunze PGA), as well as triclosan-containing Vicryl® Plus were used as control groups. Results Zone of inhibition assay documented a multispecies efficacy of novel coated sutures against tested bacterial strains, comparable to most relevant S. aureus over 48 hours. SEM pictures demonstrated uniform layers on

  14. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Andreas; Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; Deimling, Constantin von; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger

    2018-01-01

    Surgical sutures can promote migration of bacteria and thus start infections. Antiseptic coating of sutures may inhibit proliferation of adhered bacteria and avoid such complications. This study investigated the inhibition of viable adhering bacteria on novel antimicrobially coated surgical sutures using chlorhexidine or octenidine, a critical factor for proliferation at the onset of local infections. The medical need, a rapid eradication of bacteria in wounds, can be fulfilled by a high antimicrobial efficacy during the first days after wound closure. As a pretesting on antibacterial efficacy against relevant bacterial pathogens a zone of inhibition assay was conducted with middle ranged concentrated suture coatings (22 μg/cm). For further investigation of adhering bacteria in detail the most clinically relevant Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC®49230™) was used. Absorbable braided sutures were coated with chlorhexidine-laurate, chlorhexidine-palmitate, octenidine-laurate, and octenidine-palmitate. Each coating type resulted in 11, 22, or 33 μg/cm drug content on sutures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed once to inspect the coating quality and twice to investigate if bacteria have colonized on sutures. Adhesion experiments were assessed by exposing coated sutures to S. aureus suspensions for 3 h at 37°C. Subsequently, sutures were sonicated and the number of viable bacteria released from the suture surface was determined. Furthermore, the number of viable planktonic bacteria was measured in suspensions containing antimicrobial sutures. Commercially available sutures without drugs (Vicryl®, PGA Resorba®, and Gunze PGA), as well as triclosan-containing Vicryl® Plus were used as control groups. Zone of inhibition assay documented a multispecies efficacy of novel coated sutures against tested bacterial strains, comparable to most relevant S. aureus over 48 hours. SEM pictures demonstrated uniform layers on coated sutures with higher roughness for

  15. Rhamnolipids as emulsifying agents for essential oil formulations: antimicrobial effect against Candida albicans and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Ester; Bouhdid, Samira; Torrego-Solana, Noelia; Marqués, A M; Espuny, M José; García-Celma, M José; Manresa, Angeles

    2014-12-10

    This work examines the influence of essential oil composition on emulsification with rhamnolipids and their use as therapeutic antimicrobial agents against two opportunistic pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Candida albicans. Rhamnolipids, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with waste frying oil as the carbon source, were composed of eight rhamnolipid homologues. The rhamnolipid mixture was used to produce emulsions containing essential oils (EOs) of Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum verum, Origanum compactum and Lavandula angustifolia using the titration method. Ternary phase diagrams were designed to evaluate emulsion stability, which differed depending on the essential oil. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs alone and the emulsions was evaluated. The antimicrobial activity presented by the essential oils alone increased with emulsification. The surface properties of rhamnolipids contribute to the positive dispersion of EOs and thus increase their availability and antimicrobial activity against C. albicans and S. aureus. Therefore, rhamnolipid-based emulsions represent a promising approach to the development of EO delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with fulleropyrrolidine: photoinactivation mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus, in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Fila, Grzegorz; Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Kawiak, Anna; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Tadeusz; Lilge, Lothar; Bielawski, Krzysztof P

    2015-05-01

    A family of N-methylpyrrolidinium fullerene iodide salts has been intensively studied to determine their applicability in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT). This study examined in vitro the efficacy of a C60 fullerene functionalized with one methylpyrrolidinium group to kill upon irradiation with white light gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, as well as fungal cells, and the corresponding mechanism of the fullerene bactericidal action. The in vitro studies revealed that the high antistaphylococcal efficacy of functionalized fullerene could be linked to their ability to photogenerate singlet oxygen and superoxide anion. Following Staphylococcus aureus photoinactivation, no modifications of its genomic DNA were detected. In contrast, photodamage of the cell envelope seemed to be a dominant mechanism of bactericidal action. In in vivo studies, a 2 log10 reduction in the average bioluminescent radiance between treated and non-treated mice was reached. One day post APDT treatment, moist and abundant growth of bacteria could be observed on wounds of non-fulleropyrrolidine and dark control mice. APDT-treated wounds stayed visibly clear up to the third day. Moreover, cytotoxicity test on human dermal keratinocytes revealed great safety of using the sensitizer toward eukaryotic cells. These data indicate potential application of functionalized fullerene as antistaphylococcal sensitizer for superficial infections.

  17. Frequency and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepide Hassanzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is the one of most commonly isolated organisms from clinical samples which can cause life- threatening infections. The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance makes the treatment of these infections more complicated. In this study, we aimed to determine  the  patterns  of  antibiotic  resistance  among  MRSA  isolates  from Tehran, Iran.Methods: From December 2012 to April 2014, 120 clinical samples were collected. MRSA was identified by cefoxitin disc diffusion. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on MRSA isolates for eight other antibiotics by disc diffusion method according to CLSI (2013 recommendations. Also, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined for vancomycin by MIC test strips.Results: According to disc diffusion, 60 (50% isolates showed resistance to cefoxitin. Among these isolates, the rate of resistance to nitrofurantoin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, doxycycline, trimethoprim, erythromycin, clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin were 0%, 0%, 0%, 28.3%, 28.3%, 58.3%, 63.3%, and 70%, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin according to disc diffusion and MIC.Conclusion: Compared to other reports from Iran, our study indicated a moderate rate  for  MRSA.  However,  the  rates  of  resistance  to  generally  prescribed antibiotics in these isolates were high. In this situation, it is recommended tomonitor the antibiotic resistance in these hospitals.

  18. Molecular Typing and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Raw Milk, Cheese, Minced Meat, and Chicken Meat Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Alper

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: i) to detect the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in raw milk, cheese, beef minced meat, and chicken meat samples; ii) to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates; and iii) to determine clonal relation among the isolates by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Therefore, a total of 160 food samples were randomly collected between August 2014 and May 2015 in Hatay province, located in the southern Turkey. Twenty (12.5%) of the samples were found to be contaminated with S. aureus. A total of 40 isolates from the 20 positive samples were confirmed to be S. aureus by multiplex PCR based on 16S rRNA and nuc gene. The mec A gene was not detected in any of the S. aureus strains. In the present study, 39 out of 40 (97.5%) isolates were found to be resistant to one or more antibiotics. All of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, oxacillin, and vancomycin. The highest resistance rate was detected in penicillin (95%) and ampicillin (92.5%), followed by tetracycline (30%), erythromycin (20%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%). Nine major patterns were determined by PFGE. In 6 of these patterns, thirty-six strains (90%) had identical PFGE profiles. PMID:28515641

  19. Prevalence, Molecular Characterization, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Milk and Dairy Products.

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    Al-Ashmawy, Maha Abdou; Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Abd-Elghany, Samir Mohammed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2016-03-01

    The present work was undertaken to study the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in raw milk and dairy products in Mansoura City, Egypt. MRSA was detected in 53% (106/200) among all milk and dairy products with prevalence rates of 75%, 65%, 40%, 50%, and 35% in raw milk, Damietta cheese, Kareish cheese, ice cream, and yogurt samples, respectively. The mean S. aureus counts were 3.49, 3.71, 2.93, 3.40, and 3.23 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/g among tested raw milk, Damietta cheese, Kareish cheese, ice cream and yogurt, respectively, with an overall count of 3.41 log10 CFU/g. Interestingly, all recovered S. aureus isolates were genetically verified as MRSA strains by molecular detection of the mecA gene. Furthermore, genes encoding α-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, sec) were detected in all isolates. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of recovered MRSA isolates against 13 tested antimicrobials revealed that the least effective drugs were penicillin G, cloxacillin, tetracycline, and amoxicillin with bacterial resistance percentages of 87.9%, 75.9%, 65.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. These findings suggested that milk and dairy products represent a potential infection risk threat of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt due to neglected hygienic practices during production, retail, or storage stages. These findings highlighted the crucial importance of applying more restrictive hygienic measures in dairy production in Egypt for food safety.

  20. Challenges in Dermal Delivery of Therapeutic Antimicrobial Protein and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Rohan; Misra, Ambikanandan; Amrutiya, Jitendra; Patel, Hinal; Bhatt, Priyanka; Patel, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Protein and peptides in biological system form an important part of innate immune system and are being explored for potential use in various diseases as therapeutics. Importance of proteins and peptides as a new class of antimicrobial agents has boosted research in the field of biotechnology as potential alternative to antibiotic agents. Protein and peptides antimicrobial as a therapeutic class are structurally diverse and exhibit potent activity against microbes by various mechanisms. However, they present formidable challenge in formulation due to requirement of specific spatial configuration for their activity and stability. Thus, encapsulation of these therapeutics in various nano-systems may sustain activity along with improvement in stability. The article highlights the need for antimicrobial peptides in dermal infections along with discussion of mechanism of their action. It highlights challenges faced for dermal delivery and research carried out for their successful delivery using nano-systems. It is widely realized that these novel classes of therapeutic agents have tremendous market potential to emerge as an alternative to conventional antibiotic agents for combating issue of multidrug resistant microbial species. Research in their delivery aspects by use of current advances made in delivery systems through use of nanoconstructs offers much needed area for exploration and achieving success. As there is an urgent need for coming up with new therapeutic agents for encompassing the increased burden of microbial diseases in human population as well as their delivery challenges, research in field will give the much-needed strategic advantage against pathogenic organisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Glucose Augments Killing Efficiency of Daptomycin Challenged Staphylococcus aureus Persisters.

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    Marcel Prax

    Full Text Available Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus in stationary growth phase with high doses of the antibiotic daptomycin (DAP eradicates the vast majority of the culture and leaves persister cells behind. Despite resting in a drug-tolerant and dormant state, persister cells exhibit metabolic activity which might be exploited for their elimination. We here report that the addition of glucose to S. aureus persisters treated with DAP increased killing by up to five-fold within one hour. This glucose-DAP effect also occurred with strains less sensitive to the drug. The underlying mechanism is independent of the proton motive force and was not observed with non-metabolizable 2-deoxy-glucose. Our results are consistent with two hypotheses on the glucose-DAP interplay. The first is based upon glucose-induced carbohydrate transport proteins that may influence DAP and the second suggests that glucose may trigger the release or activity of cell-lytic proteins to augment DAP's mode of action.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy cows and genetic diversity of resistant isolates

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    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent and major contagious mastitis bacterial pathogen. The antibiotic treatment cure rates vary considerably from 4% to 92%. Staphylococcus aureus readily becomes resistant to antibiotics, resulting in persistent noncurable intramammary infection that usually results i...

  3. Prevalence, Virulence Genes, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus from Retail Aquatic Products in China

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    Mingfang Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important food-borne opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes severe blood and tissue infections or even fatal illnesses. Although S. aureus has been extensively studied in livestock and poultry foods in China, limited information has been reported in aquatic products. Accordingly, in this study, we aimed to characterize S. aureus in aquatic products purchased from retail markets in China. In total, 320 aquatic food samples were collected from 32 provincial capitals in China. The results showed that 119 samples (37.2%, 119/320 were positive for S. aureus by both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The contamination levels of 78.2% of samples ranged from 0.3 to 10 MPN/g, and six samples exceeded 110 MPN/g. A total of 119 S. aureus isolates from positive samples were selected to evaluate virulence factors, antibiotic resistance, and molecular characteristics. All S. aureus isolates were evaluated for the presence of 11 virulence genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and α-hemolysin (hlα, 84.9%, fibronectin-binding protein A (fnbA, 79.0%, S. aureus enterotoxin E (see, 53.8%, and Panton-Valentine leucocidin (pvl, 50.4% were identified as the major genes. These genes formed 56 different profiles, with the major profile identified as pvl-hlα-fnbA (28.6%. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all isolates was analyzed through the disk diffusion method, and the results showed high resistance to β-lactams, macrolides and tetracyclines, but susceptibility to linezolid and vancomycin. In addition, 26 sequence types (STs were obtained via multilocus sequence typing, including seven novel STs, among which ST1 (20.2%, ST15 (18.5%, and ST188 (13.4% were the most common STs. All the isolates were mecC negative, but nine isolates carrying mecA were evaluated by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing, all of which were SCCmecIII or SCCmecIV types. Isolates of SCCmecIII showed a high prevalence and were

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and characterization of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa

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    Lin Johnson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA continues to be a problem for clinicians worldwide. However, few data on the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of S. aureus isolates in South Africa have been reported and the prevalence of MRSA in the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN province is unknown. In addition, information on the characterization of S. aureus in this province is unavailable. This study investigated the susceptibility pattern of 227 S. aureus isolates from the KZN province, South Africa. In addition, characterization of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA are reported in this survey. Methods The in-vitro activities of 20 antibiotics against 227 consecutive non-duplicate S. aureus isolates from clinical samples in KZN province, South Africa were determined by the disk-diffusion technique. Isolates resistant to oxacillin and mupirocin were confirmed by PCR detection of the mecA and mup genes respectively. PCR-RFLP of the coagulase gene was employed in the characterization of MSSA and MRSA. Results All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and fusidic acid, and 26.9% of isolates studied were confirmed as MRSA. More than 80% of MRSA were resistant to at least four classes of antibiotics and isolates grouped in antibiotype 8 appears to be widespread in the province. The MSSA were also susceptible to streptomycin, neomycin and minocycline, while less than 1% was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and mupirocin. The inducible MLSB phenotype was detected in 10.8% of MSSA and 82% of MRSA respectively, and one MSSA and one MRSA exhibited high-level resistance to mupirocin. There was good correlation between antibiotyping and PCR-RFLP of the coagulase gene in the characterization of MRSA in antibiotypes 1, 5 and 12. Conclusion In view of the high resistance rates of MRSA to gentamicin, erythromycin, clindamycin, rifampicin and

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance traits of foodborne Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a recognized pathogen in humans, which causes nosocomial infections and food poisoning. The transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus (ARSA), especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), between food products and humans has become a serious problem. Hence, it is n...

  6. Ciprofloxacin HCl-loaded calcium carbonate nanoparticles: preparation, solid state characterization, and evaluation of antimicrobial effect against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad-Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2017-05-01

    Ciprofloxacin HCl-loaded calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles were prepared via a w/o microemulsion method and characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The in vitro drug release profiles as well as antimicrobial effect against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were also evaluated. The antibacterial effect was studied using serial dilution technique to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the nanoparticles and was confirmed by streak cultures. The mean particle size, drug loading and entrapment efficiency were calculated to be 116.09 nm, 20.49% and 44.05%, respectively. PXRD and FTIR studies confirmed that both vaterite and calcite polymorphs of CaCO3 were formed during the preparation process. In vitro release profiles of the nanoparticles showed slow release pattern for 12 h. The drug-loaded nanoparticles showed similar MICs against S. aureus compared to untreated drug. However, a preserved antimicrobial effect was observed for drug-loaded nanoparticles compared to untreated drug after 2 days of incubation.

  7. Low cytotoxic trace element selenium nanoparticles and their differential antimicrobial properties against S. aureus and E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phong A.; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil; Reynolds, Eric C.; Pantarat, Namfon; Biswas, Dhee P.; O'Connor, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents that have no or low cytotoxicity and high specificity are desirable to have no or minimal side effects. We report here the low cytotoxicity of polyvinyl alcohol-stabilized selenium (Se) nanoparticles and their differential effects on growth of S. aureus, a gram-positive bacterium and E. coli, a gram-negative bacterium. The nanoparticles were synthesised through redox reactions in an aqueous environment at room temperature and were characterised using UV visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The nanoparticles showed low toxicity toward fibroblasts which remained more than 70% viable at Se concentrations as high as 128 ppm. The nanoparticles also exhibited very low haemolysis with only 18% of maximal lysis observed at a Se concentration of 128 ppm. Importantly, the nanoparticles showed strong growth inhibition toward S. aureus at a concentration as low as 1 ppm. Interestingly, growth of E. coli was unaffected at all concentrations tested. This study therefore strongly suggests that these nanoparticles should be investigated further to understand this differential effect as well as for potential advanced antimicrobial applications such as S. aureus infection—resisting, non-cytotoxic coatings for medical devices.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of photodynamic therapy (UVA/riboflavin against Staphylococcus aureus Suscetibilidade antimicrobiana da terapia fotodinâmica (UVA/riboflavina contra Staphylococcus aureus

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    Renata Tiemi Kashiwabuchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess S. aureus in vitro viability after the exposure to ultraviolet light A (UVA and riboflavin (B2. METHODS: Samples of S. aureus in 96 well plates (in triplicate were exposed to riboflavin (B2 and ultraviolet light A (365 nm wavelength at a power density of 3 mW/cm², 8 mm spot diameter, for 30 minutes. Control groups were prepared as well in triplicate: blank control, ultraviolet light A only, riboflavin only and dead bacteria Control. The bacterial viability was measured using fluorescent microscopy. In order to investigate the occurrence of "viable but non-culturable" microorganisms after treatment, the cell viability was also investigated by plate culture procedure onto a broth medium. Statistical analysis was performed using the triplicate values from each experimental condition. RESULTS: No difference was observed among the treatment group and the control samples (p=1. CONCLUSION: The combination of riboflavin 0.1% and ultraviolet light A at 365 nm did not exhibit antimicrobial activity against oxacillin susceptible S. aureus.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a viabilidade celular de S. aureus in vitro após a exposição de riboflavina (B2 e luz ultravioleta A (UVA. MÉTODOS: Amostras de S. aureus colocadas em uma placa de 96 poços (em triplicata foram expostas a riboflavina 0,1% (B2 e luz ultravioleta (comprimento de onda de 365 nm poder de 3 mW/cm², 8 mm de diâmetro, por 30 minutos. Grupos controles foram também preparados em triplicata: controle branco, somente luz ultravioleta A, somente riboflavina e controle morto. A viabilidade bacteriana foi analisada usando microscópio de fluorescência. Para investigar a ocorrência de micro-organismos "viáveis porem não cultiváveis" a viabilidade celular foi avaliada utilizando-se placas de meio de cultivo bacteriano. Analise estatística foi realizada utilizando-se os valores obtidos em triplicata de cada grupo experimental. RESULTADOS: Nenhuma diferença foi observada entre o grupo

  9. Importance of control group selection for evaluating antimicrobial use as a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Erika J; Raley, George; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Diekema, Daniel J

    2005-07-01

    We investigated the importance of control group selection during an evaluation of antimicrobial use as a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia at our institution. We performed a case-control study. A case was defined as any patient admitted between January 1997 and May 2001 who developed nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. We used two control groups; control group I consisted of patients with nosocomial methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia and control group II included only patients without bacteremia. We matched control-patients to case-patients using age, gender, time at risk, and hospital ward. Data collected on all patients included demographics, comorbidities, antibiotic use, time at risk, length of stay, severity of illness, and outcome. We evaluated 63 patients (21 in each group). The three groups were well matched regarding age, gender, underlying diseases, and severity of illness. Patients in the MRSA group were more likely to have received a fluoroquinolone and had a higher mean number of days of fluoroquinolone use than did patients in the MSSA group (P = .027 and P = .015, respectively). However, all measures of fluoroquinolone use were similar for case-patients and for control-patients who did not have nosocomial bloodstream infection. Control group selection is important in evaluating antimicrobial use as a risk factor for MRSA bacteremia. Using control-patients infected with MSSA, rather than uninfected control-patients, may overestimate the association between antimicrobial use and MRSA infection.

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from the anterior nares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Cale N.; Pedigo, Lisa; Gibbs, Aaron; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-06-01

    The nosocomial infection rate has increased dramatically due to emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The primary anatomical site of MRSA colonization is the anterior nares, and this reservoir represents a primary vector of transmission from non-infected carriers to susceptible individuals. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been used successfully for topical disinfection in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of aPDT for nasal MRSA decolonization at the preclinical and clinical level. The nasal aPDT system consists of a 670 nm diode laser fibre-optically coupled to a disposable light diffusing tip, used to activate a methylene blue based photosensitizer formulation. Preclinical testing was done both in a custom nasal reservoir model and on human skin cultures colonized on the epithelial surface with MRSA. Human clinical testing was performed by clinicians in regions in which the system is approved by the regulatory authority. In vitro testing demonstrated that aPDT eradicated planktonic MRSA in an energy and photosensitizer concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, aPDT eliminated sustained colonization of MRSA on cultured human epithelial surfaces, an effect that was sustained over multiple days post-treatment. In preliminary human testing, aPDT eradicated MRSA completely from the nose with total treatment times <10 minutes. aPDT is effective against MRSA when used topically in the nose. Energy dose and photosensitizer parameters have been optimized for the nasal environment. Controlled clinical studies are currently underway to further evaluate safety and efficacy.

  11. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazines derivatives associated with the red laser against staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Miranda, Anderson F. S.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazinium dye (Toluidine blue O and methylene blue) at a low concentration of 1μg/mL irradiated with the red laser at doses of 2.4 e 4.8 J/cm² on strain of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529) in vitro. For this research, tests were performed in triplicate and the samples were distributed into six test groups: (L-P-) Negative control (L1+P-) and (L2+P-) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively in the absence of photosensitizer; (L1+P+) and (L2+P+) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer and finally (L-P+) bacterial suspensions only in the presence of phenothiazinium dye. Therefore, were analyzed the potential bactericidal PACT by counting of colony-forming units and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, p<0.05). The results showed that the negative control group when compared with laser group (L2+P-) it was observed a statistically significant increase (p<0.01) which L2+P- showed a higher number of CFU, on the other hand when compared to L1+P- no statistically significant difference was found, relation to the groups submitted to PACT, only showed a statistically significant reduction relative to the group irradiated L2+P+ (p<0.01) that showed a decrease in the number of CFU. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups submitted to PDT (L1+P+ and L2+P+). Although the results of this study have shown a reduction in average number of colony forming units by the appropriate laser-dye treatment combination, it needs further investigation.

  12. Antibody-directed targeting of lysostaphin adsorbed onto polylactide nanoparticles increases its antimicrobial activity against S. aureus in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, R.; Vertegel, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the effect of antibody-directed targeting of S. aureus by comparing the activities of lysostaphin conjugated to biodegradable polylactide nanoparticles (NPs) in the presence and in the absence of co-immobilized anti-S. aureus antibody. Lysostaphin-antibody-NP conjugates were synthesized through physical adsorption at different enzyme:antibody:NP ratios. The synthesized enzyme-NP conjugates were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering and zeta potential analysis, and the total protein binding yield on the NPs was characterized using Alexa Fluor 350 and 594 dyes for the S. aureus antibody and lysostaphin respectively. We observed enhanced antimicrobial activity for both enzyme-coated and enzyme-antibody-coated NPs for lysostaphin coatings corresponding to ~ 40% of the initial monolayer and higher compared to the free enzyme case (p bacterial lysis rates for antibody-coated samples were significantly higher than for lysostaphin-coated samples lacking the antibody (p conjugates thus have the potential for becoming novel therapeutic agents for treating antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infections.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial effects and mechanism of atmospheric-pressure He/O2 plasma jet on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Hu, Shuheng; Lan, Yan; Chu, Paul K.

    2017-03-01

    The antimicrobial effects and associated mechanism of inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) NCTC-8325 biofilms induced by a He/O2 atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are investigated in vitro. According to CFU (colony forming units) counting and the resazurin-based assay, the 10 min He/O2 (0.5%) APPJ treatment produces the optimal inactivation efficacy (>5 log10 ml-1) against the S. aureus biofilm and 5% of the bacteria enter a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state. Meanwhile, 94% of the bacteria suffer from membrane damage according to SYTO 9/PI counterstaining. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that plasma exposure erodes the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and then the cellular structure. The H2DCFDA-stained biofilms show larger concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in membrane-intact bacteria with increasing plasma dose. The admixture of oxygen in the working gas highly contributes to the deactivation efficacy of the APPJ against S. aureus and the plasma-induced endogenous ROS may work together with the discharge-generated ROS to continuously damage the bacterial membrane structure leading to deactivation of the biofilm microbes.

  14. Antimicrobial photodynamic activity of Rose Bengal, alone or in combination with Gentamicin, against planktonic and biofilm Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Laguna, Vanesa; García-Luque, Isabel; Ballesta, Sofía; Pérez-Artiaga, Luna; Lampaya-Pérez, Verónica; Samper, Sofía; Soria-Lozano, Pilar; Rezusta, Antonio; Gilaberte, Yolanda

    2017-11-28

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) could constitute an alternative therapy to antibiotics especially against superficial infections caused by bacteria involved in multidrug resistance processes. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of aPDT using the photosensitizer rose bengal (RB), combined or uncombined with gentamicin (GN), against Staphylococcus aureus. Different concentrations of RB (ranging from 0.03 to 64μg/ml) were added to S. aureus in water suspensions or forming biofilms in the absence or presence of GN (1 to 40μg/ml) and the samples were irradiated (18 or 37J/cm2). The number of viable bacteria was quantified by counting colony-forming units. RB-aPDT shows significant photoactivity. The combination of GN and RB-aPDT exerts a synergistic bactericidal effect against planktonic S. aureus. On the other hand, a synergic effect is observed only when the maximum concentration tested of RB and GN was used in biofilm. According to these result the use of RB-aPDT alone or in combination with GN could be implemented against S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus causing bovine mastitis in Argentine dairy herds Sensibilidad a los antimicrobianos de Staphylococcus aureus causantes de mastitis bovina en rodeos lecheros de Argentina

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    N.B. Russi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the in vitro activity of selected antimicrobial agents against 95 Staphylococcus aureus strains causing both clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis belonging to 61 dairy farms from the Central dairy area of Argentina. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of penicillin, oxacillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, enrofloxacin and florfenicol were estimated. In addition, the agar diffusion test was performed. MIC50 and MIC90 were as follows: penicillin, 0.05 and 4 µg/ml; oxacillin, 0.25 and 0.25 µg/ml; gentamicin, 0.25 and 0.5 µg/ml; erythromycin 0.125 and 0.25 µg/ml; enrofloxacin 0.25 and 0.5 µg/ml, and florfenicol 4 and 8 µg/ml. b-lactamase activity was detected in 89% of 46 penicillin- resistant strains. Apart from penicillin, antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus causing bovine mastitis remains rare in Argentine dairy farms.Se evaluó la actividad in vitro de un grupo seleccionado de antimicrobianos contra 95 aislamientos de Staphylococcus aureus obtenidos de casos de mastitis bovina clínica y subclínica, en 61 rodeos lecheros de la cuenca central de Argentina. Fueron estimadas las concentraciones inhibitorias mínimas (CIM de penicilina, oxacilina, gentamicina, eritromicina, enrofloxacina y florfenicol. Además se realizó la prueba de difusión en agar. Las CIM50 y CIM90 obtenidas fueron: penicilina 0,05 y 4 µg/ml; oxacilina 0,25 y 0,25 µg/ml; gentamicina 0,25 y 0,5 µg/ml; eritromicina 0,125 y 0,25 µg/ml; enrofloxacina 0,25 y 0,5 µg/ml y florfenicol 4 y 8 µg/ml. Se detectó actividad de b-lactamasa en el 89% de las cepas resistentes a la penicilina. A excepción de lo observado para penicilina, la resistencia a los antimicrobianos en S. aureus causantes de mastitis bovina en Argentina parece ser un fenómeno poco frecuente.

  16. Antimicrobial effect of conventional root canal medicaments vs propolis against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattigatti, Sudha; Ratnakar, P; Moturi, Shridhar; Varma, Sarath; Rairam, Surabhi

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate and compare antimicrobial effect of various root canal medicaments against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Six root canal medicaments: 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), EDTA, MTAD and propolis and three microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans were used. These strains were inoculated in brain heart infusion (BHI) and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. For the agar diffusion test (ADT), petri plates with 20 ml of BHI agar were inoculated with 0.1 ml of the microbial suspensions, using sterile swabs that were spread on the medium, obtaining growth injunction. Paper disks were immersed in the experimental solutions for 1 minute. Subsequently, four papers disks containing one of the substances were placed on the BHI agar surface in each agar plate. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. The diameter of microbial inhibition was measured around the papers disks containing the substances. One way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test were used. p-value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Propolis and other irrigants were found to be effective on C. albicans, S. aureus and E. faecalis. CHX and MTAD were found to be most effective amongst all the materials tested followed by propolis. Propolis showed antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis, S. aureus, C. albicans. It appears that propolis is an effective intracanal irrigant in eradicating E. faecalis and C. albicans. Propolis is an effective intracanal irrigant in eradicating E. faecalis and C. albicans. It could be used as an alternative intracanal medicament.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the responses of Staphylococcus aureus to antimicrobial peptides and characterization of the roles of vraDE and vraSR in antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrenzel Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how pathogens respond to antimicrobial peptides, and how this compares to currently available antibiotics, is crucial for optimizing antimicrobial therapy. Staphylococcus aureus has several known resistance mechanisms against human cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs. Gene expression changes in S. aureus strain Newman exposed to linear CAMPs were analyzed by DNA microarray. Three antimicrobial peptides were used in the analysis, two are derived from frog, temporin L and dermaseptin K4-S4(1-16, and the ovispirin-1 is obtained from sheep. Results The peptides induced the VraSR cell-wall regulon and several other genes that are also up-regulated in cells treated with vancomycin and other cell wall-active antibiotics. In addition to this similarity, three genes/operons were particularly strongly induced by the peptides: vraDE, SA0205 and SAS016, encoding an ABC transporter, a putative membrane-bound lysostaphin-like peptidase and a small functionally unknown protein, respectively. Ovispirin-1 and dermaseptin K4-S4(1-16, which disrupt lipid bilayers by the carpet mechanism, appeared to be strong inducers of the vraDE operon. We show that high level induction by ovispirin-1 is dependent on the amide modification of the peptide C-terminus. This suggests that the amide group has a crucial role in the activation of the Aps (GraRS sensory system, the regulator of vraDE. In contrast, temporin L, which disrupts lipid bilayers by forming pores, revealed a weaker inducer of vraDE despite the C-terminal amide modification. Sensitivity testing with CAMPs and other antimicrobials suggested that VraDE is a transporter dedicated to resist bacitracin. We also showed that SA0205 belongs to the VraSR regulon. Furthermore, VraSR was shown to be important for resistance against a wide range of cell wall-active antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents including the amide-modified ovispirin-1, bacitracin, teicoplanin, cefotaxime and

  18. Antimicrobial activity of free and liposome-encapsulated thymol and carvacrol against Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus adhered to stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Juliana Both; Heckler, Caroline; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar; Daroit, Daniel Joner; da Silva Malheiros, Patrícia

    2017-07-03

    Antimicrobial activity of thymol, carvacrol and thymol/carvacrol liposomes (TCL) was evaluated against two bacterial pools, each one consisting of four strains of Staphylococcus aureus or Salmonella enterica. TCL were prepared using thin-film hydration, showing 270.20nm average diameter (polydispersity index of 0.33) and zeta potential of +39.99mV. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of thymol, carvacrol and TCL against S. aureus pool was 0.662mg/ml, while MIC for Salmonella pool was 0.331mg/ml for thymol and carvacrol, and for TCL was 0.662mg/ml. Bacterial pools (8.0logCFU/ml), allowed in contact on stainless steel AISI 304 coupons in UHT skim milk for 15min, resulted in adhered populations of 5.6-6.1logCFU/cm2. Adhered S. aureus (±6.1logCFU/cm2) were inhibited after 1-min and 10-min treatments using thymol or carvacrol at MIC and 2.0 MIC. Reductions of 1.47-1.76logCFU/cm2 and 1.87-2.04logCFU/cm2 were obtained using 0.5 MIC of thymol and carvacrol, respectively. A 10-min contact with free (MIC and 2.0 MIC) and encapsulated (MIC) antimicrobials inhibited attached Salmonella (±6.0logCFU/cm2); however, after 1-min of contact, 2.0 MIC of thymol and carvacrol were not able to inactivate adhered Salmonella MIC of TCL inactivated S. aureus and Salmonella after 10min; however, after 1-min contact, adhered S. aureus and Salmonella populations were decreased in 1.62logCFU/cm2 and 2.01logCFU/cm2, respectively. Considering antimicrobial concentrations and contact times, thymol, carvacrol, and TCL could be employed in food-contact surfaces to prevent biofilm formation at early stages of bacterial attachment. Further investigations should be performed considering long-term antibacterial effects of TCL. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Mutating the heme sensing response regulator HssR in Staphylococcus aureus but not in the Listeria monocytogenes homologue results in increased tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide Plectasin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L. E.; Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Gottschalk, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Host defence peptides (HDPs), also known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), have emerged as potential new therapeutics and their antimicrobial spectrum covers a wide range of target organisms. However, the mode of action and the genetics behind the bacterial response to HDPs...... is incompletely understood and such knowledge is required to evaluate their potential as antimicrobial therapeutics. Plectasin is a recently discovered HDP active against Gram-positive bacteria with the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) being highly susceptible and the food borne pathogen...... constructed bacterial transposon mutant libraries of S. aureus NCTC8325-4 and L. monocytogenes 4446 and screened for increased resistance to the peptide. No resistant mutants arose when L. monocytogenes was screened on plates containing 5 and 10 fold Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of plectasin...

  20. Changes in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus over the past decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Toke Seierøe; Wibroe, Elisabeth Arnberg; Braüner, Julie Vestergaard

    2015-01-01

    in resistance patterns were noted up to 2014. CONCLUSIONS: A comprehensive and manageable inventory of the resistance patterns of the major bacteria covering the 2004-2008 period is presented. Clinicians are encouraged to use the pocket-size table as guidance when choosing antibiotic treatment. FUNDING: none......INTRODUCTION: Development of antimicrobial resistance is an ongoing and increasing problem. To provide the best possible treatment for patients it is crucial that clinicians are aware of the local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. The aim of this study was to present an overview...... susceptibility at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, from 2004 to 2008. Due to a suspected rise in resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae after this period, updated data for these bacteria are shown for selected antibiotics until 2014. The department receives samples from...

  1. Rifampicin-fosfomycin coating for cementless endoprostheses: antimicrobial effects against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Volker; Kirchhof, Kristin; Seim, Florian; Hrubesch, Isabelle; Lips, Katrin S; Mannel, Henrich; Domann, Eugen; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    New strategies to decrease infection rates in cementless arthroplasty are needed, especially in the context of the growing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a rifampicin-fosfomycin coating against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA in a rabbit infection prophylaxis model. Uncoated or rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated K-wires were inserted into the intramedullary canal of the tibia in rabbits and contaminated with an inoculation dose of 10(5) or 10(6) colony-forming units of MSSA EDCC 5055 in study 1 and MRSA T6625930 in study 2, respectively. After 28days the animals were killed and clinical, histological and microbiological assessment, including pulse-field gel electrophoresis, was conducted. Positive culture growth in agar plate testing and/or clinical signs and/or histological signs were defined positive for infection. Statistical evaluation was performed using Fisher's exact test. Both studies showed a statistically significant reduction of infection rates for rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implants compared to uncoated K-wires (P=0.015). In both studies none of the 12 animals that were treated with a rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implant showed clinical signs of infection or a positive agar plate testing result. In both studies, one animal of the coating group showed the presence of sporadic bacteria with concomitant inflammatory signs in histology. The control groups in both studies exhibited an infection rate of 100% with clear clinical signs of infection and positive culture growth in all animals. In summary, the rifampicin-fosfomycin-coating showed excellent antimicrobial activity against both MSSA and MRSA, and therefore warrants further clinical testing. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Liln, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field (AMF) is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  3. Profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Abbas Poor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital-acquired infections are a major challenge to patient. A range of gram-negative organisms are responsible for hospital-acquired infections, the Enterobacteriaceae family being the most commonly identified group overall. Infections by ESBL producers are associated with severe adverse clinical outcomes that have led to increased mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and rising medical costs. The aim of this study was to survey profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods. Material and Methods: In this study participants were patients hospitalized in PICU part of Bahrami Hospital, Tehran, with attention to involved organ. For isolation of bacteria from patient’s samples, culture performed on different selective and differential media. After confirmation of bacteria by biochemical tests, susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion method. Phenotypic detection of MRSA strains was performed using cefoxcitin disc. ESBL producing strains were detected by ceftazidime (CAZ and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid (CAZ/CLA discs. Results: Among all isolated organisms from clinical samples, the most common isolated organisms were Escherichia coli (24 cases, Pseudomonas areoginosa (9 cases and Staphylococcus aureus (8 cases, respectively. Among eight MRSA isolated strains from different clinical samples, six strains (75% were MRSA. Among 52 isolated gram negative organisms, 5 strains (9/6% were ESBL. Conclusion: Standard interventions to prevent the transmission of antimicrobial resistance in health care facilities include hand hygiene, using barrier precautions in the care of colonized and infected patients, using dedicated instruments and equipment for these patients. The colonized or infected patients should be isolated in single rooms, multibed rooms or areas

  4. Host adaptation of bovine Staphylococcus aureus seems associated with bacteriological cure after lactational antimicrobial treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den B.H.P.; Nielen, M.; Schaik, van G.; Melchior, M.B.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Zadoks, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of diseases in multiple species. Some sequence types (ST) are observed in a variety of hosts, whereas other strains are mainly associated with bovine mastitis, suggesting host adaptation. We propose that host adaptation of Staph. aureus may influence

  5. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bloodstream infections and pneumonia in Southern Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Chlebowicz, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Szczypta, Anna; Natkaniec, Joanna; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pobiega, Monika; Dzikowska, Miroslawa; Krawczyk, Lech; Koziol, Joanna; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus remains the most important cause of infections in hospitals and long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to analyse the resistance, virulence, and epidemiological and genetic relationships of S. aureus from bloodstream infections (BSIs) and pneumonia

  6. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of chitosan and its quaternized derivative on E. coli and S. aureus growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane C. Goy

    Full Text Available Abstract Chitosan is largely known for its activity against a wide range of microorganisms, in which the most acceptable antimicrobial mechanism is found to include the presence of charged groups in the polymer backbone and their ionic interactions with bacteria wall constituents. This interaction suggests the occurrence of a hydrolysis of the peptidoglycans in the microorganism wall, provoking the leakage of intracellular electrolytes, leading the microorganism to death. The charges present in chitosan chains are generated by protonation of amino groups when in acid medium or they may be introduced via structural modification. This latter can be achieved by a methylation reaction resulting in a quaternized derivative with a higher polymeric charge density. Since the charges in this derivative are permanents, it is expected a most efficient antimicrobial activity. Hence, in the present study, commercial chitosan underwent quaternization processes and both (mother polymer and derivative were evaluated, in gel form, against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative, as model bacteria. The results, as acquired from turbidity measurements, differ between materials with an expressive reduction on the Gram-positive microorganism (S. aureus growth, while E. coli (Gram-negative strain was less sensitive to both polymers. Additionally, the antibacterial effectiveness of chitosan was strongly dependent on the concentration, what is discussed in terms of spatial polymer conformation.

  7. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Studies of New Antibacterial Azo-Compounds Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, Stefano; Concilio, Simona; Sessa, Lucia; Diana, Rosita; Torrens, Gabriel; Juan, Carlos; Caruso, Ugo; Iannelli, Pio

    2017-08-19

    Some novel (phenyl-diazenyl)phenols (4a-m) were designed and synthesized to be evaluated for their antibacterial activity. Starting from an active previously-synthesized azobenzene chosen as lead compound, we introduced some modifications and optimization of the structure, in order to improve solubility and drug conveyance. Structures of all newly-synthesized compounds were confirmed by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of the new compounds was tested with the dilution method against the bacteria strains Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. All the compounds were selectively active against Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, compounds 4d, 4h, and 4i showed the highest activity against S. aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, reaching remarkable MIC100 values of 4 μg/mL and 8 μg/mL. The relationship between antimicrobial activity and compound structure has suggested that the presence of hydroxyl groups seems to be essential for antimicrobial activity of phenolic compounds.

  8. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bijnen, Evelien M E; Paget, W John; den Heijer, Casper D J; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Schellevis, François G

    2014-10-25

    Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment guidelines for bacterial skin infections were interpreted with respect to these antimicrobial resistance patterns. First- and second-choice recommendations were assessed and considered congruent if resistance to the antibiotic did not exceed 20%. We included primary care treatment guidelines for impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis and furuncle. Treatment recommendations in all countries were consistent: most of the first-choice recommendations were beta-lactams, both for children and adults. Antimicrobial resistance levels were low, except for penicillin (on average 73% resistance). Considerable variation in antimicrobial resistance levels was found between countries, with Sweden displaying the lowest levels and Spain the highest. In some countries resistance to penicillin and azithromycin was significantly higher in children (4-17 years) compared with adults. Most of the first- and second-choice recommendations in the treatment guidelines for skin infections were congruent with commensal S. aureus antimicrobial resistance patterns in the community, except for two recommendations for penicillin. Given the variation in antimicrobial resistance levels between countries, age groups and health care settings, national data regarding antimicrobial resistance in the community should be taken into account when updating or developing primary care treatment guidelines.

  9. Six-Year Retrospective Review of Hospital Data on Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Skin Infections from a Single Institution in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Stefanaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI to various antibiotics. Material and Methods: All culture-positive results for S. aureus from swabs taken from patients presenting at one Greek hospital with a skin infection between the years 2010–2015 were examined retrospectively. Bacterial cultures, identification of S. aureus and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed using the disk diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines and European Committee on Antimicrobial testing (EUCAST breakpoints. EUCAST breakpoints were applied if no CLSI were available. Results: Of 2069 S. aureus isolates identified, 1845 (88% were resistant to one or more antibiotics. The highest resistance was observed for benzylpenicillin (71.9%, followed by erythromycin (34.3%. Resistant strains to cefoxitin defined as MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus represented 21% of total isolates. Interestingly, resistance to fusidic acid was 22.9% and to mupirocin as high as 12.7%. Low rates were observed for minocycline, rifampicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT. Resistance to antibiotics remained relatively stable throughout the six-year period, with the exception of cefoxitin, fusidic acid and SXT. A high percentage of MRSA strains were resistant to erythromycin (60%, fusidic acid (46%, clindamycin (38% and tetracycline (35.5%. Conclusions: Special attention is required in prescribing appropriate antibiotic therapeutic regimens, particularly for MRSA. These data on the susceptibility of S. aureus may be useful for guiding antibiotic treatment.

  10. Comparison of the in vitro activity of five antimicrobial drugs on Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

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    Aude A Ferran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms.We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 hours to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5 to 2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2 % chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the 2 tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius biofilm, unlike S. aureus biofilm, was highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our conditions, the use of topical chlorhexidine would probably be the best currently available strategy to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm.

  11. Matricaria recutita extract associated with norfloxacin or cephalexin enhances the antimicrobial activity of these drugs against Staphylococcus aureus

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    Rodrigo Rafael Maia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of bacterial infections, including those related to Staphylococcus aureus, has resulted in the need to search for new and more effective clinical treatment strategies. The use of medicinal plants associated with conventional antibiotics may be a therapeutic option. Currently, studies have shown the synergistic effect of combining plant extracts with antibiotics. The present study evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial activity and bactericidal kinetics of a Matricaria recutita (chamomile extract, in association with cephalexin and norfloxacin, on clinical isolates of S. aureus of bovine origin, which is characterized as resistant. The tests were performed by dilution in a solid medium to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. For both combinations of the M. recutita extract, with the norfloxacin and cephalexin antibiotics, we observed an MIC at a 1:64 dilution, corresponding to 8μg/mL of the antibiotic and 13.43 μg/mL of the extract. When evaluating the MIC, cephalexin associated with the chamomile extract produced a synergistic effect in 75% of the samples. The combination of natural products frequently used by the population with the antibiotics tested in this study could be a therapeutic option for the treatment of infections caused by S. aureus, as well as prevent an increase in resistance.

  12. Matricaria recutita extract associated with norfloxacin or cephalexin enhances the antimicrobial activity of these drugs against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rafael Maia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2017v30n2p25 Emergence of bacterial infections, including those associated with Staphylococcus aureus, brings up a need for searching new and more effective strategies for clinical treatment. The use of medicinal plants associated with conventional antibiotics may represent a therapeutic option. Currently, studies evidence the synergistic effect achieved by combining plant extracts with antibiotics. Our objective was evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity and bactericidal kinetics of Matricaria recutita extract (chamomile and its association with cephalexin and norfloxacin on clinical isolates of S. aureus from bovine origin, characterized as resistant. The tests were performed by method of dilution in solid medium to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. In both combinations of M. recutita extract with antibiotics norfloxacin and cephalexin, we observed MIC in dilution 1:64, corresponding to 8μg/mL of the antibiotic and 13.43 μg/mL of extract. Cephalexin associated with chamomile extract produced a effect of the combination in 75% of samples in their MIC. The combination of natural products frequently used by the population with the antibiotics tested in this study, could represent a therapeutic option for treatment of infections caused by S. aureus, as well as the prevention of the increasing development of resistance.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from children with impetigo in China from 2003 to 2007 shows community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to be uncommon and heterogeneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Kong, F; Zhang, X; Brown, M; Ma, L; Yang, Y

    2009-12-01

    The number of patients with impetigo caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been increasing. To investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of S. aureus causing impetigo in children in China from 2003 to 2007 and further characterize isolates of CA-MRSA. We examined 984 S. aureus isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility to 11 antimicrobials using the agar dilution method. CA-MRSA isolates were analysed for Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing was performed. The largest proportion (94.5%) of strains were resistant to penicillin, followed by erythromycin (86.2%) and clindamycin (69.6%). In total 772 of 984 (78.5%) S. aureus strains were multiresistant. The incidence of CA-MRSA was 1.1%, with a high rate of resistance to clindamycin (90.9%) and tetracycline (72.7%), but all were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. The susceptibility profiles of MRSA to other antimicrobial agents were similar to those of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). None of the S. aureus strains were resistant to vancomycin and fusidic acid; moreover, only one strain was resistant to mupirocin. Typing of the SCCmec showed that 54.5% were type IV, 18.2% were type V and 9.1% were type VI. All the PVL-positive CA-MRSA carried SCCmec type IV. CA-MRSA is still relatively uncommon and heterogeneous in children in China. Penicillin and erythromycin are no longer appropriate agents. Effective antibiotic agents for patients with impetigo are mupirocin and fusidic acid.

  14. Genotypes, Virulence Factors and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated in Bovine Subclinical Mastitis from Eastern China

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    Javed Memon§, Yongchun Yang§, Jam Kashifa, Muhammad Yaqoob, Rehana Buriroa, Jamila Soomroa, Wang Liping and Fan Hongjie*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the genotypes, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance traits of 34 Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical mastitis in Eastern China. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC results showed resistance to erythromycin in all isolates. A high frequency of Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA; 29% was observed and these isolates were also highly resistant to penicillin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol than methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA isolates. Thirteen pathogenic factors and seven resistance genes including mecA and blaZ gene were checked through PCR. The spaX gene was found in all isolates, whereas cna, spaIg, nuc, clfA, fnbpB, hlA, hlB and seA were present in 35, 79, 85, 59, 35, 85, 71 and 38% isolates, respectively. Nine isolates carried a group of 8 different virulence genes. Moreover, macrolide resistance genes ermB and ermC were present in all isolates. High resistance rate against methicillin was found but no isolate was positive for mecA gene, whereas blaZ and tetK were detected in 82 and 56% isolates, respectively. Genes; fnbpA, seB, seC, seD, dfrK and tetM were not found in any isolate. The statistical association between phenotypic resistance and virulence genes showed, clfA, fnbpB, hlB and seA, were potentially associated with penicillin G, ciprofloxacin, methicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim and oxytetracycline resistance (P≤0.05. REP-PCR based genotyping showed seven distinct genotypes (A-G prevalent in this region. This study reports the presence of multidrug resistant S. aureus in sub-clinical mastitis which were also highly virulent that could be a major obstacle in the treatment of mastitis in this region of China.

  15. A macroeconomic approach to evaluating policies to contain antimicrobial resistance: a case study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D; Yago, Milton; Millar, Michael; Coast, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is, at least in part, associated with high antimicrobial usage and causes increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. However, policies to contain AMR focus on 'micro' interventions - typically in one institution (usually a hospital). Furthermore, in evaluating these interventions, economists tend to concentrate on the economic impact to the healthcare sector alone, which may give an incorrect estimation of the social costs and benefits of a disease or intervention. This study outlines and illustrates a macroeconomic approach to tackling AMR through the evaluation of three 'macro' policies: regulation, permits and taxes/charges. In addition to effects on the healthcare sector, the effect of AMR (and these three policies to contain it) on labour productivity, GDP, household income, government transfers, tax revenues, unemployment, inflation and social services are estimated for the UK using the specific context of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). AMR is likely to have a far greater impact on the national economy than would be estimated by concentrating on the healthcare sector alone. The permit system appears to offer the most efficient 'solution' to optimising antimicrobial consumption and, hence, reducing the development of resistance.

  16. Genetic engineering of a temperate phage-based delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Youn; Moon, Bo Youn; Park, Juw Won; Thornton, Justin A.; Park, Yong Ho; Seo, Keun Seok

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats and the Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system provides a new opportunity to create programmable gene-specific antimicrobials that are far less likely to drive resistance than conventional antibiotics. However, the practical therapeutic use of CRISPR/Cas9 is still questionable due to current shortcomings in phage-based delivery systems such as inefficient delivery, narrow host range, and potential transfer of virulence genes by generalized transduction. In this study, we demonstrate genetic engineering strategies to overcome these shortcomings by integrating CRISPR/Cas9 system into a temperate phage genome, removing major virulence genes from the host chromosome, and expanding host specificity of the phage by complementing tail fiber protein. This significantly improved the efficacy and safety of CRISPR/Cas9 antimicrobials to therapeutic levels in both in vitro and in vivo assays. The genetic engineering tools and resources established in this study are expected to provide an efficacious and safe CRISPR/Cas9 antimicrobial, broadly applicable to Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:28322317

  17. Bovine mastitis: prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile and detection of genes associated with biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeska Paula Casanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil currently ranks as one of the world leaders in food production and exportation. This scenario encourages the development of animal and plant health programs to ensure the production of safe food, helping the country to become an international provider of food for excellence. However, some health problems in dairy production, such as mastitis, have garnered increasing concern. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of bovine mastitis in select properties located in the western Santa Catarina region, to assess the susceptibility profile to antimicrobial agents used for treatment and to check for the presence of genes (icaA and icaD associated with biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. In 148 milk samples collected, 72.97% had bacterial growth (n = 108. Among the isolated microorganisms, 21.62% (n = 32 were classified as Staphylococcus aureus, 18.91% (n = 28 as Staphylococcus sp. coagulase negative, 7.43% (n = 11 as Corynebacterium sp., 6.76% (n = 10 as Staphylococcus sp. coagulase positive, 5.41% (n = 8 as Nocardia sp. and 12.83% (n = 19 classified in different bacterial genera. Among the isolates submitted for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, it was observed that 8.95% (n = 6/67 had resistance to amoxicillin, 8.04% (n = 7/87 to ampicillin, 5.88% (n = 5/85 to cephalothin, 3.40% (n = 3/88 to ceftiofur and enrofloxacin, 20.45% (n = 18/88 to streptomycin, 17.04% (n = 15/88 to gentamicin and lincomycin, 31.81% (n = 28/88 to neomycin, 14.94% (n = 13/87 to penicillin and 25% (n = 22/88 to tetracycline. Staphylococcus sp. coagulase negative isolates showed higher multidrug resistance when compared to those of S. aureus and Staphylococcus sp. coagulase positive. Thirty-one strains of S. aureus isolates were genotypically tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, yielding a positive result for the icaA gene in 83.87% of the samples, 80.64% positive for icaD and 74.19% of these showed both genes. The results reinforce the importance

  18. Nasal Carriage and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy preschool children in Ujjain, India

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    Sharma Megha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that community acquired S. aureus infections are spreading among healthy children. Nasal colonization with S. aureus plays pivotal role in the increasing prevalence of resistant community acquired S. aureus infections worldwide. A regular surveillance system is important in ensuring quality of patient care. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of and the factors associated with nasal carriage of S. aureus and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern among healthy children in Ujjain, India. Methods A prospective study was done in paediatric outpatient clinics of R.D. Gardi medical college Ujjain, India. Healthy children from 1 month to 59 months of age were included. Information on previously known risk factors for nasal colonization was collected using a pre-tested questionnaire. Swabs from anterior nares were collected and transported in Amies transport media with charcoal and cultured on 5% sheep blood agar. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed using Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method according to performance standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute guidelines. Results Of the 1,562 children from 1-month up-to five years of age included in the study 98 children tested positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus. The prevalence of nasal carriage of S. aureus was 6.3% (95% CI 5.1-7.5 out of which 16.3% (95% CI 8.9-23.8 were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The factors associated with nasal carriage were "child attending preschool" (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.25-8.03; P = 0.007 or "school" (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.27-7.18; P P = 0.03. The sensitivity pattern of isolated S. aureus showed resistance to commonly used oral antibiotics while resistance to glycopeptides was not noted. Conclusions We found a relatively low rate of nasal carriage of S. aureus in children below five years when compared to children of older age groups in India. Yet, prevalence of MRSA was relatively high.

  19. Nasal Carriage and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy preschool children in Ujjain, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that community acquired S. aureus infections are spreading among healthy children. Nasal colonization with S. aureus plays pivotal role in the increasing prevalence of resistant community acquired S. aureus infections worldwide. A regular surveillance system is important in ensuring quality of patient care. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of and the factors associated with nasal carriage of S. aureus and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern among healthy children in Ujjain, India. Methods A prospective study was done in paediatric outpatient clinics of R.D. Gardi medical college Ujjain, India. Healthy children from 1 month to 59 months of age were included. Information on previously known risk factors for nasal colonization was collected using a pre-tested questionnaire. Swabs from anterior nares were collected and transported in Amies transport media with charcoal and cultured on 5% sheep blood agar. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed using Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method according to performance standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute guidelines. Results Of the 1,562 children from 1-month up-to five years of age included in the study 98 children tested positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus. The prevalence of nasal carriage of S. aureus was 6.3% (95% CI 5.1-7.5) out of which 16.3% (95% CI 8.9-23.8) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The factors associated with nasal carriage were "child attending preschool" (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.25-8.03; P = 0.007) or "school" (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.27-7.18; P < 0.001) and "family size more than 10 members" (OR 2.76 95% CI 1.06-7.15; P = 0.03). The sensitivity pattern of isolated S. aureus showed resistance to commonly used oral antibiotics while resistance to glycopeptides was not noted. Conclusions We found a relatively low rate of nasal carriage of S. aureus in children below five years when compared to children of older age groups in

  20. The Challenges of Eliminating or Substituting Antimicrobial Preservatives in Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Doyle, Michael P

    2017-02-28

    Consumers' criteria for evaluating food safety have evolved recently from considering the food's potential to cause immediate physical harm to considering the potential long-term effects that consumption of artificial ingredients, including antimicrobial preservatives, would have on health. As bacteriostatic and bactericidal agents to prevent microbial spoilage, antimicrobials not only extend shelf life, but they also enhance the product's safety. Antimicrobials and their levels that may be used in foods are specified by regulatory agencies. This review addresses the safety of antimicrobials and the potential consequences of removing those that are chemically synthesized or replacing them with antimicrobials from so-called natural sources. Such changes can affect the microbiological safety and spoilage of food as well as reduce shelf life, increase wastage, and increase the occurrence of foodborne illnesses.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Europe and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Oliveira, A. P.; Watts, J. L.; Salmon, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    (123), Switzerland (69), United States (53), and Zimbabwe (6). The antimicrobial agents tested were penicillin, ampicillin, oxacillin, cephalothin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin + clavulanate, penicillin + novobiocin, enrofloxacin, premafloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, lincomycin, pirlimycin, neomycin...

  2. Semi Quantitative MALDI TOF for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-31

    antimicrobial stewardship among the forefront.1 Utilizing antimicrobials in a more conservative 42 fashion and de-escalating initial broad-spectrum treatment...Biological and Emerging Infections Resources Program (BEI 88 Resources), the Children’s National Medical Center via the Food and Drug Administration 89 (FDA...could provide confirmatory 283 diagnoses from diverse sites as opposed to technical replicate confirmation. 284 TR-17-118 Distribution Statement A

  3. 'Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains from raw meat and meat products in Zaria, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndahi, M D; Kwaga, J K P; Bello, M; Kabir, J; Umoh, V J; Yakubu, S E; Nok, A J

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial genera Listeria and Staphylococcus have been frequently isolated from food products and are responsible for a number of animal and human diseases. The aim of the study was to simultaneously isolate and characterize L. monocytogenes and Staphylococcus species from 300 samples of raw meat and meat products, to determine the susceptibility of the organisms to commonly used antimicrobial agents and to determine the presence of haemolysin A (hyl) virulence gene in L. monocytogenes and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mecA (SCCmec) gene in the Staph. aureus isolates using PCR. Of the 85 Listeria isolates tested, 12 L. monocytogenes were identified and tested for their sensitivity to 14 antimicrobial agents. All the 12 isolates (100%) were resistant to nine antimicrobial agents, but however sensitive to gentamicin. Only one isolate was found to harbour the hylA gene. Twenty-nine isolates were confirmed as Staph. aureus by the Microbact 12S identification system and were all presumptively identified as methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus species using oxacillin-resistant Staph. aureus basal medium (ORSAB). The 29 Staph. aureus isolates were tested for their sensitivity to 16 antimicrobial agents, and 11 were resistant to methicillin. None of the 11 Staph. aureus isolates harboured the methicillin resistance, mecA gene. Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus are important agents of foodborne diseases. Occurrence of these infectious agents was established in meat and meat products in Zaria, Nigeria. Majority of isolates obtained from this study, displayed multidrug resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents, including methicillin resistance among the Staph. aureus isolates. The potential virulence of L. monocytogenes found in ready-to-eat food was documented by the carriage of hly A gene by one of the isolates. A different mechanism of methicillin resistance or different homologue of mec A gene may be circulating among Nigerian

  4. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in chronic osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus: An in vitro and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis Júnior, João Alves; de Assis, Patrícia Nascimento; Paraguassú, Gardênia Matos; de Vieira de Castro, Isabele Cardoso; Trindade, Renan Ferreira; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa

    2012-09-01

    Osteomyelitis it is an acute or chronic inflammation in the marrow spaces in the superficial or cortical bone, and associated to bacterial infection. Chronic osteomyelitis represents a major health problem due to its difficult treatment and increased morbidity. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APT) by laser is a treatment based on a cytotoxic photochemical reaction in which, a bright light produced by a laser system and an active photosensitizer absorbed by cells leads an activation that induces a series of metabolic reactions that culminates a bacterial killing. The aim of this study was to assess, both in vitro and in vivo, the effect of lethal laser photosensitization on osteomyelitis. On the in vitro study a diode laser (λ660nm; 40mW; o/ = 0.4 cm2; 5 or 10 J/cm2) and 5, 10 and 15μg/mL toluidine blue (TB) were tested and the best parameter chosen for the in vivo study. The concentration of 5μg/mL was selected to perform the decontamination of infected by Staphylococcus aureus tibial bone defects in rats. The results were performed by ANOVA test. On the in vitro studies all PDTs groups in the different concentrations reduced significantly (pphotodynamic therapy using toluidine blue was effective in reducing the staphiloccocus aureus in both in vitro and in vivo studies.

  5. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of nasal Staphylococcus aureus isolates from a Chinese medical college campus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimei Du

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection occur more commonly among persons living or working in crowded conditions, but characterization of S. aureus colonization within medical communities in China is lacking. A total of 144 (15.4%, 144/935 S. aureus isolates, including 28 (3.0%, 28/935 MRSA isolates, were recovered from the nares of 935 healthy human volunteers residing on a Chinese medical college campus. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid but the majority were resistant to penicillin (96.5%, ampicillin/sulbactam (83.3% and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (93.1%. 82%, (23/28 of the MRSA isolates and 66% (77/116 of the MSSA isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, and 3 MRSA isolates were resistant to mupirocin--an agent commonly used for nasal decolonization. 16 different sequence types (STs, as well as SCCmec genes II, III, IVd, and V, were represented among MRSA isolates. We also identified, for the first time, two novel STs (ST1778 and ST1779 and 5 novel spa types for MRSA. MRSA isolates were distributed in different sporadic clones, and ST59-MRSA-VId- t437 was found within 3 MRSA isolates. Moreover, one isolate with multidrug resistance belonging to ST398-MRSA-V- t571 associated with animal infections was identified, and 3 isolates distributed in three different clones harbored PVL genes. Collectively, these data indicate a high prevalence of nasal MRSA carriage and molecular heterogeneity of S. aureus isolates among persons residing on a Chinese medical college campus. Identification of epidemic MRSA clones associated with community infection supports the need for more effective infection control measures to reduce nasal carriage and prevent dissemination of MRSA to hospitalized patients and health care workers in this community.

  6. Effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (AmPDT) on Staphylococcus aureus using phenothiazine compound with red laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Juliana S C; de Oliveira, Susana C P S; Pires Santos, Gustavo M; Pires Sampaio, Fernando José; Pinheiro Soares, Luiz Guilherme; Pinheiro, Antônio L B

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the bactericidal effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (AmPDT) using phenothiazinium dyes (Toluidine Blue O and methylene blue, 1:1) using different concentrations (100, 50, 25, 12.5, and 6.25 μg/mL) associated to red laser with different energy densities (2.4, 4.8, 7.2, 9.6, and 12 J/cm 2 ) on a strain of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529). On this study, tests were performed in triplicate and the samples were distributed into 36 test groups: Control and bacterial suspensions were irradiated with the different energy densities, respectively, in the absence of photosensitizer, bacterial suspensions were irradiated with the laser in the different concentrations of the photosensitizer, and finally bacterial suspensions only in the presence of phenothiazinium dye. The pre-irradiation time was 5 min. Therefore, we analyzed the potential of the AmPDT by counting colony-forming units. The logarithm of CFU/mL (log10 CFU/mL) was calculated and the data was analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey's test, p antimicrobial effect of phenothiazines and both concentration of the compound and energy density are important factors for greater effectiveness of therapy.

  7. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical samples at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnessa, Tebelay; Bitew, Adane

    2016-08-09

    Staphylococcus aureus particularly MRSA strains are one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired bacterial infections. They are also becoming increasingly multi-drug resistant and have recently developed resistance to vancomycin, which has been used successfully to treat MRSA for many years. In-vitro determination of drug resistance patterns of S. aureus is critical for the selection of effective drugs for the treatment of staphylococci infections. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains from different clinical specimens from patients referred for routine culture and sensitivity testing. A cross sectional study was conducted among 1360 participants at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College in Ethiopia from September 2013 to April 2014. Clinical samples from various anatomical sites of study participants were cultured on blood agar and mannitol salt agar and identified to be S. aureus by using catalase, coagulase and DNAse tests. S. aureus isolates then were screened for MRSA using 30 μg cefoxitin disc and other 11 antimicrobial drugs by disc diffusion procedure, and agar dilution and E tests for vancomycin. All S. aureus isolates examined for beta-lactamase production by employing nitrocefin. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software and logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between dependent and independent variables. Of 1360 clinical specimens analyzed S. aureus was recovered from (194, 14.3 %). Rate of isolation of S. aureus with regard to clinical specimens was the highest in pus (118, 55.4 %).No S. aureus was isolated from CSF and urethral discharge. Out of 194 S. aureus isolates, (34, 17.5 %) were found out to be MRSA and the remaining (160, 82.5 %) were MSSA. Ninety eight (50.5 %) S. aureus were multi drug resistant and the highest isolates were resistant to penicillin (187, 96.4 %) and least resistant for clindamycin (23, 11.9 %) and vancomycin

  8. Protocols for screening antimicrobial peptides that influence virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Baldry, Mara; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Compounds that inhibit virulence gene expression in bacterial pathogens have received increasing interest as possible alternatives to the traditional antibiotic treatment of infections. For the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, we have developed two simple assays based on reporter gene fusions...... is quantitative and can be employed to address whether a compound is acting on the central quorum sensing regulatory system, agr, that controls a large number of virulence genes in S. aureus....... to central virulence genes that are easily applicable for screening various sources of natural and synthetic peptides for anti-virulence effects. The plate assay is qualitative but simultaneously assesses the effect of gradient concentrations of the investigated compound, whereas the liquid assay...

  9. The antimicrobial effects of helium and helium-air plasma on Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, S; Cahill, O; O'Connor, N; Cafolla, A A; Daniels, S; Humphreys, H

    2013-08-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) affect 5-10% of acute hospital admissions. Environmental decontamination is an important component of all strategies to prevent HCAI as many bacterial causes survive and persist in the environment, which serve as ongoing reservoirs of infection. Current approaches such as cleaning with detergents and the use of chemical disinfectant are suboptimal. We assessed the efficacy of helium and helium-air plasma in killing Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile on a glass surface and studied the impact on bacterial cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both plasma types exhibited bactericidal effects on Staph. aureus (log3·6 - >log7), with increased activity against methicillin-resistant strains, but had a negligible effect on Cl. difficile spores (helium and helium-air plasma as a decontaminant and demonstrated a significant reduction in bacterial counts of Staphylococcus aureus on a glass surface. Atomic force microscopy morphologically confirmed the impact on bacterial cells. This approach warrants further study as an alternative to current options for hospital hygiene. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN NURSING PROFESSIONALS AND THE MICROORGANISM’S SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILE TO ANTIMICROBIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Pimenta Lopes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: identificar el estado del cargador y el perfil de susceptibilidad a los antibióticos de los Staphylococcus aureus aislados de la saliva y de la secreción nasal de los profesionales de enfermería. Método: estudio transversal, que utilizó muestras de saliva y secreción nasal, obtenidas de 100 profesionales de enfermería que asisten a personas con VIH/SIDA. Resultados: se identificó que 43,0% de los participantes presentaron muestras de saliva y/o secreción nasal positiva por Staphylococcus aureus . De las 74 muestras de secreción nasal con Staphylococcus aureus , 14,9% presentaron resistencia a la oxacilina; 91,9% a la penicilina; 44,6% a la eritromicina y 41,9% a la clindamicina. De las 12 muestras de saliva positivas, 16,7% fueron resistentes a la oxacilina; 100% a la penicilina; 33,4% a la eritromicina y 25,0% a la clindamicina. Conclusión: se cree que el profesional al obtener conocimiento de su estado de portador del microorganismos multi-resistentes, pasará a supervisar sus prácticas asistenciales y adoptar con mayor eficacia las medidas para la prevención y el control de la cadena epidemiológica de estas bacterias en el ambiente laboral.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of honey of africanized bee (Apis mellifera) and stingless bee, tiuba (Melipona fasciculata) against strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomona aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Eleuza Gomes; Alves, Natália Furtado; Mendes, Bianca Evanita Pimenta

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of honey of Africanized bees (Apis mellifera) and stingless bees (Melipona fasciculata), produced under the same flowering conditions, in municipalities of Baixada Maranhese, Brazil, against strains of pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In each municipality, the apiary and meliponario were less than 150 meters away from each other. The Kirby-Bauer method, and the diffusion technique of the agar plate through the extension of the inhibition in millimeters were used. The test results were negative for all samples, which did not demonstrate antimicrobial activity in any of the microorganisms tested.

  12. In Vitro Approach for Identification of the Most Effective Agents for Antimicrobial Lock Therapy in the Treatment of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S; Zapotoczna, M; Stevens, N T; Humphreys, H; O'Gara, J P; O'Neill, E

    2016-05-01

    Infection of intravascular catheters by Staphylococcus aureus is a significant risk factor within the health care setting. To treat these infections and attempt salvage of an intravascular catheter, antimicrobial lock solutions (ALSs) are being increasingly used. However, the most effective ALSs against these biofilm-mediated infections have yet to be determined, and clinical practice varies greatly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacies of antibiotics and antiseptics in current clinical use against biofilms produced by reference and clinical isolates of S. aureus Static and flow biofilm assays were developed using newly described in vivo-relevant conditions to examine the effect of each agent on S. aureus within the biofilm matrix. The antibiotics daptomycin, tigecycline, and rifampin and the antiseptics ethanol and Taurolock inactivated established S. aureus biofilms, while other commonly used antistaphylococcal antibiotics and antiseptic agents were less effective. These findings were confirmed by live/dead staining of S. aureus biofilms formed and treated within a flow cell model. The results from this study demonstrate the most effective clinically used agents and their concentrations which should be used within an ALS to treat S. aureus-mediated intravascular catheter-related infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. An investigation of exudative epidermitis (greasy pig disease) and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Staphylococcus hyicus and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M.; Poljak, Zvonimir; Weese, J. Scott; Dewey, Cate E.

    2013-01-01

    Exudative epidermitis (EE) is a common skin disease of young pigs, caused mainly by Staphylococcus hyicus. Increased prevalence of EE and poor response to treatment are reported. Common strategies used by Ontario pork producers to treat pigs with EE were determined using a survey. Injection of penicillin G was reported as the most common parenteral antibiotic choice. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of S. hyicus and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical cases (30 herds with samples from approximately 6 pigs per farm) showed that 97% of S. hyicus isolates were resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin; 71% of these isolates were resistant to ceftiofur. Similar resistance was noted among S. aureus isolates. Antimicrobial resistance has become a problem in the treatment of EE in Ontario. PMID:23904636

  14. Antimicrobial Synergic Effect of Allicin and Silver Nanoparticles on Skin Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Rad, J; Hoseini Alfatemi, Sm; Sharifi Rad, M; Iriti, M

    2014-11-01

    Today, the commonly used antibiotics may more and more frequently be ineffective against multiple pathogens, due to the selection of resistant microbial strains. As a result, an effort to find a new approach for solving this issue has been considered. The aim of this study is to investigate antimicrobial properties of allicin, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and their combination again skin infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in an animal model. In vivo, the effects of allicin, Ag NPs and their combination were investigated on mice in which the skin infection was caused by MRSA strains. In animals, S. aureus colony-forming units (CFU)/mL were counted the 4(th) day after treatment. In vitro, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of bacterial growth and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of allicin, Ag NPs and their combination were determined by microdilution technique. The results of in vitro assays showed that MIC of allicin and Ag NPs were 2.2 mg/mL and 5.6 mg/mL, respectively, and MBC of allicin and Ag NPs were 3.1 ppm and 7.5 ppm, respectively. However, MIC and MBC of allicin and Ag NPs together on MRSA strains were 0.4 mg/mL and 1.1 ppm, respectively. The results of in vivo tests on skin infection showed that bacteria counted for control, Ag NPs, allicin and their combination were 377 × 108, 80 × 106, 43 × 105, and 0 CFU/mL, respectively. The obtained results clearly indicated (for the first time, to the best of our knowledge) that allicin and Ag NPs, when used in combination, exhibited a synergistic activity. Therefore, the present results can be of interest in the future to improve the treatment of skin infections caused by MRSA strains.

  15. Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Diabetic Foot Infections in a Large Academic Hospital: Implications for Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Reveles

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot infections (DFIs are the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States. Antimicrobials active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are recommended in patients with associated risk factors; however, limited data exist to support these recommendations. Due to the changing epidemiology of MRSA, and the consequences of unnecessary antibiotic therapy, guidance regarding the necessity of empirical MRSA coverage in DFIs is needed. We sought to 1 describe the prevalence of MRSA DFIs at our institution and compare to the proportion of patients who receive MRSA antibiotic coverage and 2 identify risk factors for MRSA DFI.This was a retrospective cohort study of all adult, culture-positive DFI patients managed at University Hospital, San Antonio, TX between January 1, 2010 and September 1, 2014. Patient eligibility included a principal ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis code for foot infection and a secondary diagnosis of diabetes. The primary outcome was MRSA identified in the wound culture. Independent variables assessed included patient demographics, comorbidities, prior hospitalization, DFI therapies, prior antibiotics, prior MRSA infection, and laboratory values. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for MRSA DFI.Overall, 318 patients met inclusion criteria. Patients were predominantly Hispanic (79% and male (69%. Common comorbidities included hypertension (76%, dyslipidemia (52%, and obesity (49%. S. aureus was present in 46% of culture-positive DFIs (MRSA, 15%. A total of 273 patients (86% received MRSA antibiotic coverage, resulting in 71% unnecessary use. Male gender (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.37-7.99 and bone involvement (OR 1.93, 1.00-3.78 were found to be independent risk factors for MRSA DFI.Although MRSA was the causative pathogen in a small number of DFI, antibiotic coverage targeted against MRSA was unnecessarily high.

  16. Short communication: Antimicrobial efficacy of intramammary treatment with a novel biphenomycin compound against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, and Escherichia coli-induced mouse mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demon, Dieter; Breyne, Koen; Schiffer, Guido; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Bovine mastitis undermines udder health, jeopardizes milk production, and entails prohibitive costs, estimated at $2 billion per year in the dairy industry of the United States. Despite intensive research, the dairy industry has not managed to eradicate the 3 major bovine mastitis-inducing pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, and Escherichia coli. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of a newly formulated biphenomycin compound (AIC102827) was assessed against intramammary Staph. aureus, Strep. uberis, and E. coli infections, using an experimental mouse mastitis model. Based on its effective and protective doses, AIC102827 applied into the mammary gland was most efficient to treat Staph. aureus, but also adequately reduced growth of Strep. uberis or E. coli, indicating its potential as a broad-spectrum candidate to treat staphylococcal, streptococcal, and coliform mastitis in dairy cattle. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The heme sensing response regulator HssR in Staphylococcus aureus but not the homologous RR23 in Listeria monocytogenes modulates susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptide plectasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Hans-Henrik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host defence peptides (HDPs, also known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, have emerged as potential new therapeutics and their antimicrobial spectrum covers a wide range of target organisms. However, the mode of action and the genetics behind the bacterial response to HDPs is incompletely understood and such knowledge is required to evaluate their potential as antimicrobial therapeutics. Plectasin is a recently discovered HDP active against Gram-positive bacteria with the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus being highly susceptible and the food borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes being less sensitive. In the present study we aimed to use transposon mutagenesis to determine the genetic basis for S. aureus and L. monocytogenes susceptibility to plectasin. Results In order to identify genes that provide susceptibility to plectasin we constructed bacterial transposon mutant libraries of S. aureus NCTC8325-4 and L. monocytogenes 4446 and screened for increased resistance to the peptide. No resistant mutants arose when L. monocytogenes was screened on plates containing 5 and 10 fold Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of plectasin. However, in S. aureus, four mutants with insertion in the heme response regulator (hssR were 2-4 fold more resistant to plectasin as compared to the wild type. The hssR mutation also enhanced resistance to the plectasin-like defensin eurocin, but not to other classes of HDPs or to other stressors tested. Addition of plectasin did not influence the expression of hssR or hrtA, a gene regulated by HssR. The genome of L. monocytogenes LO28 encodes a putative HssR homologue, RR23 (in L. monocytogenes EGD-e lmo2583 with 48% identity to the S. aureus HssR, but a mutation in the rr23 gene did not change the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to plectasin. Conclusions S. aureus HssR, but not the homologue RR23 from L. monocytogenes, provides susceptibility to the defensins

  18. Antimicrobial effect of sour pomegranate sauce on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kışla, Duygu; Karabıyıklı, Şeniz

    2013-05-01

    Pomegranate sauce is one of the most popular pomegranate products produced in Turkey. This study was conducted to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of both traditional and commercial sour pomegranate sauce samples on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895). The initial microflora of the pomegranate sauce samples was determined by performing the enumerations of total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold, S. aureus, E. coli, and the determination of Salmonella spp. MIC tests were applied to the neutralized and the original (unneutralized) sour pomegranate sauce samples in order to put forth the inhibition effect depending on low pH value. It was found that inhibitory effect of the traditional and the commercial samples, except one sample, on pathogens was not only due to the acidity of the products. The results of MIC tests indicated that although both traditional and commercial samples showed a considerable inhibitory effect on test microorganisms, the traditional pomegranate sauce samples were more effective than the commercial ones. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Genetic lineages and antimicrobial resistance genotypes in Staphylococcus aureus from children with atopic dermatitis: detection of clonal complexes CC1, CC97 and CC398.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Daniel; Aspiroz, Carmen; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Sanmartín, Rosalía; Hernández-Martin, Ángela; Alonso, Mercedes; Gómez, Paula; Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    The objective was to analyse the genetic lineages of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from nasal and skin samples of atopic dermatitis (AD) paediatric patients, and to characterize the antimicrobial resistance phenotype-genotype and the immune-evasion-cluster (IEC) type of isolates. Forty S. aureus isolates from 35 patients (skin: 26; nasal samples: 14) were characterized. Isolates were submitted to spa-, agr- and multilocus sequence typing. All S. aureus strains analyzed were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). High genetic diversity was detected among the 40 MSSA isolates (especially among skin isolates), with detection of 27 different spa-types, 20 sequence-types and 16 clonal complexes (CCs). Lineages CC30 and CC5 were predominant among nasal isolates (71% vs 23% skin). Thirteen different CCs were detected among skin isolates, with detection of clades CC1, CC9 and CC398. Antimicrobial resistance rates detected were higher in skin than in nasal isolates, especially for macrolides, aminoglycosides, lincosamides and mupirocin. MSSA strains were characterized into five IEC-types, being A, B and F the predominant ones. MSSA strains of lineages CC45 and CC5 were detected in almost all cases in AD patients with severe Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) and lineages CC8, and CC30 in those with mild or moderate one. As conclusion, high-clonal-diversity was detected among MSSA from AD patients, especially in skin-isolates. Colonization with S. aureus of some CCs seems more associated with AD severity than other lineages.

  20. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in organic and conventional dairy herds in the midwestern United States and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Bennedsgaard, T W; Bartlett, P C; Erskine, R J; Kaneene, J B

    2004-06-01

    An observational study was conducted to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in organic and conventional dairy farms in Wisconsin, United States, and southern Jutland, Denmark. Bulk tank milk samples and data regarding management and production were collected from 30 organic and 30 conventional dairy farms in Wisconsin and 20 organic and 20 conventional dairy farms in Denmark. S. aureus isolates were tested for resistance against 15 antimicrobial agents by semiautomatic microbroth dilution methods in each country. Of the 118 bulk tank milk samples in Wisconsin, 71 samples (60%) yielded at least one S. aureus isolate, and a total of 331 isolates were collected. Of the 40 bulk tank milk samples from Denmark, 27 samples (55%) yielded at least one S. aureus isolate, and a total of 152 isolates were collected. Significant differences between organic and conventional dairies were detected only to ciprofloxacin in Wisconsin and avilamycin in Denmark. Significant differences (P organic and conventional farm types in each country and larger differences between the two national agricultural systems.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese secondary care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yumiko; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Matsuda, Junichi; Yamaryo, Takeshi; Kawakami, Kenji; Matsuo, Hidenori; Kosai, Kosuke; Uno, Naoki; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is prevalent in Japan, and the Staphylococcus cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type II is common among hospital-acquired MRSA isolates. Information pertaining to MRSA characteristics is limited, including SCCmec types, in primary or secondary care facilities. A total of 128 MRSA isolates (90 skin and soft tissue isolates and 38 blood isolates) were collected at a secondary care facility, Kawatana Medical Center, from 2005 to 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for anti-MRSA antibiotics and molecular testing for SCCmec and virulence genes (tst, sec, etb, lukS/F-PV) were performed. Strains positive for lukS/F-PV were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing and phage open-reading frame typing. SCCmec typing in skin and soft tissue isolates revealed that 65.6% had type IV, 22.2% had type II, 8.9% had type I, and 3.3% had type III. In blood isolates, 50.0% had type IV, 47.4% had type II, and 2.6% had type III. Minimum inhibitory concentrations, MIC(50)/MIC(90), against vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin increased slightly in SCCmec II isolates from skin and soft tissue. MICs against daptomycin were similar between sites of isolation. SCCmec type II isolates possess tst and sec genes at a greater frequently than SCCmec type IV isolates. Four lukS/F-PV-positive isolates were divided into two clonal patterns and USA300 was not included. In conclusion, SCCmec type IV was dominant in blood, skin, and soft tissue isolates in a secondary care facility in Japan. Because antimicrobial susceptibility varies with the SCCmec type, SCCmec typing of clinical isolates should be monitored in primary or secondary care facilities. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of nanostructures ZrO2:AG against staphylococcus aureus by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nova, C.V.; Reis, K.H.; Galico, D.A.; Venturini, J.; Pontes, F.M.L.; Pinheiro, A.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), SP (Brazil); Longo, E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructures of zirconia (ZrO2) has shown great prominence in the area of advanced materials and shows excellent properties such as chemical stability, mechanical strength, electrical and optical properties. When certain metals are supported on the compound, such as Fe, Ag, Au and Al, a potentiation of some properties, such as bactericide and fungicide can occur. Thus, this work deals with the synthesis and characterization of ZrO2 and ZrO2:Ag (1% and 10 % of Ag) nanostructures and the study of the influence of the antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. X-ray powder diffractograms of the zirconia and silver with zirconia shown the formation of well defined peaks of tetragonal zirconia in all the samples. Although the ZrO2:Ag (10 % of Ag) shown the characteristics peaks of cubic silver, these peaks do not appear in ZrO2:Ag (1 % of Ag) due to the small amount of silver in comparison with zirconium. The crystal size was estimated by the Scherrer equation and the calculated values for zirconia were 12.84, 12.27 and 12.61 nm for ZrO2, ZrO2 : Ag (1%) and ZrO2 : Ag (10%) respectively and the silver crystal size was 8,09 nm. Diffuse reflectance of the silver particles shown a broad plasmon band at 405 and 424 nm for the ZrO2 : Ag (1%) and ZrO2 : Ag (10%). Antimicrobial assay demonstrated that ZrO2 showed a bacteriostatic effect (61 %) and the inclusion of the silver in the ZrO2 matrix enhanced this effect to 65-72 %. Both particles with different silver content shown similar effect {[ZrO2:Ag 1%] = [ZrO2:Ag 10%]>[ZrO2]}.(author)

  3. Truncated antimicrobial peptides from marine organisms retain anticancer activity and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Ching; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Wu, Jen-Leih

    2013-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were recently determined to be potential candidates for treating drug-resistant bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to develop shorter AMP fragments that combine maximal bactericidal effect with minimal synthesis cost. We first synthesized a series of truncated forms of AMPs (anti-lipopolysaccharide factor from shrimp, epinecidin from grouper, and pardaxin from Pardachirus marmoratus). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of modified AMPs against ten bacterial species were determined. We also examined the synergy between peptide and non-peptide antibiotics. In addition, we measured the inhibitory rate of cancer cells treated with AMPs by MTS assay. We found that two modified antibacterial peptides (epinecidin-8 and pardaxin-6) had a broad range of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, epinecidin and pardaxin were demonstrated to have high antibacterial and anticancer activities, and both AMPs resulted in a significant synergistic improvement in the potencies of streptomycin and kanamycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Neither AMP induced significant hemolysis at their MICs. In addition, both AMPs inhibited human epithelial carcinoma (HeLa) and fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cell growth. The functions of these truncated AMPs were similar to those of their full-length equivalents. In conclusion, we have successfully identified shorter, inexpensive fragments with maximal bactericidal activity. This study also provides an excellent basis for the investigation of potential synergies between peptide and non-peptide antibiotics, for a broad range of antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model...... of sepsis. Results: AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions: These findings...... suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with crossresistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated....

  5. Comparison of methods for the determination of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus from bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelova, J; Rysánek, D; Sedivá, I; Babák, V

    2001-02-01

    The results of three standard methods (broth dilution, agar dilution, disk diffusion) and an experimental modification of the microdilution method for determination of resistance to ampicillin, cephalotin, cloxacillin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin and streptomycin were compared using 151 Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from cases of mastitis. The accuracy of the dilution methods was compared by determination of minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC, MIC50, MIC90 and modal MIC) and by assessment of the agreement within the tolerance of +/-1 dilution step in 2-fold dilution series. The results of the dilution methods were further compared with those of the reference disk diffusion method and the strains were classified as sensitive or resistant using the interpretation criteria for human strains. The comparisons indicated that MIC characteristics and the final classification as sensitive or resistant were method-dependent. Resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was observed more often when using broth dilution methods, especially when the broth was supplemented with lactose.

  6. Molecular identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus nasal isolates from medical students in Cartagena, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettin, Alfonso; Causil, Ceyla; Reyes, Niradiz

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) remains a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections worldwide. Nasal carriage of this bacterium among hospital personnel constitutes an important source for nosocomial infections. A cross-sectional study enrolling the whole medical student population (n=387) of the School of Medicine at the Universidad de Cartagena, Colombia, was conducted to evaluate the carriage rates of both methicillin sensitive- and methicillin resistant-SA, the frequency of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in the isolates, and risk factors associated with carriage in this selected population. After signing an informed consent, participants completed a survey related to possible risk factors for colonization, and nasal swabs were collected from anterior nares. Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from carriers were subjected to DNA extraction and PCR assays to determine the presence of MecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. Typing of the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette was performed for methicillin resistant strains. Molecular analysis was performed for only one strain per carrier. Prevalence of carriage for methicillin sensitive- and methicillin resistant-SA was 25% and 1.6% respectively. Most of the methicillin resistant isolates carried the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette type IV and the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. To determine carrier types among medical students, each participant was subjected to four additional swabs, each taken two weeks apart. 9.8% persistent carriers, 53.1% intermittent carriers, and 37.1% non-carriers of SA were found. There was no association between risk factors analyzed and carriage of the bacterium. The study was conducted from April to September 2009 and found a persistent carriage of methicillin resistant-SA strains bearing the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin among medical students, evidencing the potential contribution of this portion of healthcare personnel either to the spread or

  7. LED antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with phenothiazinium dye against Staphylococcus aureus: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Susana C P S; Monteiro, Juliana S C; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M; Sampaio, Fernando José Pires; Soares, Amanda P; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Pinheiro, Antônio L B

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the bactericidal effect of AmPDT on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) using different concentrations (100, 50, 25, 12.5 and 6.25μg/mL) of phenothiazine compound combined with LED light (λ632±2nm) using varied energy densities (12, 9.6, 7.2, 4.8 and 2.4J/cm 2 ). The experiments were carried out in triplicate and the samples were divided into groups: Control, Irradiated (treated only with light at different energy densities), Photosensitizer (treated only in the presence of the dye), AmPDT (treatment with light associated with dye). Counts of the colony forming units and the data obtained were statistically analyzed (ANOVA, Tukey's test, p<0.05). The results showed no difference between irradiated and Control groups. However, using the photosensitizer alone caused significant increased cytotoxicity and consequent reduction on the CFU counts (12.5μg/mL (p<0.001), 25μg/mL, 50μg/mL and 100μg/mL (p<0.0001). When AmPDT was used significant inhibition above 70% were detected for all concentrations of the photosensitize (p<0.0001) except for 6.25μg/mL. The results indicate a dose-response dependent when the photosensitizer is used alone but not for the sole use of the light is used. It is concluded that, a single application of AmPDT, using energy density of 12J/cm 2 associated either to 12.5 (81.52%) or 25μg/mL (91.57%) resulted in higher in vitro inhibition of S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mastitis Bovina: Resistencia a antibióticos de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus asiladas de leche (Bovine Mastitis: Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk)

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrino, MS; Frola, ID; Odierno, LM; Bogni, CI

    2011-01-01

    ResumenLa mastitis bovina es considerada la enfermedad infecciosa del ganado lechero de mayor impacto económico mundial, siendo Staphylococcus aureus el principal agente patógeno en muchos países.SummaryBovine mastitis is a frequent cause of economic loss in worldwide dairy herds, being Staphylococcus aureus the main etiological agent in many countries.

  9. Antimicrobial effect of an ultrasonic levitation washer disinfector with silver electrolysis and ozone oxidation on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Mariko; Matsushita, Shigeto; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Imuta, Naoko; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Junichiro; Sakamoto, Akihiro; Shigihara, Takanori; Kanekura, Takuro

    2013-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has rapidly emerged as a cause of severe and intractable skin infection. At present, there are no effective topical treatments, and infection or colonization by MRSA of the skin raises serious medical problems. We developed an ultrasonic levitation washer that generates silver ions (Ag(+)) and ozone (O3) to clean and sterilize medical devices. We report the effect of ultrasonic levitation (levitation) with Ag(+) and O3 on MRSA in vitro and in vivo. Antimicrobial effect against six MRSA strains of all agr types was examined under three in vitro conditions; cells floating in a water tank, cells infiltrating-, and cells forming a biofilm on an atelocollagen membrane. In the in vivo studies, we assayed the number of MRSA organisms that survived treatment on murine skin ulcers and evaluated the ulcer size. Levitation with Ag(+) dramatically decreased the survival of MRSA floating in a water tank. Levitation with Ag(+) and O3 significantly decreased the viability of MRSA that had infiltrated or formed a biofilm on atelocollagen membranes regardless of the level of biofilm production. In vivo studies showed that the number of MRSA on murine skin ulcers was significantly decreased when 15-min treatment was performed for 7 consecutive days and that the ulcer size was significantly decreased after the seventh treatment course. Levitation with Ag(+) and O3 may be a valuable tool for treating MRSA infestation of the skin and for accelerating wound healing. © 2013 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Frequency of resistance to methicillin and other antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pigs and their human handlers in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gordon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged recently worldwide in production animals, particularly pigs and veal calves, which act as reservoirs for MRSA strains for human infection. The study determined the prevalence of MRSA and other resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from the anterior nares of pigs and human handlers on pig farms in Trinidad. Methods: Isolation of S. aureus was done by concurrently inoculating Baird-Parker agar (BPA and Chromagar MRSA (CHROM with swab samples and isolates were identified using standard methods. Suspect MRSA isolates from Chromagar and BPA were subjected to confirmatory test using Oxoid PBP2 latex agglutination test. The disc diffusion method was used to determine resistance to antimicrobial agents. Results: The frequency of isolation of MRSA was 2.1% (15 of 723 for pigs but 0.0% (0 of 72 for humans. Generally, for isolates of S. aureus from humans there was a high frequency of resistance compared with those from pigs, which had moderate resistance to the following antimicrobials: penicillin G (54.5%, 51.5%, ampicillin (59.1%, 49.5%, and streptomycin (59.1%, 37.1%, respectively. There was moderate resistance to tetracycline (36.4%, 41.2% and gentamycin (27.2%, 23.7% for human and pig S. aureus isolates, respectively, and low resistance to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4.5%, 6.2% and norfloxacin (9.1%, 12.4%, respectively. The frequency of resistance to oxacillin by the disc method was 36.4 and 34.0% from S. aureus isolates from humans and pigs, respectively. Out of a total of 78 isolates of S. aureus from both human and pig sources that were resistant to oxacillin by the disc diffusion method, only 15 (19.2% were confirmed as MRSA by the PBP'2 latex test kit. Conclusions: The detection of MRSA strains in pigs, albeit at a low frequency, coupled with a high frequency of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents in pig and humans could have zoonotic and therapeutic

  11. Antimicrobial Effects of Sulfonyl Derivative of 2(5H-Furanone against Planktonic and Biofilm Associated Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S. Sharafutdinov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The gram-positive opportunistic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causatives of a variety of diseases including skin and skin structure infection or nosocomial catheter-associated infections. The biofilm formation that is an important virulence factor of this microorganism renders the antibiotic therapy ineffective, because biofilm-embedded bacteria exhibit strongly increased tolerance to antimicrobials. Here, we describe a novel 3-chloro-5(S-[(1R,2S,5R-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyloxy]-4-[4-methylphenylsulfonyl]-2(5H-furanone (F105, possessing a sulfonyl group and l-menthol moiety. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentration values (MIC and MBC of F105 were 10 and 40 mg/L, respectively, suggesting F105 biocidal properties. F105 exhibits pronounced activity against biofilm-embedded S. aureus and increases the efficacy of aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, and kanamycin and benzalkonium chloride with fractional inhibitory concentration index values of 0.33–0.44 and 0.29, respectively, suggesting an alternative external treatment option, e.g., for wound infections. Moreover, low concentrations (0.5–1.3 mg/L of F105 reduced the MICs of these antimicrobials twofold. By using confocal laser scanning microscopy and CFU counting, we show explicitly that F105 also restores the antimicrobial activity of gentamicin and ampicillin against S. aureus biofilms by several orders of magnitude. Biofilm structures were not destroyed but sterilized, with embedded cells being almost completely killed at twofold MBC. While F105 is quite toxic (CC50/MBC ratio 0.2, our data suggest that the F105 chemotype might be a promising starting point for the development of complex topical agents for combined anti-staphylococcal biofilm-therapies restoring the efficacy of some antibiotics against difficult to treat S. aureus biofilm.

  12. Antimicrobial Activities of TiO2 Nanoparticle Against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Barzegary

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organic antibacterial materials have been used as insecticides and bactericides for many years. Unfortunately, high temperatures in manufacturing process reduce their antibacterial properties. However, inorganic materials of antibacterial agents have excellent bacterial resistance and thermal stability. Over the past few decades, inorganic nanoparticles whose structures exhibit significantly novel and improved physical, chemical and biological properties and functionality due to their nano-scale size have elicited much interest. methods:The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial properties of one kind of nano-specimen (TiO2 nanoparticle against Escherichia coli and Streptococcus aureus. Our study was research perusal. In the first study, the optical density of E. coli and S. aureus cultures were observed in the presence of 0.01%, 0.75% and 1.5% of TiO2. In the second study, 6.3 log CFU/ml of E. coli and S. areus were separately exposed to 1.5% TiO2 at 37 ºC in water. In third study, we studied thew growth of E.coli in solid medium with and without nanoparticles. Results: The presence of 0.01% TiO2 nanoparticles didn’t have a statistically significant effect, but in the presence of 0.75% and 1.5% nanoparticles, the bacterial colonies decreased significantly. In the control group, bacterial cells survival was nearly 13 days, while complete cell death of E. coli was seen when 1.5% TiO2 was applied for 24 hours. The same experiment for S. aureu, showed that complete cell death occured when the bacterial culture was exposed to 1.5% TiO2 for 16 hours.. It was shown that presence of 1.5% TiO2 in the solid medium suppressed the growth of E. coli 5.6 times more (p < 0.001. Discussion: Our findings showed antibacterial effects of TiO2 nanoparticles against both bacteria, but S. areus bacteria were more sensitive to nanoparticles as compared to E. coli bacteria

  13. Development of a rapid diagnostic method for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and antimicrobial resistance in positive blood culture bottles using a PCR-DNA-chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takeya; Miyagi, Chihiro; Tamaki, Yoshikazu; Mizuno, Takuya; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Blood culturing and the rapid reporting of results are essential for infectious disease clinics to obtain bacterial information that can affect patient prognosis. When gram-positive coccoid cells are observed in blood culture bottles, it is important to determine whether the strain is Staphylococcus aureus and whether the strain has resistance genes, such as mecA and blaZ, for proper antibiotic selection. Previous work led to the development of a PCR method that is useful for rapid identification of bacterial species and antimicrobial susceptibility. However, that method has not yet been adopted in community hospitals due to the high cost and methodological complexity. We report here the development of a quick PCR and DNA-chromatography test, based on single-tag hybridization chromatography, that permits detection of S. aureus and the mecA and blaZ genes; results can be obtained within 1 h for positive blood culture bottles. We evaluated this method using 42 clinical isolates. Detection of S. aureus and the resistance genes by the PCR-DNA-chromatography method was compared with that obtained via the conventional identification method and actual antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Our method had a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 100% for the identification of the bacterial species. For the detection of the mecA gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 95.2%. For the detection of the blaZ gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 88.9%. The speed and simplicity of this PCR-DNA-chromatography method suggest that our method will facilitate rapid diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation, identification and antimicrobial resistance profile of Staphylococcus aureus in Cockroaches (Periplaneta Americana

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    Ariful Islam

    2016-09-01

    Materials and methods: A total of 150 cockroaches (P. americana were randomly captured from three households and four restaurants in Chittagong City Corporation, Bangladesh during July to December 2014. The cockroaches were transported to the bacteriology laboratory at the Poultry Research and Training Centre (PRTC, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University. The isolation and identification of Staphylococcus spp. from the external surface wash and gut homogenates by pooling cockroaches were done by following conventional bacteriological examinations followed by biochemical characterization. The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of the isolates were determined using disc diffusion method. Results: In this study, the overall prevalence of S. aureus was 38% (n=57/150. Higher prevalence of Staphylococcus spp. was observed among the cockroaches from restaurant (49.3%; n=37/75 as compared to those of households (26.7%; n=20/75 having a significant difference (P<0.05. Highest level of resistance by the Staphylococcus spp. was found to Penicillin (68% followed by Erythromycin (60%, Oxacillin (46% and Clindamycin (31%. On the other hand, the Staphylococci isolates were highly sensitive to Cephalothin (84% and Kanamycin (65%. Conclusion: The rational use of antibiotics needs to be adopted in both human and animal medicine practices to prevent the emergence of drug resistant Staphylococcus spp. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(3.000: 221-228

  15. Environmental fatty acids enable emergence of infectious Staphylococcus aureus resistant to FASII-targeted antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Claire; Halpern, David; Kénanian, Gérald; Hays, Constantin; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Brinster, Sophie; Kennedy, Sean; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire; Lamberet, Gilles; Gloux, Karine; Gruss, Alexandra

    2016-10-05

    The bacterial pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis, FASII, is a target for development of new anti-staphylococcal drugs. This strategy is based on previous reports indicating that self-synthesized fatty acids appear to be indispensable for Staphylococcus aureus growth and virulence, although other bacteria can use exogenous fatty acids to compensate FASII inhibition. Here we report that staphylococci can become resistant to the FASII-targeted inhibitor triclosan via high frequency mutations in fabD, one of the FASII genes. The fabD mutants can be conditional for FASII and not require exogenous fatty acids for normal growth, and can use diverse fatty acid combinations (including host fatty acids) when FASII is blocked. These mutants show cross-resistance to inhibitors of other FASII enzymes and are infectious in mice. Clinical isolates bearing fabD polymorphisms also bypass FASII inhibition. We propose that fatty acid-rich environments within the host, in the presence of FASII inhibitors, might favour the emergence of staphylococcal strains displaying resistance to multiple FASII inhibitors.

  16. Phytochemical Properties of Mentha longifolia L. Essential Oil and its Antimicrobial Effects on Staphylococcus Aureus

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    R Mahmodi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Due to the side effects of chemical and synthetic preservatives, consumers have recently become more eager to use foods containing natural preservatives from plants, animals and microbial sources. In the present study, biochemical composition and antibacterial effects (MIC of Mentha longifolia L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus have been evaluated. Methods: In this experimental study, the biochemical composition and antibacterial prosperities of this essential oil was determined by the Gas chromatography/ mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS and micro dilution method respectively. The morphological and membrane changes of the bacterial cell under the effect of this essential oil were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. The collected data was analyzed by the SPSS software using ANOVA. Results: The chemical analysis of the essential oil by Gas chromatography/ mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS revealed the presence of 22 substances (95.30%, mainly including Pulegon (31.54%, 1,8 Cineol (15.89%, Menthoforan (11.8% and Cis- Isopulegon (9.74%. Minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oil determined under different temperature and pH values showed to be in the range of 75-1200 µg/ ml. Conclusion: The MIC results and membrane cell damage observed in the electron microscopy evaluation indicated that this essential oil have a high antibacterial activity. Therefore, this essential oil can be combined with other agents for the preservation of foods against pathogenic and toxigenic microorganisms.

  17. Lycopus europaeus: phenolic fingerprint, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect on clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialová, Silvia; Slobodníková, Lívia; Veizerová, Lucia; Grančai, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Lycopus europaeus L. leaves water extract (LEL) was subjected to phytochemical analysis, and evaluated for its antibacterial and antioxidant effects. Antibacterial activity testing was performed on Staphylococcus aureus clinical strains from catheter-related and skin infections by broth microdilution test. LEL showed bactericidal activity at concentrations from 2500 to 5000 μg/mL against all, including methicillin resistant and polyresistant nosocomial, strains. Antioxidant activity was examined using DPPH and ABTS (11.3 and 9.8 μg/mL, respectively) and by ferric reducing ability of the plasma method (891 μmol AAE/g dry extract). Phytochemical analysis of LEL was performed by LC-DAD-MS/MS. Ten phenolic compounds were identified; two minor compounds (glucopyranosyl rosmarinic acid and sagerinig acid) have not been described in Lycopus yet. The major compounds, considered to be responsible for biological activities detected in the study, were determined as rosmarinic acid (76 mg/g) and luteolin-7-O-glucuronide (23 mg/g). L. europaeus arises from our study as a promising source of antibacterial agent for topical usage.

  18. Emerging Infectious Diseases, Antimicrobial Resistance and Millennium Development Goals: Resolving the Challenges through One Health

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    G. V. Asokan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses, which could severely hamper reaching the targets of millennium development goals (MDG. Five out of the total eight MDG’s are strongly associated with the Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs. Recent emergence and dissemination of drug-resistant pathogens has accelerated and prevent reaching the targets of MDG, with shrinking of therapeutic arsenal, mostly due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR. World Health Organization (WHO has identified AMR as 1 of the 3 greatest threats to global health. Until now, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE have been observed in hospital-acquired infections. In India, within a span of three years, New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase prevalence has risen from three percent in hospitals to twenty- fifty percent and is found to be colistin resistant as well. Routine use of antimicrobials in animal husbandry accounts for more than 50% in tonnage of all antimicrobial production to promote growth and prophylaxis. This has consequences to human health and environmental contamination with a profound impact on the environmental microbiome, resulting in resistance. Antibiotic development is now considered a global health crisis. The average time required to receive regulatory approval is 7.2 years. Moreover, the clinical approval success is only 16%. To overcome resistance in antimicrobials, intersectoral partnerships among medical, veterinary, and environmental disciplines, with specific epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches are needed. Joint efforts under “One Health”, beyond individual professional boundaries are required to stop antimicrobial resistance against zoonoses (EID and reach the MDG.

  19. Understanding the antimicrobial activity of selected disinfectants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Bumah, Violet V; Masson-Meyers, Daniela S; Eells, Janis T; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Enwemeka, Chukuka S

    2017-01-01

    Disinfectants and biocidal products have been widely used to combat Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in homes and healthcare environments. Although disruption of cytoplasmic membrane integrity has been documented as the main bactericidal effect of biocides, little is known about the biochemical alterations induced by these chemical agents. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and chemometric tools as an alternative non-destructive technique to determine the bactericidal effects of commonly used disinfectants against MRSA USA-300. FTIR spectroscopy permits a detailed characterization of bacterial reactivity, allowing an understanding of the fundamental mechanism of action involved in the interaction between bacteria and disinfectants. The disinfectants studied were ethanol 70% (N = 5), isopropanol (N = 5), sodium hypochlorite (N = 5), triclosan (N = 5) and triclocarban (N = 5). Results showed less than 5% colony forming units growth of MRSA treated with triclocarban and no growth in the other groups. Nearly 70,000 mid-infrared spectra from the five treatments and the two control (untreated; N = 4) groups of MRSA (bacteria grown in TSB and incubated at 37°C (Control I) / at ambient temperature (Control II), for 24h) were pre-processed and analyzed using principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA). Clustering of strains of MRSA belonging to five treatments and the discrimination between each treatment and two control groups in MRSA (untreated) were investigated. PCA-LDA discriminatory frequencies suggested that ethanol-treated spectra are the most similar to isopropanol-treated spectra biochemically. Also reported here are the biochemical alterations in the structure of proteins, lipid membranes, and phosphate groups of MRSA produced by sodium hypochlorite, triclosan, and triclocarban treatments. These findings provide mechanistic information involved in the interaction

  20. Understanding the antimicrobial activity of selected disinfectants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Aboualizadeh

    Full Text Available Disinfectants and biocidal products have been widely used to combat Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections in homes and healthcare environments. Although disruption of cytoplasmic membrane integrity has been documented as the main bactericidal effect of biocides, little is known about the biochemical alterations induced by these chemical agents. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and chemometric tools as an alternative non-destructive technique to determine the bactericidal effects of commonly used disinfectants against MRSA USA-300. FTIR spectroscopy permits a detailed characterization of bacterial reactivity, allowing an understanding of the fundamental mechanism of action involved in the interaction between bacteria and disinfectants. The disinfectants studied were ethanol 70% (N = 5, isopropanol (N = 5, sodium hypochlorite (N = 5, triclosan (N = 5 and triclocarban (N = 5. Results showed less than 5% colony forming units growth of MRSA treated with triclocarban and no growth in the other groups. Nearly 70,000 mid-infrared spectra from the five treatments and the two control (untreated; N = 4 groups of MRSA (bacteria grown in TSB and incubated at 37°C (Control I / at ambient temperature (Control II, for 24h were pre-processed and analyzed using principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA. Clustering of strains of MRSA belonging to five treatments and the discrimination between each treatment and two control groups in MRSA (untreated were investigated. PCA-LDA discriminatory frequencies suggested that ethanol-treated spectra are the most similar to isopropanol-treated spectra biochemically. Also reported here are the biochemical alterations in the structure of proteins, lipid membranes, and phosphate groups of MRSA produced by sodium hypochlorite, triclosan, and triclocarban treatments. These findings provide mechanistic information involved in the

  1. Antimicrobial activity of PVP from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2, on multi-drug and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jonathan P.

    2012-04-11

    Multiple drug resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become increasingly prevalent as a community acquired infection. As a result limited treatment options are available with conventional synthetic antibiotics. Bioprospecting natural products with potent antimicrobial activity show promise for developing new drugs against this pathogen. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of a purple violet pigment (PVP) from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 on 15 clinical MDR and MRSA strains. The colorimetric resazurin assay was employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of PVP against MDR and MRSA. The MIC90 ranged between 1.57 µg/mL and 3.13 µg/mL, which are significantly lower than many antimicrobials tested from natural sources against this pathogen. The spectrophotometrically determined growth analysis and total microscopic counts using Live/dead® BacLight™ fluorescent stain exhibited a steady decrease in viability of both MDR and MRSA cultures following treatment with PVP at the MIC levels. In silico predictive molecular docking study revealed that PVP could be a DNA-targeting minor groove binding antimicrobial compound. The continued development of novel antimicrobials derived from natural sources with the combination of a suite of conventional antibiotics could stem the rising pandemic of MDR and MRSA along with other deadly microbial pathogens.

  2. Combination of analytical and microbiological techniques to study the antimicrobial activity of a new active food packaging containing cinnamon or oregano against E. coli and S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, R; Gómez-Lus, R; Goñi, P; López, P; Nerín, C

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is the optimization and application of a group of analytical and microbiological techniques in the study of the activity of essential oils (EOs) incorporated in a new antimicrobial packaging material and the research in depth of the interaction between the microbial cells and the individual compounds present in the active material. For this purpose the antimicrobial activity of the active packaging containing cinnamon or oregano was evaluated against E. coli and S. aureus. The vapour phase activity and the direct contact between the antimicrobial agents themselves, or once incorporated in the packaging material, and the microbial cells have been studied. The direct contact was studied using a broth dilution method. The vapour phase was evaluated by using a new method which involves the use of a filter disk containing the EOs. Furthermore, the kill time assay was used to determine the exposure time for the maximum efficiency in packaging, and transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the antimicrobial activity and the possible mechanism of action against E. coli and S. aureus. Finally, the compounds absorbed by cells were identified. The results showed that the techniques used provide relevant information about the antibacterial activity of cinnamon and oregano in direct contact as well as in the vapour phase. The antimicrobial packaging showed a fast efficiency which supports its likely application as a food packaging material. Bacteria treated with EOs exhibit a wide range of significant abnormalities; these include formation of blebs, coagulation of cytoplasmatic constituents, collapse of the cell structure and lack of cytoplasmatic material. Some of these observations are correlated to the ability of some of these substances to disrupt envelop structure, especially the inner membrane. After an extraction from dead cells, cinnamaldehyde was detected by GC-MS in E. coli exposed to the active packaging containing cinnamon.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from clinical cutaneous specimens in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Shoji; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Nakajima, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Amano, Ayako; Matsuzaki, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against each 50 isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pyogenes according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were recovered from cutaneous specimens of Japanese adult and pediatric patients who visited hospitals in 2014. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes isolates from adult patients were ≤0.06, 4 and ≤0.06 μg/mL, respectively. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA and S. pyogenes isolates from pediatric patients were equal to those against the adult isolates. On the other hand, the MIC90s of ozenoxacin against the pediatric MRSA isolates was 0.12 μg/mL, and was 32 times lower than that against the adult isolates. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes was equal to or greater than those of 7 reference antimicrobial agents had been used for the treatment of skin infections. The MICs of ozenoxacin was highly correlated with those of nadifloxacin and levofloxacin in the 50 MRSA isolates (r(2) = 0.906 and 0.833, respectively). However, ozenoxacin kept the potent antimicrobial activity with the MIC ranging from 1 to 4 μg/mL even against MRSA low susceptible (MIC: >64 μg/mL) to nadifloxacin or levofloxacin. Ozenoxacin could represent the first-in-class non-fluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of various superficial skin infections caused by MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibiotic Exposure and Other Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Nasal Commensal Staphylococcus aureus: An Ecological Study in 8 European Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien M E van Bijnen

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AMR has become a global public health concern which threatens the effective treatment of bacterial infections. Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA increasingly appears in individuals with no healthcare associated risks. Our study assessed risk factors for nasal carriage of resistant S. aureus in a multinational, healthy, community-based population, including ecological exposure to antibiotics.Data were collected in eight European countries (Austria, Belgium, Croatia, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. Commensal AMR patterns were assessed by collecting 28,929 nasal swabs from healthy persons (aged 4+. Ecological exposure to antibiotics was operationalized as systemic antibiotic treatment patterns, extracted from electronic medical records of primary care practices in which the participants were listed (10-27 per country. A multilevel analysis related AMR in nasal commensal S. aureus to antibiotic exposure and other risk factors (e.g. age and profession.Of the 6,093 S. aureus isolates, 77% showed resistance to at least one antibiotic. 7.1% exhibited multidrug resistance (defined as resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes, and we found 78 cases MRSA (1.3%. A large variation in antibiotic exposure was found between and within countries. Younger age and a higher proportion of penicillin prescriptions in a practice were associated with higher odds for carriage of a resistant S. aureus. Also, we found higher multidrug resistance rates in participants working in healthcare or nurseries.This study indicates that in a population with no recent antibiotic use, the prescription behavior of the general practitioner affects the odds for carriage of a resistant S. aureus, highlighting the need for cautious prescribing in primary care. Finally, since variation in AMR could partly be explained on a national level, policy initiatives to decrease AMR should be encouraged at the national level within Europe.

  5. Antibiotic Exposure and Other Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Nasal Commensal Staphylococcus aureus: An Ecological Study in 8 European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bijnen, Evelien M E; Paget, John; de Lange-de Klerk, Elly S M; den Heijer, Casper D J; Versporten, Ann; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Goossens, Herman; Schellevis, François G

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a global public health concern which threatens the effective treatment of bacterial infections. Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA) increasingly appears in individuals with no healthcare associated risks. Our study assessed risk factors for nasal carriage of resistant S. aureus in a multinational, healthy, community-based population, including ecological exposure to antibiotics. Data were collected in eight European countries (Austria, Belgium, Croatia, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden). Commensal AMR patterns were assessed by collecting 28,929 nasal swabs from healthy persons (aged 4+). Ecological exposure to antibiotics was operationalized as systemic antibiotic treatment patterns, extracted from electronic medical records of primary care practices in which the participants were listed (10-27 per country). A multilevel analysis related AMR in nasal commensal S. aureus to antibiotic exposure and other risk factors (e.g. age and profession). Of the 6,093 S. aureus isolates, 77% showed resistance to at least one antibiotic. 7.1% exhibited multidrug resistance (defined as resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes), and we found 78 cases MRSA (1.3%). A large variation in antibiotic exposure was found between and within countries. Younger age and a higher proportion of penicillin prescriptions in a practice were associated with higher odds for carriage of a resistant S. aureus. Also, we found higher multidrug resistance rates in participants working in healthcare or nurseries. This study indicates that in a population with no recent antibiotic use, the prescription behavior of the general practitioner affects the odds for carriage of a resistant S. aureus, highlighting the need for cautious prescribing in primary care. Finally, since variation in AMR could partly be explained on a national level, policy initiatives to decrease AMR should be encouraged at the national level within Europe.

  6. An Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Potency of Lasianthera africana (BEAUV and Heinsia crinata (G. Taylor on Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy, I. E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the potency of many African medical plants against microorganisms is scanty, and in the current wave of antimicrobial resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs, there is need to search for plants that could be resistance-free and affordable. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of the extracts of Lasianthera africana (E1 and Heinsia crinata (E2 in combination with chloramphenicol, on Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphlococcus aureus and Candida albicans. For this purpose, the dilution sensitivity and disc diffusion techniques were respectively applied in determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the plant extracts, and the sensitivities of the organisms to the plant extracts and their combinations with chloramphenicol. L. africana and H. crinata showed very high antimicrobial activity against all the test organisms. In combination, the effect of E1 on E. coli and S. typhi was completely antagonized by that of E2, whereas additive effect on S. aureus and C. albicans was observed, indicating that the combination of E1 and E2 might be effective against gram positive pathogenic organisms. The combination of either plant extract with chloramphenicol produced synergistic effect on only C. albicans. The smaller MIC of E2 indicated greater effectivity than E1. It is concluded that the additive effect produced by the combination of the two plant extracts, and the synergic effect from the combination of any of the extracts with chloramphenicol, offer alternative therapy to gram positive bacterial infections and candidiasis respectively.

  7. Panton-Valentine leukocidin and some exotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of staphylococci isolated from milks of small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Nilgün; Askar, Şinasi; Macun, Hasan Ceyhun; Sakarya, Fatma; Altun, Belgin; Yıldırım, Murat

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the existence of pvl gene, some toxin genes, and mecA gene in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from sheep milk and to examine antimicrobial resistance profiles in staphylococci from sheep and goats' milk. The milk samples were collected from 13 different small ruminant farms in Kirikkale province from February to August 2009. A total of 1,604 half-udder milk samples from 857 ewes and 66 half-udder milk samples from 33 goats were collected. Staphylococcus spp. were isolated and identified from the samples. Toxin genes and mecA gene among S. aureus strains were determined by PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci was examined by the disk diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton agar, and interpreted according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. The prevalence of subclinical intramammary infection in both ewes and goats was 5.2%. The most prevalent subclinical mastitis agents were coagulase-negative staphylococci and S. aureus with prevalences 2.8% (n:46) and 1.3% (n = 21), respectively. The prevalence of resistances in isolated Staphylococcus spp. to penicilin G, tetracycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, and enrofloxacin were found as 26.9% (18), 7.5% (5), 6.0% (4), 3.0% (2), and 1.5% (1), respectively. Only 3 of the 21 S. aureus ewe isolates (13.4%) were shown to harbor enterotoxin genes being either seh, sej or sec. However, fourteen (66.6%) of the 21 S. aureus isolates had pvl gene while none of the isolates harbored mecA gene. In conclusion, Staphylococci were shown to be the most prevalent bacteria isolated from subclinical mastitis of ewes and goats and these isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics. In addition, S. aureus strains isolated from ewes were harboring few staphylococcal enterotoxin genes. However, Panton-Valentine leukocidin produced by S. aureus could be an important virulence factor and contribute to subclinical mastitis pathogenicity.

  8. In vitro influence of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on staphylococcus aureus by using phenothiazines derivatives associated with laser/LED light

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazinium dyes - PTZ irradiated with red laser (λ660nm) or red-orange LED (λ632+/-2nm) on Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. triplicate tests were performed in 10 groups: control, Laser (L1+P- and L2+P-) bacterial suspensions were irradiated only with laser energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively, (Led1+P- and Led2+P-) irradiated only with LED energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively, (L1+P+ and L2+P+) irradiated with laser in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer, (Led1+P+ and Led2+P+) irradiated with LED in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer and finally (L-P+) only in the presence of PTZ dye. Bactericidal effect of the PACT was assessed by counting colony-forming units. The results showed no significant difference on regards different energy densities on group PACT for both lights. PACT groups (L2+P+ and Led2+P+) compared to the Control showed significant reduction of CFUs. LED/Laser groups (L2+P- and Led2+P-) compared to control and PTZ groups showed also significant differences as groups LED/Laser (4.8J/cm2) increased the average of CFUs. Although the results of this study have shown a reduction in average number of colonyforming units by the appropriate Laser or LED-dye treatment combination, it this topic requires further investigation.

  9. In vivo monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections and antimicrobial therapy by [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose-MicroPET in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena, Beatriz; Grilló, María-Jesús

    2014-11-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [(18)F]fluoro-deoxyglucose-MicroPET ([(18)F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found in bacterial counts and the inflammatory reaction triggered were detected by the regular bacteriological and histological procedures and also by [(18)F]FDG-MicroPET image signal intensity determinations in the infection area and regional lymph node. Moreover, [(18)F]FDG-MicroPET imaging allowed the monitoring of the rifampin treatment effect, identifying the periods of controlled infection and those of reactivated infection due to the appearance of bacteria naturally resistant to rifampin. Overall, the mouse model developed may be useful for noninvasive in vivo determinations in studies on S. aureus biofilm infections and assessment of new therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. In Vivo Monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infections and Antimicrobial Therapy by [18F]Fluoro-Deoxyglucose–MicroPET in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose–MicroPET ([18F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found in bacterial counts and the inflammatory reaction triggered were detected by the regular bacteriological and histological procedures and also by [18F]FDG-MicroPET image signal intensity determinations in the infection area and regional lymph node. Moreover, [18F]FDG-MicroPET imaging allowed the monitoring of the rifampin treatment effect, identifying the periods of controlled infection and those of reactivated infection due to the appearance of bacteria naturally resistant to rifampin. Overall, the mouse model developed may be useful for noninvasive in vivo determinations in studies on S. aureus biofilm infections and assessment of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25155589

  11. Mutating the heme sensing response regulator HssR in Staphylococcus aureus but not in the Listeria monocytogenes homologue results in increased tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide Plectasin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L. E.; Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Gottschalk, S.

    2010-01-01

    is incompletely understood and such knowledge is required to evaluate their potential as antimicrobial therapeutics. Plectasin is a recently discovered HDP active against Gram-positive bacteria with the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) being highly susceptible and the food borne pathogen....... However, in S. aureus, four mutants with insertion in the heme response regulator (hssR) were 2-4 fold more resistant to plectasin as compared to the wild type. The hssR mutation also enhanced resistance to the plectasin-like defensin eurocin, but not to other classes of HDPs or to other stressors tested....... Addition of plectasin did not influence the expression of hssR or hrtA, a gene regulated by HssR. The genome of L. monocytogenes LO28 encodes a putative HssR homologue, RR23 (in L. monocytogenes EGD-e lmo2583) with 48% identity to the S. aureus HssR, but a mutation in the rr23 gene did not change...

  12. Susceptibility to antimicrobials of mastitis-causing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis and Str. dysgalactiae from New Zealand and the USA as assessed by the disk diffusion test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, K R; Grinberg, A; Williamson, N B; Abdalla, M E; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Parkinson, T J; Tucker, I G; Rapnicki, P

    2015-07-01

    To compare the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of three common mastitis pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis and Str. dysgalactiae) isolated from milk samples from New Zealand and the USA. A total of 182 S. aureus, 126 Str. uberis and 89 Str. dysgalactiae isolates from New Zealand (107, 106 and 41, respectively) and the USA (75, 20 and 48, respectively) were assessed using the disk diffusion test. Susceptibility varied among the bacterial species. All isolates were susceptible to the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination. Resistance to lincomycin was most frequent (susceptibility of 8.6%) across all species. Non-susceptible (i.e. resistant or intermediate) isolates of S. aureus were identified for the three non-isoxazolyl penicillins (amoxicillin, ampicillin and penicillin: 20.6% and 36.0%) and lincomycin (99.9% and 94.6%) for NZ and the USA, respectively. Resistance to erythromycin (5.3%) and tetracyclines (6.7%) was detected only in isolates from the USA. There were differences in susceptibility between Str. uberis and Str. dysgalactiae; all streptococcal isolates demonstrated resistance to aminoglycosides (neomycin 52.4% and streptomycin 27.9%) and enrofloxacin (28%). Resistance of Str. dysgalactiae to tetracycline was almost 100.0% and to oxytetracycline 89.9%. Most of the isolates tested were susceptible to most of the antimicrobials commonly used for treatment of bovine mastitis, with the exception of the lincosamides. Susceptibility to a selected class-representative antimicrobial and at the genus level should be interpreted with caution. Differences between NZ and the USA confirm the value of national surveys to determine the susceptibility patterns of mastitis pathogens. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  13. CLINICAL ISOLATES OF MECA, METHICILLIN, VANCOMYCIN RESISTANCE S. AUREUS; ESBLs PRODUCING K.PNEUMONIA, E.COLI, P. AUREGENOSA FROM VARIOUS CLINICAL SOURCE AND ITS ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mahmud Ali, Amirthalingam R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Antimicrobial resistance has turned into a key medical and public health crisis globally since the injudicious use of magic bullets (drugs. Aim of this study is focused on the clinical isolate and their percentages of resistant to antibiotics in gram positive bacteria such as MRSA, VRSA, and MSSA are common causes of nosocomical, skin structure infections, bacteremia and infection of other systems; ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, Klebsiella spp. is common agent of urinary tract, bloodstream, pulmonary and intra-abdominal infections and carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa with its complete antimicrobial patterns which are currently practiced in this population. Methods: There are one hundred and fourteen (114 various clinical isolates, isolated from various clinical samples like throat swab, urine, pus, sputum, and blood culture, identified as specific isolate with resistance patterns were analyzed by BD phoenix-100 the auto analyzer. Results: Off 114 clinical isolate, 6 mecA-mediated resistance (cefoxitin>8mgc/ml, 11 methicillin resistance, 18 β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor, 12 methicillin sensitive and 3 vancomycin (>16µg/ml resistance S. aureus have been isolated from overall 50 isolate of S.aureus. In addition, there are 27 P.aeruginosa, 15 ESBLs from overall of 25 K. pneumoniae and 7 ESBLs out of 12 Escherichia coli species have been isolated. The resistance and susceptibility pattern percentages have been graphically represented for each isolates. Conclusion: Current study revealed that the drug classes of β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor having high resistance rate with S.aureus, P.aureginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolate. Also, some of other drug classes such as cepham and tetracycline having higher resistance rate with P.aureginosa and K.pneumoniae. In addition, the vancomycin resistances S. aureus have been isolated and reported as first time in this population.

  14. Effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using a 660 nm laser and methyline blue dye for inactivating Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in compact and cancellous bones: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; Silva, Francine Cristina da; Nader, Sumaia Alves; Meira, Giselle Andrade; Viana, Magda Souza

    2015-06-01

    New therapeutic modalities such as antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has been investigated in order to be a valid alternative to the treatment of infections caused by different microorganisms. This work evaluated the in vitro effectiveness of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) using 660 nm laser combined with methylene blue dye to inactivate Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilms in compact and cancellous bones specimens. Eighty specimens of compact bone and 80 specimens of cancellous bone were contaminated with a standard suspension of S. aureus and incubated for 14 days at 37°C to induce the formation of biofilms. The specimens were then divided into groups (n = 10) according to the established treatment: PS-L- (control--no treatment), PS+L- (only AM for 5 min in the dark), PS-L+90 (only laser irradiation for 90 s), PS-L+180 (only laser irradiation for 180 s), PS-L+300 (only laser irradiation for 300 s), APDT90 (APDT for 90 s), APDT180 (APDT for 180 s), and APDT300 (APDT for 300 s). The findings were statistically analyzed by ANOVA 5%. All of the experimental treatments showed a significant reduction (log 10 CFU/mL) of S. aureus biofilms in compact and cancellous bones specimens compared with the control group, and the APDT group was the most effective. Compact specimens treated with APDT showed the greatest reduction in biofilms compared with cancellous specimens, regardless of length of treatment. APDT with methylene blue dye and a 660 nm laser proved to be effective in inactivating S. aureus biofilms formed in compact and cancellous bone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Hibiscus sabdariffa aqueous extracts against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus in a microbiological medium and milk of various fat concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Kristen L; Burris, Kellie P; Zivanovic, Svetlana; Davidson, P Michael; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-02-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa L. calyces are widely used in the preparation of beverages. The calyces contain compounds that exhibit antimicrobial activity, yet little research has been conducted on their possible use in food systems as antimicrobials. Aqueous extracts prepared from the brand "Mi Costenita" were sterilized by membrane filtration (0.22-μm pore size) or autoclaving (121 °C, 30 min) and tested for antimicrobial activity against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains ATCC 43894 and Cider and Staphylococcus aureus strains SA113 and ATCC 27708 in a microbiological medium and ultrahigh-temperature-processed milk with various fat percentages. Extracts heated by autoclaving exhibited greater activity than did filtered extracts in a microbiological medium. Against E. coli, results of 20 mg/ml filtered extract were not different from those of the control, whereas autoclaved extracts reduced viable cells ca. 3 to 4 log CFU/ml. At 60 mg/ml, both extracts inactivated cells after 24 h. There were reduced populations of both strains of S. aureus (ca. 2.7 and 3 log CFU/ml, respectively) after 24 h of incubation in 40 mg/ml filtered extracts. When grown in autoclaved extracts at 40 mg/ml, both strains of S. aureus were inactivated after 9 h. Autoclaved extracts had decreased anthocyanin content (2.63 mg/liter) compared with filtered extracts (14.27 mg/liter), whereas the phenolic content (48.7 and 53.8 mg/g) remained similar for both treatments. Autoclaved extracts were then tested for activity in milk at various fat concentrations (skim [3.25%]) against a 1:1 mixture of the two strains of E. coli O157:H7 and a 1:1 mixture of the two strains of S. aureus. Extracts at 40 mg/ml inactivated S. aureus after 168 h in skim and whole milk, and E. coli was inactivated after 96 h in 60 mg/ml extract in all fat levels. These findings show the potential use of Hibiscus extracts to prevent the growth of pathogens in foods and beverages.

  16. Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" on Campus: A New Challenge to College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    As new drugs to control bacterial pathogens are developed, the organisms evolve to survive. "Staphylococcus aureus", a common organism, has steadily developed resistance to antibiotics. For more than 40 years, resistant "S. aureus" presented a formidable problem to hospitalized patients; in the past decade, however, it has begun to appear outside…

  17. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    . Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention...

  18. [Determination of the antimicrobial capacity of green tea (Camellia sinensis) against the potentially pathogenic microorganisms Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Andreína; Pawa, Jonathan; Chaverri, José M; Arias, María Laura

    2013-09-01

    Many studies can be found in scientific literature demonstrating the antimicrobial capacity of different herbs, including green tea. Never-theless, many results are divergent or cannot be compared. Several green tea formulations may be found in market, but there is scarce or non-information about its activity. In this work, the potential antimicrobial effect of 50 samples of dry green tea and in 10% infusion against Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger distributed in the metropolitan area of Costa Rica, was determined. This activity was compared with the effect produced by Chinese origin green tea (Camellia sinensis). Different solvents were evaluated for preparing polyphenol enriched extracts from green tea samples. Total phenols were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu spectrophotometric methodology, using galic acid as reference. Antimicrobial activity of green tea extracts and infusions was evaluated using the microplate methodology described by Breuking (2006). Ethanol was the most efficient solvent used for the polyphenol extractions. There was no antimicrobial effect of the different green tea extracts and infusions against the microorganisms evaluated, except for Listeria monocytogenes, where the extracts of 70% of samples analyzed and the control showed an inhibitory effect in the 10.5 mg/mL and 1.05 mg/L concentrations. None of the infusions tested, including the control, showed any effect against this bacteria.

  19. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermin E. Guerra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions.

  20. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  1. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an urgent medical problem due to its growing frequency and its poor associated outcome. As healthcare delivery increasingly involves invasive procedures and implantable devices, the number of patients at risk for SAB and its complications is likely to grow....... Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention...

  2. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazines derivatives associated with the red-orange LED against staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Miranda, Anderson F. S.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zainn, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to PDT development by researching alternative light sources using redorange LED light at doses of 2.4 e 4.8 J/cm2 to evaluate the bactericidal effect of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazinium dye (Toluidine blue O and methylene blue) at a low concentration of 1μg/mL on strain of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529) in vitro. For this research, tests were performed in triplicate and the samples were distributed into six test groups: (L-P-) Negative control (L1+ P-) and (L2+ P-) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively in the absence of photosensitizer; (L1 + P+) and (L2 + P+) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer and finally (L-P+) bacterial suspensions only in the presence of phenothiazinium dye. Therefore, were analyzed the potential bactericidal PACT by counting of colony-forming units and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, p<0.05). The results demonstrated that comparing the LED group (L2 + P-) with negative control group, LED group (L1+ P-) and photosensitizer group there was a statistically significant (p<0.0001, p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively) that the group treated only with LED (energy density of 4.8J/cm2) increased the average of CFU counts. The negative control group when compared to the groups submitted to PDT only showed a statistically significant reduction (p<0.01) relative to the group (L2+P+) that showed a decrease in the number of CFU. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups submitted to PDT (L1+P+ and L2+P+). Although the results of this study have shown a reduction in average number of colony forming units by the appropriate LED-dye treatment combination, it needs further investigation.

  3. Challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland: 2. On-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; More, Simon J; Morton, David B; Hanlon, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in recent years as a significant public health threat, which requires both an ethical and a scientific approach. In a recent Policy Delphi study, on-farm use of antimicrobials was a key concern identified by veterinary professionals in Ireland. In this case study (the second in a series of three resulting from a research workshop exploring the challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland; the other two case studies investigate clinical veterinary services and emergency/casualty slaughter certification) we aim to provide a value-based reflection on the constraints and possible opportunities for responsible use of veterinary antimicrobials in Ireland. Using a qualitative focus group approach, this study gathered evidence from relevant stakeholders, namely veterinarians working in public and private organisations, a representative from the veterinary regulatory body, a dairy farmer and a general medical practitioner. Three overarching constraints to prudent on-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials emerged from the thematic analysis: 'Defective regulations', 'Lack of knowledge and values' regarding farmers and vets and 'Farm-centred concerns', including economic and husbandry concerns. Conversely, three main themes which reflect possible opportunities to the barriers were identified: 'Improved regulations', 'Education' and 'Herd health management'. Five main recommendations arose from this study based on the perspectives of the study participants including: a) the potential for regulatory change to facilitate an increase in the number of yearly visits of veterinarians to farms and to implement electronic prescribing and shorter validity of prescriptions; b) a 'One Health' education plan; c) improved professional guidance on responsible use of veterinary antimicrobials; d) improved on-farm herd health management practices; and e) the promotion of a 'One Farm-One Vet' policy. These findings may assist Veterinary Council of

  4. Antimicrobial potency of single and combined mupirocin and monoterpenes, thymol, menthol and 1,8-cineole against Staphylococcus aureus planktonic and biofilm growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifer, Domagoj; Mužinić, Vedran; Klarić, Maja Šegvić

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most commonly isolated microbes in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) that can be complicated due to the formation of a staphylococcal biofilm. In this study, we investigated antimicrobial efficacy of single mupirocin and three types of monoterpenes (thymol, menthol and 1,8-cineole) as well as mupirocin-monoterpene combinations against S. aureus ATCC 29213 and 5 methicilin-resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) grown in planktonic and biofilm form. MIC against planktonic bacteria as well as minimum biofilm-eliminating concentrations (MBECs) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) were determined by TTC and MTT reduction assay, respectively. The MICs of mupirocin (0.125-0.156 μg ml(-1)) were three orders of magnitude lower than the MICs of monoterpenes, which were as follows: thymol (0.250-0.375 mg ml(-1)) > menthol (1 mg ml(-1)) > 1,8-cineole (4-8 mg ml(-1)). Mupirocin-monoterpene combinations showed indifferent effect as compared with MICs of single substances. Mupirocin (0.016-2 mg ml(-1)) failed to destroy the biofilm. The MBECs of thymol and menthol were two- to sixfold higher than their MICs, while 1,8-cineole exerted a weak antibiofilm effect with MBECs 16- to 64-fold higher than MICs. Mixture of mupirocin and 1,8 cineole exerted a potentiated biofilm-eliminating effect, mupirocin-menthol showed antagonism, while effect of thymol-mupirocin mixture was inconclusive. MBICs of antimicrobials were close to their MICs, except 1,8-cineole, MBIC was about three- to fivefold higher. Dominant synergy was observed for mixtures of mupirocin and menthol or thymol, whereas mupirocin-1,8-cineol exerted an indifferent or additive biofilm inhibitory effect. Particular combinations of mupirocin and the monoterpenes could be applied in CRS therapy in order to eliminate or prevent bacterial biofilm growth.

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Vancomycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Clinical Specimens of Children in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Abdoli Oskouie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Staphylococci are among common causes of community acquired and nosocomial infections around the world. Over the last decade, the resistance of these bacteria in hospital environments is increasing to various antibiotics such as vancomycin. The aim of present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance pattern and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values among a clinical collection of staphylococci isolated from hospitalized children in Tabriz.   Methods: In this prospective and descriptive study, 88 staphylococcal isolates including 53 S. aureus and 35 coagulase-negative staphylococcus species were recovered from various clinical specimens referred to microbiology laboratory of Children Hospital during study period (April 2011 to March 2012. Susceptibility of the isolates against 15 different antimicrobial agents and MIC values of vancomycin was tested using standard disk diffusion and E-test methods respectively.   Results: According to the results of drug susceptibility testing, vancomycin and rifampin were the most effective but clindamycin and penicillin were the least effective drugs against tested isolates. Accordingly, the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains was determined more than 80%. According to MIC values, 13.2% of S. aureus and 3.3% of coagulase-negative staphylococcus isolates showed intermediate resistance to vancomycin. None of the isolates was fully resistant to vancomycin isolates in this study.   Conclusion: Although fully vancomycin resistant staphylococci was not found among tested isolates in this study, there was VISA strains. Since there are reports on the emergence of VRSA strains from Iran and other countries, it is necessary for the clinician to care in prescription of vancomycin as a selective drug against staphylococcal infections. Moreover, the necessity of MIC measurement in determining of vancomycin susceptibility is more apparent.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of the crude extract of Piper sarmentosum against methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, L; Daruliza, K; Sudhakaran, S; Jegathambigai, R

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of novel diseases caused by microbial pathogens and the undesirable side effects of certain antibiotics has been a recent dilemma in the medical arena. Consequently, it has stirred the discovery of many naturally occurring agents which could possibly provide important ramifications against various pharmacological targets and to combat various ailments. The main aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the crude methanolic extract of Piper (P.) sarmentosum against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The plant materials were extracted by percolation in 70% methanol. Only the leaves were used in this study. Initial antimicrobial screening using disc diffusion assay was conducted and further screening of the antimicrobial properties in the plant was performed using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The phytochemical constituents in the plant were evaluated via phytochemical screening and thin layer chromatography (TLC). P. sarmentosum inhibited the growth of MRSA with an inhibition zone of 10.0 mm. There was no inhibition zone observed for the other microbes tested. MIC test showed a value of 50mg/ml and MBC results showed no Colony Forming Unit (CFU) at 100 mg/ml against MRSA. Phytochemical screening of the crude extract indicated the presence of tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids glycosides and anthraquinone. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) further confirmed the presence of flavonoids and alkaloids in the extract. P. sarmentosum has shown to have some antimicrobial properties against MRSA. Based on the MIC index (MBC/MIC), the extract exhibits bactericidal effects against MRSA. TLC analysis indicated the presence of flavonoids and alkaloids which could have contributed to the antimicrobial activity of the plant extract.

  7. Sunlight mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles by a novel actinobacterium (Sinomonas mesophila MPKL 26) and its antimicrobial activity against multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikprabhu, Deene; Cheng, Juan; Chen, Wei; Sunkara, Anil Kumar; Mane, Sunilkumar B; Kumar, Ram; das, Mousumi; N Hozzein, Wael; Duan, Yan-Qing; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using microorganism are many, but there are only scanty reports using actinobacteria. In the present study, the actinobacterium of the genus Sinomonas was reported to synthesis silver nanoparticles for the first time. A photo-irradiation based method was developed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles, which includes two day old cultural supernatant of novel species Sinomonas mesophila MPKL 26 and silver nitrate solution, exposed to sunlight. The preliminary synthesis of silver nanoparticles was noted by the color change of the solution from colorless to brown; the synthesis was further confirmed using UV-visible spectroscopy which shows a peak between 400 and 450nm. Spherical shape silver nanoparticles of size range 4-50nm were synthesized, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy result indicates that, the metabolite produced by the novel species S. mesophila MPKL 26 was the probable reducing/capping agent involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The synthesized silver nanoparticles maintained consistent shape with respect to different time periods. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were evaluated for the antimicrobial activity against multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus which show good antimicrobial activity. The method developed for synthesis is easy, requires less time (20min) and produces spherical shape nanoparticles of size as small as 4nm, having good antimicrobial activity. Hence, our study enlarges the scope of actinobacteria for the rapid biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and can be used in formulating remedies for multi drug resistant S. aureus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. EARSS: European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System; data from the Netherlands .Incidence and resistance rates for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch WG; de Neeling AJ; CIE; LIO

    2001-01-01

    Gevoeligheid voor antimicrobiele middelen in Streptococcus pneumoniae en Staphylococcus aureus werd bepaald in 1999 in Nederland binnen het raamwerk van het European antomicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). Het EARSS project had in Nederland een dekkingsgraad van 40% van de Nederlandse

  9. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in minas frescal cheese: evaluation of classic enterotoxin genes, antimicrobial resistance and clonal diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Alice Gonçalves Martins; Marques, Leila Márcia Peres; Gomes, Marcel da Silva Amorim; Beltrão, Jhonathan Campos do Couto; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Esper, Luciana Maria Ramires; Paula, Geraldo Renato de; Teixeira, Lenise Arneiro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio

    2017-12-15

    This study aimed to investigate classical enterotoxin (sea to see) and mecA genes, by polymerase chain reaction and anitimicrobial susceptibility, by disk diffusion test of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from minas frescal cheese (MFC). All methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were investigated for the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and clonal diversity. Thirty-one S. aureus were isolated from four MFC samples. Seven (22.6%) S. aureus carried mecA gene and two of them carried enterotoxin genes seb/sec and sea/seb. Five (16.1%) S. aureus isolates showed induced resistance to clindamycin and nine (29%) were resistant to multiple -antibiotics (MDR), among these, six were MRSA. No MRSA isolates presented the PVL genes. Four MRSA were grouped into three clones and three isolates were not typable by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. MRSA isolates showed, by multilocus sequence typing, sequence types ST1, ST5, ST72 and ST4304 (new ST) and S. aureus protein A (spa type) t127, t568 and t2703. These data suggest that MFC may constitute a risk to the consumer because of its potential for staphylococcal food poisoning; however it might, also, become one of MRSA and MDR strains disseminator, including clones usually found in the hospital environment. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Bacteriophage K antimicrobial-lock technique for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus central venous catheter-related infection: a leporine model efficacy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungren, Matthew P; Donlan, Rodney M; Kankotia, Ravi; Paxton, Ben E; Falk, Irene; Christensen, Diana; Kim, Charles Y

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether a bacteriophage antimicrobial-lock technique can reduce bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on indwelling central venous catheters in a rabbit model. Cuffed central venous catheters were inserted into the jugular vein of female New Zealand White rabbits under image guidance. Catheters were inoculated for 24 hours with broth culture of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The inoculum was aspirated, and rabbits were randomly assigned to two equal groups for 24 hours: (i) untreated controls (heparinized saline lock), (ii) bacteriophage antimicrobial-lock (staphylococcal bacteriophage K, propagated titer > 10(8)/mL). Blood cultures were obtained via peripheral veins, and the catheters were removed for quantitative culture and scanning electron microscopy. Mean colony-forming units (CFU) per cm(2) of the distal catheter segment, as a measure of biofilm, were significantly decreased in experimental animals compared with controls (control, 1.2 × 10(5) CFU/cm(2); experimental, 7.6 × 10(3); P = .016). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that biofilms were present on the surface of five of five control catheters but only one of five treated catheters (P = .048). Blood culture results were not significantly different between the groups. In a rabbit model, treatment of infected central venous catheters with a bacteriophage antimicrobial-lock technique significantly reduced bacterial colonization and biofilm presence. Our data represent a preliminary step toward use of bacteriophage therapy for prevention and treatment of central venous catheter-associated infection. Copyright © 2014 SIR. All rights reserved.

  12. Establishing quality control ranges for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cornerstone to develop reference strains for Korean clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Seung Jun; Shin, Saeam; Lee, Wonmok; Pinto, Naina; Shin, Nari; Lee, Kwangjun; Hong, Seong Geun; Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Hyukmin; Kim, Heejung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-11-01

    Quality control (QC) processes are being performed in the majority of clinical microbiology laboratories to ensure the performance of microbial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by using ATCC strains. To obtain these ATCC strains, some inconveniences are encountered concerning the purchase cost of the strains and the shipping time required. This study was focused on constructing a database of reference strains for QC processes using domestic bacterial strains, concentrating primarily on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Three strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) that showed legible results in preliminary testing were selected. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters (ZDs) of eight antimicrobials for each strain were determined according to the CLSI M23. All resulting MIC and ZD ranges included at least 95% of the data. The ZD QC ranges obtained by using the CLSI method were less than 12 mm, and the MIC QC ranges extended no more than five dilutions. This study is a preliminary attempt to construct a bank of Korean QC strains. With further studies, a positive outcome toward cost and time reduction can be anticipated.

  13. Comparison of the phenotypic antimicrobial resistances and spa-types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates derived from pigs in conventional and in organic husbandry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntenkoetter, Vitus; Blaha, Thomas; Tegeler, Regina; Fetsch, Alexandra; Hartmann, Maria; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Meemken, Diana

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify differences in the phenotypic resistance to antimicrobials and in the spa-types between 273 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates derived from conventional (n = 21) versus organic pig farms (n = 10) located in Germany. The susceptibility of the isolates against 19 antimicrobial agents was tested and then compared between the two different husbandry systems. A statistically significant difference was observed between the MRSA strains isolated on conventional and on organic pig farms for the antimicrobials tilmicosin (61.8% vs. 40.0%; OR: 2.42), clindamycin (63.5% vs. 45.7%; OR: 2.06), gentamicin (14.7% vs. 34.3%; OR: 0.33), apramycin (3.8% vs. 22.9%; OR: 0.13) and enrofloxacin (13.9% vs. 34.3%; OR: 0.31). Finally, the results of the susceptibility testing were analysed in order to determine the resistance pattern per isolate. Among the tested isolates a kind of"basic resistance pattern of MRSA"to penicillin, ampicillin and tetracycline was identified. The predominant spa-types in both groups were t011 and t034. Less frequently detected spa-types were t1430, t1197, t2510, t779, t1451 and t1250.

  14. Establishing Quality Control Ranges for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus: A Cornerstone to Develop Reference Strains for Korean Clinical Microbiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Seung Jun; Shin, Saeam; Lee, Wonmok; Pinto, Naina; Shin, Nari; Lee, Kwangjun; Hong, Seong Geun; Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Hyukmin; Kim, Heejung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-01-01

    Quality control (QC) processes are being performed in the majority of clinical microbiology laboratories to ensure the performance of microbial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by using ATCC strains. To obtain these ATCC strains, some inconveniences are encountered concerning the purchase cost of the strains and the shipping time required. This study was focused on constructing a database of reference strains for QC processes using domestic bacterial strains, concentrating primarily on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Three strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) that showed legible results in preliminary testing were selected. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters (ZDs) of eight antimicrobials for each strain were determined according to the CLSI M23. All resulting MIC and ZD ranges included at least 95% of the data. The ZD QC ranges obtained by using the CLSI method were less than 12 mm, and the MIC QC ranges extended no more than five dilutions. This study is a preliminary attempt to construct a bank of Korean QC strains. With further studies, a positive outcome toward cost and time reduction can be anticipated. PMID:26354353

  15. Estudo da Atividade Antimicrobiana das Folhas de Jatrophacurcas L. frente ao Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli/ Study of Antimicrobial Activity of Leave of Jatropha curcas L. against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Venturini Arantes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: O presente estudo investigou a atividade antimicrobiana do extrato obtido das folhas de Jatropha curcas L., frente às bactérias Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli isoladas de pacientes de um Hospital Escola do sul de Minas Gerais. Metodologia: Foi realizado o teste da Microdiluição em placas de 96 poços. Colocou-se 50µl de Ágar Mueller Hinton em todos os poços, seguidos de 50µl do extrato da planta em diferentes concentrações (25 a 200 mg/mL nas colunas apropriadas e em seguida, 10µl de cada cepa bacteriana na concentração de 0,5 de McFarland em solução salina estéril. Seguiu-se a incubação em estufa de 35ºC por 24h. Posteriormente, realizou-se a revelação pela adição de 20 µL de Cloreto de Trifenil Tetrezólico e análise dos resultados pela coloração. Em cada placa foi realizado um controle positivo e negativo. Resultados: Houve efeito inibitório do crescimento microbiano de S. aureus e E. coli perante extratos de Jatropha Curcas L. nas concentrações de 50mg a 200mg. Apenas na concentração de 25mg não houve efeito inibitório diante de E. coli e S. aureus. Conclusão: O extrato bruto de Jatropha curcas L. apresentou atividade inibitória do crescimento de colônias de Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli isoladas de pacientes de um hospital escola do sul de Minas Gerais, nas concentrações 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175 e 200mg/ml. Objectives: This study investigated the antimicrobial activity of the extract obtained from the leaves of Jatropha curcas L., on the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli isolated from patients at a university hospital in southern Minas Gerais. Methodology: The microdilution test was made in plates of 96 wells. An amount of 50mL of Mueller Hinton agar was placed into each well, followed by 50mL of plant extract in different concentrations (25-200 mg / ml in the appropriate columns, and then 10ml of each bacterial strain at a concentration of 0.5 Mc

  16. Excretion of antimicrobials used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections during lactation: safety in breastfeeding infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrano, Jennifer A; Spooner, Linda M; Belliveau, Paul

    2009-09-01

    Community-acquired strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become a common cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. These infections sometimes require treatment with antibiotics, and with the increasing resistance of pathogens to these agents, choosing the appropriate drug can be difficult. In lactating women who develop these infections, selecting an antibiotic is even more challenging, as clinicians need to be aware of risks to the infant from the drug excreted during lactation. To our knowledge, no review has addressed the safety of antibiotics in breastfeeding infants when the drugs are used to treat maternal skin and soft tissue infections from MRSA. Thus, we performed a literature search of the PubMed-MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1974-March 2009), reviewed reference citations from identified publications, researched antibiotic prescribing information, and corresponded with drug manufacturers. Case reports, case series, and both in vivo and in vitro clinical trials were evaluated for the following antibiotics: clindamycin, daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, rifampin, tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, tigecycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin. Information for the newer antibiotics (linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, tigecycline, and daptomycin) was limited. Despite heterogeneity in the data for the older antibiotics (clindamycin, rifampin, tetracyclines, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin), all appear to be relatively safe in the minimal quantities nursing infants ingest through breast milk. Although the risk to infants seems to be relatively low for most of the agents we explored, the paucity of data indicates a need for close monitoring of breastfed infants whose mothers are receiving an antibiotic for an MRSA skin and soft tissue infection.

  17. Estudo Comparativo da Ação Bactericida do Mel sobre Staphylococcus aureus/Comparative Study of the Honey Antimicrobial Activity on Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othon José Ribeiro Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar, a partir da metodologia microbiológica, a ação bactericida dos diferentes tipos de mel, segundo sua florada de origem. Materiais e Métodos: foram adquiridas três amostras de cada tipo de mel, segundo sua florada de origem, sendo eles: Flores de Café, Cipó-Uva, Assa-Peixe, Limão, Laranjeira, Eucalipto e Silvestre. Os discos foram preparados sendo embebidos em mel, e mantidos em estufa para secagem. Estes foram então colocados em contato com placa de Petri, previamente preparadas com Ágar Nutriente, contendo Staphylococcus aureus, e colocados em estufa para secagem. Após 24 horas, observou-se se houve inibição da cepa bacteriana, formando halo ao redor do disco. Resultado: Notou-se, na leitura das 21 placas, que nao houve diferença significativa nos halos de inibição formados pelos diferentes tipos de mel testados. Conclusão: Pelo estudo realizado, pode-se concluir que não há diferença na ação bactericida, sobre cepa de Staphylococcus aureus, entre os diferentes tipos de mel segundo as floradas de origem testadas. Objective: To analyze, according to microbiological methodology, the bactericidal action of different ypes on honey, according to the flowering origin. Materials and Methods: three samples of each types of honey were acquired, according to the flowering of origin, namely: Coffee Flowers, Vine-Grape, Assa-Peixe, Lemon, Orange, Eucalyptus and Sylvan. The disks were prepared by being soaked in honey, and were kept in a kilnfor drying. These were then placed in contact with Petri dish, previously prepared with Nutrient Agar, containing Staphylococcus aureus, and placed in kiln for drying. After 24 hours, it was observed if there was inhibition of bacterial strain, by forming a halo around the disk. Results: It was noted, in the reading of the 21 plates, no significant difference in the inhibition halos formed by different types of honey tested. Conclusion:By the study, it can be concluded that there

  18. Enhancement of antimicrobial activities of whole and sub-fractionated white tea by addition of copper (II sulphate and vitamin C against Staphylococcus aureus; a mechanistic approach

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    Holloway Andrew C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhancement of antimicrobial plant products e.g. pomegranate extract by copper (II sulphate is known. Such combinations have applications in various settings, including the identification of novel compositions to study, treat and control infection. Methods A combination of white tea (WT (made allowing 10 minutes infusion time at 100°C was combined with 4.8 mM copper (II sulphate and tested for antimicrobial effect on the viability of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 06571. Comparisons were made with green (GT and black (BT teas. A WT sub-fraction (WTF Results A 30 minute incubation at room temperature of copper (II sulphate alone and combined with WT reduced the viability of S. aureus NCTC 06571 by c.a 1 log10 cfu mL-1. GT and BT with copper (II sulphate negated activity to buffer values. Combined with copper (II sulphate, vitamin C, WTF and, vitamin C plus WTF all reduced the viability of S. aureus NCTC 06571 by c.a. 3.5 log10 cfu mL-1. Independent experiments showed the results were not due to pH effects. Adding WT or WTF to copper (II sulphate resulted in increased acidity. Copper (II sulphate alone and combined with WT required c.a 300 μg mL-1 (final concentration catalase to restore S. aureus viability, WTF with copper (II sulphate and added vitamin C required c.a 600 μg mL-1. WT and WTF UV-visible spectra were similar. Conclusions WT showed no efficacy in the combinations tested. WTF was enhanced with copper (II sulphate and further with vitamin C. WT and WTF increased acidity of copper (II sulphate possibly via the formation of chemical complexes. The difference in WT/WTF absorbance possibly represented substances less concentrated or absent in WTF. Investigations to establish which WTF component/s and in what proportions additives are most effective against target organisms are warranted.

  19. Synergistic Effect of Pleuromutilins with Other Antimicrobial Agents against Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro and in an Experimental Galleria mellonella Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Liu; Li, Lin-Xiong; Cui, Ze-Hua; Chen, Shu-Wen; Xiong, Yan Q; Lu, Jia-Qi; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Gao, Yuan; Sun, Jian; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Invasive infections due to Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus are prevalent and life-threatening. Combinations of antibiotic therapy have been employed in many clinical settings for improving therapeutic efficacy, reducing side effects of drugs, and development of antibiotic resistance. Pleuromutilins have a potential to be developed as a new class of antibiotics for systemic use in humans. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between pleuromutilins, including valnemulin, tiamulin, and retapamulin, and 13 other antibiotics representing different mechanisms of action, against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant S. aureus both in vitro and in an experimental Galleria mellonella model. In vitro synergistic effects were observed in combination of all three study pleuromutilins with tetracycline (TET) by standard checkerboard and/or time-kill assays. In addition, the combination of pleuromutilins with ciprofloxacin or enrofloxacin showed antagonistic effects, while the rest combinations presented indifferent effects. Importantly, all study pleuromutilins in combination with TET significantly enhanced survival rates as compared to the single drug treatment in the G. mellonella model caused by S. aureus strains. Taken together, these results demonstrated synergy effects between pleuromutilins and TET against S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Synergistic Effect of Pleuromutilins with Other Antimicrobial Agents against Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro and in an Experimental Galleria mellonella Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liu Dong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive infections due to Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus are prevalent and life-threatening. Combinations of antibiotic therapy have been employed in many clinical settings for improving therapeutic efficacy, reducing side effects of drugs, and development of antibiotic resistance. Pleuromutilins have a potential to be developed as a new class of antibiotics for systemic use in humans. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between pleuromutilins, including valnemulin, tiamulin, and retapamulin, and 13 other antibiotics representing different mechanisms of action, against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant S. aureus both in vitro and in an experimental Galleria mellonella model. In vitro synergistic effects were observed in combination of all three study pleuromutilins with tetracycline (TET by standard checkerboard and/or time-kill assays. In addition, the combination of pleuromutilins with ciprofloxacin or enrofloxacin showed antagonistic effects, while the rest combinations presented indifferent effects. Importantly, all study pleuromutilins in combination with TET significantly enhanced survival rates as compared to the single drug treatment in the G. mellonella model caused by S. aureus strains. Taken together, these results demonstrated synergy effects between pleuromutilins and TET against S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Comparison of the antimicrobial activity of Ulmo honey from Chile and Manuka honey against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Sherlock Orla

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Honey has previously been shown to have wound healing and antimicrobial properties, but this is dependent on the type of honey, geographical location and flower from which the final product is derived. We tested the antimicrobial activity of a Chilean honey made by Apis mellifera (honeybee originating from the Ulmo tree (Eucryphia cordifolia, against selected strains of bacteria. Methods Ulmo 90 honey was compared with manuka UMF® 25+ (Comvita® honey and a laboratory synthesised (artificial honey. An agar well diffusion assay and a 96 well minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC spectrophotometric-based assay were used to assess antimicrobial activity against five strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results Initial screening with the agar diffusion assay demonstrated that Ulmo 90 honey had greater antibacterial activity against all MRSA isolates tested than manuka honey and similar activity against E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The MIC assay, showed that a lower MIC was observed with Ulmo 90 honey (3.1% - 6.3% v/v than with manuka honey (12.5% v/v for all five MRSA isolates. For the E. coli and Pseudomonas strains equivalent MICs were observed (12.5% v/v. The MIC for artificial honey was 50% v/v. The minimum bactericidal concentration for all isolates tested for Ulmo 90 honey was identical to the MIC. Unlike manuka honey, Ulmo 90 honey activity is largely due to hydrogen peroxide production. Conclusions Due to its high antimicrobial activity, Ulmo 90 may warrant further investigation as a possible alternative therapy for wound healing.

  2. Padrão de sensibilidade de 117 amostras clínicas de Staphylococcus aureus isoladas em 12 hospitais In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of 117 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from 12 hospitals

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    W.V.L. Farias

    1997-09-01

    antimicrobianos das amostras de S. aureus nos hospitais do Brasil, restando poucas opções para o tratamento de infecções causadas por ORSA.OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of oxacillin susceptible (OSSA and resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA isolates to other antimicrobial agents that can be used for the treatment of staphylococcal infections. MATERIAL AND METHOD. We evaluated 117 clinical S. aureus isolates from several São Paulo hospitals. Clinical isolates from Campinas, SP and from João Pessoa, PB, were also included. The in vitro susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution as described by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was evaluated for 24 antimicrobial agents, including beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins. Both commercially available and experimental drugs were included in the study. Cross-resistance among fluoroquinolones was evaluated by susceptibility testing 24 isolates to 10 fluoroquinolones. RESULTS. The antimicrobial agents that showed the highest in vitro activity were the glycopeptides, the streptogramin RP-59.500, and the mupirocin (100% susceptibility. Eighty-seven percent of the OSSA and only 38% of the ORSA isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin (MIC50 0.25mug/mL and > 4mug/mL, respectively. Cross-resistance among fluoroquinolones were noted even for the experimental drugs. Two fluoroquinolones remained active against ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, clinafloxacin and WIN-57.273. However, the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates had MICs eight-to 64-fold higher than the ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates, suggesting that the MICs may continue to increase when these fluoroquinolones become commercially available. CONCLUSION. Our results showed a high rate of antimicrobial resistance among S. aureus from the Brazilian hospitals. Very few drugs can still be used

  3. Chemical composition, antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and a pro-apoptotic effect in SGC-7901 of the essential oil from Toona sinensis (A. Juss.) Roem. leaves.

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    Wu, Jian-Guo; Peng, Wei; Yi, Jun; Wu, Yan-Bin; Chen, Ti-Qiang; Wong, Ka-Hing; Wu, Jin-Zhong

    2014-05-28

    Leaves of Toona sinensis (A. Juss.) Roem. (TSL), a popular vegetable in China, have anti-inflammatory, antidoting, and worm-killing effects and are used in folk medicine for the treatment of enteritis, dysentery, carbuncles, boils, and especially abdominal tumors. Our aim was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and anticancer property of the essential oil from TSL (TSL-EO), especially the pro-apoptotic effect in SGC-7901. TSL-EO obtained by hydrodistillation was analyzed by GC/MS and was tested in vitro against twenty clinically isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus (SA 1-20), which were either methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and two standard strains viz. ATCC 25923 and ATCC 43300. The anticancer activity of TSL-EO was evaluated in vitro against HepG2, SGC7901, and HT29 through MTT assay. Moreover, the apoptosis-inducing activity of TSL-EO in SGC7901 cells was determined by Hoechst 33324 staining and flow cytometry methods. Also, the apoptosis-related proteins viz. Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were detected by western-blotting. GC-MS analysis showed that TSL-EO contained a high amount of sesquiterpenes (84.64%), including copaene (8.27%), β-caryophyllene (10.16%), caryophyllene (13.18%) and β-eudesmene (5.06%). TSL-EO inhibited the growth of both MSSA and MRSA, with the lowest MIC values of 0.125 and 1mg/ml, respectively. Treatment with TSL-EO for 24h could significantly suppress the viability of three different cancer cell lines (P<0.05). Furthermore, the apoptosis-inducing activity of TSL-EO in SGC7901 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, potentially resulting from the up-regulated expression of Bax, caspase-3 and down-regulated expression of Bcl-2. TSL-EO possessed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells and particularly prominent pro-apoptotic activity in SGC7901 cells

  4. The antimicrobial lysine-peptoid hybrid LP5 inhibits DNA replication and induces the SOS response in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Ifrah, Dan; Lerche, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    the growth of S. aureus without ATP leakage. Instead, LP5 bound DNA and inhibited macromolecular synthesis. The binding to DNA also led to inhibition of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and caused induction of the SOS response. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that LP5 may have a dual mode of action against...... S. aureus. At MIC concentrations, LP5 binds DNA and inhibits macromolecular synthesis and growth, whereas at concentrations above the MIC, LP5 targets the bacterial membrane leading to disruption of the membrane. These results add new information about the MOA of a new synthetic AMP and aid...... in the future design of synthetic peptides with increased therapeutic potential....

  5. Antimicrobial Properties of Selected Copper Alloys on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in Different Simulations of Environmental Conditions: With vs. without Organic Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różańska, Anna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Sroka-Oleksiak, Agnieszka; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Walkowicz, Monika; Osuch, Piotr; Knych, Tadeusz

    2017-07-20

    Background: Hospital equipment made from copper alloys can play an important role in complementing traditional methods of disinfection. Aims of the study: The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of the antimicrobial properties of selected copper alloys in different simulations of environmental conditions (with organic contamination vs. without organic contamination), and to test alternatives to the currently used testing methods. Materials and Methods: A modification of Japanese standard JIS Z 2801 as well as Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Escherichia coli (EC) suspended in NaCl vs. tryptic soy broth (TSB) were used in tests performed on seven commonly used copper alloys, copper, and stainless steel. Results: A much faster reduction of the bacterial suspension was observed for the inoculum prepared in NaCl than in TSB. A faster reduction for EC than for SA was observed in the inoculum prepared in NaCl. The opposite results were found for the inoculum based on TSB. A significant correlation between the copper concentration in the copper alloys and the time and degree of bacterial suspension reduction was only observed in the case of EC. Conclusions: This study confirmed the antimicrobial properties of copper alloys, and additionally showed that Staphylococcus aureus was more resistant than Escherichia coli in the variant of the experiment without organic contamination. However, even for SA, a total reduction of the bacterial inoculum's density took no longer than 2 h. Under conditions simulating organic contamination, all of the tested alloys were shown to have bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties, which was contrary to the results from stainless steel.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Truncated and Polyvalent Peptides Derived from the FKCRRQWQWRMKKGLA Sequence against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923

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    Nataly de Jesús Huertas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Peptides derived from LfcinB were designed and synthesized, and their antibacterial activity was tested against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Specifically, a peptide library was constructed by systemically removing the flanking residues (N or C-terminal of Lfcin 17–31 (17FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA31, maintaining in all peptides the 20RRWQWR25 sequence that corresponds to the minimal antimicrobial motif. For this research, also included were (i a peptide containing an Ala instead of Cys ([Ala19]-LfcinB 17–31 and (ii polyvalent peptides containing the RRWQWR sequence and a non-natural amino acid (aminocaproic acid. We established that the lineal peptides LfcinB 17–25 and LfcinB 17–26 exhibited the greatest activity against E. coli ATCC 25922 and S. aureus ATCC 25923, respectively. On the other hand, polyvalent peptides, a dimer and a tetramer, exhibited the greatest antibacterial activity, indicating that multiple copies of the sequence increase the activity. Our results suggest that the dimeric and tetrameric sequence forms potentiate the antibacterial activity of lineal sequences that have exhibited moderate antibacterial activity.

  7. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy using a highly pure chlorin e6 against Staphylococcus aureus Xen29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Ahn, Mee-Young; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Soo-A; Moon, Yeon-Hee; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been recommended as an alternative therapy for various diseases including microbial infection. Recently, we developed a new method for the preparation of highly pure chlorin e(6) (Ce(6)), which has been widely used as a second-generation photosensitizer. PDT using Ce(6) was very effective for inhibition of in vitro growth of several bacterial strains. To clarify a possibility for its clinical application, in this study, we examined in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial effects of Ce(6)-mediated PDT in mice model of skin infection of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29. Inhibition zone analysis and colony forming unit (CFU) count revealed that Ce(6)-mediated PDT inhibited effectively in vitro bacterial growth. In addition, biofilm formation ability of S. aureus Xen29 was decreased by Ce(6)-mediated PDT. In vivo experiment, mice receiving Ce(6)-mediated PDT exhibited less intensity of bioluminescent signal, showing significant inhibition of bacterial growth. Furthermore, in histopathological examination, marked neutrophilic infiltration and massive bacterial colonies were seen in control mice and mice receiving laser or Ce(6) alone, but not in mice treated with PDT. These results suggest that PDT using Ce(6) extracted by our new method can be clinically useful against bacterial infectious diseases.

  8. A new preclinical approach for treating chronic osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus: in vitro and in vivo study on photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAmT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, João Alves; de Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos; Trindade, Renan Ferreira; de Assis, Patrícia Nascimento; de Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa

    2014-03-01

    Osteomyelitis is an acute or chronic inflammation in the marrow spaces in the superficial or cortical bone, and can be associated with bacterial or fungal infections. Chronic osteomyelitis represents a major health problem due to its difficult treatment and increased morbidity. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAmT) is a treatment based on a cytotoxic photochemical reaction in which a bright light produced by a laser system and an active photosensitizer absorbed by cells leads to a process of activation that induces a series of metabolic reactions that culminates a bacterial killing. The aim of the present randomized study was to evaluate, by in vitro and in vivo microbiological analysis, the effects of PAmT on tibial surgical bone defects in rats infected by Staphylococcus aureus using bacterial counts carried out immediately and after 30 days after treatment as outcome measure. In the preliminary in vitro study, a diode laser (λ660 nm; 40 mW; ϕ = 0.4 cm(2); 5 or 10 J/cm(2)) and 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL toluidine blue were tested, and the best parameter was chosen for the in vivo study. The concentration of 5 μg/mL was selected to perform the decontamination of S. aureus-infected tibial bone defects in rats. The findings were subjected to statistical analysis. For all PAmTs groups, with the different concentrations, treatment showed significant reductions (p < 0.001) in the amount of bacteria. The in vivo study PAmT group presented a bacterial reduction of 97.4% (p < 0.001). The PAmT using toluidine blue was effective in reducing the number of S. aureus in both in vitro and in vivo studies.

  9. No induction of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes during continuous exposure to eugenol and citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolónio, Joana; Faleiro, Maria L; Miguel, Maria G; Neto, Luís

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adaptation response of Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Listeria monocytogenes to the essential oil (EO), eugenol, and citral. The minimum inhibitory concentration of eugenol and citral was determined by agar dilution and microdilution. Adaptation to eugenol and citral was done by sequential exposure of the pathogens to increasing concentrations of the essential oils. The M2-A9 standard was used to determine the antibiotic susceptibility. The effect of eugenol and citral on the adherence ability was evaluated by the crystal violet assay. The impact of adaptation to eugenol on virulence was estimated using the Galleria mellonella model. No development of resistance to the components and antibiotics was observed in the adapted cells of S. aureus, MRSA, and L. monocytogenes. Eugenol and citral at subinhibitory concentration reduced the bacterial adherence. Adaptation to subinhibitory concentration of eugenol affected the virulence potential of S. aureus, MRSA, and L. monocytogenes. Eugenol and citral do not pose a risk of resistance development in a continuous mode of use. These EO components showed a high efficacy as antistaphylococcal and antilisterial biofilm agents. Adaptation at subinhibitory concentration of eugenol protected the larvae against listerial and staphylococcal infection. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus over the past decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Toke Seierøe; Wibroe, Elisabeth Arnberg; Braüner, Julie Vestergaard

    2015-01-01

    susceptibility at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, from 2004 to 2008. Due to a suspected rise in resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae after this period, updated data for these bacteria are shown for selected antibiotics until 2014. The department receives samples from...

  11. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcal Food-Borne Disease: An Ongoing Challenge in Public Health

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    Jhalka Kadariya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food-borne disease (SFD is one of the most common food-borne diseases worldwide resulting from the contamination of food by preformed S. aureus enterotoxins. It is one of the most common causes of reported food-borne diseases in the United States. Although several Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs have been identified, SEA, a highly heat-stable SE, is the most common cause of SFD worldwide. Outbreak investigations have found that improper food handling practices in the retail industry account for the majority of SFD outbreaks. However, several studies have documented prevalence of S. aureus in many food products including raw retail meat indicating that consumers are at potential risk of S. aureus colonization and subsequent infection. Presence of pathogens in food products imposes potential hazard for consumers and causes grave economic loss and loss in human productivity via food-borne disease. Symptoms of SFD include nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps with or without diarrhea. Preventive measures include safe food handling and processing practice, maintaining cold chain, adequate cleaning and disinfection of equipment, prevention of cross-contamination in home and kitchen, and prevention of contamination from farm to fork. This paper provides a brief overview of SFD, contributing factors, risk that it imposes to the consumers, current research gaps, and preventive measures.

  12. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

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    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels compared to the control. Furthermore, Ag

  13. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-03-06

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus , which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  14. Biofilm Removal and Antimicrobial Activities of Agar Hydrogel Containing Colloid Nano-Silver against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium

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    Leyla Sadat Bouryabaf

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background:    Antibacterial and biofilm removal effects of agar hydrogel incorporating silver nanoparticles (SNP at various concentrations were studied against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium in vitro.Methods:      The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of SNP was determined by agar dilution method. Then, hydrogels were prepared by mixing of 0.5% w/v agar and SNP (1/2 MIC, MIC, and 2 MIC and their inhibitory efficacies against planktonic and biofilm forms of bacteria were measured using agar spot and microtiter test, respectively.Results:    The MIC value was 125 µg/ mL for both bacteria. All SNP hydrogels represented antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and S. typhimurium on agar culture, which was significant compared to control group (silver sulfadiazine cream. The developed biofilm of S. aureus and S. typhimurium were strongly (85% reduction and modernly affected (60% reduction by SNP hydrogels during 15 min contact time, respectively. A dose-dependent biofilm reduction was not demonstrated when different SNP concentrations were tested. Moreover, the results from this study confirmed the moderate sanitizing ability of SNP loaded hydrogel against planktonic forms of both bacteria, which SNP (2MIC hydrogel decreased only 2.3 log10 CFU/ mL in a primary population of S. typhimurium during 15 min exposure time.Conclusion:     We recommended SNP incorporated agar hydrogel as an effective biofilm removal sanitizer.

  15. Virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Rio de Janeiro Fatores de virulência e resistência antimicrobiana em Staphylococcus aureus isolados de mastite bovina no Rio de Janeiro

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    Shana M.O. Coelho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to characterize pheno-genotypically the virulence factors and resistance pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from milk samples of cows with subclinical mastitis. All hemolytic isolates presented beta-hemolysin, and 38% of the non-hemolytic isolates were able to express hemolysins in the presence of a beta-hemolytic strain. The amplification of the coa-gene displayed four different size polymorphisms with about 400 bp, 600 bp, 700 bp and 900 bp. The spaA gene that encodes the IgG-binding region of protein A revealed sizes of 700 bp and 900 bp. The amplification of region X from spaA yielded a single amplicon for each isolate with the prevalent amplicon size being of 180 bp. Amplification of sae gene yielded an amplicon size of 920 bp in 71% of the isolates. Antibiotic resistance pattern revealed that 42% S. aureus were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Seven different antibiotic patterns were observed. Our results indicated that 47% and 25% of S. aureus strains exhibited resistance to penicillin and oxacillin respectively. All oxacillin-resistant isolates were mecA-positive.O presente estudo foi conduzido com o objetivo de caracterizar feno-genotipicamente os fatores de virulência e perfil de resistência aos antibióticos de Staphylococcus aureus isolados de amostras de leite de vacas com mastite clínica e subclínica. Em todos os isolados hemolíticos foi detectada a presença de beta hemolisina e 38% dos não-hemolíticos produziram hemolisinas na presença de cepa beta-hemolítica. A amplificação do gene coa apresentou quatro tipos polimórficos distintos com aproximadamente 400 bp, 600 bp, 700 bp e 900 bp. O gene spaA que codifica a região de ligação da proteína A à IgG apresentou bandas de 700 bp e 900 bp. A amplificação do gene que codifica a região X revelou um único amplicon para cada isolado sendo o tamanho prevalente o de 250pb. A amplificação do gene sae resultou em amplicons com

  16. The application of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on S. aureus and E. coli using porphyrin photosensitizers bound to cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakova, Adela; Bogdanova, Katerina; Tomankova, Katerina; Pizova, Klara; Malohlava, Jakub; Binder, Svatopluk; Bajgar, Robert; Langova, Katerina; Kolar, Milan; Mosinger, Jiri; Kolarova, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is usually used against malignant and non-malignant tumors. Nowadays, due to resistance of bacterial strains, we are looking for a new antimicrobial strategy to destroy bacteria with minimal invasive consequences. The worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance among different classes of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria has led to the search for alternative anti-microbial therapies such as antimicrobial PDT (aPDT). Development antimicrobial technology combines a nontoxic compound, called photosensitizer, visible light of the appropriate wavelength, and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In this work, the photosensitizers TMPyP and ZnTPPS4 are investigated for photodynamic and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. We tested these two porphyrins on two cell lines and two bacterial strains to compare effectiveness. In addition, we applied photosensitizers bound in the complex created with hp-β-cyclodextrin. The light-emitting diodes were used at the doses 0, 1, 5, 10 J/cm(2) for cells and 0, 150 J/cm(2) for bacteria. Tested concentrations for cells and microbes were from 0.5 to 50 μM and from 0.78 to 100 μM, respectively. From this work it can be concluded that TMPyP is a promising compound both in aPDT and in PDT, particularly in contrast to ZnTPPS4, which was efficient only in PDT. Furthermore, the eradication of gram-positive bacteria is possible only with higher concentrations of ZnTPPS4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of composite antimicrobial peptides in weanling piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol: II. Intestinal morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, H; Tan, B E; Wu, M M; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Yuan, D X; Li, L

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) affects animal and human health and targets the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of composite antimicrobial peptides (CAP) to repair intestinal injury in piglets challenged with DON. A total of 28 piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (7 pigs/treatment): negative control, basal diet (NC), basal diet + 0.4% composite antimicrobial peptide (CAP), basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON (DON), and basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON + 0.4% CAP (DON + CAP). After an adaptation period of 7 d, blood samples were collected on d 15 and 30 after the initiation of treatment for determinations of the concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase. At the end of the study, all piglets were slaughtered to obtain small intestines for the determination of intestinal morphology, epithelial cell proliferation, and protein expression in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The results showed that DON increased serum concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and these values in the CAP and DON + CAP treatments were less than those in the NC and DON treatments, respectively (P morphology and promoted intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and protein synthesis, indicating that CAP may repair the intestinal injury induced by DON.

  18. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-Porphyrin conjugate for visible light mediated inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Upasana; Sharma, Kajal; Chaudhri, Nivedita; Sankar, Muniappan; Gopinath, P

    2018-02-01

    Due to the excessive use of antibiotics over the years, the microorganisms have developed resistance to numerous drugs. The growth of multi-resistant organisms (MROs) heads due to the insufficient treatment with the currently available medications which present a great threat to the biotic component of the environment as well as to the food technology sectors. The goal of this research was to develop a nano-composite made up of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amine-functionalized porphyrin, which could further be used for the anti-microbial studies in presence of visible light showing photodynamic effect to inactivate cells. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy is gaining significant interest due to its capabilities as an innovative form of antimicrobial treatment. The development of anti-microbial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) is a non-antibiotic access to inactivate microorganisms. We examined the synthesis of amine-functionalized porphyrin and conjugated it to the oxidised single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By the use of appropriate amount of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we have shown the interaction between the porphyrin conjugated nanotubes and the bacterial cells in presence of visible light led to the cell membrane damage, concluding that SWCNT-porphyrin conjugates can be used as an antibacterial agent. The characterization of the oxidised SWCNT and SWCNT-porphyrin conjugates was determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), which provides detailed information about the composition and the morphological analysis. The particle size measurements were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). On investigating under the florescence microscopy, red fluorescence was observed. Thus, these properties demand us to design this facile material comprised of SWCNT-aminoporphyrin conjugates that shows potent antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: meeting the challenge of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D; Karatapanis, Stylianos

    2014-08-07

    Treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is paramount for the management of prevalent gastrointestinal disorders including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Due to the wide increase in prevalence of H. pylori resistance to antibiotics, clarithromycin-based triple therapies are not any more suitable for unconditional empiric use, and should not be recommended, unless local resistance to this antibiotic is low (novel, more effective, empirical treatments: bismuth quadruple, sequential, non-bismuth quadruple (concomitant), dual-concomitant (hybrid), and levofloxacin-based regimens, the latter mainly designated as second-line/rescue options; (2) perspectives for a susceptibility-guided (tailored) therapeutic approach based on culture-free molecular testing methods; and (3) adjunct use of probiotics to improve eradication rates. The present article is aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of current and emerging strategies in the treatment of H. pylori infection, focusing on the challenge of antimicrobial resistance.

  20. Salvage microbiology: opportunities and challenges in the detection of bacterial pathogens following initiation of antimicrobial treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, John J.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing was originally employed by soil scientists and was subsequently adapted for clinical applications. PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has also progressed from initial applications in the detection of organisms from environmental samples into the clinical realm and has demonstrated promise in detection of pathogens in clinical specimens obtained from patients with suspected infection but negative cultures. We review studies of multiplex PCR, 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR and sequencing and PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for detection of bacteria in specimens that were obtained from patients during or after administration of antibiotic treatment, and examine the role of each for assisting in antimicrobial treatment and stewardship efforts. Following an exploration of the available data in this field we discuss the opportunities that the preliminary investigations reveal, as well as the challenges faced with implementation of these strategies in clinical practice. PMID:25523281

  1. Combining biofilm matrix measurements with biomass and viability assays in susceptibility assessments of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogman, Malena Elise; Vuorela, Pia Maarit; Fallarero, Adyary

    2012-09-01

    Despite that three types of assays (measuring biofilm viability, biomass, or matrix) are described to assess anti-biofilm activity, they are rarely used together. As infections can easily reappear if the matrix is not affected after antibiotic treatments, our goal was to explore the simultaneous effects of antibiotics on the viability, biomass and matrix of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (ATCC 25923). Viability and biomass were quantified using resazurin and crystal violet staining sequentially in the same plate, while matrix staining was conducted with a wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent conjugate. Establishment of the detection limits and linearity ranges allowed concluding that all three methods were able to estimate biofilm formation in a similar fashion. In a susceptibility study with 18-h biofilms, two model compounds (penicillin G and ciprofloxacin) caused a reduction on the viability and biomass accompanied by an increase or not changed levels of the matrix, respectively. This response pattern was also proven for S. aureus Newman, S. epidermidis and E. coli biofilms. A classification of antibiotics based on five categories according to their effects on viability and matrix has been proposed earlier. Our data suggests a sixth group, represented by penicillin, causing decrease in bacterial viability but showing stimulatory effects on the matrix. Further, if effects on the matrix are not taken into account, the long-term chemotherapeutic effect of antibiotics can be jeopardized in spite of the positive effects on biofilms viability and biomass. Thus, measuring all these three endpoints simultaneously provide a more complete and accurate picture.

  2. Challenges of implementing national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection in acute care hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma

    2009-03-01

    Of the 49 acute care hospitals in Ireland that responded to the survey questionnaire drafted by the Infection Control Subcommittee of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre\\'s Strategy for the Control of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland, 43 reported barriers to the full implementation of national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection; these barriers included poor infrastructure (42 hospitals), inadequate laboratory resources (40 hospitals), inadequate staffing (39 hospitals), and inadequate numbers of isolation rooms and beds (40 hospitals). Four of the hospitals did not have an educational program on hand hygiene, and only 17 had an antibiotic stewardship program.

  3. Generic and Specific Adaptive Responses of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Challenge with Three Distinct Antimicrobial Peptides, Bacitracin, LL-37, and Nisin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majchrzykiewicz, Joanna A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Bijlsma, Jetta J.E.

    To investigate the response of Streptococcus pneumoniae to three distinct antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), bacitracin, nisin, and LL-37, transcriptome analysis of challenged bacteria was performed. Only a limited number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated in all cases. Several of these

  4. Immune challenge differentially affects transcript abundance of three antimicrobial peptides in hemocytes from the moth Pseudoplusia includens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, M D; Chen, G; Strand, M R

    2005-12-01

    Inducible expression of antimicrobial peptides and other humoral immune factors by the insect fat body is well documented. Hemocytes comprise the second essential arm of the insect immune system but it is unclear whether antimicrobial peptide genes are expressed by all or only some types of hemocytes. Here we report the cloning of cecropin A (Pi-cecA), lebocin (Pi-leb) and lysozyme (Pi-lys) homologs from the moth Pseudoplusia includens. Relative-quantitative real-time PCR (rq-rtPCR) indicated that transcript abundance for each antimicrobial gene increased in fat body and hemocytes following immune challenge with the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Relative transcript abundance of Pi-cecA was much higher in fat body than hemocytes. In contrast, transcript levels of Pi-leb were three-fold lower in hemocytes than fat body while transcript levels of Pi-lys were three-fold higher. Estimates for the overall contribution of the fat body and hemocytes to antimicrobial peptide expression suggested that hemocytes contribute significantly to Pi-lys transcript levels in larvae but produce much smaller amounts of Pi-cecA and Pi-leb compared to the fat body. Each antimicrobial peptide was also inducibly expressed in hemocytes following challenge with the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus or when hemocytes formed capsules around chromatography beads. Analysis of hemocyte types indicated that granulocytes and plasmatocytes expressed all three antimicrobial peptides, whereas spherule cells and oenocytoids expressed only lysozyme. Transcriptional profiles of these antimicrobial genes were similar in granulocytes and plasmatocytes in vivo but were very different in vitro.

  5. Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus in Oat and Soya Drinks by Enterocin AS-48 in Combination with Other Antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, María José Grande; Aguayo, M Carmen López; Pulido, Rubén Pérez; Gálvez, Antonio; López, Rosario Lucas

    2015-09-01

    The presence of toxicogenic Staphylococcus aureus in foods and the dissemination of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the food chain are matters of concern. In the present study, the circular bacteriocin enterocin AS-48, applied singly or in combination with phenolic compounds (carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, and citral) or with 2-nitro-1-propanol (2NPOH), was investigated in the control of a cocktail made from 1 methicillin-sensitive and 1 MRSA strains inoculated on commercial oat and soya drinks. Enterocin AS-48 exhibited low bactericidal activity against staphylococci in the drinks investigated when applied singly. The combinations of sub-inhibitory concentrations of enterocin AS-48 (25 μg/mL) and phenolic compounds or 2NPOH caused complete inactivation of staphylococci in the drinks within 24 h of incubation at 22 °C. When tested in oat and soya drinks stored for 7 d at 10 °C, enterocin AS-48 (25 μg/mL) in combination with 2NPOH (5.5 mM) reduced viable counts rapidly in the case of oat drink (4.2 log cycles after 12 h) or slowly in soya drink (3.8 log cycles after 3 d). The same combined treatment applied on drinks stored at 22 °C achieved a fast inactivation of staphylococci within 12 to 24 h in both drinks, and no viable staphylococci were detected for up to 7 d of storage. Results from the study highlight the potential of enterocin AS-48 in combination with 2NPOH for inactivation of staphylococci. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Evaluation of the synergistic potential of vancomycin combined with other antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lívia Viganor da; Araújo, Manuela Tedesco; Santos, Kátia Regina Netto dos; Nunes, Ana Paula Ferreira

    2011-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (CNS) are the most common pathogens that cause serious long term infections in patients. Despite the existence of new antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, vancomycin (VAN) remains the standard therapy for the treatment of infections caused by these multidrug-resistant strains. However, the use of VAN has been associated with a high frequency of therapeutic failures in some clinical scenarios, mainly with decreasing concentration of VAN. This work aims to evaluate the synergic potential of VAN plus sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT), VAN plus rifampin (RIF) and VAN plus imipenem (IPM) in sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations against 22 clinical strains of MRSA and CNS. The checkerboard method showed synergism of VAN/RIF and VAN/SXT against two and three of the 22 strains, respectively. The combination of VAN with IPM showed synergistic effects against 21 out of 22 strains by the E-test method. Four strains were analyzed by the time-kill curve method and synergistic activity was observed with VAN/SXT, VAN/RIF and especially VAN/IPM in sub-inhibitory concentrations. It would be interesting to determine if synergy occurs in vivo. Evidence of in vivo synergy could lead to a reduction of the standard VAN dosage or treatment time.

  7. Evaluation of the efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy using a phenothiazine compound and LED (red-orange) on the interface: macrophage vs S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Fernando José P.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial Photodynamic therapy is a technique in which microorganisms are exposed to a photosensitizing drug and then irradiated with low-intensity visible light of the appropriate wavelength. The resulting photochemical reaction generates cytotoxic reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen and free radicals, which are able to exert bactericidal effect. Much is already known about the photodynamic inactivation of microorganisms: both antibiotic-sensitive and - resistant strains can be successfully photo inactivated, and there is the additional advantage that repeated photosensitization of bacterial cells does not induce a selection of resistant strains. Recently, a series of studies have shown that it is possible to kill bacteria with a light source after the microorganisms have been sensitized with low concentration of dye, such as phenothiazines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phagocytic function of macrophages J774 against S. aureus in the presence and absence of AmPDT with phenothiazine compound (12.5 μg/mL) and red-orange LED. Experimental groups: Control Group (L-F-), Phenothiazine group (L-F+) LED group (L+F-), Photodynamic therapy group (L+F+). The tests presented in this study were carried out in triplicate. This study demonstrated that AmPDT is able to increase about twice the phagocytic ability of macrophages; however, the bactericidal capacity of these cells did not show a substantial improvement, probably because the oxidative burst was less intense.

  8. Silver nanoparticles as an antimicrobial agent: A case study on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as models for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2017-03-17

    The current research was focused on the characterization and antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) produced by Bacillus licheniformis NM120-17. The synthesis was initially observed by a colour change from pale yellow to brown which was further confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were characterized using TEM, EDAX and FTIR. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical and uniformly distributed with a size in the range of 9-27.5 nm. The antibacterial activities and acting mechanism of AgNPs were studied with respect to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by measuring the growth curves, protein and reducing sugar leakage, respiratory chain dehydrogenase activity, as well as the formation of bactericidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). The experimental results indicated that 50 mg/ml AgNPs could completely inhibit the growth of bacterial cells and destroy the permeability of bacterial membranes and depress the activity of some membranous enzymes, which cause bacteria to die eventually. These nontoxic nanomaterials, which can be prepared in a simple and cost-effective manner, may be suitable for the formulation of new types of bactericidal materials.

  9. Inhalable Antimicrobials for Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm-Associated Sinusitis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Challenges and Drug Delivery Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Natalie Kłodzińska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilm-associated chronic sinusitis in cystic fibrosis (CF patients caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and the lack of available treatments for such infections constitute a critical aspect of CF disease management. Currently, inhalation therapies to combat P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients are focused mainly on the delivery of antimicrobials to the lower respiratory tract, disregarding the sinuses. However, the sinuses constitute a reservoir for P. aeruginosa growth, leading to re-infection of the lungs, even after clearing an initial lung infection. Eradication of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract after a first infection has been shown to delay chronic pulmonary infection with the bacteria for up to two years. The challenges with providing a suitable treatment for bacterial sinusitis include: (i identifying a suitable antimicrobial compound; (ii selecting a suitable device to deliver the drug to the sinuses and nasal cavities; and (iii applying a formulation design, which will mediate delivery of a high dose of the antimicrobial directly to the site of infection. This review highlights currently available inhalable antimicrobial formulations for treatment and management of biofilm infections caused by P. aeruginosa and discusses critical issues related to novel antimicrobial drug formulation design approaches.

  10. Inhalable Antimicrobials for Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm-Associated Sinusitis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Challenges and Drug Delivery Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłodzińska, Sylvia Natalie; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Rades, Thomas; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-10-09

    Bacterial biofilm-associated chronic sinusitis in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and the lack of available treatments for such infections constitute a critical aspect of CF disease management. Currently, inhalation therapies to combat P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients are focused mainly on the delivery of antimicrobials to the lower respiratory tract, disregarding the sinuses. However, the sinuses constitute a reservoir for P. aeruginosa growth, leading to re-infection of the lungs, even after clearing an initial lung infection. Eradication of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract after a first infection has been shown to delay chronic pulmonary infection with the bacteria for up to two years. The challenges with providing a suitable treatment for bacterial sinusitis include: (i) identifying a suitable antimicrobial compound; (ii) selecting a suitable device to deliver the drug to the sinuses and nasal cavities; and (iii) applying a formulation design, which will mediate delivery of a high dose of the antimicrobial directly to the site of infection. This review highlights currently available inhalable antimicrobial formulations for treatment and management of biofilm infections caused by P. aeruginosa and discusses critical issues related to novel antimicrobial drug formulation design approaches.

  11. Identification of an Antimicrobial Agent Effective against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Persisters Using a Fluorescence-Based Screening Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooseong; Conery, Annie L; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Persisters are a subpopulation of normal bacterial cells that show tolerance to conventional antibiotics. Persister cells are responsible for recalcitrant chronic infections and new antibiotics effective against persisters would be a major development in the treatment of these infections. Using the reporter dye SYTOX Green that only stains cells with permeabilized membranes, we developed a fluorescence-based screening assay in a 384-well format for identifying compounds that can kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) persisters. The assay proved robust and suitable for high throughput screening (Z`-factor: >0.7). In screening a library of hits from a previous screen, which identified compounds that had the ability to block killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis by MRSA, we discovered that the low molecular weight compound NH125, a bacterial histidine kinase inhibitor, kills MRSA persisters by causing cell membrane permeabilization, and that 5 μg/mL of the compound can kill all cells to the limit of detection in a 108 CFU/mL culture of MRSA persisters within 3h. Furthermore, NH125 disrupts 50% of established MRSA biofilms at 20 μg/mL and completely eradicates biofilms at 160 μg/mL. Our results suggest that the SYTOX Green screening assay is suitable for large-scale projects to identify small molecules effective against MRSA persisters and should be easily adaptable to a broad range of pathogens that form persisters. Since NH125 has strong bactericidal properties against MRSA persisters and high selectivity to bacteria, we believe NH125 is a good anti-MRSA candidate drug that should be further evaluated.

  12. Identification of an Antimicrobial Agent Effective against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Persisters Using a Fluorescence-Based Screening Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Persisters are a subpopulation of normal bacterial cells that show tolerance to conventional antibiotics. Persister cells are responsible for recalcitrant chronic infections and new antibiotics effective against persisters would be a major development in the treatment of these infections. Using the reporter dye SYTOX Green that only stains cells with permeabilized membranes, we developed a fluorescence-based screening assay in a 384-well format for identifying compounds that can kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA persisters. The assay proved robust and suitable for high throughput screening (Z`-factor: >0.7. In screening a library of hits from a previous screen, which identified compounds that had the ability to block killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis by MRSA, we discovered that the low molecular weight compound NH125, a bacterial histidine kinase inhibitor, kills MRSA persisters by causing cell membrane permeabilization, and that 5 μg/mL of the compound can kill all cells to the limit of detection in a 108 CFU/mL culture of MRSA persisters within 3h. Furthermore, NH125 disrupts 50% of established MRSA biofilms at 20 μg/mL and completely eradicates biofilms at 160 μg/mL. Our results suggest that the SYTOX Green screening assay is suitable for large-scale projects to identify small molecules effective against MRSA persisters and should be easily adaptable to a broad range of pathogens that form persisters. Since NH125 has strong bactericidal properties against MRSA persisters and high selectivity to bacteria, we believe NH125 is a good anti-MRSA candidate drug that should be further evaluated.

  13. Antibiofilm activity of cashew juice pulp against Staphylococcus aureus, high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses, and interference on antimicrobial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. Dias-Souza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections has evolved in recent years, as this species is a major Gram-positive pathogen associated with healthcare services. The antimicrobial resistance of this species raises an urgent need for new treatment strategies. Fruits play important nutritional and economic roles in society, but their biological and pharmacological features are poorly explored when compared to nonedible parts of plants such as barks and leaves. In this study, we show that the cashew apple juice [cashew juice pulp (CJP] extract is active against the planktonic cells of S. aureus strains, and for the first time, we show that CJP is also active against S. aureus biofilms. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were conducted to prospect for polyphenols and free carbohydrates, respectively. Cashew apple juice, which is rich in nutrients, is widely consumed in Brazil; therefore, the quality attributes of CJPs were investigated. Samples were evaluated for pH, total titratable acidity, vitamin C levels, and total soluble solids. We also detected an antagonistic interference of CJP when it was combined with different antimicrobial drugs.

  14. La(III) complex involving the O,N-donor environment of quinazoline-4(3H)-one Schiff’s base and their antimicrobial attributes against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddappa, K.; Mane, Sunilkumar B.; Manikprabhu, Deene

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus increased during the past few decades, so there is an urgent need of new antimicrobial agents if public health is concerned. Though the Schiff’s bases and La(III) complex have enormous biological activity, but less attention was given in their synthesis. In the present investigation, we synthesized a new (E)-3-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl) methyleneamino)-2-methylquinazoline-4(3H)-one HNMAMQ Schiff’s base by the condensation of 3-(2-aminophenyl) quinazolin-2-methyl-4(3H)-one and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. The Schiff’s base HNMAMQ and its La(III) complex were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, NMR, mass spectra, and thermal studies. The newly synthesized Schiff’s base HNMAMQ and its La(III) complex were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the Gulbarga region in India. The Schiff’s base HNMAMQ and its La(III) complex showed good antimicrobial activity and thus represents a potential new drug of choice.

  15. Photoinduced membrane damage of E. coli and S. aureus by the photosensitizer-antimicrobial peptide conjugate eosin-(KLAKLAK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Upon irradiation with visible light, the photosensitizer-peptide conjugate eosin-(KLAKLAK2 kills a broad spectrum of bacteria without damaging human cells. Eosin-(KLAKLAK2 therefore represents an interesting lead compound for the treatment of local infection by photodynamic bacterial inactivation. The mechanisms of cellular killing by eosin-(KLAKLAK2, however, remain unclear and this lack of knowledge hampers the development of optimized therapeutic agents. Herein, we investigate the localization of eosin-(KLAKLAK2 in bacteria prior to light treatment and examine the molecular basis for the photodynamic activity of this conjugate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By employing photooxidation of 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB, (scanning transmission electron microscopy ((STEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS methodologies, eosin-(KLAKLAK2 is visualized at the surface of E. coli and S. aureus prior to photodynamic irradiation. Subsequent irradiation leads to severe membrane damage. Consistent with these observations, eosin-(KLAKLAK2 binds to liposomes of bacterial lipid composition and causes liposomal leakage upon irradiation. The eosin moiety of the conjugate mediates bacterial killing and lipid bilayer leakage by generating the reactive oxygen species singlet oxygen and superoxide. In contrast, the (KLAKLAK2 moiety targets the photosensitizer to bacterial lipid bilayers. In addition, while (KLAKLAK2 does not disrupt intact liposomes, the peptide accelerates the leakage of photo-oxidized liposomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, our results suggest that (KLAKLAK2 promotes the binding of eosin Y to bacteria cell walls and lipid bilayers. Subsequent light irradiation results in membrane damage from the production of both Type I & II photodynamic products. Membrane damage by oxidation is then further aggravated by the (KLAKLAK2 moiety and membrane lysis is accelerated by the peptide. These results therefore

  16. Hospitalization cost at childbirth: Health parameters and colonization with antimicrobial resistant bacteria and methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alexandra C; Zamfir, Mihai; Hendrowarsito, Lana; Dammeyer, Antchen; Schomacher, Lasse; Karlin, Barbara; Franitza, Manuela; Nasri, Lilia; Hörmansdorfer, Stefan; Tuschak, Christian; Valenza, Giuseppe; Ewert, Thomas; Hierl, Wolfgang; Ochmann, Uta; Herr, Caroline; Heinze, Stefanie

    2017-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistant bacteria (AMR) are of public health and economic relevance. However, there is a lack of data regarding AMR colonization in pregnant women and in newborns. Furthermore, there are few studies analyzing hospital's net income (revenues and costs). The cross-sectional study took place in two Bavarian clinics. Available data regarding women and newborns were collected using a standardized questionnaire, personal IDs and medical records in addition to AMR/MSSA screening. Economic data consisted of estimated hospitalization costs, calculated using a billing system called G-DRG (German-Diagnosis Related Groups) as well as real hospitalization costs (e.g. staff, medical and non-medical infrastructure costs). Data from 635 pregnant women and 566 newborns were included. While AMR colonization has shown no significant association with clinical complications, or net hospital income; primipara status and medical condition during pregnancy did. AMR colonization did not have a significant influence on the health status of pregnant women or of the newborns. Net hospital income for pregnant women was mostly negative in 2014. In 2014 and 2015 the majority of the cases had a net income between ±€ 1000. Newborns with clinical complications differed significantly in Apgar score at 1min, weight, body length and AMR colonization of the pregnant woman and/or the newborn (phealth status. In future studies, a Centralized Cost Accounting as billing method and an improved possibility of AMR coding in G-DRG catalog would be desirable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial Agent of Susceptibilities and Antiseptic Resistance Gene Distribution among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Impetigo and Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Norihisa; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Nishijima, Setsuko; Kurokawa, Ichiro; So, Hiromu; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents of and distributions of antiseptic resistance genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated between 1999 and 2004 in Japan were examined. The data of MRSA strains that are causative agents of impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) were compared with those of MRSA strains isolated from patients with other diseases. The susceptibilities to antiseptic agents in MRSA isolates from patients with impetigo and SSSS were higher than those in MRSA isolates from patients with other diseases. The distribution of the qacA/B genes in MRSA strains isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS (1.3%, 1/76) was remarkably lower than that in MRSA strains isolated from patients with other diseases (45.9%, 95/207). Epidemiologic typings of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that MRSA strains isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS had type IV SCCmec (75/76), except for one strain, and 64.5% (49/76) of the strains had different PFGE types. In addition, the patterns of restriction digestion of all tested qacA/B plasmid in MRSA isolates having different PFGE types were identical. The results showed that a specific MRSA clone carrying qacA/B was not prevalent, but qacA/B was spread among health care-associated MRSA strains. Therefore, it was concluded that the lower distribution rate of qacA/B resulted in higher susceptibilities to cationic antiseptic agents in MRSA isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS. PMID:16757607

  18. Reduction in hospitalwide incidence of infection or colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with use of antimicrobial hand-hygiene gel and statistical process control charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Glenys; Watson, Kerrie; Bailey, Michael; Land, Gillian; Borrell, Susan; Houston, Leanne; Kehoe, Rosaleen; Bass, Pauline; Cockroft, Emma; Marshall, Caroline; Mijch, Anne; Spelman, Denis

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of serial interventions on the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Longitudinal observational study before and after interventions. The Alfred Hospital is a 350-bed tertiary referral hospital with a 35-bed intensive care unit (ICU). A series of interventions including the introduction of an antimicrobial hand-hygiene gel to the intensive care unit and a hospitalwide MRSA surveillance feedback program that used statistical process control charts but not active surveillance cultures. Serial interventions were introduced between January 2003 and May 2006. The incidence and rates of new patients colonized or infected with MRSA and episodes of MRSA bacteremia in the intensive care unit and hospitalwide were compared between the preintervention and intervention periods. Segmented regression analysis was used to calculate the percentage reduction in new patients with MRSA and in episodes of MRSA bacteremia hospitalwide in the intervention period. The rate of new patients with MRSA in the ICU was 6.7 cases per 100 patient admissions in the intervention period, compared with 9.3 cases per 100 patient admissions in the preintervention period (P=.047). The hospitalwide rate of new patients with MRSA was 1.7 cases per 100 patient admissions in the intervention period, compared with 3.0 cases per 100 patient admissions in the preintervention period (P<.001). By use of segmented regression analysis, the maximum and conservative estimates for percentage reduction in the rate of new patients with MRSA were 79.5% and 42.0%, respectively, and the maximum and conservative estimates for percentage reduction in the rate of episodes of MRSA bacteremia were 87.4% and 39.0%, respectively. A sustained reduction in the number of new patients with MRSA colonization or infection has been demonstrated using minimal resources and a limited number of interventions.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of ceftaroline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected in 2013-2014 at the Geneva University Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrey, D O; François, P; Manzano, C; Bonetti, E J; Harbarth, S; Schrenzel, J; Kelley, W L; Renzoni, A

    2017-02-01

    Ceftaroline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Ceftaroline susceptibility of an MRSA set archived between 1994 and 2003 in the Geneva University Hospitals detected a high percentage (66 %) of ceftaroline resistance in clonotypes ST228 and ST247 and correlated with mutations in PBP2a. The ceftaroline mechanism of action is based on the inhibition of PBP2a; thus, the identification of PBP2a mutations of recently circulating clonotypes in our institution was investigated. We analyzed ceftaroline susceptibility in MRSA isolates (2013 and 2014) and established that resistant strains correlated with PBP2a mutations and specific clonotypes. Ninety-six MRSA strains were analyzed from independent patients and were isolated from blood cultures (23 %), deep infections (38.5 %), and superficial (skin or wound) infections (38.5 %). This sample showed a ceftaroline minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range between 0.25 and 2 μg/ml and disk diameters ranging from 10 to 30 mm, with a majority of strains showing diameters ≥20 mm. Based on the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints, 76 % (73/96) of isolates showed susceptibility to ceftaroline. Nevertheless, we still observed 24 % (23/96) of resistant isolates (MIC = 2 μg/ml). All resistant isolates were assigned to clonotype ST228 and carried the N146K mutation in PBP2a. Only two ST228 isolates showed ceftaroline susceptibility. The decreasing percentage of ceftaroline-resistant isolates in our hospital can be explained by the decline of ST228 clonotype circulating in our hospital since 2008. We present evidence that ceftaroline is active against recent MRSA strains from our hospital; however, the presence of PBP2a variants in particular clonotypes may affect ceftaroline efficacy.

  20. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy of self-cleaning surfaces functionalized by TiO2 photocatalytic nanoparticles against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalvo, Blanca; Faraldos, Marisol; Bahamonde, Ana; Rosal, Roberto

    2017-10-15

    A photocatalytic sol of TiO2 nanoparticles has been used for creating self-cleaning antimicrobial flat and porous glass surfaces. The substrates were irradiated to study their photocatalytic properties and behavior in the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria. Smooth glass surfaces and glass microfiber filters were covered with 1.98×10-3±1.5×10-4gcm-2 and 8.55×10-3±3.0×10-4gcm-2 densities, respectively. Self-cleaning properties were analyzed using the methylene blue 365nm UV-A photodegradation test. TiO2-coated filters achieved rapid and complete photodegradation of methylene blue because of the better TiO2 dispersion with respect to the glass slides. The effect of functionalized surfaces on the growth and viability of bacteria was studied using the strains Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas putida. After irradiation (2h, 11.2Wm-2, 290-400nm), the initially hydrophobic surface turned hydrophilic. The antibacterial effect led to extensive membrane damage and significant production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in all TiO2-loaded irradiated specimens. The reduction of cell viability was over 99.9% (>3-log) for TiO2 on glass surfaces. However, the polymeric extracellular matrix formed before the irradiation treatment was not removed. This study highlights the importance of bacterial colonization during dark periods and the difficulty of removing the structure of biofilms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy with α-D-galactopyranosyl zinc phthalocyanines: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanjuan; Li, Yanzhou; Meng, Shuai; Li, Shaozeng; Wang, Qiong; Liu, Tianjun

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is increasing globally, making urgent the discovery of novel alternative therapies for infections. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT), based on oxidative damage to subcellular structures, has the advantage of circumventing multidrug resistance, and is becoming a potential therapeutic modality for methicillin-resistant bacteria. The key to PACT is photosensitization. This study demonstrates the efficiency of PACT using α-D-galactopyranosyl zinc phthalocyanines (T1-T4) for the photosensitization of MRSA, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial suspensions were illuminated with 650-nm light from a semiconductor laser at 0.2 W/cm(2), and the energy density was maintained at 6 J/cm(2) in the presence of different concentrations of photosensitizer. The treatment response was evaluated based on the numbers of bacterial colony-forming units. PACT with these phthalocyanines strongly affected MRSA, but weakly affected E. coli and P. aeruginosa. The efficiency of PACT on MRSA with these four phthalocyanine compounds decreased in the order T1 > T2 > T3 > T4. T1-PACT eliminated >99% of MRSA in a concentration range of 25-50 μM and at an energy density of 6 J/cm(2). Uptake measurements revealed that the PACT effect correlated with the bacterial uptake of the photosensitizer and that 4-30-fold more T1 than T2-T4 was taken up by the MRSA strain, which was confirmed with laser confocal microscopy. These data suggest that T1 is an efficient PACT photosensitizer for MRSA.

  2. A Novel Topical Combination Ointment with Antimicrobial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Streptococcus aureus, Gram-Negative Superbugs, Yeasts, and Dermatophytic Fungi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomson, Kenneth S; Thomson, Gina K; Biehle, John; Deeb, Andrew; Crawford, Jamaal; Herrera, R

    2016-01-01

    .... One hundred eighty-four bacterial and fungal isolates from culture collections that included multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  3. In vitro effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) using a 660 nm laser and malachite green dye in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms arranged on compact and cancellous bone specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Nader, Sumaia Alves; Meira, Giselle Andrade; Viana, Magda Souza

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) using a 660 nm visible laser combined with malachite green (MG) dye in the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilms formed within compact and cancellous bone specimens. Specimens of 80 compact bones and 80 cancellous bones were contaminated with a standard suspension of S. aureus and incubated for 14 days at 37 °C to allow for the formation of biofilms. The specimens were divided into the following groups (n = 10) according to the treatment conditions: PS-L - (control - no treatment), PS+L - (only MG for 5 min), PS-L + 90 (only laser irradiation for 90 s), PS-L + 180 (only laser irradiation for 180 s), PS-L + 300 (only laser irradiation for 300 s), APDT90 (APDT for 90 s), APDT180 (APDT for 180 s), and APDT300 (APDT for 300 s). The findings were statistically analyzed using an ANOVA 5%. All of the experimental groups were significantly different from the control group for both the compact and cancellous bone specimens. The compact bone specimens that received APDT treatment (for either 90, 180, or 300 s) showed reductions in the log10 CFU/ml of S. aureus by a magnitude of 4 log10. Cancellous bone specimens treated with 300 s of APDT showed the highest efficacy, and these specimens had a reduction in S. aureus CFU/ml by a factor of 3 log10. APDT treatment using these proposed parameters in combination with MG was effective at inactivating S. aureus biofilms in compact and cancellous bone specimens.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health challenge, which has accelerated by the overuse of antibiotics worldwide. Increased antimicrobial resistance is the cause of severe infections, complications, longer hospital stays and increased mortality. Overprescribing of antibiotics......-the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...

  5. Antimicrobial Peptide P60.4Ac-Containing Creams and Gel for Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Cultured Skin and Airway Epithelial Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; Göblyös, Anikó; Ravensbergen, Bep; Adriaans, Alwin E; Cordfunke, Robert A; Schrumpf, Jasmijn; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; den Hartigh, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    We previously found the LL-37-derived peptide P60.4Ac to be effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human epidermal models (EMs). The goal of this study was to identify the preferred carrier for this peptide for topical application on skin and mucosal surfaces. We prepared P60.4Ac in three formulations, i.e., a water-in-oil cream with lanolin (Softisan 649), an oil-in-water cream with polyethylene glycol hexadecyl ether (Cetomacrogol), and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (hypromellose) 4000 gel. We tested the antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide in these formulations against mupirocin-resistant and -sensitive MRSA strains on EMs and bronchial epithelial models (BEMs). The cytotoxic effects of formulated P60.4Ac on these models were determined using histology and WST-1 and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Moreover, we assessed the stability of the peptide in these formulations with storage for up to 3 months. Killing of MRSA by P60.4Ac in the two creams was less effective than that by P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel. In agreement with those findings, P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel was highly effective in eradicating the two MRSA strains from EMs. We found that even 0.1% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel killed >99% of the viable planktonic bacteria and >85% of the biofilm-associated bacteria on EMs. Hypromellose gels containing 0.1% and 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac effectively reduced the numbers of viable MRSA cells from BEMs by >90%. No cytotoxic effects of P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel with up to 2% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on keratinocytes in EMs and in the hypromellose gel with up to 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on epithelial cells in BEMs were observed. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that P60.4Ac was stable in the Softisan cream and the hypromellose gel but not in the Cetomacrogol cream. We conclude that P60.4Ac formulated in hypromellose gel is both stable and highly effective in eradicating MRSA from colonized EMs and

  6. Transcriptional profiles of the response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to pentacyclic triterpenoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooi Yin Chung

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen in both hospital and the community that has demonstrated resistance to all currently available antibiotics over the last two decades. Multidrug-resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA exhibiting decreased susceptibilities to glycopeptides has also emerged, representing a crucial challenge for antimicrobial therapy and infection control. The availability of complete whole-genome nucleotide sequence data of various strains of S. aureus presents an opportunity to explore novel compounds and their targets to address the challenges presented by antimicrobial drug resistance in this organism. Study compounds α-amyrin [3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-3-ol (AM], betulinic acid [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupaene-28-oic acid (BA] and betulinaldehyde [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupen-28-al (BE] belong to pentacyclic triterpenoids and were reported to exhibit antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi, including S. aureus. The MIC values of these compounds against a reference strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (ATCC 43300 ranged from 64 µg/ml to 512 µg/ml. However, the response mechanisms of S. aureus to these compounds are still poorly understood. The transcription profile of reference strain of MRSA treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the three compounds was determined using Affymetrix GeneChips. The findings showed that these compounds regulate multiple desirable targets in cell division, two-component system, ABC transporters, fatty acid biosynthesis, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, ribosome and β-lactam resistance pathways which could be further explored in the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  7. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Maksoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005–2013. Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA and community-associated (CA Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6% and 21 (11.5% of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001. Multidrug resistance (MDR was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use.

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus globulus, Myrtus communis and Satureja hortensis against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus in minced beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenane, D; Yangüela, J; Amrouche, T; Boubrit, S; Boussad, N; Roncalés, P

    2011-12-01

    Essential oils (EOs) extracted by hydrodistillation from leaf parts of Algerian Eucalyptus globulus, Myrtus communis and Satureja hortensis were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The main components of EOs obtained were γ-terpinene (94.48%), 1,8-cineole (46.98%) and carvacrol (46.10%), respectively, for E. globulus, M. communis and S. hortensis. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus CECT 4459 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 CECT 4267 using the agar diffusion technique. Results revealed that E. globulus and S. hortensis EOs had more antibacterial effects than that from M. communis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) showed a range of 0.05-0.22% (volume by volume [v/v]). Sensitivity of gram-positive S. aureus was much higher than that of gram-negative E. coli. Plant EOs were added to minced beef (two-fold MIC value) at 0.10-0.44%, experimentally inoculated with the same pathogens at a level of 5 × 10(5) colony forming units (cfu)/g and stored at 5 ± 2 °C. Results showed that the EOs of E. globulus and S. hortensis had remarkable antibacterial properties, higher than that of M. communis, against S. aureus and E. coli. Indeed, a reduction of 5.8 log cfu/g (70.74% of reduction) was recorded after 7 days of storage for S. hortensis against E. coli. However, regarding S. aureus, both S. hortensis and E. globulus caused a highly significant (p beef meat treated with EOs was acceptable by panelists at the levels used.

  9. Effect of different antimicrobial treatments on serum acute phase responses and leukocyte counts in pigs after a primary and a secondary challenge infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölund, M; Fossum, C; Martin de la Fuente, AJM

    2011-01-01

    The susceptibility to an initial challenge and a re-challenge inoculation with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was analysed in pigs that were treated with antimicrobials of different efficacies following the first exposure to A pleuropneumoniae. In brief, 30 nine-week-old specific pathogen-free p...

  10. Controlled Release of LL-37-Derived Synthetic Antimicrobial and Anti-Biofilm Peptides SAAP-145 and SAAP-276 Prevents Experimental Biomaterial-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; de Boer, Leonie; Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Cordfunke, Robert A.; Cohen, Or; Malanovic, Nermina; Emanuel, Noam; Lohner, Karl; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Nibbering, Peter H.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to develop an implant coating releasing novel antimicrobial agents to prevent biomaterial-associated infections. The LL-37-derived synthetic antimicrobial and anti-biofilm peptides (SAAP)-145 and SAAP-276 exhibit potent bactericidal and anti-biofilm activities against clinical

  11. Novel Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Device-Related Infections Using Fibrinolytic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S; O'Gara, J P; O'Neill, E

    2018-02-01

    Staphylococcal infections involving biofilms represent a significant challenge in the treatment of patients with device-related infections. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms have been shown to be SaeRS regulated and dependent on the coagulase-catalyzed conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin on surfaces coated with human plasma. Here we investigated the treatment of staphylococcal biofilm device-related infections by digesting the fibrin biofilm matrix with and without existing antimicrobials. The fibrinolytic agents plasmin, streptokinase, and nattokinase, and TrypLE, a recombinant trypsin-like protease, were used to digest and treat S. aureus biofilms grown in vitro using in vivo-like static biofilm assays with and without antimicrobials. Cytotoxicity, the potential to induce a cytokine response in whole human blood, and the risk of induction of tolerance to fibrinolytic agents were investigated. A rat model of intravascular catheter infection was established to investigate the efficacy of selected fibrinolytic agents in vivo Under biomimetic conditions, the fibrinolytic agents effectively dispersed established S. aureus biofilms and, in combination with common antistaphylococcal antimicrobials, effectively killed bacterial cells being released from the biofilm. These fibrinolytic agents were not cytotoxic and did not affect the host immune response. The rat model of infection successfully demonstrated the activity of the selected fibrinolytic agents alone and in combination with antimicrobials on established biofilms in vivo TrypLE and nattokinase most successfully removed adherent cells from plasma-coated surfaces and significantly improved the efficacy of existing antimicrobials against S. aureus biofilms in vitro and in vivo These biofilm dispersal agents represent a viable future treatment option for S. aureus device-related infections. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus: incidência e resistência antimicrobiana em abscessos cutâneos de origem comunitária Staphylococcus aureus: etiology and susceptibility profile to antimicrobial agents of skin and subcutaneous cell tissue abscesses from community infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zavadinack Netto

    2002-03-01

    profilaxia ou tratamento de infecções por S.aureus, mesmo aqueles de origem comunitária.An analysis of Staphylococcus aureus (Monera, an etiological agent of community infections, is provided. Staphylococcus aureus causes the formation of skin and subcutaneous cell tissue abscesses. Susceptibility profile to antimicrobials used in prophylaxis or therapy of these cutaneous infections will be given. One hundred and seven samples of secretions were collected from January 1996 through July 1997 at the emergency sector of University Hospital of the State University of Maringá, Maringá, state of Paraná, Brazil, from infected patients with skin and subcutaneous cell tissue abscesses. Microbiological evaluation was carried out according to Bayle and susceptibility to antimicrobial was evaluated in vitro through the technique of diffusion in agar according to Kirby. Sixteen antimicrobials used in prophylaxis or therapy of skin and subcutaneous cell tissue infections were evaluated. From the one hundred and seven clinical samples collected from patients complaining of infections with skin and subcutaneous cell tissue abscesses, 71 (66.35% were positive to S.aureus and 36 (33,65% were either positive for other microorganisms, or tested negative. In the evaluation of susceptibility to S.aureus a higher sensitivity to vancomycin (100%, teicoplanin (100%, amikacin (100%, cefoxitin (100%, cephalothin (98.53%, lincomycin (98.53%, gentamicin (98.53%, oxacillin (96,4%, norfloxacin (95.77% and sulfazotrin (95.77% was found when compared to penicillin G (08.45%, ampicillin (08.45%, kanamycin (81,69%, erythromycin (88.41%, tetracycline (90.14 and chloramphenicol (94,36%. Results show that S.aureus is the most frequently isolated microorganism from community infections with skin and subcutaneous tissue abscesses. The susceptibility profile evidences high resistance to penicillins, which restricts the use of these antimicrobials as an alternative in the prophylaxis or treatment of S.aureus

  13. Relative prevalence of methicilline resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In our region, although methicillin resistance increased in S. aureus strains, because of the unavailability and the high cost of alternative antibiotics, gentamycin is still suggested as an alternative for treatment of S. aureus infections. These results however indicate that vancomycin seemed to be the only antimicrobial agent ...

  14. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu-Guo Yuan; Qiu-Ling Peng; Sangiliyandi Gurunathan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases...

  15. Antimicrobial peptides effectively kill a broad spectrum of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus strains independently of origin, sub-type, or virulence factor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Thomsen, L.E.; Ingmer, H.

    2008-01-01

    . Hence it is important to determine the natural variation in susceptibility to HDPs to ensure a successful use in clinical treatment regimes. Results Strains of two human bacterial pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, were selected to cover a wide range of origin, sub....... Conclusion Strains of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus were within each species equally sensitive to a range of HDPs despite variations in subtype, origin, and phenotypic behavior. Our results suggest that therapeutic use of HDPs will not be hampered by occurrence of naturally tolerant strains of the two...

  16. Performance of two tube coagulase methods for rapid identification of Staphylococcus aureus from blood cultures and their impact on antimicrobial management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, P.D.J.; Kwa, D.; Vos, F.J.; Bartels, C.J.; Schulin, T.

    2008-01-01

    Test parameters and clinical impact of the direct tube coagulase test (DTCT) for rapid identification of Staphylococcus aureus from blood culture were investigated. The sensitivity of the DTCT at 4 h using saline dilution was 96%, compared with 93% using serum separator tubes; specificity was 100%

  17. DNA microarray genotyping and virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiling of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates from renal patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Sinead

    2011-12-01

    Thirty-six methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream isolates from renal patients were genetically characterized by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. The isolates were highly clonal, belonging mainly to ST22-MRSA-IV. The immune evasion and enterotoxin gene clusters were found in 29\\/36 (80%) and 33\\/36 (92%) isolates, respectively.

  18. DNA microarray genotyping and virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiling of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates from renal patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Sinead

    2012-02-01

    Thirty-six methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream isolates from renal patients were genetically characterized by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. The isolates were highly clonal, belonging mainly to ST22-MRSA-IV. The immune evasion and enterotoxin gene clusters were found in 29\\/36 (80%) and 33\\/36 (92%) isolates, respectively.

  19. Microbial Quality and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Isolated from Traditional Ice Cream in Hamadan City, West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadimi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Foodborne diseases are one of the most major public health concerns in the world. Ice cream flavors, especially the traditional ones, have a high potential for the transmission of the pathogenic bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study is to investigate the microbiological status and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from traditional ice cream. Methods A total of 114 traditional ice creams were randomly collected from retail stores in Hamadan, Iran. Samples were investigated for the total bacteria count (TBC and contamination with the coliform, Enterobacteriaceae and Salmonella as well as the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Results The count of Enterobacteriaceae (89.47%, mold and yeast (50%, coliform (40.35% and TBC (28.07% of samples was higher than Iran’s standard. Salmonella was not found in all samples. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was confirmed in 50% and 37.72% of samples, respectively. Collected Escherichia coli had the highest antibiotic resistance to ampicillin 67.44%, nalidixic acid 39.53% and co-amoxyclav 37.21%. Staphylococcus aureus showed a higher antibiotic resistance to penicillin (82.46% of isolates and oxacillin (38% of isolates. Conclusions The results showed high contamination levels of traditional ice cream with spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms as well as considerable resistance of isolated Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to common antibiotics. Therefore, good hygienic practice during processing and personal hygiene should be considered to improve the quality of ice cream. In addition, it is necessary that the regulatory authorities carry out more control on the production centers of traditional ice cream.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Atividade antimicrobiana do óleo essencial de Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae contra Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial effect of Lippia sidoides (rosemary pepper essential oil was tested against the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli isolated from homemade Minas cheese produced in Brazil. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC determined in the Dilution Test was 13 µL oil mL-1 for both bacteria, which characterizes inhibitory action in broth for a 24-hour interaction period. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC determined in the Suspension Test, with one minute of contact, was 25 µL oil mL-1 for both tested bacteria, obtaining at this concentration a bactericidal effect of 99.9% on the viable bacterial cells from each sample. Results demonstrated the bacterial activity of Lippia sidoides essential oil against S. aureus and E. coli, suggesting its use as an antibacterial agent in foods.O efeito antibacteriano do óleo essencial da Lippia sidoides (alecrim-pimenta foi testado contra as bactérias Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli isoladas de queijo minas artesanal, produzido no Brasil. A Concentração Inibitória Mínima (CIM determinada por Teste de Diluição foi de 13 µL de óleo mL-1 para as duas bactérias, o que caracteriza ação inibitória em caldo durante vinte quatro horas de interação. A Concentração Bactericida Mínima (CBM determinada através de Teste de Suspensão, com um minuto de contato, foi de 25 µL de óleo mL-1 para ambas as bactérias testadas, obtendo-se a esta concentração o efeito bactericida de 99,9% sobre as células bacterianas viáveis em cada uma das amostras. Os resultados demonstraram atividade bactericida do óleo essencial de Lippia sidoides contra S. aureus e E. coli, sugerindo a possibilidade do uso como agente antibacteriano em alimentos.

  1. Changing epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Iceland from 2000 to 2008: a challenge to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzknecht, B.J.; Hardardottir, H.; Haraldsson, Gustav Helgi

    2010-01-01

    , and screening for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. Two hundred twenty-six infected (60%) or colonized (40%) individuals were detected (annual incidence 2.5 to 16/100,000). From 2000 to 2003, two health care-associated outbreaks dominated (spa types t037 and t2802), which were successfully controlled...... with extensive infection control measures. After 2004, an increasing number of community-associated (CA) cases without relation to the health care system occurred. A great variety of clones (40 PFGE types and 49 spa types) were found, reflecting an influx of MRSA from abroad. The USA300 and Southwest Pacific......The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is continuously changing. Iceland has a low incidence of MRSA. A "search and destroy" policy (screening patients with defined risk factors and attempting eradication in carriers) has been implemented since 1991. Clinical...

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Combretum molle (Combretaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from crossbred dairy cows with clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regassa, Fekadu; Araya, Mengistu

    2012-08-01

    Following the rapidly expanding dairy enterprise, mastitis has remained the most economically damaging disease. The objective of this study was mainly to investigate the in vitro antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Combretum molle (R.Br.Ex.G.Don) Engl & Diels (Combretaceae) against antibiotic-resistant and susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from clinical cases of bovine mastitis using agar disc diffusion method. The leaf and bark extracts showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus at concentrations of 3 mg/ml while the stem and seed extract did not show any bioactivity. Although both leaf and bark extracts were handled in the same manner, the antibacterial activity of the bark extract against the bacterial strains had declined gradually to a lower level as time advanced after extraction. The leaf extract had sustained bioactivity for longer duration. The susceptibility of the bacteria to the leaf extract is not obviously different between S. aureus and S. agalactiae. Also, there was no difference in susceptibility to the leaf extract between the antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-sensitive bacteria. Further phytochemical and in vivo efficacy and safety studies are required to evaluate the therapeutic value of the plant against bovine mastitis.

  3. A Novel Topical Combination Ointment with Antimicrobial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-Negative Superbugs, Yeasts, and Dermatophytic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S. Thomson, B.Ag.Sc, MS, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that this combination ointment has a broad in vitro spectrum of antimicrobial activity against both more common bacterial and fungal pathogens and may be particularly useful for treatment of infections by multidrug-resistant organisms. Additional studies are warranted to investigate the full clinical utility as a therapeutic agent and also for possible infection control interventions.

  4. In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol Extracts of Zanthoxylum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activities of two Nigerian medicinal plant commonly used as chewing sticks Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloides and Pseudocedrela kotschyi antimicrobial activities were investigated against 7clinical strains of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and ...

  5. Airborne Pathogens inside Automobiles for Domestic Use: Assessing In-Car Air Decontamination Devices Using Staphylococcus aureus as the Challenge Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Syed A; Zargar, Bahram; Wright, Kathryn E; Rubino, Joseph R; Ijaz, M Khalid

    2017-05-15

    Family cars represent ∼74% of the yearly global output of motorized vehicles. With a life expectancy of ∼8 decades in many countries, the average person spends >100 min daily inside the confined and often shared space of the car, with exposure to a mix of potentially harmful microbes. Can commercial in-car microbial air decontamination devices mitigate the risk? Three such devices (designated devices 1 to 3) with HEPA filters were tested in the modified passenger cabin (3.25 m 3 ) of a four-door sedan housed within a biosafety level 3 containment facility. Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) was suspended in a soil load to simulate the presence of body fluids and aerosolized into the car's cabin with a 6-jet Collison nebulizer. A muffin fan (80 mm by 80 mm, with an output of 0.17 m 3 /min) circulated the air inside. Plates (150 mm diameter) of Trypticase soy agar (TSA), placed inside a programmable slit-to-agar sampler, were held at 36 ± 1°C for 18 to 24 h and examined for CFU. The input dose of the test bacterium, its rate of biological decay, and the log 10 reductions by the test devices were analyzed. The arbitrarily set performance criterion was the time in hours a device took for a 3-log 10 reduction in the level of airborne challenge bacterium. On average, the level of S. aureus challenge in the air varied between 4.2 log 10 CFU/m 3 and 5.5 log 10 CFU/m 3 , and its rate of biological decay was -0.0213 ± 0.0021 log 10 CFU/m 3 /min. Devices 1 to 3 took 2.3, 1.5, and 9.7 h, respectively, to meet the performance criterion. While the experimental setup was tested using S. aureus as an archetypical airborne pathogen, it can be readily adapted to test other types of pathogens and technologies. IMPORTANCE This study was designed to test the survival of airborne pathogens in the confined and shared space of a family automobile as well as to assess claims of devices marketed for in-car air decontamination. The basic experimental setup and the test protocols

  6. New antimicrobial contact catalyst killing antibiotic resistant clinical and waterborne pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guridi, A. [Biophysics Unit (CSIC, UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Diederich, A.-K. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Infectious Diseases, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Biology II, Microbiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schänzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Aguila-Arcos, S.; Garcia-Moreno, M. [Biophysics Unit (CSIC, UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Blasi, R.; Broszat, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Infectious Diseases, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Biology II, Microbiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schänzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Schmieder, W.; Clauss-Lendzian, E. [Biology II, Microbiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schänzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Sakinc-Gueler, T. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Infectious Diseases, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Andrade, R. [Advanced Research Facilities (SGIker), University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Alkorta, I. [Biophysics Unit (CSIC, UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Meyer, C.; Landau, U. [Largentec GmbH, Am Waldhaus 32, 14129 Berlin (Germany); Grohmann, E., E-mail: elisabeth.grohmann@googlemail.com [Biophysics Unit (CSIC, UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa (Spain); University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Infectious Diseases, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Biology II, Microbiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schänzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Microbial growth on medical and technical devices is a big health issue, particularly when microorganisms aggregate to form biofilms. Moreover, the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the clinical environment is dramatically growing, making treatment of bacterial infections very challenging. In search of an alternative, we studied a novel antimicrobial surface coating based on micro galvanic elements formed by silver and ruthenium with surface catalytic properties. The antimicrobial coating efficiently inhibited the growth of the nosocomial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium as demonstrated by the growth inhibition on agar surface and in biofilms of antibiotic resistant clinical E. faecalis, E. faecium, and S. aureus isolates. It also strongly reduced the growth of Legionella in a drinking water pipeline and of Escherichia coli in urine. We postulate a mode of action of the antimicrobial material, which is independent of the release of silver ions. Thus, the novel antimicrobial coating could represent an alternative to combat microbial growth avoiding the toxic side effects of high levels of silver ions on eukaryotic cells. - Highlights: • The novel antimicrobial inhibits growth of clinical staphylococci and enterococci. • The novel antimicrobial inhibits growth of Legionella in drinking water. • A putative mode of action of the antimicrobial coating is presented.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides Are Expressed during Early Development of Zebrafish (Danio rerio and Are Inducible by Immune Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Caccia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPS are ancestral components in the evolution of immunity from protozoans to metazoans. Their expression can be constitutive or inducible by infectious challenge. Although characterized in detail in their structure and activity, the temporal and spatial expression of AMPS during vertebrate embryogenesis is still poorly understood. In the present study, we identified selected AMPs in zebrafish, and characterized their expression during early development, and upon experimental immune challenge in adult animals, with the goal of establishing this genetically-tractable model system for further AMP studies. By mining available genomic databases, zebrafish AMP sequences homologous to AMPs from other vertebrates were selected for further study. These included parasin I and its enzyme cathepsin D, β-defensin (DB1, liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (LEAP2, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI, and chromogranin-A and -B (CgA and CgB. Specific primers were designed for RT-PCR amplification of each AMP gene of interest and amplicons between 242 bp and 504 bp were obtained from RNA extracted from adult zebrafish. Sequencing of the amplicons and alignment of their deduced amino acid sequences with those from AMPs from other vertebrate species confirmed their identity. The temporal expression of AMPs was investigated by RT-PCR analysis in fertilized oocytes, embryos, and adult individuals. Parasin I and chatepsin D transcripts were detectable immediately after fertilization, while the transcripts for CgA and CgB became evident starting at 48 h post fertilization. Mature transcripts of LEAP2 and DB1 were detectable only in the adult zebrafish, while BPI transcripts were detectable starting from the 12th day post fertilization. To explore the possible upregulation of AMP expression by infectious challenge, experiments were carried out in adult zebrafish by intraperitoneal injection of a cocktail of lipopolysaccharide

  8. Emergence of SCCmec type III with variable antimicrobial resistance profiles and spa types among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from healthcare- and community-acquired infections in the west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Sattar; Sekawi, Zamberi; Monjezi, Azam; Maleki, Mohammad-Hossein; Soroush, Setareh; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Pakzad, Iraj; Azizi-Jalilian, Farid; Emaneini, Mohammad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Pourahmad, Fazel; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2014-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen of public health importance. The prevalence of MRSA and its antimicrobial resistance pattern, as well as SCCmec and spa types, remain unclear both in the community and in the hospitals of the western region of Iran. One hundred MRSA isolates were collected from different hospitals in the west of Iran during 2010-2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 15 antimicrobial agents was carried out by disk agar diffusion (DAD) method in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were evaluated by a broth microdilution method. The Etest was used for the detection of highly gentamicin-resistant MRSA. A combination of single and multiplex PCR was used for the detection of different resistance genes, including beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AMEs), and macrolide-lincosamine, and for SCCmec typing of MRSA isolates. Genotyping of MRSA isolates was performed via spa typing. All tested isolates were susceptible to quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, and vancomycin, but were resistant to penicillin (100%), erythromycin (50%), clindamycin (27%), and gentamicin (18%). MIC50 and MIC90 was 256 μg/ml among gentamicin-resistant MRSA. The most prevalent AME genes among aminoglycoside-resistant isolates were aac(6')-1e-aph(2")-1a (77.8%), aph(3')-IIIa (38.9%), and ant(4')-1a (27.8%). Nearly all tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant MRSA had ermA and/or ermC but not ermB. Five SCCmec types and subtypes, 13 spa types, and four BURP groups (A-D) were identified. SCCmec types III (45%) and IVc (24%), spa type t701 (30%), and new spa type t12311 (15%) were the most prevalent among MRSA isolates. This study showed the emergence of MRSA with SCCmec type III and with spa types t12311, t10740, t1234, t1991, and t2651 with different phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance in the west of Iran. We found different

  9. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in bone specimens using methylene blue, toluidine blue ortho and malachite green: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Nader, Sumaia Alves; Meira, Giselle Andrade; Viana, Magda Souza

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effectiveness of APDI with a 660 nm laser combined with methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue ortho (TBO) and malachite green (MG) dyes to inactivate Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilms in compact and cancellous bone specimens. Eighty specimens of compact and 80 of cancellous bone were contaminated with a standard suspension of the microorganism and incubated for 14 days at 37°C to form biofilms. After this period, the specimens were divided into groups (n=10) according to established treatment: PS-L- (control - no treatment); PSmb+L-, PStbo+L-, PSmg+L- (only MB, TBO or MG for 5 min in the dark); PS-L+ (only laser irradiation for 180 s); and APDImb, APDItbo and APDImg (APDI with MB, TBO or MG for 180 s). The findings were statistically analyzed by ANOVA at 5% significance levels. All experimental treatments showed significant reduction of log CFU/mL S. aureus biofilms when compared with the control group for compact and cancellous bones specimens; the APDI group's treatment was more effective. The APDI carried out for the compact specimens showed better results when compared with cancellous specimens at all times of application. For the group of compact bone, APDImg showed greater reductions in CFU/mL (4.46 log 10). In the group of cancellous bone, the greatest reductions were found in the APDImb group (3.06 log 10). APDI with methylene blue, toluidine blue ortho and malachite green dyes and a 660 nm laser proved to be effective in the inactivation of S. aureus biofilms formed in compact and cancellous bone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating Antimicrobial Effects of Centaurea Plant’s Essential Oil on Pathogenic Bacteria: Staphylococcus Aureus, Staphylococcus Epidermidis, and Escherichia Coli Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haedeh Mobaiyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives :Nowadays, development of drug resistance against chemical antimicrobial drugs has attracted attention using medicinal plants in treatment of infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of two species of Centaurea plant’s essential oil on drug resistant clinical isolates of three pathogenic isolates. Materials & Methods :The studied plants were collected from Marand city in East Azerbaijan, Iran and were confirmed as Centaurea Depressa M.B. and Centaurea Cyanus L. by botanists of Iran Agriculture Organization. The essential oil of these plants (Stems and leaf were extracted via steam distillation method by Clevenger, and their antimicrobial effects were studied by well diffusion method in the abovementioned bacteria. The components of essential oil were identified by injection to gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry (GC/M. Results :The results of this study prove that the essential oils from the abovementioned plants have bactericidal effects. The most antibacterial effect is observed in Escherichia coli strains. The results of GC/MS chromatography reveal that the essential oils of Centaurea Depressa M.B. and Centaurea Cyanus L. have 28 and 32 compounds, respectively. Conclusion: This study confirmed that the grasses could be used in medicinal plants group with antibacterial properties. However, their effects in vivo must be evaluated and the most effective component of them must be identified carefully so that they can be applied commonly as an alternative synthetic drug in treating infections.

  11. Complete sequence of a plasmid from a bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus harbouring a novel ica-like gene cluster in addition to antimicrobial and heavy metal resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feßler, Andrea T; Zhao, Qin; Schoenfelder, Sonja; Kadlec, Kristina; Brenner Michael, Geovana; Wang, Yang; Ziebuhr, Wilma; Shen, Jianzhong; Schwarz, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The multiresistance plasmid pAFS11, obtained from a bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate, was completely sequenced and analysed for its structure and organisation. Moreover, the susceptibility to the heavy metals cadmium and copper was determined by broth macrodilution. The 49,189-bp plasmid harboured the apramycin resistance gene apmA, two copies of the macrolide/lincosamide/streptogramin B resistance gene erm(B) (both located on remnants of a truncated transposon Tn917), the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD, the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L) and the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK. The latter three genes were part of a 7,284-bp segment which was bracketed by two copies of IS431. In addition, the cadmium resistance operon cadDX as well as the copper resistance genes copA and mco were located on the plasmid and mediated a reduced susceptibility to cadmium and copper. Moreover, a complete novel ica-like gene cluster of so far unknown genetic origin was detected on this plasmid. The ica-like gene cluster comprised four different genes whose products showed 64.4-76.9% homology to the Ica proteins known to be involved in biofilm formation of the S. aureus strains Mu50, Mu3 and N315. However, 96.2-99.4% homology was seen to proteins from S. sciuri NS1 indicating an S. sciuri origin. The finding of five different antibiotic resistance genes co-located on a plasmid with heavy metal resistance genes and an ica-like gene cluster is alarming. With the acquisition of this plasmid, antimicrobial multiresistance, heavy metal resistances and potential virulence properties may be co-selected and spread via a single horizontal gene transfer event. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular characterization and protein localization of the antimicrobial peptide big defensin from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus after Vibrio splendidus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roxana; Brokordt, Katherina; Cárcamo, Claudia B; Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Oyanedel, Daniel; Mercado, Luis; Schmitt, Paulina

    2017-09-01

    Big defensins are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are proposed as important effectors of the immune response in mollusks, chelicerates and chordates. At present, only two members of the big defensin family have been identified in scallop. In the present work, a cDNA sequence encoding a new big defensin homologue was characterized from the scallop Argopecten purpuratus, namely ApBD1. ApBD1 cDNA sequence comprised 585 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 375 bp and 5'- and 3'-UTRs of 41 and 167 bp, respectively. The deduced protein sequence contains 124 amino acids with a molecular weight of 13.5 kDa, showing characteristic motifs of the big defensin family and presenting 76% identity with the big defensin from the scallop A. irradians. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ApBD1 is included into the cluster of big defensins from mollusks. Tissue-specific transcript expression analysis by RT-qPCR showed that ApBD1 was present in all tissues tested from non-immune challenged scallops but it was most strongly expressed in the mantle. The transcript levels of ApBD1 were significantly up-regulated in gills at 24 and 48 h post-injection with the heat-attenuated bacteria Vibrio splendidus. Additionally, immunofluorescence analysis using a polyclonal anti-ApBD1 antibody showed that this protein was abundantly located in epithelial linings of gills and mantle; and also in digestive gland showing ApBD1-infiltrating hemocytes from immune challenged scallops. This is the first time that a big defensin is detected and located at the protein level in a mollusk. These results suggest an important role of ApBD1 in the mucosal immune response of A. purpuratus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with RLP068 kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and improves wound healing in a mouse model of infected skin abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Daniela; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Liyi; Fantetti, Lia; Roncucci, Gabrio; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an alternative treatment for infections that can kill drug resistant bacteria without damaging host-tissue. In this study we used bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a mouse skin abrasion model, to investigate the effect of PDT on bacterial inactivation and wound healing. RLP068/Cl, a tetracationic Zn(II)phthalocyanine derivative and toluidine blue (TBO) were used. The light-dose response of PDT to kill bacteria in vivo and the possible recurrence in the days post-treatment were monitored by real-time bioluminescence imaging, and wound healing by digital photography. The results showed PDT with RLP068/Cl (but not TBO) was able to kill bacteria, to inhibit bacterial re-growth after the treatment and to significantly accelerate the wound healing process. Successive bioluminescence images of a representative mouse skin scratch model infected with 108 CFU MRSA. PMID:22987338

  14. Beyond conventional antibiotics for the future treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections: two novel alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Devocelle, Marc; Humphreys, Hilary

    2012-08-01

    The majority of antibiotics currently used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) infections target bacterial cell wall synthesis or protein synthesis. Only daptomycin has a novel mode of action. Reliance on limited targets for MRSA chemotherapy, has contributed to antimicrobial resistance. Two alternative approaches to the treatment of S. aureus infection, particularly those caused by MRSA, that have alternative mechanisms of action and that address the challenge of antimicrobial resistance are cationic host defence peptides and agents that target S. aureus virulence. Cationic host defence peptides have multiple mechanisms of action and are less likely than conventional agents to select resistant mutants. They are amenable to modifications that improve their stability, effectiveness and selectivity. Some cationic defence peptides such as bactenecin, mucroporin and imcroporin have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against MRSA. Antipathogenic agents also have potential to limit the pathogenesis of S aureus. These are generally small molecules that inhibit virulence targets in S. aureus without killing the bacterium and therefore have limited capacity to promote resistance development. Potential antipathogenic targets include the sortase enzyme system, the accessory gene regulator (agr) and the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Inhibitors of these targets have been identified and these may have potential for further development. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond conventional antibiotics for the future treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections: two novel alternatives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre

    2012-08-01

    The majority of antibiotics currently used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) infections target bacterial cell wall synthesis or protein synthesis. Only daptomycin has a novel mode of action. Reliance on limited targets for MRSA chemotherapy, has contributed to antimicrobial resistance. Two alternative approaches to the treatment of S. aureus infection, particularly those caused by MRSA, that have alternative mechanisms of action and that address the challenge of antimicrobial resistance are cationic host defence peptides and agents that target S. aureus virulence. Cationic host defence peptides have multiple mechanisms of action and are less likely than conventional agents to select resistant mutants. They are amenable to modifications that improve their stability, effectiveness and selectivity. Some cationic defence peptides such as bactenecin, mucroporin and imcroporin have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against MRSA. Antipathogenic agents also have potential to limit the pathogenesis of S aureus. These are generally small molecules that inhibit virulence targets in S. aureus without killing the bacterium and therefore have limited capacity to promote resistance development. Potential antipathogenic targets include the sortase enzyme system, the accessory gene regulator (agr) and the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Inhibitors of these targets have been identified and these may have potential for further development.

  16. Intravitreal injection of the chimeric phage endolysin Ply187 protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Donovan, David M; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of endophthalmitis is becoming very challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Hence, the development of novel therapeutic alternatives for ocular use is essential. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Ply187AN-KSH3b, a chimeric phage endolysin derived from the Ply187 prophage, in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis. Our data showed that the chimeric Ply187 endolysin exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, as evidenced by MIC determinations, reductions in turbidity, and disruption of biofilms. Moreover, exposure of S. aureus to Ply187 for up to 10 generations did not lead to resistance development. The intravitreal injection of chimeric Ply187 (at 6 or 12 h postinfection) significantly improved the outcome of endophthalmitis, preserved retinal structural integrity, and maintained visual function as assessed by electroretinogram analysis. Furthermore, phage lysin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden and the levels of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in the eyes. These results indicate that the intravitreal administration of a phage lytic enzyme attenuates the development of bacterial endophthalmitis in mice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the therapeutic use of phage-based antimicrobials in ocular infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Comparison of identification and antimicrobial resistance pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of identification and antimicrobial resistance pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Amassoma, Bayelsa state, Nigeria. ... Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of S. aureus isolates was performed by Kirby Bauer technique while MRSA was screened for by growth on chromIDTM MRSA plate and confirmed ...

  18. Antioxidant and antimicrobial efficacies of Amaranthus polygonoides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, the extract was proved to be active against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebseilla pneumonia, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus through antimicrobial activity test. After the initial assessment, the ...

  19. preliminary phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. Antimicrobial activity of seed extracts of Persia amerciana against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium ulcerans, Salmonella typhi, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Candida albicans was carried out ...

  20. Study on the antimicrobial activity of Ethanol Extract of Propolisagainst enterotoxigenic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in lab prepared Ice-cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A El-Bassiony

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol extract of propolis against enterotoxigenic strain of MRSA which inoculated into lab prepared ice cream. EEP was added to ice cream in 3 concentrations (150, 300 and 600 mg/L. The prepared ice cream was divided into 2 groups, one stored at freezer temp. at (-5˚C, while the other was kept in deep freezer temp. at (-20˚C. MRSA could not be counted from the 4th, 2nd and 1st week of storage at freezer temp, while at deep freezer temp. MRSA could not be enumerated from the 3rd, 1st week and 3rd day of storage in portions contained 150, 300 and 600mg/L EEP, respectively. [Vet. World 2012; 5(3.000: 155-159

  1. Direct analysis of bacterial viability in endotracheal tube biofilm from a pig model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia following antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Ferrer, Miquel; Bosch, Anna; Calvo, Maria; Vila, Jordi; Gabarrús, Albert; Martínez-Olondris, Pilar; Rigol, Montse; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Néstor; Torres, Antoni

    2012-07-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) helps to observe the biofilms formed in the endotracheal tube (ETT) of ventilated subjects and to determine its structure and bacterial viability using specific dyes. We compared the effect of three different treatments (placebo, linezolid, and vancomycin) on the bacterial biofilm viability captured by CLSM. Eight pigs with pneumonia induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were ventilated up to 96 h and treated with linezolid, vancomycin, or placebo (controls). ETT images were microscopically examined after staining with the live/dead(®) BacLight(™) Kit (Invitrogen, Barcelona, Spain) with a confocal laser scanning microscope. We analyzed 127 images obtained by CLSM. The median ratio of live/dead bacteria was 0.51, 0.74, and 1 for the linezolid, vancomycin, and control groups, respectively (P = 0.002 for the three groups); this ratio was significantly lower for the linezolid group, compared with the control group (P = 0.001). Images showed bacterial biofilm attached and non-attached to the ETT surface but growing within secretions accumulated inside ETT. Systemic treatment with linezolid is associated with a higher proportion of dead bacteria in the ETT biofilm of animals with MRSA pneumonia. Biofilm clusters not necessarily attach to the ETT surface. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in children: a formidable foe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the most common causes of bacteraemia in children. In order to evade and overcome the immune responses of its host and any antimicrobial therapies aimed at destroying it, this organism, through various mechanisms, continues to evolve. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a ...

  4. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasal Staphylococcus aureus is a major source of community and hospital associated staphylococcal infections. This study determined the prevalence of nasal S. aureus isolates and investigated their antimicrobial resistance profile in healthy volunteers. Methods: Nasal specimens of healthy volunteers in ...

  5. Prevalence of Methicillin–Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen that causes different community and hospital-acquired infections. Over time, strains of S. aureus have become resistant to different antibiotics including penicillinase-resistant penicillins. Having data on the local antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of this pathogen is ...

  6. Intracellular antimicrobial activity appearing as a relevant factor in antibiotic efficacy against an experimental foreign-body infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, O; Pachón, M E; Euba, G; Verdaguer, R; Carreras, M; Cabellos, C; Cabo, J; Gudiol, F; Ariza, J

    2009-11-01

    The presence of bacterial biofilm, tolerance to antibiotics and dysfunctional activity of phagocytic cells are all related to difficulties in eradicating foreign-body infections. We aimed to quantify the presence of intracellular Staphylococcus aureus and to study the extent to which the intracellular activity of antibiotics might determine their efficacy against an experimental rat tissue-cage model of foreign-body infection. Using this model, animals were treated for 7 days with 100 mg/kg/day levofloxacin or 200 mg/kg/12 h cloxacillin, or were left untreated. Antibiotic efficacy was evaluated by means of bacterial counts from tissue-cage fluid (TCF); these counts were derived separately in total, intracellular and extracellular bacteria. The presence of intracellular bacteria was checked by electron microscopy. Population analysis was performed with surviving bacteria recovered at the end of levofloxacin therapy. Among a total number of bacteria (mean log cfu/mL +/- SD) from TCF of 6.86 +/- 0.6, we identified 6.38 +/- 0.8 intracellular bacteria and 5.57 +/- 0.5 extracellular bacteria. Levofloxacin was more efficient than cloxacillin (P < 0.05) against both intracellular and extracellular bacteria. The killing activity of levofloxacin against the intracellular population was higher than against the extracellular bacteria (P = 0.1). The frequency of levofloxacin-resistant mutants among surviving bacteria at the end of levofloxacin therapy was similar to that for the wild-type strain. Intracellular bacteria accounted for the largest proportion of the total inoculum in this model of foreign-body infection. The intracellular activity of an antibiotic seems to be an additional relevant factor in the antibiotic response to these infections.

  7. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus from cow's milk, nasal and environmental swabs in selected dairy farms in Morogoro, ... 28.4% (n=27) of all isolates were resistant to Oxacillin and/or Cefoxitin, and therefore classified as Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

  8. Improving institutional memory on challenges and methods for estimation of pig herd antimicrobial exposure based on data from the Danish Veterinary Medicines Statistics Program (VetStat)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Nana Hee; Fertner, Mette; Birkegård, Anna Camilla

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary Medicines Statistics Program (VetStat). VetStat was established in 2000, as a national database containing detailed information on purchases of veterinary medicine. This paper presents a critical set of challenges originating from static system features, which researchers must address when...... was based on a consensus by a cross-institutional group of researchers working in projects using VetStat data. No quantitative data quality evaluations were performed, as the frequency of errors and inconsistencies in a dataset will vary, depending on the period covered in the data. Instead, this paper...... focuses on clarifying how VetStat data may be translated to an estimation of the antimicrobial exposure at herd level, by suggesting uniform methods of extracting and editing data, in order to obtain reliable and comparable estimates on pig antimicrobial consumption for research purposes....

  9. Comparison of Mannitol Salt Agar and Blood Agar Plates for Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Staphylococcus aureus in Specimens from Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Susan E.; Searcy, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Staphylococcus aureus strains can be determined accurately by using isolates from mannitol salt agar, and yellow isolates on mannitol salt agar at quantities of >1+ can be reported as S. aureus. These methods decrease the time to identification/antimicrobial susceptibility testing of S. aureus and decrease costs through eliminating additional testing.

  10. Concentração mínima inibitória de dez antimicrobianos para amostras de Staphylococcus aureus isoladas de infecção intramamária bovina Minimum inhibitory concentrations for ten antimicrobial agents against Staphylococcus aureus from bovine intramammary infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.V.P. Brito

    2001-10-01

    cases of mastitis, 66 from subclinical infections and 22 from chronic infections. The chronic infection strains were isolated from the same mammary quarters of nine cows of one herd over a period of 13 months. The MIC was performed on Mueller Hinton agar and concentrations, ranging from 0.015 to 128µgml-1, were evaluated for each antimicrobial agent. The American Type Culture Collection (ATCC recommended quality control strains, S. aureus ATCC 29213, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, were included on each batch of test. All strains were susceptible to cephalothin, erythromycin, gentamicin, norfloxacin and oxacillin, 91% were susceptible to tetracycline (MIC50: 0.5µgml-1 and tylosin (MIC50: 2.0µgml-1, 65% to ampicillin (MIC50: 0.125µgml-1 and penicillin G (MIC50: 0.06µgml-1. All strains but one in the intermediate pattern, were susceptible to neomycin (MIC50: 0.5µgml-1. The resistance levels to ampicillin and penicillin were higher in strains isolated from clinical and subclinical (positive scores on CMT cases (P or = 0.125µgml-1 to penicillin were positive for ß-lactamase production.

  11. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in veal calf farming: human MRSA carriage related with animal antimicrobial usage and farm hygiene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitske Graveland

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recently a specific MRSA sequence type, ST398, emerged in food production animals and farmers. Risk factors for carrying MRSA ST398 in both animals and humans have not been fully evaluated. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated factors associated with MRSA colonization in veal calves and humans working and living on these farms. METHODS: A sample of 102 veal calf farms were randomly selected and visited from March 2007-February 2008. Participating farmers were asked to fill in a questionnaire (n = 390 to identify potential risk factors. A nasal swab was taken from each participant. Furthermore, nasal swabs were taken from calves (n = 2151. Swabs were analysed for MRSA by selective enrichment and suspected colonies were confirmed as MRSA by using slide coagulase test and PCR for presence of the mecA-gene. Spa types were identified and a random selection of each spa type was tested with ST398 specific PCR. The Sequence Type of non ST398 strains was determined. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Human MRSA carriage was strongly associated with intensity of animal contact and with the number of MRSA positive animals on the farm. Calves were more often carrier when treated with antibiotics, while farm hygiene was associated with a lower prevalence of MRSA. CONCLUSION: This is the first study showing direct associations between animal and human carriage of ST398. The direct associations between animal and human MRSA carriage and the association between MRSA and antimicrobial use in calves implicate prudent use of antibiotics in farm animals.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of a new synthetic peptide loaded in polylactic acid or poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J.; Flórez, J.; Torres, R.; Urquiza, M.; Gutiérrez, J. A.; Guzmán, F.; Ortiz, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    Nanocarrier systems are currently being developed for peptide, protein and gene delivery to protect them in the blood circulation and in the gastrointestinal tract. Polylactic acid (PLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with a new antimicrobial GIBIM-P5S9K peptide were obtained by the double emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation method. PLA- and PLGA-NPs were spherical with sizes between 300 and 400 nm for PLA and 200 and 300 nm for PLGA and 20 mV. The peptide-loading efficiency of PLA-NP and PLGA-NPs was 75% and 55%, respectively. PLA- and PLGA-NPs released around 50% of this peptide over 8 h. In 10% human sera the size of peptide loaded PLA- and PLGA-NPs increased between 25.2% and 39.3%, the PDI changed from 3.2 to 5.1 and the surface charge from -7.15 to 14.6 mV. Both peptide loaded PLA- and PLGA-NPs at 0.5 μM peptide concentration inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas. aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). In contrast, free peptide inhibited at 10 μM but did not inhibit at 0.5 and 1 μM. These PLA- and PLGA-NPs presented <10% hemolysis indicating that they are hemocompatible and promising for delivery and protection system of GIBIM-P5S9K peptide.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance profile of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonizing the anterior nares of health-care workers and outpatients attending the remotely located tertiary care hospital of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Seema; Malhotra, Rubina; Grover, Pragati; Bansal, Renu; Galhotra, Shipra; Kaur, Rupinderjit; Jindal, Neerja

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is a major concern worldwide and is exemplified by the global spread of the Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Health care workers (HCWs) and asymptomatically colonized patients are important sources of nosocomial MRSA infections. To determine the prevalence of MRSA colonisation, two hundred HCWs and 200 consecutive outpatients attending our tertiary care hospital were studied. Two sterile pre-moistened cotton tipped swabs were used to collect specimens from their anterior nares. These were inoculated immediately on Blood agar with oxacillin, Mannitol salt agar with oxacillin and CHROM agar. Resistance to cefoxitin was confirmed by PCR by demonstration of mecA gene. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method and MIC of vancomycin by using broth dilution and Vitek-2 Compact system. The nasal carriage of MRSA among HCWs was found to be 7.5% and in outpatients 3%. All strains of MRSA from HCWs and outpatients grew on three selective media and mecA gene amplified in all of them. All the isolated strains of MRSA showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole (93.3%), ciprofloxacin (80%) and erythromycin (66.66%). However, there was 100% susceptiability to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid and Rifampicin. Although a direct casual relationship could not be established, it could be assumed that the transmission from colonised health care worker is responsible atleast in part for MRSA infection among patients. Therefore emphasis should be laid on strict implementation of standard infection control practices which would help in minimizing the carriage and transmission of MRSA in the hospital.

  14. Changes in Holstein cow milk and serum proteins during intramammary infection with three different strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Claude

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent pathogens to cause mastitis in dairy cattle. Intramammary infection of dairy cows with S. aureus is often subclinical, due to the pathogen's ability to evade the innate defense mechanisms, but this can lead to chronic infection. A sub-population of S. aureus, known as small colony variant (SCV, displays atypical phenotypic characteristics, causes persistent infections, and is more resistant to antibiotics than parent strains. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the host immune response will be different for SCV than its parental or typical strains of S. aureus. In this study, the local and systemic immune protein responses to intramammary infection with three strains of S. aureus, including a naturally occurring bovine SCV strain (SCV Heba3231, were characterized. Serum and casein-depleted milk cytokine levels (interleukin-8, interferon-γ, and transforming growth factor-β1, as well as serum haptoglobin concentrations were monitored over time after intramammary infection with each of the three S. aureus strains. Furthermore, comparative proteomics was used to evaluate milk proteome profiles during acute and chronic phases of S. aureus intramammary infection. Results Serum IL-8, IFN-γ, and TGF-β1 responses differed in dairy cows challenged with different strains of S. aureus. Changes in overall serum haptoglobin concentrations were observed for each S. aureus challenge group, but there were no significant differences observed between groups. In casein-depleted milk, strain-specific differences in the host IFN-γ response were observed, but inducible IL-8 and TGF-β1 concentrations were not different between groups. Proteomic analysis of the milk following intramammary infection revealed unique host protein expression profiles that were dependent on the infecting strain as well as phase of infection. Notably, the protein, component-3 of the proteose peptone (CPP3, was

  15. Immune-modifying and antimicrobial effects of Eucalyptus oil and simple inhalation devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadlon, Angela E; Lamson, Davis W

    2010-01-01

    Eucalyptus oil (EO) and its major component, 1,8-cineole, have antimicrobial effects against many bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA...

  16. Phytochemical and Antimicrobial Properties of Commiphora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extracts from the stem bark of Commiphora pedunculata, a plant used in Northern Nigeria for the treatment of infectious diseases, were subjected to phytochemical as well as antimicrobial screening using standard procedures. The antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus, S. typhii, E. coli and C. albicans was ...

  17. phytochemical and antimicrobial properties of commiphora

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. The extracts from the stem bark of Commiphora pedunculata, a plant used in Northern Nigeria for the treatment of infectious diseases, were subjected to phytochemical as well as antimicrobial screening using standard procedures. The antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus, S. typhii ...

  18. Antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to various antimicrobial agents, and the relationship between antimicrobial resistance of the isolates and carriage of plasmids. Design: A random sampling of milk and meat samples was carried out. Setting: Milk was collected from various dairy ...

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in suppurative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus, a mainly acquired hospital infection is responsible for many suppurative lesions and has demonstrated the ability of developing resistance to many antimicrobial agents leading to life threatening infections and long hospital stay. Objective: To determined the prevalence and antibiotic ...

  20. Antimicrobial And Antioxidant Activities Of Some Nigerian Medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten Nigerian plants suggested from their ethnomedical uses to possess antimicrobial and antioxidant activities were studied for their anti-microbial and anti-oxidant properties. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Escherichia coli NCTC 10418, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, ...

  1. comparison of antimicrobial activity of seed oil of garlic and moringa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    kinds of antibiotics, including the major last-resort drugs, the .... antihypertensive, antimicrobial, antidote (heavy metal poisoning) and .... 1 Antimicrobial activity of seed oil of Garlic against E.coli, S. aureus, Salmonella Sp. and Pseudomonas.

  2. Expression of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines in mouse mammary gland following Staphylococcus aureus challenge and in response to milk accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazemi, Sasan; Aalbæk, Bent; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We used a mouse model of pathogenic (Staphylococcus aureus) and non-pathogenic (teat sealing) mammary inflammation to investigate mRNA expression of several inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins (APP) in mammary tissue and liver, and the appearance of some of these factors in plasma...... and milk. The expression levels of IL1β and TNFα were markedly up-regulated in Staph. aureus-inoculated mammary tissue at 72 h, whilst IL6 was up-regulated to a lesser extent in a way which was not confined to the inoculated glands. APP expression was up-regulated at 48 and 72 h in both Staph. aureus......-inoculated and teat-sealed mammary glands. These differences between cytokine and APP expression provide additional support for the contention that APPs are produced within the mammary tissue itself during inflammation, rather than in associated immune cells. We propose that measurement of cytokines and APP...

  3. Cow-to-cow variation in fibroblast response to a toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist and its relation to mastitis caused by intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, A L; Green, B B; Hayden, L R; Barlow, J W; Kerr, D E

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of chronic mammary gland infections in dairy cattle. However, the inflammatory response and duration of infection following pathogen exposure is variable between individual animals. To investigate interanimal differences in immune response, dermal fibroblast cultures were established from skin biopsies collected from 50 early lactation Holstein cows. The fibroblasts ability to produce IL-8 in response to a 24-h treatment with a synthetic toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist (Pam2CSK4) was used to assign a response phenotype to the animals. Five high-responding and 5 low-responding animals were then selected for an intramammary challenge with S. aureus to evaluate differences in the inflammatory response, chronicity of infection, and development of antibodies to the pathogen. All animals exhibited clinical symptoms of mastitis at 24h postchallenge. Animals previously classified as high responders experienced a greater inflammatory response characterized by elevated levels of milk somatic cell count, IL-8, and BSA following the challenge compared with low responders. In addition, antibodies toward the challenge strain of S. aureus reached higher levels in whey from the challenged gland of high responders compared with low responders. Despite the antibody response, all 5 high responders were chronically infected for the 6-wk duration of the study, whereas 2 of the low responders cleared the infection, although 1 of these did become reinfected. The observed differences between animals classified as low and high responders based on their fibroblast responsiveness suggests that this cell type can be used to further examine the causes of interanimal variation in response to mammary infection. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Bryum argenteum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabovljevic, Aneta; Sokovic, Marina; Sabovljevic, Marko; Grubisic, Dragoljub

    2006-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Bryum argenteum ethanol extracts was evaluated by microdilution method against four bacterial (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Staphilococcus aureus) and four fungal species (Aspergillus niger, Penicillium ochrochloron, Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophyes). All the investigated ethanol extracts have been proved to be active against all bacteria and fungi tested.

  5. Synergistic effects of Salvia officinalis L. essential oils and antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Marina T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA due to the acquisition of resistance to current antimicrobials pose a serious challenge for therapy, and new measures to treat and prevent this infectious pathogen are of crucial importance. Plant essential oils (EOs and their constituents are promising agents with antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antistaphylococcal effect of essential oils from Salvia officinalis using the broth-microdilution method. Essential oils of S. officinalis were isolated from the same individual, but at different life stages - young and old leaves. The effects of combinations of sub-inhibitory concentrations of oil and different antibiotics were evaluated by the checkerboard method. The results, expressed as the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC and index (FICI, indicate that the essential oil isolated from young leaves potentiated the inhibitory effect of antibiotics against tested MRSA strains. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173021

  6. Antimicrobial and resistance modulatory activity of Alpinia katsumadai seed phenolic extract, essential oil and post-distillation extract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovac, Jasna; Gavaric, Neda; Bucar, Franz; Mozina, Sonja Smole

    2014-01-01

    .... We investigated antimicrobial and resistance modulatory activity of the phenolic extract, essential oil and post-distillation extract of Alpinia katsumadai seeds against Campylobacter jejuni and Staphylococcus aureus...

  7. Síntese e determinação da atividade antimicrobiana de derivados 5-nitro-2-tiofilidênicos frente a Staphylococcus aureus multi-resistente Synthesis and determination of antimicrobial activity of 5-nitro-2-thiophylidene derivatives against MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Masunari

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O elevado nível de resistência que cepas de Staphylococcus aureus vêm apresentando aos antibióticos atualmente disponíveis caracteriza-se como grave problema em âmbito mundial e com consequências que beiram à fatalidade. Com a atenção voltada para este fenômeno, quatorze derivados 5-nitro-2-tiofilidênicos foram sintetizados e testados quanto à atividade antimicrobiana frente a cepas padrão (ATCC 25923 e multi-resistente (3SP/R33 de Staphylococcus aureus. Todos os compostos testados apresentaram excelente atividade bacteriostática e, alguns entre eles, atividade bactericida. A 5-nitro-2-tiofilideno-4-acetilbenzidrazida se mostrou como o composto mais ativo com concentração inibitória equivalente a 0,14 mg/mL. A partir dos resultados obtidos evidenciou-se o forte potencial de derivados 5-nitro-2-tiofilidênicos como possível alternativa para o desenvolvimento de novos fármacos com atividade antimicrobiana.Infection diseases caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have been an increasing problem worldwide presenting significant morbidity and mortality rates. Thus, fourteen benzoic acid [(5-nitro-thiophen-2-yl-methylene]-hydrazides were designed, synthesized and tested against standard (ATCC 25923 and multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. All compounds exhibited significant bacteriostatic activity and, in such cases, also bactericidal activity, especially the p-COCH3 derivative with MIC = 0.14 mg/mL. The results have demonstrated the potential of synthesized compounds as alternative to the development of selective antimicrobial agents.

  8. Comparative antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solutions evaluated using a novel standardized assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, R M S; Robinson, G M; Reynolds, D M

    2013-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces.

  9. Antimicrobial alkaloid fraction from Commiphora africana (A. Rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An alkaloid fraction was isolated from Commiphora africana (Myrrh) and assayed against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pyogenes using the agar diffusion method. The fraction exhibited antimicrobial activities against all the test microorganisms ...

  10. Antimicrobial studies on the stem-bark extracts of Ficus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial evaluation shows that the extracts have activity against E. coli, Candida albicans, Candida stellatodea, Corynebacterium ulcerans, MRSA, Neisseria gonorrheae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Staphylococcus aureus while Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Proteus mirabilis and Streptococcus pyrogens were ...

  11. In-vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of Carex Powerful Antiseptic Liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Paterson Zochonis Industries in Lagos, Nigeria recently produced Carex Powerful Antiseptic Liquid, which was investigated for antimicrobial activities against common human skin pathogenic bacteria, yeasts and a dermatophyte including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Malassezia furfur, Candida ...

  12. Isolation and identification of antimicrobial-producing lactic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Proteus species, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella species, Pseudomonas flourescence, P. aeruginosa, Serratia species and Pediococcus acidilactici. Of the 42 antimicrobial producing isolates characterized, 16, 12, 6 and 8 were identified ...

  13. Studies on the Antimicrobial Activities of Aframomum melegueta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three extracts of Aframomum melegueta seeds namely; water, methanol and ethanol were tested for antimicrobial activities against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All the organisms ...

  14. Antimicrobial activities of methanol and aqueous extracts of the stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR ONUOHA

    2011-11-16

    Nov 16, 2011 ... The stem of Bryophyllum pinnatum (Crassulaceae), used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of various diseases, was screened for secondary metabolites and antimicrobial activity on Salmonella typhi,. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus.

  15. Antimicrobial activities of calotropis procera on selected pathogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial effect of ethanol, aqueous and chloroform extracts of leaf and latex of Calotropis procera on six bacteria namely, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus albus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae and three fungi: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporium ...

  16. A chlorhexidine-releasing epoxy-based coating on titanium implants prevents Staphylococcus aureus experimental biomaterial-associated infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riool, M; Dirks, A J; Jaspers, V; de Boer, L; Loontjens, T J; van der Loos, C M; Florquin, S; Apachitei, I; Rijk, L N; Keul, H A; Zaat, S A

    2017-02-14

    Prevention of biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) remains a challenging problem, in particular due to the increased risk of resistance development with the current antibiotic-based strategies. Metallic orthopaedic devices, such as non-cemented implants, are often inserted under high mechanical stress. These non-cemented implants cannot be protected by e.g. antibioticreleasing bone cement or other antimicrobial approaches, such as the use of bioactive glass. Therefore, in order to avoid abrasion during implantation procedures, we developed an antimicrobial coating with great mechanical stability for orthopaedic implants, to prevent Staphylococcus aureus BAI. We incorporated 5 and 10 wt % chlorhexidine in a novel mechanically stable epoxy-based coating, designated CHX5 and CHX10, respectively. The coatings displayed potent bactericidal activity in vitro against S. aureus, with over 80 % of the release (19 µg/cm2 for CHX5 and 41 µg/cm2 for CHX10) occurring within the first 24 h. In mice, the CHX10 coating significantly reduced the number of CFU (colony forming units), both on the implants and in the peri-implant tissues, 1 d after S. aureus challenge. The CHX10-coated implants were well-tolerated by the animals, with no signs of toxicity observed by histological analysis. Moreover, the coating significantly reduced the frequency of culture-positive tissues 1 d, and of culture-positive implants 1 and 4 d after challenge. In summary, the chlorhexidine-releasing mechanically stable epoxy-based CHX10 coating prevented implant colonisation and S. aureus BAI in mice and has good prospects for clinical development.

  17. Efeitos da administração de vitamina E na infecção mamária e na contagem de células somáticas de cabras primíparas desafiadas experimentalmente com Staphylococcus aureus Effects of administration of vitamin E on mammary health and milk cell counts of first parturition goats experimentally challenged with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R.O. Paes

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve por objetivo estudar os efeitos da administração de vitamina E sobre a contagem de células somáticas e a infecção da glândula mamária de cabras primíparas desafiadas com a inoculação intramamária de Staphylococcus aureus ao 10º dia pós-parto. Vinte e oito animais foram divididos em quatro grupos, cada um composto por sete cabras primíparas da raça Saanen, como segue: grupo-controle, grupo de animais suplementados com vitamina E, grupo de animais desafiados com S.aureus inoculados na glândula mamária e grupo de animais suplementados com vitamina E e desafiados com S.aureus na glândula mamária. Na segunda e terceira semanas de lactação, a inoculação de S.aureus na glândula mamária permitiu a recuperação do microrganismo no leite e elevou a contagem de células somáticas (CCS. A liberação de S.aureus no leite ocorreu de maneira intermitente. Em animais suplementados com vitamina E, o desafio com S.aureus resultou em CCS mais baixa e menor número de microrganismos no leite. Sugere-se que a CCS possa ser utilizada para a detecção da mastite caprina, devendo-se utilizar contagens superiores a 1,0x10(6células/ml de leite como critério para a realização de exames microbiológicos.The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of administration of vitamin E on mammary health and milk cell counts of first parturition Saanen goats, experimentally challenged with intramammary inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus on the 10th day postpartum. Twenty-eight animals were distributed into four groups: control group, a group supplemented with vitamin E, a group inoculated with S.aureus and a group supplemented with vitamin E and inoculated with S.aureus. The results demonstrated that, after inoculation of S.aureus into the mammary gland, the microorganism was recovered from the milk, and the somatic cell count was increased. The recovery of S.aureus from milk was intermittent. The increase in

  18. Antimicrobial ceramics. Kokinsei ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, T.; Uchida, M. (Shinagawa Fuel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    In recent years, the occurrence of infection by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), for which almost all antibiotics do not affect, in facilities such as hospitals is causing trouble. The antimicrobial property of silver has been known empirically since the ancient times. However, since 1985, so called silver zeolite in which zeolite carries silver ions has become utilized as an inorganic antimicrobial agent with silver as its constituent. In this article, the effect of inhibiting MRSA propagation of antimicrobial fibers containing silver zeolite is explained centering around the physical properties of silver zeolite. MRSA has resistance against antibiotics, methicillin which is mainly used at present. When the antimicrobial power of silver zeolite is compared with those of copper zeolite and zinc zeolite, the antimicrobial power of silver zeolite is the strongest and further increases as the silver ion concentration in the zeolite increases. Silver zeolite is safe to use and used for tools and clothes to be used in the fields of food and medical care. 12 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Stilbenes reduce Staphylococcus aureus hemolysis, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Ryu, Shi Yong; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-09-01

    Stilbenoids have a broad range of beneficial health effects. On the other hand, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus presents a worldwide problem that requires new antibiotics or nonantibiotic strategies. S. aureus produces α-hemolysin (a pore-forming cytotoxin) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia. Furthermore, the biofilms formed by S. aureus constitute a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we investigated the hemolytic and antibiofilm activities of 10 stilbene-related compounds against S. aureus. trans-Stilbene and resveratrol at 10 μg/mL were found to markedly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus, and trans-stilbene also inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation without affecting its bacterial growth. Furthermore, trans-stilbene and resveratrol attenuated S. aureus virulence in vivo in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is normally killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analysis showed that trans-stilbene repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene and the intercellular adhesion locus (icaA and icaD) in S. aureus, and this finding was in line with observed reductions in virulence and biofilm formation. In addition, vitisin B, a stilbenoid tetramer, at 1 μg/mL was observed to significantly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus.

  20. Prevalence and resistance of commensal Staphylococcus aureus, including meticillin-resistant S aureus, in nine European countries: a cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Pringle, M.; Goossen, H.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Information about the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus resistance to antimicrobial drugs has mainly been obtained from invasive strains, although the commensal microbiota is thought to be an important reservoir of resistance. We aimed to compare the prevalence of nasal S aureus

  1. Prevalence and resistance of commensal Staphylococcus aureus, including meticillin-resistant S aureus, in nine European countries: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D. den; Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Pringle, M.; Goossens, H.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information about the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus resistance to antimicrobial drugs has mainly been obtained from invasive strains, although the commensal microbiota is thought to be an important reservoir of resistance. We aimed to compare the prevalence of nasal S aureus

  2. IB-367 pre-treatment improves the in vivo efficacy of teicoplanin and daptomycin in an animal model of wounds infected with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirioni, Oscar; Silvestri, Carmela; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Kamysz, Wojciech; Ghiselli, Roberto; Scalise, Alessandro; Brescini, Lucia; Castelli, Pamela; Orlando, Fiorenza; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Guerrieri, Mario; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are known as immunomodulators and antibiotic enhancers. We report that administration of an antimicrobial peptide, IB-367, was efficacious in increasing the antimicrobial activity of daptomycin and teicoplanin in a mouse model of wound infection caused by meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Mice were assigned to seven groups: an IB-367 pre-treated group with no antibiotics given after challenge, two IB-367 pre-treated groups plus daptomycin or teicoplanin given after challenge, two groups treated with daptomycin or teicoplanin only after challenge, and two control groups without infection or that did not receive any treatment. The main outcome measures were quantitative bacterial culture and analysis of natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity and leukocyte phenotype. The wound, established through the panniculus carnosus muscle of mice, was infected by MRSA. Bacterial cultures of mice receiving antibiotics alone showed a -2 log decrease, whilst those for IB-367 plus daptomycin or teicoplanin showed a -4 log decrease. IB-367 plus daptomycin showed the highest efficacy. The higher antimicrobial effect exerted by IB-367 was associated with increased levels of NK cytotoxicity but not of NK cell number. IB-367 increased the number of both CD11b and Gr-1 cells 3 days after MRSA challenge, whereas both of these leukocyte populations were reduced at 10 days after challenge. Our data suggest that a combination of IB-367 with antibiotic exerts a therapeutic effect and may be useful for the management of staphylococcal wounds.

  3. Prospective study on antimicrobial protein of Spirastrella inconstans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    tract, respiratory tract, intestinal tract and bloodstream infections (Chakraborty et al.,. 2011). S. aureus has developed resistance to most classes of antimicrobial agents. Penicillin was the first choice of antibiotics to treat staphylococcal infection. In 1994, by destroying the penicillin by penicillinase, S. aureus became resistant ...

  4. Antimicrobial Activities and Cellular Toxicity of Ethanol and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial effects of ethanol and methanol extracts of Ocimum gratissimum from against three (3) bacteria -E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from urine; two (2) typed bacterial strains – E.coli (ATCC 117755) and S. aureus (ATCC 12600); and six (6) fungi isolates - Trichophyton ...

  5. 62 original article in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility pattern

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    This study shows that S. aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens and healthy students in Umuahia are highly resistant to common antibiotics. This may not be ... Key words: Staphylococcus aureus, antimicrobial resistance, disc agar diffusion, antibiotic susceptibility ... healthcare facilities and in the community (4).

  6. Antimicrobial activity of the leaf extracts of Moringa oleifera and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the antimicrobial activity of the leaf extracts of Moringa oleifera and Jatropha curcas against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Different concentrations of the extracts were subjected to these organisms in which Moringa oleifera showed a higher zone of inhibition on Staphylococcus aureus ...

  7. New challenges in the application of biocompatible silver nanoparticles in enology: Antimicrobial capacity, digestibility and potential cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil-Sánchez I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the search for new substitutes to the use of sulfur dioxide (SO2 in oenology, a new line of research based on nanotechnology has been launched. Within this line, this paper evaluates the suitability of two new biocompatible silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs to control microbial growth in wine as well as their stability and potential risks at intestinal level. Antimicrobial activities against spoilage wine microorganisms were carried out in both culture media and wines. In addition, in vitrosimulations (static and dynamic were conducted to monitor the passage of Ag-NPs through the buco-gastrointestinal tract and also to assess their effects on the gut microbiota and intestinal epithelial cells. Both Ag-NPs proved to be highly efficient for the control of wine undesirable bacteria in culture media and microvinification assays, and to a lesser extent, for reducing Brettanomycespopulations in wine. Furthermore, undigested Ag-NPs as their corresponding digests after gastrointestinal simulation were not toxic to intestinal microbiota either epithelial cells, at least at the conditions used in these experiments.

  8. Peppermint Oil Decreases the Production of Virulence-Associated Exoproteins by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ming Deng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of peppermint oil against Staphylococcus aureus, and further investigate the influence of peppermint oil on S. aureus virulence-related exoprotein production. The data show that peppermint oil, which contained high contents of menthone, isomenthone, neomenthol, menthol, and menthyl acetate, was active against S. aureus with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs ranging from 64-256 µg/mL, and the production of S. aureus exotoxins was decreased by subinhibitory concentrations of peppermint oil in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that peppermint oil may potentially be used to aid in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infections at a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tissue infections (SSTIs) in hospitalised children and adults in Gaborone, Botswana, and to describe the changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus isolates over time. Methods. A retrospective cohort study evaluated SSTI isolates from ...

  10. Evaluation of fusidic acid in therapy of experimental Staphylococcus aureus meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian; Yieng-Kow, Runa Vavia; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2003-01-01

    Combination therapy that includes fusidic acid, an antimicrobial agent highly active against staphylococci, has been recommended in the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, CSF bactericidal and anti...

  11. Role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashimav Deb Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients suffering from chronic urticaria. Method: All total 82 patients were included for this study. Study group comprised 57 patients with chronic urticaria and the control group comprised 25 healthy volunteers. Nasal swab specimens were taken from all the 82 patients for bacterial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity. Patients with chronic urticaria who had positive growth for S. aureus were treated with sensitive antimicrobial agent. Nasal swab specimens were taken again from all the patients who received antimicrobial therapy to ensure complete eradication of S. aureus. All patients were followed up for a period of 6 weeks after the treatment. Urticarial activity was measured with the help of urticarial activity score. Results: S. aureus was detected in swab specimens from the nasal cavity in 32 patients in the study group and 7 patients in the control group. In the study group, after the antimicrobial treatment, 9 patients (28.12% had complete recovery from urticaria during the follow-up period; 4 patients (12.5% showed partial recovery from urticaria while the remaining patients (59.37% continued to suffer from urticaria. Conclusion: This study showed that nasal carriage of S. aureus can act as an etiological factor in chronic urticaria.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alginate Overproduction Promotes Coexistence with Staphylococcus aureus in a Model of Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoli, Dominique H; Whitfield, Gregory B; Kitao, Tomoe; Ivey, Melissa L; Davis, Michael R; Grahl, Nora; Hogan, Deborah A; Rahme, Laurence G; Howell, P Lynne; O'Toole, George A; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2017-03-21

    While complex intra- and interspecies microbial community dynamics are apparent during chronic infections and likely alter patient health outcomes, our understanding of these interactions is currently limited. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are often found to coinfect the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), yet these organisms compete under laboratory conditions. Recent observations that coinfection correlates with decreased health outcomes necessitate we develop a greater understanding of these interbacterial interactions. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa and/or S. aureus adopts phenotypes that allow coexistence during infection. We compared competitive interactions of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates from mono- or coinfected CF patients employing in vitro coculture models. P. aeruginosa isolates from monoinfected patients were more competitive toward S. aureus than P. aeruginosa isolates from coinfected patients. We also observed that the least competitive P. aeruginosa isolates possessed a mucoid phenotype. Mucoidy occurs upon constitutive activation of the sigma factor AlgT/U, which regulates synthesis of the polysaccharide alginate and dozens of other secreted factors, including some previously described to kill S. aureus Here, we show that production of alginate in mucoid strains is sufficient to inhibit anti-S. aureus activity independent of activation of the AlgT regulon. Alginate reduces production of siderophores, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinolone-N-oxide (HQNO), and rhamnolipids-each required for efficient killing of S. aureus These studies demonstrate alginate overproduction may be an important factor driving P. aeruginosa coinfection with S. aureusIMPORTANCE Numerous deep-sequencing studies have revealed the microbial communities present during respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are diverse, complex, and dynamic. We now face the challenge of determining

  13. Decline in the proportion of methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from non-invasive samples and in outpatient settings, and changes in the co-resistance profiles: an analysis of data collected within the Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network, Germany 2010 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jan; Noll, Ines; Feig, Marcel; Weiss, Bettina; Claus, Hermann; Werner, Guido; Eckmanns, Tim; Hermes, Julia; Abu Sin, Muna

    2017-02-23

    Recent analysis of trends of non-invasive infections with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), of trends of MRSA infections in outpatient settings and of co-resistance profiles of MRSA isolates are scarce or lacking in Germany. We analysed data from the Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (ARS). We included in the analysis the first isolate of S. aureus per patient and year, which had a valid test result for oxacillin resistance and which was not a screening sample. We limited the analysis to isolates from facilities, which contributed to ARS for all six years between 2010 and 2015. We compared the proportion of methicillin resistance among S. aureus isolates by calendar year using Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. We corrected for multiple testing using the Bonferroni correction. We stratified the analysis by sample type including various non-invasive sample types and by type of care (e.g. hospital versus outpatient clinic). We also analysed the non-susceptibility of MRSA to selected antibiotics. The analysis included 148,561 S. aureus isolates. The distribution of these isolates by sex, age, region, sample type, clinical speciality and type of care remained relatively stable over the six years analysed. The proportion of MRSA among S. aureus isolates decreased continuously from 16% in 2010 to 10% in 2015. This decrease was seen for all types of care and for the majority of sample types, including the outpatient clinic (12 to 8%), as well as blood culture (19 to 9%), urine samples (25 to 15%), swabs (14 to 9%), respiratory samples (22 to 11%) and lesions (15 to 10%). The non-susceptibility of MRSA isolates to tobramycin (47 to 32%), ciprofloxacin (95 to 89%), moxifloxacin (94 to 84%), clindamycin (80 to 71%) and erythromycin (81 to 72%) declined markedly, but it increased for tetracyclines (6 to 9%) and gentamicin (3 to 6%). Non-susceptibility of MRSA to linezolid, teicoplanin, tigecycline and vancomycin remained rare. This analysis

  14. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Crava

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV. We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity.

  15. The Effect of Essential Oils on Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Ozdikmenli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are widespread through the world in spite of developing technology. S. aureus is an important pathogen causing food intoxications besides hospital infections by its antibiotic resistant strains. Nowadays, there has been worldwide increasing concern on usage of natural products to control microorganisms. One of these natural products is essential oils. They are produced from plants especially from spices and composed of many components and volatiles. This review summarizes informative literature on essential oils and their mode of antimicrobial action. In addition, current knowledge on in vitro researches on antibacterial activity of essential oils and food applications to control S. aureus has been discussed.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  17. Osteomyelitis: a current challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Souza Jorge

    Full Text Available Over the last 30 years, the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis has almost been totally elucidated, and many factors responsible for the persistence of this infection have been identified. Numerous antimicrobial agents with distinct spectrums of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics have been used in its treatment. Surgical techniques, including muscle grafts, the Ilizarov technique, and antibiotic bone cements, have been applied. However, bone infections are still a challenge. Despite the importance of isolation and identification of microorganisms to determine the antimicrobial treatment of bone infections, there are few systematic national studies about the etiological profile of these diseases. This article describes the current knowledge of osteomyelitis and summarizes published national data based on the experience of different Orthopedic and Traumatology Services. In general, S. aureus was described as an important etiological agent; however, the difference in design of national studies makes a comparison between the prevalence of bone infection, the associated risk factors, and the different therapeutic approaches difficult. In conclusion, effort is necessary in order to stimulate systematic national studies in different Orthopedics and Traumatology Services to obtain a better consensus on preventive measures and therapies of bone infections.

  18. Anti-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Activity and Optimal Culture Condition of Streptomyces sp. SUK 25

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Junaidah, Ahmad; Suhaini, Sudi; Mohd Sidek, Hasidah; Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Zin,Noraziah Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential of secondary metabolites extracted from Streptomyces sp. to treat bacterial infections including infections with Staphylococcus aureus is previously documented. The current study showed significant antimicrobial activities associated with endophytic Streptomyces sp. isolated from medicinal plants in Peninsular Malaysia. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine anti-methicillin-resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) activities of Streptomyces sp. isolates. Mat...

  19. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, based on the literature sources, the key role of chemokines of CC, CXS families and antimicrobial peptides in the elimination of Staphylococcus aureus is analyzed. The main mechanisms of the anti-staphylococcal activity of catelicidin LL-37 in the development of the immune response in pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus are described in detail.

  20. Triple-acting Peptidoglycan hydrolase treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  1. Application of molecular techniques in the study of Staphylococcus aureus clonal evolution - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Marcos Vivoni

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important agent of healthcare-associated and community-acquired infections. A major characteristic of this microorganism is the ability to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. Several molecular techniques have been applied for the characterization of S. aureus in epidemiological studies. In the present review, we discuss the application of molecular techniques for typing S. aureus strains and describe the nomenclature and evolution of epidemic clones of this important pathogen.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Methanolic Extracts of Sambucus ebulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increase in the emergence of drug - resistant pathogens led to the development of natural antimicrobials. In this study the antimicrobial effect of methanolic extracts of Sambucus ebulus and Urtica dioica on 16 skin and wound infections isolates of methicillin resistant. S. aureus have been studied. Material and ...

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Monodora myristica seed oil | Odoh | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil is colourless, bitter with nice smell and the density is 0.789 g/ml. The oil had antimicrobial activity of the oil against Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus among the tested organism and can be incorporated into cream as antimicrobial agent and as a perfume. Key words: Monodora ...

  4. Antimicrobial activity of ethyl acetate extract of Citrullus lanatus seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the antimicrobial activity and chemical constituents of ethyl acetate extract of Citrullus lanatus seeds. Methods: Antimicrobial activity of the ethyl acetate extract of the seeds of C. lanatus was evaluated against Staphylococus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Bacillus subtilis ...

  5. In vitro antimicrobial screening of Aquilaria agallocha roots | Canh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... agallocha roots should have a medicinal uses especially against E. faecium, L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644, B. subtilis DSMZ 1971, C. albicans DSMZ 1386, S. epidermidis DSMZ 20044 and S. aureus ATCC 25923. Keywords: Aquilaria agallocha, Mesir paste, antimicrobial activity, antimicrobial screening, ethanol extract ...

  6. Screening of the antimicrobial properties of the essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The antimicrobial test results showed that the oils had a great potential antimicrobial activity against all 13 bacteria: Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Enterococcus faecium, E. faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Klebsiella pneumonia, ...

  7. Comparative antimicrobial activities of aloe vera gel and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparative antimicrobial activities of the gel and leaf of Aloe vera were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Trichophyton mentagraphytes, T. schoeleinii, Microsporium canis and Candida albicans. Ethanol was used for the extraction of the leaf after obtaining the gel from it. Antimicrobial ...

  8. Antimicrobial Effectiveness of Selected Vranac Wines Against Six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess potential antimicrobial effectiveness of selected red wines from Balkan region, made from autochthonic Vranac V. vinifera L. grape variety. Methods: The antimicrobial activity of Vranac wines against Gram-positive: C. perfringens, B. subtillis, S. aureus, L. inocua, S. Lutea, and M.

  9. Chemical constituents and antimicrobial activity of a traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A combination of crushed garlic (Allium sativum) and black cumin seeds (Nigelia sativum) has been used as a traditional remedy for urinary tract infections. In-vitro antimicrobial testing suggested that the mixture of two spices in the ratio of 1:1 has antimicrobial effects on both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli ...

  10. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with ... from your health care provider. What is a staph infection? Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is a type of ...

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Clove and Thyme Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzeako, B C; Al-Kharousi, Zahra S N; Al-Mahrooqui, Zahra

    2006-01-01

    Objective: It has been postulated that geographical locations of the herbs affect the constituents of their essential oils and thus the degree of their antimicrobial action. This study examine two samples of clove obtained from Sri Lanka and Zanzibar and two samples of thyme from Iran and Oman to determine the antimicrobial potential of their extracted oils. Method: The active agents in each plant were extracted by steam distillation and by boiling. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts were determined at neat and by two-fold dilutions in well agar diffusion technique using Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pyogenes, Corynebacterium species, Salmonella species, Bacteroides fragilis and Candida albicans. Results: All oil extracts possessed antimicrobial activity against all bacteria and yeast tested. Their water extracts exhibited lower antimicrobial activity, though thyme aqueous extract was active only against S. aureus. The lowest concentration of antimicrobial activity (0.1% i.e., 1:1024) was obtained with thyme oil extract using Candida albicans. There was no significant difference in antimicrobial activity between clove obtained from Sri Lanka or Zanzibar or thyme obtained from Iran or Oman. Conclusion: Our experiment showed that the country of origin of the herbs has no effect on their antimicrobial activity. However, further work is necessary to ascertain why Candida albicans displayed remarkable degree of sensitivity with the extracts than all the other organisms test. PMID:21748125

  12. The lysine-peptoid hybrid LP5 maintain activity under physiological conditions and affects virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Ingmer, Hanne; Thomsen, Line E.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide, LP5, is a lysine-peptoid hybrid, with antimicrobial activity against clinically relevant bacteria. Here, we investigated how various environmental conditions affect the antimicrobial activity of LP5 against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). We found that LP5 maintained...... to sub-inhibitory concentrations of LP5 affected the expression of the major virulence factors of S. aureus, revealing a potential as anti virulence compound. Thus, these results show how environmental factors affect the peptide efficiency and further add to the knowledge on how the peptide affects S...

  13. Antimicrobial peptides from the hemolymph of the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuthirapandian Ravichandran

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to find the antimicrobial activity of hemolymph of Macrobrachium rosenbergii and to evaluate the antimicrobial compounds. The highest inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus vulgaris and Klebsiella pneumonia (12 mm and antifungal activity was observed only against Fusarium moniliforme (11 mm. Antimicrobial peptide was characterized in molecular size ranging from 22 to 91KDa with antimicrobial activity against various infectious pathogens. Hemolymph plays a vital role in the disease prevention in crustaceans and there is no report on antimicrobial activities of the prawn M. rosenbergii.

  14. Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René-Éric Dagorn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Sous le titre « The Hispanic Challenge », Samuel P. Huntington propose dans le numéro de Foreign Policy de mars-avril 2004 une nouvelle démonstration du danger de sa pseudo-théorie du « choc des civilisations ». Quel est donc ce «  challenge  » auquel, d'après Huntington, la société américaine serait aujourd'hui confrontée ? C'est celui de l'immigration « hispanique » qui « menace l'identité américaine, ses valeurs et son mode de vie » ...

  15. Psoriasis and staphylococcus aureus skin colonization in Moroccan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This colonization was less important in lesional psoriatic skin (3%) than in non lesional psoriatic skin (12.1%) p= 0.20. Nasal screening identified (7/33) 21, 21% S. aureus carriers in psoriasis group and in control group. Our results are in consensus withliterature findings. They have confirmed the importance of antimicrobial ...

  16. Efficacy of extended cefquinome treatment of clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, J. M.; Cox, P.; Schukken, Y. H.; Lam, T. J G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14686820X

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis is difficult to cure. Extended antimicrobial treatment is often advocated as a practical approach to improve cure rates; however, scientific evidence of this hypothesis is lacking. A multi-centered, nonblinded, randomized, positive-controlled clinical trial

  17. Antibacterial properties of Mangifera indica on Staphylococcus aureus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial activity of Mangifera indica stem bark extracts was determined using disk diffusion, agar and broth dilution methods. In disk diffusion method, inhibition zone sizes were used to determine the susceptibility of S. aureus to the extracts. The results showed that the stem-bark extracts of M. indica have antimicrobial ...

  18. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a persistent nosocomial and community acquired pathogen has become a global health concern. It has a remarkable capability of evolving different mechanisms of resistance to most antimicrobial agents. The aim of the present study is to establish the incidence of ...

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-05

    Sep 5, 2015 ... Introduction. Staphylococcus aureus may cause serious skin and soft tissue infections, the bacteria can also infect any tissue of the body, causing other serious or life‑threating diseases, such as deep abscesses, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, and sepsis.[1] Emergence and spread of antimicrobial.

  20. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out among veterinary students coming for laboratory training. After their wise consent, nasal swabs of the anterior nares were carried out; and S. aureus was isolated by selective chromogenic culture. They were then assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility. Results: Nasal swabs ...

  1. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activities and biopreservative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Well-in-Agar diffusion method was used for antimicrobial screening at different concentrations on E. coli, B. subtilis, S. aureus, S. typhi and S. cerevisiae. The preservative effects at 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3% alone and in combination were determined in minced meat using E. coli and B. subtilis as test isolates. E. hirta cold and A.

  3. Labeled Antimicrobial Peptides for Detection of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    beef, chicken carcass, and lettuce samples with an 7 imrnunomagnetic chemiluminescence fiber-optic biosensor. J. Food Protection, 66: 512-517. Maloy, W...Antimicrobial Peptides in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Disease , 31: 467-473. Wiemer, B. C, Walsh, M. K

  4. Phytochemical, antimicrobial and pharmacological studies on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the presence of phytochemical metabolites, while the antimicrobial effect was tested on standard organisms‟ isolates of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 6571, Escherichia coli NCTC 10418 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 6750. Twenty four hourly daily measurements of food intake, water intake and urinary output of ...

  5. Antimicrobial activities of constituents of Uvaria chamae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, C D; Lasswell, W L

    1978-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of a number of cytotoxic C-benzylated flavonoids from Uvaria chamae have been determined. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of these flavonoids and certain of their derivatives against Straphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Mycobacterium smegmatis compare favorably with those of streptomycin sulfate.

  6. Occurrence of Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and sixteen isolates of staphylococcus aureus were obtained from raw milk within different locations in the Rift Valley of Kenya. Their resistance profiles to six families of antimicrobials were evaluated using the plate diffusion method. Resistance to penicillin (72.2 %) was the most frequent followed by ...

  7. Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most commonly isolated bacteria is Staphylococcus epidermidis (13.16%) followed by Escherichia coli (11.41%) and Staphylococcus aureus (9.65%). Antimicrobial sensitivity test revealed that Streptococcus pyogenes, S. epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae were strongly sensitive to seven of the eight ...

  8. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial activity of the mixed ligands metal complexes and the free ligands were carried out against the bacterial Escherichia coli, staphylococcus aureus, klebsiella pneumonia, pseudomonas aeruginosa and the fungi candida spp. The mixed ligands metal complexes showed higher activities when compared to the ...

  9. Identification of antimicrobial properties of cashew, Anacardium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial capabilities of plant extract derived from the leaves of the cashew plant, Anacardium occidentale L. (Family Anacardiaceae), on two common human pathogens of clinical importance, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated. All test organisms were identified to be sensitive to the ...

  10. Preliminary phytochemical and antimicrobial screening of 50 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethanolic extracts of 50 plant species were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The results indicated that of the 50 plant extracts, 28 plant extracts inhibited the growth of one or more test pathogens.

  11. Postantibiotic effect and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect of LTX-109 and mupirocin on Staphylococcus aureus blood isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravolatz, L D; Pawlak, J; Martin, H; Saravolatz, S; Johnson, L; Wold, H; Husbyn, M; Olsen, W M

    2017-11-01

    The development of new synthetic antimicrobial peptides like LTX-109 provides a new class of drugs for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections. We evaluated LTX-109 and mupirocin for pharmacodynamic parameters against 10 methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. The postantibiotic effect (PAE) is defined as the length of time that bacterial growth is suppressed following a brief exposure to an antibiotic. We also determined the sub-MIC effect (SME) which measures the direct effect of subinhibitory levels on strains that have not previously been exposed to antibiotics. The postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA-SME) is a combination of the PAE and SME. LTX-109 had an average PAE of 5·51 h vs 1·04 h for mupirocin. The PA-SME of LTX-109 ranged from 2·51 to 9·33 h as the concentration increased from 0·2 to 0·4 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). The PA-SME range for mupirocin was 0·93-2·58 h. LTX-109, as compared to mupirocin, demonstrated prolonged time of effect for these pharmacodynamic parameters, which supports persistent activity for several hours after the drug is no longer present or is below the MIC. The pharmacodynamic parameters studied here suggest that LTX-109 is less likely than mupirocin to generate resistance to S. aureus. Resistant bacterial infections continue to be a challenge for clinicians. Identification of antibiotics with pharmacodynamic advantages may be beneficial in the treatment of these infections. An antibiotic with a longer postantibiotic effect may be able to be administered less frequently resulting in improved adherence. In this study, a new synthetic antimicrobial peptide, LTX-109, demonstrated a more prolonged time for LTX-109 than mupirocin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Prevalence of nasal portal of Staphylococcus aureus in disabled children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Molin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colonization of the nasal mucosa by Staphylococcus aureus set a carrier state. Which is recognized as a potential source of infection and a high risk factor for subsequent invasive infections. The prevalence of nasal carriage of this germ in disabled children in Paraguay is not known, thus contributing to the knowledge of their frequency and evaluate the profile of sensitivity to common antimicrobials was conducted this study, from May to July 2015.  Objective: to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage and profile of antimicrobial resistance in disabled children. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study in which 80 nasal swabs of children, who attended the service laboratory of SENADIS (Secretaria Nacional por los Derechos Humanos de las Personas con Discapacidad. The identification and sensitivity of germ was accomplished by conventional testing.  Results: 80 pediatric patients, 46 boys and 34 girls. 18 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were obtained, corresponding to a prevalence of 22,5%. Susceptibility testing indicated that 14 strains were MSSA (Methicillin – Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and 4 RMSA ( Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in a population with its own characteristics provides valuable data for the epidemiology, reflecting the need for continued vigilance and take steps to reduce associated infections. The detection of RMAR evidences their progress; it is important to evaluate the empirical treatment to primary care.

  13. Strategies to Prevent and Control the Emergence and Spread of Antimicrobial-Resistant Microorganisms in Hospitals. A challenge to hospital leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, D A; Weinstein, R A; Wenzel, R P; Tablan, O C; Duma, R J; Gaynes, R P; Schlosser, J; Martone, W J

    1996-01-17

    To provide hospital leaders with strategic goals or actions likely to have a significant impact on antimicrobial resistance, outline outcome and process measures for evaluating progress toward each goal, describe potential barriers to success, and suggest countermeasures and novel improvement strategies. A multidisciplinary group of experts was drawn from the following areas: hospital epidemiology and infection control, infectious diseases (including graduate training programs), clinical practice (including nursing, surgery, internal medicine, and pediatrics), pharmacy, administration, quality improvement, appropriateness evaluation, behavior modification, practice guideline development, medical informatics, and outcomes research. Representatives from appropriate federal agencies, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, and the pharmaceutical industry also participated. Published literature, guidelines, expert opinion, and practical experience regarding efforts to improve antibiotic utilization and prevent and control the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in hospitals. Participants were divided into two quality improvement teams: one focusing on improving antimicrobial usage and the other on preventing and controlling transmission of resistant microorganisms. The teams modeled the process a hospital might use to develop and implement a strategic plan to combat antimicrobial resistance. Ten strategic goals and related process and outcome measures were agreed on. The five strategic goals to optimize antimicrobial use were as follows: optimizing antimicrobial prophylaxis for operative procedures; optimizing choice and duration of empiric therapy; improving antimicrobial prescribing by educational and administrative means; monitoring and providing feedback regarding antibiotic resistance; and defining and implementing health care delivery system guidelines for important types of antimicrobial use. The five

  14. Production of Recombinant Antimicrobial Polymeric Protein Beta Casein-E 50-52 and Its Antimicrobial Synergistic Effects Assessment with Thymol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Fahimirad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating emergence of antimicrobial resistance among food pathogens and consumers’ increasing demands for preservative-free foods are two contemporary challenging aspects within the food industry. Antimicrobial packaging and the use of natural preservatives are promising solutions. In the present study, we used beta-casein—one of the primary self-assembly proteins in milk with a high polymeric film production capability—as a fusion partner for the recombinant expression of E 50-52 antimicrobial peptide in Escherichia coli. The pET21a-BCN-E 50-52 construct was transformed to E. coli BL21 (DE3, and protein expression was induced under optimized conditions. Purified protein obtained from nickel affinity chromatography was refolded under optimized dialysis circumstances and concentrated to 1600 µg/mL fusion protein by ultrafiltration. Antimicrobial activities of recombinant BCN-E 50-52 performed against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus flavus, and Candida albicans. Subsequently, the synergistic effects of BCN-E 50-52 and thymol were assayed. Results of checkerboard tests showed strong synergistic activity between two compounds. Time–kill and growth kinetic studies indicated a sharp reduction of cell viability during the first period of exposure, and SEM (scanning electron microscope results validated the severe destructive effects of BCN E 50-52 and thymol in combination on bacterial cells.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background : Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods : A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results : We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions : The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  17. Synergistic effect of Thymbra spicata L. extracts with antibiotics against multidrug- resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F Haroun

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: These results may indicate that T. spicata extracts potentiates the antimicrobial action of antibiotics, suggesting a possible utilization of this herb in combination therapy against emerging multidrug-resistance S. aureus and K. pneumoniae.

  18. Early oral switch therapy in low-risk Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (SABATO) : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasch, Achim J.; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Prinz-Langenohl, Reinhild; Paulus, Ursula; Hellmich, Martin; Weiß, Verena; Jung, Norma; Rieg, Siegbert; Kern, Winfried V.; Seifert, Harald; Lewalter, Karl; Lemmen, Sebastian; Stijnis, Cornelis; Van der Meer, Jan; Soriano, Alex; Ruiz, Laura Morata; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Kluytmans, Jan; Veenemans, Jacobien; Brodt, Hans Reinhard; Stephan, Christoph; Wolf, Timo; Kessel, Johanna; Joost, Insa; Sinha, Bhanu; van Assen, Sander; Wilting, Kasper; Tobias Welte, Welte; Christiane Mölgen, Mölgen; Julia Freise, Freise; Brunkhorst, Frank; Pletz, Mathias; Hagel, Stefan; Becker, Christian; Frieling, Thomas; Kösters, Katrin; Reuter, Stefan; Hsiao, Mikai; Rupp, Jan; Dalhoff, Klaus; Turner, David; Snape, Susan; Crusz, Shanika; Venkatesan, Pradhib; Salzberger, Bernd; Hanses, Frank; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesùs; Méndez, Adoración Valiente; López-Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Cisneros, José Miguel; Navarro-Amuedo, Maria Dolores; Bonten, Marc; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommend that patients with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (SAB) are treated with long courses of intravenous antimicrobial therapy. This serves to avoid SAB-related complications such as relapses, local extension and distant metastatic foci. However, in

  19. Invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in an African adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains an important cause of mortality, in the community and health care set-ups. S. aureus strains with genes encoding lethal toxins and culture negative sepsis augment the diagnostic challenge in resource limited settings. With a growing rate of resistance to the causative bacteria and atypical ...

  20. Detection and identification of Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus causes foodborne diseases if consumed in contaminated milk products. Rapid detection and characterization of foodborne pathogen S. aureus is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. It is still a challenge to detect and identify bacterial pathogens quickly and ...

  1. Synergism of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants with antimicrobial drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Nathalia Cristina Cirone [UNESP; Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes [UNESP; Andrade, Bruna Fernanda Murbach Teles [UNESP; Probst, Isabela da Silva [UNESP; Doyama, Julio Toshio [UNESP; Fernandes Junior, Ary [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistant strains to conventional antimicrobial drugs has been constant as well as research aimed new alternatives of antibacterial agents. Therefore, considering that natural products have been an important potential source of new antimicrobial drugs, aim to verify the synergism by disk and time kill curve method between antimicrobials (extracts-Ext. and essential oils-EO) from four plant and eight antimicrobial drugs against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strain...

  2. Evolution of multidrug resistance during Staphylococcus aureus infection involves mutation of the essential two component regulator WalKR.

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin P Howden; Christopher R E McEvoy; David L Allen; Kyra Chua; Wei Gao; Paul F Harrison; Jan Bell; Geoffrey Coombs; Vicki Bennett-Wood; Jessica L Porter; Roy Robins-Browne; John K Davies; Torsten Seemann; Timothy P Stinear

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health threat, compounded by emergence of strains with resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, both last line antimicrobials. Here we have performed high throughput DNA sequencing and comparative genomics for five clinical pairs of vancomycin-susceptible (VSSA) and vancomycin-intermediate ST239 S.?aureus (VISA); each pair isolated before and after vancomycin treatment failure. These comparisons revealed a frequent pattern of...

  3. Use of extracellular extracts of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria for the inhibition of dermatological pathogen Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan Hor

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: LAB were able to produce antimicrobial compounds that inhibit S. aureus. The inhibitory action of the CFS was mainly due to the organic acids produced by LAB. Antimicrobial metabolites produced by LAB comprise lactic acid, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and diacetyl. S. aureus was able to form a biofilm, which was successfully inhibited by the CFS of L. bulgaricus FTDC 8611.

  4. Antimicrobial Acrylic Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    the spinneret fitted with a 325 mesh wire screen filter inside. Extrusion conditions were as follows: 2 Process: dry-jet wet spinning...crude nonwoven fabric (one inch square), treated samples were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) using a modified AATCC Test Method 100...obtained chlorine after chlorination. The fibers were formed into a nonwoven matt which upon chlorination with 10% household bleach became

  5. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Stefania; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2012-01-01

    decisions with regard to harmonisation of typing methods. A stratified, three-level organisation of testing laboratories was proposed: local; regional; and national. The functions of, and testing methodology used by, each laboratory were defined. The group consensus was to recommend spa and staphylococcal......This article reviews recent findings on the global epidemiology of healthcare-acquired/associated (HA), community-acquired/associated (CA) and livestock-associated (LA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and aims to reach a consensus regarding the harmonisation of typing methods...... health. Continuous efforts to understand the changing epidemiology of S. aureus infection in humans and animals are therefore necessary, not only for appropriate antimicrobial treatment and effective infection control but also to monitor the evolution of the species. The group made several consensus...

  6. Animal venoms as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Stiles, Bradley G; Franco, Octavio L; Sethi, Gautam; Lim, Lina H K

    2017-06-15

    Hospitals are breeding grounds for many life-threatening bacteria worldwide. Clinically associated gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus/methicillin-resistant S. aureus and many others increase the risk of severe mortality and morbidity. The failure of antibiotics to kill various pathogens due to bacterial resistance highlights the urgent need to develop novel, potent, and less toxic agents from natural sources against various infectious agents. Currently, several promising classes of natural molecules from snake (terrestrial and sea), scorpion, spider, honey bee and wasp venoms hold promise as rich sources of chemotherapeutics against infectious pathogens. Interestingly, snake venom-derived synthetic peptide/snake cathelicidin not only has potent antimicrobial and wound-repair activity but is highly stable and safe. Such molecules are promising candidates for novel venom-based drugs against S. aureus infections. The structure of animal venom proteins/peptides (cysteine rich) consists of hydrophobic α-helices or β-sheets that produce lethal pores and membrane-damaging effects on bacteria. All these antimicrobial peptides are under early experimental or pre-clinical stages of development. It is therefore important to employ novel tools for the design and the development of new antibiotics from the untapped animal venoms of snake, scorpion, and spider for treating resistant pathogens. To date, snail venom toxins have shown little antibiotic potency against human pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Screening for the presence of antimicrobial activity in few Indian seaweeds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kotnala, S.; Garg, Aakriti; Chatterji, A.

    Methanolic extracts of 17 commonly found seaweeds in the west coast of India were screened for the presence of antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Streptococcus pyrogenes, Staphylococcus aureus...

  8. The changing epidemiology of bacteraemias in Europe : trends from the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kraker, M. E. A.; Jarlier, V.; Monen, J. C. M.; Heuer, O. E.; van de Sande, N.; Grundmann, H.

    We investigated bacteraemia trends for five major bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, and determined how expanding antimicrobial resistance influenced the total burden of bacteraemias in Europe.

  9. Biological and immunotoxicity evaluation of antimicrobial peptide-loaded coatings using a layer-by-layer process on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jue; Liu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Shifang; Yang, Guoli

    2015-11-01

    The prevention and control of peri-implantitis is a challenge in dental implant surgery. Dental implants with sustained antimicrobial coating are an ideal way of preventing peri-implantitis. This study reports development of a non- immunotoxicity multilayered coating on a titanium surface that had sustained antimicrobial activity and limited early biofilm formation. In this study, the broad spectrum AMP, Tet213, was linked to collagen IV through sulfo-SMPB and has been renamed as AMPCol. The multilayer AMPCol coatings were assembled on smooth titanium surfaces using a LBL technique. Using XPS, AFM, contact angle analysis, and QCM, layer-by-layer accumulation of coating thickness was measured and increased surface wetting compared to controls was confirmed. Non-cytotoxicity to HaCaT and low erythrocyte hemolysis by the AMPCol coatings was observed. In vivo immunotoxicity assays showed IP administration of AMPCol did not effect serum immunoglobulin levels. This coating with controlled release of AMP decreased the growth of both a Gram-positive aerobe (Staphylococcus aureus) and a Gram-negative anaerobe (Porphyromonas gingivalis) up to one month. Early S. aureus biofilm formation was inhibited by the coating. The excellent long-term sustained antimicrobial activity of this multilayer coating is a potential method for preventing peri-implantitis through coated on the neck of implants before surgery.

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with RLP068 kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and improves wound healing in a mouse model of infected skin abrasion PDT with RLP068/Cl in infected mouse skin abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Daniela; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Liyi; Fantetti, Lia; Roncucci, Gabrio; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an alternative treatment for infections that can kill drug resistant bacteria without damaging host-tissue. In this study we used bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a mouse skin abrasion model, to investigate the effect of PDT on bacterial inactivation and wound healing. RLP068/Cl, a tetracationic Zn(II)phthalocyanine derivative and toluidine blue (TBO) were used. The light-dose response of PDT to kill bacteria in vivo and the possible recurrence in the days post-treatment were monitored by real-time bioluminescence imaging, and wound healing by digital photography. The results showed PDT with RLP068/Cl (but not TBO) was able to kill bacteria, to inhibit bacterial re-growth after the treatment and to significantly accelerate the wound healing process (© 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The intramammary efficacy of first generation cephalosporins against Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demon, Dieter; Ludwig, Carolin; Breyne, Koen; Guédé, David; Dörner, Julia-Charlotte; Froyman, Robrecht; Meyer, Evelyne

    2012-11-09

    Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in cattle causes important financial losses in the dairy industry due to lower yield and bad milk quality. Although S. aureus is susceptible to many antimicrobials in vitro, treatment often fails to cure the infected udder. Hence, comprehensive evaluation of antimicrobials against S. aureus mastitis is desirable to direct treatment strategies. The mouse mastitis model is an elegant tool to evaluate antimicrobials in vivo while circumventing the high costs associated with bovine experiments. An evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of the intramammary (imam) applied first generation cephalosporins cefalexin, cefalonium, cefapirin and cefazolin, was performed using the S. aureus mouse mastitis model. In vivo determination of the effective dose 2log(10) (ED(2log10)), ED(4log10), protective dose 50 (PD(50)) and PD(100) in mouse mastitis studies, support that in vitro MIC data of the cephalosporins did not fully concur with the in vivo clinical outcome. Cefazolin was shown to be the most efficacious first generation cephalosporin to treat S. aureus mastitis whereas the MIC data indicate that cefalonium and cefapirin were more active in vitro. Changing the excipient for imam application from mineral oil to miglyol 812 further improved the antimicrobial efficacy of cefazolin, confirming that the excipient can influence the in vivo efficacy. Additionally, statistical analysis of the variation of S. aureus-infected, excipient-treated mice from fourteen studies emphasizes the strength of the mouse mastitis model as a fast, cost-effective and highly reproducible screening tool to assess the efficacy of antimicrobial compounds against intramammary S. aureus infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  13. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci to teicoplanin in Pakistan: the MRSET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Altaf; Hussain, Shagufta; Ijaz, Tayyaba; Hashemy, Irfan

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the susceptibility pattern of S. aureus and enterococci to teicoplanin using an in vitro method. Between February and November 2011, valid bacteriological samples were collected at three hospitals in three cities in Pakistan and the organism was isolated. Only samples containing S. aureus or enterococci were tested for their sensitivity to teicoplanin and various other standard antimicrobials in therapy, using the disc diffusion testing by the Kirby-Bauer method. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 401 isolates collected, a majority 293 (59.6%) were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, while 136 (33.9%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus; and 26 (6.5%) were enterococci. All isolates were sensitive to teicoplanin and vancomycin. Teicoplanin had the same in vitro sensitivity as vancomycin against methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and enterococci in clinical isolates.

  14. Fresh garlic extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panan Ratthawongjirakul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the leading aetiological pathogens of nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria form biofilms on both biotic and abiotic surfaces causing biofilm-associated infections. Within the biofilm, these bacteria might develop persistent and antimicrobial resistant characteristics resulting in chronic infections and treatment failures. Garlic exhibits broad pharmaceutical properties and inhibitory activities against S. aureus. We investigated the effects of aqueous fresh garlic extract on biofilm formation in S. aureus ATCC25923 and MRSA strains under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions. The viable bacteria and biofilm levels were quantified through colony count and crystal violet staining, respectively. The use of fresh garlic extract under both conditions significantly inhibited biofilm formation in S. aureus strains ATCC25923 and MRSA. Garlic could be developed as either a prophylactic or therapeutic agent to manage S. aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  15. Antimicrobial properties of ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in polyurethane varnish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Zvekić

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial effect of the ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in polyurethane varnishes was investigated. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated against three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and one strain fungi (Sacharomyces cerevisiae by the “pour-plate” test. It was shown that the ZnO nanoparticles efficiently inhibit growth of the colonies of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but their activity against Escherichia coli was found to be questionable suggesting more detailed research.

  16. Antimicrobial properties of ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in polyurethane varnish

    OpenAIRE

    Dušan Zvekić; Vladimir V. Srdić; Maja A. Karaman; Milan N. Matavulj

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of the ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in polyurethane varnishes was investigated. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated against three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and one strain fungi (Sacharomyces cerevisiae) by the “pour-plate” test. It was shown that the ZnO nanoparticles efficiently inhibit growth of the colonies of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but their activity against Es...

  17. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Effects of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Conventional Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie de Rapper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (lavender essential oil in combination with four commercial antimicrobial agents. Stock solutions of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nystatin, and fusidic acid were tested in combination with L. angustifolia essential oil. The antimicrobial activities of the combinations were investigated against the Gram-positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27858 and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231 was selected to represent the yeasts. The antimicrobial effect was performed using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC microdilution assay. Isobolograms were constructed for varying ratios. The most prominent interaction was noted when L. angustifolia essential oil was combined with chloramphenicol and tested against the pathogen P. aeruginosa (ΣFIC of 0.29. Lavendula angustifolia essential oil was shown in most cases to interact synergistically with conventional antimicrobials when combined in ratios where higher volumes of L. angustifolia essential oil were incorporated into the combination.

  18. Surface Attachment of Natural Antimicrobial Coatings onto Conventional Polypropylene Nonwoven Fabric and Its Antimicrobial Performance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lijun; Wang, Hao; Liu, Dan; Zheng, Zhengnan

    2018-02-01

    The growing number of microbial cross-contamination events necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial strategies in the food industry. In this study, a polypropylene nonwoven fabric (PPNWF) was grafted with a natural antimicrobial component, aloe emodin (AE), and its antimicrobial performance was evaluated. The grafted samples (PPNWF-g-AE) were examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. AE was effectively grafted onto the surface of the PPNWF through the adsorption covalent effect. Compared with nongrafted PPNWF, the antimicrobial activity of PPNWF-g-AE against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans was significantly enhanced. Scanning electron micrographs confirmed that the inhibitory mechanism of PPNWF-g-AE was the microbicidal function of the grafted AE. These findings indicate that PPNWF-g-AE has potential as an effective antimicrobial material in food applications.

  19. The Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall-Anchored Protein Clumping Factor A Is an Important T Cell Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Keenan A; Leech, John M; Lalor, Stephen J; McCormack, Niamh; Geoghegan, Joan A; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2017-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, and vaccines offer a potential solution to this epidemic of antimicrobial resistance. Targeting of specific T cell subsets is now considered crucial for next-generation anti- S. aureus vaccines; however, there is a paucity of information regarding T cell antigens of S. aureus This study highlights the importance of cell wall-anchored proteins as human CD4 + T cell activators capable of driving antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 cell activation. Clumping factor A (ClfA), which contains N1, N2, and N3 binding domains, was found to be a potent human T cell activator. We further investigated which subdomains of ClfA were involved in T cell activation and found that the full-length ClfA N123 and N23 were potent Th1 and Th17 activators. Interestingly, the N1 subdomain was capable of exclusively activating Th1 cells. Furthermore, when these subdomains were used in a model vaccine, N23 and N1 offered Th1- and Th17-mediated systemic protection in mice upon intraperitoneal challenge. Overall, however, full-length ClfA N123 is required for maximal protection both locally and systemically. Copyright © 2017 Lacey et al.

  20. Nasal Carriage Rate of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Health Care Workers at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, S; Pant, N D; Bhandari, R; Shrestha, K L; Shrestha, C D; Adhikari, N; Poudel, A

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Due to its multidrug resistant nature; infections due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are often very difficult to treat. Colonized health care workers are the important sources of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The objectives of this study were to determine the nasal carriage rate of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among health care workers at Kathmandu Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Nepal and to assess their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A cross sectional study was conducted among 252 health care workers from July to November 2013. Mannitol salt agar was used to culture the nasal swabs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were confirmed by using cefoxitin disc and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of oxacillin by agar dilution method. Of 252 healthcare workers, 46(18.3%) were positive for Staphylococcus aureus among which 19(41.3%) were Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers. Overall rate of nasal carriage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 7.5% (19/252).The higher percentages of lab personnel were nasal carriers of S. aureus (31.6%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (10.5%).The percentages of nasal carriage of S. aureus (35.7%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (14.3%) were highest in the health care workers from post operative department. Higher percentage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were susceptible toward amikacin (100%) and vancomycin (100%) followed by cotrimoxazole (84.2%). High rates of nasal carriage of S. aureus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were observed among the healthcare workers, which indicate the need of

  1. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  2. In vitro evaluation of novel antimicrobial coatings for surgical sutures using octenidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, A; Schneider, J; Föhr, P; Wehner, S; Kühn, K-D; Stemberger, A; Schieker, M; Burgkart, R

    2015-09-24

    Sutures colonized by bacteria represent a challenge in surgery due to their potential to cause surgical site infections. In order to reduce these type of infections antimicrobially coated surgical sutures are currently under development. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial drug octenidine as a coating agent for surgical sutures. To achieve high antimicrobial efficacy and required biocompatibility for medical devices, we focused on optimizing octenidine coatings based on fatty acids. For this purpose, antimicrobial sutures were prepared with either octenidine-laurate or octenidine-palmitate at 11, 22, and 33 μg/cm drug concentration normalized per length of sutures. Octenidine containing sutures were compared to the commercial triclosan-coated suture Vicryl® Plus. The release of octenidine into aqueous solution was analyzed and long-term antimicrobial efficacy was assessed via agar diffusion tests using Staphylococcus aureus. For determining biocompatibility, cytotoxicity assays (WST-1) were performed using L-929 mouse fibroblasts. In a 7 days elution experiment, octenidine-palmitate coated sutures demonstrated much slower drug release (11 μg/cm: 7%; 22 μg/cm: 5%; 33 μg/cm: 33%) than octenidine-laurate sutures (11 μg/cm: 82%; 22 μg/cm: 88%; 33 μg/cm: 87%). Furthermore sutures at 11 μg/cm drug content were associated with acceptable cytotoxicity according to ISO 10993-5 standard and showed, similar to Vicryl® Plus, relevant efficacy to inhibit surrounding bacterial growth for up to 9 days. Octenidine coated sutures with a concentration of 11 μg/cm revealed high antimicrobial efficacy and biocompatibility. Due to their delayed release, palmitate carriers should be preferred. Such coatings are candidates for clinical testing in regard to their safety and efficacy.

  3. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N C C; Barbosa, L; Seito, L N; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus and 16 Escherichia coli strains from human specimens was carried out using the dilution method in Mueller-Hinton agar. Some phenolic compounds with antimicrobial properties were established, and all EOs had a higher antimicrobial activity than the extracts. Matricaria chamomilla extract and E. uniflora EO were efficient against S. aureus strains, while E. uniflora and V. polyanthes extracts and V. polyanthes EO showed the best antimicrobial activity against E. coli strains. Staphylococcus aureus strains were more susceptible to the tested plant products than E. coli, but all natural products promoted antimicrobial growth inhibition.

  4. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of amphiphilic carbohydrate derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Roberta C.N.; Oda, Simone C.; Almeida, Mauro V. de; Le Hyaric, Mireille [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: mireille.hyaric@ufjf.edu.br; Lourenco, Maria C.S.; Vicente, Felipe R.C. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil ). Instituto de Pesquisa Clinica Evandro Chagas (IPEC); Barbosa, Nadia R.; Trevizani, Rafael; Santos, Priscila L.C. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia e Bioquimica

    2008-07-01

    N-monoalkylated diamines were synthesised and treated with D-ribonolactone or D-gluconolactone. The resulting aldonamides were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, E. coli, M. tuberculosis and C. albicans. Two hydrazides were also prepared from ribonohydrazide and their biological activity was compared to their amide analogues. All the ribono-derivatives displayed moderated antitubercular activity, and some of them were also active against S. aureus. (author)

  5. Antimicrobial hyperbranched poly(ester amide)/polyaniline nanofiber modified montmorillonite nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Sujata [Advanced Polymer and Nanomaterial Laboratory, Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028 (India); Bharali, Pranjal; Konwar, B.K. [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028 (India); Karak, Niranjan, E-mail: karakniranjan@yahoo.com [Advanced Polymer and Nanomaterial Laboratory, Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028 (India)

    2014-02-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of nanomaterials featuring potent of antimicrobial activity in the biomedical domain. It still remains a challenge for the researchers to develop an efficient nanocomposite possessing antimicrobial efficacy against broad spectrum microbes including bacteria, fungi as well as algal consortium, posing serious challenges for the human survival. In addressing the above problem, we report the fabrication of bio-based hyperbranched poly(ester amide) (HBPEA)/polyaniline nanofiber modified montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites by an ex-situ polymerization technique at varied weight percentages (1, 2.5, 5 wt.%) of the modified MMT (nanohybrid). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the structural changes upon interaction of the nanohybrid with HBPEA. A probable mechanism is proposed for the formation of nanocomposites with partially exfoliated nanoplatelet structure, which was further confirmed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analyses. The prepared nanocomposites exhibited potent efficacy against gram positive bacteria like Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus as compared to the gram negative ones like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The nanocomposites showed significant antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum and Coleotricum capcii and antialgal activity against algal consortium comprising of Chlorella, Hormidium and Cladophorella species. The formation of thermosetting nanocomposites resulted in the acceptable improvement of desired physico-chemical and mechanical properties including thermostability. Thus pronounced antimicrobial activity of the nanocomposites against a spectrum of bacterial and fungal strains as well as a consortium of algal species along with other desired performance vouched them as potent antimicrobial materials in the realm of health and biomedical industry. - Highlights: • A possible approach for fabrication of the

  6. Effect of Pithecellobium jiringa as antimicrobial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzilawati Abu Bakar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pithecellobium jiringa is Malay traditional local delicacy. There is no local data on antimicrobial nature of P. jiringa is available. The objective of our study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of P. jiringa. Leaves, pods and seeds of P. jiringa were extracted using methanol. Ten test microorganisms were used in the study. The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the sensitivity of the samples, while the liquid dilution method was used for the determination of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC. Chloramphenicol was used as a reference standard. The results revealed that all extracts of P. jiringa showed the antimicrobial and antifungal activities against the test organisms. Amongst the active extracts, the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC determination showed that the extract of P. jiringa leaf was the most active against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and M. gypsum (100 mg/mL. The results provided evidence that the studied plants extract might be potential sources of new antimicrobial drug.

  7. Synthesis of a novel multi N-halamines siloxane precursor and its antimicrobial activity on cotton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lin; Xu, Yan; Cai, Lu; Zang, Xiong [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, No 199 Renai Road, Industry Park, Suzhou 215021 (China); Li, Zhanxiong, E-mail: lizhanxiong@suda.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, No 199 Renai Road, Industry Park, Suzhou 215021 (China)

    2014-09-30

    A novel N-halamine siloxane antibacterial precursor N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-N′- (N″′-heptylcarbamido-N″-ethyl)-butanediamide (TSHCEB) was synthesized and characterized in this study. The compound was then tethered to the surface of cotton fabrics through covalent ether linkages, followed by exposure to dilute sodium hypochlorite solutions to confer the cotton fabrics antibacterial property. The chemical structure of the monomer was confirmed by FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR and MS, and the surface of the treated cotton fabrics was characterized by FTIR, TGA, SEM, and XPS analysis. The antimicrobial cotton materials were then challenged with Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538). Results showed that it provided excellent antimicrobial properties against E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus via direct contacting for 2–15 min. The controlled release of diverse chlorines was proved by inhibition zone. The chlorine bonded to the coating was stable under standard washing test and routine storage, stability toward UVA irradiation was also investigated, and the lost chlorine could be regenerated by rechlorination. The new N-halamine antibacterial precursor can provide superior antibacterial property within a short contact time.

  8. Synthesis of a novel multi N-halamines siloxane precursor and its antimicrobial activity on cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Xu, Yan; Cai, Lu; Zang, Xiong; Li, Zhanxiong

    2014-09-01

    A novel N-halamine siloxane antibacterial precursor N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-N‧- (N″‧-heptylcarbamido-N″-ethyl)-butanediamide (TSHCEB) was synthesized and characterized in this study. The compound was then tethered to the surface of cotton fabrics through covalent ether linkages, followed by exposure to dilute sodium hypochlorite solutions to confer the cotton fabrics antibacterial property. The chemical structure of the monomer was confirmed by FTIR, 1H NMR and MS, and the surface of the treated cotton fabrics was characterized by FTIR, TGA, SEM, and XPS analysis. The antimicrobial cotton materials were then challenged with Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538). Results showed that it provided excellent antimicrobial properties against E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus via direct contacting for 2-15 min. The controlled release of diverse chlorines was proved by inhibition zone. The chlorine bonded to the coating was stable under standard washing test and routine storage, stability toward UVA irradiation was also investigated, and the lost chlorine could be regenerated by rechlorination. The new N-halamine antibacterial precursor can provide superior antibacterial property within a short contact time.

  9. Highly brominated antimicrobial metabolites from a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, Domonkos; Barlow, Russell; McAtee, Jesse; Hemscheidt, Thomas K

    2010-11-29

    Extracts of a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. (CMMED 290) isolated from the surface of a nudibranch collected in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, displayed significant antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipophilic extract led to the isolation and structure elucidation of two new highly brominated compounds, 2,3,5,7-tetrabromobenzofuro[3,2-b]pyrrole (1) and 4,4',6-tribromo-2,2'-biphenol (2). In addition, we have identified the known compounds pentabromopseudilin and bromophene. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of the compounds 1 and 2 together with their antimicrobial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Proof of Principle for a Real-Time Pathogen Isolation Media Diagnostic: The Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Discriminate Bacterial Pathogens and Antimicrobial-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Grown on Blood Agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie A. Multari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS is a rapid, in situ, diagnostic technique in which light emissions from a laser plasma formed on the sample are used for analysis allowing automated analysis results to be available in seconds to minutes. This speed of analysis coupled with little or no sample preparation makes LIBS an attractive detection tool. In this study, it is demonstrated that LIBS can be utilized to discriminate both the bacterial species and strains of bacterial colonies grown on blood agar. A discrimination algorithm was created based on multivariate regression analysis of spectral data. The algorithm was deployed on a simulated LIBS instrument system to demonstrate discrimination capability using 6 species. Genetically altered Staphylococcus aureus strains grown on BA, including isogenic sets that differed only by the acquisition of mutations that increase fusidic acid or vancomycin resistance, were also discriminated. The algorithm successfully identified all thirteen cultures used in this study in a time period of 2 minutes. This work provides proof of principle for a LIBS instrumentation system that could be developed for the rapid discrimination of bacterial species and strains demonstrating relatively minor genomic alterations using data collected directly from pathogen isolation media.

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from person to person. Poor infection control, inadequate sanitary conditions and inappropriate food-handling encourage the spread ... week of the campaign. The Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (GLASS) The WHO-supported system supports a ...

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... developed a strategy to combat CA-MRSA. By neutralizing the bacterium's toxin, the researchers were able to ... target disease areas experiencing the greatest antimicrobial selective pressure and test novel therapeutic approaches that minimize drug ...

  14. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates pesticides under the statutory authority of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). The registration requirements for antimicrobial pesticides differ somewhat from those of other pesticides. Find out more.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Goats with Subclinical Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Virdis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance patterns and gene coding for methicillin resistance (mecA were determined in 25 S. aureus and 75 Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CNS strains isolates from half-udder milk samples collected from goats with subclinical mastitis. Fourteen (56.0% S. aureus and thirty-one (41.3% CNS isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. S. aureus showed the highest resistance rate against kanamycin (28.0%, oxytetracycline (16.0%, and ampicillin (12.0%. The CNS tested were more frequently resistant to ampicillin (36.0% and kanamycin (6.7%. Multiple antimicrobial resistance was observed in eight isolates, and one Staphylococcus epidermidis was found to be resistant to six antibiotics. The mecA gene was not found in any of the tested isolates. Single resistance against β-lactamics or aminoglicosides is the most common trait observed while multiresistance is less frequent.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Desbois

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available New compounds are needed to treat acne and superficial infections caused by Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus due to the reduced effectiveness of agents used at present. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs are attracting attention as potential new topical treatments for Gram-positive infections due to their antimicrobial potency and anti-inflammatory properties. This present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of six LC-PUFAs against P. acnes and S. aureus to evaluate their potential to treat infections caused by these pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined against P. acnes and S. aureus, and the LC-PUFAs were found to inhibit bacterial growth at 32–1024 mg/L. Generally, P. acnes was more susceptible to the growth inhibitory actions of LC-PUFAs, but these compounds were bactericidal only for S. aureus. This is the first report of antibacterial activity attributed to 15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (15-OHEPA and 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (HETrE, while the anti-P. acnes effects of the six LC-PUFAs used herein are novel observations. During exposure to the LC-PUFAs, S. aureus cells were killed within 15–30 min. Checkerboard assays demonstrated that the LC-PUFAs did not antagonise the antimicrobial potency of clinical agents used presently against P. acnes and S. aureus. However, importantly, synergistic interactions against S. aureus were detected for combinations of benzoyl peroxide with 15-OHEPA, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA and HETrE; and neomycin with 15-OHEPA, DGLA, eicosapentaenoic acid, γ-linolenic acid and HETrE. In conclusion, LC-PUFAs warrant further evaluation as possible new agents to treat skin infections caused by P. acnes and S. aureus, especially in synergistic combinations with antimicrobial agents already used clinically.

  17. Spread of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to penicillin and tetracycline within and between dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, S.; Bjorland, J.; Caugant, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    One hundred and seven bovine isolates of penicillin and tetracycline resistant Staphylococcus aureus, recovered from 25 different dairy herds in various parts of Norway, were characterized using antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, ribotyping, plasmid analysis...... different counties, were assigned to 6 different strains. Seven out of these 8 isolates had the same plasmid restriction profile. In conclusion, penicillin and tetracycline resistant S. aureus occurring in dairy herds in Norway mainly seems to represent one particular strain that has achieved widespread...

  18. Synthetic analogs of anoplin show improved antimicrobial activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Jens; Uggerhøj, Lars Erik; Poulsen, Tanja Juul

    2013-01-01

    We present the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of the decapeptide anoplin and 19 analogs thereof tested against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 33591 (MRSA), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ATCC...... that increasing the charge and/or hydrophobicity improves antimicrobial activity and increases hemolytic activity. For each strain tested, we identify at least six anoplin analogs with an improved therapeutic index compared with anoplin, the only exception being Enterococcus faecium, against which only few...

  19. Antimicrobial activity of yeasts against some pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gamal Younis; Amal Awad; Dawod, Rehab E.; Yousef, Nehal E.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to isolate and identify yeast species from milk and meat products, and to test their antimicrobial activity against some bacterial species. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 milk and meat products samples were collected from random sellers and super markets in New Damietta city, Damietta, Egypt. Samples were subjected to yeast isolation procedures and tested for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherich...

  20. Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation and QSAR studies of propionic acid derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Kumar, Pradeep; Marwaha, Rakesh Kumar; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    A series of Schiff bases (1–17) and esters (18–24) of propionic acid was synthesized in appreciable yield and characterized by physicochemical as well as spectral means. The synthesized compounds were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli and fungal strains Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger by tube dilution method. Results of antimicrobial screening indicated th...

  1. Antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeana M.E. Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima - an abundant plant from the Brazilian Pantanal region - against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The crude extracts and fractions showed activity in all tested microorganisms. The chloroform fraction of the leaves and roots showed the most antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, with an MIC of 500 μg/mL. This fraction was submitted to bioautographic assays to characterize the activity of the compounds. Two bands from the leaves (L-A and L-B and three bands from the roots (R-C, R-D and R-E were bioactive. Within the root-derived bands, the terpene derivatives stigmasterol, kaurenoic acid and kaura-9(11, 16-dien-18-oic acid were identified. Antibiotic activity of A. latissima is reported for the first time.

  2. Evaluation of the in vitro antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of three Miconia species

    OpenAIRE

    Celotto,Andréa Carla; Nazario,Daniela Zaupa; Spessoto,Marcela de Almeida; Martins,Carlos Henrique Gomes; Cunha,Wilson Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of nine crude extracts of three Miconia species (M. albicans, M. rubiginosa and M. stenostachya) was tested against eleven selected microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus agalactiae and Candida albicans. The results of the test showed that three extracts had some antimicrobial activit...

  3. Studies on the antimicrobial effect of corn steep liquor on some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial effect of Corn Steep Liquor (CSL) was investigated over a five day period. The pH and titrable acidity of the liquor were determined, while the antimicrobial effect on some diarrhoea causing organisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteriditis, Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus was ...

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: ...

  5. Cutaneous bacterial infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larru, Beatriz; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in children. The medical burden of SSSIs, particularly abscesses, has increased nationwide since the emergence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. SSSIs represent a wide spectrum of disease severity. Prompt recognition, timely institution of appropriate therapy, and judicious antimicrobial use optimize patient outcomes. For abscesses, incision and drainage are paramount and might avoid the need for antibiotic treatment in uncomplicated cases. If indicated, empiric antimicrobial therapy should target Streptococcus pyogenes for nonpurulent SSSIs, such as uncomplicated cellulitis, and S aureus for purulent SSSIs such as abscesses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug repurposing: a new front in the war against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swetarka; Dasgupta, Arunava; Chopra, Sidharth

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus continues its domination of worldwide bacterial infection rates, thereby remaining a pathogen of significant public health interest. A major reason for its continued success is its ability to acquire and maintain diverse drug resistance mechanisms, leading to a paucity of antimicrobials active against it, concomitantly leading to a continuous search for new antimicrobial agents. However, with the withdrawal of the major pharmaceutical firms from the anti-infective area, drug repurposing has provided a potential boost to the drug pipeline. In this review, we provide an overview of the currently approved drugs with repurposing potential against Staphylococcus aureus, thus augmenting the classical drug discovery pathway.

  7. Hypoxic radiosensitization by the antimicrobial methyl paraben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, G.P.; Sade, N.

    1984-08-01

    The antimicrobial preservative, methyl paraben (methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate) sensitizes anoxic buffered suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus to gamma-radiation. The maximal response at an 0.5 mM concentration represents a 150 percent increase in response over that for deoxygenated suspensions without additive, and 80 percent of the response for aerated suspensions alone. Methyl paraben is not toxic to the test organism under the present test conditions.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus entrance into the dairy chain: Tracking S. aureus from dairy cow to cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kümmel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. 1176 quarter milk (QM samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294 and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS. Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing, dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day fourteen of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires effective clearance strategies and hygienic

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Entrance into the Dairy Chain: Tracking S. aureus from Dairy Cow to Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Judith; Stessl, Beatrix; Gonano, Monika; Walcher, Georg; Bereuter, Othmar; Fricker, Martina; Grunert, Tom; Wagner, Martin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. one thousand hundred seventy six one thousand hundred seventy six quarter milk (QM) samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294) and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM) of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS) and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS). Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing), dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day 14 of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej) of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus, our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires

  11. The synergistic effect of PDT and oxacillin on clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iluz, Natanel; Maor, Yasmin; Keller, Natan; Malik, Zvi

    2018-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in clinical microbiology. It is known to cause infections at various body sites and can be life-threatening. The development of resistance to many well-established antibiotic treatments and the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRAS) among hospital patients and the general community pose challenges in treating the pathogen. The antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been a subject of study for a long time and can offer new strategies for dealing with resistant strains. In our study, we searched for a positive synergistic relationship between PDT and the standard antibiotics used to treat S. aureus and MRSA infections. The phototoxic profile of deuteroporphyrin (DP) in both resistant and susceptible clinical strains of S. aureus was determined by plating of treated and untreated broth cultures. Electron microscopy imaging was done to explore possible sites of damage and free-radical accumulation in the cells during DP-PDT. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of oxacillin, gentamicin, vancomycin, rifampin, and fusidic acid was determined using the broth dilution method, and the checkerboard method was used to detect and evaluate the synergistic potential of DP-PDT and antibiotic combinations. A synergistic combination was further characterized using broth cultures and plating. DP-PDT using a light dose of 15 J/cm 2 showed a bactericidal effect even with a small concentration of 17 μM DP. Transmission electron microscopy indicated profound damage in the cell wall and cell membrane, and the appearance of mesosome-like structures. Free radicals tend to localize in the cell membrane and inside the mesosome. No synergistic effect was detected by combining PDT with gentamicin, vancomycin, rifampin, and fusidic acid treatments. A positive synergistic effect was observed only in DP-PDT-oxacillin combined treatment using the checkerboard method. The effect was observed in clinical antibiotic

  12. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 1% sodium hypochlorite and paramonochlorophenol combined with furacin against S. aureus, C. albicans, E. faecalise and P. aureginosa = Atividade antimicrobiana da clorexidina a 2%, hipoclorito de sódio a 1% e paramonoclorofenol com furacin sobre S. aureus, C. albicans, E. faecalise e P. aureginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle Vedove

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar a ação antimicrobiana da clorexidina a 2%, do hipoclorito de sódio a 1% e do paramonoclorofenol associado ao furacin sobre S aureus, C albicans, E faecalise e P aureginosa. Metodologia: Foram utilizadas 40 placas Petri. Quatro placas foram separadas como controle negativo e em 4 outras, além do meio de cultura, semearam-se os microrganismos, com o círculo de papel, para se obter o controle positivo. Em 32 placas seguiu-se a colocação de 4 círculos de filtro de papel esterilizados e impregnados das substâncias testes e controle, depositados em cada quadrante das mesmas. Os grupos foram analisados por 7 dias. Para a verificação dos resultados, usaram-se os halos de inibição de crescimento bacteriano. Resultados: A clorexidina 2% foi significantemente (P<0,05 mais efetiva para todas as cepas microbianas que as demais substâncias. O hipoclorito de sódio a 1% apresentou resultados intermediários. O paramonoclorofenol associado ao furacin (PMC+F obteve os piores resultados. Conclusão: A clorexidina obteve os melhores resultados. O PMC+F apresentou os menores halos de inibição

  14. Metabolites of the "smoke tree", Dalea spinosa, potentiate antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belofsky, Gil; Carreno, Roberto; Lewis, Kim; Ball, Anthony; Casadei, Gabriele; Tegos, George P

    2006-02-01

    Two new 2-arylbenzofuran aldehydes (1 and 2) and three known phenolic compounds (3-5) were isolated from organic extracts of Dalea spinosa. These compounds were evaluated for their intrinsic antimicrobial activity and their ability to perform as multidrug-resistance inhibitors by potentiating the activity of known antimicrobials against a variety of pathogenic microorganisms. Compound 1 and its acetate derivative 6 exhibited no direct antimicrobial activity but enhanced the effect of the weak plant antimicrobial berberine when tested against Staphylococcus aureus. Additional potentiation assays with S. aureus overexpression and knockout isogenic efflux mutants for the NorA pump were done in order to assess whether the potentiating effects were associated with inhibition of this known pump mechanism.

  15. Photothermal killing of Staphylococcus aureus using antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenbaugh, Nancy J; Baskin, Jonathan B; DeSilva, Mauris N; Elliott, W Rowe; Glickman, Randolph D

    2015-01-01

    The continued emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and the decline in discovery of new antibiotics are major challenges for health care throughout the world. This situation has heightened the need for novel antimicrobial therapies as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. The combination of metallic nanoparticles and laser exposure has been proposed as a strategy to induce physical damage to bacteria, regardless of antibiotic sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to test the antibacterial effect of antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles combined with pulsed laser irradiation. Gold nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan were incubated with suspensions of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MRSA and MSSA). Bacterial suspensions were then exposed to 8 ns pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm and fluences ranging from 1 to 5 J/cm(2). Viability of the bacteria following laser exposure was determined using colony forming unit assays. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm the binding of nanoparticles to bacteria and the presence of cellular damage. The laser-activated nanoparticle treatment reduced the surviving population to 31% of control in the MSSA population, while the survival in the MRSA population was reduced to 58% of control. Significant decreases in bacterial viability occurred when the laser fluence exceeded 1 J/cm(2), and this effect was linear from 0 to 5 J/cm(2) (r (2)=0.97). Significantly less bactericidal effect was observed for nonfunctionalized nanoparticles or functionalized nanoparticles without laser activation. Laser-activated nanoparticles targeted to S. aureus surface antigens significantly reduced the percentage of viable organisms and represents a promising new treatment modality that could be used either alone or as an adjunct to existing, conventional antibiotic therapy.

  16. Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobials against Biofilm Bacteria on Hard, Non-Porous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the availability of two test methods (MB-19 and MB-20) for evaluating the efficacy of antimicrobial pesticides against two biofilm bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

  17. How can we fight against antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Gu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The public health community is faced with the global challenge posed by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and extended-spectrum b-lactamases (ESBLs-producing enterobacteriaceae. The need to address this issue prompted the focus of World Health Day 2011, which was entitled “Antimicrobial resistance: no action today, no cure tomorrow.”In today’s world of international travel, the globalization of drug-resistant bacteria is a pressing issue for public health professionals. In the World Health Organization (WHO Western Pacific Region, as well as other regions in the world, more and more new types of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria have come to the forefront. An important example is New Delhi Metallo-b-lactamase 1 (NDM-1-carrying enterobacteriaceae, which attracted attention in Europe in 2010 as imported cases associated with health care contact in India and Bangladesh. Although some NDM-1 cases were reported from Australia and Japan,2 no outbreaks were reported in the Western Pacific Region.In this perspective article, we consider four focus areas for countries in the Western Pacific Region to consider when strategizing their response to antimicrobial resistant bacteria.

  18. Diaryltriazenes as antibacterial agents against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajs, Jure; Proud, Conor; Brozovic, Anamaria; Gazvoda, Martin; Lloyd, Adrian; Roper, David I; Osmak, Maja; Košmrlj, Janez; Dowson, Christopher G

    2017-02-15

    Diaryltriazene derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their antimicrobial properties. Initial experiments showed some of these compounds to have activity against both methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) and Mycobacterium smegmatis, with MICs of 0.02 and 0.03 μg/mL respectively. Those compounds with potent anti-staphylococcal and anti-mycobacterial activity were not found to act as growth inhibitors of mammalian cell lines or yeast. Furthermore, we demonstrated that one of the most active anti-MRSA diaryltriazene derivatives was subject to very low frequencies of resistance at resistant isolates identified mutations in the enzyme that lysylates phospholipids. This could result in the modification of phospholipid metabolism and consequently the characteristics of the staphylococcal cell membrane, ultimately modifying the sensitivity of these pathogens to triazene challenge. Our work has therefore extended the potential range of triazenes, which could yield novel antimicrobials with low levels of resistance. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Myricetin protects Galleria mellonella against Staphylococcus aureus infection and inhibits multiple virulence factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira-Silva, L; Da Hora, G. C.A.; Soares, Goncalo Teofilo Afonso Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen related to a variety of life-threatening infections but for which antimicrobial resistance is liming the treatment options. We report here that myricetin, but not its glycosylated form, can remarkably decrease the production of several S. aureus...... related gene expression and computational simulations of pivotal proteins involved in pathogenesis demonstrate that myricetin downregulates the saeR global regulator and interacts with sortase A and α-hemolysin. Furthermore, Myr confers a significant degree of protection against staphylococcal infection...... in the Galleria mellonella model. The present findings reveal the potential of Myr as an alternative multi-target antivirulence candidate to control S. aureus pathogenicity....

  20. Influence of Magnolol on the Secretion of α-Toxin by Staphylococcus aureus

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    Xu-Ming Deng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the antimicrobial activity of magnolol on Staphylococcus aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of magnolol against 31 S. aureus strains ranged from 4–32 μg/mL. In addition, hemolysin assays, Western blotting, and real-time RT-PCR were performed to investigate the effect of magnolol on α-toxin secretion by both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The results indicated that sub-inhibitory concentrations of magnolol dose-dependently inhibited the transcription of hla (the gene encoding α-toxin in S. aureus, resulting in a reduction of α-toxin secretion and, thus, hemolytic activities.

  1. Repurposing celecoxib as a topical antimicrobial agent

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    Mohamed N. Seleem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new antibiotics and alternative strategies to combat multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens, which are a growing clinical issue. Repurposing existing approved drugs with known pharmacology and toxicology is an alternative strategy to accelerate antimicrobial research and development. In this study, we show that celecoxib, a marketed inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens from a variety of genera, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Listeria, Bacillus, and Mycobacterium, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. However, celecoxib is active against all of the Gram-negative bacteria tested, including strains of, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas, when their intrinsic resistance is artificially compromised by outer membrane permeabilizing agents such as colistin. The effect of celecoxib on incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules in Staphylococcus aureus was examined. The primary antimicrobial mechanism of action of celecoxib was the dose-dependent inhibition of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis. Further, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of celecoxib in a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA infected Caenorhabditis elegans whole animal model. Topical application of celecoxib (1 and 2% significantly reduced the mean bacterial count in a mouse model of MRSA skin infection. Further, celecoxib decreased the levels of all inflammatory cytokines tested, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-1 beta, and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 in wounds caused by MRSA infection. Celecoxib also exhibited synergy with many conventional antimicrobials when tested against four clinical isolates of S. aureus. Collectively, these results demonstrate that celecoxib alone, or in combination with traditional antimicrobials, has a potential to use as a topical drug for the treatment of bacterial skin infections.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a finger felon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, B; Johnstone, F; Gerlinger, T; Puttler, E

    2000-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is an increasingly prevalent nosocomial pathogen that presents therapeutic challenges. We report an incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus in a felon. The biochemical and clinical characteristics of methicillin-resistant S aureus are reviewed. The alarming increase of this organism in various types of infections demands the attention of all surgeons and emphasizes the importance of early surgical drainage and culture of pus in all cases of infection. (J Hand Surg 2000; 25A:173-175. Copyright 2000 by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.).

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates in milk from flocks diagnosed with subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, A R E O; Almeida, A C; Souza, C N; Silva, L M V; Ruas, A X A; Sanglard, D A; Júnior, A F M; Oliveira, A M E; Xavier, M A S

    2017-06-29

    The Staphylococcus aureus is the most common isolated microorganism in ruminant animal species diagnostic with clinical or subclinical mastitis. Dairy herds with these diseases can transfer S. aureus into the milk supply, which can lead to food poisoning in humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the profile of antimicrobial susceptibility, the presence of femA gene, the genetic relationships among isolates of S. aureus obtained from milk originating from flocks diagnosed with subclinical mastitis in nine rural properties in the northern of Minas Gerais State. To this end, 498 samples of bovine milk tested positive for the California mastitis test (CMT) were subjected to morphological methods and biochemical patterns for microbiological presumptive identification of S. aureus. The PCR test with the genetic marker femA was used to confirm the species S. aureus. All the 26 isolates presumptively identified as S. aureus amplified a fragment of 132 bp corresponding to the femA gene. The profile of antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to the disk-diffusion methodology and two isolates were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested. The drug multiresistence was found in 80.76% of the isolates. The determination of the genetic profile and the clonal relationship among the isolates was performed by the method of DNA RAPD-PCR polymorphism. The S. aureus isolates were divided into two groups with 26 distinct subgroups. The analysis of RAPD-PCR showed no genetic diversity among them, heterogeneous profile and absence of clonality.

  4. Staphylococcal phage 2638a endolysin is lytic for Staphylococcus aureus and harbors an inter-lytic-domain cryptic translational start site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious pathogen with a propensity for developing resistance to virtually all antibiotics. Staphylococcal phage 2638A endolysin is a peptidoglycan hydrolase that is lytic for Staphylococcus aureus when exposed externally, making it a new candidate antimicrobial. It sha...

  5. Bacterial isolates from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with pneumonia not responding to initial antimicrobial therapy

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    Rahul Magazine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP who are admitted in a hospital but do not respond to initial antimicrobial therapy pose a challenge to the attending physician. The knowledge of the likely pathogens and their sensitivity pattern can help the clinicians to better manage such cases. Aims and Objectives: To study the spectrum of the bacterial isolates and to determine the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern obtained from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid of CAP patients who did not respond to initial antimicrobial therapy. Setting and Design: A retrospective study of 87 patients who were admitted in the medical wards of a tertiary care teaching hospital in South India with the diagnosis of CAP and were not responding to initial antimicrobial therapy. Materials and Methods: The patient-related data were obtained from the case records and entered on a pre-designed proforma. This included demographic characteristics and reports of relevant clinical tests. The BAL culture and sensitivity results were also noted on the proforma. Results: The mean age of the patients was 49.28 ± 16.61 years (mean ± SD, range 17-80 years. Fifty-seven patients (65.5% of were male. Also, 98 bacterial isolates were obtained from the BAL fluid of 87 patients. The most prevalent bacterial isolates included Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 35, 35.7%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 19, 19.4%, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 15, 15.3% and Acinetobacter species (n = 11, 11.2%. Most bacterial isolates tested showed 100% sensitivity to meropenem except Acinetobacter species (25%. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were the most common bacterial pathogens isolated from the BAL fluid. The isolates tested showed 100% sensitivity to meropenem except Acinetobacter species. All the methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates displayed sensitivity to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin.

  6. Performance of the Chromogenic Medium CHROMagar Staph Aureus and the Staphychrom Coagulase Test in the Detection and Identification of Staphylococcus aureus in Clinical Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carricajo, Anne; Treny, Axel; Fonsale, Nathalie; Bes, Michele; Reverdy, Marie Elisabeth; Gille, Yves; Aubert, Gerald; Freydiere, Anne Marie

    2001-01-01

    CHROMagar Staph aureus (CSAM) (CHROMagar Microbiology, Paris, France) is a new chromogenic medium designed to enable detection of colo