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Sample records for auger-electron emitting estrogen

  1. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17α- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE2, were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the [p,n] reaction with 80Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE2 showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE2 were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of [/sup 80m/Br]BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSombre, E.R.; Mease, R.C.; Hughes, A.; Harper, P.V.; DeJesus, O.T.; Friedman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17..cap alpha..- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE/sub 2/, were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the (p,n) reaction with /sup 80/Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE/sub 2/ showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE/sub 2/ were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of (/sup 80m/Br)BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development of this

  4. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development

  5. Accelerator based Production of Auger-Electron-emitting Isotopes for Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Augerelectron- emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Augeremitter 119Sb has been identified...... isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able...

  6. Auger electron spectroscopy of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes how the surface compositions of some alloys can be determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The motivation for this research and the reasons for the choice of alloy systems studied are formulated. The theoretical background of AES is briefly discussed and the apparatus used and the experimental procedures applied are described. Four alloy systems have been investigated in this thesis - Ni-Cu and Pd - Ag (consisting of a component active in most cataytic reactions - Ni and Pd; and a component which is almost inactive for a number of reactions - Cu and Ag) and Pt - Pd and Pt-Ir (consisting of two active components). Knowledge of the surface composition of the various alloy systems is shown to be essential for the interpretation of catalytic results. (Auth./C.F.)

  7. Validation of 64Cu-ATSM damaging DNA via high-LET Auger electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive copper (II) (diacetyl-bis N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) isotopes were originally developed for the imaging of hypoxia in tumors. Because the decay of a 64Cu atom is emitting not only positrons but also Auger electrons, this radionuclide has great potential as a theranostic agent. However, the success of 64Cu-ATSM internal radiation therapy would depend on the contribution of Auger electrons to tumor cell killing. Therefore, we designed a cell culture system to define the contributions to cell death from Auger electrons to support or refute our hypothesis that the majority of cell death from 64Cu-ATSM is a result of high-LET Auger electrons and not positrons or other low-LET radiation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) wild type and DNA repair–deficient xrs5 cells were exposed to 64Cu-ATSM during hypoxic conditions. Surviving fractions were compared with those surviving gamma-radiation, low-LET hadron radiation, and high-LET heavy ion exposure. The ratio of the D10 values (doses required to achieve 10% cell survival) between CHO wild type and xrs5 cells suggested that 64Cu-ATSM toxicity is similar to that of high-LET Carbon ion radiation (70 keV/μm). γH2AX foci assays confirmed DNA double-strand breaks and cluster damage by high-LET Auger electrons from 64Cu decay, and complex types of chromosomal aberrations typical of high-LET radiation were observed after 64Cu-ATSM exposure. The majority of cell death was caused by high-LET radiation. This work provides strong evidence that 64Cu-ATSM damages DNA via high-LET Auger electrons, supporting further study and consideration of 64Cu-ATSM as a cancer treatment modality for hypoxic tumors. (author)

  8. Auger electron appearance potential spectrum of Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons are accelerated onto a solid polycrystalline Ni surface. These primary electrons interact with the surface to produce one of two phenomena: x-ray fluorescence, or Auger electron emission. Auger Electron Appearance Potential Spectroscopy (AEAPS) is a process by which the Auger component of the secondary electron flux is analysed to extract qualitative information about the electronic structure of the empty conduction band states. In AEAPS, the threshold behavior of the Auger transitions is examined by taking the first derivative of the secondary electron current with respect to the incident electron energy using the potential modulation technique. Width of the empty band, degree of localization of the conduction band wave functions, overlapping of the 3d band with the 4s, and satellite phenomena are among the important parameters ascertainable by AEAPS. The present AEAPS measurements of L3 levels of Ni are compared with the reported data from Soft X-ray Appear nce Potential Spectroscopy (SXAPS) of Ni. SXAPS is a complimentary process of AEAPS in that it examines the secondary xray fluorescence from the surface in much the same way as AEAPS examines the total electron yield. AEAPS, used alone, or in conjunction with SXAPS, is considered to be a powerful technique for the systematic investgation of series of metals, such as the transition, or lanthanide series

  9. Improvements upon the continuum wavefunctions of Auger electrons by use of the least-squares variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variational least-squares technique is developed to obtain an iterative improvements upon the wavefunctions of Auger electrons emitted by the ion Ar2+. The core potentials seen by the Auger electrons are evaluated on the basis of the Hartree-Fock orbitals delivered by the conventional Hartree-Fock programs. In order to illustrate our technique, the transition rates of the Auger electrons emitted from Ar corresponding to different configurations, namely 1s → 3p 3p, 1s → 3s 3s, 1s → 2s 2s, 1s → 2p 2p, 1s → 2s 3s and 1s → 2p 3p are calculated. (author)

  10. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaee, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Rezaee@USherbrooke.ca; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon [Groupe en Sciences des Radiations, Département de Médecine Nucléaire et Radiobiologie, Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods: Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by{sup 125}I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results: For a single decay of{sup 125}I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm{sup 3} volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions: Ultra-low-energy electrons (<18 eV) substantially contribute to the absorbed dose and to the molecular damage from Auger-electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should

  11. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  12. Block copolymer micelles target Auger electron radiotherapy to the nucleus of HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Bryan; Reilly, Raymond M; Allen, Christine

    2012-02-13

    Intracellular trafficking of Auger electron emitting radionuclides to perinuclear and nuclear regions of cells is critical to realizing their full therapeutic potential. In the present study, block copolymer micelles (BCMs) were labeled with the Auger electron emitter indium-111 ((111)In) and loaded with the radiosensitizer methotrexate. HER2 specific antibodies (trastuzumab fab) and nuclear localization signal (NLS; CGYGPKKKRKVGG) peptides were conjugated to the surface of the BCMs to direct uptake in HER2 expressing cells and subsequent localization in the cell nucleus. Cell uptake and intracellular distribution of the multifunctional BCMs were evaluated in a panel of breast cancer cell lines with different levels of HER2 expression. Indeed cell uptake was found to be HER2 density dependent, confirming receptor-mediated internalization of the BCMs. Importantly, conjugation of NLS peptides to the surface of BCMs was found to result in a significant increase in nuclear uptake of the radionuclide (111)In. Successful nuclear targeting was shown to improve the antipoliferative effect of the Auger electrons as measured by clonogenic assays. In addition, a significant radiation enhancement effect was observed by concurrent delivery of low-dose MTX and (111)In in all breast cancer cell lines evaluated.

  13. Ramsey method for Auger-electron interference induced by an attosecond twin pulse

    OpenAIRE

    Buth, Christian; Schafer, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the archetype of an interference experiment for Auger electrons: two electron wave packets are launched by inner-shell ionizing a krypton atom using two attosecond light pulses with a variable time delay. This setting is an attosecond realization of the Ramsey method of separated oscillatory fields. Interference of the two ejected Auger-electron wave packets is predicted, indicating that the coherence between the two pulses is passed to the Auger electrons. For the detection of the...

  14. Relationship Between Chromatin Structure and Sensitivity to Molecularly Targeted Auger Electron Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Samantha Y.A. [CR-UK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Vallis, Katherine A., E-mail: katherine.vallis@oncology.ox.ac.uk [CR-UK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. Methods and Materials: Chromatin structure was altered in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N human breast cancer cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, or hypertonic treatment. The extent and duration of chromatin structural changes were evaluated using the micrococcal nuclease assay. DNA damage ({gamma}H2AX assay) and clonogenic survival were evaluated after exposure to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, or IR. The intracellular distribution of {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF after chromatin modification was investigated in cell fractionation experiments. Results: Chromatin remained condensed for up to 20 minutes after NaCl and in a relaxed state 24 hours after SAHA treatment. The number of {gamma}H2AX foci per cell was greater in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (0.5 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) compared with IR alone (16 {+-} 0.6 and 14 {+-} 0.3 vs. 12 {+-} 0.4 and 11 {+-} 0.2, respectively). More {gamma}H2AX foci were observed in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells exposed to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF (6 MBq/{mu}g) plus SAHA vs. {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (11 {+-} 0.3 and 12 {+-} 0.7 vs. 9 {+-} 0.4 and 7 {+-} 0.3, respectively). 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine enhanced the DNA damage caused by IR and {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF. Clonogenic survival was reduced in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (6 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) vs. IR alone (0.6% {+-} 0.01 and 0.3% {+-} 0.2 vs. 5.8% {+-} 0.2 and 2% {+-} 0.1, respectively) and after {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF plus SAHA compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (21% {+-} 0.4% and 19% {+-} 4.6 vs. 33% {+-} 2.3 and 32% {+-} 3.7). SAHA did not affect {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF nuclear localization. Hypertonic treatment resulted in fewer {gamma}H2AX foci per cell

  15. Defect identification by compositional defect review using auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defect identification plays an enabling role in determining the source of particles that occur during semiconductor processing and are subsequently detected by defect inspection tools. Auger electron spectroscopy provides a high spatial resolution, surface sensitive analytical probe that is well matched to examining small, thin or complex defects. A focused ion beam (FIB) can be used to cross-section buried defects and structures for subsequent Auger analysis. Such measurements have been made on defects from two wafers pulled at different process steps. One wafer was analyzed after poly-Si deposition, and the other wafer was analyzed after metal 2 etch. The defects on the poly-Si wafer are Si particles. Three types of particles were found on the metal 2 wafer: C-based, stainless steel, and Si-oxide. The majority of defects on this wafer are C-based. Auger, EDS and FIB results will be compared for representative defects on these two wafers

  16. Properties of Auger electrons following excitation of polarized atoms by polarized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupliauskiene, A. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy of Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)], E-mail: akupl@itpa.lt; Tutlys, V. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy of Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2009-01-15

    In non-relativistic approximation, the most general expression for differential cross sections describing the properties of Auger-electron emission induced in the excitation of polarized atoms by polarized electrons is obtained for the first time. The ways of the application of the general expressions suitable for the specific experimental conditions are outlined by deriving the expressions for the asymmetry parameters and the magnetic dichroism of the angular distribution of the Auger electrons as well as of the angular correlations between the scattered and Auger electrons.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  19. Monte-Carlo simulation of backscattered electrons in Auger electron spectroscopy. Part 1: Backscattering factor calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholomier, M.; Vicario, E.; Doghmane, N.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of backscattered electrons to Auger electrons yield was studied with a multiple scattering Monte-Carlo simulation. The Auger backscattering factor has been calculated in the 5 keV-60 keV energy range. The dependence of the Auger backscattering factor on the primary energy and the beam incidence angle were determined. Spatial distributions of backscattered electrons and Auger electrons are presented for a point incident beam. Correlations between these distributions are briefly investigated.

  20. Distribution of strand breaks produced by Auger electrons in decay of iodine 125 in triplex DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigate the possibility of using Auger electrons as a probing agent for the study of structures of nucleic acids. To this end, we present the distribution of breaks produced in strands of a DNA duplex and a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) carrying Auger emitting radionuclide 125I. The method of calculation includes use of a molecular model of plasmid DNA duplex with bound TFO carrying a labelled 125I at position C5 of a single deoxycytosine residue, a source of Auger spectra, Monte Carlo electron track structure and the ensuing chemistry codes, to simulate the distribution of breaks produced in both strands of a plasmid DNA. Frequencies of fragment length distributions were obtained for the TFO, the purine and the pyrimidine strands. The frequency of breaks in the purine strand showed good correlation with the published experimental results, while that for the pyrimidine strand is lower by a factor of 3. It is concluded that the true structure of triplex DNA may not be purely of B-form

  1. Distribution of strand breaks produced by Auger electrons in decay of iodine 125 in triplex DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikjoo, H.; Panyutin, I.G.; Terrissol, M.; Vrigneaud, J.M.; Laughton, C.A. [MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    2000-11-01

    In this study we investigate the possibility of using Auger electrons as a probing agent for the study of structures of nucleic acids. To this end, we present the distribution of breaks produced in strands of a DNA duplex and a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) carrying Auger emitting radionuclide {sup 125}I. The method of calculation includes use of a molecular model of plasmid DNA duplex with bound TFO carrying a labelled {sup 125}I at position C5 of a single deoxycytosine residue, a source of Auger spectra, Monte Carlo electron track structure and the ensuing chemistry codes, to simulate the distribution of breaks produced in both strands of a plasmid DNA. Frequencies of fragment length distributions were obtained for the TFO, the purine and the pyrimidine strands. The frequency of breaks in the purine strand showed good correlation with the published experimental results, while that for the pyrimidine strand is lower by a factor of 3. It is concluded that the true structure of triplex DNA may not be purely of B-form.

  2. Localized Irradiation of Cell Membrane by Auger Electrons Is Cytotoxic Through Oxidative Stress-Mediated Nontargeted Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillas, Salomé; Ladjohounlou, Riad; Lozza, Catherine; Pichard, Alexandre; Boudousq, Vincent; Jarlier, Marta; Sevestre, Samuel; Le Blay, Marion; Deshayes, Emmanuel; Sosabowski, Jane; Chardès, Thierry; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Mairs, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We investigated whether radiation-induced nontargeted effects are involved in the cytotoxic effects of anticell surface monoclonal antibodies labeled with Auger electron emitters, such as iodine 125 (monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I [125I-mAbs]). Results: We showed that the cytotoxicity of 125I-mAbs targeting the cell membrane of p53+/+ HCT116 colon cancer cells is mainly due to nontargeted effects. Targeted and nontargeted cytotoxicities were inhibited in vitro following lipid raft disruption with Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) or filipin or use of radical oxygen species scavengers. 125I-mAb efficacy was associated with acid sphingomyelinase activation and modulated through activation of the AKT, extracellular signal-related kinase ½ (ERK1/2), p38 kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways, and also of phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK-2), and paxillin, involved in Ca2+ fluxes. Moreover, the nontargeted response induced by directing 5-[(125)I]iodo-2′-deoxyuridine to the nucleus was comparable to that of 125I-mAb against cell surface receptors. In vivo, we found that the statistical significance of tumor growth delay induced by 125I-mAb was removed after MBCD treatment and observed oxidative DNA damage beyond the expected Auger electron range. These results suggest the involvement of nontargeted effects in vivo also. Innovation: Low-energy Auger electrons, such as those emitted by 125I, have a short tissue range and are usually targeted to the nucleus to maximize their cytotoxicity. In this study, we show that targeting the cancer cell surface with 125I-mAbs produces a lipid raft-mediated nontargeted response that compensates for the inferior efficacy of non-nuclear targeting. Conclusion: Our findings describe the mechanisms involved in the efficacy of 125I-mAbs targeting the cancer cell surface. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 467–484. PMID:27224059

  3. Radiotoxicity induced by auger electron emitters in human osteosarcoma cell line using comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis assay) was used to evaluate the radiotoxicity of Auger electron emitters in the human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603). After internal exposure to 67Ga-EDTMP, the sarcoma cell has been injured severely. The comet length was longer along with the increase of dose, the appearance of comet tail was different from that with respect to the 60Co γ-ray irradiation. DNA damage of cell was mainly due to the radiation effect of Auger electrons. The 67Ga may be a therapeutic radionuclide with good prospect for tumor treatment and palliation of bone pain induced by metastasis

  4. Relationship between chromatin structure and sensitivity to molecularly targeted auger electron radiation therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terry, S.Y.A.; Vallis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chromatin structure was alte

  5. Application of Auger electron spectroscopy in studies about diffusion of Cu in thin Ni films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion coefficient of Cu in thin Ni films (350A) at low temperatures is determined by using Auger electron spectroscopy and timepermeation technic. A grain-boundary mechanism is proposed for the diffusion of Cu in Ni. The activation energy is determined to Q=0,6eV. (Author)

  6. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    1993-10-01

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  7. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li

  8. Evaluation of new iodinated acridine derivatives for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma using 125I, an Auger electron emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardette, Maryline; Papon, Janine; Bonnet, Mathilde; Desbois, Nicolas; Labarre, Pierre; Wu, Ting-Dee; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Moins, Nicole

    2011-12-01

    The increasing incidence of melanoma and the lack of effective therapy on the disseminated form have led to an urgent need for new specific therapies. Several iodobenzamides or analogs are known to possess specific affinity for melanoma tissue. New heteroaromatic derivatives have been designed with a cytotoxic moiety and termed DNA intercalating agents. These compounds could be applied in targeted radionuclide therapy using (125)I, which emits Auger electrons and gives high-energy, localized irradiation. Two iodinated acridine derivatives have been reported to present an in vivo kinetic profile conducive to application in targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of the present study was to perform a preclinical evaluation of these compounds. The DNA intercalating property was confirmed for both compounds. After radiolabeling with (125)I, the two compounds induced in vitro a significant radiotoxicity to B16F0 melanoma cells. Nevertheless, the acridine compound appeared more radiotoxic than the acridone compound. While cellular uptake was similar for both compounds, SIMS analysis and in vitro protocol showed a stronger affinity for melanin with acridone derivative, which was able to induce a predominant scavenging process in the melanosome and restrict access to the nucleus. In conclusion, the acridine derivative with a higher nuclear localization appeared a better candidate for application in targeted radionuclide therapy using (125)I. PMID:20567996

  9. Chirped Auger electron emission due to field-assisted post-collision interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonitz M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the Auger decay in the temporal domain by applying a terahertz streaking light field. Xenon and krypton atoms were studied by implementing the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH as well as a source of high-order harmonic radiation combined with terahertz pulses from an optical rectification source. The observed linewidth asymmetries in the streaked spectra suggest a chirped Auger electron emission which is understood in terms of field-assisted post-collision interaction. The experimentally obtained results agree well with model calculations.

  10. Radiotoxicity induced by Auger electron emitters in human osteosarcoma cell line using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yu-Jie; LI Qing-Nuan; ZHU Ran; ZHU Ben-Xing; ZHANG Yong-Ping; ZHANG Xiao-Dong; FAN Wo; HONG Cheng-Jiao; LI Wen-Xin

    2003-01-01

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis assay) was used to evaluate the radiotoxicity of Augerelectron emitters in the human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603). After internal exposure to 67Ga-EDTMP, the sar-coma cell has been injured severely. The comet length was longer along with the increase of dose, the appearance ofcomet tail was different from that with respect to the 60Co γ-ray irradiation. DNA damage of cell was mainly due tothe radiation effect of Auger electrons. The 67Ga may be a therapeutic radionuclide with good prospect for tumortreatment and palliation of bone pain induced by metastasis.

  11. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy studies of grain-boundary segregation in Type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy studies have been conducted on grain-boundary surfaces of Type 304 stainless steel that were fractured in situ. To enhance the probability of intergranular fracture, the specimens were first subjected to creep deformation for 1000 h at 7000C. A semiquantitative surface chemical composition was calculated from the peak heights of Auger electron spectra. The concentration of Cr at the fracture surface was not different from the bulk value. This indicates that the long-term heat treatment caused healing of the sensitization. The concentrations of S, C, and Si at the fracture surface were at least an order of magnitude higher than the bulk values. Chemical composition profiles obtained by ion-sputtering indicated that segregation of S, C, P, and Si occurred within a depth of several atomic monolayers from the grain-boundary surface. Mo, Mn and Cu were not detected. The concentrations of Ni and Fe are in good agreement with the bulk chemical analysis

  12. The characterisation of non-evaporable getters by Auger electron spectroscopy Analytical potential and artefacts

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M

    2002-01-01

    The surfaces of getter materials are particularly difficult to analyse because of their high chemical reactivity. The results obtained can be strongly influenced by the experimental set-up and procedures. In this paper the experimental influence on the Auger electron spectroscopy results is discussed, based on the measurements of more than 100 different non-evaporable getter (NEG) materials. There are four typical changes in the Auger electron spectra when a NEG becomes activated. The oxygen peak intensity decreases, the shape of the metal peaks changes, the carbon peak shape changes shape and intensity and a chlorine peak occurs. All these changes are affected by instrumental artefacts. The Zr-MNV peak shape changes occurring during the reduction of ZrO2 are well suited to determine the onset of NEG activation, while the slope with which the O-KLL peak intensity decreases in a certain temperature range is a better criterion for the determination of the temperature at which activation is complete. The O-KLL i...

  13. Sputtering measurements on controlled thermonuclear reactor materials using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous auger electron spectroscopy and ion sputtering have been used to measure the sputter yield, S (atom/ion), for Ar+ on carbon, tungsten, niobium, and silver in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 keV and for H+ on tungsten, carbon, and silver at 11 keV. All measurements were performed on thin films, ranging in thickness from 150 to 6000 A, which were maintained at room temperature during bombardment. These films were produced by vacuum vapor deposition, and the thicknesses were measured by surface profilometry. The auger electron signals were used to determine the time required to etch through a film; from these measurements and a knowledge of the ion current density, the sputter yield was determined. For Ar+, 0.7 less than or equal to S less than or equal to 5.1 and for H+, 0.004 less than or equal to S less than or equal to 0.04 for the various materials studied in this energy range. Agreement with earlier experimental results is generally within +-25 percent

  14. Fragmentation of CF3Br induced by fluroine is core excitation: Energy resolved auger electron multiple-ion coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragmentation processes in CF3Br near the F K edge were investigated using synchrotron radiation and Energy Resolved Auger Electron Multiple Ion Coincidence (ERAEMICO). Time-of flight mass spectra were collected in coincidence with either selected F 1s Auger or resonant-Auger electrons which were energy analyzed with a hemispherical detector. In addition, a more inclusive mass spectrum was taken near the F 1s ionization potential in coincidence with low energy electrons. Preliminary spectra the Br2+ ion intensity is negligible and the relative CF+ abundance is higher. These differences confirm the notion that the electronic state prior to bond breakage governs the resulting fragmentation pattern

  15. Atomic and molecular photoelectron and Auger-electron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were also measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the ejected electrons. The double-angle-TOF method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collection efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. An electron spectroscopy study of inner-shell photoexcitation and ionization of Xe, photoelectron angular distributions from H2 and D2, and photoionization cross sections and photoelectron asymmetries of the valence orbitals of NO are reported

  16. Calculations of energies and absolute intensities of Auger electrons and X-rays arising from electron capture decay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chun-Mei; WU Zhen-Dong; HUANG Xiao-Long

    2005-01-01

    Calculations of energies and absolute intensities of Auger electron and X-ray arising from electron capture are introduced briefly. The calculation codes and main process are also presented. The application is also given by taking 55Fe ε decay as an example.

  17. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  18. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  19. Auger electron spectroscopic study of CO{sub 2} adsorption on Zircaloy-4 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojilovic, N.; Farkas, N. [Institute for Teaching and Learning and Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-6236 (United States); Ramsier, R.D. [Institute for Teaching and Learning and Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-6236 (United States)], E-mail: rex@uakron.edu

    2008-02-28

    We investigate the adsorption of CO{sub 2} onto Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) surfaces at 150, 300 and 600 K using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Following CO{sub 2} adsorption at 150 K the graphitic form of carbon is detected, whereas upon chemisorption at 300 and 600 K we detect the carbidic phase. As the adsorption temperature is increased, the carbon Auger signal increases, whereas the oxygen signal decreases. Adsorption at all three temperatures results in a shift of the Zr Auger features, indicating surface oxidation. The effect of adsorbed CO{sub 2} on the Zr(MVV) and Zr(MNV) transitions depends on adsorption temperature and is less pronounced at higher temperatures. On the other hand, changes in the Zr(MNN) feature are similar for all three adsorption temperatures. The changes in the Zr Auger peak shapes and positions are attributed to oxygen from dissociated CO{sub 2}, with the differences observed at various temperatures indicative of the diffusion of oxygen into the subsurface region.

  20. Diffraction and holography with photoelectrons and Auger electrons: Some new directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadley, C.S. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The current status of photoelectron and Auger-electron diffraction is reviewed, with emphasis on new directions of activity. The use of forward scattering in the study of adsorbed molecules, epitaxial overlayers, and clean surfaces is one of the most developed applications, and one that will become more powerful as higher energy resolution and perhaps spin analysis are used to resolve emitters on the basis of chemical state, position at a surface, or magnetic state. The use of larger data sets spanning a considerable fraction of the solid angle above a surface will also much enhance the structural information available, for example, in the growth of epitaxial layers or nanostructures on surfaces. Detailed fitting of experimental data to theoretical calculations based upon either single scattering or multiple scattering should also provide more rich structural information, including such parameters as substrate interlayer relaxation. Surface phase transitions in which near-surface layers become highly disordered can also be studied, with results that are complementary to those from such techniques as low energy electron diffraction and medium energy ion scattering. Short-range magnetic order also can be probed by somehow resolving the spin of the outgoing electrons, e.g. by using multiplet-split core levels.

  1. Investigation of grain boundary chemistry in Al-Li 2195 welds using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.H. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL (United States). George C. Marshall Space Flight Center

    1996-05-01

    Al-Li alloy 2195 is a low-density material with high fracture toughness that is particularly well-suited for aerospace systems. It will replace Al-Cu alloy 2219 in the Super Light Weight Tank (SLWT), a modified version of the external tank being developed for the Space Shuttle to support Space Station deployment. Recent efforts have focused on joining 2195 with variable polarity plasma arc welding, as well as repairing 2195 welds with tungsten inert gas techniques. During this study, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to examine grain boundary chemistry in 2195 welds. Results indicated that weld integrity depends on whether (and how much) the grain boundaries are covered with thin films comprised of a mixture of discontinuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in Al (Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which form during weld solidification. O was probably introduced as a contaminant in the shielding gases, occurring at low levels considered negligible for Al alloys that do not contain Li. However, oxidation kinetics in 2195 are increased by Li enrichment of small quantities of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, further enhancing thin film formation at the grain boundaries. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can ultimately occupy sufficient grain boundary area to degrade the material`s mechanical properties, producing negative effects that are compounded by the cumulative heat input of multi-pass repair welding. (orig.)

  2. Channel-resolved photo- and Auger-electron spectroscopy of halogenated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, Utuq; Kaderiya, B.; Kumarapan, V.; Kushawaha, R.; Rudenko, A.; Rolles, D.; Xiong, H.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Savelyev, E.; Kilcoyne, D.

    2016-05-01

    Inner-shell photoelectron and Auger electron spectra of polyatomic molecules such as halogenated hydrocarbons are typically hard to interpret and assign due to many overlapping states that form broad bands even in high-resolution measurements. With the help of electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements performed using the velocity map imaging technique, we are able to detect high-energy (assigning individual components of the electron spectra to specific potential surfaces and final states. In this work, we present measurements on CH3 I, CH2 IBr, and CH2 ICl molecules in the gas-phase using soft x-ray light provided by the Advanced Light Source at LBNL. This project is supported by the DOE, Office of Science, BES, Division of Chemical, Geological and Biological Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-86ER13491 (U.A., B.K., V.K., A.R., D.R.) and Award Number DE-SC0012376 (H.X., N.B.).

  3. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  4. Quantitative auger electron spectroscopy of the interface carbon layer formation on the vacuum cleavage surfaces of layered semiconductor In4Se3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the qualitative Auger electron spectroscopy of the interface carbon layer formation on the high vacuum cleavage surfaces of layered semiconductor In4Se3 crystals are presented. The kinetics of interfacial carbon layer formation on the cleavage surfaces of crystals and the elemental and phase composition of the interface dependent on the exposition time in high vacuum and on the dose of electron irradiation have been studied by the quantitative Auger electron and mass-spectroscopy methods

  5. Satellite X-ray lines and KLL Auger electrons from fluorine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine K X-rays are excited by irradiation of solid samples (LiF, NaF, KF, RbF, CsF, AgF; BeF2, MgF2, CaF2, CrF2, FeF2, CoF2, NiF2, CuF2, SnF2, ZnF2, PbF2, BaF2) with α-particles. Optimal conditions for the observation of Kαsub(3,4) satellites from thick samples are obtained with 2 MeV4He+ particles from a Van de Graaff generator. X-rays are analysed with a Bragg spectrometer equipped with a flat crystal of TIAP, the resolution is 1.2 eV for Fluorine K X-rays. Auger electrons are excited by irradiation of same samples with Al Kαsub(1,2) X-rays; electrons from the main KLL Auger line are detected with a resolution of about 1 eV. The observations made on these compounds are in accordance with previous data on a few samples as reported by Deconninck et al. (1978). Important variations in shape and amplitude are observed in Kαsub(3,4) X-ray and KLL Auger spectra. The relative amplitude of the Kαsub(3,4) peak is maximum in ionic compound and the peak width is narrower, this amplitude decreases with increasing covalency and the presence of energy band is observed by the energy spreading of the peaks (X-ray and Auger). The competition between different decay modes is investigated in an attempt to interpretate the relative amplitude of the satellite peaks. (author)

  6. Development of DNA-based radiopharmaceuticals carrying Auger-electron emitters for anti-gene radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeting of radiation damage to specific DNA sequences is the essence of antigene radiotherapy. This technique also provides a tool to study molecular mechanisms of DNA repair on a defined, single radio damaged site. It was achieved such sequence-specific radio damage by combining the highly localized DNA damage produced by the decay of Auger-electron-emitters such as 125I with the sequence-specific action of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO). TFO complementary to polypurine-polypyrimidine regions of human genes were synthesized and labeled with 125I-dCTP by the primer extension method. 125I-TFO were delivered into cells with several delivery systems. In addition, human enzymes capable of supporting DNA single-strand-break repair were isolated and assessed for their role in the repair of this lesion. Also, the mutagenicity and repairability of 125I-TFO-induced double strand breaks (DSB) were assessed by repair of plasmid possessing a site-specific DSB lesion. Using plasmids containing target polypurine-polypyrimidine tracts, it was obtained the fine structure of sequence-specific DNA breaks produced by decay of 125I with single-nucleotide resolution. It was showed that the designed 125I-TFO in nanomolar concentrations could bind to and introduce double-strand breaks into the target sequences in situ, i.e., within isolated nuclei and intact digitonin-permeabilized cells. It was also showed 125I-TFO-induced DSB to be highly mutagenic lesions resulting in a mutation frequency of nearly 80%, with deletions comprising the majority of mutations. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of 125I-TFO to target specific sequences in their natural environment - within eukaryotic nucleus. Repair of 125I-TFO-induced DNA damage should typically result in mutagenic gene inactivation

  7. Development of DNA-based radiopharmaceuticals carrying Auger-electron emitters for anti-gene radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panyutin, I.G.; Winters, T.A.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Neumann, R.D. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2000-09-01

    Targeting of radiation damage to specific DNA sequences is the essence of antigen radiotherapy. This technique also provides a tool to study molecular mechanisms of DNA repair on a defined, single radio damaged site. It was achieved such sequence-specific radio damage by combining the highly localized DNA damage produced by the decay of Auger-electron-emitters such as {sup 125}I with the sequence-specific action of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO). TFO complementary to polypurine-polypyrimidine regions of human genes were synthesized and labeled with {sup 125}I-dCTP by the primer extension method. {sup 125}I-TFO were delivered into cells with several delivery systems. In addition, human enzymes capable of supporting DNA single-strand-break repair were isolated and assessed for their role in the repair of this lesion. Also, the mutagenicity and repairability of {sup 125}I-TFO-induced double strand breaks (DSB) were assessed by repair of plasmid possessing a site-specific DSB lesion. Using plasmids containing target polypurine-polypyrimidine tracts, it was obtained the fine structure of sequence-specific DNA breaks produced by decay of {sup 125}I with single-nucleotide resolution. It was showed that the designed {sup 125}I-TFO in nanomolar concentrations could bind to and introduce double-strand breaks into the target sequences in situ, i.e., within isolated nuclei and intact digitonin-permeabilized cells. It was also showed {sup 125}I-TFO-induced DSB to be highly mutagenic lesions resulting in a mutation frequency of nearly 80%, with deletions comprising the majority of mutations. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of {sup 125}I-TFO to target specific sequences in their natural environment - within eukaryotic nucleus. Repair of {sup 125}I-TFO-induced DNA damage should typically result in mutagenic gene inactivation.

  8. Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the biocorrosion of copper by alginic acid polysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, John G.; Geesey, Gill G.; Hankins, Michael R.; Wright, Randy B.; Wichlacz, Paul L.

    1989-08-01

    Thin films (3.4 nm) of copper on germanium substrates were exposed to 2% alginic acid polysaccharide aqueous solution. Pre- and post-exposure characterization were done by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ancillary graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the removal process of the copper thin film from the germanium substrate. Results indicate that some of the copper was oxidized by the alginic acid solution. Some of the copper was removed from the Cu/Ge interface and incorporated into the polymer matrix. Thus, biocorrosion of copper was exhibited by the alginic acid polysaccharide.

  9. Auger electron spectroscopy in sputtering measurements: Application to low-energy Ar+ sputtering of Ag and Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sputtering of Ag and Nb by Ar+ in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 keV has been measured. The agreement with extant data, where available, is good. The experimental technique is a new adaptation of certain earlier methods and employs Auger electron spectroscopy of a continuously sputtered area of a thin-film composite structure, produced by vapor deposition. This new method should permit very low sputter yields (Sapproximately-less-than10-3) to be measured in subsequent experiments

  10. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-04-03

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to {delta}E/E{approx}10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION {sup registered} ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to {delta}E/E < 1. The exceptional surface sensitivity and elemental selectivity of PAES was demonstrated in measurements of Pd and Fe, both coated with Cu layers of varying thickness. PAES showed that with 0.96 monolayer of Cu on Fe, more than 55% of the detected Auger electrons stem from Cu. In the case of the Cu coated Pd sample 0.96 monolayer of Cu resulted in a Cu Auger fraction of more than 30% with PAES and less than 5% with electron induced Auger spectroscopy

  11. Silicidation in Ni/Si thin film system investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: amar@igcar.gov.in; Kalavathi, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Gopalan, Padma [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kamruddin, M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sundar, C.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-02-15

    Silicide formation induced by thermal annealing in Ni/Si thin film system has been investigated using glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Silicide formation takes place at 870 K with Ni{sub 2}Si, NiSi and NiSi{sub 2} phases co-existing with Ni. Complete conversion of intermediate silicide phases to the final NiSi{sub 2} phase takes place at 1170 K. Atomic force microscopy measurements have revealed the coalescence of pillar-like structures to ridge-like structures upon silicidation. A comparison of the experimental results in terms of the evolution of various silicide phases is presented.

  12. Evaluation of new iodinated acridine derivatives for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma using 125I, an Auger electron emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full text of the publication follows. The increasing incidence of melanoma and the lack of effective therapy on the disseminated form have led to an urgent need for new specific therapies. Several iodo-benzamides or analogs are known to possess specific affinity for melanoma tissue. New hetero-aromatic derivatives have been designed with a cytotoxic moiety and termed DNA intercalating agents. These compounds could be applied in targeted radionuclide therapy using 125I, Auger electrons emitter which gives high-energetic localized irradiation. Two iodinated acridine derivatives have been reported to present an in vivo kinetic profile conducive to application in targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of the present study was to perform a preclinical evaluation of these compounds. The DNA intercalating property was confirmed for both compounds. After radiolabeling with 125I, the two compounds induced in vitro a significant radiotoxicity on B16F0 melanoma cells. The acridine compound, ICF01040, appeared more radio toxic than the acridone compound, ICF01035. While cellular uptake was similar for both compounds, SIMS analysis and in vitro protocol showed a stronger affinity for melanin with ICF01035, which was able to induce a predominant scavenging process in the melanosome and restrict access to the nucleus. Nevertheless, an important radiotoxicity was measured for the two compounds while the nuclear accumulation was low. Indeed, even if nuclear localization remains the main target sensitive to Auger electrons, the cell membrane remains sensitive to 125I decays. So, these compounds may induce secondary toxic effects of irradiation, such as membrane lipid damage. Conducted to current experiments are evaluate such hypothesis. Taken together, these results suggest that ICF01040 is a better candidate for application in targeted radionuclide therapy using 125I. The next step will be in vivo evaluation, where high tumoral vectorization gives promising perspectives

  13. Auger electron emitter against multiple myeloma - targeted endo-radio-therapy with {sup 125}I-labeled thymidine analogue 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenroth, Agnieszka, E-mail: amorgenroth@ukaachen.de [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Aachen, RWTH, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dinger, Cornelia; Zlatopolskiy, Boris D.; Al-Momani, Ehab; Glatting, Gerhard [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Aachen, RWTH, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Reske, Sven N. [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by accumulation of malignant, terminally differentiated B cells in the bone marrow. Despite advances in therapy, MM remains an incurable disease. Novel therapeutic approaches are, therefore, urgently needed. Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are attractive for targeted nano-irradiation therapy, given that DNA of malignant cells is selectively addressed. Here we evaluated the antimyeloma potential of the Auger electron-emitting thymidine analogue {sup 125}I-labeled 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine ([{sup 125}I]ITdU). Methods: Cellular uptake and DNA incorporation of [{sup 125}I]ITdU were determined in fluorodeoxyuridine-pretreated KMS12BM, U266, dexamethasone-sensitive MM1.S and -resistant MM1.R cell lines. The effect of stimulation with interleukin 6 (IL6) or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) on the intracellular incorporation of [{sup 125}I]ITdU was investigated in cytokine-sensitive MM1.S and MM1.R cell lines. Apoptotic cells were identified using Annexin V. Cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP was visualized by Western blot. DNA fragmentation was investigated using laddering assay. Therapeutic efficiency of [{sup 125}I]ITdU was proven by clonogenic assay. Results: [{sup 125}I]ITdU was shown to be efficiently incorporated into DNA of malignant cells, providing a promising mechanism for delivering highly toxic Auger radiation emitters into tumor DNA. [{sup 125}I]ITdU had a potent antimyeloma effect in cell lines representing distinct disease stages and, importantly, in cell lines sensitive or resistant to the conventional therapeutic agent, but was not toxic for normal plasma and bone marrow stromal cells. Furthermore, [{sup 125}I]ITdU abrogated the protective actions of IL6 and IGF1 on MM cells. [{sup 125}I]ITdU induced massive damage in the DNA of malignant plasma cells, which resulted in efficient inhibition of clonogenic growth. Conclusion: These studies may provide a

  14. 123I: Calculation of the Auger electron spectrum and assessment of the strand breakage efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger cascades induced by electron capture in 123I have been simulated by the Monte Carlo technique with special emphasis on the determination of the electron kinetic energies. By using an approach which considers the individual electron population of all electronic shells before and after a transition, errors in the electron energy normally introduced when applying the so-called (Z+1)-approximation are avoided. Thus, the energy of the electrons released in transitions between higher shells were found to be about half the value mentioned in the literature. An average total number of 7.6 electrons (6.4 Auger-, and 1.2 shake-off electrons) has been determined to be emitted per decay, a number which is considerably lower than those reported in similar studies. The efficiency of strand break induction has been assessed to be 0.4 DSB and 1.1 additional SSB per decay of DNA bound 123I. A comparison with the corresponding DSB values of 125I reveals that 125I is 2.5 times more effective than 123I. This is about the same ratio as that determined by Makrigiorgos on the basis of cell killing experiments

  15. A detailed Auger electron spectroscopy study of the first stages of the growth of C60 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, R. A.; Ferrón, J.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we take advantage of the large sensitivity and in-depth resolution of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to study in a detailed way the growth of C60 over different substrates, namely Cu(1 1 1), Si(1 0 0) and graphene. The ability of AES, as compared to more local probes like STM or AFM, to follow the process in a dynamic way, allows us to study the growth of C60 below and over one ML, including the change of C60 over either Si or Cu to the growth of C60 over a C60 film. We found that the growth always proceeds layer by layer. This result shows that differences in diffusion barriers are not as important as one may think following the idea of diffusion by a jumping mechanism. We propose that the sticking coefficient, governed by the adsorption energy, is responsible for the differences observed between Cu and Si. Our results also point to a different charge transfer among fullerene molecules and these surfaces. The same result is suggested in the case of C60 over graphene, but in this case our conclusion comes from the variable temperature experiments.

  16. Characterisation of the surface over-layer of welded uranium by FIB, SIMS and Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), focused ion beam (FIB) milling and Auger electron spectroscopy have been used to examine the composition and surface structure of uranium welded by an electron beam. Four characteristic areas of the metal surface were designated, these being: body (unaffected by the welding process), heat affected zone (HAZ), weld edge and weld. Surface composition to a depth of a few microns was determined using SIMS profiling, and direct thickness measurements of surface over-layers on the metal were made using FIB. Marked variations in both the thickness and composition of the over-layers were found when comparing the body/HAZ, weld edge and weld material. Additionally, numerous prismatic inclusions, approximately 5 μm2, were observed at the surface of the weld material. Auger and SIMS analyses indicated these inclusions were nitro-carbides. An increased concentration of these inclusions and other elemental impurities at the margins of the weld and within the HAZ indicated that during welding a segregation of impurities from the molten metal had occurred. The results are discussed in terms of processes considered to be occurring during welding and their implications in regard to corrosion in hydrogen atmospheres.

  17. ANALYSIS OF PASSIVATED SURFACES FOR MASS SPECTROMETER INLET SYSTEMS BY AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajo, H.; Clark, E.

    2010-09-01

    Stainless steel coupons approximately 0.5' in diameter and 0.125' thick were passivated with five different surface treatments and an untreated coupon was left as a control. These surface treatments are being explored for use in tritium storage containers. These coupons were made to allow surface analysis of the surface treatments using well-know surface analysis techniques. Depth profiles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on these coupons to characterize the surface and near surface regions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were collected as well. All of the surface treatments studied here appear to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7-0.9 nm thick) as well as the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E's silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  18. Auger-electron spectra of F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} obtained by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi, E-mail: nagaoka@ehimegw.dpc.ehime-u.ac.j [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Nitta, Akiko [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tamenori, Yusuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5198 (Japan); Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Ueda, Kiyoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kakiuchi, Takuhiro [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kitajima, Yoshinori; Mase, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Isao H. [Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    A study on Auger-electron spectra of F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} was performed by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The normal Si:L{sub 23}VV Auger-electron spectrum was measured in the vapor phase and characterized through the ab initio molecular orbital calculation. The cascade Si:L{sub 23}VV Auger-electron spectra were also obtained by L{sub 23}-holes creation through Si:KL{sub 23}L{sub 23} Auger transitions after Si:1s photoexcitation in the vapor phase or its photoelectron emission in the condensed phase. Further the C:KVV and F:KVV Auger-electron spectra were measured and discussed in comparison with those of some related molecules.

  19. Direct and Auger Electron-Induced, Single- and Double-Strand Breaks on Plasmid DNA Caused by 99mTc-Labeled Pyrene Derivatives and the Effect of Bonding Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissig, Falco; Mamat, Constantin; Steinbach, Joerg; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen; Freudenberg, Robert; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos; Caballero, Julio; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wunderlich, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that 99mTc causes radical-mediated DNA damage due to Auger electrons, which were emitted simultaneously with the known γ-emission of 99mTc. We have synthesized a series of new 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives with varied distances between the pyrene moiety and the radionuclide. The pyrene motif is a common DNA intercalator and allowed us to test the influence of the radionuclide distance on damages of the DNA helix. In general, pUC 19 plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between the radiotracers and DNA that results in single-strand breaks (SSB) or double-strand breaks (DSB). The resulting DNA fragments were separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. Direct DNA damage and radical-induced indirect DNA damage by radiolysis products of water were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. We demonstrated that Auger electrons directly induced both SSB and DSB in high efficiency when 99mTc was tightly bound to the plasmid DNA and this damage could not be completely prevented by DMSO, a free radical scavenger. For the first time, we were able to minimize this effect by increasing the carbon chain lengths between the pyrene moiety and the 99mTc nuclide. However, a critical distance between the 99mTc atom and the DNA helix could not be determined due to the significantly lowered DSB generation resulting from the interaction which is dependent on the type of the 99mTc binding motif. The effect of variable DNA damage caused by the different chain length between the pyrene residue and the Tc-core as well as the possible conformations of the applied Tc-complexes was supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The effectiveness of the DNA-binding 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives was demonstrated by comparison to non-DNA-binding 99mTcO4-, since nearly all DNA damage caused by 99mTcO4- was prevented by incubating with DMSO. PMID:27583677

  20. Evaluation of two (125)I-radiolabeled acridine derivatives for Auger-electron radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardette, Maryline; Viallard, Claire; Paillas, Salomé; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Papon, Janine; Moins, Nicole; Labarre, Pierre; Desbois, Nicolas; Wong-Wah-Chung, Pascal; Palle, Sabine; Wu, Ting-Di; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Degoul, Francoise

    2014-08-01

    We previously selected two melanin-targeting radioligands [(125)I]ICF01035 and [(125)I]ICF01040 for melanoma-targeted (125)I radionuclide therapy according to their pharmacological profile in mice bearing B16F0 tumors. Here we demonstrate in vitro that these compounds present different radiotoxicities in relation to melanin and acidic vesicle contents in B16F0, B16F0 PTU and A375 cell lines. ICF01035 is effectively observed in nuclei of achromic (A375) melanoma or in melanosomes of melanized melanoma (B16F0), while ICF01040 stays in cytoplasmic vesicles in both cells. [(125)I]ICF01035 induced a similar survival fraction (A50) in all cell lines and led to a significant decrease in S-phase cells in amelanotic cell lines. [(125)I]ICF01040 induced a higher A50 in B16 cell lines compared to [(125)I]ICF01035 ones. [(125)I]ICF01040 induced a G2/M blockade in both A375 and B16F0 PTU, associated with its presence in cytoplasmic acidic vesicles. These results suggest that the radiotoxicity of [(125)I]ICF01035 and [(125)I]ICF01040 are not exclusively reliant on DNA alterations compatible with γ rays but likely result from local dose deposition (Auger electrons) leading to toxic compound leaks from acidic vesicles. In vivo, [(125)I]ICF01035 significantly reduced the number of B16F0 lung colonies, enabling a significant increase in survival of the treated mice. Targeting melanosomes or acidic vesicles is thus an option for future melanoma therapy. PMID:24691673

  1. Dependence of Cell Survival on Iododeoxyuridine Concentration in 35-keV Photon-Activated Auger Electron Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure and compare Chinese hamster ovary cell survival curves using monochromatic 35-keV photons and 4-MV x-rays as a function of concentration of the radiosensitizer iododeoxyuridine (IUdR). Methods and Materials: IUdR was incorporated into Chinese hamster ovary cell DNA at 16.6 ± 1.9%, 12.0 ± 1.4%, and 9.2 ± 1.3% thymidine replacement. Cells were irradiated from 1 to 8 Gy with 35-keV synchrotron-generated photons and conventional radiotherapy 4-MV x-rays. The effects of the radiation were measured via clonogenic survival assays. Surviving fraction was plotted vs. dose and fit to a linear quadratic model. Sensitization enhancement ratios (SER10) were calculated as the ratio of doses required to achieve 10% surviving fraction for cells without and with DNA-incorporated IUdR. Results: At 4 MV, SER10 values were 2.6 ± 0.1, 2.2 ± 0.1, and 1.5 ± 0.1 for 16.6%, 12.0%, and 9.2% thymidine replacement, respectively. At 35 keV, SER10 values were 4.1 ± 0.2, 3.0 ± 0.1, and 2.0 ± 0.1, respectively, which yielded SER10 ratios (35 keV:4 MV) of 1.6 ± 0.1, 1.4 ± 0.1, and 1.3 ± 0.1, respectively. Conclusions: SER10 increases monotonically with percent thymidine replacement by IUdR for both modalities. As compared to 4-MV x-rays, 35-keV photons produce enhanced SER10 values whose ratios are linear with percent thymidine replacement and assumed to be due to Auger electrons contributing to enhanced dose to DNA. Although this Auger effectiveness factor is less than the radiosensitization factor of IUdR, both could be important for the clinical efficacy of IUdR radiotherapy.

  2. Estrogen overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002584.htm Estrogen overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Estrogen is a female hormone. Estrogen overdose occurs when ...

  3. Time-dependent investigation of sub-monolayers of Ni on Pd using Positron-annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy and XPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnik, Samantha; Piochacz, Christian; Vohburger, Sebastian; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a polycrystalline Pd-substrate covered with (sub-) monolayers of Ni was investigated with Positron-annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). Comparative studies using conventional AES induced by electrons and X-rays showed the outstanding surface sensitivity of PAES. Time-dependent PAES was performed on a 0.5 ML Ni cover layer on Pd and compared with conventional X-ray induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in order to observe changes in the elemental composition of the surface. The PAES results appear to show a migration of Ni atoms into the Pd substrate, whereas the Ni signal shows a decrease of 12% within 13 h with respect to the initial value.

  4. Surface compositions of atomic layer deposited Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O thin films studied using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ting; Romero, Danilo; Gomez, Romel D., E-mail: rdgomez@umd.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the authors present Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) studies of Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O (ZMO) films grown via interrupted atomic-layer deposition (ALD) techniques. The ZMO films were fabricated by alternating ALD deposition of ZnO and MgO layers up to 1000 cycles. Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O films with progressively decreasing Mg/Zn ratios (Mg/Zn = 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/9, and 2/8, 3/12, 4/16, and 5/20) were fabricated for this study. The AES results exhibit an abrupt drop of Mg composition on the ZMO surface when the Mg/Zn < 1/3. Additionally, the surface composition ratios of O to Mg, O to Zn, and Mg to Zn were estimated with known Auger sensitivity factors. The results indicate that Mg ions diffuse into the bulk, forming Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O alloys.

  5. Influence of the "surface effect" on the segregation parameters of S in Fe(100): A multi-scale modelling and Auger Electron Spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P. E.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    The article takes a new look at the process of atomic segregation by considering the influence of surface relaxation on the segregation parameters; the activation energy (Q), segregation energy (ΔG), interaction parameter (Ω) and the pre-exponential factor (D0). Computational modelling, namely Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Modified Darken Model (MDM) in conjunction with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to study the variation of the segregation parameters for S in the surface region of Fe(100). Results indicate a variation in each of the segregation parameters as a function of the atomic layer under consideration. Values of the segregation parameters varied more dramatically as the surface layer is approached, with atomic layer 2 having the largest deviations in comparison to the bulk values. This atomic layer had the highest Q value and formed the rate limiting step for the segregation of S towards the Fe(100) surface. It was found that the segregation process is influenced by two sets of segregation parameters, those of the surface region formed by atomic layer 2, and those in the bulk material. This article is the first to conduct a full scale investigation on the influence of surface relaxation on segregation and labelled it the "surface effect".

  6. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers

  7. Effect of heating on the behaviors of hydrogen in C-TiC films with auger electron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-TiC films with a content of 75% TiC were prepared with magnetron sputtering deposition followed by Ar+ ion bombardment. Effect of heating on the behaviors of hydrogen in C-TiC films before and after heating was studied with Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analyses. SIMS depth profiles of hydrogen after H+ ion implantation and thermal treatment show different hydrogen concentrations in C-TiC coatings and stainless steel. SIMS measurements show the existence of TiH, TiH2, CH3, CH4, C2H2 bonds in the films after H+ ion irradiation and the changes in the Ti LMM, Ti LMV and C KLL Auger line shape reveal that they have a good hydrogen retention ability after heating up to the temperature 393 K. All the results show that C-TiC coatings can be used as a hydrogen retainer or hydrogen permeable barrier on stainless steel to protect it from hydrogen brittleness

  8. Estrogen Vaginal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal estrogen is used to treat vaginal dryness, itching, and burning; painful or difficult urination; and sudden need to urinate immediately in women who are experiencing or have experienced menopause ( ...

  9. 核衰变产生的X射线和俄歇电子数据计算%Data Calculation of X-Ray and Auger Electron Arising from Nuclear Decay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周春梅; 黄小龙; 吴振东

    2003-01-01

    核衰变过程中,内转换电子发射和电子俘获能在原子电子壳层内留下空穴. 其他原子电子壳层的电子将填补这些空穴,其原子电子位置将重排,并发射X射线和俄歇电子. X射线和俄歇电子的能量由原子电子结合能计算得到,X射线和俄歇电子的强度分别由内转换电子发射和电子俘获在原子电子壳层内留下的空穴数,X射线荧光产额,和空穴转移系数计算得到. 本文简要介绍核衰变产生的X射线和俄歇电子数据的计算方法、计算程序与工作流程,并以核衰变为例说明其具体应用和简要讨论与总结.%In nuclear decay process, internal conversion electron emission and electron capture leave vacancies in atomic shells. The vacancies in atomic shells give rise to rearrangements in the shells which are accompanied by the emission of X-ray and the ejection of Auger electrons. The energies of X-ray and Auger electron can be calculated on the basis of atomic-electron binding energies in different atomic shells. The intensities of X-ray and Auger electron can be also calculated from vacancy number, X-ray fluorescence yield and vacancy transfer coefficient of different atomic shells. The calculation methods of energies and absolute intensities of X-ray and Auger electron arising from nuclear decay are introduced briefly. The calculation codes and flow chart are presented. The application is also given by using some nuclear decays as an example.

  10. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting estrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2006-08-15

    Bioelectronic devices for the detection of estrogen include a collection of eukaryotic cells which harbor a recombinant lux gene from a high temperature microorganism wherein the gene is operably linked with a heterologous promoter gene. A detectable light-emitting lux gene product is expressed in the presence of the estrogen and detected by the device.

  11. Multicolor Imaging of Bifacial Activities of Estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces multicolor imaging of bifacial activities of an estrogen. For the multicolor imaging, the authors fabricated two single-chain probes emitting green or red bioluminescence (named Simer-G and -R, respectively) from click beetle luciferase (CBLuc) green and red: Simer-R consists of the ligand binding domain of estrogen receptor (ER LBD) and the Src homology-2 (SH2) domain of Src, which are sandwiched between split-CBLuc red (CBLuc-R). On the other hand, Simer-G emitting red light consists of the ER LBD and a common consensus sequence of coactivators (LXXLL motif), which are inserted between split-CBLuc green (CBLuc-G). This probe set creates fingerprinting spectra from the characteristic green and red bioluminescence in response to agonistic and antagonistic activities of a ligand of interest. The present protocol further provides a unique methodology to calculate characteristic estrogenicity scores of various ligands from the spectra. PMID:27424902

  12. Positron lifetime measurements and positron-annihilation induced auger electron spectroscpy using slow positron beams; Teisoku yodenshi bimu wo mochiita yodenshi jumyo sokutei oyobi yodenshi shometsu reiki oje denshi bunko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, R. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-02-20

    Slow positron beam with less than several eV can be controlled freely such as accelerating, throttling the beam size, shortening the pulse or making pulse with short time width and so forth. These low positron beams are applied to various measurements like Doppler broadening measurement of annihilation {gamma} rays or lifetime measurement of positron, and secondary particle measurements using positron microscope, positron electron ray diffraction, flight time method and so forth. In particular, these recent years, high intensity slow positron beams were possible using accelerators like electron linac and its application is increasing. In this report, pulse shortening method for high intensity slow positron beam, and incidence energy variable positron lifetime measurement method using this slow pulsed beam and flight time type positron-annihilation-induced auger electron spectroscopy are outlined. In future, these measurements can be possible to carry out with high resolution and also with high counting rate if higher intensity monochromatic excellent positron beam than present one is produced. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are used to treat hot flashes (sudden feelings of warmth, especially in the ... women may experience other symptoms and body changes). Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are also used to prevent ...

  14. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  15. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  16. Estrogen Signaling and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has pleiotropic effects on the cardiovascular system. The mechanisms by which estrogen confers these pleiotropic effects on cardiovascular function is under active investigation. Until a decade ago, all estrogen signaling was thought to occur by estrogen binding to nuclear estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), which bind to DNA and function as ligand activated transcription factors. Estrogen binding to the receptor alters gene expression thereby altering cell function. In 2000 estrogen w...

  17. Study of the adsorption of methyl iodide and molecular iodine on clean uranium and uranium dioxide surfaces by means of X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of methyl iodide as well as of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been studied at 250C. Surfaces of the substrates were cleaned and characterized before and after exposure using X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron induced Auger electron (AES) spectroscopy. Exposures amounted up to 1500 L CH3I on uranium metal, 1000 L CH3I on UO2, 100 L I2 on uranium metal, and 75 L I2 on UO2 (1 L = 1 Langmuir = 10-6 torr x sec). From the measured binding energies, Auger parameters, and intensity ratios for substrate and adsorbate constituents we deduced that for both CH3I and I2 on uranium metal a uranium iodide, UI3, is formed. The adsorption of CH3I on U-metal is in addition accompanied by the formation of a carbide-type carbon, UC. Thus, in both cases a dissociative (adsorption/reaction) process is observed. For adsorption of CH3I on UO2 the experimental findings indicate a dissociative process, too, though the species formed could not be identified. In contrast, I2 adsorption on UO2 appears to have non-dissociative character. Saturation coverages for CH3I were found to be approx.= 2 L on U-metal and approx.= 5 L on UO2, for I2 approx.= 40 L on U-metal and 10-15 L on UO2. Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extraatomic relaxation processes. (orig.)

  18. Surface and subsurface oxidation of Mo2C/Mo(100): low-energy ion-scattering, auger electron, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron, and mass spectroscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovári, László; Kiss, János; Farkas, Arnold P; Solymosi, Frigyes

    2005-03-17

    The interaction of oxygen with a carburized Mo(100) surface was investigated at different temperatures (300-1000 K). The different information depths of low-energy ion-scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy, with topmost layer sensitivity, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) allowed us to discriminate between reactions on the topmost layer and subsurface transformations. According to ARXPS measurements, a carbide overlayer was prepared by the high-temperature decomposition of C(2)H(4) on Mo(100), and the carbon distribution proved to be homogeneous with a Mo(2)C stoichiometry down to the information depth of XPS. O(2) adsorbs dissociatively on the carbide layer at room temperature. One part of the chemisorbed oxygen is bound to both C and Mo sites, indicated by LEIS. Another fraction of oxygen atoms probably resides in the hollow sites not occupied by C. The removal of C from the outermost layer by O(2), in the form of CO, detected by mass spectroscopy (MS), was observed at 500-600 K. The carbon-depleted first layer is able to adsorb more oxygen compared to the Mo(2)C/Mo(100) surface. Applying higher doses of O(2) at 800 K results in the inward diffusion of O and the partial oxidation of Mo atoms. This process, however, is not accompanied by the removal of C from subsurface sites. The depletion of C from the bulk starts only at 900 K (as shown by MS, AES, and XPS), very probably by the diffusion of C to the surface followed by its reaction with oxygen. At T(ads) = 1000 K, the carbon content of the sample, down to the information depth of XPS, decreased further, accompanied by the attenuation of the C concentration gradient and a substantially decreased amount of oxygen.

  19. Enzymatic treatment of estrogens and estrogen glucuronide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takaaki Tanaka; Toshiyuki Tamura; Yuuichi Ishizaki; Akito Kawasaki; Tomokazu Kawase; Masahiro Teraguchi; Masayuki Taniguchi

    2009-01-01

    Natural and synthetic estrogens from sewage treatment systems are suspected to influence the reproductive health of the animals in the rivers.In this article we investigated the enzymatic treatment of three estrogens (estrone,17β-estradiol,and 17α-ethynyletstradiol) by a fungal laccase which oxidize phenolic compounds with dissolved oxygen.The elimination of the estrogenic activities by enzymatic oxidation was demonstrated by medaka vitellogenin assay.In addition,we developed an enzymatic treatment system comprised of β-D-glucuronidase and the laccase for 17β-estradiol 3-(β-D-glucuronide) degradation.The two enzymes eliminated 17β-estradiol 3-(β-D-glucuronide) and the intermediate,17β-estradiol,efficiently.

  20. Steroid estrogens, conjugated estrogens and estrogenic activity in farm dairy shed effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadd, Jennifer B., E-mail: j.gadd@niwa.co.n [Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Tremblay, Louis A., E-mail: tremblayl@landcareresearch.co.n [Landcare Research, PO Box 40, Lincoln, 7640 (New Zealand); Northcott, Grant L., E-mail: grant.northcott@plantandfood.co.n [Plant and Food Research, Private Bag 3123, Waikato Mail Centre, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2010-03-15

    Agricultural wastes are a source of steroid estrogens and, if present, conjugated estrogens may add to the estrogen load released to soil and aquatic environments. Dairy shed effluent samples were collected from 18 farms for analysis of steroid estrogens by GC-MS, conjugated estrogens by LC-MS-MS, and estrogenic activity by E-screen in vitro bioassay. 17alpha-estradiol was found at highest concentrations (median 730 ng l{sup -1}), followed by estrone (100 ng l{sup -1}) and 17beta-estradiol (24 ng l{sup -1}). Conjugated estrogens (estrone-3-sulfate, 17alpha-estradiol-3-sulfate and 17beta-estradiol-3,17-disulfate) were measured in most samples (12-320 ng l{sup -1}). Median estrogenic activity was 46 ng l{sup -1} 17beta-estradiol equivalents. Conjugated estrogens contributed up to 22% of the total estrogen load from dairy farming, demonstrating their significance. Steroid estrogens dominated overall estrogenic activity measured in the samples. Significantly, 17alpha-estradiol contributed 25% of overall activity, despite potency 2% that of 17beta-estradiol, highlighting the importance in environmental risk assessments of this previously neglected compound. - In rural ecosystems, 17alpha-estradiol and conjugated estrogens are significant sources of environmental estrogens from agricultural wastes.

  1. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  2. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  3. Estrogenic compounds -endocrine disruptors

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu Constantin; Hoteteu Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane [DDT], dioxin, and some pesticides) are estrogen-like and anti-androgenic chemicals in the environment. They mimic natural hormones, inhibit the action of hormones, or alter the normal regulatory function of the endocrine system and have potential hazardous effects on male reproductive axis causing infertility. Although testicular and prostate cancers, abnormal sexual development, undescended testis, chronic inf...

  4. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  5. ESTROGEN IN THE LIMBIC SYSTEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, Gert J.; Litwack, G

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens are a group of steroid hormones that function as the primary female sex hormone. Estrogens not only have an important role in the regulation of the estrous or menstrual cycle but also control, for example, bone formation, the cardiovascular system, and cognitive functions. Estradiol (E2),

  6. Estrogenic compounds -endocrine disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Constantin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors (polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane [DDT], dioxin, and some pesticides are estrogen-like and anti-androgenic chemicals in the environment. They mimic natural hormones, inhibit the action of hormones, or alter the normal regulatory function of the endocrine system and have potential hazardous effects on male reproductive axis causing infertility. Although testicular and prostate cancers, abnormal sexual development, undescended testis, chronic inflammation, Sertoli-cell-only pattern, hypospadias, altered pituitary and thyroid gland functions are also observed, the available data are insufficient to deduce worldwide conclusions.

  7. Experimental study of electron ejection by heavy ion irradiation of solids: Observation of forward and backward emitted electron jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zäpfel, T.; Hagmann, S.; Rothard, H.; Ullrich, J.; Kraft, G.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Groeneveld, K. O.

    2002-06-01

    Doubly differential cross sections for electron emission induced by the passage of swift heavy ions such as F q+ (1.5-2.0 MeV/u) through thin solid foil targets were measured at the Tandem accelerator of the JR Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The complete angular distribution of electron emission up to 4000 eV (beyond the maximum of the "binary encounter" electron peak) was determined as a function of the projectile charge state ( q=5 and 9) and the target material in a wide Z range: C ( Z=6), Al ( Z=13) and Au ( Z=79). Electrons emitted from the foils between 0 and ±180° with respect to the beam axis were energy and angle analysed by means of a toroidal electrostatic electron spectrometer equipped with a 2D position sensitive channelplate detector. In addition to low energy cascade electrons, electrons from collective excitation (plasmons), target Auger electrons, convoy electrons and binary encounter electrons, we also observe a new feature never before seen in electron angular distributions: narrow electron jets ("spikes") emitted along the ion beam axis in forward and backward directions. This observation is made possible by the good angular resolution of our spectrometer and the possibility to record the entire angular distribution in a single run.

  8. Estrogen and gastrointestinal malignancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    The concept that E2 exerts an effect on the gastrointestinal tract is not new and its actions on intestinal mucosa have been investigated for at least three decades. An attempt to consolidate results of these investigations generates more questions than answers, thus suggesting that many unexplored avenues remain and that the full capabilities of this steroid hormone are far from understood. Evidence of its role in esophageal, gastric and gallbladder cancers is confusing and often equivocal. The most compelling evidence regards the protective role conferred by estrogen (or perhaps ERbeta) against the development and proliferation of colon cancer. Not only has the effect been described but also many mechanisms of action have been explored. It is likely that, along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal manipulation will play an integral role in colon cancer management in the very near future.

  9. Mechanisms enforcing the estrogen receptor β selectivity of botanical estrogens

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yan; Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Martin, Teresa; Jeyakumar, Muthu; Carlson, Kathryn; Khan, Ikhlas; Smillie, Troy J.; Amar G. Chittiboyina; Rotte, Sateesh C. K.; Helferich, William G.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2013-01-01

    Because little is known about the actions of botanical estrogens (BEs), widely consumed by menopausal women, we investigated the mechanistic and cellular activities of some major BEs. We examined the interactions of genistein, daidzein, equol, and liquiritigenin with estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, with key coregulators (SRC3 and RIP140) and chromatin binding sites, and the regulation of gene expression and proliferation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells containing ERα and/or ERβ. Unlike the endog...

  10. Estrogen Sulfotransferase Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Taira; Ihunnah, Chibueze A.; Gao, Jie; Chai, Xiaojuan; Zeng, Su; Philips, Brian J.; Rubin, J. Peter; Marra, Kacey G.; Xie, Wen

    2011-01-01

    The estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) is a phase II drug-metabolizing enzyme known to catalyze the sulfoconjugation of estrogens. EST is highly expressed in the white adipose tissue of male mice, but the role of EST in the development and function of adipocytes remains largely unknown. In this report, we showed that EST played an important role in adipocyte differentiation. EST was highly expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and primary mouse preadipocytes. The expression of EST was dramatically r...

  11. The Relationship between Periodontopathy and Estrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shiguang; LI Dexiang

    2002-01-01

    Objecitve To discuss the relationship between peridontopathy and estrogen. Method We discussed the relationship between periodontopathy and increasing of estrogen, the relationship between peridontopoathy and deficiency of estrogen and the relationship between osteoprotegerin in osteoblasts and estrogen. Results When estrogen increased or decreased abnormally, osteoporosis could occur, which induced alveolar ridge resorption and alveolar bone atrophy. Then the teeth exfoliated.Teeth uncleanness facilitated periodontopathy. Conclusion No matter how young or old, keeping the relative balance of estrogen can protect gingiva and alveolar bone. At the same time, keeping teeth clean is also essential to prevent periodontopathy.

  12. Effects of pinostrobin on estrogen metabolism and estrogen receptor transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bail, J C; Aubourg, L; Habrioux, G

    2000-08-01

    The interaction between the estrogen receptor and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (pinostrobin) was studied in the presence or absence of estradiol or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), respectively, using a stably transfected human breast cancer cell line (MVLN). We also evaluated its action on the proliferation in estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) human breast cancer cells in the same conditions than the estrogen receptor assay. On the other hand pinostrobin was evaluated for their effects on the human placental aromatase, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Delta(4)/Delta(5) isomerase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities. Pinostrobin did not possess antiestrogenic activity but presented anti-aromatase activity and decreased the growth of MCF-7 cells induced by DHEAS and E(2). This study provides particularly evidence of the potential biological interest of pinostrobin among the flavonoids. PMID:10840157

  13. ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2004-01-01

    ERGDB is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed database and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant databases, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475

  14. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Estrogen-alone hormone therapy does not increase the risk of ...

  15. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ER alpha and ER beta, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ER alpha mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most nota

  16. Iodine labelled diethylstilbestrol (DES) of high specific activity: A potential radiopharmaceutical for therapy of estrogen receptorpositive tumours and their metastases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) estrogens are localized very close to the DNA. Therefore, radioactively labelled estrogens, especially in connection with Auger-electron emitters which have only a very short range (1-10 nm) of radiation, are excellent candidates to achieve high specific cytotoxicity, in combination with a low degree of side effects. Diethylstilbestrol (3,4-Di-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-hexene-3) is a well-known, synthetic, non-steroidal estrogen, which has a higher affinity to the estrogen receptor than the natural hormone estradiol itself. The idea to use iodine labelled DES for imaging of ER positive tumours is not new. Several working groups successfully tried to label DES with different methods and investigated the diagnostic usefulness of the product. Most attempts for labelling with radioiodine have been made with a water soluble derivate of DES, the tetra-sodium salt of diethylstilbestrol-diphosphate (DES-2P). Former labelling methods had some disadvantages: low yield (20-30%), low specific activity (0.7 - 2.9 GBq/mmol), bad reproducibility, and time consuming procedures. Presumably, the low specific activity was the reason for the unsatisfying biodistribution data observed with this labelled compounds. In the present work a fast and simple labelling and purification method for *I-DES was used and its binding affinity for ER was determined. For testing its cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 mamma carcinoma cells different iodine isotopes bound to DES or in form of iodide were compared with regard to apoptosis, necrosis, and viability. Last but not least first animal experiments with tumour bearing mice were carried out. DES was iodinated by Chloramine T in methanolic solution. Purification and quality control was carried out with reversed phase HPLC (column: Column: Hypersil ODS, 250 x 4 mm, 10 Ym, Eluent A: Methanol G, Eluent B: Water G, Gradient: 20% A to 70% A within 5 min, Flow: 1 ml/min, UV-Detection: 254 nm). The dissociation constants for

  17. Cross-fire doses from {beta}-emitting radionuclides in targeted radiotherapy. A theoretical study based on experimentally measured tumor characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enger, S A; Carlsson, J; Lundqvist, H [Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Hartman, T [Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: shirin.enger@bms.uu.se

    2008-04-07

    A mathematical model based upon histological findings of cell cluster distributions in primary breast cancers and lymph node metastases was developed. The model is unique because it accounts for tumor cell cluster formations within both primary tumors and metastases. The importance of inter-cell cluster cross-fire radiation dose for {beta}-emitting radionuclides of different energies was studied. The cell clusters were simulated as spheres with 15, 25 and 50 {mu}m radii having a homogeneous radioactivity distribution. The self-dose as well as the dose distribution around the spheres was calculated for seven radionuclides, {sup 90}Y, {sup 188}Re, {sup 32}P, {sup 186}Re, {sup 159}Gd, {sup 131}I and {sup 177}Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. Generally, the self-dose was decreasing with increasing energy of the emitted beta particles. An exception was {sup 188}Re which, compared to {sup 32}P, had higher beta energy as well as higher self-dose. This was due to the higher emission of conversion and Auger electrons in the {sup 188}Re-decay. When the cell clusters had a mean distance that was shorter than the maximum range of {beta}-particles, then the inter-cluster cross-fire radiation contributed significantly to the absorbed dose. Thus, high-energy {beta}-particles may, in spite of a low self-dose to single clusters, still be favorable to use due to the contribution of inter-cluster cross-fire radiation.

  18. Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence study for condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefani, G. [Department of Physics and Unita' INFM, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: stefani@fis.uniroma3.it; Gotter, R. [National Laboratory TASC-INFM, Area Science Park, SS 14 Km 163.5, Basovizza, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Ruocco, A. [Department of Physics and Unita INFM, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Offi, F. [Department of Physics and Unita INFM, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Pieve, F. Da [Department of Physics and Unita INFM, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Iacobucci, S. [IMIP-CNR Area della Ricerca di Roma, via Salaria Km 29, 3 Montelibretti (Italy); Morgante, A. [National Laboratory TASC-INFM, Area Science Park, SS 14 Km 163.5, Basovizza, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Verdini, A. [National Laboratory TASC-INFM, Area Science Park, SS 14 Km 163.5, Basovizza, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Liscio, A. [IMIP-CNR Area della Ricerca di Roma, via Salaria Km 29, 3 Montelibretti (Italy); Yao, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Laboratory of Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States); Bartynski, R.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Laboratory of Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Advances in materials science have produced a wide array of new solid-state systems with tunable properties and previously unattainable combinations of phenomena that hold the promise of entirely new approaches to technological applications. Invariably, these new materials are increasingly complex and include a large number of constituents in a variety of chemical states. Entirely new theoretical and experimental approaches are needed to gain the insights necessary for intelligent engineering of these materials. In the past 20 years, a steadily increasing number of electron-electron coincidence experiments on atoms and molecules have demonstrated the capability of investigating complicated systems with sensitivity and specificity well beyond the limits imposed by conventional electron spectroscopies. Over the past decade or so, Auger-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) has emerged as a powerful technique for obtaining detailed information about complex materials systems. Moreover, the recent advent of angle-resolved (AR)-APECS has introduced a new level of discrimination in studying the distribution of electrons photoemitted from complex systems. In this review, we describe the basic ideas behind APECS and discuss a study of the SiO{sub 2} system as an example of the unique information this technique can provide. We then introduce the concept of AR-APECS, explain its novel state and angular momentum selectivity that can be used to disentangle information about complex systems that is hidden to conventional spectroscopies. Examples of AR-APECS measurements from Cu, Ge, and graphite that exemplify the capabilities of this technique are presented.

  19. Sputtering measurements on CTR materials using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sputter yield of Nb, W, C, and Ag by Ar+ in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 keV was measured. In addition, the sputter yield for W, C and Ag by H+ at 11.0 keV has been determined. With the exception of carbon, the data are in general agreement with earlier work. For carbon, some discrepancies between the present work and earlier studies are found. It is suggested that major factors contributing to these discrepancies are structural and/or chemical in nature

  20. Pharmacological profile of estrogens in oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, J

    2011-06-01

    The synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE)given by mouth is stable and yields satisfactory results in terms of ovulation inhibition and effects on the endometrium. It increases however the risk especially for venous thrombotic events and to a lesser degree also arterial thrombosis. Therefore research focused on diminuition of the EE dosage and the development of a different estrogen component in oral contraceptives, specifically an estrogen occurring during physiological processes in the female body. Two estrogens emerge: 17ß Estradiol is the most potent natural estrogen and it is the major estrogen secreted by the ovaries. Estetrol is a human sex steroid (15 alpha hydroxyestriol) which is only produced during pregnancy by the fetal liver. The pharmacolokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these estrogens are compared to those of EE (absorption, metabolization, bioavailability etc.) and the clinical profile is described as far it is known from a limited number of studies. PMID:21654614

  1. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  2. Estrogen and estrogen receptors in cardiovascular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Muehlfelder, Melanie; Pelzer, Theo

    2013-05-01

    The cardiovascular system of a premenopausal woman is prepared to adapt to the challenges of increased cardiac output and work load that accompany pregnancy. Thus, it is tempting to speculate whether enhanced adaptability of the female cardiovascular system might be advantageous under conditions that promote cardiovascular disease. In support of this concept, 17β-estradiol as the major female sex hormone has been shown to confer protective cardiovascular effects in experimental studies. Mechanistically, these have been partially linked to the prevention and protection against oxidative stress. Current evidence indicates that estrogens attenuate oxidative stress at two levels: first, by preventing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, second, by scavenging ROS in the myocardium and in the vasculature. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on current concepts on conditions and mechanisms by which estrogens protect the cardiovascular system against ROS-mediated cellular injury.

  3. Estrogen Therapy Rescues Advanced Heart Failure via Estrogen Receptor Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Iorga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, defined as an enlargement of the ventricles, is often triggered when the heart is subjected to hemodynamic stress from physiological stimuli such as pregnancy, or from pathological stimuli such as pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy or pulmonary hypertension-induced right ventricular hypertrophy. Physiological hypertrophy is beneficial and adaptive, while pathological hypertrophy is maladaptive and detrimental. Estrogen treatment prior to the onset of p...

  4. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  5. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  6. Holographic QSAR of environmental estrogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaodong; XIAO; Qianfen; CUI; Shihai; LIU; Shushen

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that some man-made and naturally occurring chemicals related to the environment have the potential to interrupt normal functioning of the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife. These chemicals, termed EDCs (Endocrine disrupting Chemicals), pose serious threats to the reproductive capability of humans and wildlife. Because of the structural diversity and various types, development of structure-based rapid screening methodologies is important and necessary for the assessment of the environmental pollutants. In this paper molecular hologram based QSAR models were developed with the combinatory application of partial least square (PLS) regression for a large diverse set of 105 environmental estrogens. Quantitatively predictive models were developed based on only molecular structures, which can be used for the accurate prediction of estrogenicity to rapidly screen potential environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals.

  7. Urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites and subsequent risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Eliassen, A. Heather; Spiegelman, Donna; Xu, Xia; Keefer, Larry K; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Barbieri, Robert L.; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ziegler, Regina G.

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolism are hypothesized to be associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk but evidence is limited. We examined 15 urinary estrogens/estrogen metabolites (EM) and breast cancer risk among premenopausal women in a case-control study nested within the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII). In 1996–1999, urine was collected from 18,521 women during the mid-luteal menstrual phase. Breast cancer cases (N=247) diagnosed between collection and June 2005 were match...

  8. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  9. Oral Contraceptive Estrogen Content and Adverse Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Margaret; Ramcharan, Savitri

    1987-01-01

    The 1985 Health and Welfare Canada Report on Oral Contraceptives recommended oral contraceptives (OCs) containing 30-35 mcg of estrogen rather than 50 mcg as the preferred dosage for contraception. Many family physicians may regard these guidelines as mandatory when prescribing OCs, because of a presumption that pills of 50-mcg estrogen content carry a higher risk of disease. In this article, the epidemiologic evidence pertaining to a dose-response relationship between the estrogen dose of or...

  10. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L; Hall, James B; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2014-05-15

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p < 0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  11. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  12. Selective estrogen modulators in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambacciani, M

    2013-12-01

    Hypoestrogenism is the primary etiologic factor for osteoporosis and related fractures, as well as for a number of clinical symptoms that can reduce the quality of life in postmenopausal women. Alternative to classical hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are needed for women that cannot or don't want to be treated with hormones. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are compounds that lack the steroid structure of estrogens, but interact with estrogen receptors (ERs) as agonists or antagonists depending on the target tissue. Tamoxifen, the first generation of SERMs, has been used for decades in the primary prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Tamoxifen exerts positive estrogenic effect on bone protecting bone mineral density (BMD). However, tamoxifen acts as agonist also on the endometrium, leading to an increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. In addition, tamoxifen administration is associated with significantly increased risks of stroke, venous thromboembolism, including both deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli. Thus, these actions, in addition to the increased risk of and hot flushes, prevent the use of tamoxifen for the prevention of osteoporosis. Further generations of SERM, Raloxifene and bazedoxifene were developed for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and are now licensed for this indication. In addition. Raloxifene is as effective as tamoxifen in reducing the risk of invasive breast cancer. On the other hand, the available data indicate that Bazedoxifene exerts a greater anti-fracture activity than Raloxifene. At variance of tamoxifen, both raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. However, they are associated with a significant increase the risks of venous thromboembolic events. Although raloxifene and Bazedoxifene prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis, they have not been associated with reductions in climacteric symptoms, particularly hot flushes. In order

  13. Role of estrogen in avian osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M M; Hansen, K K

    2004-02-01

    One of the difficulties associated with commercial layer production is the development of osteoporosis in hens late in the production cycle. In light of this fact and because of hens' unique requirements for Ca, many studies have focused on the regulation of Ca and the role of estrogen in this process. The time course of estrogen synthesis over the productive life of hens has been well documented; increased circulating estrogen accompanies the onset of sexual maturity while decreases signal a decline in egg production prior to a molt. Numbers of estrogen receptors decrease with age in numerous tissues. The parallel changes in calcium-regulating proteins, primarily Calbindin D28K, and in the ability of duodenal cells to transport Ca, are thought to occur as a result of the changes in estrogen, and are also reversible by the molt process. In addition to the traditional model of estrogen action, evidence now exists for a possible nongenomic action of estrogen via membrane-bound receptors, demonstrated by extremely rapid surges of ionized Ca in chicken granulosa cells in response to 17beta-estradiol. Estrogen receptors have also been discovered in duodenal tissue, and tamoxifen, which binds to the estrogen receptor, has been shown to cause a rapid increase in Ca transport in the duodenum. In addition, recent evidence also suggests that mineralization of bone per se may not explain entirely the etiology of osteoporosis in the hen but that changes in the collagen matrix may contribute through decreases in bone elasticity. Taken together, these studies suggest that changes in estrogen synthesis and estrogen receptor populations may underlie the age-related changes in avian bone. As with postmenopausal women, dietary Ca and vitamin D are of limited benefit as remedies for osteoporosis in the hen. PMID:14979570

  14. Identification of estrogenic/anti-estrogenic compounds in diesel exhaust particulate extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Keiko; Toriba, Akira; Chung, Sang Woon; Kizu, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2007-11-01

    Diesel exhaust particulate extract (DEPE) was obtained from diesel exhaust particulates with Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane. After separating DEPE into 11 fractions by liquid-liquid extraction, the neutral fraction (N) showed anti-estrogenic activity and the weak acid (phenol) fraction (WA(P)) showed estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities by a yeast two-hybrid assay system expressing human estrogen receptor alpha. Both fractions were thoroughly fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. In the WA(P) fraction, 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol and 2,6-dimethyl-4-nitrophenol were identified by LC-MS/MS as estrogenic compounds. This is the first study to identify 2,6-dimethyl-4-nitrophenol in DEPE and the first study to show that it is an estrogenic compound. In the N fraction, 1-hydroxypyrene was also identified by LC-MS/MS as an anti-estrogenic compound.

  15. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  16. Estrogenic activity of naturally occurring anthocyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, E; Stopper, H

    2001-01-01

    Anthocyanins, which are natural plant pigments from the flavonoid family, represent substantial constituents of the human diet. Because some other bioflavonoids are known to have estrogenic activity, the aim of this study was to determine the estrogenic activity of the anthocyanine aglycones. Binding affinity to the estrogen receptor-alpha was 10,000- to 20,000-fold lower than that of the endogenous estrogen estradiol. In the estrogen receptor-positive cell line MCF-7, the anthocyanidins induced expression of a reporter gene. The tested anthocyanidins showed estrogen-inducible cell proliferation in two cell lines (MCF-7 and BG-1), but not in the receptor-negative human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The phytoestrogen-induced cell proliferation could be blocked by addition of the receptor antagonist 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Combination treatments with the endogenous estrogen estradiol resulted in a reduction of estradiol-induced cell proliferation. Overall, the tested anthocyanidins exert estrogenic activity, which might play a role in altering the development of hormone-dependent adverse effects.

  17. The effects of estrogen in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellhoffer, Edward C; McCullough, Louise D

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and the most common cause of long-term disability in the USA. Women have a lower incidence of stroke compared with men throughout most of the lifespan which has been ascribed to protective effects of gonadal steroids, most notably estrogen. Due to the lower stroke incidence observed in pre-menopausal women and robust preclinical evidence of neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of estrogen, researchers have focused on the potential benefits of hormones to reduce ischemic brain injury. However, as women age, they are disproportionately affected by stroke, coincident with the loss of estrogen with menopause. The risk of stroke in elderly women exceeds that of men and it is clear that in some settings estrogen can have pro-inflammatory effects. This review will focus on estrogen and inflammation and its interaction with aging.

  18. Differential estrogen receptor binding of estrogenic substances: a species comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J; Celius, T; Halgren, R; Zacharewski, T

    2000-11-15

    The study investigated the ability of 34 natural and synthetic chemicals to compete with [3H]17beta-estradiol (E2) for binding to bacterially expressed glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-estrogen receptors (ER) fusion proteins from five different species. Fusion proteins consisted of the ER D, E and F domains of human alpha (GST-hERalphadef), mouse alpha (GST-mERalphadef), chicken (GST-cERdef), green anole (GST-aERdef) and rainbow trout ERs (GST-rtERdef). All five fusion proteins displayed high affinity for E2 with dissociation constants (K(d)) ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 nM. Although, the fusion proteins exhibited similar binding preferences and binding affinities for many of the chemicals, several differences were observed. For example, alpha-zearalenol bound with greater affinity to GST-rtERdef than E2, which was in contrast to other GST-ERdef fusion proteins examined. Coumestrol, genistein and naringenin bound with higher affinity to the GST-aERdef, than to the other GST-ERdef fusion proteins. Many of the industrial chemicals examined preferentially bound to GST-rtERdef. Bisphenol A, 4-t-octylphenol and o,p' DDT bound with approximately a ten-fold greater affinity to GST-rtERdef than to other GST-ERdefs. Methoxychlor, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDE, alpha-endosulfan and dieldrin weakly bound to the ERs from the human, mouse, chicken and green anole. In contrast, these compounds completely displaced [3H]E2 from GST-rtERdef. These results demonstrate that ERs from different species exhibit differential ligand preferences and relative binding affinities for estrogenic compounds and that these differences may be due to the variability in the amino acid sequence within their respective ER ligand binding domains. PMID:11162928

  19. Estrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are allergic to aspirin or tartrazine (a food color additive). Ask your pharmacist or check the manufacturer's patient ... this medication.If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  20. Estrogen receptor beta treats Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Tian; Jia Fan; Yang Zhao; Sheng Bi; Lihui Si; Qun Liu

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that estrogen receptor β can attenuate the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β protein on PC12 cells through the Akt pathway without estrogen stimulation. In this study, we aimed to observe the effect of estrogen receptor β in Alzheimer's disease rat models established by intraventricular injection of amyloid β protein. Estrogen receptor β lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection increased Akt content in the hippocampus, decreased interleukin-1β mRNA, tumor necrosis factor α mRNA and amyloid β protein levels in the hippocampus, and improved the learning and memory capacities in Alzheimer's disease rats. Estrogen receptor β short hairpin RNA lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection had none of the above impacts on Alzheimer's disease rats. These experimental findings indicate that estrogen receptor β, independent from estrogen, can reduce inflammatory reactions and amyloid β deposition in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease rats, and improve learning and memory capacities. This effect may be mediated through activation of the Akt pathway.

  1. Effects of estrogen and tibolone on bladder histology and estrogen receptors in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xin; LI Ya-zhen; MAO Zhuo; GU Pei; SHANG Ming

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogen deficiency causes atrophic changes within the urogenital tract, and is associated with urinary symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of estrogen and tibolone on bladder histology, and the changes of estrogen receptor α and β (ERα and β) protein expression in the detrusor muscle.Methods Forty female rats were separated into four groups of ten each. They received a sham operation (Sham), ovariectomy (Ovx), ovariectomy plus estrogen replacement (Ovx+E), or ovariectomy plus tibolone treatment (Ovx+T). After 12 weeks each rat was anesthetized and the bladders were removed. The bladders' ultra structure, collagen fiber (CF) to smooth muscle(SM) ratio and ER subtypes were studied. Statistical analyses were performed using the one-way analysis of variance test.Results Ovx resulted in significant degeneration in bladder ultra structure; however, estrogen and tibolone reversed those changes. Ovx increased the CF/SM ratio, estrogen and tibolone resulted in an increase. Two estrogen receptors (ERs) were expressed in the bladder detrusor, with ERβ the main subtype. Ovx resulted in up-regulation of ERα and down-regulation of ERβ. With estrogen and tibolone treatment, ERβ showed a significant increase but ERα showed no significant difference compared with Ovx.Conclusions Estrogen deficiency deteriorates bladder ultra structure and histology. Supplementary estrogen can improve bladder function which may be due to inhibition of collagen hyperplasia and increased SM density. ERβ has an important role in mediating estrogen function in the bladder. Tibolone has a mild estrogenic action and has an effect on bladder function and structure to some degree.

  2. Comparison of estrogens and estrogen metabolites in human breast tissue and urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veenstra Timothy D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important aspect of the link between estrogen and breast cancer is whether urinary estrogen levels are representative of the intra-tissue levels of bioavailable estrogens. Methods This study compares 15 estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in breast tissue and urine of 9 women with primary breast cancer using a quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Results The average levels of estrogens (estrone, 17 beta-estradiol were significantly higher in breast tissue than in urine. Both the 2 and the 16-hydroxylation pathways were less represented in breast tissue than urine; no components of the 4-hydroxypathway were detected in breast tissue, while 4-hydroxyestrone was measured in urine. However, the 2/16 ratio was similar in urine and breast tissue. Women carrying the variant CYP1B1 genotype (Leu/Val and Val/Val showed significantly lower overall estrogen metabolite, estrogen, and 16-hydroxylation pathway levels in breast tissue in comparison to women carrying the wild type genotype. No effect of the CYP1B1 polymorphism was observed in urinary metabolites. Conclusions The urinary 2/16 ratio seems a good approximation of the ratio observed in breast tissue. Metabolic genes may have an important role in the estrogen metabolism locally in tissues where the gene is expressed, a role that is not readily observable when urinary measurements are performed.

  3. Fabrication of Metal-Deposited Indium Tin Oxides: Its Applications to 385 nm Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ju; Kim, Tae Geun

    2016-03-01

    We report performance improvements in near-ultraviolet (NUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using various metal-doped indium tin oxide (ITO/metals). Metals with an orbital energy gap greater than that of an In atom (e.g., Ti, Ga, Ge, and Al) are deposited on ITO, and subsequent annealing is performed to improve optical transmittance of ITO due to effective bandgap increase via the linear combination of atomic orbitals, as well as electrical conductivity; thus, current spreading via metal-doping effect at the surface of ITO. As a result, the ITO/metals (annealed at 550 °C, 1 min) exhibit 90.5-94.7% transmittance at 385 nm and a specific contact resistance of 2.1-3.0 × 10(-3) Ω cm(2), whereas the reference ITOs exhibit 76.5-89.5% and 3.2-4.5 × 10(-3) Ω cm(2), respectively. Compared to NUV LEDs using conventional ITO (60 nm), the InGaN/AlGaInN NUV LED using ITO (110 nm)/metal (3 nm) on average exhibits a 70% increase in light output power at 100 mA and a 2% decrease in forward voltage at 20 mA, with more uniform and brighter emission images. We also identified the origin for the improvement by analyzing the surface of ITO/metals using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. This approach could offer a simple, effective way to enhance the overall efficiency of conventional NUV LEDs using ITO.

  4. Estrogen and Progestin (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made by the body. Estrogen reduces feelings of warmth in the upper body and periods of sweating ... and the laboratory. You should have a complete physical exam, including blood pressure measurements, breast and pelvic ...

  5. Sulfation of thyroid hormone by estrogen sulfotransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique); T.J. Visser (Ton); C.H. van Dijk (Caren); D. Tibboel (Dick); A.M. Hood (Margaret); N.J. Rose; W. Meinl; U. Pabel; H. Glatt; C.N. Falany; M.W. Coughtrie

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSulfation is one of the pathways by which thyroid hormone is inactivated. Iodothyronine sulfate concentrations are very high in human fetal blood and amniotic fluid, suggesting important production of these conjugates in utero. Human estrogen sulfotransferas

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of estrogen-responsive genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Adam E.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that plays critical roles in a myriad of intracellular pathways. The expression of many genes is regulated through the steroid hormone receptors ESR1 and ESR2. These bind to DNA and modulate the expression of target genes. Identification of estrogen target genes is greatly facilitated by the use of transcriptomic methods, such as RNA-seq and expression microarrays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). Combining transcriptomic and ChIP-seq data enables a distinction to be drawn between direct and indirect estrogen target genes. This chapter will discuss some methods of identifying estrogen target genes that do not require any expertise in programming languages or complex bioinformatics. PMID:26585125

  7. Bioinformatics Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that plays critical roles in a myriad of intracellular pathways. The expression of many genes is regulated through the steroid hormone receptors ESR1 and ESR2. These bind to DNA and modulate the expression of target genes. Identification of estrogen target genes is greatly facilitated by the use of transcriptomic methods, such as RNA-seq and expression microarrays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). Combining transcriptomic and ChIP-seq data enables a distinction to be drawn between direct and indirect estrogen target genes. This chapter discusses some methods of identifying estrogen target genes that do not require any expertise in programming languages or complex bioinformatics. PMID:26585125

  8. Estrogen directly activates AID transcription and function

    OpenAIRE

    Pauklin, Siim; Sernández, Isora V.; Bachmann, Gudrun; Ramiro, Almudena R.; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K.

    2009-01-01

    The immunological targets of estrogen at the molecular, humoral, and cellular level have been well documented, as has estrogen's role in establishing a gender bias in autoimmunity and cancer. During a healthy immune response, activation-induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosines at immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). Protein levels of nuclear AID are tightly controlled, as unregulated expression can lead to alterations in th...

  9. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-01

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment. PMID:27344259

  10. Estrogenic activity in Finnish municipal wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välitalo, Pia; Perkola, Noora; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Sillanpää, Markus; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Mikola, Anna; Hollert, Henner; Schultz, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a major source of estrogenic compounds to the aquatic environment. In the present work, estrogenic activities of effluents from eight municipal WWTPs in Finland were studied. The main objectives of the study were to quantify the concentrations of selected estrogenic compounds, to evaluate their contribution to estrogenic potency and to test the feasibility of the commercial bioassays for wastewater analysis. The effluent samples were analyzed by two in vitro tests, i.e. ERα-CALUX(®) and ELISA-E2, and by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for six estrogenic compounds: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17α-estradiol and bisphenol A (BPA). Estrogenic effects were found in all of the effluent samples with both of the bioassays. The concentrations measured with ELISA-E2 (8.6-61.6 ng/L) were clearly higher but exhibited a similar pattern than those with chemical analysis (E2 estrogenic potency was possible only for E1 and BPA, which contributed less than 10% to the observed effects, except in one sample with a high BPA contribution (17%). The contribution of E2 was significant in two samples where it was detected (28% and 67%). The results demonstrated that more comprehensive information on potential estrogenic activity of wastewater effluents can be achieved by using in vitro biotests in addition to chemical analysis and their use would be beneficial in monitoring and screening purposes. PMID:26584345

  11. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  12. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  13. Urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites and subsequent risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliassen, A Heather; Spiegelman, Donna; Xu, Xia; Keefer, Larry K; Veenstra, Timothy D; Barbieri, Robert L; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E; Ziegler, Regina G

    2012-02-01

    Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolism are hypothesized to be associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk but evidence is limited. We examined 15 urinary estrogens/estrogen metabolites and breast cancer risk among premenopausal women in a case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII). From 1996 to 1999, urine was collected from 18,521 women during the mid-luteal menstrual phase. Breast cancer cases (N = 247) diagnosed between collection and June 2005 were matched to two controls each (N = 485). Urinary estrogen metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and adjusted for creatinine level. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. Higher urinary estrone and estradiol levels were strongly significantly associated with lower risk (top vs. bottom quartile RR: estrone = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.30-0.88; estradiol = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.30-0.86). Generally inverse, although nonsignificant, patterns also were observed with 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathway estrogen metabolites. Inverse associations generally were not observed with 16-pathway estrogen metabolites and a significant positive association was observed with 17-epiestriol (top vs. bottom quartile RR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.08-2.81; P(trend) = 0.01). In addition, there was a significant increased risk with higher 16-pathway/parent estrogen metabolite ratio (comparable RR = 1.61; 95% CI, 0.99-2.62; P(trend) = 0.04). Other pathway ratios were not significantly associated with risk except parent estrogen metabolites/non-parent estrogen metabolites (comparable RR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.96; P(trend) = 0.03). These data suggest that most mid-luteal urinary estrogen metabolite concentrations are not positively associated with breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. The inverse associations with parent estrogen metabolites and the parent estrogen metabolite/non-parent estrogen metabolite ratio

  14. The molecular, cellular and clinical consequences of targeting the estrogen receptor following estrogen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y; Curpan, Ramona F; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V Craig

    2015-12-15

    During the past 20 years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed "morning after pill", was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite "antiestrogen" resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women's health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells.

  15. Evidence of a correlation of estrogen receptor level and avian osteoclast estrogen responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, L; Kremer, M; Foged, N T; Winding, B; Ritchie, C; Fitzpatrick, L A; Oursler, M J

    1997-05-01

    Isolated osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens respond to estradiol treatment in vitro with decreased resorption activity, increased nuclear proto-oncogene expression, and decreased lysosomal enzyme secretion. This study examines osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and egg-laying hens for evidence of estrogen responsiveness. Although osteoclasts from both of these sources express estrogen receptor mRNA and protein, estradiol treatment had no effect on resorption activity. In contrast to the lack of effect on resorption, estradiol treatment for 30 minutes resulted in steady-state mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun increasing in osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and decreasing in osteoclasts from egg-laying hens. These data suggest that a nuclear proto-oncogene response may not be involved in estradiol-mediated decreased osteoclast resorption activity. To examine the influence of circulating estrogen on osteoclast estrogen responsiveness, 5-week-old chickens were injected with estrogen for 4 days prior to sacrifice. Estradiol treatment of osteoclasts from these chickens did not decrease resorption activity in vitro. Transfection of an estrogen receptor expression vector into osteoclasts from the estradiol-injected chickens and egg-laying hens restored estrogen responsiveness. Osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens and estradiol treated 5-week-old chickens transfected with the estrogen receptor expression vector contained significantly higher levels of estrogen receptor protein and responded to estradiol treatment by decreasing secretion of cathepsins B and L and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, osteoclasts from embryonic chickens, egg-laying hens, and estradiol-treated 5-week-old chickens either untransfected or transfected with an empty expression vector did not respond similarly. These data suggest that modulation of osteoclast estrogen responsiveness may be controlled by changes in the osteoclast estrogen receptor levels. PMID:9144340

  16. Estrogen and the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) protection against cell death in estrogen receptor alpha and beta expressing U2OS cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Anu; Guo, Tao; Lamminen, Elisa; Seppänen, Jani; Kangas, Lauri; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Härkönen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen and the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) protection against cell death in estrogen receptor alpha and beta expressing U2OS cells SWEDEN (Kallio, Anu) SWEDEN Received: 2007-12-01 Revised: 2008-03-12 Accepted: 2008-03-12

  17. Positron emitting pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of physiology at the molecular level bridges the gap between laboratory science and clinical medicine by providing the most specific and sensitive means for imaging molecular pathways and interactions in tissues of man. PET-imaging requires the use Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals (PRPs), which are radioactively labeled 'true metabolites' i.e., sugars, amino acids, fatty acids etc., essentially made of H, C, N and O which the cells in the body can metabolize. The PET-isotopes: 11C, 15O, 13N and 18F (instead of H) are cyclotron produced and are short-lived, which places several constraints on the synthesis time for the PRPs, quality control and their clinical use as compared to the conventional 99mTc- and other SPECT-RPs widely used in nuclear medicine. There are large number of published reports showing the utility of several PRPs labeled with 18F (T1/2 = 110 min) and 11C (T1/2 = 20 min). A few PRPs have been labeled with 13N (T1/2 = 10 min). 15O (T1/2 = 2min) is used mostly as H215O, C15 or C15O2. 18F-radiopharmaceuticals can be made at a medical cyclotron facility and sent to PET -imaging centres, which can be reached in a couple of hours. The sensitivity of PET -imaging has encouraged R and D in several other PRPs, labeled with viz., 68Ga (generator produced, T1/2 68 min), 124I (cyclotron, T1/2 4.2 d), 82Rb (generator, T1/2 75s), 64Cu (cyclotron, T1/2 12h), and 94mTc (cyclotron, T1/2 52 min). Due to its relevance in several diseases, particularly cancer, PET-imaging has made major scientific contribution to drug development, particularly for neurological diseases and cancer treatment. (author)

  18. Fecal microbial determinants of fecal and systemic estrogens and estrogen metabolites: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High systemic estrogen levels contribute to breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women, whereas low levels contribute to osteoporosis risk. Except for obesity, determinants of non-ovarian systemic estrogen levels are undefined. We sought to identify members and functions of the intestinal microbial community associated with estrogen levels via enterohepatic recirculation. Methods Fifty-one epidemiologists at the National Institutes of Health, including 25 men, 7 postmenopausal women, and 19 premenopausal women, provided urine and aliquots of feces, using methods proven to yield accurate and reproducible results. Estradiol, estrone, 13 estrogen metabolites (EM, and their sum (total estrogens were quantified in urine and feces by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In feces, β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase activities were determined by realtime kinetics, and microbiome diversity and taxonomy were estimated by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA amplicons. Pearson correlations were computed for each loge estrogen level, loge enzymatic activity level, and microbiome alpha diversity estimate. For the 55 taxa with mean relative abundance of at least 0.1%, ordinal levels were created [zero, low (below median of detected sequences, high] and compared to loge estrogens, β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase enzymatic activity levels by linear regression. Significance was based on two-sided tests with α=0.05. Results In men and postmenopausal women, levels of total urinary estrogens (as well as most individual EM were very strongly and directly associated with all measures of fecal microbiome richness and alpha diversity (R≥0.50, P≤0.003. These non-ovarian systemic estrogens also were strongly and significantly associated with fecal Clostridia taxa, including non-Clostridiales and three genera in the Ruminococcaceae family (R=0.57−0.70, P=0.03−0.002. Estrone, but not other EM, in urine correlated significantly with

  19. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D L; Wheeland, R G; Solomon, H

    1985-01-01

    Using a variety of techniques, estrogen and progesterone receptors have previously been identified in variable percentages of malignant melanomas. We examined 10 primary superficial spreading melanomas (SSM) with a fluorescent hormone-binding technique for estrogen and progesterone cytoplasmic receptors. Of these 6 SSM were markedly positive for estrogen and progesterone binding. Patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) or a family history of DNS were markedly positive for estrogen and progesterone binding. A single patient with lentigo maligna and another patient with lentigo maligna melanoma were negative for estrogen and progesterone binding. None of the 21 control intradermal nevi examined for estrogen and progesterone binding exhibited marked positivity. PMID:3965520

  20. Molecular Pathways: Estrogen Pathway in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Annika Medea; Labonte, Melissa J.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide colorectal cancer (CRC) has a higher incidence rate in men than in women, suggesting a protective role for sex hormones in the development of the disease. Preclinical data supports a role for estrogen and its receptors in the initiation and progression of CRC and establishes that protective effects of estrogen are exerted through ERβ. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women as well as consumption of soy reduces the incidence of CRC. In the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) trial use of HRT in postmenopausal women reduced the risk of colon cancer by 56% (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.81; P=0.003). A recent meta-analysis showed that in females, consumption of soy reduced the risk of colon cancer by 21% (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.35; P=0.026). In this review, utilizing the preclinical data, we translate the findings in the clinical trials and observational studies to define the role of estrogen in the prevention of CRC. We hypothesize that sometime during the tumorigenesis process ERβ expression in colonocytes is lost and the estrogen ligand, HRT or soy products, exerts its effects through preventing this loss. Thus in the adenoma to carcinoma continuum, timing of HRT is a significant determinant of the observed benefit from this intervention. We further argue that the protective effects of estrogen are limited to certain molecular subtypes. Successful development of estrogen modulators for prevention of CRC depends on identification of susceptible CRC population(s). Thus research to better understand the estrogen pathway is fundamental for clinical delivery of these agents. PMID:23965904

  1. Effect of vaginal estrogen on pessary use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessie, Sybil G.; Armstrong, Katherine; Modest, Anna M.; Hacker, Michele R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Many providers recommend concurrent estrogen therapy with pessary use to limit complications; however, limited data exist to support this practice. We hypothesized that vaginal estrogen supplementation decreases incidence of pessary-related complications and discontinuation. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent a pessary fitting from 1 January 2007 through 1 September 2013 at one institution; participants were identified by billing code and were eligible if they were post-menopausal and had at least 3 months of pessary use and 6 months of follow-up. All tests were two sided, and P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Data from 199 women were included; 134 used vaginal estrogen and 65 did not. Women who used vaginal estrogen had a longer median follow-up time (29.5 months) compared with women who did not (15.4 months) and were more likely to have at least one pessary check (98.5 % vs 86.2 %, P < 0.001). Those in the estrogen group were less likely to discontinue using their pessary (30.6 % vs 58.5 %, P < 0.001) and less likely to develop increased vaginal discharge than women who did not [hazard ratio (HR) 0.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.17–0.58]. Vaginal estrogen was not protective against erosions (HR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.54–1.6) or vaginal bleeding (HR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.36–1.7). Conclusions Women who used vaginal estrogen exhibited a higher incidence of continued pessary use and lower incidence of increased vaginal discharge than women who did not. PMID:26992727

  2. The role of estrogens at men. Part 1. General and developmental endocrinology, physiology and pathophysiology of estrogens at men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens (female sex hormones are important sex hormones for women and men, although traditionally the problems associated with impaired synthesis and metabolism of estrogens are considered, especially in relation to the female population. However, presented an overview allows for a different look at the role and significance of estrogens for men. In the first part of the literature review highlights issues of general endocrinology and age of estrogens and the results of clinical and experimental studies, reflecting the physiological functionsof estrogens and pathophysiologic consequences of violations of the synthesis and metabolism of estrogens in male organism.

  3. Emissive Ion Thruster -EMIT Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A propulsion system is proposed that is based on acceleration of ions emitted from a thin, solid-state electrochemical ceramic membrane. This technology would...

  4. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    This article's objective is to provide an overview of the association between estrogen and glaucoma. A literature synthesis was conducted of articles published in peer-reviewed journals screened through May 5, 2015, using the PubMed database. Keywords used were "estrogen and glaucoma," "reproductive factors and glaucoma," and "estrogen, nitric oxide and eye." Forty-three journal articles were included. Results indicated that markers for lifetime estrogen exposure have been measured by several studies and show that the age of menarche onset, oral contraceptive (OC) use, bilateral oophorectomy, age of menopause onset and duration between menarche to menopause are associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) risk. The Blue Mountain Eye Study found a significantly increased POAG risk with later (>13 years) compared with earlier (≤12 years) age of menarche. Nurses' Health Study (NHS) investigators found that OC use of greater than 5 years was associated with a 25% increased risk of POAG. The Mayo Clinic Cohort Study of Oophorectomy and Aging found that women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 43 years had an increased risk of glaucoma. The Rotterdam Study found that women who went through menopause before reaching the age of 45 years had a higher risk of open-angle glaucoma (2.6-fold increased risk), while the NHS showed a reduced risk of POAG among women older than 65 who entered menopause after age ≥ 54 years. Increased estrogen states may confer a reduced risk of glaucoma or glaucoma-related traits such as reduced intraocular pressure (IOP). Pregnancy, a hyperestrogenemic state, is associated with decreased IOP during the third trimester. Though the role of postmenopausal hormone (PMH) use in the reduction of IOP is not fully conclusive, PMH use may reduce the risk of POAG. From a genetic epidemiologic perspective, estrogen metabolic pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with POAG in women and polymorphisms in

  5. Estrogenicity of glabridin in Ishikawa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Su Wei Poh

    Full Text Available Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2, suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT. This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2.

  6. Estrogenicity of glabridin in Ishikawa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su Wei Poh, Melissa; Voon Chen Yong, Phelim; Viseswaran, Navaratnam; Chia, Yoke Yin

    2015-01-01

    Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2. PMID:25816349

  7. Thermally stable AuBe-based ohmic contacts to p-type GaP for AlGaInP-based light-emitting diode by using a tungsten barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kang, Daesung; Park, Jae-Seong; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how a tungsten diffusion barrier layer affected the electrical properties of AuBe/Au contacts to a p-GaP window layer (na = 5 × 1019 cm-3) for an AlGaInP-based light emitting diode. All of the as-deposited samples were ohmic. After annealing at 500 °C, the AuBe/Au contacts were electrically degraded with a specific contact resistivity of 1.0 × 10-4 Ωcm2. However, the electrical properties of the W-based contacts were improved, having a contact resistivity of 5.0 × 10-6 Ωcm2. The X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that the Ga 2 p core level for the annealed AuBe/Au contacts shifted to the high binding-energy side. On the other hand, that for the AuBe/W/Au contacts shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. For the AuBe/Au contacts, both Be and P atoms were shown to be outdiffused into the metal contact after annealing. However, for the AuBe/W/Au contacts, the outdiffusion of Be atoms was prevented by the W barrier layer, and the Be atoms were indiffused into GaP. Based on the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and electrical results, the annealing-induced electrical degradation and improvement are described and discussed.

  8. Ozonation of estrogenic chemicals in biologically treated sewage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Ledin, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The present study shows that ozonation of effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is likely to be a future treatment solution to remove estrogens and xeno-estrogens. The required ozone dose and electrical energy for producing the ozone were determined in two WWTP effluents...... for removal of 17 estrogenic chemicals. The estrogenic compounds included parabens, industrial phenols, sunscreen chemicals, and steroid estrogens. The obtained values of Electrical Energy per Order (EEOs) for the treatment of the estrogens were in the range 0.14–1.1 kWh/m3 corresponding to 1.7–14 g O3/m3....... It is furthermore suggested that UV-absorbance is a useful parameter for online control of the ozone dose in a full scale application since the absorbance of the WWTP effluents and the remaining concentration of the estrogens and xeno-estrogens correlated well with the applied ozone dose....

  9. Estrogen/estrogen receptor alpha signaling in mouse posterofrontal cranial suture fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While premature suture fusion, or craniosynostosis, is a relatively common condition, the cause is often unknown. Estrogens are associated with growth plate fusion of endochondral bones. In the following study, we explore the previously unknown significance of estrogen/estrogen receptor signaling in cranial suture biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, estrogen receptor (ER expression was examined in physiologically fusing (posterofrontal and patent (sagittal mouse cranial sutures by quantitative RT-PCR. Next, the cranial suture phenotype of ER alpha and ER beta knockout (alphaERKO, betaERKO mice was studied. Subsequently, mouse suture-derived mesenchymal cells (SMCs were isolated; the effects of 17-beta estradiol or the estrogen antagonist Fulvestrant on gene expression, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation were examined in vitro. Finally, in vivo experiments were performed in which Fulvestrant was administered subcutaneously to the mouse calvaria. Results showed that increased ERalpha but not ERbeta transcript abundance temporally coincided with posterofrontal suture fusion. The alphaERKO but not betaERKO mouse exhibited delayed posterofrontal suture fusion. In vitro, addition of 17-beta estradiol enhanced both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation in suture-derived mesenchymal cells, effects reversible by Fulvestrant. Finally, in vivo application of Fulvestrant significantly diminished calvarial osteogenesis, inhibiting suture fusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Estrogen signaling through ERalpha but not ERbeta is associated with and necessary for normal mouse posterofrontal suture fusion. In vitro studies suggest that estrogens may play a role in osteoblast and/or chondrocyte differentiation within the cranial suture complex.

  10. Determination of estrogens and estrogenic activities in water from three rivers in Tianjin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaifeng Rao; Bingli Lei; Na Li; Mei Ma; Zijian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Studies on estrogenic disrupting compounds (EDCs) occurrence and identification of main responsible compounds in river water discharged into the sea are of significance.In the present research,we screened estrogenic activities of 10 river water samples from 3 main rivers discharged into Bohai Sea in Tianjin using a recombinant two-hybrid yeast assay and chemical analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.All sample extracts induced significant estrogenic activity,with 17β-estradiol equivalents (EEQ)of raw water ranging from 5.72 to 59.06 ng/L.Six most concerned EDCs in the river water samples including estrone,17β-estradiol,17α-ethinylestradiol,estriol,diethylstilbestrol and estradiol valerate were determined,with their concentrations up to 50.70,31.40,24.40,37.20,2.56,and 8.47 ng/L,respectively.Through causality analysis by comparing the EEQ values of yeast assay and chemical analysis,17α-ethinylestradiol and 17ββ-estradiol were identified as the main contributors to the estrogenic effects of the river samples,accounting for the whole estrogenic activities (62.99% to 185.66%),and estrogen antagonistic compounds might presented in the heavy polluted water samples.The proposed approach using both chemical analysis and bioassay could be used for identification and evaluation of the estrogenic activity of EDCs in river water.

  11. Sex-dependent influence of endogenous estrogen in pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Mair, Kirsty M.; Wright, Audrey F.; Duggan, Nicholas; Rowlands, David J.; Hussey, Martin J.; Roberts, Sonia; Fullerton, Josephine; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Thomas, Matthew; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is greater in women suggesting estrogens may play a role in the disease pathogenesis. Experimentally, in males exogenously administered estrogen can protect against PH; however in models that display female susceptibility estrogens may play a causative role. Objectives: To clarify the influence of endogenous estrogen and gender in PH and assess the therapeutic potential of a clinically available aromatase inhibitor. Met...

  12. Phytoestrogens: Plant-derived Estrogenic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Konar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is a hormone, which is produced in ovary and testis; however, it has many biological effects besides the reproductive system. Phytoestrogens are the compounds, which have estrogen-like structure and activities, taking place in structure of various edible plants at different levels and in different compositions. These compounds attracted notice after the first quarter of 20th century upon they had been associated with infertility seen in some of animals fed with alfalfa, and these compounds have been identified in human-derived biological samples and its effects on health have been taken under study in the recent 30 years. These materials have especially antioxidant role in plants while they have activities in animals and humans as estrogen agonist and antagonists. Based on their chemical structure, they may be gathered under especially isoflavon and lignan groups while some of members of coumestan and stilbene groups are also identified as phytoestrogenic compound.

  13. Cumulative Estrogen Exposure and Prospective Memory in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at cumulative lifetime estrogen exposure, as estimated with a mathematical index (Index of Cumulative Estrogen Exposure (ICEE)) that included variables (length of time on estrogen therapy, age at menarche and menopause, postmenopausal body mass index, time since menopause, nulliparity and duration of breastfeeding) known to…

  14. Estrogen Abolishes Latent Inhibition in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofrey, Barbara S.; Ben-Shahar, Osnat M.; Brake, Wayne G.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is frequently prescribed as a method of birth control and as hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women with varied effects on cognition. Here the effects of estrogen on attention were examined using the latent inhibition (LI) behavioral paradigm. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were given either estrogen benzoate (EB, 10 or…

  15. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphisms and postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladd, AM Gonzalez-Zuloet; Vasquez, A.A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Siemes, C.; Hofman, A.; Stricker, B.H.; Pols, H.A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Duijn, C.M. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) is a mediator of estrogen response in the breast. The most studied variants in this gene are the PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms, which have been associated to lower sensitivity to estrogen. We evaluated whether these polymorphisms were associated with bre

  16. Estrogen receptor α polymorphisms and postmenopausal breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. González-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela); A.A. Vásquez (Arias); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); C. Siemes (Claire); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) is a mediator of estrogen response in the breast. The most studied variants in this gene are the PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms, which have been associated to lower sensitivity to estrogen. We evaluated whether these polymorphisms were associa

  17. ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aririguzo Marvis Ijeaku

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED is a device composed of an organic layer that emits lights in response to an electrical current. Organic light emitting diodes have advanced tremendously over the past decades. The different manufacturing processes of the OLED itself to several advantages over flat panel displays made with LCD technology which includes its light weight and flexible plastic substrates, wider viewing angles, improved brightness, better power efficiency and quicker response time. However, its drawbacks include shorter life span, poor color balance, poor outdoor performance, susceptibility to water damage etc.The application of OLEDs in electronics is on the increase on daily basics from cameras to cell phones to OLED televisions, etc. Although OLEDs provides prospects for thinner, smarter, lighter and ultraflexible electronics displays, however, due to high cost of manufacturing, it is not yet widely used.

  18. Estrogenic effects of fusarielins in human breast cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Teis; G. Klitgaard, Louise; Purup, Stig;

    2012-01-01

    from fungi that bind to the estrogen receptors and induce an estrogenic response in targeted cells. All four tested fusarielins stimulate MCF-7 cell proliferation with fusarielin H as the most potent, able to stimulate cell proliferation 4-fold in a resazurin metabolism assay at 25 μM. MDA-MB-231 cells...... without the estrogen receptor-α and MCF-10a cells without estrogen receptors were not stimulated by fusarielins. Furthermore, the stimulation was prevented in MCF-7 cells when fusarielins were incubated in the presence of the estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant. These observations suggest...

  19. Role of Estrogens on Human Male Reproductive System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo Rochira; Lucia Zirilli; Bruno Madeo; Antonio Balestrieri; Cesare Carani; Antonio R. M. Granata

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on estrogen role on human male physiology. Biological estrogen actions on male reproductive system are summarized with particular regard to the effects of congenital estrogen deprivation in men. The effects of estrogen on spermatogenesis, hormonal secretion and gonadotropin feedback and on sexual behavior are discussed. It is remarked that the role of estrogens in male reproduction is a very recent acquisition in reproductive endocrinology, but it promises new future fields of research to be investigated as well as the possible disclosure of new strategies in clinical practice.

  20. Estrogen and Estrogen Receptor-α-Mediated Transrepression of Bile Salt Export Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuan; Vasilenko, Alex; Song, Xiulong; Valanejad, Leila; Verma, Ruchi; You, Sangmin; Yan, Bingfang; Shiffka, Stephanie; Hargreaves, Leeza; Nadolny, Christina; Deng, Ruitang

    2015-01-01

    Among diseases unique to pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is the most prevalent disorder with elevated serum bile acid levels. We have previously shown that estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) transrepresses bile salt export pump (BSEP) through an interaction between estrogen receptor (ER)-α and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transrepression of BSEP by E2/ERα is an etiological contributing factor to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Currently the mechanistic insights into such tr...

  1. Estrogen receptors in human vaginal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, M.A.H.M.; Poortman, J.; Agema, A.R.; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of specific estrogen receptors could be demonstrated in vaginal tissue, obtained during operation from 38 women, age 27–75 yr. In 23 premenopausal women the receptor concentration in the vaginal tissue varied between 12 and 91 fmol/mg protein, no significant difference in the receptor

  2. Estrogen and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. Slooter (Arjen); J.B. Bronzova (Juliana); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEstrogen use may be protective for Alzheimer's disease with late onset. However, the effects on early onset Alzheimer's disease are unclear. This issue was studied in a population based setting. For each female patient, a female control was matched on age (within 5 years) and place of re

  3. Urinary estrogen metabolites and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallal, Cher M; Stone, Roslyn A; Cauley, Jane A;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Circulating estrogens are associated with increased breast cancer risk, yet the role of estrogen metabolites in breast carcinogenesis remains unclear. This combined analysis of 5 published studies evaluates urinary 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 16a-hydroxyestrone (16a-OHE1......), and their ratio (2:16a-OHE1) in relation to breast cancer risk. ¿Methods: Primary data on 726 premenopausal women (183 invasive breast cancer cases and 543 controls) and 1,108 postmenopausal women (385 invasive breast cancer cases and 723 controls) were analyzed. Urinary estrogen metabolites were measured using...... premenopausal 2:16a-OHE1 was suggestive of reduced breast cancer risk overall (study-adjusted ORIIIvsI=0.80; 95% CI: 0.49-1.32) and for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) subtype (ORIIIvsI=0.33; 95% CI: 0.13-0.84). Among postmenopausal women, 2:16a-OHE1 was unrelated to breast cancer risk (study-adjusted ORIIIvs...

  4. Amping up estrogen receptors in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Amy M; Alarid, Elaine T

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights a recent study by Holst et al. in Nature Genetics that finds estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) amplification in early benign lesions and more advanced invasive carcinomas of the breast, and discusses the potential implications to our present understanding of the role of ER-α in breast tumorigenesis.

  5. Xeno-estrogenic compounds in precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.J.B.; Beeltje, H.; Delft, R.J. van

    2008-01-01

    The exposure to some chemicals can lead to hormone disrupting effects. Presently, much attention is focused on so-called xeno-estrogens, synthetic compounds that interact with hormone receptors causing a number of reactions that eventually lead to effects related to reproduction and development. The

  6. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. Review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cummulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena.

  7. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cumulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena.

  8. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. Review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cummulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena. PMID:2292429

  9. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cumulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena. PMID:2101377

  10. Combining docking and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (COMSIA) to predict estrogen activity and probe molecular mechanisms of estrogen activity for estrogen compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XuShu; WANG XiaoDong; JI Li; LI Rong; SUN Cheng; WANG LianSheng

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen compounds are suspected of disrupting endocrine functions by mimicking natural hormones,and such compounds may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife. Close attention has been paid to the prediction and molecular mechanisms of estrogen activity for estrogen compounds. In this article, estrogen receptor a subtype (Era) -based comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (COMSIA) was performed on 44 estrogen compounds with structural diversity to find out the structural relationship with the activity and to predict the activity. The model with the significant correlation and the best predictive power (R2 = 0.965, (Q2LOO = 0.599, R2pred = 0.825) was achieved. The COMSIA and docking results revealed the structural features for estrogen activity and key amino acid residues in binding pocket, and provided an insight into the interaction between the ligands and these amino acid residues.

  11. 3D-QSAR and docking studies of estrogen compounds based on estrogen receptor β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XuShu; WANG XiaoDong; LUO Si; JI Li; QIN Liang; LI Rong; SUN Cheng; WANG LianSheng

    2009-01-01

    Close attention has been paid to estrogen compounds because these chemicals may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife.Estrogen receptor (ER) exists as two subtypes,ERo and ERβ.The difference in amino acids sequence of the binding sites of ERo and ERβ might lead to a result that some synthetic estrogens and naturally occurring steroidal ligands have different relative affinities and binding modes for ERa and ERβ.In this investigation,comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was performed on 50 estrogen compounds binding ERβ to find out the structural relationship with the activities.We also compared two alignment schemes employed in CoMSIA analysis,namely,atom-fit and receptor-based alignment,with respect to the predictive capability of their respective models for structurally diverse data sets.The model with the significant correlation and the best predictive power (R2=0.961,q2LOO=0.671,Rp2red=0.722) was achieved.The CoMSIA and docking results revealed the structural features related to an activity and provided an insight into molecular mechanisms of estrogenic activities for estrogen compounds.

  12. 3D-QSAR and docking studies of estrogen compounds based on estrogen receptor β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Close attention has been paid to estrogen compounds because these chemicals may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife. Estrogen receptor (ER) exists as two subtypes, ERα and ERβ. The difference in amino acids sequence of the binding sites of ERα and ERβ might lead to a result that some synthetic estrogens and naturally occurring steroidal ligands have different relative affinities and binding modes for ERα and ERβ. In this investigation, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was performed on 50 estrogen compounds binding ERβ to find out the structural relationship with the activities. We also compared two alignment schemes employed in CoMSIA analy-sis, namely, atom-fit and receptor-based alignment, with respect to the predictive capability of their respective models for structurally diverse data sets. The model with the significant correlation and the best predictive power (R2=0.961, qL 2OO=0.671, RP 2red=0.722) was achieved. The CoMSIA and docking results revealed the structural features related to an activity and provided an insight into molecular mechanisms of estrogenic activities for estrogen compounds.

  13. Estrogen and its role in gastrointestinal health and disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Aisling M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: While the concept of a role of estrogen in gastrointestinal (in particular, colonic) malignancy has generated excitement in recent years, no review has examined the role of this potent and omnipresent steroid hormone in physiological states or its contribution to the development of benign pathological processes. Understanding these effects (and mechanisms therein) may provide a platform for a deeper understanding of more complex disease processes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database and the search terms were "estrogen," "estrogen AND gastrointestinal tract," "estrogen AND colon," "estrogen AND esophagus," "estrogen AND small intestine," "estrogen AND stomach," "estrogen AND gallbladder," and "estrogen AND motility." Bibliographies of extracted studies were further cross-referenced. In all, 136 full-text articles were selected for review. A logical organ-based approach was taken to enable extraction of data of clinical relevance and meaningful interpretation thereof. Insight is provided into the hypotheses, theories, controversies, and contradictions generated over the last five decades by extensive investigation of estrogen in human, animal, and cell models using techniques as diverse as autoradiographic studies of baboons to human population analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Effects from esophagus through to the colon and rectum are summarized in this first concise collection of data pertaining to estrogenic actions in gastrointestinal health and disease. Mechanisms of these actions are discussed where possible. Undoubtedly, this hormone exerts many actions yet to be elucidated, and its potential therapeutic applications remain, as yet, largely unexplored.

  14. Analysis of the Contribution of Charge Transport in Iodine-125 induced DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Ndlebe, Thabisile; Panyutin, Igor; Neumann, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Auger electron emitters, like iodine-125, are the radionuclides of choice for gene-targeted radiotherapy. The highly localized damage they induced in DNA is produced by three mechanisms: direct damage by the emitted Auger electrons, indirect damage by diffusible free radicals produced by Auger electrons travelling in water, and charge neutralization of the residual, highly positively charged, tellurium daughter atom by stripping electrons from covalent bonds of neighboring residues. The purpo...

  15. Estrogen, male dominance and esophageal adenocarcinoma: Is there a link?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqi Yang; Olga A Sukocheva; Damian J Hussey; David I Watson

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a cancer with poor prognosis, and its incidence has risen sharply over recent decades. Obesity is a major risk factor for developing this cancer and there is a clear male gender bias in the incidence that cannot be fully explained by known risk factors. It is possible that a difference in the expression of estrogen, or its signaling axes, may contribute to this gender bias. We undertook a comprehensive literature search and analyzed the available data regarding estrogen and estrogen receptor expression, and the possible sex-specific links with esophageal adenocarcinoma development. Potentially relevant associations between visceral vs subcutaneous fat deposition and estrogen expression, and the effect of crosstalk between estrogen and leptin signaling were identified. We also found limited studies suggesting a role for estrogen receptor β expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma development. The current literature supports speculation on an etiological role for estrogen in the male gender bias in esophageal adenocarcinoma, but further studies are required.

  16. Estrogen and Growth Hormone and their Roles in Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Baki ÇİFTCİ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the effect of estrogen on growth hormone secretion and the roles of estrogen and growth hormone in reproductive function. Estrogen is the main hormone affecting growth, development, maturation and functioning of reproductive tract as well as the sexual differentiation and the behavior. Growth hormone is also important factor in sexual maturation and attainment of puberty. The impact of estrogen on growth hormone secretion has been reported in rodents and primates. However, the precise mechanism for the alterations in growth hormone secretion is not clearly known. Estrogen may possibility have a direct affect on growth hormone secretion via the binding to estrogen receptor-α due to its co-expression in growth hormone neurons in the medial preoptic area and arcuate nucleus. Estrogen may also have an indirect effect via the reducing insulin-like growth factor-1 feedback inhibition resulting with increased growth hormone secretion.

  17. Estrogens and male reproduction: a new concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Carreau

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian testis serves two main functions: production of spermatozoa and synthesis of steroids; among them estrogens are the end products obtained from the irreversible transformation of androgens by a microsomal enzymatic complex named aromatase. The aromatase is encoded by a single gene (cyp19 in humans which contains 18 exons, 9 of them being translated. In rats, the aromatase activity is mainly located in Sertoli cells of immature rats and then in Leydig cells of adult rats. We have demonstrated that germ cells represent an important source of estrogens: the amount of P450arom transcript is 3-fold higher in pachytene spermatocytes compared to gonocytes or round spermatids; conversely, aromatase activity is more intense in haploid cells. Male germ cells of mice, bank voles, bears, and monkeys express aromatase. In humans, we have shown the presence of a biologically active aromatase and of estrogen receptors (alpha and ß in ejaculated spermatozoa and in immature germ cells in addition to Leydig cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the amount of P450arom transcripts is 30% lower in immotile than in motile spermatozoa. Alterations of spermatogenesis in terms of number and motility of spermatozoa have been described in men genetically deficient in aromatase. These last observations, together with our data showing a significant decrease of aromatase in immotile spermatozoa, suggest that aromatase could be involved in the acquisition of sperm motility. Thus, taking into account the widespread localization of aromatase and estrogen receptors in testicular cells, it is obvious that, besides gonadotrophins and androgens, estrogens produced locally should be considered to be physiologically relevant hormones involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis.

  18. ESTROGEN RECEPTORS OF HAIRS BLACKS AND WHITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laswati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aging is termed as same as degenerative process, in which all part of tissue organs retarted the microstructure either macrostructure, forming and function even the colour, including black hair change to white hair. Several researchers have been recommended that estrogen hormone be able ease black to white hair, but hormone without any presenting of receptor won’t be work properly. The main aim of this study were to determine amount of estrogen receptor contents in famales and males black and white hairs included the microscopically structure. Method: Twelve females and males there were 50 -56 years old each pairs black and white head hairs were plucked along with follicles. This estrogen receptors analyzed using radioreceptor binding assay there were 5mm eah hair follices including the root cutted and each pair put its in 2 ml glass tube already filled in with 500 µl 125I-estradiol and incubated in 37oC for 3 hrs. Following times were over the tube flushed twice carefully the hair won’t be flushed. Then count by putting in the gamma counter chamber for 1 minute each. The values that shown in the monitor as CPM (count per minute, recorded as receptor of estradiol. Results: Mean (±SD sum estrogen receptor in females black and white hairs were 479.3 ± 37.5 and 387.7 ± 33.0, but significantly decreased in male black hair was 316.9±17.8 and 274.0 ± 19.8. All those pairs significantly different either female black and white hairs or male black and white hair and also significantly different among groups. Conclusion: The lowest estrogen receptors recorded in male white hairs and microstructure decreasing of melanin contents.

  19. A tantalum diffusion barrier layer for improving the output performance of AlGaInP-based light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Park, Jae-Seong; Kang, Daesung; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of a Ta diffusion barrier layer on the electrical characteristics of AuBe/Au contacts on a p-GaP window layer for AlGaInP-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). It was shown that after annealing at 500 °C, the AuBe/Ta/Au contacts exhibited nearly 2 orders of magnitude lower specific contact resistance (2.8 × 10-6 Ω·cm2) than the AuBe/Au contacts (1.0 × 10-4 Ω·cm2). The LEDs with and without the Ta diffusion barrier layer showed an external quantum efficiency of 14.03 and 13.5% at 50 mA, respectively. After annealing at 500 °C, the AuBe/Ta/Au contacts showed a higher reflectance (92.8% at 617 nm) than that of the AuBe/Au contacts (87.7%). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that the Ga 2p core level for the annealed AuBe/Au samples shifted to higher binding energies, while this level shifted towards lower binding energies for the AuBe/Ta/Au samples. Depth profiles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) showed that annealing of the AuBe/Au samples caused the outdiffusion of both Be and P atoms into the metal contact, while for the AuBe/Ta/Au samples, the outdiffusion of Be atoms was blocked by the Ta barrier layer and more Be atoms were indiffused into GaP. The annealing-induced electrical degradation and ohmic contact formation are described and discussed based on the XPS and electrical results.

  20. Activation of estrogen response elements is mediated both via estrogen and muscle contractions in rat skeletal muscle myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiik, A.; Hellsten, Ylva; Berthelson, P.;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of estrogen response elements (EREs) by estrogen and muscle contractions in rat myotubes in culture and to assess whether the activation is dependent on the estrogen receptors (ERs). In addition, the effect of estrogen and contraction...... then differentiated into myotubes and subjected to either estrogen or electrical stimulation. Activation of the ERE sequence was determined by measurement of luciferase activity. The results show that both ERalpha and ERbeta are expressed in myotubes from rats. Both estrogen stimulation and muscle contraction...... increased (P muscle contraction. Use of ER antagonists showed that, whereas the estrogen-induced transactivation is mediated via ERs, the effect of muscle contraction...

  1. Estrogen therapy in gynecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidozzi, F

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer has significant impact on a woman's quality of life because it commonly includes removal of the uterus and ovaries, both being the core of a woman's femininity, whilst irradiation and chemotherapy, be they as primary therapy or when indicated as postoperative adjuvant therapy, will lead to ablation of ovarian function if the ovaries had not been removed. This will lead to an acute onset of menopausal symptoms, which may be more debilitating than those occurring as a result of natural aging, and of which hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, mood swings, vaginal dryness, decreased libido, malaise and a general feeling of apathy are the most common. About 25% of gynecological cancers will occur in pre- and perimenopausal women, a large percentage of whom will become menopausal as a result of their treatment. There are also the gynecological cancer survivors who are not rendered menopausal as a result of the treatment strategy but who will become menopausal because of natural aging. Concern among the medical attendants of these women is whether use of estrogen therapy or estrogen and progestogens for their menopausal symptoms will reactivate tumor deposits and therefore increase the rate of recurrence and, as a result, decrease overall survival among these women. Yet the data that are available do not support this concern. There are eight retrospective studies and only one randomized study that have analyzed outcome in endometrial cancer survivors who used hormone therapy after their surgery, whilst, among ovarian cancer survivors, there are four retrospective studies and one randomized study. The studies do suffer from small numbers and, although the studies pertaining to endometrial cancer analyze mostly women with early-stage disease, a number of the studies in both the endometrial and ovarian cancer survivors do have a sizeable follow-up. These studies seem to support that estrogen therapy after the treatment for gynecological

  2. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lizcano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women.

  3. Estrogen replacement therapy and cardioprotection: mechanisms and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T.R. Subbiah

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and case-controlled studies suggest that estrogen replacement therapy might be beneficial in terms of primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD. This beneficial effect of estrogens was initially considered to be due to the reduction of low density lipoproteins (LDL and to increases in high density lipoproteins (HDL. Recent studies have shown that estrogens protect against oxidative stress and decrease LDL oxidation. Estrogens have direct effects on the arterial tissue and modulate vascular reactivity through nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis. While many of the effects of estrogen on vascular tissue are believed to be mediated by estrogen receptors alpha and ß, there is evidence for `immediate non-genomic' effects. The role of HDL in interacting with 17ß-estradiol including its esterification and transfer of esterified estrogens to LDL is beginning to be elucidated. Despite the suggested positive effects of estrogens, two recent placebo-controlled clinical trials in women with CHD did not detect any beneficial effects on overall coronary events with estrogen therapy. In fact, there was an increase in CHD events in some women. Mutations in thrombogenic genes (factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation, etc. in a subset of women may play a role in this unexpected finding. Thus, the cardioprotective effect of estrogens appears to be more complicated than originally thought and requires more research.

  4. Effects of treadmill exercise training on cerebellar estrogen and estrogen receptors, serum estrogen, and motor coordination performance of ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Saidah Rauf; Sri Kadarsih Soejono; Ginus Partadiredja

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The present study aims at examining the motor coordination performance, serum and cerebellar estrogen, as well as ERβ levels, of ovariectomized rats (as menopausal model) following regular exercise. Materials and Methods: Ten female Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks old were randomly divided into two groups; all of which underwent ovariectomy. The first group was treated with regular exercise of moderate intensity, in which the rats were trained to run on a treadmill for 60 min ...

  5. Sensing Estrogen with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Kim, Byung Kun; Im, Ji-Eun; Choi, Han Nim; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Cho, Seong In

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application feasibility of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in measuring estrogen (17β-estradiol) in gas phase. The present biosensor gives a linear response (R2 = 0.999) for 17β-estradiol vapor concentration from 3.7 ng/L to 3.7 × 10−4 ng/L with a limit of detection (3.7 × 10−4 ng/L). The results show that the fabricated biosensor demonstrates better detection limit of 17β-estradiol in gas phase than the previous report with GC-MS method. This estrogen biosensor has many potential applications for on-site detection of a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the gas phase.

  6. CERAPP: Collaborative estrogen receptor activity prediction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER......). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. oBjectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project......) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United...

  7. Sensing Estrogen with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the application feasibility of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in measuring estrogen (17β-estradiol in gas phase. The present biosensor gives a linear response (R2=0.999 for 17β-estradiol vapor concentration from 3.7 ng/L to 3.7 × 10−4 ng/L with a limit of detection (3.7 × 10−4 ng/L. The results show that the fabricated biosensor demonstrates better detection limit of 17β-estradiol in gas phase than the previous report with GC-MS method. This estrogen biosensor has many potential applications for on-site detection of a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs in the gas phase.

  8. Organic Light-Emitting Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Karg, Siegfried; Rost-Bietsch, Constance; Riess, Walter; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Murgia, Mauro; Muccini, Michele

    2005-01-01

    A light-emitting OFET with pronounced ambipolar current characteristic has been prepared by co-evaporation of α-quinquethiophene (α-5T) as hole-transport material and ditridecyl-perylene-tetracarboxylic diimide (P13) as electron-transport material. The light intensity is controlled by both the drain-source voltage VDS and the gate voltage VG. Here, we demonstrate the general concept of adjusting electron and hole mobilities by co-evaporation of two different organic semiconductors.

  9. Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy and Risk of Gallstone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine;

    2013-01-01

    was to examine the association between postmenopausal estrogen therapy and risk of gallstone disease and the impact of duration of treatment and use of opposing progestin. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a population-based case-control study. Cases were postmenopausal women (defined as aged ≥45 years) with gallstone...... disease identified in the period 1996-2010. For each case, we selected ten population controls matched to cases by age and sex. We defined exposure as any use of estrogen (opposed and unopposed by progestin). Cases/controls were categorized as current estrogen users if their last prescription was redeemed...... OR for former users was 1.35 (95 % CI 1.28-1.42). The results suggested a duration response for current users. Use of unopposed estrogen was associated with higher adjusted ORs than estrogen opposed by progestin. CONCLUSION: Postmenopausal estrogen therapy was associated with increased risk of gallstone disease...

  10. Computational method for discovery of estrogen responsive genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Suisheng; Tan, Sin Lam; Ramadoss, Suresh Kumar;

    2004-01-01

    Estrogen has a profound impact on human physiology and affects numerous genes. The classical estrogen reaction is mediated by its receptors (ERs), which bind to the estrogen response elements (EREs) in target gene's promoter region. Due to tedious and expensive experiments, a limited number of...... human genes are functionally well characterized. It is still unclear how many and which human genes respond to estrogen treatment. We propose a simple, economic, yet effective computational method to predict a subclass of estrogen responsive genes. Our method relies on the similarity of ERE frames...... across different promoters in the human genome. Matching ERE frames of a test set of 60 known estrogen responsive genes to the collection of over 18,000 human promoters, we obtained 604 candidate genes. Evaluating our result by comparison with the published microarray data and literature, we found that...

  11. Exogenous pubertal induction by oral versus transdermal estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, Lisa; Balachandar, Sadana; Prasad, Kris; Shah, Bina

    2013-04-01

    Hypogonadal adolescent girls need estrogen therapy for the induction of puberty. For years, oral conjugated estrogens have been used for this purpose, starting at a very low dose, with gradual increments over time, to allow for the maturation of the reproductive organs, in order to mimic physiologic conditions. Several concerns, mainly due to first pass through the liver, are manifest with oral estrogen therapy. With the advent of transdermal estrogens and its improved efficacy profile as well as reduced side effects, it seems reasonable to consider it for pubertal induction. The primary objective of this study was to compare and contrast oral versus transdermal estrogen with regard to metabolism and physiology and to review current available data on transdermal estrogens with respect to exogenous pubertal induction. PMID:22112543

  12. Estrogen, Progesterone and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Shuk-Mei

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian carcinoma (OCa continues to be the leading cause of death due to gynecologic malignancies and the vast majority of OCa is derived from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE and its cystic derivatives. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that steroid hormones, primarily estrogens and progesterone, are implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. However, it has proved difficult to fully understand their mechanisms of action on the tumorigenic process. New convincing data have indicated that estrogens favor neoplastic transformation of the OSE while progesterone offers protection against OCa development. Specifically, estrogens, particularly those present in ovulatory follicles, are both genotoxic and mitogenic to OSE cells. In contrast, pregnancy-equivalent levels progesterone are highly effective as apoptosis inducers for OSE and OCa cells. In this regard, high-dose progestin may exert an exfoliation effect and rid an aged OSE of pre-malignant cells. A limited number of clinical studies has demonstrated efficacies of antiestrogens, aromatase inhibitors, and progestins alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of OCa. As a result of increased life expectancy in most countries, the number of women taking hormone replacement therapies (HRT continues to grow. Thus, knowledge of the mechanism of action of steroid hormones on the OSE and OCa is of paramount significance to HRT risk assessment and to the development of novel therapies for the prevention and treatment of OCa.

  13. Estrogenic activity of flavonoids in mice. The importance of estrogen receptor distribution, metabolism and bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Hossaini, A.; Svendsen, Gitte W.;

    2000-01-01

    The in vivo estrogenic potential of the flavonoids apigenin, kaempferol, genistein and equol was investigated in immature female mice. Genistein and equol, administered by gavage for 4 consecutive days [post-natal day (PND) 17-20, 100 mg/kg body weight], was found to significantly increase uterine...... weights and the overall uterine concentration of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha). In kaempferol- and equol-exposed mice the cytosolic ER alpha concentration was significantly increased as compared to the solvent control, which is speculated to result in an increased sensitivity of the uterus to...... subsequently encountered estrogens. Oral administration of equol, genistein, biochanin A and daidzein to 6-week-old female mice revealed a great variation in their systemic bioavailability. The urinary recovery of equol was thus over 90% of a single gavage administered dose, whereas the urinary recoveries of...

  14. Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Shannon T.; Shin, Hyunjin; Westerling, Thomas; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Brown, Myles

    2012-01-01

    More than two-thirds of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogen for growth and survival. Therapies targeting ER function, including aromatase inhibitors that block the production of estrogens and ER antagonists that alter ER transcriptional activity, play a central role in the treatment of ER+ breast cancers of all stages. In contrast to ER− breast cancers, which frequently harbor mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor, ER+ breast cancers are predominantly wild...

  15. Functional roles of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, S; Thampan, RaghavaVarman

    2003-07-01

    A series of emerging data supports the existence and importance of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors in a variety of cells that are targets for the steroid hormone action. When estradiol (E2) binds to the cell surface protein, the ensuing signal transduction event triggers downstream signaling cascades that contribute to important biological functions. Aside from the classical signaling through nuclear estrogen receptors, we have provided evidence for the functional roles of an estrogen receptor localized in the plasma membrane. This review highlights some of the recent advances made in the understanding of the genomic/non-genomic actions of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors. PMID:15255376

  16. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdal, Merete; Destefano, Anita L;

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different...... mechanisms, some estrogen-related disease processes might work in similar manners and result in association between the diseases. Indeed, the association between diseases need not be due only to estrogen-related factors, but due to similar disease processes from a variety of mechanisms....

  17. Estrogens and the pathophysiology of the biliary tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Domenico Alvaro; Maria Grazia Mancino; Paolo Onori; Antonio Franchitto; Gianfranco Alpini; Heather Francis; Shannon Glaser; Eugenio Gaudio

    2006-01-01

    The scientific framework concerning estrogen effects on different tissues has expanded enormously during the last decades, when estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes were identified. Estrogens are not only essential for the female reproductive system, but they also control fundamental functions in other tissues including the cardiovascular system, bone, brain and liver. Recently,estrogens have been shown to target the biliary tree,where they modulate the proliferative and secretory activities of cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining bile ducts. By acting on both estrogen receptors (ER-α) and (ER-β) subtypes, and by activating either genomic or non-genomic pathways, estrogens play a key role in the complex loop of growth factors and cytokines, which modulates the proliferative response of cholangiocytes to damage. Specifically, estrogens activate intracellular signalling cascades [ERK1/2 (extracellular regulated kinases 1/2, PI3- kinase/AKT (phosphatidylinositol-3'kinase/AKT)] typical of growth factors such as insulin like growth factor (IGF1), nerve growth factor (NGF)and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thus potentiating their action. In addition, estrogens stimulate the secretion of different growth factors in proliferating cholangiocytes. This review specifically deals with the recent advances related to the role and mechanisms by which estrogens modulate cholangiocyte functions in normal and pathological conditions.

  18. KBERG: KnowledgeBase for Estrogen Responsive Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Suisheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Tan, Sin Lam;

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen has a profound impact on human physiology affecting transcription of numerous genes. To decipher functional characteristics of estrogen responsive genes, we developed KnowledgeBase for Estrogen Responsive Genes (KBERG). Genes in KBERG were derived from Estrogen Responsive Gene Database...... is based on ab initio discovery of common cis-elements from the orthologous gene cluster from human, mouse and rat, thus reflecting a degree of promoter sequence preservation during evolution. The identified motifs are linked to transcription factor binding sites based on the TRANSFAC database. In addition...

  19. Estrogen intracrinology: therapy and chemoprevention of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Licznerska

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects approximately 1 in 10 women and is the leading cause of death in females between the ages of 40 and 50 years in the Western world. The World Health Organization (WHO classified estrogens as carcinogenic in humans and one of the most important risk factors of breast cancer. One of the main arguments has been that estrogens can not only promote cancers but may also initiate mutations caused by certain estrogen metabolites. Therapeutics and chemopreventive agents (e.g. tamoxifen currently in use for breast cancer generally act through an estrogen receptor (ER mechanism and are thus inappropriate for estrogen-independent disease. In the last decade, numerous studies have searched for new therapeutic and preventive agents acting independently of ER status, hence suitable for cases of estrogen-independent breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, when gonads stop producing estrogens, active hormones are produced locally. These locally produced bioactive estrogens exert their actions in the cells of tissues that have not been considered classical hormone-producing sites (i.e. breast cancer tissue and where synthesis occurs without release into the circulation. This mechanism has been termed “intracrinology”, a phenomenon different from the classical concept of endocrinology. Interference in the local production of estrogens seems to be a good alternative to chemotherapy and chemoprevention of breast carcinoma. In this article, crucial enzymes in estrogen’s biosynthesis in the breast and their potential use in therapy and chemoprevention are discussed.

  20. Regulation of Activation Induced Deaminase (AID) by Estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauklin, Siim

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Activation Induced Deaminase (AID) by the hormone estrogen has important implications for understanding adaptive immune responses as well as the involvement of AID in autoimmune diseases and tumorigenesis. This chapter describes the general laboratory techniques for analyzing AID expression and activity induced by estrogen, focusing on the isolation and preparation of cells for hormone treatment and the subsequent analysis of AID responsiveness to estrogen at the RNA level and for determining the regulation of AID activity via estrogen by analyzing Ig switch circle transcripts and mutations in switch region loci.

  1. Estrogen signaling in the proliferative endometrium: implications in endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Pereira da Costa e Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Even though the physiological role of estrogen in the female reproductive cycle and endometrial proliferative phase is well established, the signaling pathways by which estrogen exerts its action in the endometrial tissue are still little known. In this regard, advancements in cell culture techniques and maintenance of endometrial cells in cultures enabled the discovery of new signaling mechanisms activated by estrogen in the normal endometrium and in endometriosis. This review aims to present the recent findings in the genomic and non-genomic estrogen signaling pathways in the proliferative human endometrium specifically associated with the pathogenesis and development of endometriosis.

  2. Melatonin affects the dynamic steady-state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by regulating the balance between estrogen sulfatase and sulfotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is known to reduce the growth of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with estrogen signaling pathways. Estrogens play an important role in breast cancer, but also in various types of tissues, including vascular tissue. Estrogen sulfatase (STS) converts inactive estrogen sulfates into active estrogens, whereas estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) sulfonates estrogens to estrogen sulfates. Therefore, STS and EST are considered to be involved in the regulation of local estrogen levels in hormone‑dependent tumors and in non-pathologic tissues, such as those of the vascular system. Estrogens have a major impact on the vasculature, influencing vascular function, the expression of adhesion proteins, angiogenesis and the inflammatory state. In this study, we investigated the status of STS and EST in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the modulatory effects of melatonin. Both STS and EST were highly expressed in the HUVECs. The enzymatic activity correlated with the expression levels in these cells. Our findings also demonstrated that melatonin, at physiological concentrations, modulated the synthesis and transformation of biologically active estrogens in HUVECs through the inhibition of STS activity and expression, and the stimulation of EST activity and expression. Since melatonin decreased the STS levels and increased the EST levels, it modified the dynamic steady‑state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates by increasing the inactive estrogen levels and decreasing the active estrogen levels. Therefore, melatonin may modulate the known different biological actions of estrogens in endothelial cells, as well as in estrogen-dependent tumors and non-pathologic tissues. PMID:26458420

  3. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Caroline [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5056 (United States); Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay [Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier, Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale U896, Institut Régional de Cancérologie de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 1, 34298 Montpellier (France); Pakdel, Farzad [Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, Environnement et Travail (IRSET), INSERM U1085, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim [Unité Écotoxicologie In Vitro et In Vivo, INERIS, Parc ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Cavaillès, Vincent [Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier, Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale U896, Institut Régional de Cancérologie de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 1, 34298 Montpellier (France); Bourguet, William [U1054, Centre de Biochimie Structurale, CNRS UMR5048, Université Montpellier 1 et 2, 34290 Montpellier (France); Gustafsson, Jan-Ake [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5056 (United States); Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, 14183 Huddinge (Sweden); and others

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  4. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  5. Transcriptional targets shared by estrogen receptor- related receptors (ERRs) and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, but not by ERbeta.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacker, J M; K. Pettersson; Gustafsson, J.A.; Laudet, V

    1999-01-01

    The physiological activities of estrogens are thought to be mediated by specific nuclear receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. However, certain tissues, such as the bone, that are highly responsive to estrogens only express a low level of these receptors. Starting from this apparent contradiction, we have evaluated the potentials of two related receptors ERRalpha and ERRbeta to intervene in estrogen signaling. ERalpha, ERRalpha and ERRbeta bind to and activate transcription through both the classica...

  6. Transcriptomic analysis identifies gene networks regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ that control distinct effects of different botanical estrogens

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C. Michael; Helferich, William G.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ mediate the actions of endogenous estrogens as well as those of botanical estrogens (BEs) present in plants. BEs are ingested in the diet and also widely consumed by postmenopausal women as dietary supplements, often as a substitute for the loss of endogenous estrogens at menopause. However, their activities and efficacies, and similarities and differences in gene expression programs with respect to endogenous estrogens such as estradiol (E2) are not f...

  7. Bisphenol-A acts as a potent estrogen via non-classical estrogen triggered pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Ropero, Ana Belén; Soriano, Sergi; García-Arévalo, Marta; Ripoll, Cristina; Fuentes, Esther; Quesada, Iván; Nadal, Ángel

    2012-05-22

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an estrogenic monomer commonly used in the manufacture of numerous consumer products such as food and beverage containers. Widespread human exposure to significant doses of this compound has been reported. Traditionally, BPA has been considered a weak estrogen, based on its lower binding affinity to the nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) compared to 17-β estradiol (E2) as well as its low transcriptional activity after ERs activation. However, in vivo animal studies have demonstrated that it can interfere with endocrine signaling pathways at low doses during fetal, neonatal or perinatal periods as well as in adulthood. In addition, mounting evidence suggests a variety of pathways through which BPA can elicit cellular responses at very low concentrations with the same or even higher efficiency than E2. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to analyze with substantiated scientific evidence the strong estrogenic activity of BPA when it acts through alternative mechanisms of action at least in certain cell types. PMID:22227557

  8. Estrogenic followed by anti-estrogenic effects of PCBs exposure in juvenil fish (Spaurus aurata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, M; Alberghina, D; Bitto, A; Lauriano, E R; Lo Cascio, P

    2010-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a phospho-lipo-glycoprotein produced by oviparous animals in response to estrogen receptor (ER) binding. The presence of Vtg in juvenile and male fish liver and plasma has been used as biomarker to evaluate levels of environmental contaminants as dioxin and PCBs. Interaction of dioxins and PCBs with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) may affect reproduction by recruitment of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PCB-126, a co-planar PCB prototypical AhR agonist, and of PCB-153, a non-coplanar PCB lacking dioxine-like activity, on Vtg expression in young fish (Spaurus aurata) after a 12 or 24h exposure to PCBs as well as 48h following PCBs removal. Vtg expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and by Western-blot analysis. Our results showed an increased Vtg expression following PCBs administration, with a maximum level after 12h of exposure to either PCB-126, PCB-153 or a mixture of both PCBs. Following this estrogenic activity, an anti-estrogenic activity was detected after 24h of incubation with PCB-126 (alone or mixed with PCB-153), suggested by a decrease in Vtg expression likely through AhR, as a consequence of a hypothetic defence mechanism to endogenous or exogenous ligands.

  9. Bisphenol-A acts as a potent estrogen via non-classical estrogen triggered pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Ropero, Ana Belén; Soriano, Sergi; García-Arévalo, Marta; Ripoll, Cristina; Fuentes, Esther; Quesada, Iván; Nadal, Ángel

    2012-05-22

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an estrogenic monomer commonly used in the manufacture of numerous consumer products such as food and beverage containers. Widespread human exposure to significant doses of this compound has been reported. Traditionally, BPA has been considered a weak estrogen, based on its lower binding affinity to the nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) compared to 17-β estradiol (E2) as well as its low transcriptional activity after ERs activation. However, in vivo animal studies have demonstrated that it can interfere with endocrine signaling pathways at low doses during fetal, neonatal or perinatal periods as well as in adulthood. In addition, mounting evidence suggests a variety of pathways through which BPA can elicit cellular responses at very low concentrations with the same or even higher efficiency than E2. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to analyze with substantiated scientific evidence the strong estrogenic activity of BPA when it acts through alternative mechanisms of action at least in certain cell types.

  10. Serum estrogen levels and hippocampus β-estrogen receptor expressions in patients with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum estrogen (estrodial) levels estrogen β-receptor expressions in hippocampus and occurrence of seizure attack in patients of both sexes. Methods: The serum estrodial (E2) levels were detected in 8male and 9 female epileptic patients with radioimmunoassay. β-estrgen receptor (β-ER) in hippocampus were blotted with immuno-histochemical method in the 27 specimens from epilepsy surgery. Results: Few differences of E2 levels were found between those in epileptics and non-epileptics (n=30 as controls) (P>0.05). However the β-ER expression in hippocampus was significantly up-regulated in specimens from 8 female patients with catamenial epilepsy (P<0.05) as compared with that in the other 19 surgical specinens of this study and 27 other surgical specimen with different non-epileptic diseases as controls. Conclusion: Serum estrogen is not responsible for occurrence of seizure attack in patients with epilepsy. But the increased expression of β-estrogen receptors in hippocampus may be closely related with seizure in catamenial epilepsy. (authors)

  11. Differential permeability of uterine and liver vascular beds to estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheugen, C; Pardridge, W M; Judd, H L; Chaudhuri, G

    1984-12-01

    The role of capillary membrane permeability and the effect of plasma protein binding on the influx of unconjugated and conjugated estrogens into a target organ, the uterus, and a metabolic organ, the liver, were studied in anesthetized rats. In the absence of plasma proteins, estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) were freely diffusible through the uterine capillaries, but influx was significantly reduced for estriol (E3) and estetrol. In the uterus, the influx of the conjugated estrogens was markedly restricted and approximated the influx of dextran, a vascular space marker. The polarity of the compound (based on the number of hydrogen bond-forming functional groups and the presence of charged groups) appeared to predict uterine endothelial membrane permeability better than the octanol/Ringer's partition coefficient. In contrast to the selective permeability properties of the uterine endothelial barrier, the limiting membrane lining the hepatic microcirculation, the hepatocyte cell membrane, was highly permeable to all unconjugated and conjugated estrogens. The addition of 4% albumin to the injection solution led to a significant inhibition of uterine influx of E2, but not E1 or E3. In the liver, only the influx of E1 sulfate was slightly diminished by 4% albumin. In all cases, the influx of estrogens greatly exceeded the rate that would be expected if only the fraction that was free (dialyzable) in vitro was diffusible in vivo. Human sera containing sex hormone-binding globulin and albumin caused inhibition of influx of E1 and E2 through the uterine capillary barriers, whereas in the liver, the influx of E2 sulfate, and E3 glucuronide were diminished. The results are compatible with a difference in permeability of the microvasculature of the two organs and a differential availability of protein-bound estrogen for influx into liver and uterus. With the exception of E1, which is nearly completely diffusible into both organs, the influx of estrogens and estrogen conjugates

  12. Evolution of estrogen receptors in ray-finned fish and their comparative responses to estrogenic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Saki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Lange, Anke; Ogino, Yukiko; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ihara, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Kobayashi, Tohru; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens play fundamental roles in regulating reproductive activities through estrogen receptors (ESRs), and disruption of estrogen signaling is now of global concern for both wildlife and human health. To date, ESRs of only a limited number of species have been characterized. We investigated the functional diversity and molecular basis or ligand sensitivity of ESRs among ray-finned fish species (Actinopterygii), the most variable group within vertebrates. We cloned and characterized ESRs from several key species in the evolution of ray-finned fish including bichir (Polypteriformes, ESR1 and ESR2) at the basal lineage of ray-finned fish, and arowana (Osteoglossiformes, ESR1 and ESR2b) and eel (Anguilliformes, ESR1, ESR2a and ESR2b) both belonging to ancient early-branching lineages of teleosts, and suggest that ESR2a and ESR2b emerged through teleost-specific whole genome duplication, but an ESR1 paralogue has been lost in the early lineage of euteleost fish species. All cloned ESR isoforms showed similar responses to endogenous and synthetic steroidal estrogens, but they responded differently to non-steroidal estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) (e.g., ESR2a exhibits a weaker reporter activity compared with ESR2b). We show that variation in ligand sensitivity of ESRs can be attributed to phylogeny among species of different taxonomic groups in ray-finned fish. The molecular information provided contributes both to understanding of the comparative role of ESRs in the reproductive biology of fish and their comparative responses to EDCs. PMID:26707410

  13. Estrogen and inflammation modulate estrogen receptor alpha expression in specific tissues of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellinger Larry L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen is known to play role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders and estrogen effects can be mediated by estrogen receptor (ER alpha present in the TMJ. Cells expressing the estrogen receptor ERalpha are present in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ but changes in expression due to estrogen and inflammation have not been characterized. In this study, ERalpha protein content and the number of cells expressing ERalpha was measured in 17 beta-estradiol-treated rats after inflammation was induced in the TMJ. Methods Sixteen ovariectomized female rats were divided into two groups such that one group received 17 beta estradiol (E2 and the other was given vehicle (VEH. Groups were then subdivided further, one received injections of saline and the other received Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA within the superior joint space of the TMJ. Thus the four groups include no E2/saline, E2/saline, no E2/CFA and E2/CFA. After treatment, the rats were sacrificed, and the TMJ anterior, disc, retrodiscal and synovial tissues were analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Positive stained cells were counted using a Nikon epifluorescent microscope. Results The western blot showed that ERalpha protein significantly decreased with inflammation. The number of ERalpha-positive cells in the TMJ was not affected by inflammation or 17 beta-estradiol with exception of the retrodiscal tissue. In the retrodiscal tissue 17 beta-estradiol significantly decreased the number of ERalpha-positive cells but only in a non-inflamed joint. Conclusions In conclusion, inflammation and 17 beta-estradiol can modulate ERalpha expression in the TMJ but the effects are tissue specific.

  14. Caffeine, coffee and tea intake and urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Julia S.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Gu, Fangyi; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Rosner, Bernard; Xu, Xia; Ziegler, Regina; Eliassen, A. Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior studies have found weak inverse associations between breast cancer and caffeine and coffee intake, possibly mediated through their effects on sex hormones. Methods High-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify levels of 15 individual estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among 587 premenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Study II with mid-luteal phase urine samples and caffeine, coffee and/or tea intakes from self-reported food frequency questionnaires. Multivariate linear mixed models were used to estimate geometric means of individual EM, pathways and ratios by intake categories, and P-values for tests of linear trend. Results Compared to women in the lowest quartile of caffeine consumption, those in the top quartile had higher urinary concentrations of 16α-hydroxyestrone (28% difference; P-trend=0.01) and 16-epiestriol (13% difference; P-trend=0.04), and a decreased parent estrogens/2-, 4-, 16-pathway ratio (P-trend=0.03). Coffee intake was associated with higher 2-catechols, including 2-hydroxyestradiol (57% difference, ≥4 cups/day vs. ≤6 cups/week; P-trend=0.001) and 2-hydroxyestrone (52% difference; P-trend=0.001), and several ratio measures. Decaffeinated coffee was not associated with 2-pathway metabolism, but women in the highest (vs. lowest) category of intake (≥2 cups/day vs. ≤1–3 cups/month) had significantly lower levels of two 16-pathway metabolites, estriol (25% difference; P-trend=0.01) and 17-epiestriol (48% difference; Ptrend=0.0004). Tea intake was positively associated with 17-epiestriol (52% difference; Ptrend=0.01). Conclusion Caffeine and coffee intake were both associated with profiles of estrogen metabolism in premenopausal women. Impact Consumption of caffeine and coffee may alter patterns of premenopausal estrogen metabolism. PMID:26063478

  15. The role of estrogen in bipolar disorder, a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinhard, Ninja; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vinberg, Maj

    2014-01-01

    tamoxifen studies found that tamoxifen was effective in producing antimanic effects. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that estrogen fluctuations may be an important factor in the etiology of bipolar disorder and it is obvious that more research on this topic is needed to clarify the role of estrogen...

  16. The Tissue Selective Estrogen Complex: A Promising New Menopausal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Mirkin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with health concerns including vasomotor symptoms, vulvar/vaginal atrophy (VVA, and osteoporosis. Estrogen therapy or combined estrogen-progestin therapy (EPT are primary treatment options for menopausal symptom relief and osteoporosis prevention. Because EPT has been associated with some safety/tolerability concerns relating to undesirable effects of estrogen and progestin, alternative options are needed. The tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC is a novel class of agents pairing a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM with 1 or more estrogens. The TSEC combines the established efficacy of estrogens on menopausal symptoms and bone with the protective effects of a SERM on the reproductive tract. The pairing of bazedoxifene (BZA with conjugated estrogens (CE has been evaluated in a series of phase 3 clinical trials. BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg and BZA 20 mg/CE 0.625 mg have shown efficacy in reducing the frequency and severity of hot flushes, relieving VVA symptoms, and maintaining bone mass while protecting the endometrium and breast. These BZA/CE doses have been associated with a favorable safety/tolerability profile, with higher rates of cumulative amenorrhea and lower incidences of breast pain than those reported for EPT. Thus, BZA/CE may be a promising alternative to conventional EPT for treating non-hysterectomized, postmenopausal women.

  17. Scanning for Clues to Better Use Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Ingle and colleagues present timely findings identifying genetic variants associated with response to selective estrogen receptor modulator therapy that when substantiated in follow-up may represent an important step towards understanding estrogen-dependent induction of BRCA1 expression and advancing individualized preventive medicine in women at high risk for developing breast cancer.

  18. The Endocrine Role of Estrogens on Human Male Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Rochira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Before the characterization of human and animal models of estrogen deficiency, estrogen action was confined in the context of the female bone. These interesting models uncovered a wide spectrum of unexpected estrogen actions on bone in males, allowing the formulation of an estrogen-centric theory useful to explain how sex steroids act on bone in men. Most of the principal physiological events that take place in the developing and mature male bone are now considered to be under the control of estrogen. Estrogen determines the acceleration of bone elongation at puberty, epiphyseal closure, harmonic skeletal proportions, the achievement of peak bone mass, and the maintenance of bone mass. Furthermore, it seems to crosstalk with androgen even in the determination of bone size, a more androgen-dependent phenomenon. At puberty, epiphyseal closure and growth arrest occur when a critical number of estrogens is reached. The same mechanism based on a critical threshold of serum estradiol seems to operate in men during adulthood for bone mass maintenance via the modulation of bone formation and resorption in men. This threshold should be better identified in-between the ranges of 15 and 25 pg/mL. Future basic and clinical research will optimize strategies for the management of bone diseases related to estrogen deficiency in men.

  19. Ontogeny of the mouse estrogen receptor: the pelvic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance of estrogen receptors was examined during the course of fetal and neonatal development in the pelvic region of the mouse; 3H-diethylstilbestrol (DES) was administered via the maternal circulation to developing mice on days 4, 7, 10, 13, 14, 15, and 17 of gestation or to neonates on the day of birth. Localization of the ligand was monitored autoradiographically. The earliest appearance of estrogen receptors occurred in the mesenchyme around the genital ducts on day 13 of pregnancy. On subsequent days, estrogen-concentrating cells appeared in certain mammary-gland cells, connective-tissue strands, in perichondrium associated with specific developing bones, skin, interstitial tissue of the testis, in a sheath of cells surrounding the colon, and in the urethra. The significance of cells containing estrogen receptors in these locations is discussed in reference to a transplacental action of estrogens and the clinical ramifications of DES

  20. Synthesis of a dendritic estrogen cluster: A potential tool for studies of nuclear versus extranuclear pathways of estrogen actions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Chen; Hu Zheng; Yan Song; Yu Feng Liang; Qing Rong Qi

    2012-01-01

    A novel estrogen dendrimer has been synthesized through a combination of divergent and convergent approaches in 9 practical steps and in good yields.It was characterized and confirmed by elemental analysis,FT-IR,MS,1H NMR,13C NMR.The dendrimer contains 16 estrone units and is potentially a useful tool for the studies of estrogen actions.

  1. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michaël; Antonio, Leen; Sinnesael, Mieke; Dubois, Vanessa; Gielen, Evelien; Classens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2) by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution) peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  2. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Laurent

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T to estradiol (E2 by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  3. Estrogen biosynthesis in human uterine adenomyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urabe, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Takara; Kitawaki, Jo; Honjo, Hideo; Okada, Hiroji (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan))

    1989-01-01

    Estrogen biosynthesis (aromatiase activity) was investigated in human adenomyosis tissue and compared with that of the normal myometrium, endometrium, and endometrical cancer tissues. Homogenates were incubated with (1,2,6,7-{sup 3}H)androstenedione and NADPH at 37 deg. C for 1 h. After stopping the enzymatic reaction with ethyl acetate, (4-{sup 14}C)estrone and (4-{sup 14}C)estradiol-17{beta} were added to the incubated sample. Estrone and estradiol were purified and identified by Bio-Rad AG1-X2 column chromatography, thin-layer chromatography and co-crystallization. Estrogen formed in the incubated sample was calculated from the {sup 3}H/{sup 14}C ratio of the final crystal. The value for estrone formed from androstenedione was 52-132 fmol{sup .}h{sup -1.}g{sup -1} wet weight. Aromatase activity in the adenomyosis tissues was higher than that in normal endometrial or myometrial tissues, but lower than that found in myometrial or endometrial tumour tissue. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of danazol, progresterone, and medroxyprogesterone acetate on adenomyosis cells in primary cultures. Aromatase activity in adenomyosis was blocked by danazol, but stimulated by progesterone and MPA. These results indicate that aromatase activity in adenomyosis may contribute to the growth of the ectopic endometrial tissue which occurs in this disease. (author).

  4. Ligand-based identification of environmental estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, C.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Oprea, T.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chae, K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) paradigm, was used to examine the estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinities of a series of structurally diverse natural, synthetic, and environmental chemicals of interest. The CoMFA/3D-QSAR model is statistically robust and internally consistent, and successfully illustrates that the overall steric and electrostatic properties of structurally diverse ligands for the estrogen receptor are both necessary and sufficient to describe the binding affinity. The ability of the model to accurately predict the ER binding affinity of an external test set of molecules suggests that structure-based 3D-QSAR models may be used to supplement the process of endocrine disrupter identification through prioritization of novel compounds for bioassay. The general application of this 3D-QSAR model within a toxicological framework is, at present, limited only by the quantity and quality of biological data for relevant biomarkers of toxicity and hormonal responsiveness. 28 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Licorice root components in dietary supplements are selective estrogen receptor modulators with a spectrum of estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonmuen, Nittaya; Gong, Ping; Ali, Zulfiqar; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Khan, Ikhlas; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2016-01-01

    Licorice root extracts are often consumed as botanical dietary supplements by menopausal women as a natural alternative to pharmaceutical hormone replacement therapy. In addition to their components liquiritigenin (Liq) and isoliquiritigenin (Iso-Liq), known to have estrogenic activity, licorice root extracts also contain a number of other flavonoids, isoflavonoids, and chalcones. We have investigated the estrogenic activity of 7 of these components, obtained from an extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra powder, namely Glabridin (L1), Calycosin (L2), Methoxychalcone (L3), Vestitol (L4), Glyasperin C (L5), Glycycoumarin (L6), and Glicoricone (L7), and compared them with Liq, Iso-Liq, and estradiol (E2). All components, including Liq and Iso-Liq, have low binding affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). Their potency and efficacy in stimulating the expression of estrogen-regulated genes reveal that Liq and Iso-Liq and L2, L3, L4, and L6 are estrogen agonists. Interestingly, L3 and L4 have an efficacy nearly equivalent to E2 but with a potency ca. 10,000-fold less. The other components, L1, L5 and L7, acted as partial estrogen antagonists. All agonist activities were reversed by the antiestrogen, ICI 182,780, or by knockdown of ERα with siRNA, indicating that they are ER dependent. In HepG2 hepatoma cells stably expressing ERα, only Liq, Iso-Liq, and L3 stimulated estrogen-regulated gene expression, and in all cases gene stimulation did not occur in HepG2 cells lacking ERα. Collectively, these findings classify the components of licorice root extracts as low potency, mixed ER agonists and antagonists, having a character akin to that of selective estrogen receptor modulators or SERMs. PMID:26631549

  6. Light-emitting polymer LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moratti, S.C.; Bradley, D.D.C.; Cervini, R.; Friend, R.H.; Greenham, N.C.; Holmes, A.B. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Simple light emitting diodes can be constructed using fluorescent organic materials. Conjugated polymers can be used both for charge transport and for light emission. It is considered necessary for maximum device efficiency to balance the rates of electron and hole injection. The authors report the synthesis of a poly(cyanoterephthalylidenene) that was designed to exhibit an increased electron affinity. Electrochemical measurements showed a significant shift in the oxidation and reduction potentials due to the cyano functionality. The use of this polymer in a range of electroluminescent devices is described. Internal quantum efficiencies of up to 4% can be achieved in a bilayer device using stable electrode materials. The route used to synthesize this polymer is amenable to considerable variation in the subunits employed. This allows tuning of both the band-gap and the electron affinity of the resulting polymer.

  7. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Lisa J., E-mail: robinsonlj@msx.upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Blair, Harry C. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Veteran' s Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15243 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  8. Light-Emitting Devices with Conjugated Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Yu Deng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a previous study and tremendous progress in basic theoretical modeling, material developments and device engineering for polymer light-emitting devices (PLEDs.

  9. Assessment of methods of detection of water estrogenicity for their use as monitoring tools in a process of estrogenicity removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blavier, J; Songulashvili, G; Simon, C; Penninckx, M; Flahaut, S; Scippo, M L; Debaste, F

    2016-12-01

    Methods of monitoring of estrogenicity in water were gathered, compared, and tested within the context of their practical use as measurement and design tools, in the development of a process of degradation of estrogenic endocrine disruptors. In this work, the focus was put on in vitro assays, with the use of analytical techniques as additional analysis when possible. Practically, from a literature review, four methods that seemed most suitable to practical use required in a process development were tested: the Yeast Estrogen Screen assay, the Lyticase-assisted Yeast Estrogen Screen assay (LYES), the MMV-LUC assay and the HPLC-UV analytical method. Dose-response curves in response to estrogenic standard 17β-estradiol were compared. Bisphenol A estrogenicity was measured by the methods as well. The model for the calculation of estradiol equivalents as measurements units was adapted. The methods were assessed in terms of ranges of detection, time of experiment, cost, ease of the experiment, reproducibility, etc. Based on that assessment, the LYES assay was selected and successfully applied to the monitoring of estrogenicity removal from 17β-estradiol and bisphenol A. More precisely, the bioassay allowed the acquisition of kinetic curves for a laboratory-scaled process of estrogenicity removal by immobilized enzymes in a continuous packed-bed reactor. The LYES assay was found to have a real methodological potential for scale-up and design of a treatment process. The HPLC-UV method showed good complementarity with the LYES assay for the monitoring of bisphenol A concentrations in parallel with estrogenicity, reporting no significant estrogenicity from degradation byproducts, among others. PMID:27144327

  10. Fast spatial atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at low temperature (<100 °C) as a gas permeation barrier for flexible organic light-emitting diode displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hagyoung; Shin, Seokyoon; Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeongtae; Kim, Junghun; Kim, Sanghun; Chung, Seog Chul; Oh, Kiyoung [LIG INVENIA Co., Ltd., Seongnam, Gyeonggi 462-807 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The authors developed a high throughput (70 Å/min) and scalable space-divided atomic layer deposition (ALD) system for thin film encapsulation (TFE) of flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays at low temperatures (<100 °C). In this paper, the authors report the excellent moisture barrier properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on 2G glass substrates of an industrially relevant size (370 × 470 mm{sup 2}) using the newly developed ALD system. This new ALD system reduced the ALD cycle time to less than 1 s. A growth rate of 0.9 Å/cycle was achieved using trimethylaluminum as an Al source and O{sub 3} as an O reactant. The morphological features and step coverage of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition was analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy. These deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films demonstrated a good optical transmittance higher than 95% in the visible region based on the ultraviolet visible spectrometer measurements. Water vapor transmission rate lower than the detection limit of the MOCON test (less than 3.0 × 10{sup −3} g/m{sup 2} day) were obtained for the flexible substrates. Based on these results, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited using our new high-throughput and scalable spatial ALD is considered a good candidate for preparation of TFE films of flexible OLEDs.

  11. Membrane estrogen receptors: genomic actions and post transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Julie; Sebastian, K S; Devassy, Sony; Priyadarsini, Lakshmi; Farook, Mohamed Febin; Shameem, A; Mathew, Deepa; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2006-02-26

    The primary cellular location of the nuclear estrogen receptor II (nER II) is the plasma membrane. A number of reports that have appeared in the recent past indicate that plasma membrane localized estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) also exists. Whether the membrane localized ERalpha represents the receptor that binds to the estrogen responsive element (ERE) remains to be known. The mechanisms that underlie the internalization of nER II (non-activated estrogen receptor, deglycosylated) have been identified to a certain extent. The question remains: is the primary location of the ERalpha also the plasma membrane? If that is the case, it will be a challenging task to identify the molecular events that underlie the plasma membrane-to-nucleus movement of ERalpha. The internalization mechanisms for the two 66kDa plasma membrane ERs, following hormone binding, appear to be distinct and without any overlaps. Interestingly, while the major gene regulatory role for ERalpha appears to be at the level of transcription, the nER II has its major functional role in post transcriptional mechanisms. The endoplasmic reticulum associated anchor protein-55 (ap55) that was recently reported from the author's laboratory needs a closer look. It is a high affinity estrogen binding protein that anchors the estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) in an estrogen-mediated event. It will be interesting to examine whether ap55 bears any structural similarity with either ERalpha or ERbeta. PMID:16423448

  12. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect

  13. Estrogen Stimulates Homing of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Endometriotic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Nenicu, Anca; Nickels, Ruth M; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into microvessels contributes to the vascularization of endometriotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed whether this vasculogenic process is regulated by estrogen. Estrogen- and vehicle-treated human EPCs were analyzed for migration and tube formation. Endometriotic lesions were induced in irradiated FVB/N mice, which were reconstituted with bone marrow from FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/green fluorescent protein) 287 Sato mice. The animals were treated with 100 μg/kg β-estradiol 17-valerate or vehicle (control) over 7 and 28 days. Lesion growth, cyst formation, homing of green fluorescent protein(+)/Tie2(+) EPCs, vascularization, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by high-resolution ultrasonography, caliper measurements, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Numbers of blood circulating EPCs were assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro, estrogen-treated EPCs exhibited a higher migratory and tube-forming capacity when compared with controls. In vivo, numbers of circulating EPCs were not affected by estrogen. However, estrogen significantly increased the number of EPCs incorporated into the lesions' microvasculature, resulting in an improved early vascularization. Estrogen further stimulated the growth of lesions, which exhibited massively dilated glands with a flattened layer of stroma. This was mainly because of an increased glandular secretory activity, whereas cell proliferation and apoptosis were not markedly affected. These findings indicate that vasculogenesis in endometriotic lesions is dependent on estrogen, which adds a novel hormonally regulated mechanism to the complex pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27315780

  14. Reviewing the options for local estrogen treatment of vaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindahl SH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarah H Lindahl Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, SEBMF – Diablo Division, Castro Valley, CA, USA Background: Vaginal atrophy is a chronic condition with symptoms that include vaginal dryness, pain during sex, itching, irritation, burning, and discharge, as well as various urinary problems. Up to 45% of postmenopausal women may be affected, but it often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the current recommendations for treatment of vaginal atrophy, and current data on the effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies. Methods: Literature regarding vaginal atrophy (2007–2012 was retrieved from PubMed and summarized, with emphasis on data related to the treatment of vaginal atrophy with local vaginal estrogen therapy. Results: Published data support the effectiveness and endometrial safety of low-dose local estrogen therapies. These results further support the general recommendation by the North American Menopause Society that a progestogen is not needed for endometrial protection in patients using low-dose local vaginal estrogen. Benefits of long-term therapy for vaginal atrophy include sustained relief of symptoms as well as physiological improvements (eg, decreased vaginal pH and increased blood flow, epithelial thickness, secretions. Conclusion: Currently available local vaginal estrogen therapies are well tolerated and effective in relieving symptoms of vaginal atrophy. Recent data support the endometrial safety of low-dose regimens for up to 1 year. Keywords: menopause, estrogen, local estrogen therapy, vaginal atrophy

  15. Functional adaptation in female rats: the role of estrogen signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah J Sample

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sex steroids have direct effects on the skeleton. Estrogen acts on the skeleton via the classical genomic estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ, a membrane ER, and the non-genomic G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER. GPER is distributed throughout the nervous system, but little is known about its effects on bone. In male rats, adaptation to loading is neuronally regulated, but this has not been studied in females. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the rat ulna end-loading model to induce an adaptive modeling response in ovariectomized (OVX female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were treated with a placebo, estrogen (17β-estradiol, or G-1, a GPER-specific agonist. Fourteen days after OVX, rats underwent unilateral cyclic loading of the right ulna; half of the rats in each group had brachial plexus anesthesia (BPA of the loaded limb before loading. Ten days after loading, serum estrogen concentrations, dorsal root ganglion (DRG gene expression of ERα, ERβ, GPER, CGRPα, TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and load-induced skeletal responses were quantified. We hypothesized that estrogen and G-1 treatment would influence skeletal responses to cyclic loading through a neuronal mechanism. We found that estrogen suppresses periosteal bone formation in female rats. This physiological effect is not GPER-mediated. We also found that absolute mechanosensitivity in female rats was decreased, when compared with male rats. Blocking of adaptive bone formation by BPA in Placebo OVX females was reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen acts to decrease periosteal bone formation in female rats in vivo. This effect is not GPER-mediated. Gender differences in absolute bone mechanosensitivity exist in young Sprague-Dawley rats with reduced mechanosensitivity in females, although underlying bone formation rate associated with growth likely influences this observation. In contrast to female and male rats, central neuronal signals had a diminished effect on

  16. Contribution of a Membrane Estrogen Receptor to the Estrogenic Regulation of Body Temperature and Energy Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Roepke, Troy A.; Bosch, Martha A.; Rick, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Benjamin; Wagner, Edward J.; Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Martin J Kelly

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key region of the central nervous system involved in the control of homeostasis, including energy and core body temperature (Tc). 17β-Estradiol (E2) regulates Tc, in part, via actions in the basal hypothalamus and preoptic area. E2 primarily controls hypothalamic functions via the nuclear steroid receptors, estrogen receptor α/β. However, we have previously described an E2-responsive, Gq-coupled membrane receptor that reduces the postsynaptic inhibitory γ-aminobutyric ac...

  17. Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Pesticides at the Human Estrogen Receptor α and β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Bettina; Klawonn, Frank; Nguema Bekale, Boris; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consumers of fruits and vegetables are frequently exposed to small amounts of hormonally active pesticides, some of them sharing a common mode of action such as the activation of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα) or β (hERβ). Therefore, it is of particular importance to evaluate risks emanating from chemical mixtures, in which the individual pesticides are present at human-relevant concentrations, below their corresponding maximum residue levels. Binary and ternary iso-effective mixtures of estrogenic pesticides at effect concentrations eliciting a 1 or 10% effect in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol were tested experimentally at the hERα in the yeast-based estrogen screen (YES) assay as well as in the human U2-OS cell-based ERα chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ERα CALUX) assay and at the hERβ in the ERβ CALUX assay. The outcome was then compared to predictions calculated by means of concentration addition. In most cases, additive effects were observed with the tested combinations in all three test systems, an observation that supports the need to expand the risk assessment of pesticides and consider cumulative risk assessment. An additional testing of mixture effects at the hERβ showed that most test substances being active at the hERα could also elicit additive effects at the hERβ, but the hERβ was less sensitive. In conclusion, effects of the same ligands at the hERα and the hERβ could influence the estrogenic outcome under physiological conditions.

  18. Reproductive toxicities of methoxychlor based on estrogenic properties of the compound and its estrogenic metabolite, hydroxyphenyltrichloroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Chapin, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Methoxychlor is an organochlorine pesticide having a weak estrogenicity, which is estimated to be approximately 1000- to 14,000-fold less potent to a natural ligand, 17β-estradiol. However, its active metabolite, hydroxyphenyltrichloroethane, has much more potent estrogenic activity and probably acts in the target organs of animals exposed to methoxychlor at least 100 times stronger than the parent compound. A variety of in vivo reproductive toxicity studies have shown that treatment with methoxychlor exerts typical endocrine-disrupting effects manifest as estrogenic effects, such as formation of cystic ovaries resulting in ovulation failures, uterine hypertrophy, hormonal imbalances, atrophy of male sexual organs, and deteriorations of sperm production in rats and/or mice, through which it causes serious reproductive damages in both sexes of animals at sufficient dose levels. However, methoxychlor is not teratogenic. The no-observed-adverse-effect level of methoxychlor among reliable experimental animal studies in terms of the reproductive toxicity is 10 ppm (equivalent to 0.600 mg/kg/day) in a two-generation reproduction toxicity study.

  19. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity of off-the-shelf hair and skin care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Sharon L; Yang, Chun Z; Bittner, George D; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R; Baird, Donna D

    2015-05-01

    Use of personal care products is widespread in the United States but tends to be greater among African Americans than whites. Of special concern is the possible hazard of absorption of chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) or anti-EA (AEA) in these products. Such exposure may have adverse health effects, especially when it occurs during developmental windows (e.g., prepubertally) when estrogen levels are low. We assessed the ethanol extracts of eight commonly used hair and skin products popular among African Americans for EA and AEA using a cell proliferation assay with the estrogen sensitive MCF-7:WS8 cell line derived from a human breast cancer. Four of the eight personal care products tested (Oil Hair Lotion, Extra-dry Skin Lotion, Intensive Skin Lotion, Petroleum Jelly) demonstrated detectable EA, whereas three (Placenta Hair Conditioner, Tea-Tree Hair Conditioner, Cocoa Butter Skin Cream) exhibited AEA. Our data indicate that hair and skin care products can have EA or AEA, and suggest that laboratory studies are warranted to investigate the in vivo activity of such products under chronic exposure conditions as well as epidemiologic studies to investigate potential adverse health effects that might be associated with use of such products.

  20. Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    Devices utilizing an entirely new class of earth abundant, inexpensive phosphorescent emitters based on metal-halide nanoclusters are reported. Light-emitting diodes with tunable performance are demonstrated by varying cation substitution to these nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations provide insight about the nature of the phosphorescent emitting states, which involves a strong pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion.

  1. Green emitting phosphors and blends thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Siclovan, Oltea Puica; Nammalwar, Prasanth Kumar; Sathyanarayan, Ramesh Rao; Porob, Digamber G.; Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi; Heward, William Jordan; Radkov, Emil Vergilov; Briel, Linda Jane Valyou

    2010-12-28

    Phosphor compositions, blends thereof and light emitting devices including white light emitting LED based devices, and backlights, based on such phosphor compositions. The devices include a light source and a phosphor material as described. Also disclosed are phosphor blends including such a phosphor and devices made therefrom.

  2. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  3. Multilayer polymer light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Zachary; Thomas, Adam; Tzolov, Marian

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of device layers and their interfaces is a major area of study in Polymer Light Emitting Devices (PLEDs). Many factors such as the degradation, efficiency, and overall performance depend on how these layers interact with each other. A fundamental understanding of the interfaces of these layers can lend to better performing devices using a multitude of organic polymers deposited in conjunction with each other in several ways. We have studied basic PLED devices in which we vary the emissive layer used, along with final bake temperatures. Devices include a glass substrate with Indium Tin Oxide anode, Aluminum cathode, and Plexcore Hole Injection layer. The active polymer films were spin casted from solution of MEH-PPV and PFO. Single layer and dual layers of several polymers are studied by examining current-voltage characteristics, film densities, impedance measurements, light emission, and efficiency calculations. We have found that not only do dual layers positively alter the performance of the device in the majority of cases, but the solvents in which each layer is originally in when deposited affects the formation of the interface, thereby altering the device mechanisms.

  4. Estrogen receptor α AF-2 mutation results in antagonist reversal and reveals tissue selective function of estrogen receptor modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Arao, Yukitomo; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Ray, Manas K.; Scott, Gregory; Mishina, Yuji; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor containing two transcriptional activation domains. AF-1 is in the N terminus of the receptor protein and AF-2 activity is dependent on helix 12 of the C-terminal ligand-binding domain. Two point mutations of leucines 543 and 544 to alanines (L543A, L544A) in helix 12 minimized estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation and reversed the activity of the estrogen antagonists ICI182780 (ICI) and tamoxifen (TAM) into agonists...

  5. Estrogen Intake and Copper Depositions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Amtage

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with chronic postmenopausal estrogen intake with presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring in the cornea and Alzheimer's disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of estrogen intake and copper accumulation in various tissues, including the central nervous system. Sonography was compatible with copper accumulation in the basal ganglia, but the patient showed no clinical signs of Wilson's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography revealed a typical pattern for Alzheimer's disease. We propose increased copper levels as a direct effect of estrogen intake due to an augmented ATP7A-mRNA in the intestine. Moreover, we discuss the impact of elevated free serum copper on accompanying Alzheimer's disease, knowing that copper plays a crucial role in the formation of amyloid plaques and tau aggregation. This might offer a partial explanation for the observation that postmenopausal estrogen therapy is associated with a higher risk of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. EARLY MORNING URINE ESTROGEN-GLUCURONIDE DETERMINATION FOR OVULATION PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUMei-Guang; TULCHINSKYD

    1989-01-01

    Monitoring of ovulation is necessary for induction of ovulation in clinical trials. Bakerfound that the conoentration of estrogen glucuronides was high in female urine and devel-oped a RIA method for direct measurment. Adlevcrefutz and some other five groups

  7. STUDY OF ESTROGEN BINDING SITE ON HUMAN EJACULATED SPERMATOZOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUJin-Shong; WANGYi-Fei

    1989-01-01

    The specific estrogen binding site for 17β-estradiol has been investigated on human spermatozoa by electron microscopec autoradiography. The results show that the binding sites were distributed over the surface of human spermatozoa: acrosomal cap, equatorial

  8. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, Andrea; Sbisa, Alyssa M; Sun, Jeehae; Gibbons, Andrew; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol's underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol's impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems. PMID:26491441

  9. Role of estrogen receptor-α on food demand elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-05-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have an inhibitory effect on food intake under free-feeding conditions, yet the effects of estrogens on food-maintained operant responding have been studied to a much lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α, knockout of subtype β, and their wild type controls. The mice responded in a closed economy, and the price of food was increased by increasing the fixed-ratio response requirement every four sessions. Overall, we found that mice with the knockout of receptor subtype α had the most elastic demand functions. Therefore, under these conditions, estrogens increased food seeking via activation of the receptor subtype α. The results were inconsistent with those reported by previous studies that employed free-feeding conditions. PMID:25869426

  10. Estrogenicity of selected biphenyls evaluated using a recombinant yeast assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, T.W.; Kraut, D.H.; Sayler, G.S.; Layton, A.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The estrogenic activity of biphenyl and 4-hydroxylated derivatives with varied levels of chloro- and/or hydroxyl substitution was measured in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based lac-Z ({beta}-galactosidase) reporter assay, {beta}-Galactosidase activity was compared with competitive binding to soluble mouse uterine estrogen receptor protein. The comparison of relative potency for biphenyls hydroxylated on one ring and chlorinated on the other ring (n = 5) revealed excellent correlation between the two systems (r{sup 2} = 0.995). However, estrogenicities of biphenyls hydroxylated and chlorinated on the same ring were not in agreement. Although weak ligand binding was demonstrated for these compounds, {beta}-galactosidase activity was not observed. Rather, these compounds were shown to be cytotoxic to yeast. The results of this study further support the hypothesis that both an unhindered phenolic ring and molecular symmetry are structural features associated with estrogenicity.

  11. Functional role of estrogen in pituitary tumor pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Heaney, Anthony P.; Fernando, Manory; Melmed, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    Pituitary hyperplasia and lactotroph replication are induced by estrogen. The product of the pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) exhibits in vitro and in vivo transforming activity and induces basic bFGF secretion, thereby modulating pituitary angiogenesis and tumor formation. We demonstrated previously that pituitary pttg is induced by estrogen and bFGF, the latter being expressed in a concordant fashion with pttg in experimental and human pituitary adenomas. We now elucidate the role o...

  12. Weak estrogenic transcriptional activities of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S

    OpenAIRE

    GRIGNARD ELISE; Bremer, Susanne; LAPENNA SILVIA

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, the European Commission has restricted the use of Bisphenol A in plastic infant feeding bottles. In a response to this restriction, Bisphenol S is now often used as a component of plastic substitutes for the production of babybottles. One of the major concerns leading to the restriction of Bisphenol A was its weak estrogenic activity. By using two highly standardised transactivation assays, we could demonstrate that the estrogenic activity of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S i...

  13. Estrogen induces Vav1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-juan Du

    Full Text Available Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for Rho family GTPases, is a hematopoietic protein involved in a variety of cellular events. In recent years, aberrant expression of Vav1 has been reported in non-hematopoietic cancers including human breast cancer. It remains to be answered how Vav1 is expressed and what Vav1 does in its non-resident tissues. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanism for Vav1 expression in breast cancer cells in correlation with estrogen-ER pathway. We not only verified the ectopic expression of Vav1 in human breast cancer cell lines, but also observed that Vav1 expression was induced by 17β-estradiol (E2, a typical estrogen receptor (ER ligand, in ER-positive cell lines. On the other hand, Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM, and ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suppressed the expression of Vav1. The estrogen receptor modulating Vav1 expression was identified to be α form, not β. Furthermore, treatment of E2 increased the transcription of vav1 gene by enhancing the promoter activity, though there was no recognizable estrogen response element (ERE. Nevertheless, two regions at the vav1 gene promoter were defined to be responsible for E2-induced activation of vav1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP analyses suggested that ERα might access to the vav1 promoter via interacting with transcription factors, c-Myb and ELF-1. Consequently, the enhanced expression of Vav1 led to the elevation of Cyclin D1 and the progression of cell cycle. The present study implies that estrogen-ER modulates the transcription and expression of Vav1, which may contribute to the proliferation of cancerous cells.

  14. Toxicogenomics-based in vitro alternatives for estrogenicity testing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.

    2013-01-01

    Testing chemicals for their endocrine-disrupting potential, including interference with estrogen receptor signaling, is an important aspect to assess the safety of currently used and newly developed chemicals. The standard test for disruption of normal estrogen function is the in vivo uterotrophic assay in immature or ovariectomised rodents with uterus weight as a crucial read-out parameter. Due to the high costs, ethical objections and labour intensiveness of the in vivo uterotrophic assay, ...

  15. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Gogos; Sbisa, Alyssa M.; Jeehae Sun; Andrew Gibbons; Madhara Udawela; Brian Dean

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects ...

  16. Sex-Dependent Influence of Endogenous Estrogen in Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Kirsty M.; Wright, Audrey F.; Duggan, Nicholas; Rowlands, David J.; Hussey, Martin J.; Roberts, Sonia; Fullerton, Josephine; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Thomas, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension is greater in women, suggesting estrogens may play a role in the disease pathogenesis. Experimentally, in males, exogenously administered estrogen can protect against pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, in models that display female susceptibility, estrogens may play a causative role. Objectives: To clarify the influence of endogenous estrogen and sex in PH and assess the therapeutic potential of a clinically available aromatase inhibitor. Methods: We interrogated the effect of reduced endogenous estrogen in males and females using the aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, in two models of PH: the hypoxic mouse and Sugen 5416/hypoxic rat. We also determined the effects of sex on pulmonary expression of aromatase in these models and in lungs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Measurements and Main Results: Anastrozole attenuated PH in both models studied, but only in females. To verify this effect was caused by reduced estrogenic activity we confirmed that in hypoxic mice inhibition of estrogen receptor α also has a therapeutic effect specifically in females. Female rodent lung displays increased aromatase and decreased bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Id1 expression compared with male. Anastrozole treatment reversed the impaired bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 pathway in females. Increased aromatase expression was also detected in female human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells compared with male. Conclusions: The unique phenotype of female pulmonary arteries facilitates the therapeutic effects of anastrozole in experimental PH confirming a role for endogenous estrogen in the disease pathogenesis in females and suggests aromatase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. PMID:24956156

  17. Artery Wall Imaging and Effects of Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Macias Wallberg, Kenny A.

    2005-01-01

    Postmenopausal estrogen therapy, initiated early in the menopause, seems to protect against development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. This thesis concerns studies of artery wall thickness and arterial stiffness estimated by noninvasive ultrasound techniques in long-term estrogen treated postmenopausal women who initiated therapy at the time of the menopause. A noninvasive 25 MHz high-frequency ultrasound technique was validated in the imaging of superficial arteries by using...

  18. Rapid yeast estrogen bioassays stably expressing human estrogen receptors alpha and beta, and green fluorescent protein: a comparison of different compounds on both receptor types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, J.R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Keijer, J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we described the construction of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor (hER) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) in response to estrogens. In the present study, the properties of this assay were further studied by testing a series of estrogenic

  19. Selective estrogen receptor modulators promising for cardiac syndrome X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac syndrome X (CSX is defined as a typical anginal-like chest pain with a transient ischemic electrocardiogram, but without abnormal coronary angiography. It is usually accepted that endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, oxidative stress and estrogen deficiency are the main reasons of CSX. There are some methods to treat CSX including statins, b blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrates, estrogen, and so on. The estrogen replacement therapy (ERT, in particular, has been reported by many researchers to significantly reduce the frequency of chest pain after administration of estrogen, which has been explained as estrogen acting on its receptor to improve the endothelial function. However, it has been suggested that ERT must not be used for coronary heart disease due to its adverse effects. However, some selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs can inhibit inflammatory response as well as oxidative stress, and improve the endothelial function, to reduce the occurrence of chest pain. Here, we hypothesize that SERMs may be the beneficial selection for patients with CSX.

  20. Distribution of estrogen and progesterone receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrabi Sh.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Epulides Fissurata (EF are common proliferative and denture- induced lesions of the oral cavity with a predilection for female. This suggests a possible role for sex steroid hormones in the development and progression of these lesions. Purpose: The objective of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of epulis fissuratum of the oral cavity for estrogen and progesterone receptors expression in epithelial, stromal, inflammatory and endothelial cells populations. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 15 samples of formalin- fixed, paraffin- embedded epulis fissuratums including marginal mucosal tissues in 4 cases as a control group, were immuno-histochemically evaluated for estrogen and progesterone receptors protein expression. Result: In 10 cases, estrogen receptor positivity was found within the epithelium and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity was present in 7 cases. Stromal cells exhibited estrogen and progesterone receptor immunostaining in many cases but only few cases showed expression of these receptors in the inflammatory and endothelial cells. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were also detected in some cases containing salivary glands tissue. Conclusion: Although chronic irritation may be the initiating factor for the occurence of epulis fissuratum, some of the cells in the lesion, could be potential targets for estrogen and progestrone hormones.

  1. The in vitro estrogenic activities of triclosan and triclocarban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongyu; Du, Guizhen; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jialei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2014-09-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), as broad spectrum antibacterial agents, are distributed widely in the environment and humans. Most studies have focused on their distribution and biodegradation, but the endocrine-disrupting effects of these chemicals, especially their estrogenic effects, are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the estrogenic effects of TCS and TCC using a series of in vitro assays, including the ER reporter gene assay in the CV-1 cells, E-screen assay and evaluation of estrogen-responsive genes in the MCF-7 cells. The tested concentrations of TCS and TCC were both from 1 × 10(-9) to 1 × 10(-6)  M. Results showed that TCS and TCC exerted estrogenic activities by inducing luciferase activities in an ER reporter gene assay, promoting the proliferation of the MCF-7 cells, up-regulating the expression of pS2 and down-regulating ERα expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in the MCF-7 cells. We further found that TCS and TCC could alter the expression of multiple microRNAs (mir-22, mir-206 and mir-193b) in the MCF-7 cells, which would help understand the mechanisms of their estrogenic effects on regulating the expression of ERα. In brief, our results demonstrated the potential estrogenic effects and profiled in vitro data for further risk assessment of TCS and TCC. PMID:24740835

  2. Combined effects of estrogenic chemicals with the same mode of action using an estrogen receptor binding bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2014-11-01

    The increasing amounts of various estrogenic chemicals coexisting in the aquatic environment may pose environmental risks. While the concept of estradiol equivalent (EEQ) has been frequently applied in studying estrogenic mixtures, few experiments have been done to prove its reliability. In this study, the reliability of EEQ and the related model concentration addition (CA) was verified based on the two-hybrid recombinant yeast bioassay when all mixture components had the same mode of action and target of action. Our results showed that the measured estrogenic effects could be well predicted by CA and EEQ for all laboratory-made mixtures using two designs, despite the varying estrogenic activity, concentration levels and ratios of the test chemicals. This suggests that when an appropriate endpoint and its relevant bioassay are chosen, CA should be valid and the application of EEQ in predicting the effect of non-equi-effect mixtures is feasible. PMID:25461542

  3. Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) and Estrogen Related Receptor α (ERRα) are both transcriptional regulators of the Runx2-I isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Martial; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Stauffer, Daniela; Delhon, Isabelle; Seltenmeyer, Yves; Fournier, Brigitte

    2013-04-30

    Runx2 is a master regulator of bone development and has also been described as an oncogene. Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) and Estrogen Related Receptor α (ERRα), both implicated in bone metabolism and breast cancer, have been shown to share common transcriptional targets. Here, we show that ERα is a positive regulator of Runx2-I transcription. Moreover, ERRα can act as a transcriptional activator of Runx2-I in presence of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α). In contrast, ERRα behaves as a negative regulator of Runx2-I transcription in presence of PGC-1β. ERα and ERRα cross-talk via a common estrogen receptor response element on the Runx2-I promoter. In addition, estrogen regulates PGC-1β that in turn is able to modulate both ERα and ERRα transcriptional activity.

  4. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  5. Secondary electron yield and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements on oxides, carbide, and nitride of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary electron yield measurements before and after Ar ion sputtercleaning were made on Nb and Nb compounds of interest for rf superconductingcavities. Total secondary electron yields (sigma) for primary energies 20--1500 eV were measured for solid Nb (sigma/sub max/ = 1.3 at 300 eV), anodized Nb2O5 (sigma/sub max/ = 1.2 at 300 eV), and powders of Nb(sigma/sub max/ = 1.0 at 400 eV), NbO (sigma/sub max/ = 0.9 at 400 eV), NbO2 (sigma/sub max/ = 1.0 at 400 eV), Nb2O5 (sigma/sub max/ = 0.95 at 400 eV), NbC(sigma/sub max/ = 0.8 at 400 eV), and NbN (sigma/sub max/ = 0.8 at 500 eV). Determinations were made for Auger elemental sensitivities, and the relationship between Auger peak heights and oxide stoichiometry is discussed. The sputter etch rate of anodized Nb2O5 was measured by depth profiling anodic coatings of known thickness

  6. Partial inhibition of estrogen-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats by tamoxifen: balance between oxidant stress and estrogen responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra Singh

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidences strongly support the role of estrogens in breast tumor development. Both estrogen receptor (ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms are implicated in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator is widely used as chemoprotectant in human breast cancer. It binds to ERs and interferes with normal binding of estrogen to ERs. In the present study, we examined the effect of long-term tamoxifen treatment in the prevention of estrogen-induced breast cancer. Female ACI rats were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2, tamoxifen or with a combination of E2 and tamoxifen for eight months. Tissue levels of oxidative stress markers 8-iso-Prostane F(2α (8-isoPGF(2α, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase, and oxidative DNA damage marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG were quantified in the mammary tissues of all the treatment groups and compared with age-matched controls. Levels of tamoxifen metabolizing enzymes cytochrome P450s as well as estrogen responsive genes were also quantified. At necropsy, breast tumors were detected in 44% of rats co-treated with tamoxifen+E2. No tumors were detected in the sham or tamoxifen only treatment groups whereas in the E2 only treatment group, the tumor incidence was 82%. Co-treatment with tamoxifen decreased GPx and catalase levels; did not completely inhibit E2-mediated oxidative DNA damage and estrogen-responsive genes monoamine oxygenase B1 (MaoB1 and cell death inducing DFF45 like effector C (Cidec but differentially affected the levels of tamoxifen metabolizing enzymes. In summary, our studies suggest that although tamoxifen treatment inhibits estrogen-induced breast tumor development and increases the latency of tumor development, it does not completely abrogate breast tumor development in a rat model of estrogen-induced breast cancer. The inability of tamoxifen to completely inhibit E2-induced breast

  7. Passive secondary biological treatment systems reduce estrogens in dairy shed effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Jennifer B; Northcott, Grant L; Tremblay, Louis A

    2010-10-01

    Steroid estrogens are found at high concentrations in untreated dairy shed effluents. Reduction of estrogenic activity and steroid estrogen concentrations was assessed in two systems used to treat dairy shed effluents: the two-pond system and the advanced pond system. Both include anaerobic and aerobic treatment stages. Samples of effluent were collected from the systems and analyzed for free estrogens, conjugated estrogens and total estrogenic activity using E-Screen assay. Both systems showed increases of up to 8000% in aqueous free estrogens and estrogenic activity after anaerobic treatment, followed by decreases after aerobic treatment (36-83%). The complete systems decreased total steroid estrogen concentrations by 50-100% and estrogen activity by 62-100%, with little difference between systems. Removal rates were lower in winter for both systems. Final effluents from the advanced pond system contained total estrogens at <15-1400 ng/L and estrogenic activity at 3.2-43 ng/L. Final effluent from the two-pond system contained total estrogens at <15-300 ng/L and estrogenic activity at 3.3-25 ng/L. At times the final effluent EEQs exceeded guideline values for protection of freshwater fish and suggest further treatment may be required.

  8. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended. PMID:27353134

  9. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  10. Estrogen withdrawal from osteoblasts and osteocytes causes increased mineralization and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M Á; Haugh, M G; O'Brien, F J; McNamara, L M

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated increased bone mineral heterogeneity following estrogen withdrawal in vivo. Such changes likely contribute to fracture risk during post-menopausal osteoporosis since tissue mineralization is correlated with bone strength and stiffness. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for increased mineral variability have not yet been distinguished. The objective of this study is to elucidate how alterations in mineral distribution are initiated during estrogen depletion. Specifically, we tested two separate hypotheses; (1) estrogen deficiency directly alters osteoblast mineralization and (2) estrogen deficiency increases bone cell apoptosis. Osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) and osteocyte-like cells (MLO-Y4) were pretreated with or without estrogen (17β-estradiol) for 14 days. Estrogen deficiency was subsequently induced by either withdrawing estrogen from cells or blocking estrogen receptors using an estrogen antagonist, fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). Cell number (Hoechst DNA), alkaline phosphatase activity (p-NPP), mineralization (alizarin red) and apoptosis (Caspase 3/7) were evaluated. Whether estrogen withdrawal altered apoptosis rates in the presence of an apoptosis promoting agent (etoposide) was also determined. Interestingly, estrogen withdrawal from cells accustomed to estrogen exposure caused significantly increased osteoblast mineralization and osteocyte apoptosis compared with continued estrogen treatment. In contrast, blocking estrogen receptors with fulvestrant abrogated the mineralization induced by estrogen treatment. When apoptosis was induced using etoposide, cells undergoing estrogen withdrawal increased apoptosis compared to cells with continued estrogen treatment. Recognizing the underlying mechanisms regulating bone cell mineralization and apoptosis during estrogen deficiency and their consequences is necessary to further our knowledge of osteoporosis.

  11. Estrogen withdrawal from osteoblasts and osteocytes causes increased mineralization and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M Á; Haugh, M G; O'Brien, F J; McNamara, L M

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated increased bone mineral heterogeneity following estrogen withdrawal in vivo. Such changes likely contribute to fracture risk during post-menopausal osteoporosis since tissue mineralization is correlated with bone strength and stiffness. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for increased mineral variability have not yet been distinguished. The objective of this study is to elucidate how alterations in mineral distribution are initiated during estrogen depletion. Specifically, we tested two separate hypotheses; (1) estrogen deficiency directly alters osteoblast mineralization and (2) estrogen deficiency increases bone cell apoptosis. Osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) and osteocyte-like cells (MLO-Y4) were pretreated with or without estrogen (17β-estradiol) for 14 days. Estrogen deficiency was subsequently induced by either withdrawing estrogen from cells or blocking estrogen receptors using an estrogen antagonist, fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). Cell number (Hoechst DNA), alkaline phosphatase activity (p-NPP), mineralization (alizarin red) and apoptosis (Caspase 3/7) were evaluated. Whether estrogen withdrawal altered apoptosis rates in the presence of an apoptosis promoting agent (etoposide) was also determined. Interestingly, estrogen withdrawal from cells accustomed to estrogen exposure caused significantly increased osteoblast mineralization and osteocyte apoptosis compared with continued estrogen treatment. In contrast, blocking estrogen receptors with fulvestrant abrogated the mineralization induced by estrogen treatment. When apoptosis was induced using etoposide, cells undergoing estrogen withdrawal increased apoptosis compared to cells with continued estrogen treatment. Recognizing the underlying mechanisms regulating bone cell mineralization and apoptosis during estrogen deficiency and their consequences is necessary to further our knowledge of osteoporosis. PMID:24446157

  12. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stisova, Viktorie [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire CNRS, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Davidkova, Marie, E-mail: davidkova@ujf.cas.c [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERalpha, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with gamma rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  13. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic influences in cultured brown trout hepatocytes: Focus on the expression of some estrogen and peroxisomal related genes and linked phenotypic anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira; Malhão, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Ivone; Lopes, Célia; Ferreira, Nádia; Urbatzka, Ralph; Castro, L Filipe C; Rocha, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Estrogens, estrogenic mimics and anti-estrogenic compounds are known to target estrogen receptors (ER) that can modulate other nuclear receptor signaling pathways, such as those controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and alter organelle (inc. peroxisome) morphodynamics. By using primary isolated brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) hepatocytes after 72 and 96h of exposure we evaluated some effects in selected molecular targets and in peroxisomal morphological features caused by: (1) an ER agonist (ethinylestradiol-EE2) at 1, 10 and 50μM; (2) an ER antagonist (ICI 182,780) at 10 and 50μM; and (3) mixtures of both (Mix I-10μM EE2 and 50μM ICI; Mix II-1μM EE2 and 10μM ICI and Mix III-1μM EE2 and 50μM ICI). The mRNA levels of the estrogenic targets (ERα, ERβ-1 and vitellogenin A-VtgA) and the peroxisome structure/function related genes (catalase, urate oxidase-Uox, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4-17β-HSD4, peroxin 11α-Pex11α and PPARα) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stereology combined with catalase immunofluorescence revealed a significant reduction in peroxisome volume densities at 50μM of EE2 exposure. Concomitantly, at the same concentration, electron microscopy showed smaller peroxisome profiles, exacerbated proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a generalized cytoplasmic vacuolization of hepatocytes. Catalase and Uox mRNA levels decreased in all estrogenic stimuli conditions. VtgA and ERα mRNA increased after all EE2 treatments, while ERβ-1 had an inverse pattern. The EE2 action was reversed by ICI 182,780 in a concentration-dependent manner, for VtgA, ERα and Uox. Overall, our data show the great value of primary brown trout hepatocytes to study the effects of estrogenic/anti-estrogenic inputs in peroxisome kinetics and in ER and PPARα signaling, backing the still open hypothesis of crosstalk interactions between these pathways and calling for more mechanistic

  14. No substantial changes in estrogen receptor and estrogen-related receptor orthologue gene transcription in Marisa cornuarietis exposed to estrogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Richard; Beresford, Nicola; Granger, David W; Pounds, Nadine A; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; White, Roger; Jobling, Susan; Routledge, Edwin J

    2013-09-15

    Estrogen receptor orthologues in molluscs may be targets for endocrine disruptors, although mechanistic evidence is lacking. Molluscs are reported to be highly susceptible to effects caused by very low concentrations of environmental estrogens which, if substantiated, would have a major impact on the risk assessment of many chemicals. The present paper describes the most thorough evaluation to-date of the susceptibility of Marisa cornuarietis ER and ERR gene transcription to modulation by vertebrate estrogens in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the effects of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol exposure on in vivo estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen-related receptor (ERR) gene transcription in the reproductive and neural tissues of the gastropod snail M. cornuarietis over a 12-week period. There was no significant effect (p>0.05) of treatment on gene transcription levels between exposed and non-exposed snails. Absence of a direct interaction of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol with mollusc ER and ERR protein was also supported by in vitro studies in transfected HEK-293 cells. Additional in vitro studies with a selection of other potential ligands (including methyl-testosterone, 17α-ethinylestradiol, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, diethylstilbestrol, cyproterone acetate and ICI182780) showed no interaction when tested using this assay. In repeated in vitro tests, however, genistein (with mcER-like) and bisphenol-A (with mcERR) increased reporter gene expression at high concentrations only (>10(-6)M for Gen and >10(-5)M for BPA, respectively). Like vertebrate estrogen receptors, the mollusc ER protein bound to the consensus vertebrate estrogen-response element (ERE). Together, these data provide no substantial evidence that mcER-like and mcERR activation and transcript levels in tissues are modulated by the vertebrate estrogen estradiol-17β or 4-tert-Octylphenol in vivo, or that other ligands of vertebrate ERs and ERRs (with the possible exception of genistein and

  15. E-Cigarettes Emit Toxic Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160107.html E-Cigarettes Emit Toxic Vapors: Study Levels depend on ... findings could be important to both makers of e-cigarettes and regulators who want to reduce the ...

  16. Radiation-emitting Electronic Product Codes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains product names and associated information developed by the Center for all products, both medical and non-medical, which emit radiation. It...

  17. Radiation Emitting Product Corrective Actions and Recalls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database provides descriptions of radiation-emitting products that have been recalled under an approved corrective action plan to remove defective and...

  18. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure and inter......This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...

  19. VASCULAR AGING IN WOMEN: IS ESTROGEN THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana eNovella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a physiological process associated with structural and functional changes in vasculature, including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and remodeling, impaired angiogenesis, and defective vascular repair, and with an increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis. The risk of cardiovascular disease differs between men and women, remaining lower in women during their fertile years and reaching values similar to their male peers after menopause. Menopause is marked by the loss of endogenous estrogen production. Therefore, estrogens have been implicated in premenopausal protection from cardiovascular disease, an assumption supported by experimental and some clinical studies, where estrogen induces protective effects in vascular endothelium. Indeed, estradiol promotes endothelial vasodilator synthesis, including NO production through increased expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and modulates prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 release; the thromboxane A2 pathway plays a key role in regulating vascular tone in females in both normal and in pathophysiologic states.Contrary to experimental results, some clinical trials found no cardiovascular benefit from estrogen replacement therapy in aged postmenopausal women. These discrepancies could be due to the Timing Hypothesis which suggests that estrogen-mediated vascular benefits may occur only before the detrimental effects of aging are established in the vasculature. Thus, there is still a gap in the knowledge, understanding, and general awareness of mechanisms for cardiovascular aging in women.In this review, we discuss clinical and experimental data on the effects of aging, estrogens and hormonal replacement therapy on vascular function of females to delve into how menopause and aging contribute jointly to vascular aging and how estrogen modulates the vascular responses at different ages.

  20. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S; Asare, B K; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanan, R V

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide "I-box" derived from ER residues 503-518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479-485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497-506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511-520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497-506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27462021

  1. Temperature dependence of estrogen binding: importance of a subzone in the ligand binding domain of a novel piscine estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, N S; Frecer, V; Lam, T J; Ding, J L

    1999-11-11

    The full length estrogen receptor from Oreochromis aureus (OaER) was cloned and expressed in vitro and in vivo as a functional transcription factor. Amino acid residues involved in the thermal stability of the receptor are located at/near subzones beta1 and beta3, which are highly conserved in other non-piscine species but not in OaER. Hormone binding studies, however, indicate that OaER is thermally stable but exhibited a approximately 3-fold reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperatures. Transfection of OaER into various cell lines cultured at different temperatures displayed a significant estrogen dose-response shift compared with that of chicken ER (cER). At 37 degrees C, OaER requires approximately 80-fold more estrogen to achieve half-maximal stimulation of CAT. Lowering of the incubation temperature from 37 degrees C to 25 degrees C or 20 degrees C resulted in a 4-fold increase in its affinity for estrogen. The thermally deficient transactivation of OaER at temperatures above 25 degrees C was fully prevented by high levels of estrogen. Thus, compared to cER, the OaER exhibits reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperature as reflected in its deficient transactivation capability. Amino acid replacements of OaER beta3 subzones with corresponding amino acids from cER could partially rescue this temperature sensitivity. The three-dimensional structure of the OaER ligand binding domain (LBD) was modelled based on conformational similarity and sequence homology with human RXRalpha apo, RARgamma holo and ERalpha LBDs. Unliganded and 17beta-estradiol-liganded OaER LBD retained the overall folding pattern of the nuclear receptor LBDs. The residues at/near the subzone beta3 of the LBD constitute the central core of OaER structure. Thus, amino acid alteration at this region potentially alters the structure and consequently its temperature-dependent ligand binding properties. PMID:10559464

  2. Inhibition of estrogen biosynthesis enhances lymphoma growth in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaber, Gergely; Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Guan, Jiyu; Inzunza, Jose; Okret, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Most lymphomas show higher incidence and poorer prognosis in males compared to females. However, the endocrine contribution to this gender difference is not entirely known. Here we show that castration accelerates lymphoma growth in C57BL6 male mice grafted with murine EG7 T cell lymphoma cells. However, the androgen receptor antagonist Bicalutamide did not affect lymphoma growth, suggesting no impact of androgen receptor signaling on lymphoma progression. In contrast, inhibition of androgen-to-estrogen conversion by the aromatase inhibitor (AI) Letrozole induced faster lymphoma growth in mice, suggesting that androgens impact lymphoma growth through its conversion to estrogens. This was supported by the inability of dihydrotestosterone, which is not converted to estrogens by aromatase, to influence lymphoma growth in castrated male mice. Lymphoma growth was also stimulated in immunocompromised mice grafted with human B cell lymphoma (Granta-519) and treated with either reversible or irreversible AIs, showing that the blockage of estrogen synthesis caused enhanced growth of both murine T and human B cell lymphomas and with different AIs. Additionally, AI-treated EG7 lymphomas showed accelerated growth not only in male but also in intact female mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that aromatase inhibition accelerates lymphoma growth but not androgens per se, highlighting a protective role of estrogens in lymphoma pathogenesis. These results also raise concern that the use of AIs in women with breast cancer might enhance lymphoma progression. PMID:26943574

  3. Immunohistochemical Expression of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Seyedmajidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epulis Fissuratum (Epulis Fissuratum (EF or Denture Epulis or inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is a common hyperplastic tumor-like lesion with reactive nature, related to loose and ill-fitting, full or partial removable dentures and it is more common in women than men. For this reason, hormonal influences may also play role in its creation. The effect of steroid hormones especially sex hormones (Estrogen and progesterone on oral mucosa is identified in some studies. In the present study, the distribution pattern and presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells in Epulis Fissuratum was investigated. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 30 samples of paraffin blocks with Epulis Fissuratum diagnosis and 30 samples of normal mucosal tissues as a control group who have had surgery as a margin beside the above lesions and had been obtained from the oral and maxillofacial pathology departement of Babol Dental School since 2003 up to 2010. Intensity of staining and immunoreactivity were evaluated using subjective index and considering the positive control group (breast carcinoma.Results: Epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells didn’t show reaction with monoclonal antibodies against estrogen and progesterone in none of the samples. Conclusion: It seems that the hypothesis of the existence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epulis fissuratum and normal oral mucosa is ruled out. The possibility of direct effect of estrogen and progesterone in occurring of epulis fissuratum is rejected.

  4. Destruction of estrogenic activity in water using UV advanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeldt, Erik J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Chen, P.J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Kullman, Seth [Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Linden, Karl G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Box 90287, 121 Hudson Hall Engineering Building, Durham, NC 27708-0287 (United States)]. E-mail: kglinden@duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    The transformation of the steroidal Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) and 17-{alpha}-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) by direct UV photolysis and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} advanced oxidation was studied from the perspective of the removal of estrogenic activity associated with the compounds. First, experiments were performed to link the oxidation of E2 and EE2 with subsequent reduction in estrogenic activity. No statistically significant difference between removal rates was observed, implying that the oxidation products of E2 and EE2 are not as estrogenic (measured by the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES)) as the parent compounds. Utilizing the YES, 90% removal of estrogenic activity of E2 and EE2 at environmentally relevant concentrations ({approx} 3 {mu}g L{sup -1}) was achieved using a combination of 5 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a UV fluence of less than 350 mJ cm{sup -2}. Thus, these compounds, when considered at environmentally relevant levels, are significantly degraded at much lower UV fluences than previously thought. A steady state OH radical model was used to predict oxidation of EE2 in laboratory and natural waters.

  5. The estrogenic and androgenic potential of pyrethroids in vitro. Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillenfait, Anne-Marie; Ndiaye, Dieynaba; Sabaté, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids are used worldwide as insecticides. Their metabolites are regularly detected in the urine of adults and children from the general population. There is increasing concern that they may induce sex-hormone disrupting effects. The present work reviews available published information on the (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic activity of pyrethroids in in vitro screening tests. In recent years, a large number of pyrethroids have been evaluated using various common testing methods. In tests using recombinant yeast or mammalian cells, the pyrethroids were found to be essentially negative or weakly estrogenic. More inconsistent results were found regarding their estrogenic action in proliferation tests. Conflicting findings were also reported across studies and/or assays which evaluated their anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic potential. Some studies have suggested that certain pyrethroids may have potential antagonist activity. However, no strong interaction with the estrogenic or androgenic pathway was reported. The present review confirms the interest in performing a screening battery and in adopting an integrative approach for identifying the potential of different compounds from a chemical family to interfere with the endocrine system. PMID:26921664

  6. Tissue Specific Effects of Loss of Estrogen During Menopause and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korinna eWend

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The roles of estrogens have been best studied in the breast, breast cancers and in the female reproductive tract. However, estrogens have important functions in almost every tissue in the body. Recent clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative have highlighted both the importance of estrogens and how little we know about the molecular mechanism of estrogens in these other tissues. In this review, we illustrate the diverse functions of estrogens in the bone, adipose tissue, skin, hair, brain, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular system, and how the loss of estrogens during aging affects these tissues. Early transcriptional targets of estrogen are reviewed in each tissue. We also describe the tissue-specific effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs used for the treatment of breast cancers and post-menopausal symptoms.

  7. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  8. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N;

    1995-01-01

    :Pi ratio in the two estrogen-dependent xenografts, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the estrogen-independent tumors. In ZR75/LCC-3 tumors a slight decrease in nucleoside triphosphate:Pi was observed following onset of estrogen stimulation after initial growth without estrogen. Extracts of freeze......The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After...... Gompertzian growth was verified, the estrogen pellet was removed from half of the animals. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the tumors was performed 1 day before and on days 2, 6, and 14 after estrogen removal. Estrogen withdrawal induced a significant increase in the nucleoside triphosphate...

  9. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  10. Serum estrogen receptor bioactivity and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Vanessa W; Li, Jun; Gong, Yinhan; Jin, Aizhen; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yong, Eu Leong; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen levels of Asian women are different from those of Western women, and this could affect estrogen receptor (ER) bioactivity and breast cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study of 169 postmenopausal breast cancer cases and 426 matched controls nested within a population-based prospective cohort, The Singapore Chinese Health Study, to evaluate serum levels of estrogens and their receptor (ERα and ERβ)-mediated estrogenic activities in relation to breast cancer risk. Breast canc...

  11. Nuclear factor RIP140 modulates transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaillès, V; Dauvois, S; L'Horset, F; Lopez, G; Hoare, S.; Kushner, P J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    A conserved region in the hormone-dependent activation domain AF2 of nuclear receptors plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We have characterized a novel nuclear protein, RIP140, that specifically interacts in vitro with this domain of the estrogen receptor. This interaction was increased by estrogen, but not by anti-estrogens and the in vitro binding capacity of mutant receptors correlates with their ability to stimulate transcription. RIP140 also interacts with estrogen re...

  12. Advances of Targeted Therapy Based on Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathway 
in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Liqiang; Liao, Yongde; Hexiao TANG; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Zhaoguo

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that estrogen promotes tumor growth in both estrogen target organs and non-target organs. Estrogen regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via two different receptors, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ). In recent decades, with the clarification of the ERα-mediated signaling pathways in breast cancer, targeted therapy through these pathways have successfully been used in clinical application. Tamoxifen, the classic representative, is a selective es...

  13. In vivo relevance of in vitro detected estrogenic effects of food associated compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Veld, ter, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to study the in vivo relevance of in vitro detected estrogenic effects of food associated compounds, with emphasis on prenatal exposure. The estrogenic potency of 21 food packaging-associated compounds was studied in ERα or ERβ transfected U2-OS (human osteoblasts devoid of endogenous estrogen receptors) cell lines. Six plasticizers and three anti-oxidants were slightly estrogenic in the ERα cells. BPA, NP, tris (2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate (TEHTM), propyl gal...

  14. Estrogens induce expression of membrane-associated estrogen receptor α isoforms in lactotropes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zárate

    Full Text Available Estrogens are key to anterior pituitary function, stimulating hormone release and controlling cell fate to achieve pituitary dynamic adaptation to changing physiological conditions. In addition to their classical mechanism of action through intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs, estrogens exert rapid actions via cell membrane-localized ERs (mERs. We previously showed that E2 exerts a rapid pro-apoptotic action in anterior pituitary cells, especially in lactotropes and somatotropes, through activation of mERs. In the present study, we examined the involvement of mERα in the rapid pro-apoptotic action of estradiol by TUNEL in primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized rats using a cell-impermeable E2 conjugate (E2-BSA and an ERα selective antagonist (MPP dihydrochloride. We studied mERα expression during the estrous cycle and its regulation by gonadal steroids in vivo by flow cytometry. We identified ERα variants in the plasma membrane of anterior pituitary cells during the estrous cycle and studied E2 regulation of these mERα variants in vitro by surface biotinylation and Western Blot. E2-BSA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by MPP in total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes. In cycling rats, we detected a higher number of lactotropes and a lower number of somatotropes expressing mERα at proestrus than at diestrus. Acute E2 treatment increased the percentage of mERα-expressing lactotropes whereas it decreased the percentage of mERα-expressing somatotropes. We detected three mERα isoforms of 66, 39 and 22 kDa. Expression of mERα66 and mERα39 was higher at proestrus than at diestrus, and short-term E2 incubation increased expression of these two mERα variants. Our results indicate that the rapid apoptotic action exerted by E2 in lactotropes depends on mERα, probably full-length ERα and/or a 39 kDa ERα variant. Expression and activation of mERα variants in lactotropes could be one of the mechanisms through

  15. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, H H; Windahl, S H; Westberg, L; Isaksson, H; Egecioglu, E; Schele, E; Ryberg, H; Jansson, J O; Tuukkanen, J; Koskela, A; Xie, S K; Hahner, L; Zehr, J; Clegg, D J; Lagerquist, M K; Ohlsson, C

    2016-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα(-/-)). Female POMC-ERα(-/-) and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα(-/-) mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice.

  16. Weak estrogenic transcriptional activities of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignard, Elise; Lapenna, Silvia; Bremer, Susanne

    2012-08-01

    In 2011, the European Commission has restricted the use of Bisphenol A in plastic infant feeding bottles. In a response to this restriction, Bisphenol S is now often used as a component of plastic substitutes for the production of babybottles. One of the major concerns leading to the restriction of Bisphenol A was its weak estrogenic activity. By using two highly standardised transactivation assays, we could demonstrate that the estrogenic activity of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S is of a comparable potency. Furthermore, some insights about the structure-activity relationships of these two chemicals and their metabolites could be gained from in silico predictions of their relative estrogen receptor-binding affinities and their liver phase-I biotransformation.

  17. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D. Eaton

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy.

  18. Bisphenol A in dental sealants and its estrogen like effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A or BPA-based epoxy resins are widely used in the manufacture of commercial products, including dental resins, polycarbonate plastics, and the inner coating of food cans. BPA is a precursor to the resin monomer Bis-GMA. During the manufacturing process of Bis-GMA dental sealants, Bisphenol A (BPA might be present as an impurity or as a degradation product of Bis-DMA through esterases present in saliva. Leaching of these monomers from resins can occur during the initial setting period and in conjunction with fluid sorption and desorption over time and this chemical leach from dental sealants may be bioactive. Researchers found an estrogenic effect with BPA, Bis-DMA, and Bis-GMA because BPA lacks structural specificity as a natural ligand to the estrogen receptor. It generated considerable concern regarding the safety of dental resin materials. This review focuses on the BPA in dental sealants and its estrogen-like effect.

  19. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Christina S., E-mail: cbaik2@u.washington.edu; Eaton, Keith D. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2012-09-25

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy.

  20. Estrogen bioactivity in fo-ti and other herbs used for their estrogen-like effects as determined by a recombinant cell bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerter Klein, Karen; Janfaza, Mona; Wong, Jeffrey A; Chang, R Jeffrey

    2003-09-01

    One of the most important issues in women's health concerns the risks and benefits of estrogen replacement therapy. Continual uncertainty and lack of consensus regarding estrogen replacement therapy has driven many women to seek alternative sources of estrogen, including herbal remedies. We adapted a recombinant cell bioassay to measure estrogen bioactivity in herbs. We studied, in vitro, estrogen bioactivity in red clover, dong quai, black cohosh, soy, licorice, chaste tree berry, fo-ti, and hops. Soy, clover, licorice, and hops have a large amount of measurable estrogen bioactivity, as suspected, based on previous reports using other methods. We discovered surprisingly high estrogen activity in extracts of fo-ti not previously reported. Chaste tree berry, black cohosh, and dong quai did not have measurable activity with this method. We also discovered that removal of a glycone group from soy increases its estrogen bioactivity significantly. We conclude that this recombinant cell bioassay for estradiol can be used to measure bioactivity in herbal products. The preparations of fo-ti studied had estrogen activity of 409 +/- 55 pmol/liter estradiol equivalents per microgram of herb, which is 1/300 the activity of 17 beta-estradiol. Clinical studies are underway to determine the estrogen bioactivity in women using dietary supplements containing these herbs. PMID:12970265

  1. Role of estrogen receptors (ERs and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER in regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-testis axis and spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eChimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproductive function is under the control of both gonadotropins and androgens through a negative feedback loop that involves the hypothalamus, pituitary and testis known as hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG. Indeed, also estrogens play an important role in regulating HPG axis but the relative contribution to the inhibition of gonadotropins secretion exerted by the amount of estrogens produced within the hypothalamus and/or the pituitary or by the amount of circulating estrogens are still ongoing. Moreover, it is known that maintenance of spermatogenesis is controlled by gonadotrophins and testosterone, the effects of which are modulated by a complex network of locally produced factors, including estrogens. Physiological effects of estrogens are mediated by the classical nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1 and estrogen receptor beta (ESR2, which mediate both genomic and rapid signaling events. In addition, estrogens induce rapid non-genomic responses through a membrane-associated G protein-coupled receptor (GPER. Ours and other studies reported that, in the testis, GPER is expressed in both normal germ cells and somatic cells and it is involved in mediating the estrogen action in spermatogenesis controlling proliferative and/or apoptotic events. Interestingly, GPER expression has been revealed also in hypothalamus and in pituitary. However, its role in mediating estrogen rapid actions in this context is under investigation. Recent studies indicate that GPER is involved in modulating GnRH release as well as gonadotropins secretion. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of estrogen/estrogen receptors (ERs molecular pathways in regulating GnRH, FSH and LH release at hypothalamic and pituitary level in male as well as in controlling specific testicular functions such as spermatogenesis, focusing our attention mainly on estrogen signaling mediated by GPER.

  2. Improved Quantum Efficiency of Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Gradiently Doped Double Emitting Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文宝; 姜文龙; 孙家鑫; 冯晶; 侯晶莹; 刘式墉

    2003-01-01

    We investigate electroluminescent characteristics of gradiently doped organic light-emitting diodes, which were gradiently doped in both the hole and the electron-transporting layer to form a double emitting zone. The device structure was ITO/(15nm) CuPc/(60nm)NPB:rubrene/(30nm)Alqs:rubrene/(20nm)Alqs/(0.5nm)LiF/Al. We observed that charge carriers were well trapped by the dopant molecules and the main emitting zone was localized at the NPB:rubrene side close to the interface of NPB:rubrene/Alqs:rubrene. The quantum efficiency (cd/A) was enhanced to 5.89 cd/A at 6 V. We attributed this improvement to the charge carriers trapping and the emitting of the double emitting zone.

  3. Aromatase, estrogen receptors and brain development in fish and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Adrio, Fátima; Diotel, Nicolas; Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Nasri, Ahmed; Vaillant, Colette; Kah, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Estrogens affect brain development of vertebrates, not only by impacting activity and morphology of existing circuits, but also by modulating embryonic and adult neurogenesis. The issue is complex as estrogens can not only originate from peripheral tissues, but also be locally produced within the brain itself due to local aromatization of androgens. In this respect, teleost fishes are quite unique because aromatase is expressed exclusively in radial glial cells, which represent pluripotent cells in the brain of all vertebrates. Expression of aromatase in the brain of fish is also strongly stimulated by estrogens and some androgens. This creates a very intriguing positive auto-regulatory loop leading to dramatic aromatase expression in sexually mature fish with elevated levels of circulating steroids. Looking at the effects of estrogens or anti-estrogens in the brain of adult zebrafish showed that estrogens inhibit rather than stimulate cell proliferation and newborn cell migration. The functional meaning of these observations is still unclear, but these data suggest that the brain of fish is experiencing constant remodeling under the influence of circulating steroids and brain-derived neurosteroids, possibly permitting a diversification of sexual strategies, notably hermaphroditism. Recent data in frogs indicate that aromatase expression is limited to neurons and do not concern radial glial cells. Thus, until now, there is no other example of vertebrates in which radial progenitors express aromatase. This raises the question of when and why these new features were gained and what are their adaptive benefits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  4. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  5. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  6. Gene expression changes in rat prostate after activation or blocking of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Dalgaard, Majken; Holst, Bjørn;

    2005-01-01

    and the anti-estrogen, ICI 182780, only affected ODC expression. Therefore, estrogenic or anti-estrogenic compounds would not be expected to seriously affect the outcome of a Hershberger test. However, EB given alone to castrated rats resulted in various effects. EB increased seminal vesicle weight, an effect...

  7. Bone marrow oxytocin mediates the anabolic action of estrogen on the skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen withdrawal in women due to natural or artificial menopause is followed by rapid bone loss, osteoporosis, and a high fracture risk. Replacement with estrogen prevents this bone loss and reduces the risk of fracture. Estrogen uses two mechanisms to exert this effect: it inhibits bone resorpti...

  8. The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D;

    2008-01-01

    . We undertook these challenges by using an established clinical paradigm, the estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia, as the criterion to select candidates among the numerous genes experimentally implicated in schizophrenia. Bioinformatic tools were used to build and priorities the signaling networks...... implicated by the candidate genes resulting from the estrogen selection. We identified ten candidate genes using this approach that are all active in glucose metabolism and particularly in the glycolysis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that variants of the glycolytic genes are associated with schizophrenia...

  9. Androgens and estrogens in postmenopausal insulin-treated diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H; Djursing, H; Hagen, C;

    1989-01-01

    Diabetic women may have an increased risk of developing endometrial carcinoma. Ovarian and adrenal activity seem to be factors in the genesis of this cancer. We have measured serum sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free and bound fractions of estrogens and androgens, and gonadotropins in 20...... levels were similar in the two groups, while serum PRL was significantly lower in the diabetic group (P less than 0.02). The hormonal changes in the diabetics were not related to control of the diabetes. We conclude that total estrogen levels are increased in postmenopausal women with insulin...

  10. A helminth cestode parasite express an estrogen-binding protein resembling a classic nuclear estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth Guadalupe; Escobedo, Galileo; Nava-Castro, Karen; Jesús Ramses, Chávez-Rios; Hernández-Bello, Romel; García-Varela, Martìn; Ambrosio, Javier R; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Fonseca-Liñán, Rocío; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Pavón, Lenin; Hernández, María Eugenia; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The role of an estrogen-binding protein similar to a known mammalian estrogen receptor (ER) is described in the estradiol-dependent reproduction of the helminth parasite Taenia crassiceps. Previous results have shown that 17-β-estradiol induces a concentration-dependent increase in bud number of in vitro cultured cysticerci. This effect is inhibited when parasites are also incubated in the presence of an ER binding-inhibitor (tamoxifen). RT-PCR assays using specific oligonucleotides of the most conserved ER sequences, showed expression by the parasite of a mRNA band of molecular weight and sequence corresponding to an ER. Western blot assays revealed reactivity with a 66 kDa protein corresponding to the parasite ER protein. Tamoxifen treatment strongly reduced the production of the T. crassiceps ER-like protein. Antibody specificity was demonstrated by immunoprecipitating the total parasite protein extract with anti-ER-antibodies. Cross-contamination by host cells was discarded by flow cytometry analysis. ER was specifically detected on cells expressing paramyosin, a specific helminth cell marker. Parasite cells expressing the ER-like protein were located by confocal microscopy in the subtegumental tissue exclusively. Analysis of the ER-like protein by bidimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot identified a specific protein of molecular weight and isoelectric point similar to a vertebrates ER. Sequencing of the spot produced a small fragment of protein similar to the mammalian nuclear ER. Together these results show that T. crassiceps expresses an ER-like protein which activates the budding of T. crassiceps cysticerci in vitro. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an ER-like protein in parasites. This finding may have strong implications in the fields of host-parasite co-evolution as well as in sex-associated susceptibility to this infection, and could be an important target for the design of new drugs.

  11. Estrogen and Estrogen Receptor-α-Mediated Transrepression of Bile Salt Export Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Vasilenko, Alex; Song, Xiulong; Valanejad, Leila; Verma, Ruchi; You, Sangmin; Yan, Bingfang; Shiffka, Stephanie; Hargreaves, Leeza; Nadolny, Christina; Deng, Ruitang

    2015-04-01

    Among diseases unique to pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is the most prevalent disorder with elevated serum bile acid levels. We have previously shown that estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) transrepresses bile salt export pump (BSEP) through an interaction between estrogen receptor (ER)-α and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transrepression of BSEP by E2/ERα is an etiological contributing factor to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Currently the mechanistic insights into such transrepression are not fully understood. In this study, the dynamics of coregulator recruitment to BSEP promoter after FXR activation and E2 treatment were established with quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 was predominantly recruited to the BSEP promoter upon FXR activation, and its recruitment was decreased by E2 treatment. Meanwhile, recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor was markedly increased upon E2 treatment. Functional evaluation of ERα and ERβ chimeras revealed that domains AC of ERα are the determinants for ERα-specific transrepression on BSEP. Further studies with various truncated ERα proteins identified the domains in ERα responsible for ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transrepression. Truncated ERα-AD exhibited potent ligand-independent transrepressive activity, whereas ERα-CF was fully capable of transrepressing BSEP ligand dependently in vitro in Huh 7 cells and in vivo in mice. Both ERα-AD and ERα-CF proteins were associated with FXR in the coimmunoprecipitation assays. In conclusion, E2 repressed BSEP expression through diminishing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 recruitment with a concurrent increase in nuclear receptor corepressor recruitment to the BSEP promoter. Domains AD and CF in ERα mediated ligand-independent and ligand-dependent transrepression on BSEP, respectively, through interacting with FXR. PMID:25675114

  12. Immunolocalization of aromatase, estrogen and estrogen receptor α and β in the epithelium of digestive tract and enteric neurons of amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yongqiang; WENG Youzhu; YE Rongzhong; LIU Lili

    2005-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of aromatase, estrogen and estrogen receptor in the digestive tract and enteric neurons of amphioxus is investigated. It was found that immunoreactive proteins of aromatase, estrogen and ER-α and β are expressed in hepatic diverticulum, epithelial cells of anterior and posterior region of midgut, as well as in enteric neurons, while hindgut showed immunonegative. The results suggest that digestive tract of amphioxus may be able to synthesize estrogen and possess endocrine function, like rat gastric epithelium and enteric neurons in mammals. The present study provides authentic morphological evidence for explaining the action mechanism of estrogen in regulating the digestive function of gut and the functional evolution of estrogen, which has important theoretical significance in amphioxus.

  13. Identification and quantification of estrogenic compounds in recycled and virgin paper for household use as determined by an in vitro yeast estrogen screen and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Körner, Wolfgang; Lund, Kirsten H.;

    2000-01-01

    The use of recycled paper for the manufacture of food contact materials is widespread, but very little is known about the presence of potential contaminants in the paper. The purpose of this study was to assess the worst-case migration of estrogenic active compounds using extracts of paper...... for household use. Twenty different brands of kitchen rolls, nine of which were made from recycled paper and the remainder from virgin paper, were obtained from retail shops. Paper extracts were subjected to (a) determination of the total estrogenic activity by using an in vitro estrogen screen based on yeast...... cells stably transfected with the human estrogen receptor alpha and (b) chemical analysis and quantification by GC/MS, GC/FTIR/MS, and GC/FID for detection of a variety of estrogenic compounds. A marked estrogenic response was observed in nine of the extracts, seven of which were made from recycled...

  14. The Expression of Estrogen Receptor is Dependent on the Estrogen Level and Associated with Cholesterol-Rich Diet in Female Rat's Heart and Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴赛珠; 刘建国; 周可祥; 刘长青; 马瑞; 孙飞; 隗和明

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of estrogen level and cholesterol - rich diet on the ex-pression of estrogen receptor (ER) in cardiovasculartissues including vascular endothelial cells (VEC) offemale rats. Methods The receptor binding assay(RBA) was adopted to measure the estrogen receptorlevel in aortic wall, heart and vascular endothelialcells of female rats on a cholesterol- rich diet. A ra-dioimmunoassay was employed to measure the level ofserum estradiol. Results The number of ER signif-icantly decreased in hearts, aorta and vascular en-dothelial cells in the ovariectomized rats and the ratson a cholesterol- rich diet. In contrast, the adminis-tration of estrogen somewhat restored the expression ofER. Conclusions For female rats, the level of es-trogen affects the expression of ER in cardiovascularsystem. The number of ER decreases along with thedecrease in the level of estrogen. A cholesterol -richdiet also can decrease the expression of ER in cardio-vascular system of female rats.

  15. Estrogen and its signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruitong Xu; Yongqian Shu

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world. It is a highly lethal disease in women and men, and new treatments are urgently needed. Several studies have implicated a role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in lung cancer progression. This review will investigate the biological significance of estrogens in lung cancer cells, the expression and molecular mechanisms of estrogen receptors(ER α and ER β, elucidate the prognostic significance of estrogens and their receptors in lung carcinomas and provide new options for patients afflicted with lung malignancies.

  16. Aroma chemical emitted from Gerris paludum insularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Toshirou; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2004-06-01

    An aroma chemical emitted from Gerris paludum insularis was analyzed by means of GC and GC-MS. The main constituent was identified as iso amyl alcohol (3-methyl-1-butanol). The chemical showed a characteristic aroma of Gerris paludum insularis.

  17. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general…

  18. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  19. Hops (Humulus lupulus) inhibits Oxidative Estrogen Metabolism and Estrogen-Induced Malignant Transformation in Human Mammary Epithelial cells (MCF-10A)

    OpenAIRE

    Madhubhani, L.P.; Hemachandra, P.; Esala, R.; Chandrasena, P.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Main", "Matthew; Lankin, David C.; Scism, Robert A; Dietz, Birgit M.; Pauli, Guido F.; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term exposure to estrogens including those in traditional hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of developing hormone-dependent cancers. As a result, women are turning to over-the-counter (OTC) botanical dietary supplements such as black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) and hops (Humulus lupulus) as natural alternatives to HRT. The two major mechanisms which likely contribute to estrogen and/or HRT cancer risk are: the estrogen receptor (ER) mediated hormonal pathway; and, the...

  20. Effects of environmental and natural estrogens on vitellogenin production in hepatocytes of the brown frog (Rana temporaria)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouhani Rankouhi, T.; Sanderson, J.T.; Holsteijn, van I.; Kooten, van P.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Berg, van den M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of the natural estrogens and synthetic estrogens as well as the estrogen mimics to induce estrogen-receptor mediated vitellogenesis in primary hepatocytes of the brown frog (Rana temporaria). Based on EC50 values the following order was dete

  1. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  2. Estrogenic response of bisphenol A in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian; Pedersen, Knud Ladegaard; Pedersen, Søren Nørby

    2000-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) previously shown to possess xenoestrogenic activities was administered to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) through a continuos flow system. The estrogenic response expressed as the induction of vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis was measured during 12 days of exposure, using a direct...

  3. Inter-laboratory exercise on steroid estrogens in aqueous samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, E.; Kosjek, T.; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus;

    2010-01-01

    matrices. As the main task three steroid estrogens. 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol, 17 beta-estradiol and estrone were determined in four spiked aqueous matrices' tap water, river water and wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS Results were compared and discussed according...

  4. Identification and function of coactivator of estrogen receptor: ERIAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; Saijun; (樊赛军); MENG; Qinghui; (孟庆慧); ZHOU; Lixin; (周立新); CAO; Jianping; (曹建平); GAO; Bin; (高斌); SHAO; Rongguang; (邵荣光); LI; Jiyou; (李及友)

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER), one member of nuclear hormone receptor (NR) family, is an estrogen-dependent transcriptional factor that plays an important role in development, progression and treatment of breast cancer. Transcriptional co-factors (co-activators and co-repressors) are critical for ER to transduce hormone and metabolic signaling to target genes. A number of functional and structural studies have elucidated the precise mechanisms of co-activator interaction with the ligand-inducible activation domain in ER via one and several LXXLL motifs (where X is any amino acid) known as NR-Box. By the yeast two-hybrid system we have identified a novel ER-αinteracting protein ERIAP (Estrogen Receptor Interacting and Activating Protein) which contains two consensus LXXLL motifs. ERIAP associated with ER-α in a ligand-dependent manner, as demonstrated by in vivo immunoprecipitation and in vitro GST capture assays. The two NR boxes were essential for ERIAP interaction with ER-α. Furthermore, ERIAP specifically enhanced ligand-mediated ER-α transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent fasion and increased the expression of estrogen-responsive gene pS2. Thus, our present findings indicate that ERIAP funcions as a new coactivator for ER-α transcriptional activity, which may play an important role in development and progression of breast cancer.

  5. Steroidal estrogen sources in a sewage-impacted coastal ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, David R; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Eglinton, Timothy I; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B; Gschwend, Philip M

    2016-08-10

    Estrogens are known to be potent endocrine disrupting chemicals that are commonly found in wastewater effluents at ng L(-1) levels. Yet, we know very little about the distribution and fate of estrogens in coastal oceans that receive wastewater inputs. This study measured a wide range of steroidal estrogens in sewage-impacted seawater using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) together with the method of standard addition. In Massachusetts Bay, we find conjugated, free, and halogenated estrogens at concentrations that are consistent with dilution at sites close to the sewage source. At a site 6 miles down current of the sewage source, we observe estrone (E1) concentrations (520 ± 180 pg L(-1)) that are nearly double the nearfield concentrations (320 ± 60 pg L(-1)) despite 9-fold dilution of carbamazepine, which was used as a conservative sewage tracer. Our results suggest that background E1 concentrations in Massachusetts Bay (∼270 ± 50 pg L(-1)) are derived largely from sources unrelated to wastewater effluent such as marine vertebrates.

  6. EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern about the potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife has prompted this study of effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection in songbirds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as a model as it is ...

  7. EFFECTS OF EXTROGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection of house finches. Clark, J., Fairbrother, A*. Parametrix, Inc., Corvallis, OR; Brewer, L., EBA, Inc., Sisters, OR; Bennett, R.S., USEPA, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN. Concern about the potential for endocrine...

  8. METHOXYCHLOR REGULATES RAT UTERINE ESTROGEN-INDUCED PROTEIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methoxychlor (MXC), a pesticide, affects fertility and the uterus. o address the question of whether MXC acts like estradiol (E2) at the molecular level, we used immature rat uteri to compare the effects of MXC and E2 on the estrogen-induced protein (IP), also known as creatine k...

  9. Prospects for the use of selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Bykanova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The review presents a contemporary data concerning the use of tamoxifen in wide range of pathological conditions: central nervous system diseases and mechanisms of neuroprotective action of estrogen receptors, pituitary tumors with the accent on the treatment of prolactinomas, infertility treatment. We also discuss the risks of tamoxifen treatment for pregnancy induction in women including complications of pregnancy, fetus malformations.

  10. Modulation of estrogen signaling in hepatic and vascular tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, Yvonne Duvera

    2006-01-01

    This thesis centers on the mechanisms of estrogen action and the effects on the development of atherosclerosis. We have focused on the liver as central organ in lipid and glucose metabolism and the vessel wall as the actual site where the injury occurs. To gain insight in tissue-specific actions of

  11. Microbial transformation of synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajthaml, Tomas, E-mail: cajthaml@biomed.cas.c [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Kresinova, Zdena; Svobodova, Katerina; Sigler, Karel; Rezanka, Tomas [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2009-12-15

    Natural estrogens such as estrone, 17beta-estradiol, estriol, and the particularly recalcitrant synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol used as oral contraceptive, accumulate in the environment and may give rise to health problems. The processes participating in their removal from soil, wastewater, water-sediments, groundwater-aquifer material, and wastewater or sewage treatment plant effluents may involve the action of bacterial and microbial consortia, and in some cases fungi and algae. This review discusses the different efficiencies of bacterial degradation of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the role of sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing conditions in anaerobic degradation, and the role of sorption. The participation of autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria in cometabolic degradation of estrogens, the estrogen-degrading action of ligninolytic fungi and their extracellular enzymes (lignin peroxidase, manganese-dependent peroxidase, versatile peroxidase, laccase), and of algae are discussed in detail. - Current knowledge of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol microbial transformation is summarized.

  12. Sorption and degradation of estrogen conjugates in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The natural estrogenic hormone, 17'-estradiol (E2), can disrupt the endocrine system of some aquatic species at ng/L concentrations. Laboratory studies have shown low potentials for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment due to high degradation and soil retention. However, field studies have...

  13. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  14. Endogenous estrogen exposure and cardiovascular mortality risk in postmenopausal women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, M.J.J. de; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Peeters, P.M.; Banga, J.D.; Graaf, Y. van der

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether combined information on reproductive factors has additive value to the single reproductive factor age at menopause for assessing endogenous estrogen exposure and cardiovascular mortality risk in postmenopausal women. They conducted a population-based c

  15. Guppy sexual behavior as an effect biomarker of estrogen mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, M; Nielsen, J R; Baatrup, E

    1999-01-01

    There is widespread concern that some environmental chemicals can reduce the reproductive capability of humans and wildlife by mimicking natural estrogens and disrupting endocrine function. This potential threat to animal populations posed by xenoestrogens has, hardly surprisingly, been met by an...

  16. Estrogenic effects of flavonoid components in Xiaoyao powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J H; Zhang, N; Wang, Y Q; Wang, J Z; Ji, S X; Dang, W J; Li, S M; Feng, L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the estrogenic effects and mechanisms of three flavonoid components in Xiaoyao powder: quercetin, kaempferol, and isorhamnetin. The drugs were used to treat estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and proliferation was measured using the MTT method. The expression of proteins and mRNA of the ER subtype were measured using western blotting and real time polymerase chain reaction. The quercetin (10(-2) μM, 10(-3) μM), kaempferol (100 μM, 10(-2) μM), and isorhamnetin (10(-3) μM) promoted the proliferation of MCF-7 cells, and the expression of ERα and ERβ proteins and mRNA were all increased significantly (P < 0.05). These effects were reversed by treatment with 0.1 μM estrogen antagonist ICI182780. Three flavonoid components in Xiaoyao powder increased the expression of proteins and mRNA of ERα and ERβ and promoted the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. These estrogenic effects were mediated by the ER. PMID:26909969

  17. Estrogen Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Incident Aging Macula Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhoorn, S.S.; Vingerling, J.R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Meurs, J.B.J. van; Duijn, C.M. van; Pols, H.A.P.; Hofman, A.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE. It has been suggested that early menopause increases the risk of aging-macula disorder (AMD), the major cause of incurable blindness with a dry and wet late subtype, and that exposure to endogenous or postmenopausal exogenous estrogens reduces this risk. This study was undertaken to investi

  18. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gogos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol’s underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol’s impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems.

  19. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... recent revision of the patient package insert. (d) Guidance language. The Food and Drug Administration... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515 Section 310.515 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  20. Cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Jisha; Dasgupta, Tanushree; Rhodes, Jenny M; McEwan, Miranda V; Print, Cristin G; O'Sullivan, Justin M; Horsfield, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    The cohesin complex has essential roles in cell division, DNA damage repair and gene transcription. The transcriptional function of cohesin is thought to derive from its ability to connect distant regulatory elements with gene promoters. Genome-wide binding of cohesin in breast cancer cells frequently coincides with estrogen receptor alpha (ER), leading to the hypothesis that cohesin facilitates estrogen-dependent gene transcription. We found that cohesin modulates the expression of only a subset of genes in the ER transcription program, either activating or repressing transcription depending on the gene target. Estrogen-responsive genes most significantly influenced by cohesin were enriched in pathways associated with breast cancer progression such as PI3K and ErbB1. In MCF7 breast cancer cells, cohesin depletion enhanced transcription of TFF1 and TFF2, and was associated with increased ER binding and increased interaction between TFF1 and its distal enhancer situated within TMPRSS3. In contrast, cohesin depletion reduced c-MYC mRNA and was accompanied by reduced interaction between a distal enhancer of c-MYC and its promoters. Our data indicates that cohesin is not a universal facilitator of ER-induced transcription and can even restrict enhancer-promoter communication. We propose that cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-dependent genes to achieve appropriate directionality and amplitude of expression.

  1. Estrogen mediated protection of cytoskeleton against oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshini A Ganatra

    2013-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed that E 2 helped in preventing deteriorating effect of H 2 O 2 , inhibited cell death, apoptosis and depolymerisation of cytoskeletal proteins in LECs. However, the exact mechanism by which estrogen renders this protection to cytoskeleton of lens epithelial cells remains to be determined.

  2. Evaluation of the in vitro estrogenicity of emerging bisphenol analogs and their respective estrogenic contributions in municipal sewage sludge in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Ting; Liang, Dong; Song, Shanjun; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-04-01

    There is a potential risk to the environment from persistent estrogenic compounds in sewage sludge. In this study, eight bisphenols (BPs) were identified in sewage sludge collected from wastewater treatment plants in 15 cities in China. The estrogenic potencies of the eight BPs and the estrogenic activities of sludge samples were evaluated using a bioluminescence yeast estrogen screen (BLYES) assay. All sludge samples elicited considerable estrogenic activity at a range of 2.8-4.7 ng E2 g(-1) dry weight (dw). All BPs exhibited estrogenic activity in the BLYES assay, but there were significant differences between the potency of individual chemicals. Bisphenol AF had the highest activity, followed by tetrachlorobisphenol A, bisphenol F, bisphenol A, bisphenol E, bisphenol S and 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone. Tetrabromobisphenol A showed weak estrogenic activity at 1×10(4)nM, but significant cytotoxicity above this concentration. The total estradiol equivalency quantities (EEQs) of BPs were in the range of 2.16-49.13 pg E2 g(-1) dw, accounting for 0.05-1.47% of the total EEQs in sewage sludge samples. The results indicate that BPs made a minor contribution to the estrogenic activity of the investigated sewage sludge. Nevertheless, our results suggest that considerable attention should be directed to the estrogenic potentials of emerging organic pollutants because of their widespread use and their potential to persist in the environment.

  3. Electrochemical estrogen screen method based on the electrochemical behavior of MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlian; Song, Jia; Bi, Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Jiguang; Wu, Dongmei

    2016-08-01

    It was an urgent task to develop quick, cheap and accurate estrogen screen method for evaluating the estrogen effect of the booming chemicals. In this study, the voltammetric behavior between the estrogen-free and normal fragmented MCF-7 cell suspensions were compared, and the electrochemical signal (about 0.68V attributed by xanthine and guanine) of the estrogen-free fragmented MCF-7 cell suspension was obviously lower than that of the normal one. The electrochemistry detection of ex-secretion purines showed that the ability of ex-secretion purines of cells sharp decreased due to the removing of endogenous estrogen. The results indicated that the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells was related to the level of intracellular estrogen. When the level of intracellular estrogen was down-regulated, the concentrations of the xanthine and hypoxanthine decreased, which led to the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells fall. Based on the electrochemical signal, the electrochemical estrogen screen method was established. The estrogen effect of estradiol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A was evaluated with the electrochemical method, and the result was accordant with that of MTT assay. The electrochemical estrogen screen method was simple, quickly, cheap, objective, and it exploits a new way for the evaluation of estrogenic effects of chemicals. PMID:27108272

  4. Electrochemical estrogen screen method based on the electrochemical behavior of MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlian; Song, Jia; Bi, Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Jiguang; Wu, Dongmei

    2016-08-01

    It was an urgent task to develop quick, cheap and accurate estrogen screen method for evaluating the estrogen effect of the booming chemicals. In this study, the voltammetric behavior between the estrogen-free and normal fragmented MCF-7 cell suspensions were compared, and the electrochemical signal (about 0.68V attributed by xanthine and guanine) of the estrogen-free fragmented MCF-7 cell suspension was obviously lower than that of the normal one. The electrochemistry detection of ex-secretion purines showed that the ability of ex-secretion purines of cells sharp decreased due to the removing of endogenous estrogen. The results indicated that the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells was related to the level of intracellular estrogen. When the level of intracellular estrogen was down-regulated, the concentrations of the xanthine and hypoxanthine decreased, which led to the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells fall. Based on the electrochemical signal, the electrochemical estrogen screen method was established. The estrogen effect of estradiol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A was evaluated with the electrochemical method, and the result was accordant with that of MTT assay. The electrochemical estrogen screen method was simple, quickly, cheap, objective, and it exploits a new way for the evaluation of estrogenic effects of chemicals.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Estrogen-Mediated Signal Transduction in Osteoclasts Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen plays an important role in inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and protecting against bone loss from osteoporosis, especially in postmenopausal women. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the effect of estrogen on osteoclasts are not well known. In the present study, we performed proteomics analysis and bioinformatics analysis to comprehensively compare the differential expression of proteins in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand RANKL-induced osteoclasts in the presence and absence of estrogen. We identified 6403 proteins, of which 124 were upregulated and 231 were downregulated by estrogen. Bioinformatics analysis showed that estrogen treatment interfered with 77 intracellular pathways, including both confirmed canonical and unconfirmed pathways of osteoclast formation. Our findings validate the inhibitory effect of estrogen on osteoclasts via the promotion of apoptosis and suppression of differentiation and polarization and suggest that estrogen might inhibit osteoclast formation via other pathways, which requires further investigation and verification.

  6. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics and neurological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2008-10-01

    The 'healthy cell bias of estrogen action' hypothesis examines the role that regulating mitochondrial function and bioenergetics play in promoting neural health and the mechanistic crossroads that lead to divergent outcomes following estrogen exposure. Estrogen-induced signaling pathways in hippocampal and cortical neurons converge upon the mitochondria to enhance aerobic glycolysis coupled to the citric acid cycle, mitochondrial respiration and ATP generation. Convergence of estrogen-induced signaling onto mitochondria is also a point of vulnerability when activated in diseased neurons which exacerbates degeneration through increased load on dysregulated calcium homeostasis. As the continuum of neurological health progresses from healthy to unhealthy so too do the benefits of estrogen or hormone therapy. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action hypothesis provides a lens through which to assess disparities in outcomes across basic and clinical science and on which to predict outcomes of estrogen interventions for sustaining neurological health and preventing age-associated neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

  7. Detection of weak estrogenic flavonoids using a recombinant yeast strain and a modified MCF7 cell proliferation assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Larsen, John Christian

    1998-01-01

    -estradiol, when compared on the basis of EC50 values. The estrogenic activity of the dietary flavonoids was further investigated in estrogen-dependent human MCF7 breast cancer cells. In this system several of the flavonoids were likewise capable of mimicking natural estrogens and thereby induce cell proliferation....... Similar structural requirements for estrogenic activity were found for the two assays. The present results provide evidence that several of the flavo-estrogens possess estrogenic properties comparable in activity to the well-established isoflavonoid estrogens. The use of Alamar Blue, a vital dye which...

  8. Occurrence and removal of estrogens in Brazilian wastewater treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluated the occurrence and removal efficiency of four estrogenic hormones in five biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), located in the State of Ceará, Brazil. The five WWTPs comprised: two systems consisted of one facultative pond followed by two maturation ponds, one facultative pond, one activated sludge (AS) system followed by a chlorination step, and one upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by a chlorination step. Estrogen occurrence showed a wide variation among the analyzed influent and effluent samples. Estrone (E1) showed the highest occurrence in the influent (76%), whereas both 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) presented a 52% occurrence, and the compound 17β-estradiol 17-acetate (E2-17A), a 32% one. The occurrence in the effluent samples was 48% for E1, 28% for E2, 12% for E2-17A, and 40% for EE2. The highest concentrations of E1 and EE2 hormones in the influent were 3050 and 3180 ng L−1, respectively, whereas E2 and E2-17A had maximum concentrations of 776 and 2300 ng L−1, respectively. The lowest efficiencies for the removal of estrogenic hormones were found in WWTP consisted of waste stabilization ponds, ranging from 54 to 79.9%. The high-rate systems (AS and UASB), which have chlorination as post-treatment, presented removal efficiencies of approximately 95%. - Highlights: • The occurrence of four endocrine disrupting chemicals was evaluated. • The removal efficiency of four hormones in low-cost plants was examined. • Estrogen occurrence showed a wide variation in influent and effluent samples. • Estrone showed the highest occurrence in the influent and the effluent samples. • WSP treatment was observed to be less effective for removing estrogens

  9. Occurrence and removal of estrogens in Brazilian wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Germana P. [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 713, CEP: 60455-900, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Souza, Neyliane C. de [Department Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, State University of Paraíba, Rua Juvêncio Arruda, S/N, Campus Universitário, Bodocongó, CEP: 58109-790, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Vidal, Carla B.; Alves, Joana A.C.; Firmino, Paulo Igor M. [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 713, CEP: 60455-900, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Nascimento, Ronaldo F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry and Physical Chemistry, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 940, CEP: 60451-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Santos, André B. dos, E-mail: andre23@ufc.br [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 713, CEP: 60455-900, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    This paper evaluated the occurrence and removal efficiency of four estrogenic hormones in five biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), located in the State of Ceará, Brazil. The five WWTPs comprised: two systems consisted of one facultative pond followed by two maturation ponds, one facultative pond, one activated sludge (AS) system followed by a chlorination step, and one upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by a chlorination step. Estrogen occurrence showed a wide variation among the analyzed influent and effluent samples. Estrone (E1) showed the highest occurrence in the influent (76%), whereas both 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) presented a 52% occurrence, and the compound 17β-estradiol 17-acetate (E2-17A), a 32% one. The occurrence in the effluent samples was 48% for E1, 28% for E2, 12% for E2-17A, and 40% for EE2. The highest concentrations of E1 and EE2 hormones in the influent were 3050 and 3180 ng L{sup −1}, respectively, whereas E2 and E2-17A had maximum concentrations of 776 and 2300 ng L{sup −1}, respectively. The lowest efficiencies for the removal of estrogenic hormones were found in WWTP consisted of waste stabilization ponds, ranging from 54 to 79.9%. The high-rate systems (AS and UASB), which have chlorination as post-treatment, presented removal efficiencies of approximately 95%. - Highlights: • The occurrence of four endocrine disrupting chemicals was evaluated. • The removal efficiency of four hormones in low-cost plants was examined. • Estrogen occurrence showed a wide variation in influent and effluent samples. • Estrone showed the highest occurrence in the influent and the effluent samples. • WSP treatment was observed to be less effective for removing estrogens.

  10. Estrogenic endpoints in fish early life-stage tests: luciferase and vitellogenin induction in estrogen-responsive transgenic zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, R.; Mutsaerds, E.; Druke, J.; Roode, de D.F.; Murk, A.J.; Burg, van der B.; Legler, J.

    2006-01-01

    This study incorporated specific endpoints for estrogenic activity in the early life-stage (ELS) test, as described in Guideline 210 of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and traditionally used for toxicity screening of chemicals. A transgenic zebrafish model expressing an est

  11. NJK14013, a novel synthetic estrogen receptor-α agonist, exhibits estrogen receptor-independent, tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-In; Kim, Taelim; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jun; Heo, Jinyuk; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens act through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) to play diverse roles in various pathophysiological conditions. A number of synthetic selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, have been developed and used to treat ER-related diseases, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Here, we identified a novel compound, bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)methanone-O-isopentyl oxime, designated NJK14013, as an ER agonist. NJK14013 activated ER-dependent transcription in a concentration-dependent manner, while suppressing androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activity. It induced the activation-related phosphorylation of ER and enhanced the transcription of growth regulation by estrogen in breast cancer 1 (GREB1), further supporting its ER-stimulating activity. NJK14013 exerted anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cell lines, including an ER-negative breast cancer cell line, suggesting that it is capable of suppressing the growth of cancer cells independent of its ER-modulating activity. In addition, NJK14013 treatment resulted in significant apoptotic death of MCF7 and Ishikawa cancer cells, but did not induce apoptosis in non-cancer human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that NJK14013 is a novel SERM that can activate ER-mediated transcription in MCF7 cells and suppress the proliferation of various cancer cells, including breast cancer cells and endometrial cancer cells. These results suggest that NJK14013 has potential as a novel SERM for anticancer or hormone-replacement therapy with reduced risk of carcinogenesis.

  12. Binding of estrogen receptor with estrogen conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Yasuto; Koslowski, Mirek; Bodenner, Donald L

    2004-08-19

    BACKGROUND: The classic model of estrogen action requires that the estrogen receptor (ER) activates gene expression by binding directly or indirectly to DNA. Recent studies, however, strongly suggest that ER can act through nongenomic signal transduction pathways and may be mediated by a membrane bound form of the ER. Estradiol covalently linked to membrane impermeable BSA (E2-BSA) has been widely used as an agent to study these novel membrane-associated ER events. However, a recent report suggests that E2-BSA does not compete for E2 binding to purified ER in vitro. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we performed competition studies examining the binding of E2 and E2-BSA to both purified ER preparations and ER within intact cells. To eliminate potential artifacts due to contamination of commercially available E2-BSA preparations with unconjugated E2 (usually between 3-5%), the latter was carefully removed by ultrafiltration. RESULTS: As previously reported, a 10-to 1000-fold molar excess of E2-BSA was unable to compete with 3H-E2 binding to ER when added simultaneously. However, when ER was pre-incubated with the same concentrations of E2-BSA, the binding of 3H-E2 was significantly reduced. E2-BSA binding to a putative membrane-associated ER was directly visualized using fluorescein labeled E2-BSA (E2-BSA-FITC). Staining was restricted to the cell membrane when E2-BSA-FITC was incubated with stable transfectants of the murine ERalpha within ER-negative HeLa cells and with MC7 cells that endogenously produce ERalpha. This staining appeared highly specific since it was competed by pre-incubation with E2 in a dose dependent manner and with the competitor ICI-182,780. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that E2-BSA does bind to purified ER in vitro and to ER in intact cells. It seems likely that the size and structure of E2-BSA requires more energy for it to bind to the ER and consequently binds more slowly than E2. More importantly, these findings demonstrate

  13. Expression of estrogen receptor and estrogen receptor messenger RNA in gastric carcinoma tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Han Zhao; Shan-Zhi Gu; Shan-Xi Liu; Bo-Rong Pan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen receptor messenger RNA (ERmRNA) expression in gastric carcinoma tissues and to investigate their association with the pathologic types of gastric carcinoma.METHODS: The expression of ER and ERmRNA in gastric carcinoma tissues (15 males and 15 females, 42-70 years old) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively.RESULTS: The positive rate of ER (immunohistochemistry)was 33.3% in males and 46.7% in females. In Borrmann Ⅳ gastric carcinoma ER positive rate was greater than that in other pathologic types, and in poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma the positive rates were greater than those in other histological types of both males and females (P<0.05). The ER was more highly expressed in diffused gastric carcinoma than in non-diffused gastric carcinoma (P<0.05). The ER positive rate was also related to regional lymph nodes metastases (P<0.05), and was significantly higher in females above 55 years old, and higher in males under 55 years old (P<0.05). The ERmRNA (in situ hybridization) positive rate was 73.3% in males and 86.7% in females. The ERmRNA positive rates were almost the same in Borrmann Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ gastric carcinoma (P>0.05). ERmRNA was expressed in all tubular adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma (P<0.05). The ERmRNA positive rate was related to both regional lymph nodes metastases and gastric carcinoma growth patterns, and was higher in both sexes above 55 years old but without statistical significance (P>0.05). The positive rate of ERmRNA expression by in situ hybridization was higher than that of ER expression by immunohistochemistry (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: ERmRNA expression is related to the pathological behaviors of gastric carcinoma, which might help to predict the prognosis and predict the effectiveness of endocrine therapy for gastric carcinoma.

  14. Mechanisms of estrogen action%雌激素作用分子机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈智; 王庭槐

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen has widespread biological actions. Besides sexual organs, estrogen plays an im-portant role in cardiovascular system, central nervous system and bone tissue. However, the mechanisms of es-trogen action are very complex and not fully understood. The actions of estrogen are not identical and even completely different in some organs system. In this review, we will focus on the new development of molecular mechanisms of estrogen action.

  15. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Monika; Miltyk, Wojciech; Swiatecka, Jolanta; Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Kuźmicki, Mariusz; Pałka, Jerzy; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9. PMID:20067880

  16. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kuźmicki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  17. Antiestrogenic effects of the fetal estrogen estetrol in women with estrogen-receptor positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Christian F; Bennink, Herjan J T Coelingh; Natter, Camilla; Steurer, Stefan; Rudas, Margaretha; Moinfar, Farid; Appels, Nicole; Visser, Monique; Kubista, Ernst

    2014-11-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a fetal estrogen with estrogenic effects on reproductive organs and bone in preclinical models and in postmenopausal women. However, E4 exerts antiestrogenic effects on breast cancer (BC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We have investigated the effect of 14 days preoperative treatment with 20mg E4 per day on tumor proliferation markers, sex steroid receptor expression and endocrine parameters in a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, preoperative window trial in 30 pre- and post-menopausal women with estrogen-receptor positive early BC. E4 had a significant pro-apoptotic effect on tumor tissue, whereas Ki67 expression remained unchanged in both pre- and post-menopausal women. E4 increased sex-hormone-binding globulin significantly thereby reducing the concentrations of bioavailable estradiol. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels decreased in postmenopausal women only and luteinizing hormone levels remained unchanged. Systemic insulin growth factor-1 levels decreased significantly. Intratumoral epithelial ERα expression decreased significantly and a trend was found towards an increased expression of ERβ. This clinical data support the preclinical findings that E4 has antiestrogenic effects on BC cells, whereas earlier studies have shown that E4 has estrogenic effects on reproductive tissues and bone. Further clinical studies seem acceptable and are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of E4 for the breast in hormone replacement therapy, including hormone replacement therapy in women who have or have had BC, especially in those BC patients treated with aromatase inhibitors and suffering from serious complaints due to estrogen deficiency. PMID:24997853

  18. Silicon light emitting device in CMOS technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-jun; GU Ming; LIU Jin-bin; HUANG Bei-ju; CHEN Hong-da

    2007-01-01

    A novel silicon light emitting device was realized with standard 0.35 μ m 2P4M Mixed Mode/RF CMOS technology. The device functions in a reverse breakdown mode and can be turned on at 8.3 V and operated normally at a wide voltage range of 8.3 V-12.0 V. An output optical power of 13.6 nW was measured at the bias of 10 V and 100 mA, and the emitted light intensity was calculated to be more than 1 mW/cm2. The optical spectrum of the device is in the range of 500-820 nm.

  19. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  20. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, S. D.; Kuehne, M.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.

    1992-01-01

    The experiment Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) is designed for the investigations of plasma flow characteristics, turbulence and wave motions, plasma densities and temperatures, structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity in the chromosphere, the transition zone and the corona. Specifically, SUMER will measure profiles and intensities of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lines emitted in the solar atmosphere ranging from the upper chromosphere to the lower corona; determine line broadenings, spectral positions and Doppler shifts with high accuracy, provide stigmatic images of selected areas of the Sun in the EUV with high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution and obtain full images of the Sun and the inner corona in selectable EUV lines, corresponding to a temperature from 10,000 to more than 1,800,000 K.

  1. UVC emitting phosphors obtained by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broadband inter-configurational (4f15d1→4f2) emission of Pr3+ doped in lanthanum orthophosphate (LaPO4) and in calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7) has been investigated under plasma excitation. The synthesis by spray pyrolysis at moderate temperature followed by a controlled annealing proves to be a very efficient way to produce good quality UVC emitting phosphor Ca1.92Pr0.04Na0.04P2O7 (α phase). The emission of this phosphor in the wavelength range 200-350 nm has been measured with a prototype device, which can be employed for anti-microbial testing. - Research Highlights: → The Pr3+ doped orthophosphate and pyrophosphate were synthesized by spray pyrolysis. → The dense particles present good quality UVC emitting (200-350 nm). → The prototype device can be employed for anti-microbial testing.

  2. Biointegrated flexible inorganic light emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Keon Jae

    2012-01-01

    Min Koo, So Young Park, Keon Jae LeeDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, Republic of KoreaAbstract: The use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as therapeutic tools has been actively studied over the past few decades due to their advantages of high safety, low cost, excellent portability, and wide bandwidth. In addition, their application in biomedical fields has been expanded to such areas as nerve stimulation, ...

  3. Researches of odour emitted by household waste

    OpenAIRE

    Eglė Marčiulaitienė; Tadas Lukauskas

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with odour emitted by household waste, the chemical composition of household waste. The experiment was made with food waste (1000 g) placed in 5 litter containers. Food waste was containing products of animal origin (meat, fish, dairy products) and plant origin (vegetables, fruit) waste. Time of the experiment was 14 days 19±3 °C at environment temperature. Odour concentration is determined by dynamic olfactometry method. Studies have shown that the strongest odour of all ho...

  4. Approaches to blue light emitting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue-light emitting polymers are important for full colour displays. Blue- light emitting polymers, such as poly(fluorene)s have been reported, but tend to be soluble in the conjugated form. The aim of the project was to produce insoluble polymers, prepared via processible soluble precursor polymers, so that multilayer devices could be easily fabricated. Multilayer devices are often required for more efficient light emission. The target materials were derivatives of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV), a green-yellow emitting polymer. To blue shift the emission of PPV, bulky substituents, namely chloro, phenyl and alkyl, were attached to the vinylic linkage. These bulky substituents were incorporated to introduce steric interactions between the side group and the backbone phenyl protons, to shorten the effective conjugation length and increase the HOMO-LUMO energy gap. Chloro substituents quenched the fluorescence. Phenyl substituents resulted in highly conjugated precursor polymers with low molecular weights, showing blue- green to green emission in the conjugated form. Alkyl substituted PPV derivatives, prepared via chloro or xanthate precursors, were blue-light emitting conjugated polymers, which were electroluminescent in ITO/polymer/AI devices. The PL quantum yields were found to be up to 38%. The incorporation of electron withdrawing groups into the polymers was attempted, to lower the barrier to electron injection. Chloro groups quenched fluorescence and methylsulfone substituents resulted in insoluble polymers, probably due to cross-linking. However a copolymer containing methylsulfone electron withdrawing groups could be prepared. Phenylsulfone substituents were found to give fluorescent polymers which were soluble in the precursor form. (author)

  5. Identification of estrogen responsive genes using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as a model

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2012-10-26

    Background: Estrogen therapy has positively impact the treatment of several cancers, such as prostate, lung and breast cancers. Moreover, several groups have reported the importance of estrogen induced gene regulation in esophageal cancer (EC). This suggests that there could be a potential for estrogen therapy for EC. The efficient design of estrogen therapies requires as complete as possible list of genes responsive to estrogen. Our study develops a systems biology methodology using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as a model to identify estrogen responsive genes. These genes, on the other hand, could be affected by estrogen therapy in ESCC.Results: Based on different sources of information we identified 418 genes implicated in ESCC. Putative estrogen responsive elements (EREs) mapped to the promoter region of the ESCC genes were used to initially identify candidate estrogen responsive genes. EREs mapped to the promoter sequence of 30.62% (128/418) of ESCC genes of which 43.75% (56/128) are known to be estrogen responsive, while 56.25% (72/128) are new candidate estrogen responsive genes. EREs did not map to 290 ESCC genes. Of these 290 genes, 50.34% (146/290) are known to be estrogen responsive. By analyzing transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in the promoters of the 202 (56+146) known estrogen responsive ESCC genes under study, we found that their regulatory potential may be characterized by 44 significantly over-represented co-localized TFBSs (cTFBSs). We were able to map these cTFBSs to promoters of 32 of the 72 new candidate estrogen responsive ESCC genes, thereby increasing confidence that these 32 ESCC genes are responsive to estrogen since their promoters contain both: a/mapped EREs, and b/at least four cTFBSs characteristic of ESCC genes that are responsive to estrogen. Recent publications confirm that 47% (15/32) of these 32 predicted genes are indeed responsive to estrogen.Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge our study is the first

  6. Researches of odour emitted by household waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Marčiulaitienė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with odour emitted by household waste, the chemical composition of household waste. The experiment was made with food waste (1000 g placed in 5 litter containers. Food waste was containing products of animal origin (meat, fish, dairy products and plant origin (vegetables, fruit waste. Time of the experiment was 14 days 19±3 °C at environment temperature. Odour concentration is determined by dynamic olfactometry method. Studies have shown that the strongest odour of all household waste used in this experiment was emitted by meat and fish waste (76 444 OUE/m3. Meat and fish waste emits the strongest odour as waste contains proteins, their decomposition releases into the environment a strong unpleasant odour, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia. Protein degradation releases into the environment are, characterized by a strong unpleasant smell of hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas. During the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter a variety of other fragrant compounds: alcohols (e.g., ethanol and methanol, vinegar, formic acid, etc. is found.

  7. Does antimatter emit a new light?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Ruggero Maria

    1997-08-01

    Contemporary theories of antimatter have a number of insufficiencies which stimulated the recent construction of the new isodual theory based on a certain anti-isomorphic map of all (classical and quantum) formulations of matter called isoduality. In this note we show that the isodual theory predicts that antimatter emits a new light, called isodual light, which can be distinguished from the ordinary light emitted by matter via gravitational interactions (only). In particular, the isodual theory predicts that all stable antiparticles such as the isodual photon, the positron and the antiproton experience antigravity in the field of matter (defined as the reversal of the sign of the curvature tensor). The antihydrogen atom is therefore predicted to: experience antigravity in the field of Earth; emit the isodual photon; and have the same spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom, although subjected to an anti-isomorphic isodual map. In this note we also show that the isodual theory predicts that bound states of elementary particles and antiparticles (such as the positronium) experience ordinary gravitation in both fields of matter and antimatter, thus bypassing known objections against antigravity. A number of intriguing and fundamental, open theoretical and experimental problems of “the new physics of antimatter” are pointed out.

  8. Does antimatter emit a new light?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Ruggero Maria [Instituto per la Ricerca di Base (Italy)

    1997-08-15

    Contemporary theories of antimatter have a number of insufficiencies which stimulated the recent construction of the new isodual theory based on a certain anti-isomorphic map of all (classical and quantum) formulations of matter called isoduality. In this note we show that the isodual theory predicts that antimatter emits a new light, called isodual light, which can be distinguished from the ordinary light emitted by matter via gravitational interactions (only). In particular, the isodual theory predicts that all stable antiparticles such as the isodual photon, the positron and the antiproton experience antigravity in the field of matter (defined as the reversal of the sign of the curvature tensor). The antihydrogen atom is therefore predicted to: experience antigravity in the field of Earth; emit the isodual photon; and have the same spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom, although subjected to an anti-isomorphic isodual map. In this note we also show that the isodual theory predicts that bound states of elementary particles and antiparticles (such as the positronium) experience ordinary gravitation in both fields of matter and antimatter, thus bypassing known objections against antigravity. A number of intriguing and fundamental, open theoretical and experimental problems of 'the new physics of antimatter' are pointed out.

  9. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants.

  10. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  11. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of Growth Hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro eFernandez-Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver responds to estrogens and GH which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk with endocrine, metabolic, and sex-differentiated functions of GH. Most previous studies have been focused on the influence of estrogens on pituitary GH secretion, which has a great impact on hepatic transcriptional regulation. However, there is strong evidence that estrogens can influence the GH-regulated endocrine and metabolic functions in the human liver by acting at the level of GHR-STAT5 signaling pathway. This cross-talk is relevant because the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. Therefore, GH or estrogen signaling deficiency as well as the influence of estrogens on GH biology can cause a dramatic impact in liver physiology during mammalian development and in adulthood. In this review, we will summarize the current status of the influence of estrogen on GH actions in liver. A better understanding of estrogen-GH interplay in liver will lead to improved therapy of children with growth disorders and of adults with GH deficiency.

  12. Ecological risk of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals in sewage plant effluent and reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Huang, Huang; Sun, Ying; Wang, Chao; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Hu, Hong-Ying; Kameya, Takashi; Fujie, Koichi

    2013-09-01

    The long-term ecological risk of micropollutants, especially endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has threatened reclaimed water quality. In this study, estrogenic activity and ecological risk of eight typical estrogenic EDCs in effluents from sewage plants were evaluated. The estrogenic activity analysis showed that steroidal estrogens had the highest estrogenic activity (ranged from 10(-1) to 10(3) ng-E2/L), phenolic compounds showed weaker estrogenic activity (mainly ranged from 10(-3) to 10 ng-E2/L), and phthalate esters were negligible. The ecological risk of the estrogenic EDCs which was characterized by risk quotient ranged from 10(-4) to 10(3), with an order in descending: steroids estrogens, phenolic compounds and phthalate esters. The eight estrogenic EDCs were scored and sorted based on the comparison of the estrogenic activity and the ecological risk, suggesting that 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) should be the priority EDCs to control in municipal sewage plants. PMID:23735815

  13. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants. PMID:24798317

  14. Assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. Recommendations and proposals for lines of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system with well-established relevance for the management and prevention of exposures. Despite this, there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that this system is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures, particularly when incorporated radionuclides decay, emitting electrons. Criticisms of the system particularly pertain to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides, the intake of which can occur during environmental and industrial exposures or, simply, during a medical use of ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. These debates result from a lack of data in the fields of dosimetry and toxicology of these radionuclides. Auger and beta emitters can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of electrons in matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions, not taken into account in conventional dosimetry methods, which make the assumption of uniform energy depositions. These specific physical and biochemical features of some of these radionuclides seem to influence their cellular toxicity directly. It is thus established that intranuclear distribution of iodine-125 is more effective for the induction of mutations or even cell death than a cytosolic distribution. This point is explained by the very short range of Auger electrons in matter (around a few dozen nm), which, in the case of an intranuclear distribution, would deliver all of their energy in the vicinity of the DNA, which, if affected, would be detrimental to the survival of the cell. The observation

  15. Impact of secondary treatment types and sludge handling processes on estrogen concentration in wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Erica J; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-02-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as estrogen, are known to be present in the aquatic environment at concentrations that negatively affect fish and other wildlife. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are major contributors of EDCs into the environment. EDCs are released via effluent discharge and land application of biosolids. Estrogen removal in WWTPs has been studied in the aqueous phase; however, few researchers have determined estrogen concentration in sludge. This study focuses on estrogen concentration in wastewater sludge as a result of secondary treatment types and sludge handling processes. Grab samples were collected before and after multiple treatment steps at two WWTPs receiving wastewater from the same city. The samples were centrifuged into aqueous and solid phases and then processed using solid phase extraction. Combined natural estrogens (estrone, estradiol and estriol) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) purchased from a manufacturer. Results confirmed that activated sludge treatments demonstrate greater estrogen removal compared to trickling filters and mass concentration of estrogen was measured for the first time on trickling filter solids. Physical and mechanical sludge treatment processes, such as gravity thickeners and centrifuges, did not significantly affect estrogen removal based on mass balance calculations. Dissolved air flotation thickening demonstrated a slight decrease in estrogen concentration, while anaerobic digestion resulted in increased mass concentration of estrogen on the sludge and a high estrogen concentration in the supernatant. Although there are no state or federally mandated discharge effluent standards or sludge application standards for estrogen, implications from this study are that trickling filters would need to be exchanged for activated sludge treatment or followed by an aeration basin in order to improve estrogen removal. Also, anaerobic digestion may need to be replaced

  16. The AlGaAs light emitting particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozela, J. E-mail: pozela@uj.pfi.lt; Pozela, K.; Silenas, A.; Juciene, V.; Dapkus, L.; Jasutis, V.; Tamulaitis, G.; Zukauskas, A.; Bendorius, R.-A

    1999-09-11

    An AlGaAs light emitting particle detector was fabricated and investigated experimentally. Light emitting semiconductor Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As layers with graded-gap energy band structure were grown, and luminescence spectra were investigated. A light emitting X-ray detector was also fabricated. (author)

  17. The AlGaAs light emitting particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pozela, J; Silenas, A; Juciene, V; Dapkus, L; Jasutis, V; Tamulaitis, G; Zukauskas, A; Bendorius, R A

    1999-01-01

    An AlGaAs light emitting particle detector was fabricated and investigated experimentally. Light emitting semiconductor Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As layers with graded-gap energy band structure were grown, and luminescence spectra were investigated. A light emitting X-ray detector was also fabricated. (author)

  18. THE ESTROGENIC ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL BISPHENOL A (BPA) AND OBESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Saal, Frederick S.; Nagel, Susan C.; Coe, Benjamin L.; Angle, Brittany M.; Taylor, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing experimental and epidemiological evidence that fetal programming of genetic systems is a contributing factor in the recent increase in adult obesity and other components of metabolic syndrome. In particular, there is evidence that epigenetic changes associated with the use of manmade chemicals may interact with other factors that influence fetal and postnatal growth in contributing to the current obesity epidemic. The focus of this review is on the developmental effects of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and more specifically on effects of exposure to the estrogenic EDC bisphenol A (BPA), on adipocytes and their function, and the ultimate impact on adult obesity; BPA exposure also results in impaired reproductive capacity. We discuss the interaction of EDCs with other factors that impact growth during fetal and neonatal life, such as placental blood flow and nutrient transport to fetuses, and how these influence fetal growth and abnormalities in homeostatic control systems required to maintain normal body weight throughout life. PMID:22249005

  19. Estrogen- and progesterone-induced uterine motility of anestrous goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, O P; Singh, L P

    1976-02-01

    Uterine motility was studied in the anestrous goats after a series of estradiol injections was given and after estradiol-plus-progesterone treatment was administered. Estradiol (0.1 mg/kg) given alone by intramuscular route every 6 hours for 4 continuous days produced only a moderate increase in the uterine contractions during treatment, but significantly higher amplitude and frequency of contractions occurred at 2 days after treatment was stopped. The same doses of estradiol administered for a 24-hour period and followed by 4 injections of progesterone (1.0 mg/kg) given intramuscularly once a day produced a moderate response during treatment, but depressed the amplitude and the frequency of contractions after the treatment was stopped. The results indicate that the tissues primed with estrogen produced a stimulatory effect after their estrogen contents diminished. Progesterone, likewise, produced inhibition after a decrease in the progesterone contents of the uterine tissue. PMID:944003

  20. Chronic oxidative stress causes estrogen-independent aggressive phenotype, and epigenetic inactivation of estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2015-08-01

    The role of chronic oxidative stress in the development and aggressive growth of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is well known; however, the mechanistic understanding is not clear. Estrogen-independent growth is one of the features of aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on estrogen sensitivity and expression of nuclear estrogen receptors in ER-positive breast cancer cells. MCF-7 cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide were used as a cell model in this study, and their growth in response to 17-β estradiol was evaluated by cell viability, cell cycle, and cell migration analysis. Results were further confirmed at molecular level by analysis of gene expressions at transcript and protein levels. Histone H3 modifications, expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, and the effect of DNA demethylation were also analyzed. Loss of growth in response to estrogen with a decrease in ERα expression was observed in MCF-7 cells adapted to chronic oxidative stress. Increases in mtTFA and NRF1 in these cells further suggested the role of mitochondria-dependent redox-sensitive growth signaling as an alternative pathway to estrogen-dependent growth. Changes in expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, levels of histone H3 modifications as well as significant restorations of both ERα expression and estrogen response by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further confirmed the epigenetic basis for estrogen-independent growth in these cells. In conclusion, results of this study suggest that chronic oxidative stress can convert estrogen-dependent nonaggressive breast cancer cells into estrogen-independent aggressive form potentially by epigenetic mechanism.

  1. Use of adenovirus vector expressing the mouse full estrogen receptor alpha gene to infect mouse primary neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao HU; Lei Lou; Jun Yuan; Xing Wan; Jianyi Wang; Xinyue Qin

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen plays important regulatory and protective roles in the central nervous system through estrogen receptor a mediation.Previous studies applied eukaryotic expression and lentiviral vectors carrying estrogen receptor a to clarify the undedying mechanisms,in the present study,an adenovirus vector expressing the mouse full estrogen receptor a gene was constructed to identify biological characteristics of estrogen receptor a recombinant adenovirus infecting nerve cells.Primary cultured mouse nerve cells were first infected with estrogen receptor a recombinant adenovirus at various multiplicities of infection,followed by 100 multiplicity of infection.Results showed overexpression of estrogen receptor a mRNA and protein in the infected nerve cells.Estrogen receptor a recombinant adenovirus at 100 multiplicity of infection successfully infected neurons and upregulated estrogen receptor a mRNA and protein expression.

  2. Sex hormones modulate circulating antioxidant enzymes: Impact of estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bellanti

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Menopause is associated with significant change in antioxidant gene expression that in turn affects circulating redox state. Estrogens replacement therapy is able to prevent and counteract such modifications by acting as regulators of key antioxidant gene expression. These findings suggest that antioxidant genes are, almost in part, under the control of sex hormones, and that pathophysiology of the difference in gender disease may depend on the redox biology.

  3. Can estrogen keep you smart? Evidence from clinical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwin, B B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review and critically analyze the biological plausibility of and the clinical empirical evidence concerning a link between estrogen levels and memory in women. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE search of the literature published from 1980 to 1998. Studies published between 1952 and 1980 that were known to the author were also included. STUDY SELECTION: Sixteen prospective, placebo-controlled studies in humans. DATA SYNTHESIS: Most of the studies that used neuropsychological tests with known...

  4. The Role of Estrogen Receptor β in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christoforou, Paraskevi; Christopoulos, Panagiotis F; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the main molecular tool regulating growth and function of the prostate gland, estrogen receptor β (ERβ) is involved in the differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells and numerous antiproliferative actions on prostate cancer cells. However, ERβ splice variants have been associated with prostate cancer initiation and progression mechanisms. ERβ is promising as an anticancer therapy and in the prevention of prostate cancer. Herein, we review the re...

  5. The role of Estrogen Receptor Beta in Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Christoforou, Paraskevi; Christopoulos, Panagiotis F; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the main molecular tool regulating growth and function of prostate gland, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is involved contributive in the differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells and numerous antiproliferative actions on prostate cancer cells. However, ERβ splice variants have been associated with prostate cancer initiation and progression mechanisms. Nowadays, ERß is a promising target as an anticancer therapy and prevention for prostate cancer....

  6. Equine estrogen-induced mammary tumors in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Yoshinori; Liu, Xiaoping; Suzuki, Naomi; OKAMOTO, KANAKO; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Santosh Laxmi, Y. R.; Sayama, Kazutoshi; Shibutani, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Long-term hormone replacement therapy is associated with an increased risk of breast, ovarian and endometrial cancers in women. Equine estrogens are a principal component of hormone replacement therapy; however, their tumorigenic potential toward mammary tissue and reproductive organs has not been extensively explored. A pellet containing equilin was inserted under the skin of female ACI rats and the development of mammary tumors was monitored. Histological examination revealed premalignant l...

  7. Hepatosteatosis and estrogen increase apolipoprotein O production in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidinger, Barbara; Weijler, Anna M; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Hermann, Marcela

    2016-08-01

    Apolipoprotein O (ApoO) is a recently discovered plasma apolipoprotein that may also play a role in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Possibly due to this complexity, its physiological functions have not been elucidated yet. To gain insight from a non-mammalian experimental system, we have investigated the regulation of ApoO levels in an alternative, well-suited model for studies on lipid metabolism, the chicken. qPCR using specific primer pairs and Western blot analysis with our rabbit anti-chicken ApoO antiserum demonstrated ApoO in the liver of chickens fed a control or a fat-enriched diet, as well as in 2 chicken hepatoma cell lines, LMH cells and the estrogen-responsive LMH-2A cells, under conditions of lipid loading by incubation with BSA-complexed oleic acid. Induced triglyceride accumulation in both the liver and the hepatic cells was associated with significantly increased levels of ApoO mRNA and protein. Furthermore, upon treatment for 24 h with estrogen of the estrogen receptor-expressing LMH-2A cells, quantitative analysis of ApoO transcripts and Western blotting revealed increases of ApoO expression. Finally, upon a single administration of estrogen to roosters that leads to hyperlipidemia, higher hepatic levels of both ApoO transcript and protein were observed within 24 h. Based on these data, we propose that hepatic expression of ApoO is tightly linked not only to diet-induced hepatosteatosis, but also to increased lipoprotein-production induced by, e.g., hormones. The findings support a role of ApoO as an effector of compromised mitochondrial function that likely accompanies the onset of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27126072

  8. Colocalization of Estrogen Receptors with the Fluorescent Tamoxifen Derivative, FLTX1, Analyzed by Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Araceli; Marín, Raquel; Marrero-Alonso, Jorge; Boto, Alicia; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that competitively binds the ligand-binding domain of estrogen receptors. Binding of tamoxifen displaces its cognate ligand, 17β-estradiol, thereby hampering the activation of estrogen receptors. Cellular labeling of ER is typically carried out using specific antibodies which require permeabilization of cells, incubation with secondary antibodies, and are expensive and time consuming. In this article, we describe the usefulness of FLTX1, a novel fluorescent tamoxifen derivative, which allows the labeling of estrogen receptors in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry studies, both under permeabilized and non-permeabilized conditions. Further, besides labeling canonical estrogen receptors, this novel fluorescent probe is also suitable for the identification of unconventional targets such membrane estrogen receptors as well as other noncanonical targets, some of which are likely responsible for the number of undesired side effects reported during long-term tamoxifen treatments. PMID:26585134

  9. Advances of Targeted Therapy Based on Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathway 
in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang XU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that estrogen promotes tumor growth in both estrogen target organs and non-target organs. Estrogen regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via two different receptors, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ. In recent decades, with the clarification of the ERα-mediated signaling pathways in breast cancer, targeted therapy through these pathways have successfully been used in clinical application. Tamoxifen, the classic representative, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM. Along with the elucidation of the role of estrogen in the pathophysiology of lung cancer, targeted lung cancer treatment based on the ER signaling pathways is also gradually being applied and it could become an important part of the comprehensive treatment for lung cancer.

  10. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelten, Courtney S; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women's health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  11. Estrogen: a master regulator of bioenergetic systems in the brain and body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Jamaica R; Yao, Jia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen is a fundamental regulator of the metabolic system of the female brain and body. Within the brain, estrogen regulates glucose transport, aerobic glycolysis, and mitochondrial function to generate ATP. In the body, estrogen protects against adiposity, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes, and regulates energy intake and expenditure. During menopause, decline in circulating estrogen is coincident with decline in brain bioenergetics and shift towards a metabolically compromised phenotype. Compensatory bioenergetic adaptations, or lack thereof, to estrogen loss could determine risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Estrogen coordinates brain and body metabolism, such that peripheral metabolic state can indicate bioenergetic status of the brain. By generating biomarker profiles that encompass peripheral metabolic changes occurring with menopause, individual risk profiles for decreased brain bioenergetics and cognitive decline can be created. Biomarker profiles could identify women at risk while also serving as indicators of efficacy of hormone therapy or other preventative interventions. PMID:23994581

  12. Removal characteristics of steroid estrogens in trickling filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳春; 胡碧波; WHEATLEY; Andrew; GLASGOW; Graeme

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of steroid estroens from sewage treatment works (STW) is to be regulated by Environmental Quality Standard in the UK,thus requiring the understanding of removal characteristics of steroid estroens in trickling filters to benefit UK water industry with trickling filters used in 75% STWs. Two pilot-scale trickling filters were operated in parallel to treat synthetic sewage spiked with oestrone (E1),oestradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinyl oestradiol (EE2) at environmentally related concentrations. Control experiments show that biodegradation is the dominant removal mechanism although adsorption onto biofilm solids prior to biodegradation would be part of the overall mechanisms of estrogen removal. Approximately 44.7%-58.9% is removed by the pilot trickling filter normally operated,whilst the 1:1 recirculation increases 29.0%-32.2% estrogen removals by improved wetting rate and hydraulic retention time supported by tracer experiment with lithium chloride. Extra feed solids with 32.0% higher suspended solids levels inhibited estrogen removals by 10.8%-34.4% rather than helping bridge adsorption to the biofilm,and the change of particle characteristics with higher adsorption potency would benefit the removal.

  13. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Pósa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, the myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers.

  14. Anti-Estrogen Withdrawal Effect With Raloxifene? A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmo, Walter

    2016-09-01

    A 66-year-old patient presented with acute recurrent metastatic estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, Her-2/neu-negative breast cancer, bone lesions (lumbar spine, pelvis), pulmonary nodules, hepatic metastasis, elevated cancer antigen 15 and liver enzymes, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. The patient had been taking raloxifene for approximately 8 years. After discontinuation, clinical parameters and symptoms improved rapidly without oncological therapy or other forms of treatment. Three months after raloxifene discontinuation, capecitabine was initiated by the treating oncologist who deemed an anti-estrogen withdrawal effect (AEWE) implausible. However, the lasting regression was more indicative of a raloxifene rebound effect than chemotherapy or other interventions. Today, the patient is asymptomatic with a good performance status. Hepatic metastatic regression has been confirmed, without any oncological treatment administered in the past 16 months and approximately 23 months following the withdrawal of raloxifene. This case highlights the need to screen breast cancer patients for the possibility of an AEWE if they are using raloxifene and possibly similar selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) which includes tamoxifen, when diagnosed with advanced breast cancer, especially in the recurrent disease setting. PMID:27411856

  15. Anatomical distribution of estrogen target neurons in turtle brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoradiographic studies with [3H]estradiol-17β in red-eared turtle (Pseudemys scripta elegans) show concentration and retention of radioactivity in nuclei of neurons in certain regions. Accumulations of estrogen target neurons exist in the periventricular brain with relationships to ventral extensions of the forebrain ventricles, including parolfactory, amygdaloid, septal, preoptic, hypothalamic and thalamic areas, as well as the dorsal ventricular ridge, the piriform cortex, and midbrain-pontine periaqueductal structures. The general anatomical pattern of distribution of estrogen target neurons corresponds to those observed not only in another reptile (Anolis carolinensis), but also in birds and mammals, as well as in teleosts and cyclostomes. In Pseudemys, which appears to display an intermediate degree of phylogenetic differentiation, the amygdaloid-septal-preoptic groups of estrogen target neurons constitute a continuum. In phylogenetic ascendency, e.g. in mammals, these cell populations are increasingly separated and distinct, while in phylogenetic descendency, e.g. in teleosts and cyclostomes, an amygdaloid group appears to be absent or contained within the septal-preoptic target cell population. (Auth.)

  16. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  17. Suburbanization, estrogen contamination, and sex ratio in wild amphibian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Max R; Giller, Geoffrey S J; Barber, Larry B; Fitzgerald, Kevin C; Skelly, David K

    2015-09-22

    Research on endocrine disruption in frog populations, such as shifts in sex ratios and feminization of males, has predominantly focused on agricultural pesticides. Recent evidence suggests that suburban landscapes harbor amphibian populations exhibiting similar levels of endocrine disruption; however the endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) sources are unknown. Here, we show that sex ratios of metamorphosing frogs become increasingly female-dominated along a suburbanization gradient. We further show that suburban ponds are frequently contaminated by the classical estrogen estrone and a variety of EDCs produced by plants (phytoestrogens), and that the diversity of organic EDCs is correlated with the extent of developed land use and cultivated lawn and gardens around a pond. Our work also raises the possibility that trace-element contamination associated with human land use around suburban ponds may be contributing to the estrogenic load within suburban freshwaters and constitutes another source of estrogenic exposure for wildlife. These data suggest novel, unexplored pathways of EDC contamination in human-altered environments. In particular, we propose that vegetation changes associated with suburban neighborhoods (e.g., from forests to lawns and ornamental plants) increase the distribution of phytoestrogens in surface waters. The result of frog sex ratios varying as a function of human land use implicates a role for environmental modulation of sexual differentiation in amphibians, which are assumed to only have genetic sex determination. Overall, we show that endocrine disruption is widespread in suburban frog populations and that the causes are likely diverse. PMID:26372955

  18. The Estrogen Receptor-β Expression in De Quervain's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Wang, Ping-Hui; Wu, Po-Ting; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain's disease) is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain's. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (an inflammatory enzyme), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Von Willebrand's factor (vWF). De Quervain's occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors--IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain's disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain's disease therapy. PMID:26556342

  19. Prenatal lignan exposures, pregnancy urine estrogen profiles and birth outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During pregnancy, human exposure to endogenous estrogens and xenoestrogens (such as lignans) may comprehensively impact the gestational maintenance and fetal growth. We measured the concentrations of 5 lignans and the profile of 13 estrogen metabolites (EMs) in the urine samples of 328 pregnant women and examined their associations with birth outcomes. We found significantly positive associations between gestational age and urinary matairesinol (MAT), enterodiol (END) and enterolactone (ENL), as well as 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs. There were consistently positive relationships between END and the 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs. The positive relationships of MAT, END and ENL exposures with the length of gestation were mainly in the low exposure strata of the levels of these EMs. This study reveals that MAT, END and ENL as well as 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs are associated with birth outcomes, and that there are interactive relationships between lignans and 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs with birth outcomes. - Highlights: • We examined relations between prenatal lignan exposures and birth outcomes. • We examined relations between pregnancy urine estrogen profiles and birth outcomes. • MAT, END and ENL are associated with birth outcomes. • 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs are associated with birth outcomes. • There are interactive relationships between ligans and EMs with birth outcomes. - Prenatal lignan exposures and EM levels were interactively related to birth outcomes

  20. Distribution of specific estrogen receptor in various organs and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For clinical application of radioreceptor assay, distribution of the estrogen receptor in various organs and tumors was studied. The materials consisted of 110 specimens from several organs of 10 rabbits (5 female, 5 male) and 69 specimens from 36 patients who underwent surgical procedures at St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Medical College. The specific estradiol binding index was measured by competitive binding of 6,7-3H-estradiol and unlabeled estradiol to the estroge receptor of these tissues. The specific estradiol binding index was classified as high positive when the index was above 23.1%, low positive when the index was 12.1-23.0%, and negative when the index was below 12.0%. It is concluded that estrogen receptors are not confined to any specific target organ but distributed in other organs and tumor tissues, to a different degree. Clinical significance of estrogen receptor in breast carcinoma and other tumors in the Korean subjects should be further evaluated. (Author)

  1. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. PMID:27509656

  2. Bipolar Host Materials for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-02-01

    It is important to balance holes and electrons in the emitting layer of organic light-emitting diodes to maximize recombination efficiency and the accompanying external quantum efficiency. Therefore, the host materials of the emitting layer should transport both holes and electrons for the charge balance. From this perspective, bipolar hosts have been popular as the host materials of thermally activated delayed fluorescent devices and phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. In this review, we have summarized recent developments of bipolar hosts and suggested perspectives of host materials for organic light-emitting diodes.

  3. Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2008-02-01

    Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting device (AMOLED) realizing top emission by using bottom-emitting organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structure was proposed. The multilayer structure of OLED deposited in the conventional sequence is not on the thin film transistor (TFT) backplane but on the OLED plane. The contact between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode of TFT backplane and metal cathode of OLED plane is implemented by using transfer electrode. The stringent pixel design for aperture ratio of the bottom-emitting AMOLED, as well as special technology for the top ITO electrode of top-emitting AMOLED, is unnecessary in the laminated AMOLED.

  4. The Potential Contribution of Phytoestrogens and Organochlorine Pesticides in an Experimental Fish Diet to Estrogenic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Munekazu; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Ushijima, Marie; Inudo, Makiko; Honda, Eiko; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Cho, Hyeon-Seo; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Arizono, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Phytoestrogens and organochlorine pesticides in the diet of laboratory animals are a possible source of interference in bioassays that assess estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the levels of dietary phytoestrogens, organochlorine pesticides and the estrogenic activity of various diets for an experimental fish and discuss the potential contribution of these substances to estrogenic activity, in comparison with those used in previous studies. After hydrolysis with β-gluc...

  5. Estrogen signaling prevents diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance in male mice with obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lin; Martinez, Melissa N.; Emfinger, Christopher H.; Palmisano, Brian T.; John M Stafford

    2014-01-01

    The development of insulin resistance in the liver is a key event that drives dyslipidemia and predicts diabetes and cardiovascular risk with obesity. Clinical data show that estrogen signaling in males helps prevent adiposity and insulin resistance, which may be mediated through estrogen receptor-α (ERα). The tissues and pathways that mediate the benefits of estrogen signaling in males with obesity are not well defined. In female mice, ERα signaling in the liver helps to correct pathway-sele...

  6. Different modes of hippocampal plasticity in response to estrogen in young and aged female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Michelle M.; Shah, Ravi A.; Janssen, William G. M.; Morrison, John H.

    2001-01-01

    Estrogen regulates hippocampal dendritic spine density and synapse number in an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent manner, and these effects may be of particular importance in the context of age-related changes in endocrine status. We investigated estrogen's effects on axospinous synapse density and the synaptic distribution of the NMDA receptor subunit, NR1, within the context of aging. Although estrogen induced an increase in axospinous synapse density in young animals, it did n...

  7. Oleocanthal Modulates Estradiol-Induced Gene Expression Involving Estrogen Receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Djiogue, Sefirin; Ehrhardt, Tino; Zierau, Oliver; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Halabalaki, Maria; Vollmer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Oleocanthal is a bioactive compound from olive oil. It has attracted considerable attention as it is anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Delineated from its polyphenolic structure, the aim of this study was to characterize oleocanthal towards estrogenic properties. This might contribute to partly explain the beneficial effects described for the Mediterranean diet. Estrogenic properties of oleocanthal were assessed by different methods: a) stimulation of reporter gene activity in MVLN or RNDA cells either expressing estrogen receptor α or β, b) stimulation of luciferase reporter gene activity in U2OS osteosarcoma cells expressing estrogen receptor α or β, and c) elucidation of the impact on estradiol-induced gene expression in U2OS cells transduced with both estrogen receptors. Depending on the cell line origin, oleocanthal inhibited luciferase activity (MVLN, U2OS-estrogen receptor β) or weakly induced reporter gene activity at 10 µM in U2OS-estrogen receptor α cells. However, oleocanthal inhibited stimulation of luciferase activity by estradiol from both estrogen receptors. Oleocanthal, if given alone, did not stimulate gene expression in U2OS cells, but it significantly modulated the response of estradiol. Oleocanthal enhanced the effect of estradiol on the regulation of those genes, which are believed to be regulated through heterodimeric estrogen receptors. As the estrogenic response pattern of oleocanthal is rather unique, we compared the results obtained with oleacein. Oleocanthal binds to both estrogen receptors inducing estradiol-agonistic or antiagonistic effects depending on the cell line. Regarding regulation of gene expression in U2OS-estrogen receptor α/β cells, oleocanthal and oleacein enhanced estradiol-mediated regulation of heterodimer-regulated genes. PMID:26166135

  8. Identification of estrogen target genes during zebrafish embryonic development through transcriptomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixin Hao

    Full Text Available Estrogen signaling is important for vertebrate embryonic development. Here we have used zebrafish (Danio rerio as a vertebrate model to analyze estrogen signaling during development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1 µM 17β-estradiol (E2 or vehicle from 3 hours to 4 days post fertilization (dpf, harvested at 1, 2, 3 and 4 dpf, and subjected to RNA extraction for transcriptome analysis using microarrays. Differentially expressed genes by E2-treatment were analyzed with hierarchical clustering followed by biological process and tissue enrichment analysis. Markedly distinct sets of genes were up and down-regulated by E2 at the four different time points. Among these genes, only the well-known estrogenic marker vtg1 was co-regulated at all time points. Despite this, the biological functional categories targeted by E2 were relatively similar throughout zebrafish development. According to knowledge-based tissue enrichment, estrogen responsive genes were clustered mainly in the liver, pancreas and brain. This was in line with the developmental dynamics of estrogen-target tissues that were visualized using transgenic zebrafish containing estrogen responsive elements driving the expression of GFP (Tg(5xERE:GFP. Finally, the identified embryonic estrogen-responsive genes were compared to already published estrogen-responsive genes identified in male adult zebrafish (Gene Expression Omnibus database. The expressions of a few genes were co-regulated by E2 in both embryonic and adult zebrafish. These could potentially be used as estrogenic biomarkers for exposure to estrogens or estrogenic endocrine disruptors in zebrafish. In conclusion, our data suggests that estrogen effects on early embryonic zebrafish development are stage- and tissue- specific.

  9. Selective coactivation of estrogen-dependent transcription by CITED1 CBP/p300-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Yahata, Tetsuro; Shao, Wenlin; Endoh, Hideaki; Hur, Jingyung; Coser, Kathryn R.; Sun, Huiping; Ueda, Yoshitaka; Kato, Shigeaki; Isselbacher, Kurt J.; Brown, Myles; Shioda, Toshi

    2001-01-01

    CITED1, a CBP/p300-binding nuclear protein that does not bind directly to DNA, is a transcriptional coregulator. Here, we show evidence that CITED1 functions as a selective coactivator for estrogen-dependent transcription. When transfected, CITED1 enhanced transcriptional activation by the ligand-binding/AF2 domain of both estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and ERβ in an estrogen-dependent manner, but it affected transcriptional activities of other nuclear receptors only marginally. CITED1 bound direc...

  10. Urogenital epithelial cells as simple markers of estrogen response in infants: methods and applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A Adgent

    Full Text Available Exposure to estrogen-mimicking chemicals during critical periods of development, such as infancy, may have adverse effects. However, these effects can be difficult to characterize in most epidemiologic studies. For example, growth of reproductive organs may be susceptible to estrogenic chemicals, but measuring it requires skilled ultrasound examination; timing of pubertal onset may be altered, but observing it requires long-term follow up. To address the need for a simple marker of response to estrogenic exposures in infants, we propose a novel application of a classic marker of estrogen response in adult women: cytological evaluation of urogenital epithelial cells. In this cross-sectional study of 34 female and 41 male infants, we demonstrate that epithelial cells can be obtained from swabs of the vaginal introitus (females and urethral meatus (males, as well as from spun urine, and that these cells respond to differential estrogenic conditions, as indicated by the relative abundance of the superficial epithelial cell type. To model varying estrogen exposure, we sampled from infants who were either newborn (highly exposed to maternal estrogens, or 12 weeks old (12 W (negligibly exposed to estrogen. Newborns had a higher percentage of superficial cells (%S, as compared to 12 W (mean ± standard error: 8.3 ± 1.8 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 (p < 0.01, consistent with an estrogen response. This difference in %S from newborn to 12 W was observed similarly for swab (-7.6 ± 1.7 and urine (-7.3 ± 2.6 specimens and for males (-9.6 ± 2.9 and females (-5.2 ± 2.1. Examination of urogenital epithelial cells can successfully demonstrate estrogen response in both sexes, using cell specimens collected from either swab or urine sampling. In future studies, this simple, non-invasive method may be applied to assess whether estrogen-mimicking chemicals produce an estrogenic response in infants.

  11. Urogenital Epithelial Cells as Simple Markers of Estrogen Response in Infants: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Flake, Gordon P.; Umbach, David M.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Bernbaum, Judy C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to estrogen-mimicking chemicals during critical periods of development, such as infancy, may have adverse effects. However, these effects can be difficult to characterize in most epidemiologic studies. For example, growth of reproductive organs may be susceptible to estrogenic chemicals, but measuring it requires skilled ultrasound examination; timing of pubertal onset may be altered, but observing it requires long-term follow up. To address the need for a simple marker of response to estrogenic exposures in infants, we propose a novel application of a classic marker of estrogen response in adult women: cytological evaluation of urogenital epithelial cells. In this cross-sectional study of 34 female and 41 male infants, we demonstrate that epithelial cells can be obtained from swabs of the vaginal introitus (females) and urethral meatus (males), as well as from spun urine, and that these cells respond to differential estrogenic conditions, as indicated by the relative abundance of the superficial epithelial cell type. To model varying estrogen exposure, we sampled from infants who were either newborn (highly exposed to maternal estrogens), or 12 weeks old (12W) (negligibly exposed to estrogen). Newborns had a higher percentage of superficial cells (%S), as compared to 12W (mean ± standard error: 8.3 ± 1.8 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2) (p < 0.01), consistent with an estrogen response. This difference in %S from newborn to 12W was observed similarly for swab (-7.6 ± 1.7) and urine (-7.3 ± 2.6) specimens and for males (-9.6 ± 2.9) and females (-5.2 ± 2.1). Examination of urogenital epithelial cells can successfully demonstrate estrogen response in both sexes, using cell specimens collected from either swab or urine sampling. In future studies, this simple, non-invasive method may be applied to assess whether estrogen-mimicking chemicals produce an estrogenic response in infants. PMID:24146956

  12. [Effects and side effects of estrogens and gestagens in pediatric and adolescent gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, C

    1990-10-01

    An overview is given on the indications and possibilities of estrogen-progestagen medication in girls during childhood and adolescence. The physiological effects of estrogen and progestagen treatment are described, and practical advice is given for the management with estrogens-progestagens of labial adhesions, lichen sclerosus, vulvovaginitis, breast anomalies, the different forms of amenorrhoeas, pubertas tarda, anorexia-bulimia, bleeding anomalies and high stature. PMID:2079940

  13. An Assessment of Potential Exposure and Risk from Estrogens in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Daniel J.; Mastrocco, Frank; Nowak, Edward; Johnston, James; Yekel, Harry; Pfeiffer, Danielle; Hoyt, Marilyn; DuPlessie, Beth M.; Anderson, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Detection of estrogens in the environment has raised concerns in recent years because of their potential to affect both wildlife and humans. Objectives We compared exposures to prescribed and naturally occurring estrogens in drinking water to exposures to naturally occurring background levels of estrogens in the diet of children and adults and to four independently derived acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) to determine whether drinking water intakes are larger or smaller than dietary...

  14. Fruit intake associated with urinary estrogen metabolites in healthy premenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Reding, Kerryn W.; Atkinson, Charlotte; Westerlind, Kim C.; Stanczyk, Frank; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Yong, Mellissa; Newton, Katherine M.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2012-01-01

    Urinary concentrations of 2:16-hydroxyestrone (2:16-OHE1) approximate concentrations of 2-OHE1 and 16α -OHE1 in breast tissue. As estrogens are purported to be involved in breast cancer development, the 2:16-OHE1 ratio can provide an indication of estrogen metabolite exposure in the breast. With prior studies observing associations between urinary estrogen metabolites and dietary intake of fruits, vegetables, and fiber ascertained from food questionnaires, we examined associations between die...

  15. Immunolocalization of estrogen receptor beta in the epididymis of mature and immature pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Maggiolini, M.; L Siciliano; B Bilinska; CARPINO, A.; V Rago

    2004-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role of estrogens in the male reproduction via their specific estrogen receptors (ERalpha/ERbeta). Estrogen receptor distribution along the genital tract tissues has been described in different species, but it is unknown in the pig. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to localize ERbeta in the epididymis of mature and immature pigs (aged 2 and 18 months, respectively). Immunohistochemistry was carried out on paraffin-embedded tissues using a mouse...

  16. Application of the analytical methods REM/EDX, AES and SNMS to a chlorine induced aluminium corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Scheithauer, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy - SEM - with energy dispersive X-ray detection - EDX -, Auger electron spectroscopy - AES - and sputtered neutral mass spectrometry - SNMS - have been used to characterize a chlorine induced corrosion of an aluminium metallisation. SEM/EDX detects the characteristic X-rays that are emitted from the first few micrometers beneath the specimens surface after inner shell ionisation by the primary electrons. AES detects the alternatively ejected Auger electrons that ar...

  17. Profile of bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens for the treatment of estrogen deficiency symptoms and osteoporosis in women at risk of fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossini M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Rossini,1 Stefano Lello,2 Ignazio Sblendorio,3 Ombretta Viapiana,1 Elena Fracassi,1 Silvano Adami,1 Davide Gatti11Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, University of Verona, Italy; 2Endocrinological Gynecology, Pathophysiology of Menopause and Osteoporosis, Dermopathic Institute of Immacolata, Roma, Italy; 3Medical Coach Italia Center, Bari, ItalyAbstract: Decreasing levels of estrogens during menopause are associated with reduced bone density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. Many women also experience bothersome vasomotor and vaginal symptoms during the menopausal transition. Results of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials have shown that both systemic estrogen therapy or hormone therapy (estrogen combined with a progestin are useful to prevent bone loss, and they are the most effective treatment for such climacteric symptoms as hot flushes, sweating, vaginal dryness, and dyspareunia. Unfortunately, estrogen therapy and hormone therapy increase the risk of endometrial and breast cancer, respectively. The selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs result in positive estrogenic effects on bone, with no negative effects on the endometrium and breast but do not provide relief from postmenopausal symptoms. The combination of a SERM with estrogen as a tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC is a new strategy for the prevention of bone loss and the treatment of climacteric symptoms. This combination is particularly interesting from a clinical point of view, taking into account that estrogen alone did not increase breast cancer risk by the Women's Health Initiative. TSEC is hypothesized to provide the benefits of estrogen-alone therapy, with an improved tolerability profile because the SERM component can make possible the elimination of progestin. The objective of this review was to critically evaluate the evidence from the reports published to date on the use of bazedoxifene (a third

  18. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30 μm for a bias increment of 0.2 V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity

  19. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettinari, G., E-mail: giorgio.pettinari@cnr.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); National Research Council (CNR), Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN-CNR), Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Patanè, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M. [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-09

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30 μm for a bias increment of 0.2 V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  20. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinari, G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.; Patanè, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30 μm for a bias increment of 0.2 V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  1. Efficient organic light emitting-diodes (OLEDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of intense research globally, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has steadily emerged as the ultimate display technology of choice for the coming decades. Portable active matrix OLED displays have already become prevalent, and even large-sized ultra-high definition 4K TVs are being mass-produced. More exotic applications such as wearable displays have been commercialized recently. With the burgeoning success in displays, researchers are actively bringing the technology forward into the exciting solid-state lighting market. This book presents the knowledge needed for

  2. Silicon Light Emitting Devices in CMOS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Da; LIU Hai-Jun; LIU Jin-Bin; GU Ming; HUANG Bei-Ju

    2007-01-01

    @@ Two silicon light emitting devices with different structures are realized in standard 0.35 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. They operate in reverse breakdown mode and can be turned on at 8.3 V. Output optical powers of 13.6nW and 12.1 nW are measured at 10 V and 100 mA, respectively, and both the calculated light emission intensities are more than 1 mW/cm2. The optical spectra of the two devices are between 600-790 nm with a clear peak near 760 nm.

  3. Aero particles characterization emitted by mobile sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our country, the mobile sources that conform most of the emissions at the atmosphere, are concentrated on the urban areas. For the present work, samples coming from the escapes of terrestrial transport were obtained, such as: passenger buses, load transport and particular vehicles of the Metropolitan area of the Toluca valley. The material was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy of low vacuum and X-ray diffraction. The objective was to characterize the emitted particles by mobile sources, morphological and chemically to know the structure, size and elements that compose them. (Author)

  4. Light-emitting waveguide-plasmon polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, S R K; Verschuuren, M A; Rivas, J Gomez

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of light in an optical waveguide strongly coupled to a periodic array of metallic nanoantennas. This coupling gives rise to hybrid waveguide-plasmon polaritons (WPPs), which undergo a transmutation from plasmon to waveguide mode and viceversa as the eigenfrequency detuning of the bare states transits through zero. Near zero detuning, the structure is nearly transparent in the far-field but sustains strong local field enhancements inside the waveguide. Consequently, light-emitting WPPs are strongly enhanced at energies and in-plane momenta for which WPPs minimize light extinction. We elucidate the unusual properties of these polaritons through a classical model of coupled harmonic oscillators.

  5. Studies of outward-emitting coaxial vircator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a novel concept of vircator geometry proposed, the outward-emitting coaxial vircator (OECV) is at the cutting edge in the field of high-power microwave (HPM) source researches. Theoretical analyses are carried out to study the space-charge-limiting current in coaxial configuration and the terms of virtual cathode formation. According to the simulation results, OECV has the advantages in energy conversion efficiency and bears the potentialities in increasing the high-power microwave pulse width, as well as in generating HPM in relatively low bands. Two kinds of geometries for HPM emission are also given

  6. Deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, X.; Deng, J.; Zhang, J.P.; Lunev, A.; Bilenko, Y.; Katona, T.; Gaska, R. [Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc., 1195 Atlas Road, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States); Shur, M.S. [Department of Electrical Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Shatalov, M.; Khan, A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We report on the development of AlGaN-based deep UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission wavelengths from 254 to 340 nm, focusing on the improvement of 280 nm LEDs efficiency. Under optimal device structure the UV LEDs efficiency was found to strongly depend on the AlGaN material quality. Milliwatt-power level LEDs were demonstrated for the 254-340 nm spectral range, and for 280 nm LEDs powers reaching 2.5 mW was achieved at 20 mA DC. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Postlesion estradiol treatment increases cortical cholinergic innervations via estrogen receptor-α dependent nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszegi, Zsombor; Szego, Éva M; Cheong, Rachel Y; Tolod-Kemp, Emeline; Ábrahám, István M

    2011-09-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) treatment exerts rapid, nonclassical actions via intracellular signal transduction system in basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons in vivo. Here we examined the effect of E2 treatment on lesioned BFC neurons in ovariectomized mice and the role of E2-induced nonclassical action in this treatment. Mice given an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) injection into the substantia innominata-nucleus basalis magnocellularis complex (SI-NBM) exhibited cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM and ipsilateral cholinergic fiber loss in the cortex. A single injection of E2 after NMDA lesion did not have an effect on cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM, but it restored the ipsilateral cholinergic fiber density in the cortex in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The most effective cholinergic fiber restoration was observed with 33 ng/g E2 treatment at 1 h after NMDA lesion. The E2-induced cholinergic fiber restoration was absent in neuron-specific estrogen receptor-α knockout mice in vivo. Selective activation of nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo by estren induced E2-like restorative actions. Selective blockade of the MAPK or protein kinase A pathway in vivo prevented E2's ability to restore cholinergic fiber loss. Finally, studies in intact female mice revealed an E2-induced restorative effect that was similar to that of E2-treated ovariectomized mice. These observations demonstrate that a single E2 treatment restores the BFC fiber loss in the cortex, regardless of endogenous E2 levels. They also reveal the critical role of nonclassical estrogen signaling via estrogen receptor-α and protein kinase A-MAPK pathways in E2-induced restorative action in the cholinergic system in vivo.

  8. The role of estrogens at men. Part 2. Private clinical endocrinology and pathophysiology of estrogens at men

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Tyuzikov; S Yu Kalinchenko; L. O. Vorslov; Yu A Tishova

    2015-01-01

    Until now, estrogens are traditionally considered primarily as key hormones that perform critical functions in females, however, their role in males is not less important, although it remains understudied. However, a deep understanding of male physiology and endocrinology, it is imperative to solve practical problems of gender pathogenetic therapy of men,s diseases, is impossible today without taking into account the key role of testosterone in males, and without rethinking the role of estrog...

  9. c-Src modulates estrogen-induced stress and apoptosis in estrogen-deprived breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Ping; Griffith, Obi L; Agboke, Fadeke; Anur, Pavana; Zou, Xiaojun; McDaniel, Russell E.; Creswell, Karen; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Gray, Joe W; Jordan, V Craig

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer is an important clinical phenomenon affecting long-term survival in this disease. Identifying factors that convey cell survival in this setting may guide improvements in treatment. Estrogen (E2) can induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells that have been selected for survival after E2 deprivation for long periods (MCF-7:5C cells), but the mechanisms underlying E2-induced stress in this setting have not been elucidated. Here, we report t...

  10. Effects of sex and estrogen on chicken ductus arteriosus reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinsenberg, Thijs W H; van der Sterren, Saskia; van Cleef, Anne N H; Schuurman, Marijn J; Agren, Pia; Villamor, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Sex hormones have an important influence on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology and sex differences in vascular reactivity have been widely demonstrated. In the present study we hypothesized 1) the presence of sexual dimorphism in chicken ductus arteriosus (DA) responsiveness to contractile and relaxant stimuli and 2) that estrogens are vasoactive in the chicken DA. In vitro contractions (assessed with a wire myograph) induced by normoxia, KCl, 4-aminopyridine, norepinephrine, phenylephrine, U46619, or endothelin-1, as well as relaxations induced by ACh, sodium nitroprusside, BAY 41-2272, PGE(2), isoproterenol, forskolin,Y-27632, and hydroxyfasudil were not significantly different between males and females. The estrogen 17beta-estradiol elicited concentration-dependent relaxation of KCl-, phenylephrine-, and oxygen-induced active tone in male and female chicken DA. The stereoisomer 17alpha-estradiol showed lesser relaxant effects, and the selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[(1)H]pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)tris-phenol (ERalpha) and 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERbeta) did not show any effect. There were no sex differences in the responses to estrogen. Endothelium removal or the presence of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ, the K(+) channel blockers tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, and charybdotoxin, or the ER antagonist fulvestrant did not modify 17beta-estradiol-induced relaxation. CaCl(2) (30 muM-10 mM) induced concentration-dependent contraction in DA rings depolarized by 62.5 mM KCl or stimulated with 21% O(2) in Ca(2+)-free medium. Preincubation with 17beta-estradiol or the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine produced an inhibition of CaCl(2)-induced contractions. In conclusion, there are no sex-related differences in chicken DA reactivity. The estrogen 17beta-estradiol induces an endothelium-independent relaxation of chicken DA that is not mediated by ER activation. This relaxant effect is, at least

  11. Effect of source-separated urine storage on estrogenic activity detected using bioluminescent yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Kivistö, Anniina; Palmroth, Marja R T; Karp, Matti

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to demonstrate that a microbial whole cell biosensor, bioluminescent yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BMAEREluc/ERα) can be applied to detect overall estrogenic activity from fresh and stored human urine. The use of source-separated urine in agriculture removes a human originated estrogen source from wastewater influents, subsequently enabling nutrient recycling. Estrogenic activity in urine should be diminished prior to urine usage in agriculture in order to prevent its migration to soil. A storage period of 6 months is required for hygienic reasons; therefore, estrogenic activity monitoring is of interest. The method measured cumulative female hormone-like activity. Calibration curves were prepared for estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α- ethinylestradiol and estriol. Estrogen concentrations of 0.29-29,640 μg L(-1) were detectable while limit of detection corresponded to 0.28-35 μg L(-1) of estrogens. The yeast sensor responded well to fresh and stored urine and gave high signals corresponding to 0.38-3,804 μg L(-1) of estrogens in different urine samples. Estrogenic activity decreased during storage, but was still higher than in fresh urine implying insufficient storage length. The biosensor was suitable for monitoring hormonal activity in urine and can be used in screening anthropogenic estrogen-like compounds interacting with the receptor.

  12. Effect of source-separated urine storage on estrogenic activity detected using bioluminescent yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Kivistö, Anniina; Palmroth, Marja R T; Karp, Matti

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to demonstrate that a microbial whole cell biosensor, bioluminescent yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BMAEREluc/ERα) can be applied to detect overall estrogenic activity from fresh and stored human urine. The use of source-separated urine in agriculture removes a human originated estrogen source from wastewater influents, subsequently enabling nutrient recycling. Estrogenic activity in urine should be diminished prior to urine usage in agriculture in order to prevent its migration to soil. A storage period of 6 months is required for hygienic reasons; therefore, estrogenic activity monitoring is of interest. The method measured cumulative female hormone-like activity. Calibration curves were prepared for estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α- ethinylestradiol and estriol. Estrogen concentrations of 0.29-29,640 μg L(-1) were detectable while limit of detection corresponded to 0.28-35 μg L(-1) of estrogens. The yeast sensor responded well to fresh and stored urine and gave high signals corresponding to 0.38-3,804 μg L(-1) of estrogens in different urine samples. Estrogenic activity decreased during storage, but was still higher than in fresh urine implying insufficient storage length. The biosensor was suitable for monitoring hormonal activity in urine and can be used in screening anthropogenic estrogen-like compounds interacting with the receptor. PMID:26804108

  13. Kaempferol is an estrogen-related receptor alpha and gamma inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjian; Fang, Fang; Huang, Zhiyan; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-02-18

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonoid that is thought to function as a selective estrogen receptor modulator. In this study, we established that kaempferol also functions as an inverse agonist for estrogen-related receptors alpha and gamma (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). We demonstrated that kaempferol binds to ERRalpha and ERRgamma and blocks their interaction with coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Kaempferol also suppressed the expressions of ERR-target genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 (PDK2 and PDK4). This evidence suggests that kaempferol may exert some of its biological effect through both estrogen receptors and estrogen-related receptors. PMID:19171140

  14. Urinary estrogen metabolites and self-reported infertility in women infected with Schistosoma haematobium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, endemic in 76 countries, that afflicts more than 240 million people. The impact of schistosomiasis on infertility may be underestimated according to recent literature. Extracts of Schistosoma haematobium include estrogen-like metabolites termed catechol-estrogens that down regulate estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estrogen responsive cells. In addition, schistosome derived catechol-estrogens induce genotoxicity that result in estrogen-DNA adducts. These catechol estrogens and the catechol-estrogen-DNA adducts can be isolated from sera of people infected with S. haematobium. The aim of this study was to study infertility in females infected with S. haematobium and its association with the presence of schistosome-derived catechol-estrogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken of female residents of a region in Bengo province, Angola, endemic for schistosomiasis haematobia. Ninety-three women and girls, aged from two (parents interviewed to 94 years were interviewed on present and previous urinary, urogenital and gynecological symptoms and complaints. Urine was collected from the participants for egg-based parasitological assessment of schistosome infection, and for liquid chromatography diode array detection electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/UV-DAD/ESI-MSn to investigate estrogen metabolites in the urine. Novel estrogen-like metabolites, potentially of schistosome origin, were detected in the urine of participants who were positive for eggs of S. haematobium, but not detected in urines negative for S. haematobium eggs. The catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts were significantly associated with schistosomiasis (OR 3.35; 95% CI 2.32-4.84; P≤0.001. In addition, presence of these metabolites was positively associated with infertility (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.13-16.70; P≤0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Estrogen metabolites occur widely in diverse

  15. Evaluation of Estrogenic Activity and Measurement of EDCs in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. C. Lee; J. Y. Jung; H. K.Kim

    2006-01-01

    Correlations between estrogenic activity and DOC/UV260 ratio in wastewater treatment processes were investigated to propose a simple, reliable and comprehensive indicator for the presence of estrogenic substances. Contrary to this,when short-term bioassays such as the E-SCREEN, receptor binding and reporter gene expression assays are used for detecting estrogenic activity in the wastewater sample, they require a long time, at least a few days. The major factors contributing to the estrogenic activity were found to be 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1). A good relationship between the DOC/UV260 ratio and the concentration of estrogens (E1 and E2) in the effluent of the activated sludge process was found: the E2 concentration increased as the DOC/UV260 ratio increased while the E1 concentration decreased. The relative estrogenic activity and DOC/UV260 ratio showed a good correlation (R2 = 0.84) for all sewage samples except the ozonized samples in the sewage treatment plants. This study shows that the estrogenic compounds are hard to be mineralized by the conventional biological processes. Advanced oxidation processes are required to further remove estrogenic substances in the secondary effluent. By analysis of DOC and UV260, the estrogenic activity in the wastewater can be rapidly estimated.

  16. Uterine Micro-Environment and Estrogen-Dependent Regulation of Osteopontin Expression in Mouse Blastocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhen Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER. Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  17. Androgens and estrogens in benign prostatic hyperplasia: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Ricke, William A

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology. While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, sex steroids have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Sufficient data exists linking androgens and androgen receptor pathways to BPH and use of androgen reducing compounds, such as 5α-reductase inhibitors which block the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, are a component of the standard of care for men with LUTS attributed to an enlarged prostate. However, BPH is a multifactorial disease and not all men respond well to currently available treatments, suggesting factors other than androgens are involved. Testosterone, the primary circulating androgen in men, can also be metabolized via CYP19/aromatase into the potent estrogen, estradiol-17β. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of endogenous and exogenous estrogens in directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation signifying potential roles in BPH. Recent research has demonstrated that estrogen receptor signaling pathways may be important in the development and maintenance of BPH and LUTS; however, new models are needed to genetically dissect estrogen regulated molecular mechanisms involved in BPH. More work is needed to identify estrogens and associated signaling pathways in BPH in order to target BPH with dietary and therapeutic SERMs.

  18. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer

  19. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Darong [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jonghokim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  20. Estrogen-dependent changes in serum iron levels as a translator of the adverse effects of estrogen during infection: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mawieh; Awadallah, Samir

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of estrogen often associate with increased susceptibility to infection. This has been attributed to the ability of estrogen to concomitantly enhance the growth and virulence of pathogens and suppress host immunity. But the exact mechanism of how estrogen mediates such effects, especially in cases where the pathogen and/or the immune components in question do not express estrogen receptors, has yet to be elucidated. Here we propose that translating the adverse effects of estrogen during infection is dependent to a significant degree upon its ability to manipulate iron homeostasis. For elevated levels of estrogen alter the synthesis and/or activity of several factors involved in iron metabolism including hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and hepcidin among others. This leads to the inhibition of hepcidin synthesis in hepatocytes and the maintenance of ferroportin (FPN) integrity on the surface of iron-releasing duodenal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and macrophages. Intact FPN permits the continuous efflux of dietary and stored iron into the circulation, which further enhances pathogen growth and virulence on the one hand and suppresses host immunity on the other. This new conceptual framework may help explain a multitude of disparate clinical and experimental observations pertinent to the relationship between estrogen and infection. PMID:24211145

  1. Electrically and Optically Readable Light Emitting Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Tan, Wei-Chun; Lu, Meng-Lin; Pan, Tai-Chun; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Electrochemical metallization memories based on redox-induced resistance switching have been considered as the next-generation electronic storage devices. However, the electronic signals suffer from the interconnect delay and the limited reading speed, which are the major obstacles for memory performance. To solve this problem, here we demonstrate the first attempt of light-emitting memory (LEM) that uses SiO2 as the resistive switching material in tandem with graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) light-emitting diode (LED). By utilizing the excellent properties of graphene, such as high conductivity, high robustness and high transparency, our proposed LEM enables data communication via electronic and optical signals simultaneously. Both the bistable light-emission state and the resistance switching properties can be attributed to the conducting filament mechanism. Moreover, on the analysis of current-voltage characteristics, we further confirm that the electroluminescence signal originates from the carrier tunneling, which is quite different from the standard p-n junction model. We stress here that the newly developed LEM device possesses a simple structure with mature fabrication processes, which integrates advantages of all composed materials and can be extended to many other material systems. It should be able to attract academic interest as well as stimulate industrial application.

  2. Organic bistable light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liping; Liu, Jie; Pyo, Seungmoon; Yang, Yang

    2002-01-01

    An organic bistable device, with a unique trilayer structure consisting of organic/metal/organic sandwiched between two outmost metal electrodes, has been invented. [Y. Yang, L. P. Ma, and J. Liu, U.S. Patent Pending, U.S. 01/17206 (2001)]. When the device is biased with voltages beyond a critical value (for example 3 V), the device suddenly switches from a high-impedance state to a low-impedance state, with a difference in injection current of more than 6 orders of magnitude. When the device is switched to the low-impedance state, it remains in that state even when the power is off. (This is called "nonvolatile" phenomenon in memory devices.) The high-impedance state can be recovered by applying a reverse bias; therefore, this bistable device is ideal for memory applications. In order to increase the data read-out rate of this type of memory device, a regular polymer light-emitting diode has been integrated with the organic bistable device, such that it can be read out optically. These features make the organic bistable light-emitting device a promising candidate for several applications, such as digital memories, opto-electronic books, and recordable papers.

  3. FLUORENE-BASED LIGHT-EMITTING POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-Lin Yu; Bin Liu; Jian Pei; Gang Zeng; Wei Huang

    2001-01-01

    Several series of fluorene-based light-emitting polymers with the emphasis on achieving efficient and stable blue light emission are reported. Spiro-functionalization may narrow the emission spectra (with smaller tail at longer wavelengths)of fluorene homopolymers to provide purer blue emission. The thermal spectral stability of the polymers could also be improved because of the elevation of the glass transition temperature caused by the spiro-functionalization. However, the excimer emission in fluorene homopolymers is not suppressed by the spiro-functionalization. Alternate copolymers of 9,9-dihexylfluorene and substituted phenylenes may emit efficient blue light both in solution and in film. The optical properties are dependent on the substitution on the phenylene ring. The alkoxy-substituted polymers displayed efficient PL and EL and good thermal spectral stability. The HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the polymers based on the backbone structure could be tuned in a wide range by attaching different functional groups on the phenylene ring. By attaching europium(III) complex at the ends of the side chains in the alternate copolymers, we have demonstrated a new approach to achieving red emission with a very narrow spectrum. The copolymers of 9,9-dihexylfluorene and thiophene and bithiophene with different substitutions were also synthesized to study the effect of substitution and regioregularity on the optical and other physical properties of the polymers.

  4. Pomegranate extract demonstrate a selective estrogen receptor modulator profile in human tumor cell lines and in vivo models of estrogen deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, Sreekumar; Santhosh Kumar, Thankayyan R; Lakshmi, Baddireddi S; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2012-07-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are estrogen receptor (ER) ligands exhibiting tissue-specific agonistic or antagonistic biocharacter and are used in the hormonal therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancers. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to exert antiproliferative effects on human breast cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the tissue-specific estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of methanol extract of pericarp of pomegranate (PME). PME was evaluated for antiproliferative activity at 20-320 μg/ml on human breast (MCF-7, MDA MB-231) endometrial (HEC-1A), cervical (SiHa, HeLa), ovarian (SKOV3) carcinoma and normal breast fibroblast (MCF-10A) cells. Competitive radioactive binding studies were carried out to ascertain whether PME interacts with ER. The reporter gene assay measured the estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of PME in MCF-7 and MDA MB-231 cells transiently transfected with plasmids coding estrogen response elements with a reporter gene (pG5-ERE-luc) and wild-type ERα (hEG0-ER). PME inhibited the binding of [³H] estradiol to ER and suppressed the growth and proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells. PME binds ER and down-regulated the transcription of estrogen-responsive reporter gene transfected into breast cancer cells. The expressions of selected estrogen-responsive genes were down-regulated by PME. Unlike 17β-estradiol [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)] and tamoxifen (10 mg/kg BW), PME (50 and 100 mg/kg BW) did not increase the uterine weight and proliferation in ovariectomized mice and its cardioprotective effects were comparable to that of 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, our findings suggest that PME displays a SERM profile and may have the potential for prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancers with beneficial effects in other hormone-dependent tissues. PMID:21839626

  5. Klotho/fibroblast growth factor 23- and PTH-independent estrogen receptor-α-mediated direct downregulation of NaPi-IIa by estrogen in the mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rose; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Faroqui, Rashma; Siddiqui, Faraaz; Hawse, John R; Amlal, Hassane

    2016-08-01

    Estrogen treatment causes renal phosphate (Pi) wasting and hypophosphatemia in rats and humans; however, the signaling mechanisms mediating this effect are still poorly understood. To determine the specific roles of estrogen receptor isoforms (ERα and ERβ) and the Klotho pathway in mediating these effects, we studied the effects of estrogen on renal Pi handling in female mice with null mutations of ERα or ERβ or Klotho and their wild type (WT) using balance studies in metabolic cages. Estrogen treatment of WT and ERβ knockout (KO) mice caused a significant reduction in food intake along with increased renal phosphate wasting. The latter resulted from a significant downregulation of NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIc protein abundance. The mRNA expression levels of both transporters were unchanged in estrogen-treated mice. These effects on both food intake and renal Pi handling were absent in ERα KO mice. Estrogen treatment of Klotho KO mice or parathyroid hormone (PTH)-depleted thyroparathyroidectomized mice exhibited a significant downregulation of NaPi-IIa with no change in the abundance of NaPi-IIc. Estrogen treatment of a cell line (U20S) stably coexpressing both ERα and ERβ caused a significant downregulation of NaPi-IIa protein when transiently transfected with a plasmid containing full-length or open-reading frame (ORF) 3'-untranslated region (UTR) but not 5'-UTR ORF of mouse NaPi-IIa transcript. In conclusion, estrogen causes phosphaturia and hypophosphatemia in mice. These effects result from downregulation of NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIc proteins in the proximal tubule through the activation of ERα. The downregulation of NaPi-IIa by estrogen involves 3'-UTR of its mRNA and is independent of Klotho/fibroblast growth factor 23 and PTH signaling pathways. PMID:27194721

  6. White organic light-emitting diodes with an ultra-thin premixed emitting layer

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, T; Tondelier, Denis; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Forget, Sebastien; Chenais, Sebastien; Ishow, Elena

    2014-01-01

    We described an approach to achieve fine color control of fluorescent White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLED), based on an Ultra-thin Premixed emitting Layer (UPL). The UPL consists of a mixture of two dyes (red-emitting 4-di(4'-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)amino-4'-dicyanovinylbenzene or fvin and green-emitting 4-di(4'-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)aminobenzaldehyde or fcho) premixed in a single evaporation cell: since these two molecules have comparable structures and similar melting temperatures, a blend can be evaporated, giving rise to thin films of identical and reproducible composition compared to those of the pre-mixture. The principle of fine color tuning is demonstrated by evaporating a 1-nm-thick layer of this blend within the hole-transport layer (4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphtyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (\\alpha-NPB)) of a standard fluorescent OLED structure. Upon playing on the position of the UPL inside the hole-transport layer, as well as on the premix composition, two independent parameters are available to finel...

  7. Highly flexible, electrically driven, top-emitting, quantum dot light-emitting stickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuyong; Mutlugun, Evren; Dang, Cuong; Dev, Kapil; Gao, Yuan; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-08-26

    Flexible information displays are key elements in future optoelectronic devices. Quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) with advantages in color quality, stability, and cost-effectiveness are emerging as a candidate for single-material, full color light sources. Despite the recent advances in QLED technology, making high-performance flexible QLEDs still remains a big challenge due to limited choices of proper materials and device architectures as well as poor mechanical stability. Here, we show highly efficient, large-area QLED tapes emitting in red, green, and blue (RGB) colors with top-emitting design and polyimide tapes as flexible substrates. The brightness and quantum efficiency are 20,000 cd/m(2) and 4.03%, respectively, the highest values reported for flexible QLEDs. Besides the excellent electroluminescence performance, these QLED films are highly flexible and mechanically robust to use as electrically driven light-emitting stickers by placing on or removing from any curved surface, facilitating versatile LED applications. Our QLED tapes present a step toward practical quantum dot based platforms for high-performance flexible displays and solid-state lighting.

  8. Rigorous simulations of emitting and non-emitting nano-optical structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, O.T.A.

    2010-01-01

    In the next decade, several applications of nanotechnology will change our lives. LED lighting is about to replace the common light bulb. The main advantages are its energy efficiency and long lifetime. LEDs can be much more efficient, when part of the emitted light that is currently trapped in the

  9. Estimating estrogen release and load from humans and livestock in shanghai, china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Shi, Jianghong; Zhang, Hui; Zhan, Xinmin; Shen, Genxiang; Hu, Shuangqing

    2014-03-01

    The estrogens estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) cause potent endocrine disruptive effects on aquatic wildlife. Currently, four sources of released estrogens exist in Shanghai: treated effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WTPs); wastewater discharge from livestock farms; untreated or simply digested sewage from rural households; and runoff from farmland with livestock manure (LM) applied and irrigated with livestock wastewater (LW). A modified estimation method for estrogen release, in consideration of the difference in estrogen excretion rates between Caucasian and Oriental people and estrogen reduction in livestock wastes, was presented in the study. Based on the estimation method, we estimated the amount of estrogen release from humans and livestock and analyzed the spatially explicit distribution of estrogen loads. By comparing the four estrogen sources, the amount of estrogens released to water environments from livestock (56.8 g d), in terms of E2 equivalents (EEQ), was nearly twofold higher than the EEQ from humans (35.2 g d), which accounted for 61.0% of the total EEQ in Shanghai. Regarding the livestock EEQ, land-applied and irrigated EEQ via surface runoff to water environments (0.11 g d) was obviously low compared with the EEQ of LW directly released into adjacent waterways (56.7 g d). Therefore, the LW was the major contributor to estrogenic risk to the water environment in Shanghai. The spatial distribution of estrogen loads indicated that the highest EEQ loads were in the southern region of Pudong New Area and the eastern and central regions of Fengxian District. PMID:25602658

  10. Molecular Characterization and Sex-Specific Tissue Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha (esr1), Estrogen Receptor Beta-a (esr2a) and Ovarian Aromatase (cyp19a1a) in Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exhibit an estrogen-stimulated sexual size dimorphism (SSD) wherein females grow faster and larger than males. To aid in the examination of this phenomenon, the cDNA sequences encoding estrogen receptor-alpha (esr1), estrogen receptor-beta-a (esr2a) and ovarian aroma...

  11. A single blue nanorod light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y.; Bai, J.; Smith, R.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report a light emitting diode (LED) consisting of a single InGaN/GaN nanorod fabricated by a cost-effective top-down approach from a standard LED wafer. The device demonstrates high performance with a reduced quantum confined Stark effect compared with a standard planar counterpart fabricated from the same wafer, confirmed by optical and electrical characterization. Current density as high as 5414 A cm‑2 is achieved without significant damage to the device due to the high internal quantum efficiency. The efficiency droop is mainly ascribed to Auger recombination, which was studied by an ABC model. Our work provides a potential method for fabricating compact light sources for advanced photonic integrated circuits without involving expensive or time-consuming fabrication facilities.

  12. Near infrared polymer light-emitting diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; YANG Jian; HOU Qiong; MO Yueqi; PENG Junbiao; CAO Yong

    2005-01-01

    High efficiency of near infrared polymer light-emitting diodes with bilayer structure was obtained. The diode structure is ITO/PEDOT/L1/L2/Ba/Al, where L1 is phenyl-substituted poly [p-phenylphenylene vinylene] derivative (P-PPV), L2 is 9,9-dioctylfluorene (DOF) and 4,7- bis(3-hexylthiophen)-2-yl-2,1,3-naphthothiadiazole (HDNT) copolymer (PFHDNT10). The electroluminescence (EL) spectrum of diodes from PFHDNT10 is at 750 nm located in the range of near infrared. The maximum external quantum efficiency is up to 2.1% at the current density of 35 mA/cm2. The improvement of the diode's performances was considered to be the irradiative excitons confined in the interface between L1 and L2 layers.

  13. Light-emitting diodes for analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  14. Recycling technology of emitted carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hironori [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research (NIMC), Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Ways to halt global warming are being discussed worldwide. Global warming is an energy problem which is mainly attributed to the large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) released into the atmosphere from the rapid increase in energy consumption since the Industrial Revolution. The basic solution to the problem, therefore, is to cut consumption of fossil fuels. To this end, it is important to promote energy conservation by improving the fuel efficiency of machines, as well as shift to energy sources that do not emit carbon dioxide and develop related technologies. If current trends in economic growth continue in the devloping world as well as the developed countries, there can be no doubt that energy consumption will increase. Therefore, alongside energy conservation and the development of alternative energies, the importance of technologies to recover and fix CO{sub 2} will increase in the fight against global warming.

  15. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  16. Decreased Estrogen May Contribute to Osteopenia in Unloaded Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Janet; Arnaud, Sara; Grindeland, Richard; Wade, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Progressive loss of weight-bearing bone in astronauts is one of the most serious impediments to long-duration spaceflight. Estrogen deficiency in women is an established factor in bone loss. Reduced sex hormone levels have been reported in male astronauts, but no data is available regarding spaceflight effects on female sex hormones. The objective of our study was to determine the role of estrogen in disuse osteopenia. The NASA developed hindlimb suspension (HLS) model was used to simulate the unloading disuse of weight-bearing bones experienced in space. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (age 77d; n = 20/group) were HLS or kept ambulatory (AMB) for 38 d and endocrine and bone indices determined. HLS of rats resulted in lower (p less than 0.01) bone mass (9%0), bone mineral content (BMC 13%) and mechanical strength (28%) compared to AMB animals. Plasma estradiol (E2) was lower (p = 0.03) in HLS (10.1 +/- 1.4 pg/ml) compared to AMB rats (16.7 +/- 2.6 pg/ml). E2 was positively correlated to BMC r(sup 2) = 0.67 and mechanical strength r(sup 2) = 0.61. These results suggest that reduced E2 plays a role in disuse osteopenia induced by HLS. Plasma or pituitary lutenizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were not different in HLS versus AMB rats. However, pituitary LH was correlated to E2 (r(sup 2) = 0.57), suggesting changes in E2 were exerted at the level of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. Understanding the role of estrogen in disuse osteopenia is necessary to the development of efficacious therapies for female astronauts, bed rest patients and the increasing number of individuals in our sedentary population suffering bone loss.

  17. Protection of estrogen in portal hypertension gastropathy: an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Morgan-Martins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Portal hypertension is a complication secondary to cirrhosis that is characterized by increased blood flow and/or vascular resistance in the portal system, causing the appearance of a hyperdynamic collateral circulation. Partial portal vein ligation is an experimental model used in rats to study the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in pre-hepatic portal hypertension. Estrogen E2 is an antioxidant molecule with various physiological actions. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antioxidant activity of endogenous estrogen in an experimental model of partial portal vein ligation by comparing intact with castrated rats. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats, weighing on average 250 g were used and divided into four groups: sham-operated (SO; intact (I with partial portal vein ligation (I + PPVL, castrated (C and castrated with partial ligation of the vein (C + PPVL. Day 1: castration or sham-operation; day 7, PPVL surgery; on day 15 post-PPVL, portal pressure in the mesenteric vein of rats was measured on polygraph Letica. Lipid peroxidation in the stomach was assessed using the technique of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Statistical analysis was done with ANOVA - Student-Newman-Keuls (mean ± SE, and P<0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: Portal pressure was significantly increased in C + PPVL as compared to the other groups. There was no significant difference in the group of intact rats. TBARS showed significant damage in C and C + PPVL in relation to others. Antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the castrated rats with subsequent PPVL as compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that estrogen E2 plays a protective role in intact compared with castrated rats because it presents hydrophenolic radicals in its molecule, thus acting as an antioxidant in this experimental model.

  18. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yo Lin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript, suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs, 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha

  19. Cigarette Smoke and Estrogen Signaling in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalem Sathish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cigarette smoke (CS in active smokers and second-hand smoke exposure exacerbate respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. While women are known to experience a more asthmatic response to CS than emphysema in men, there is limited information on the mechanisms of CS-induced airway dysfunction. We hypothesize that CS interferes with a normal (protective bronchodilatory role of estrogens, thus worsening airway contractility. Methods: We tested effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on 17β-estradiol (E2 signaling in enzymatically-dissociated bronchial airway smooth muscle (ASM obtained from lung samples of non-smoking female patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Results: In fura-2 loaded ASM cells, CSE increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i responses to 10µM histamine. Acute exposure to physiological concentrations of E2 decreased [Ca2+]i responses. However, in 24h exposed CSE cells, although expression of estrogen receptors was increased, the effect of E2 on [Ca2+]i was blunted. Acute E2 exposure also decreased store-operated Ca2+ entry and inhibited stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1 phosphorylation: effects blunted by CSE. Acute exposure to E2 increased cAMP, but less so in 24h CSE-exposed cells. 24h CSE exposure increased S-nitrosylation of ERα. Furthermore, 24h CSE-exposed bronchial rings showed increased bronchoconstrictor agonist responses that were not reduced as effectively by E2 compared to non-CSE controls. Conclusion: These data suggest that CS induces dysregulation of estrogen signaling in ASM, which could contribute to increased airway contractility in women exposed to CS.

  20. Estrogen regulation of TRPM8 expression in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevestre Henri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium-permeable cation channel TRPM8 (melastatin-related transient receptor potential member 8 is over-expressed in several cancers. The present study aimed at investigating the expression, function and potential regulation of TRPM8 channels by ER alpha (estrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer. Methods RT-PCR, Western blot, immuno-histochemical, and siRNA techniques were used to investigate TRPM8 expression, its regulation by estrogen receptors, and its expression in breast tissue. To investigate the channel activity in MCF-7 cells, we used the whole cell patch clamp and the calcium imaging techniques. Results TRPM8 channels are expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Bath application of the potent TRPM8 agonist Icilin (20 μM induced a strong outwardly rectifying current at depolarizing potentials, which is associated with an elevation of cytosolic calcium concentration, consistent with established TRPM8 channel properties. RT-PCR experiments revealed a decrease in TRPM8 mRNA expression following steroid deprivation for 48 and 72 hours. In steroid deprived medium, addition of 17-beta-estradiol (E2, 10 nM increased both TRPM8 mRNA expression and the number of cells which respond to Icilin, but failed to affect the Ca2+ entry amplitude. Moreover, silencing ERα mRNA expression with small interfering RNA reduced the expression of TRPM8. Immuno-histochemical examination of the expression of TRPM8 channels in human breast tissues revealed an over-expression of TRPM8 in breast adenocarcinomas, which is correlated with estrogen receptor positive (ER+ status of the tumours. Conclusion Taken together, these results show that TRPM8 channels are expressed and functional in breast cancer and that their expression is regulated by ER alpha.

  1. Bisphenol A Inhibits Follicle Growth and Induces Atresia in Cultured Mouse Antral Follicles Independently of the Genomic Estrogenic Pathway1

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Jackye; Craig, Zelieann R.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical used to manufacture many commonly used plastic and epoxy resin-based products. BPA ubiquitously binds to estrogen receptors throughout the body, including estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in the ovary. Few studies have investigated the effects of BPA on ovarian antral follicles. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that BPA alters cell cycle regulators and induces atresia in antral follicles via the genomic estrogenic pathway, inhibiting follicle growth. To...

  2. Risk factors for breast cancer characterized by the estrogen receptor alpha A908G (K303R) mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Kathleen; Parrish, Eloise; Edmiston, Sharon N; Tolbert, Dawn; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia; Newman, Beth; Millikan, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen is important in the development of breast cancer, and its biological effects are mediated primarily through the two estrogen receptors alpha and beta. A point mutation in the estrogen receptor alpha gene, ESR1, referred to as A908G or K303R, was originally identified in breast hyperplasias and was reported to be hypersensitive to estrogen. We recently detected this mutation at a low frequency of 6% in invasive breast tumors of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS). Met...

  3. YEAST ESTROGEN SCREEN FOR EXAMINING THE RELATIVE EXPOSURE OF CELLS TO NATURAL AND XENOESTROGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoestrogens, such as o,p'-DDT and octyl phenol (OP) have been associated with reproductive abnormalities in various wildlife species. Xenoestrogens mimic the natural estrogen 17b-estradiol and compete for binding to the estrogen receptor. Even though the affinity of o,p'-DDTan...

  4. Quantitative structure-activity relationship of estrogen activities of bisphenol A analogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Shihai; LIU Shushen; YANG Jing; WANG Xiaodong; WANG Liansheng

    2006-01-01

    The molecular electronegativity-distance vector (MEDV) is employed to describe the chemical structure of bisphenol A analogs and their correlated estrogen activities. The result shows that the constructed models have good predictability and indicates substructures that may influence estrogen activities of chemicals.

  5. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  6. Fertility of Tall Girls Treated with High-Dose Estrogen, a Dose-Response Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A. E. J.; Drop, S. L. S.; Laven, J. S. E.; Boot, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of university hosp

  7. Interaction between vitamin D receptor genotype and estrogen receptor alpha genotype influences vertebral fracture risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Colin; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.P. Bergink (Arjan); M. van de Klift (Marjolein); Y. Fang (Yue); P.P. Arp (Pascal); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn view of the interactions of vitamin D and the estrogen endocrine system, we studied the combined influence of polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha gene and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene on the susceptibility to osteoporotic vertebral fractures in 634

  8. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of growth hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Guerra, Borja; Díaz-Chico, Juan C;

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to estrogens and growth hormone (GH) which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk ...

  9. Serum estrogen and its metabolites in pregnant women exposed to dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuli; Chang, Y.C.; Li, C.M.; Chou, W.L. [National Health Research Insts., Kaohsiung (Taiwan). Div. of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine; Chao, H.R.; Guo, Y.L. [National Chung Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins and PCBs are environmental endocrine disruptors that have half-life of 7-10 years in human bodies and have toxicities including carcinogenesis. Studies showed a high estrogen 4-/2- hydroxylation ratio appears to be a marker for neoplasm. The aim is to examine dioxin and PCBs body burden1 in relation to estrogen metabolites and catabolites.

  10. Duavee: a tissue-selective estrogen complex for menopausal symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Tikoo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-menopausal women suffer from a plethora of problems like vasomotor symptoms, vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA, bone loss, and all this can be attributed to estrogen deficiency. The conventional treatment till date for these hormone deficient manifestations have been estrogen replacement therapy in hysterectomized female or a combination of estrogen and progesterone therapy in women with an intact uterus. The reason for adding progesterone is to protect the endometrium from estrogenic stimulation. The drawback with the combination therapy was irregular vaginal bleeding and breast discomfort, which led to the discontinuation of this therapy. The United States Food and Drug Administration, has recently approved a novel tissue selective estrogen complex comprising of conjugated estrogen (0.45 mg and a selective estrogen receptor modulator, bazedoxifene (BZA (20 mg for the treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis in non-hysterectomized post-menopausal women. This combination retains the benefits of estrogen on vasomotor symptoms, VVA and bone density along with the protective effect of BZA on endometrium and breast tissue. The results of clinical trials have been promising but what still needs to be evaluated is the long term safety of this pair on venous thromboembolism, stroke, and breast cancer. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 391-396

  11. Ethanolic extract of dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum) induces estrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells and immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2015-11-01

    Plants of the genus Taraxacum, commonly known as dandelions, are used to treat breast cancer in traditional folk medicine. However, their use has mainly been based on empirical findings without sufficient scientific evidence. Therefore, we hypothesized that dandelions would behave as a Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and be effective as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the postmenopausal women. In the present study, in vitro assay systems, including cell proliferation assay, reporter gene assay, and RT-PCR to evaluate the mRNA expression of estrogen-related genes (pS2 and progesterone receptor, PR), were performed in human breast cancer cells. Dandelion ethanol extract (DEE) significantly increased cell proliferation and estrogen response element (ERE)-driven luciferase activity. DEE significantly induced the expression of estrogen related genes such as pS2 and PR, which was inhibited by tamoxifen at 1 μmol·L(-1). These results indicated that DEE could induce estrogenic activities mediated by a classical estrogen receptor pathway. In addition, immature rat uterotrophic assay was carried out to identify estrogenic activity of DEE in vivo. The lowest concentration of DEE slightly increased the uterine wet weight, but there was no significant effect with the highest concentration of DEE. The results demonstrate the potential estrogenic activities of DEE, providing scientific evidence supporting their use in traditional medicine. PMID:26614455

  12. Effects of conjugated estrogens/bazedoxifene on lipid and coagulation variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouby, Sven O; Pan, Kaijie; Thompson, John R;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the effects of conjugated estrogens (CE)/bazedoxifene (BZA) on lipid and coagulation variables in a randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled phase 3 study of nonhysterectomized postmenopausal women. METHODS: The Selective estrogens, Menopause...

  13. Understanding the endocrine disruption of chiral pesticides:The enantioselectivity in estrogenic activity of synthetic pyrethroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids(SPs) ,a family of chiral insecticides consisting of multiple stereoismers,have been regarded as estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals(EDCs) .In this study,we applied the yeast two-hybrid and molecular docking(MD) assay to assess the enantioselective estrogenic activities of three commonly used SPs,bifenthrin(cis-BF) ,permethrin(PM) and fenvalerate(Fen) .The β-galactosidase analyses indicated that all of the testing pyrethroids displayed significant(p<0.05) enantioselectivity.The results showed that the estrogenic potential of cis-BF was mainly attributed to 1S-cis-BF.Neither PM nor Fen showed estrogenic effects.However,two stereoisomers of PM possessed estrogenic potential activities.αR-2R-Fen and αS-2S-Fen also induced the β-galactosidase activity.The inability to initiate the reporter gene expression by the racemic chemicals may be due to the low ratios of these isomers or the antagonism among them.The strong hydrophobic interaction and the hydrogen bond between positive estrogenic isomers and ERα support our biological testing results.This research demonstrated that the enantioselective estrogenic activity of chiral SPs was due to selective binding between their isomers and the ERαreceptor.The data suggests that enantioselectivity of these chiral pesticides is significant to their estrogenic activities.

  14. Shedding light on anti-estrogen resistance and antigen presentation through biophysical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Willem Teunis

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts part one: The study on anti-estrogen resistance and defining criteria a cell has to meet in order to become resistant to anti-estrogenic compounds. part two: the study of antigen-loading, vesicle positioning and costimulation.

  15. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  16. Identification and Biological Evaluation of Coactivator Binding Inhibitors for the Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jillian Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    The physiologic effects of estrogen action through the estrogen receptor (ER) are widespread, as this hormone exerts actions in both reproductive (e.g., uterus) and non-reproductive (e.g., bone, brain) tissues in both men and women. As such, the regulation of the activity of this ligand-activated transcription factor is highly relevant to the…

  17. Dietary sources of lignans and isoflavones modulate responses to estradiol in estrogen reporter mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penttinen-Damdimopoulou, P.E.; Power, K.A.; Hurmerinta, T.T.; Nurmi, T.; van der Saag, P.T.; Makela, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens, such as the lignan metabolite enterolactone (ENL) and the isoflavone genistein (GEN), are suggested to modulate the risk of estrogen-dependent disease (e.g., breast cancer) through regulation of estrogen signaling. However, the effects of complex food items containing lignans

  18. Notch-1 activates estrogen receptor-α-dependent transcription via IKKα in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L; Rizzo, P; Osipo, C; Pannuti, A; Wyatt, D; Cheung, LW-K; Sonenshein, G; Osborne, BA; Miele, L

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and are treated with anti-estrogens. Resistance to these agents is a major cause of mortality. We have shown that estrogen inhibits Notch, whereas anti-estrogens or estrogen withdrawal activate Notch signaling. Combined inhibition of Notch and estrogen signaling has synergistic effects in ERα-positive breast cancer models. However, the mechanisms whereby Notch-1 promotes the growth of ERα-positive breast cancer cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Notch-1 increases the transcription of ERα-responsive genes in the presence or absence of estrogen via a novel chromatin crosstalk mechanism. Our data support a model in which Notch-1 can activate the transcription of ERα-target genes via IKKα-dependent cooperative chromatin recruitment of Notch–CSL–MAML1 transcriptional complexes (NTC) and ERα, which promotes the recruitment of p300. CSL binding elements frequently occur in close proximity to estrogen-responsive elements (EREs) in the human and mouse genomes. Our observations suggest that a hitherto unknown Notch-1/ERα chromatin crosstalk mediates Notch signaling effects in ERα-positive breast cancer cells and contributes to regulate the transcriptional functions of ERα itself. PMID:19838210

  19. Distinct hypothalamic neurons mediate estrogenic effects on energy homeostasis and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogens regulate body weight and reproduction primarily through actions on estrogen receptor-a(ERa). However, ERalpha-expressing cells mediating these effects are not identified. We demonstrate that brain-specific deletion of ERalapha in female mice causes abdominal obesity stemming from both hype...

  20. Estrogens stimulate serotonin neurons to inhibit binge-like eating in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binge eating afflicts approximately 5% of US adults, though effective treatments are limited. Here, we showed that estrogen replacement substantially suppresses binge-like eating behavior in ovariectomized female mice. Estrogen-dependent inhibition of binge-like eating was blocked in female mice spe...

  1. Estrogen receptor-alpha-immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray of the adult ovariectomized female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, Veronique G.J.M.; Meijer, Ellie; Schasfoort, Fabienne C.; Leeuwen, Fred van; Holstege, Gert

    1998-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological studies in rodent and cat have shown that distinct parts of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (FAG) are important for the estrogen dependent, female reproductive behavior. The present study gives a detailed overview of the estrogen receptor-alpha-immunoreactive (ER-IR) ne

  2. Identification of estrogenic activity change in sewage, industrial and livestock effluents by gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byeong-Yong; Kang, Sung-Wook; Yoo, Jisu; Kim, Woong-Ki; Bae, Paek-Hyun; Jung, Jinho

    2012-11-01

    In this study, reduction of estrogenic activity in three different types of effluents from sewage, industrial and livestock wastewater treatment plants by gamma-irradiation was investigated using the yeast two-hybrid assay. After gamma-ray treatment at a dose of 10 kGy, estrogenic activities of sewage, industrial and livestock effluents decreased from 4.4 to 3.0, 1.5 to 1.0 and 16 to 9.9 ng-EEQ L-1, respectively. The substantial reduction of estrogenic activity in livestock effluent was attributable to the degradation of 17β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2). Although bisphenol A (BPA) was found at the highest concentration in all effluents, its contribution to the estrogenic activity was not significant due to its low relative estrogenic potency. Meanwhile, the calculated estrogenic activity based on concentrations of E2, E1, EE2 and BPA in the effluents significantly differed from the measured ones. Overestimation may have resulted by dissolved organic matters in effluents inhibiting the estrogenic activity of E2, E1, EE2 and BPA, whereas underestimation was likely due to estrogenic by-products generated by gamma-irradiation.

  3. Estrogen leads to reversible hair cycle retardation through inducing premature catagen and maintaining telogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-min Hu

    Full Text Available Estrogen dysregulation causes hair disorder. Clinical observations have demonstrated that estrogen raises the telogen/anagen ratio and inhibits hair shaft elongation of female scalp hair follicles. In spite of these clinical insights, the properties of estrogen on hair follicles are poorly dissected. In the present study, we show that estrogen induced apoptosis of precortex cells and caused premature catagen by up-regulation of TGF β2. Immediately after the premature catagen, the expression of anagen chalone BMP4 increased. The up-regulation of BMP4 may further function to prevent anagen transition and maintain telogen. Interestingly, the hair follicle stem cell niche was not destructed during these drastic structural changes caused by estrogen. Additionally, dermal papilla cells, the estrogen target cells in hair follicles, kept their signature gene expressions as well as their hair inductive potential after estrogen treatment. Retention of the characteristics of both hair follicle stem cells and dermal papilla cells determined the reversibility of the hair cycle suppression. These results indicated that estrogen causes reversible hair cycle retardation by inducing premature catagen and maintaining telogen.

  4. Estrogenic activity associated with organochlorine compounds in fish extracts from European mountain lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish muscle extracts from ten European mountain lakes were analyzed for organochlorine compounds (OCs) and estrogenic activity, the latter by a recombinant yeast assay based on the human estrogen receptor. Seventy percent of the samples showed estrogenic activity above detection limits and a subset of five samples showed estrogenic activities, equivalent to more than 10,000 pg/g of estradiol. These highly estrogenic samples occurred in two lakes, Velke Hincovo in the Tatra Mountains and Redon in the Pyrenees. Principal component analysis correlated estrogenic activity of muscle extracts to fish age and concentrations of the more chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs). This is consistent with previously observed correlations of these PCBs with fish age. In addition, most fish with high estrogenic activity were found in lakes containing high OC levels in the sediments, which gives further ground to atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic pollutants as main process leading to the observed endocrine disruption effects. - Estrogen receptor agonists in lake fish are correlated with organochlorine compound content

  5. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  6. Short-term tests of estrogenic potential of plant stanols and plant stanol esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnbull, D.; Frankos, V.H.; Leeman, W.R.; Jonker, D.

    1999-01-01

    To test for potential estrogenic activity of plant stanols and plant stanol esters, two short-term tests were performed. These were the E-screen test, which measures a substance's ability to induce proliferation of estrogen-responsive human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells in culture, and an in v

  7. The role of estrogens in seizures and epilepsy: the bad guys or the good guys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velísková, J

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens influence neuronal activity and are important for normal brain functions. Effects of estrogens on seizures are contradictory. It is commonly accepted that estrogens may increase neuronal excitability and thus mediate proconvulsant effects. However, clinical and animal data show that estrogen may also have no effect or anticonvulsant effects. The action of estrogens on seizures depends on various factors, such as treatment duration and latency prior to the seizure testing, estrogen dose, hormonal status (naïve vs gonadectomized animals), estrogenic substance, the region/neurotransmitter system involved, the seizure type/model used, and sex. Besides the effects on seizure susceptibility, estrogens may also play an important role in seizure-induced damage. Pretreatment with beta-estradiol in ovariectomized female rats has neuroprotective effects on status epilepticus-induced hippocampal damage and prevents the loss of inhibition in the dentate gyrus during the early post-status epilepticus period determined by the in vitro paired pulse paradigm. Several signaling pathways may be involved in the neuroprotective effects of beta-estradiol on status epilepticus-induced hippocampal damage but at least one of these pathways involves interactions with neuropeptide Y. PMID:16310960

  8. Modulatory effect of raloxifene and estrogen on the metabolic action of growth hormone in hypopituitary women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Birzniece, Vita

    2010-05-01

    The metabolic action of GH is attenuated by estrogens administered via the oral route. Selective estrogen receptor modulators lower IGF-I to a lesser degree than 17beta-estradiol in GH-deficient women, and their effect on fat and protein metabolism is unknown.

  9. Estrogen and phenol red free medium for osteoblast culture: study of the mineralization ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, A N; Zancanela, D C; Ramos, A P; Torqueti, M R; Ciancaglini, P

    2016-08-01

    To design an estrogen and phenol red free medium for cell culture and check its effectiveness and safety on osteoblast growth it is necessary to maintain the estrogen receptors free for tests. For this purpose, we tested some modifications of the traditional culture media: estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum; estrogen charcoal stripped fetal bovine serum and phenol red free α-MEM. The aim of this work is to examine the effects of its depletion in the proliferation, differentiation, and toxicity of mesenchymal stromal cells differentiated into osteoblasts to obtain an effective interference free culture medium for in vitro studies, focused on non-previously studied estrogen receptors. We performed viability tests using the following techniques: MTT, alkaline phosphatase specific activity, formation of mineralized matrix by Alizarin technique and analysis of SEM/EDX of mineralized nodules. The results showed that the culture media with estrogen free α-MEM + phenol red free α-MEM did not impact viability, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of the osteoblasts culture compared to control. In addition, its nodules possess Ca/P ratio similar to hydroxyapatite nodules on the 14th and 21st day. In conclusion, the modified culture medium with phenol red free α-MEM with estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum can be safely used in experiments where the estrogen receptors need to be free. PMID:25634598

  10. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors.

  11. PET imaging of brain sex steroid hormone receptors and the role of estrogen in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khayum, Mohamed Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens are steroid hormones that are involved in several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Decreased levels of steroid hormones are associated with e.g. decreased cognition, anxiety and depression. Androgens and estrogens exert their biological effects through their corre

  12. Identification of Estrogen Target Genes during Zebrafish Embryonic Development through Transcriptomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen signaling is important for vertebrate embryonic development. Here we have used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model to analyze estrogen signaling during development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1 μM 17β-estradiol (E2) or vehicle from 3 hours to 4 days post...

  13. Effects of estrogen on diverse stem cells and relevant intracellular mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism definitely exists in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular,neurodegenerative and bone metabolism disorders.Estrogen affects the healing of ischemic myocardium partially through paracrine growth hormone production by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) and facilitation on mobilization of endothelial progenitors cells(EPCs) to the ischemic myocardium.Estrogen can also inhibit the proliferation of the cardiac fibroblasts.Therefore,estrogen effectively enhances the neovascularization at the ischemic border zone and limits pathological myocardial remodeling.Moreover,estrogen increases proliferation of embryonic neural stem cells and accelerates differentiation of neurons during neurogenesis,suggesting a possible role of estrogen in transplantation of neural stem cells as a therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases.Finally,estrogen can modulate osteogenic progenitors and osteoclasts,preventing the osteoporosis.In general,estrogen offers significant benefits on diverse stem/progenitor cell populations.A great understanding of estrogens on these cells and relevant intracellular mechanisms will allow modulation of the potent stem cells directly for the ultimate clinical applications.

  14. In vivo relevance of in vitro detected estrogenic effects of food associated compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, ter M.G.R.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to study the in vivo relevance of in vitro detected estrogenic effects of food associated compounds, with emphasis on prenatal exposure. The estrogenic potency of 21 food packaging-associated compounds was studied in ERα or ERβ transfected U2-OS (human osteoblasts d

  15. Estrogenic plant extracts reverse weight gain and fat accumulation without causing mammary gland or uterine proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise F Saunier

    Full Text Available Long-term estrogen deficiency increases the risk of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Menopausal hormone therapy containing estrogens might prevent these conditions, but its prolonged use increases the risk of breast cancer, as wells as endometrial cancer if used without progestins. Animal studies indicate that beneficial effects of estrogens in adipose tissue and adverse effects on mammary gland and uterus are mediated by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. One strategy to improve the safety of estrogens to prevent/treat obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome is to develop estrogens that act as agonists in adipose tissue, but not in mammary gland and uterus. We considered plant extracts, which have been the source of many pharmaceuticals, as a source of tissue selective estrogens. Extracts from two plants, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (RG and Pueraria montana var. lobata (RP bound to ERα, activated ERα responsive reporters, and reversed weight gain and fat accumulation comparable to estradiol in ovariectomized obese mice maintained on a high fat diet. Unlike estradiol, RG and RP did not induce proliferative effects on mammary gland and uterus. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that RG and RP induced estradiol-like regulation of genes in abdominal fat, but not in mammary gland and uterus. The compounds in extracts from RG and RP might constitute a new class of tissue selective estrogens to reverse weight gain, fat accumulation and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  16. Influence of sex and estrogen on musculotendinous protein turnover at rest and after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Women differ from men with regard to muscle and tendon, most likely because of sex differences in estrogen. The present experimental findings suggest the hypothesis that estrogen has an anabolic effect on muscle primarily by lowering the protein turnover and enhancing sensitivity to resistance tr...

  17. Estrogen receptor ligands counteract cognitive deficits caused by androgen deprivation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Grassi, Daniela; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2011-04-01

    Androgen deprivation causes impairment of cognitive tasks in rodents and humans, and this deficit can be reverted by androgen replacement therapy. Part of the effects of androgens in the male may be mediated by their local metabolism to estradiol or 3-alpha androstanediol within the brain and the consequent activation of estrogen receptors. In this study we have assessed whether the administration of estradiol benzoate, the estrogen receptor β selective agonist diarylpropionitrile or the estrogen receptor α selective agonist propyl pyrazole triol affect performance of androgen-deprived male Wistar rats in the cross-maze test. In addition, we tested the effect of raloxifene and tamoxifen, two selective estrogen receptor modulators used in clinical practice. The behavior of the rats was assessed 2 weeks after orchidectomy or sham surgery. Orchidectomy impaired acquisition in the cross-maze test. Estradiol benzoate and the selective estrogen receptor β agonist significantly improved acquisition in the cross-maze test compared to orchidectomized animals injected with vehicle. Raloxifene and tamoxifen at a dose of 1mg/kg, but not at doses of 0.5 or 2mg/kg, also improved acquisition of orchidectomized animals. Our findings suggest that estrogenic compounds with affinity for estrogen receptor β and selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, may represent good candidates to promote cognitive performance in androgen-deprived males.

  18. The Influence of Estrogens on the Biological and Therapeutic Actions of Growth Hormone in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Fernández-Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available GH is main regulator of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism and gender-dependent dimorphism in mammals. The liver is a direct target of estrogens because it expresses estrogen receptors which are connected with development, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity, hepatic carcinogenesis, protection from drug-induced toxicity and fertility. In addition, estrogens can modulate GH actions in liver by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and, peripherally, by modulating GHR-JAK2-STAT5 signalling pathway. Therefore, the interactions of estrogens with GH actions in liver are biologically and clinically relevant because disruption of GH signaling may cause alterations of its endocrine, metabolic, and gender differentiated functions and it could be linked to dramatic impact in liver physiology during development as well as in adulthood. Finally, the interplay of estrogens with GH is relevant because physiological roles these hormones have in human, and the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. This review highlights the importance of these hormones in liver physiology as well as how estrogens modulate GH actions in liver which will help to improve the clinical use of these hormones.

  19. Ligands specify estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caze-Subra Stéphanie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα is found predominately in the nucleus, both in hormone stimulated and untreated cells. Intracellular distribution of the ERα changes in the presence of agonists but the impact of different antiestrogens on the fate of ERα is a matter of debate. Results A MCF-7 cell line stably expressing GFP-tagged human ERα (SK19 cell line was created to examine the localization of ligand-bound GFP-ERα. We combined digitonin-based cell fractionation analyses with fluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to determine the intracellular distribution of ligand-bound ERα and/or GFP-ERα. Using fluorescence- and electron microscopy we demonstrate that both endogenous ERα and GFP-ERα form numerous nuclear focal accumulations upon addition of agonist, 17β-estradiol (E2, and pure antagonists (selective estrogen regulator disruptor; SERD, ICI 182,780 or RU58,668, while in the presence of partial antagonists (selective estrogen regulator modulator; SERM, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT or RU39,411, diffuse nuclear staining persisted. Digitonin based cell fractionation analyses confirmed that endogenous ERα and GFP-ERα predominantly reside in the nuclear fraction. Overall ERα protein levels were reduced after estradiol treatment. In the presence of SERMs ERα was stabilized in the nuclear soluble fraction, while in the presence of SERDs protein levels decreased drastically and the remaining ERα was largely found in a nuclear insoluble fraction. mRNA levels of ESR1 were reduced compared to untreated cells in the presence of all ligands tested, including E2. E2 and SERDs induced ERα degradation occurred in distinct nuclear foci composed of ERα and the proteasome providing a simple explanation for ERα sequestration in the nucleus. Conclusions Our results indicate that chemical structure of ligands directly affect the nuclear fate and protein turnover of the estrogen receptor alpha independently of their impact on

  20. How to target estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, H; Glondu, M; Sahla, M E; Platet, N; Garcia, M

    2003-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers generally have a better prognosis and are often responsive to anti-estrogen therapy, which is the first example of a successful therapy targeted on a specific protein, the ER. Unfortunately ER-negative breast cancers are more aggressive and unresponsive to anti-estrogens. Other targeted therapies are thus urgently needed, based on breast cancer oncogene inhibition or suppressor gene activation as far as molecular studies have demonstrated the alteration of expression, or structure of these genes in human breast cancer. Using the MDA-MB.231 human breast cancer cell line as a model of ER-negative breast cancers, we are investigating two of these approaches in our laboratory. Our first approach was to transfect the ER or various ER-deleted variants into an ER-negative cell line in an attempt to recover anti-estrogen responsiveness. The unliganded receptor, and surprisingly estradiol, were both found to inhibit tumor growth and invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of these inhibitions in ER-negative cancer cells are being studied, in an attempt to target the ER sequence responsible for such inhibition in these cancer cells. Another strategy is trying to inhibit the activity or expression of an oncogene specifically overexpressed in most breast cancers. This approach was recently shown by others to be efficient in breast cancer therapy with HER2-Neu oncogene amplification using Herceptin. Without excluding other molecular putative targets, we have focused our research on cathepsin D as a potential target, since it is often overexpressed in aggressive human breast cancers, including ER-negative tumors, and rarely associated with HER2-Neu amplification. Our first results obtained in vitro on cell lines and in vivo in tumor xenografts in nude mice, illustrate that the mode of action of cathepsin D in breast cancer is useful to guide the development of these therapies. In the past 20 years we have learned that the