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Sample records for auditory steady-state response

  1. 40 Hz auditory steady state response to linguistic features of stimuli during auditory hallucinations.

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    Ying, Jun; Yan, Zheng; Gao, Xiao-rong

    2013-10-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain, depending on the modulation frequency used. In general, responses induced by low rates (≤40 Hz) emanate mostly from central structures of the brain, and responses from high rates (≥80 Hz) emanate mostly from the peripheral auditory nerve or brainstem structures. Besides, it was reported that the gamma band ASSR (30-90 Hz) played an important role in working memory, speech understanding and recognition. This paper investigated the 40 Hz ASSR evoked by modulated speech and reversed speech. The speech was Chinese phrase voice, and the noise-like reversed speech was obtained by temporally reversing the speech. Both auditory stimuli were modulated with a frequency of 40 Hz. Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with hallucination symptom participated in the experiment. Results showed reduction in left auditory cortex response when healthy subjects listened to the reversed speech compared with the speech. In contrast, when the patients who experienced auditory hallucinations listened to the reversed speech, the auditory cortex of left hemispheric responded more actively. The ASSR results were consistent with the behavior results of patients. Therefore, the gamma band ASSR is expected to be helpful for rapid and objective diagnosis of hallucination in clinic. PMID:24142731

  2. Distraction task rather than focal attention modulates gamma activity associated with auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griskova-Bulanova, Inga; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Dapsys, Kastytis; Maciulis, Valentinas; Arnfred, Sidse Marie Hemmingsen

    2011-01-01

    To explore the modulation of auditory steady-state response (ASSR) by experimental tasks, differing in attentional focus and arousal level.......To explore the modulation of auditory steady-state response (ASSR) by experimental tasks, differing in attentional focus and arousal level....

  3. Improved Electrically Evoked Auditory Steady-State Response Thresholds in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Michael; Wouters, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) are EEG potentials in response to periodic electrical stimuli presented through a cochlear implant. For low-rate pulse trains in the 40-Hz range, electrophysiological thresholds derived from response amplitude growth functions correlate well with behavioral T levels at these rates. The aims of this study were: (1) to improve the correlation between electrophysiological thresholds and behavioral T levels at 900 pps by using amplitude...

  4. Can place-specific cochlear dispersion be represented by auditory steady-state responses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated to what extent properties of local cochlear dispersion can be objectively assessed through auditory steady-state responses (ASSR). The hypothesis was that stimuli compensating for the phase response at a particular cochlear location generate a maximally modulated...... basilar membrane (BM) response at that BM position, due to the large "within-channel" synchrony of activity. This would lead, in turn, to a larger ASSR amplitude than other stimuli of corresponding intensity and bandwidth. Two stimulus types were chosen: 1] Harmonic tone complexes consisting of equal......-amplitude tones with a starting phase following an algorithm developed by Schroeder [IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 16, 85-89 (1970)] that have earlier been considered in behavioral studies to estimate human auditory filter phase responses; and 2] simulations of auditory-filter impulse responses (IR). In both cases...

  5. The Effect of Objective Room Acoustic Parameters on Auditory Steady-State Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata Rodriguez, Valentina; M. Harte, James; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Verification that Hearing Aids (HA) have been fitted correctly in pre-lingual infants and hard-to-test adults is an important emerging application in technical audiology. These test subjects are unable to undergo reliable behavioral testing, so an objective method is required. Auditory steady-state...... responses (ASSR), recorded in a sound field is a promising technology to verify the hearing aid fitting. The test involves the presentation of the auditory stimuli via a loudspeaker, unlike the usual procedure of delivering via insert earphones. Room reverberation clearly may significantly affect the...... features of the stimulus important for eliciting a strong electrophysiological response, and thus complicate its detection. This study investigates the effect of different room acoustic conditions on recorded ASSRs via an auralisation approach using insert earphones. Fifteen normal-hearing listeners were...

  6. Cholinergic modulation of auditory steady-state response in the auditory cortex of the freely moving rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Ma, L; Li, W; Yang, P; Qin, L

    2016-06-01

    As disturbance in auditory steady-state response (ASSR) has been consistently found in many neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia, there is considerable interest in the development of translational rat models to elucidate the underlying neural and neurochemical mechanisms involved in ASSR. This is the first study to investigate the effects of the non-selective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine and the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil (also in combination with scopolamine) on ASSR. We recorded the local field potentials through the chronic microelectrodes implanted in the auditory cortex of freely moving rat. ASSRs were recorded in response to auditory stimuli delivered over a range of frequencies (10-80Hz) and averaged over 60 trials. We found that a single dose of scopolamine produced a temporal attenuation in response to auditory stimuli; the most attenuation occurred at 40Hz. Time-frequency analysis revealed deficits in both power and phase-locking to 40Hz. Donepezil augmented 40-Hz steady-state power and phase-locking. Scopolamine combined with donepezil had an enhanced effect on the phase-locking, but not power of ASSR. These changes induced by cholinergic drugs suggest an involvement of muscarinic neurotransmission in auditory processing and provide a rodent model investigating the neurochemical mechanism of neurophysiological deficits seen in patients. PMID:26964684

  7. Using auditory steady state responses to outline the functional connectivity in the tinnitus brain.

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    Winfried Schlee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is an auditory phantom perception that is most likely generated in the central nervous system. Most of the tinnitus research has concentrated on the auditory system. However, it was suggested recently that also non-auditory structures are involved in a global network that encodes subjective tinnitus. We tested this assumption using auditory steady state responses to entrain the tinnitus network and investigated long-range functional connectivity across various non-auditory brain regions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using whole-head magnetoencephalography we investigated cortical connectivity by means of phase synchronization in tinnitus subjects and healthy controls. We found evidence for a deviating pattern of long-range functional connectivity in tinnitus that was strongly correlated with individual ratings of the tinnitus percept. Phase couplings between the anterior cingulum and the right frontal lobe and phase couplings between the anterior cingulum and the right parietal lobe showed significant condition x group interactions and were correlated with the individual tinnitus distress ratings only in the tinnitus condition and not in the control conditions. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrates existence of a global tinnitus network of long-range cortical connections outside the central auditory system. This result extends the current knowledge of how tinnitus is generated in the brain. We propose that this global extend of the tinnitus network is crucial for the continuos perception of the tinnitus tone and a therapeutical intervention that is able to change this network should result in relief of tinnitus.

  8. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

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    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  9. Auditory steady state response in hearing assessment in infants with cytomegalovirus

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    Daniela Polo C. Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus and progressive sensorineural hearing loss, who was assessed by three methods of hearing evaluation. CASE DESCRIPTION: In the first audiometry, at four months of age, the infant showed abnormal response in Otoacoustic Emissions and normal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR, with electrophysiological threshold in 30dBnHL, in both ears. With six months of age, he showed bilateral absence of the ABR at 100dBnHL. The behavioral observational audiometry was impaired due to the delay in neuropsychomotor development. At eight months of age, he was submitted to Auditory Steady State Response (ASSR and the thresholds were 50, 70, absent in 110 and in 100dB, respectively for 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000Hz in the right ear, and 70, 90, 90 and absent in 100dB, respectively for 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000Hz in the left ear. COMMENTS: In the first evaluation, the infant had abnormal Otoacoustic Emission and normal ABR, which became altered at six months of age. The hearing loss severity could be identified only by the ASSR, which allowed the best procedure for hearing aids adaptation. The case description highlights the importance of the hearing status follow-up for children with congenital cytomegalovirus.

  10. Habituation of auditory steady state responses evoked by amplitudemodulated acoustic signals in rats

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    Pavel Prado-Gutierrez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials.

  11. Is the effect of tinnitus on auditory steady-state response amplitude mediated by attention?

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    Eugen eDiesch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The amplitude of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR is enhanced in tinnitus. As ASSR ampli¬tude is also enhanced by attention, the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude could be interpreted as an effect of attention mediated by tinnitus. As attention effects on the N1 are signi¬fi¬cantly larger than those on the ASSR, if the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude were due to attention, there should be similar amplitude enhancement effects in tinnitus for the N1 component of the auditory evoked response. Methods: MEG recordings of auditory evoked responses which were previously examined for the ASSR (Diesch et al. 2010 were analysed with respect to the N1m component. Like the ASSR previously, the N1m was analysed in the source domain (source space projection. Stimuli were amplitude-modulated tones with one of three carrier fre¬quen¬cies matching the tinnitus frequency or a surrogate frequency 1½ octaves above the audio¬metric edge frequency in con¬trols, the audiometric edge frequency, and a frequency below the audio¬metric edgeResults: In the earlier ASSR study (Diesch et al., 2010, the ASSR amplitude in tinnitus patients, but not in controls, was significantly larger in the (surrogate tinnitus condition than in the edge condition. In the present study, both tinnitus patients and healthy controls show an N1m-amplitude profile identical to the one of ASSR amplitudes in healthy controls. N1m amplitudes elicited by tonal frequencies located at the audiometric edge and at the (surrogate tinnitus frequency are smaller than N1m amplitudes elicited by sub-edge tones and do not differ among each other.Conclusions: There is no N1-amplitude enhancement effect in tinnitus. The enhancement effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude cannot be accounted for in terms of attention induced by tinnitus.

  12. Prediction of hearing thresholds: Comparison of cortical evoked response audiometry and auditory steady state response audiometry techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, LLN; Yeung, KNK

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated how well auditory steady state response (ASSR) and tone burst cortical evoked response audiometry (CERA) thresholds predict behavioral thresholds in the same participants. A total of 63 ears were evaluated. For ASSR testing, 100% amplitude modulated and 10% frequency modulated tone stimuli at a modulation frequency of 40Hz were used. Behavioral thresholds were closer to CERA thresholds than ASSR thresholds. ASSR and CERA thresholds were closer to behavioral thresho...

  13. Distinct features of auditory steady-state responses as compared to transient event-related potentials.

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    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available Transient event-related potentials (ERPs and steady-state responses (SSRs have been popularly employed to investigate the function of the human brain, but their relationship still remains a matter of debate. Some researchers believed that SSRs could be explained by the linear summation of successive transient ERPs (superposition hypothesis, while others believed that SSRs were the result of the entrainment of a neural rhythm driven by the periodic repetition of a sensory stimulus (oscillatory entrainment hypothesis. In the present study, taking auditory modality as an example, we aimed to clarify the distinct features of SSRs, evoked by the 40-Hz and 60-Hz periodic auditory stimulation, as compared to transient ERPs, evoked by a single click. We observed that (1 SSRs were mainly generated by phase synchronization, while late latency responses (LLRs in transient ERPs were mainly generated by power enhancement; (2 scalp topographies of LLRs in transient ERPs were markedly different from those of SSRs; (3 the powers of both 40-Hz and 60-Hz SSRs were significantly correlated, while they were not significantly correlated with the N1 power in transient ERPs; (4 whereas SSRs were dominantly modulated by stimulus intensity, middle latency responses (MLRs were not significantly modulated by both stimulus intensity and subjective loudness judgment, and LLRs were significantly modulated by subjective loudness judgment even within the same stimulus intensity. All these findings indicated that high-frequency SSRs were different from both MLRs and LLRs in transient ERPs, thus supporting the possibility of oscillatory entrainment hypothesis to the generation of SSRs. Therefore, SSRs could be used to explore distinct neural responses as compared to transient ERPs, and help us reveal novel and reliable neural mechanisms of the human brain.

  14. Auditory steady-state responses in cochlear implant users: Effect of modulation frequency and stimulation artifacts.

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    Gransier, Robin; Deprez, Hanne; Hofmann, Michael; Moonen, Marc; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that objective measures based on stimulation with low-rate pulse trains fail to predict the threshold levels of cochlear implant (CI) users for high-rate pulse trains, as used in clinical devices. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) can be elicited by modulated high-rate pulse trains, and can potentially be used to objectively determine threshold levels of CI users. The responsiveness of the auditory pathway of profoundly hearing-impaired CI users to modulation frequencies is, however, not known. In the present study we investigated the responsiveness of the auditory pathway of CI users to a monopolar 500 pulses per second (pps) pulse train modulated between 1 and 100 Hz. EASSRs to forty-three modulation frequencies, elicited at the subject's maximum comfort level, were recorded by means of electroencephalography. Stimulation artifacts were removed by a linear interpolation between a pre- and post-stimulus sample (i.e., blanking). The phase delay across modulation frequencies was used to differentiate between the neural response and a possible residual stimulation artifact after blanking. Stimulation artifacts were longer than the inter-pulse interval of the 500pps pulse train for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. As a result the stimulation artifacts could not be removed by artifact removal on the bases of linear interpolation for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. However, artifact-free responses could be obtained in all subjects from recording electrodes contralateral to the CI, when subject specific reference electrodes (Cz or Fpz) were used. EASSRs to modulation frequencies within the 30-50 Hz range resulted in significant responses in all subjects. Only a small number of significant responses could be obtained, during a measurement period of 5 min, that originate from the brain stem (i.e., modulation frequencies in the 80-100 Hz range). This reduced synchronized activity of brain stem

  15. Evaluation of peripheral compression and auditory nerve fiber intensity coding using auditory steady-state responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Encina Llamas, Gerard; M. Harte, James; Epp, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    . Evaluation of these properties provides information about the health state of the system. It has been shown that a loss of outer hair cells leads to a reduction in peripheral compression. It has also recently been shown in animal studies that noise over-exposure, producing temporary threshold shifts, can......The compressive nonlinearity of the auditory system is assumed to be an epiphenomenon of a healthy cochlea and, particularly, of outer-hair cell function. Another ability of the healthy auditory system is to enable communication in acoustical environments with high-level background noises...

  16. Auditory steady-state evoked response in diagnosing and evaluating hearing in infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Mai; Xiaozhuang Zhang; Qunxin Lai; Yanfei Wu; Nanping Liao; Yi Ye; Zhenghui Zhong

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Auditory steady-state evoked response (ASSR) is one of the new objective electrophysiological methods to test hearing in infants. It can provide a reliable and complete audiogram with specific frequency to help the hearing diagnosis and rehabilitation of hearing and languaging following auditory screening.OBJECTIVE: To compare the response threshold of ASSR with auditory threshold of visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA) in infants failed in the hearing screening for investigating their hearing loss.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTINGS: Maternal and child health care hospitals of Guangdong province, Shunde city, Nanhai city and Huadu district.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 321 infants of 0-3 years undergoing ASSR test were selected from the Hearing Center of Guangdong Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital from January 2002 to December 2004.Informed consents were obtained from their guardians. There were 193 cases (60.2%) of 0-6 months, 31 cases (9.7%) of 7-12 months, 17 cases (5.3%) of 13-18 months, 14 cases (4.4%) of 19-24 months, 33 cases of 25-30 months, and 33 cases (10.2%) of 31-36 months.METHODS: ① The 321 infants failed in the hearing screening were tested under sleeping status, the ranges of response threshold distribution in ASSR of different frequencies were analyzed in each age group. ② The infants above 2 years old were also tested with VRA, and their response thresholds were compared between VRA and ASSR. ③ Evaluative standards: The response threshold was < 30 dB for normal hearing, 31-50 dB for mild hearing loss, 51-70 dB for moderate hearing loss, 71-90 dB for severe hearing loss, and > 91 dB for extremely severe hearing loss.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① ASSR results of the infants failed in the screening; ② Proportion of cases of each response threshold in each age group; ③ Comparison of ASSR response thresholds and VRA auditory thresholds in the infants of 2-3 years old.RESULTS: ①The response threshold was < 30 dB in 47

  17. Top-down modulation of the auditory steady-state response in a task-switch paradigm

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    Nadia Müller

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Auditory selective attention is an important mechanism for top-down selection of the vast amount of auditory information our perceptual system is exposed to. In the present study, the impact of attention on auditory steady-state responses - previously shown to be generated in primary auditory regions - was investigated. This issue is still a matter of debate and recent findings point to a complex pattern of attentional effects on the aSSR. The present study aimed at shedding light on the involvement of ipsilateral and contralateral activations to the attended sound taking into account hemispheric differences and a possible dependency on modulation frequency. In aid of this, a dichotic listening experiment was designed using amplitude-modulated tones that were presented to the left and right ear simultaneously. Participants had to detect target tones in a cued ear while their brain activity was assessed using MEG. Thereby, a modulation of the aSSR by attention could be revealed, interestingly restricted to the left hemisphere and 20 Hz responses: Contralateral activations were enhanced while ipsilateral activations turned out to be reduced. Thus, our findings support and extend recent findings, showing that auditory attention can influence the aSSR, but only under specific circumstances and in a complex pattern regarding the different effects for ipsilateral and contralateral activations.

  18. 40 Hz Auditory Steady-State Response Is a Pharmacodynamic Biomarker for Cortical NMDA Receptors.

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    Sivarao, Digavalli V; Chen, Ping; Senapati, Arun; Yang, Yili; Fernandes, Alda; Benitex, Yulia; Whiterock, Valerie; Li, Yu-Wen; Ahlijanian, Michael K

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit dysfunctional gamma oscillations in response to simple auditory stimuli or more complex cognitive tasks, a phenomenon explained by reduced NMDA transmission within inhibitory/excitatory cortical networks. Indeed, a simple steady-state auditory click stimulation paradigm at gamma frequency (~40 Hz) has been reproducibly shown to reduce entrainment as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) in patients. However, some investigators have reported increased phase locking factor (PLF) and power in response to 40 Hz auditory stimulus in patients. Interestingly, preclinical literature also reflects this contradiction. We investigated whether a graded deficiency in NMDA transmission can account for such disparate findings by administering subanesthetic ketamine (1-30 mg/kg, i.v.) or vehicle to conscious rats (n=12) and testing their EEG entrainment to 40 Hz click stimuli at various time points (~7-62 min after treatment). In separate cohorts, we examined in vivo NMDA channel occupancy and tissue exposure to contextualize ketamine effects. We report a robust inverse relationship between PLF and NMDA occupancy 7 min after dosing. Moreover, ketamine could produce inhibition or disinhibition of the 40 Hz response in a temporally dynamic manner. These results provide for the first time empirical data to understand how cortical NMDA transmission deficit may lead to opposite modulation of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR). Importantly, our findings posit that 40 Hz ASSR is a pharmacodynamic biomarker for cortical NMDA function that is also robustly translatable. Besides schizophrenia, such a functional biomarker may be of value to neuropsychiatric disorders like bipolar and autism spectrum where 40 Hz ASSR deficits have been documented. PMID:26837462

  19. Are Auditory Steady-State Responses Useful to Evaluate Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss in Children?

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    Grasel, Signe Schuster; de Almeida, Edigar Rezende; Beck, Roberto Miquelino de Oliveira; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Ramos, Henrique Faria; Rossi, Amanda Costa; Koji Tsuji, Robinson; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Brito, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR) at high intensities in pediatric cochlear implant candidates and to compare the results to behavioral tests responses. Methods. This prospective study evaluated 42 children with suspected severe-to-profound hearing loss, aged from 3 to 72 months. All had absent ABR and OAE responses. ASSR were evoked using binaural single frequency stimuli at 110 dB HL with a 10 dB down-seeking procedure. ASSR and behavioral test results were compared. Results. Forty-two subjects completed both ASSR and behavioral evaluation. Eleven children (26.2%) had bilateral responses. Four (9.5%) showed unilateral responses in at least two frequencies, all confirmed by behavioral results. Overall 61 ASSR responses were obtained, most (37.7%) in 500 Hz. Mean thresholds were between 101.3 and 104.2 dB HL. Among 27 subjects with absent ASSR, fifteen had no behavioral responses. Seven subjects showed behavioral responses with absent ASSR responses. No spurious ASSR responses were observed at 100 or 110 dB HL. Conclusion. ASSR is a valuable tool to detect residual hearing. No false-positive ASSR results were observed among 42 children, but in seven cases with absent ASSR, the test underestimated residual hearing as compared to the behavioral responses. PMID:26557677

  20. Simultaneous measurement of auditory-steady-state responses and otoacoustic emissions to estimate peripheral compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Lopez, Raul; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    outer hair cells in the inner ear play an important role in the compressive nonlinearity, it is desirable to selectively obtain information about the inner ear. In the current study, the signal in the ear canal present during ASSR measurements is utilized to extract sinusoidally-amplitude modulated...... otoacoustic emissions (SAMOAEs). It is hypothesized that the stimulus used to evoke ASSRs will cause acoustic energy to be reflected back from the inner ear into the ear canal, where it can be picked up as an otoacoustic emission (OAE) and provide information about cochlear processing. Results indicate that...... SAMOAE in connection with ASSR may be possible by a proposed method to minimize the distortion. The ability to evaluate SAMOAE over a large input level range during ASSR measurement will provide information about the state of the peripheral auditory system without the need of additional measurement time....

  1. Transient and steady-state auditory gamma-band responses in first-degree relatives of people with autism spectrum disorder

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    Rojas Donald C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stimulus-related γ-band oscillations, which may be related to perceptual binding, are reduced in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. The purpose of this study was to examine auditory transient and steady-state γ-band findings in first-degree relatives of people with ASD to assess the potential familiality of these findings in ASD. Methods Magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings in 21 parents who had a child with an autism spectrum disorder (pASD and 20 healthy adult control subjects (HC were obtained. Gamma-band phase locking factor (PLF, and evoked and induced power to 32, 40 and 48 Hz amplitude-modulated sounds were measured for transient and steady-state responses. Participants were also tested on a number of behavioral and cognitive assessments related to the broad autism phenotype (BAP. Results Reliable group differences were seen primarily for steady-state responses. In the left hemisphere, pASD subjects exhibited lower phase-locked steady-state power in all three conditions. Total γ-band power, including the non-phase-locked component, was also reduced in the pASD group. In addition, pASD subjects had significantly lower PLF than the HC group. Correlations were seen between MEG measures and BAP measures. Conclusions The reduction in steady-state γ-band responses in the pASD group is consistent with previous results for children with ASD. Steady-state responses may be more sensitive than transient responses to phase-locking errors in ASD. Together with the lower PLF and phase-locked power in first-degree relatives, correlations between γ-band measures and behavioral measures relevant to the BAP highlight the potential of γ-band deficits as a potential new autism endophenotype.

  2. A Comparison of Thresholds in Auditory Steady - State Response with Pure Tone Audiometry in Subjects with Normal Hearing and Those with Mild and Moderate Sensorineural Hearing los

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    Sadegh Jafarzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Among all auditory assessment tools, auditory steady state response (ASSR is a modern test. Modulation frequency for this test is usually 80 Hz. The purpose of this study, was to examined adult subjects with 40 Hz and 80 Hz ASSR and compare the results.Materials and Methods: Thirty adult (60 ears were evaluated by ASSR and PTA test, Results were divided into three groups: normal hearing, mild and moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Results: In all groups, forty hertz ASSR thresholds were relatively closer to behavioral threshold than those of 80 Hz ASSR(p<0.05. Besides, the more severe hearing loss, the lower the difference between those two thresholds. Correlation coefficients were also higher in 40 Hz ASSR(p<0.05. Conclusion: Frequency modulation thresholds with 40 Hz are more likely to be closer to the behavioral thresholds. Moreover, it has better results than the thresholds with 80 Hz.

  3. Comparison of peripheral compression estimates using auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Encina Llamas, Gerard; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten

    The healthy auditory system shows a compressive input/output (I/O) function as a result of healthy outer-hair cell function. Hearing impairment often leads to a decrease in sensitivity and a reduction of compression, mainly caused by loss of inner and/or outer hair cells. Compression is commonly...... (DPOAEs) recordings. Results show compressive ASSR I/O functions for NH subjects. For HI subjects, ASSR reveal the loss of sensitivity at low stimulus levels. Growth slopes are smaller (more compressive) in ASSR than in DPOAE I/O functions....

  4. The amplitude and phase precision of 40 Hz auditory steady-state response depend on the level of arousal

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    Griskova, Inga; Morup, Morten; Parnas, Josef; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Arnfred, Sidse M

    2007-01-01

    level of arousal, but the findings are somewhat controversial. Generally, ASSR is diminished in sleep but it may be increased in drowsiness. Besides, ASSR reduction has been observed in schizophrenia. However, schizophrenic patients are known to have a disturbance of arousal level, what makes it...... pertinent to know the effects of fluctuations in arousal on passive response to gamma-range stimulation. In nine healthy volunteers trains of 40 Hz click stimuli were applied during two conditions: in the "high arousal" condition subjects were sitting upright silently reading a book of interest; in the "low...

  5. Phase-locking index and power of 40-Hz auditory steady-state response are not related to major personality trait dimensions.

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    Korostenskaja, Milena; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Pipinis, Evaldas; Griskova-Bulanova, Inga

    2016-03-01

    Although a number of studies have demonstrated state-related dependence of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), the investigations assessing trait-related ASSR changes are limited. Five consistently identified major trait dimensions, also referred to as "big five" (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness), are considered to account for virtually all personality variances in both healthy people and those with psychiatric disorders. The purpose of the present study was, for the first time, to establish the link between 40-Hz ASSR and "big five" major personality trait dimensions in young healthy adults. Ninety-four young healthy volunteers participated (38 males and 56 females; mean age ± SD 22.180 ± 2.75). The 40-Hz click trains were presented for each subject 30 times with an inter-train interval of 1-1.5 s. The EEG responses were recorded from F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, P3, Pz and P4 locations according to 10/20 electrode placement system. Phase-locking index (PLI) and event-related power perturbation (ERSP) were calculated, each providing the following characteristics: peak time, entrainment frequency, peak value and mean value. For assessing "big five" personality traits, NEO Personality Inventory Revised (NEO-PI-R) was used. No significant correlation between 40-Hz ASSR PLI or ERSP and "big five" personality traits was observed. Our results indicate that there is no dependence between 40-Hz ASSR entrainment and personality traits, demonstrating low individual 40-Hz variability in this domain. Our results support further development of 40-Hz ASSR as a neurophysiological marker allowing distinguishing between healthy population and patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:26586270

  6. Evaluation of New Methods for Artifacts Rejection in Evoked Auditory Steady-State Potentials

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    Cyndi González Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two alternative methods to the traditional method of artifact rejectionequipment currently used in evoked potential recording steady state (ASSR in order to improveefficiency based on the use of a larger number of individual records. The first method proposedis to replace the traditional use of rejection threshold amplitude, while the second version is afaster implementation of the weighted averaging used today, which is applicable also in thetransient Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR. These changes have been made in order toimplement these methods in a real time microprocessor.

  7. Steady-State Chemotactic Response in E. coli

    CERN Document Server

    Kafri, Yariv

    2007-01-01

    The bacterium E. coli maneuvers itself to regions with high chemoattractant concentrations by performing two stereotypical moves: `runs', in which it moves in near straight lines, and `tumbles', in which it does not advance but changes direction randomly. The duration of each move is stochastic and depends upon the chemoattractant concentration experienced in the recent past. We relate this stochastic behavior to the steady-state density of a bacterium population, and we derive the latter as a function of chemoattractant concentration. In contrast to earlier treatments, here we account for the effects of temporal correlations and variable tumbling durations. A range of behaviors obtains, that depends subtly upon several aspects of the system - memory, correlation, and tumbling stochasticity in particular.

  8. Estimation of a transient response from steady-state responses by deconvolution with built-in constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the steady-state response (SSR) elicited by a periodic train of auditory stimuli can largely be understood as a superposition of transient responses. This study is devoted to the problem of how to estimate that transient response from measured SSRs. The proposed method differs from previous approaches in that the solution can be constrained to be consistent with physiology-based prior knowledge or educated guesses. To achieve this goal, the transient response is not represented by a time series, but by a linear combination of auxiliary functions, called components. Constraints are introduced by assigning certain properties to the components. Only few parameters are required for that purpose, because the individual components are derived from a suitably designed mother component. After adjusting the components to the problem at hand, the component amplitudes are determined by optimizing the match between predicted and measured SSRs. This requires solving a linear inverse problem. A model simulation as well as an analysis of exemplary experimental data (auditory SSRs elicited by periodically presented clicks) prove the workability of the method. Since part of the theory is quite general, it would be relatively easy to refine and extend the method. Not only could responses other than SSRs be dealt with, it could also be realized that certain key parameters of the transient response, such as amplitude and delay, depend on stimulus repetition rate. PMID:27234643

  9. Steady-state responses of axially accelerating viscoelastic beams: Approximate analysis and numerical confirmation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear parametric vibration of axially accelerating viscoelastic beams is inves-tigated via an approximate analytical method with numerical confirmations. Based on nonlinear models of a finite-small-stretching slender beam moving at a speed with a periodic fluctuation, a solvability condition is established via the method of multiple scales for subharmonic resonance. Therefore, the amplitudes of steady-state periodic responses and their existence conditions are derived. The amplitudes of stable steady-state responses increase with the amplitude of the axial speed fluctuation, and decrease with the viscosity coefficient and the nonlinear coefficient. The minimum of the detuning parameter which causes the existence of a stable steady-state periodic response decreases with the amplitude of the axial speed fluctuation, and increases with the viscosity coefficient. Nu-merical solutions are sought via the finite difference scheme for a nonlinear par-tial-differential equation and a nonlinear integro-partial-differential equation. The calculation results qualitatively confirm the effects of the related parameters pre-dicted by the approximate analysis on the amplitude and the existence condition of the stable steady-state periodic responses. Quantitative comparisons demonstrate that the approximate analysis results have rather high precision.

  10. STEADY-STATE RESPONSES AND THEIR STABILITY OF NONLINEAR VIBRATION OF AN AXIALLY ACCELERATING STRING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴俊; 陈立群

    2004-01-01

    The steady-state transverse vibration of an axially moving string with geometric nonlinearity was investigated. The transport speed was assumed to be a constant mean speed with small harmonic variations. The nonlinear partial-differential equation that governs the transverse vibration of the string was derived by use of the Hamilton principle. The method of multiple scales was applied directly to the equation. The solvability condition of eliminating the secular terms was established. Closed form solutions for the amplitude and the existence conditions of nontrivial steady-state response of the two-to-one parametric resonance were obtained. Some numerical examples showing effects of the mean transport speed, the amplitude and the frequency of speed variation were presented. The Liapunov linearized stability theory was employed to derive the instability conditions of the trivial solution and the nontrivial solutions for the two-to-one parametric resonance. Some numerical examples highlighting influences of the related parameters on the instability conditions were presented.

  11. Steady-state responses of a belt-drive dynamical system under dual excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hu

    2016-02-01

    The stable steady-state periodic responses of a belt-drive system with a one-way clutch are studied. For the first time, the dynamical system is investigated under dual excitations. The system is simultaneously excited by the firing pulsations of the engine and the harmonic motion of the foundation. Nonlinear discrete-continuous equations are derived for coupling the transverse vibration of the belt spans and the rotations of the driving and driven pulleys and the accessory pulley. The nonlinear dynamics is studied under equal and multiple relations between the frequency of the firing pulsations and the frequency of the foundation motion. Furthermore, translating belt spans are modeled as axially moving strings. A set of nonlinear piecewise ordinary differential equations is achieved by using the Galerkin truncation. Under various relations between the excitation frequencies, the time histories of the dynamical system are numerically simulated based on the time discretization method. Furthermore, the stable steady-state periodic response curves are calculated based on the frequency sweep. Moreover, the convergence of the Galerkin truncation is examined. Numerical results demonstrate that the one-way clutch reduces the resonance amplitude of the rotations of the driven pulley and the accessory pulley. On the other hand, numerical examples prove that the resonance areas of the belt spans are decreased by eliminating the torque-transmitting in the opposite direction. With the increasing amplitude of the foundation excitation, the damping effect of the one-way clutch will be reduced. Furthermore, as the amplitude of the firing pulsations of the engine increases, the jumping phenomena in steady-state response curves of the belt-drive system with or without a one-way clutch both occur.

  12. Precise mapping of the somatotopic hand area using neuromagnetic steady-state responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Shahab; Ross, Bernhard

    2012-05-21

    The body surface is represented in somatotopically organized maps in the primary somatosensory cortex. Estimating the size of the hand area with neuromagnetic source analysis has been used as a metric for monitoring neuroplastic changes related to training, learning, and brain injury. Commonly, results were significant as group statistics only because source localization accuracy was limited by factors such as residual noise and head motion. In this study we aimed to develop a robust method for obtaining the somatotopic map of the hand area in individuals using the bootstrap framework. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of the different factors affecting the accuracy of the obtained maps was provided. We applied vibrotactile touch stimuli to the tip of the index finger or the ring finger of the right hand and recorded the 22-Hz steady-state response using MEG. Single equivalent dipole sources were localized in contralateral left somatosensory cortex. Bootstrap resampling revealed the confidence intervals for the source coordinates using a single block of 5 min MEG recording. Residual noise in the averaged evoked response predominantly affected source localization, and the related confidence interval was reciprocally related to the signal-to-noise ratio. Apparently, head movements within a block of MEG recording contributed less to the variability of source localization in cooperative volunteers. The results of the current study indicate that significant separations of index finger and ring finger representations along the somatotopic map can be revealed in an individual using bootstrap framework. PMID:22507747

  13. The influence of visual perspective on the somatosensory steady-state response during pain observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Linsey Canizales

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The observation and evaluation of other's pain activate part of the neuronal network involved in the actual experience of pain, including those regions subserving the sensori-discriminative dimension of pain. This was largely interpreted as evidence showing that part of the painful experience can be shared vicariously. Here, we investigated the effect of the visual perspective from which other people’s pain is seen on the cortical response to continuous 25 Hz non-painful somatosensory stimulation (somatosensory steady-state response: SSSR. Based on the shared representation framework, we expected first-person visual perspective (1PP to yield more changes in cortical activity than third-person visual perspective (3PP during pain observation. Twenty healthy adults were instructed to rate a series of pseudo-dynamic pictures depicting hands in either painful or non-painful scenarios, presented either in 1PP (0°-45° angle or 3PP (180° angle, while changes in brain activity was measured with a 128-electode EEG system. The ratings demonstrated that the same scenarios were rated on average as more painful when observed from the 1PP than from the 3PP. As expected from previous works, the SSSR response was decreased after stimulus onset over the left caudal part of the parieto-central cortex, contralateral to the stimulation side. Moreover, the difference between the SSSR was of greater amplitude when the painful situations were presented from the 1PP compared to the 3PP. Together, these results suggest that a visuospatial congruence between the viewer and the observed scenarios is associated with both a higher subjective evaluation of pain and an increased modulation in the somatosensory representation of observed pain. These findings are discussed with regards to the potential role of visual perspective in pain communication and empathy.

  14. Auditory steady-state response measurement in evaluating hearing loss milder than moderate to severe level%多频稳态诱发电位测试对中重度以下听力损失的评估价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏; 苏振忠; 陈锡辉; 熊观霞; 李广智; 李倩斐; 王新光

    2006-01-01

    耳和中重度聋组12例耳均测出各项指标,全部进入结果分析.①听性脑干反应值与实际听力水平相符合,与多频稳态诱发电位1.0~2.0 kHz的阈值最为接近;不同频率的多频稳态诱发电位的引出率随着听力损害的加重而逐渐降低,听力正常或轻度聋者多频稳态诱发电位的引出率均为100%,而中度、中重度聋组的引出率有所下降(0.5 kHz时,分别为77.8%和92.8%;4 kHz时,分别为88.9%和85.7%).不同频率时,中重度聋组的多频稳态诱发电位阈值显著高于听力正常组,差异有显著性意义(P<0.05);0.5 kHz及4 kHz时中重度聋组的多频稳态诱发电位阈值显著高于轻度聋组,差异有显著性意义(P<0.05);2 kHz时轻度聋组的多频稳态诱发电位阈值显著高于听力正常组,差异均有显著性意义(P<0.05);4 kHz时中度聋组的多频稳态诱发电位阈值显著高于听力正常组和轻度聋组,差异均有显著性意义.②由多频稳态诱发电位检查结果和实际纯音测听的组别经交互聚类判别纯音测听结果所犯的判断错误,听力正常组的判别符合正确率为100%;轻度聋组12例中仅有1例错判,正确率为92%;中度聋组9例中1例错判,正确率为89%,中重度聋组判别正确率为83%.结论:由多频稳态诱发电位测试结果可推测以纯音测听结果为标准的客观听力状况所犯的判别错误,多频稳态诱发电位测试在客观听力评价中对轻度聋以上的有较好的准确率,在实际应用中有较好应用前景.%BACKGROUND: Auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) is an objective method of hearing examination in clinic in recent years. ASSR has the frequency specificity as compared with previous auditory brainstem responses (ABR).OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy of ASSR in objective hearing assessment.DESIGN: A case-control observation.SETTING: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.PARTICIPANTS: The subjects

  15. Transient and Steady-State Responses of an Asymmetric Nonlinear Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Elías-Zúñiga

    2013-01-01

    oscillator that describes the motion of a damped, forced system supported symmetrically by simple shear springs on a smooth inclined bearing surface. We also use the percentage overshoot value to study the influence of damping and nonlinearity on the transient and steady-state oscillatory amplitudes.

  16. Steady-State Response of Periodically Supported Structures to a Moving Load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metrikine, A.V.; Wolfert, A.F.M.; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Steady-state vibrations of periodically supported structures under a moving load are analytically investigated. The following three structures are considered: an overhead power line for a train, a long suspended bridge and a railway track. The study is based on the application of so-called 'periodic

  17. The steady-state response of the cerebral cortex to the beat of music reflects both the comprehension of music and attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eMeltzer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The brain's analyses of speech and music share a range of neural resources and mechanisms. Music displays a temporal structure of complexity similar to that of speech, unfolds over comparable timescales, and elicits cognitive demands in tasks involving comprehension and attention. During speech processing, synchronized neural activity of the cerebral cortex in the delta and theta frequency bands tracks the envelope of a speech signal, and this neural activity is modulated by high-level cortical functions such as speech comprehension and attention. It remains unclear, however, whether the cortex also responds to the natural rhythmic structure of music and how the response, if present, is influenced by higher cognitive processes. Here we employ electroencephalography (EEG to show that the cortex responds to the beat of music and that this steady-state response reflects musical comprehension and attention. We show that the cortical response to the beat is weaker when subjects listen to a familiar tune than when they listen to an unfamiliar, nonsensical musical piece. Furthermore, we show that in a task of intermodal attention there is a larger neural response at the beat frequency when subjects attend to a musical stimulus than when they ignore the auditory signal and instead focus on a visual one. Our findings may be applied in clinical assessments of auditory processing and music cognition as well as in the construction of auditory brain-machine interfaces.

  18. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to steady-state changes in end-tidal CO2 during passive heat stress

    OpenAIRE

    Low, DA; Wingo, JE; Keller, DM; Davis, SL; Zhang, R.; Crandall, CG

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that passive heat stress alters cerebrovascular responsiveness to steady-state changes in end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2). Nine healthy subjects (4 men and 5 women), each dressed in a water-perfused suit, underwent normoxic hypocapnic hyperventilation (decrease PetCO2 ~20 Torr) and normoxic hypercapnic (increase in PetCO2 ~9 Torr) challenges under normothermic and passive heat stress conditions. The slope of the relationship between calculated cerebrovascular conductan...

  19. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. On the nonlinear steady state response of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings - Theory and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jon Steffen; Santos, Ilmar

    2015-01-01

    The demand for oil-free turbo compressors is increasing. Current trends are divided between active magnetic bearings and air foil bearings (AFB), the latter being important due to mechanical simplicity. AFB supported rotors are sensitive to unbalance due to low damping and nonlinear characteristics......, hence accurate prediction of their response is important. This paper gives theoretical and experimental contributions by implementing and validating a new method to simulate the nonlinear steady-state response of a rotor supported by three pads segmented AFBs. The fluid film pressures, foil deflections...

  1. On the nonlinear steady-state response of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings-Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jon S.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2015-06-01

    The demand for oil-free turbo compressors is increasing. Current trends are divided between active magnetic bearings and air foil bearings (AFB), the latter being important due to mechanical simplicity. AFB supported rotors are sensitive to unbalance due to low damping and nonlinear characteristics, hence accurate prediction of their response is important. This paper gives theoretical and experimental contributions by implementing and validating a new method to simulate the nonlinear steady-state response of a rotor supported by three pads segmented AFBs. The fluid film pressures, foil deflections and rotor movements are simultaneously solved, considering foil stiffness and damping coefficients estimated using a structural model, previously described and validated against experiments.

  2. On the Steady State Response of a Cantilever Beam Partially Immersed in a Fluid and Carrying an Intermediate Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Al-Qaisia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the nonlinear steady state response of a slender beam partially immersed in a fluid and carrying an intermediate mass. The model is developed based on the large deformation theory with the constraint of inextensible beam, which is valid for most engineering structures. The Lagrangian dynamics in conjunction with the assumed mode method is utilized in deriving the non-linear unimodal temporal equation of motion. The distributed and concentrated sinusoidal loads are accounted for in a consistent manner using the assumed mode method. The non-linear equation of motion is, analytically, solved using the single term harmonic balance (SHB and the two terms harmonic balance (2HB methods. The stability of the system, under various loading conditions, is investigated. The results are presented, discussed and some conclusions on the partially immersed beam nonlinear dynamics are extracted.

  3. STEADY STATE RESPONSE ANALYSIS ON HELICAL SPRING IMPACTED BY SHORT WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Chaoxing; WANG Xiulun; WANG Jirong; LIU Dawei

    2006-01-01

    The wave transmission character of helical spring is applied to establish 2-DOF model of impacted vehicle on the wave impact theory. Considering the concrete structure of helical spring,corresponding responses under different impact frequency of the vehicle are imitated. The reason why the vehicle floor overresponds in some special frequency fields is explored based on analyzing the responses. When the impactions are in low frequency, the change of the spring has not been considered, but this does not affect the results. Because the transmission characters of velocity and acceleration are unanimous in helical spring, the responses characters of velocity and acceleration are also unanimous, the only difference is the magnitude, which can make use of acceleration responses to analyse velocity responses.

  4. Steady-state unbalance response of a three-disk flexible rotor on flexible, damped supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the unbalance response of a flexible, ball bearing supported rotor to speeds above the third lateral bending critical. Values of squeeze film damping coefficients obtained from measured data are compared to theoretical values obtained from short bearing approximation over a frequency range from 5000 to 31 000 cycles/min. Experimental response for an undamped rotor is compared to that of one having oil squeeze film dampers at the bearings. Unbalance applied varied from 0.62 to 15.1 gm-cm.

  5. Role of metabolic CO2 production in ventilatory response to steady-state exercise.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillipson, E A; Bowes, G.; Townsend, E. R.; Duffin, J; Cooper, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the role of metabolic CO2 production in the hyperpnea of muscular exercise by comparing the response of alveolar ventilation to moderate levels of exercise with the response to venous infusion of CO2 at rest. Studies were performed in four awake sheep that were trained to run on a treadmill. The sheep had been cannulated for veno-venous extracorporeal perfusion so that CO2 could be infused into the peripheral venous blood through membrane lungs in the perfusion circuit. The sheep ...

  6. Steady State Ocean Response to Wind Forcing in Extratropical Frontal Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Meghan F; Tozuka, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    In regions of strong sea surface temperature (SST) gradients, the surface "geostrophic" currents have a vertical shear aligned with the surface density front defined by the temperature. This surface geostrophic ("thermal wind") shear can balance a portion of the surface wind stress, altering the classic Ekman response to wind forcing. Here we show that these frontal effects cannot be ignored in the Tropics or in strong frontal regions in the extratropics, such as found in coastal regions and in western boundary currents of all basins. Frontal effects also dominate the classic Ekman response in the regions of both hemispheres where Trade winds change to westerlies. Implications for vertical motion and global heat transport are discussed. PMID:27354231

  7. Coupled bending-torsion steady-state response of pretwisted, nonuniform rotating beams using a transfer-matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Carl E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Using the Newtonian method, the equations of motion are developed for the coupled bending-torsion steady-state response of beams rotating at constant angular velocity in a fixed plane. The resulting equations are valid to first order strain-displacement relationships for a long beam with all other nonlinear terms retained. In addition, the equations are valid for beams with the mass centroidal axis offset (eccentric) from the elastic axis, nonuniform mass and section properties, and variable twist. The solution of these coupled, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous, differential equations is obtained by modifying a Hunter linear second-order transfer-matrix solution procedure to solve the nonlinear differential equations and programming the solution for a desk-top personal computer. The modified transfer-matrix method was verified by comparing the solution for a rotating beam with a geometric, nonlinear, finite-element computer code solution; and for a simple rotating beam problem, the modified method demonstrated a significant advantage over the finite-element solution in accuracy, ease of solution, and actual computer processing time required to effect a solution.

  8. Monocular and binocular steady-state flicker VEPs: frequency-response functions to sinusoidal and square-wave luminance modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David S; Hamilton, Ruth; Shahani, Uma; McCulloch, Daphne L

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state VEPs to full-field flicker (FFF) using sinusoidally modulated light were compared with those elicited by square-wave modulated light across a wide range of stimulus frequencies with monocular and binocular FFF stimulation. Binocular and monocular VEPs were elicited in 12 adult volunteers to FFF with two modes of temporal modulation: sinusoidal or square-wave (abrupt onset and offset, 50% duty cycle) at ten temporal frequencies ranging from 2.83 to 58.8 Hz. All stimuli had a mean luminance of 100 cd/m(2) with an 80% modulation depth (20-180 cd/m(2)). Response magnitudes at the stimulus frequency (F1) and at the double and triple harmonics (F2 and F3) were compared. For both sinusoidal and square-wave flicker, the FFF-VEP magnitudes at F1 were maximal for 7.52 Hz flicker. F2 was maximal for 5.29 Hz flicker, and F3 magnitudes are largest for flicker stimulation from 3.75 to 7.52 Hz. Square-wave flicker produced significantly larger F1 and F2 magnitudes for slow flicker rates (up to 5.29 Hz for F1; at 2.83 and 3.75 Hz for F2). The F3 magnitudes were larger overall for square-wave flicker. Binocular FFF-VEP magnitudes are larger than those of monocular FFF-VEPs, and the amount of this binocular enhancement is not dependant on the mode of flicker stimulation (mean binocular: monocular ratio 1.41, 95% CI: 1.2-1.6). Binocular enhancement of F1 for 21.3 Hz flicker was increased to a factor of 2.5 (95% CI: 1.8-3.5). In the healthy adult visual system, FFF-VEP magnitudes can be characterized by the frequency-response functions of F1, F2 and F3. Low-frequency roll-off in the FFF-VEP magnitudes is greater for sinusoidal flicker than for square-wave flicker for rates ≤ 5.29 Hz; magnitudes for higher-frequency flicker are similar for the two types of flicker. Binocular FFF-VEPs are larger overall than those recorded monocularly, and this binocular summation is enhanced at 21.3 Hz in the mid-frequency range. PMID:21279419

  9. Extrasolar giant magnetospheric response to steady-state stellar wind pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Tilley, Matt A; Winglee, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet's magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semi-major axes - 10, 5, 1 and 0.2 AU. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semi-major axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 AU and 5 AU cases which reach a state of mass loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 AU or 0.2 AU cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 AU and 0.2 AU cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents (FAC), associated with auroral radio emissions, are shown to increase in magnitude and latitu...

  10. Extrasolar Giant Magnetospheric Response to Steady-state Stellar Wind Pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Matt A.; Harnett, Erika M.; Winglee, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet’s magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semimajor axes—10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semimajor axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass-loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 and 5 au cases, which reach a state of mass-loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 or 0.2 au cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 and 0.2 au cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents, associated with auroral radio emissions, is shown to increase in magnitude and latitudinal coverage with a corresponding shift equatorward from increased dynamic ram pressure experienced in the hotter orbits. Similar to observed hot Jovian planets, the warm exo-Saturn simulated in the current work shows enhanced ion density in the magnetosheath and magnetopause regions, as well as the plasma torus, which could contribute to altered transit signals, suggesting that for planets in warmer (>0.1 au) orbits, planetary magnetic field strengths and possibly exomoons—via the plasma torus—could be observable with future missions.

  11. Psychophysiological responses to auditory change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuen, Lorraine; Sears, David; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive characterization of autonomic and somatic responding within the auditory domain is currently lacking. We studied whether simple types of auditory change that occur frequently during music listening could elicit measurable changes in heart rate, skin conductance, respiration rate, and facial motor activity. Participants heard a rhythmically isochronous sequence consisting of a repeated standard tone, followed by a repeated target tone that changed in pitch, timbre, duration, intensity, or tempo, or that deviated momentarily from rhythmic isochrony. Changes in all parameters produced increases in heart rate. Skin conductance response magnitude was affected by changes in timbre, intensity, and tempo. Respiratory rate was sensitive to deviations from isochrony. Our findings suggest that music researchers interpreting physiological responses as emotional indices should consider acoustic factors that may influence physiology in the absence of induced emotions. PMID:26927928

  12. NUMEL: a computer aided design suite for the assessment of the steady state, static/dynamic stability and transient responses of nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUMEL is a computer aided design suite for the assessment of the steady state, static/dynamic stability and transient responses of nuclear steam generators. The equations solved are those of a monotube coflow or counterflow heat exchanger. The advantages of NUMEL are its fast execution speed, robustness, extensive validation and flexibility coupled with ease of use. The code can simultaneously model up to four separate sections (e.g. reheater, HP boiler). This document is a user manual and describes in detail the running of the NUMEL suite. In addition, a discussion is presented of the necessary approximations involved in representing a serpentine or helical AGR boiler as a monotube counterflow heat exchanger. To date, NUMEL has been applied to the modelling of AGR, Fast Reactor and once through Magnox and conventional boilers. Other versions of the code are available for specialist applications, e.g. Magnox and conventional recirculation boilers. (author)

  13. Analysis of high field effects on the steady-state current-voltage response of semi-insulating 4H-SiC for photoconductive switch applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model-based analysis of the steady-state, current-voltage response of semi-insulating 4H-SiC is carried out to probe the internal mechanisms, focusing on electric field driven effects. Relevant physical processes, such as multiple defects, repulsive potential barriers to electron trapping, band-to-trap impact ionization, and field-dependent detrapping, are comprehensively included. Results of our model match the available experimental data fairly well over orders of magnitude variation in the current density. A number of important parameters are also extracted in the process through comparisons with available data. Finally, based on our analysis, the possible presence of holes in the samples can be discounted up to applied fields as high as ∼275 kV/cm

  14. Auditory brainstem response in dolphins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgway, S. H.; Bullock, T H; Carder, D.A.; Seeley, R L; Woods, D.; Galambos, R

    1981-01-01

    We recorded the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in four dolphins (Tursiops truncatus and Delphinus delphis). The ABR evoked by clicks consists of seven waves within 10 msec; two waves often contain dual peaks. The main waves can be identified with those of humans and laboratory mammals; in spite of a much longer path, the latencies of the peaks are almost identical to those of the rat. The dolphin ABR waves increase in latency as the intensity of a sound decreases by only 4 microseconds/dec...

  15. Multiple Steady States in Distillation

    OpenAIRE

    Bekiaris, Nikolaos

    1995-01-01

    We study multiple steady states in distillation. We first analyze the simplest case of ternary homogeneous azeotropic mixtures. We show that in the case of infinite reflux and an infinite number of trays (∞/∞ case) one can construct bifurcation diagrams on physical grounds with the distillate flow as the bifurcation parameter. Multiple steady states exist when the distillate flow varies non-monotonically along the continuation path of the bifurcation diagram. We derive a necessary and suffici...

  16. Estradiol promotes functional responses in inflammatory and steady-state dendritic cells through differential requirement for activation function-1 of estrogen receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillet, Cyril; Rouquié, Nelly; Foulon, Eliane; Douin-Echinard, Victorine; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-François; Guéry, Jean-Charles; Laffont, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to regulate GM-CSF- or Flt3 ligand-driven dendritic cell (DC) development through estrogen receptor (ER) α signaling in myeloid progenitors. ERα regulates transcription of target genes through two distinct activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2, whose respective involvement varies in a cell type- or tissue-specific manner. In this study, we investigated the role of ERα AFs in the development and effector functions of inflammatory DCs, steady-state conventional DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC), using mouse lacking either AF-1 or AF-2. In agreement with previous works, we showed that E2 fostered the differentiation and effector functions of inflammatory DCs through ERα-dependent upregulation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 in GM-CSF-stimulated myeloid progenitors. Interestingly, whereas AF-1 was required for early IRF-4 upregulation in DC precursors, it was dispensable to enhance IRF-4 expression in differentiated DCs to a level compatible with the development of the more functional Ly6C(-) CD11b(+) DC subset. Presence of E2 had no effect on progenitors from either knock-in mice with 7-aa deletion in helix 12 of ERα, lacking AF-2, or ERα(-/-) mice. By contrast, in Flt3 ligand-driven DC differentiation, activation of AF-1 domain was required to promote the development of more functionally competent conventional DCs and pDCs. Moreover, lack of ERα AF-1 blunted the TLR7-mediated IFN-α response of female pDCs in vivo. Thus, our study demonstrates that ERα uses AF-1 differently in steady-state and inflammatory DC lineages to regulate their innate functions, suggesting that selective ER modulators could be used to target specific DC subsets. PMID:23626011

  17. STEADY-STATE RESPONSE OF A TIMOSHENKO BEAM ON AN ELASTIC HALF-SPACE UNDER A MOVING LOAD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yunmin; Wang Changjing

    2006-01-01

    By introducing the equivalent stiffness of an elastic half-space interacting with a Timoshenko beam, the displacement solution of the beam resting on an elastic half-space subjected to a moving load is presented. Based on the relative relation of wave velocities of the half-space and the beam, four cases with the combination of different parameters of the half-space and the beam, the system of soft beam and hard half-space, the system of sub-soft beam and hard halfspace, the system of sub-hard beam and soft half-space, and the system of hard beam and soft half-space are considered. The critical velocities of the moving load are studied using dispersion curves. It is found that critical velocities of the moving load on the Timoshenko beam depend on the relative relation of wave velocities of the half-space and the beam. The Rayleigh wave velocity in the half-space is always a critical velocity and the response of the system will be infinite when the load velocity reaches it. For the system of soft beam and hard half-space, wave velocities of the beam are also critical velocities. Besides the shear wave velocity of the beam, there is an additional minimum critical velocity for the system of sub-soft beam and hard half-space. While for systems of (sub-) hard beams and soft half-space, wave velocities of the beam are no longer critical ones.Comparison with the Euler-Bernoulli beam shows that the critical velocities and response of the two types of beams are much different for the system of (sub-) soft beam and hard half-space but are similar to each other for the system of (sub-) hard beam and soft half space. The largest displacement of the beam is almost at the location of the load and the displacement along the beam is almost symmetrical if the load velocity is smaller than the minimum critical velocity (the shear wave velocity of the beam for the system of soft beam and hard half-space). The largest displacement of the beam shifts behind the load and the asymmetry

  18. Steady-state response attenuation of a linear oscillator-nonlinear absorber system by using an adjustable-length pendulum in series: Numerical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, R. P.; Sun, C.; Dick, A. J.; Nagarajaiah, S.

    2015-05-01

    Response attenuation of a linear primary structure (PS)-nonlinear tuned mass damper (NTMD) dynamic system with and without an adaptive-length pendulum tuned mass damper (ALPTMD) in a series configuration is studied by using numerical and experimental methods. In the PS-NTMD system, coexisting high and low amplitude solutions are observed in the experiment, validating previous numerical efforts. In order to eliminate the potentially dangerous high amplitude solutions, a series ALPTMD with a mass multiple orders of magnitude smaller than the PS is added to the NTMD. The ALPTMD is used in order to represent the steady-state behavior of a smart tuned mass damper (STMD). In the experiment, the length of the pendulum is adjusted such that its natural frequency matches the dominant frequency of the harmonic ground motions. In the present study, the proposed ALPTMD can be locked so that it is unable to oscillate and influence the dynamics of the system in order to obtain the benefits provided by the NTMD. The experimental data show good qualitative agreement with numerical predictions computed with parameter continuation and time integration methods. Activation of the ALPTMD can successfully prevent the transition of the response from the low amplitude solution to the high amplitude solution or return the response from the high amplitude solution to the low amplitude solution, thereby protecting the PS.

  19. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process.......This chapter covers the basic principles of steady state modelling and simulation using a number of case studies. Two principal approaches are illustrated that develop the unit operation models from first principles as well as through application of standard flowsheet simulators. The approaches...

  20. The amplitude and phase precision of 40 Hz auditory steady-state response depend on the level of arousal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griskova, Inga; Mørup, Morten; Parnas, Josef; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Arnfred, Sidse

    2007-01-01

    arousal" condition subjects were sitting in a reclined position with eyes closed and the lights turned off. The 64-channel EEG data was wavelet transformed and the amplitude and phase precision of the wavelet transformed evoked potential were decomposed by the recently proposed multi-subject non...

  1. Staffing in a Steady State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Options for faculty utilization in a steady state are examined, with consideration for their economy or ability to increase turnover or flexibility: early retirement, part retirement, retraining, exchange with other institutions or industry, and fixed-term appointments or lecturer positions. (MSE)

  2. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process....

  3. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hinckley Delano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body, inferior colliculus, cochlear nucleus and superior olivary complex reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular, (ii cortico-(collicular-olivocochlear and (iii cortico-(collicular-cochlear nucleus pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate that blocking ongoing auditory-cortex activity with pharmacological and physical methods modulates the amplitude of cochlear potentials. In addition, auditory-cortex microstimulation independently modulates cochlear sensitivity and the strength of the olivocochlear reflex. In this mini-review, anatomical and physiological evidence supporting the presence of a functional efferent network from the auditory cortex to the cochlear receptor is presented. Special emphasis is given to the corticofugal effects on initial auditory processing, that is, on cochlear nucleus, auditory nerve and cochlear responses. A working model of three parallel pathways from the auditory cortex to the cochlea and auditory nerve is proposed.

  4. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreros, Gonzalo; Delano, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body (MGB), inferior colliculus (IC), cochlear nucleus (CN) and superior olivary complex (SOC) reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear (OC) fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i) colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular; (ii) cortico-(collicular)-OC; and (iii) cortico-(collicular)-CN pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate that blocking ongoing auditory-cortex activity with pharmacological and physical methods modulates the amplitude of cochlear potentials. In addition, auditory-cortex microstimulation independently modulates cochlear sensitivity and the strength of the OC reflex. In this mini-review, anatomical and physiological evidence supporting the presence of a functional efferent network from the auditory cortex to the cochlear receptor is presented. Special emphasis is given to the corticofugal effects on initial auditory processing, that is, on CN, auditory nerve and cochlear responses. A working model of three parallel pathways from the auditory cortex to the cochlea and auditory nerve is proposed. PMID:26483647

  5. Steady-state eternal inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the advent of inflation, several theorems have been proven suggesting that although inflation can (and generically does) continue eternally into the future, it cannot be extended eternally into the past to create a 'steady-state' model with no initial time. Here we provide a construction that circumvents these theorems and allows a self-consistent, geodesically complete, and physically sensible steady-state eternally inflating universe, based on the flat slicing of de Sitter space. This construction could be used as the background spacetime for creation events that form big-bang-like regions, and hence could form the basis for a cosmology that is compatible with observations and yet which avoids an initial singularity or beginning of time

  6. Steady state neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learning from operational reliability of neutral beam injectors in particular and various heating schemes including RF in general on TFTR, JET, JT-60, it has become clear that neutral beam injectors may find a greater role assigned to them for maintaining the plasma in steady state devices under construction. Many technological solutions, integrated in the present day generation of injectors have given rise to capability of producing multimegawatt power at many tens of kV. They have already operated for integrated time >105 S without deterioration in the performance. However, a new generation of injectors for steady state devices have to address to some basic issues. They stem from material erosion under particle bombardment, heat transfer > 10 MW/m2, frequent regeneration of cryopanels, inertial power supplies, data acquisition and control of large volume of data. Some of these engineering issues have been addressed to in the proposed neutral beam injector for SST-1 at our institute; the remaining shall have to wait for the inputs of the database generated from the actual experience with steady state injectors. (author)

  7. Study on steady-state response of a vertical axis automatic washing machine with a hydraulic balancer using a new approach and a method for getting a smaller deflection angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Wei; Zhang, Qiu-Ju; Fan, Sheng-Yao

    2011-04-01

    A new approach is used in this paper to analyze steady-state response of a vertical axis automatic washing machine with a hydraulic balancer and a method for getting a smaller deflection angle of the washing/drying assembly is presented. First, a mathematical model of the vertical axis washing machine and a numerical description of the hydraulic balancer are described and a vibration model for the vertical axis washing machine with a hydraulic balancer is built. Second, the vibration model is transformed into an autonomous form whose equilibrium point can be used to analyze dynamics of the washing machine at the steady state. Because the autonomous form can be solved by the Newton-Raphson method which requires only a few iterations, it provides a much faster approach for analyzing steady-state response of the spin drying process than traditional numerical integration methods. Five parameters influencing the spin drying process are considered, and the balancer's importance in reducing vibrations at the steady state is illustrated. Third, the equilibrium conditions of the centrifugal forces acting on the clothes, the washing/drying assembly and the balancer are considered, and a governing equation for getting a smaller deflection angle of the washing/drying assembly is derived. At last, parameters in the governing equation, especially those related to the hydraulic balancer, are discussed.

  8. On Typicality in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Denis J.; Williams, Stephen R.; Searles, Debra J.; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-08-01

    From the statistical mechanical viewpoint, relaxation of macroscopic systems and response theory rest on a notion of typicality, according to which the behavior of single macroscopic objects is given by appropriate ensembles: ensemble averages of observable quantities represent the measurements performed on single objects, because " almost all" objects share the same fate. In the case of non-dissipative dynamics and relaxation toward equilibrium states, " almost all" is referred to invariant probability distributions that are absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure. In other words, the collection of initial micro-states (single systems) that do not follow the ensemble is supposed to constitute a set of vanishing, phase space volume. This approach is problematic in the case of dissipative dynamics and relaxation to nonequilibrium steady states, because the relevant invariant distributions attribute probability 1 to sets of zero volume, while evolution commonly begins in equilibrium states, i.e., in sets of full phase space volume. We consider the relaxation of classical, thermostatted particle systems to nonequilibrium steady states. We show that the dynamical condition known as Ω T-mixing is necessary and sufficient for relaxation of ensemble averages to steady state values. Moreover, we find that the condition known as weak T-mixing applied to smooth observables is sufficient for ensemble relaxation to be independent of the initial ensemble. Lastly, we show that weak T-mixing provides a notion of typicality for dissipative dynamics that is based on the (non-invariant) Lebesgue measure, and that we call physical ergodicity.

  9. Steady-state evoked potentials to study the processing of tactile and nociceptive somatosensory input in the human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Colon, Elisabeth; Legrain, Valéry; Mouraux, André

    2012-01-01

    The periodic presentation of a sensory stimulus induces, at certain frequencies of stimulation, a sustained electroencephalographic response of corresponding frequency, known as steady-state evoked potentials (SS-EP). In visual, auditory and vibrotactile modalities, studies have shown that SS-EP reflect mainly activity originating from early, modality-specific sensory cortices. Furthermore, it has been shown that SS-EP have several advantages over the recording of transient event-related brai...

  10. Auditory brain-stem responses in syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenhall, U; Roupe, G

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of auditory brain-stem electrical responses (BSER) provides an effective means of detecting lesions in the auditory pathways. In the present study the wave patterns were analysed in 11 patients with secondary or latent syphilis with no clinical symptoms referrable to the central nervous system and in two patients with congenital syphilis and general paralysis. Decreased amplitudes and prolonged latencies occurred frequently in patients with secondary and with advanced syphilis. This ...

  11. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  12. Inconsistencies in steady state thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Ronald; Motai, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    We address the issue of extending thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Using driven stochastic lattice gases, we ask whether consistent definitions of an effective chemical potential μ, and an effective temperature Te, are possible. These quantities are determined via zero-flux conditions of particles and energy between the driven system and a reservoir. For the models considered here, the fluxes are given in terms of certain stationary average densities, eliminating the need to perturb the system by actually exchanging particles; μ and Te are thereby obtained via open-circuit measurements, using a virtual reservoir. In the lattice gas with nearest-neighbor exclusion, temperature is not relevant, and we find that the effective chemical potential, a function of density and drive strength, satisfies the zeroth law, and correctly predicts the densities of coexisting systems. In the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn driven lattice gas, both μ and Te need to be defined. We show analytically that the zeroth law is violated, and determine the size of the violations numerically. Our results highlight a fundamental inconsistency in the extension of thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Research supported by CNPq, Brazil.

  13. Measurement of non-steady-state free fatty acid turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of non-steady-state equations for measuring changes in free fatty acid rate of appearance (Ra) is unknown. In the present study, endogenous lipolysis (traced with [14C]-linoleate) was pharmacologically suppressed in six conscious mongrel dogs. A computer-responsive infusion pump was then used to deliver an intravenous oleic acid emulsion in both constant and linear gradient infusion modes. Both non-steady-state equations with various effective volumes of distribution (V) and steady-state equations were used to measure oleate Ra [(14C]oleate). Endogenous lipolysis did not change during the experiment. When oleate Ra increased in a linear gradient fashion, only non-steady-state equations with a large (150 ml/kg) V resulted in erroneous values (9% overestimate, P less than 0.05). In contrast, when oleate Ra decreased in a similar fashion, steady-state and standard non-steady-state equations (V = plasma volume = 50 ml/kg) overestimated total oleate Ra (18 and 7%, P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Overall, non-steady-state equations with an effective V of 90 ml/kg (1.8 x plasma volume) allowed the most accurate estimates of oleate Ra

  14. Measurement of non-steady-state free fatty acid turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M.D.; Heiling, V.; Miles, J.M. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of non-steady-state equations for measuring changes in free fatty acid rate of appearance (Ra) is unknown. In the present study, endogenous lipolysis (traced with ({sup 14}C)-linoleate) was pharmacologically suppressed in six conscious mongrel dogs. A computer-responsive infusion pump was then used to deliver an intravenous oleic acid emulsion in both constant and linear gradient infusion modes. Both non-steady-state equations with various effective volumes of distribution (V) and steady-state equations were used to measure oleate Ra (({sup 14}C)oleate). Endogenous lipolysis did not change during the experiment. When oleate Ra increased in a linear gradient fashion, only non-steady-state equations with a large (150 ml/kg) V resulted in erroneous values (9% overestimate, P less than 0.05). In contrast, when oleate Ra decreased in a similar fashion, steady-state and standard non-steady-state equations (V = plasma volume = 50 ml/kg) overestimated total oleate Ra (18 and 7%, P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Overall, non-steady-state equations with an effective V of 90 ml/kg (1.8 x plasma volume) allowed the most accurate estimates of oleate Ra.

  15. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  16. Boundary Element Analysis of the Steady-state Response of an Elastic Half-Space to a Moving Force on its Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    2003-01-01

    is approximated, but the error which is introduced in this way is insignificant. Numerical examples are given for a moving rectangular load on an elastic half-space. The result from a boundary element code based on the derived Green's function are compared with a semi-analytic solution.......The paper deals with the boundary element method formulation of the steady-state wave propagation through elastic media due to a source moving with constant velocity. The Greens' function for the three-dimensional full-space is formulated in a local frame of reference following the source...

  17. Cooperative dynamics in auditory brain response

    CERN Document Server

    Kwapien, J; Liu, L C; Ioannides, A A

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous estimates of the activity in the left and right auditory cortex of five normal human subjects were extracted from Multichannel Magnetoencephalography recordings. Left, right and binaural stimulation were used, in separate runs, for each subject. The resulting time-series of left and right auditory cortex activity were analysed using the concept of mutual information. The analysis constitutes an objective method to address the nature of inter-hemispheric correlations in response to auditory stimulations. The results provide a clear evidence for the occurrence of such correlations mediated by a direct information transport, with clear laterality effects: as a rule, the contralateral hemisphere leads by 10-20ms, as can be seen in the average signal. The strength of the inter-hemispheric coupling, which cannot be extracted from the average data, is found to be highly variable from subject to subject, but remarkably stable for each subject.

  18. Steady-State Response of the Flexible Connecting Rod of a Slider-Crank Mechanism with Time-Dependent Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, R.-F.; Chen, H.-H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element method for the dynamic analysis of a flexible connecting rod in a slider-crank mechanism with time-dependent boundary conditions. Kinetic and strain energies of the flexible link are formulated and used with Hamilton's principle to develop the governing equations. Time-dependent boundary conditions instead of simply-supported end conditions are used to define the displacement field of the connecting rod. A special finite element method is developed for such a time-dependent boundary condition. The equations of motion are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations and the harmonic balance method is used to obtain the steady-state amplitudes and rotary angles. The results are compared for the time dependent and simply-supported end conditions.

  19. Chemical reaction systems with toric steady states

    CERN Document Server

    Millan, Mercedes Perez; Shiu, Anne; Conradi, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Mass-action chemical reaction systems are frequently used in Computational Biology. The corresponding polynomial dynamical systems are often large, consisting of tens or even hundreds of ordinary differential equations, and poorly parameterized (due to noisy measurement data and a small number of data points and repetitions). Therefore, it is often difficult to establish the existence of (positive) steady states or to determine whether more complicated phenomena such as multistationarity exist. If, however, the steady state ideal of the system is a binomial ideal, then we show that these questions can be answered easily. The focus of this work is on systems with this property, and we say that such systems have toric steady states. Our main result gives sufficient conditions for a chemical reaction system to have toric steady states. Furthermore, we analyze the capacity of such a system to exhibit positive steady states and multistationarity. Examples of systems with toric steady states include weakly-reversib...

  20. Auditory Brainstem Response Improvements in Hyperbillirubinemic Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Farzaneh Zamiri; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Lotfi, Yones

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hyperbillirubinemia in infants have been associated with neuronal damage including in the auditory system. Some researchers have suggested that the bilirubin-induced auditory neuronal damages may be temporary and reversible. This study was aimed at investigating the auditory neuropathy and reversibility of auditory abnormalities in hyperbillirubinemic infants. Subjects and Methods The study participants included 41 full term hyperbilirubinemic infants (mean age 39.24 days) with normal birth weight (3,200-3,700 grams) that admitted in hospital for hyperbillirubinemia and 39 normal infants (mean age 35.54 days) without any hyperbillirubinemia or other hearing loss risk factors for ruling out maturational changes. All infants in hyperbilirubinemic group had serum bilirubin level more than 20 milligram per deciliter and undergone one blood exchange transfusion. Hearing evaluation for each infant was conducted twice: the first one after hyperbilirubinemia treatment and before leaving hospital and the second one three months after the first hearing evaluation. Hearing evaluations included transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening and auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold tracing. Results The TEOAE and ABR results of control group and TEOAE results of the hyperbilirubinemic group did not change significantly from the first to the second evaluation. However, the ABR results of the hyperbilirubinemic group improved significantly from the first to the second assessment (p=0.025). Conclusions The results suggest that the bilirubin induced auditory neuronal damage can be reversible over time so we suggest that infants with hyperbilirubinemia who fail the first hearing tests should be reevaluated after 3 months of treatment. PMID:27144228

  1. Steady-state creep in the mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. RANALLI

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY - The creep equations for steady-state flow of olivine at high
    pressure and temperature are compared in an attempt to elucidate the rheological
    behaviour of the mantle. Results are presented in terms of applied deformation
    maps and curves of effective viscosity v depth.
    In the upper mantle, the transition stress between dislocation and diffusion
    creep is between 10 to 102 bar (as orders of magnitude for grain sizes from
    0.01 to 1 cm. The asthenosphere under continents is deeper, and has higher
    viscosity, than under oceans. Predominance of one creep mechanism above the
    others depends on grain size, strain rate, and volume fraction of melt; the
    rheological response can be different for different geodynamic processes.
    In the lower mantle, on the other hand, dislocation creep is predominant
    at all realistic grain sizes and strain rates. If the effective viscosity has to be only
    slightly higher than in the upper mantle, as some interpretations of glacioisostatic
    rebound suggest, then the activation volume cannot be larger than
    11 cm3 mole^1.

  2. Fast Estimation of Plant Steady State, with Application to Static RTO

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Diogo; Amrhein, Michael; Billeter, Julien; Bonvin, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    In the operation of continuous processes, many tasks require the knowledge of plant steady state at various operating points. This is for example the case in the context of kinetic modeling, response surface modeling and real-time optimization. If the computational techniques are in principle straightforward, the time needed to reach steady state represents the main limiting factor. This work proposes a novel way of speeding up the estimation of plant steady state through...

  3. Frequency-specific disruptions of neuronal oscillations reveal aberrant auditory processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrynen, Lauren K; Hamm, Jordan P; Sponheim, Scott R; Clementz, Brett A

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit abnormalities in evoked brain responses in oddball paradigms. These could result from (a) insufficient salience-related cortical signaling (P300), (b) insufficient suppression of irrelevant aspects of the auditory environment, or (c) excessive neural noise. We tested whether disruption of ongoing auditory steady-state responses at predetermined frequencies informed which of these issues contribute to auditory stimulus relevance processing abnormalities in schizophrenia. Magnetoencephalography data were collected for 15 schizophrenia and 15 healthy subjects during an auditory oddball paradigm (25% targets; 1-s interstimulus interval). Auditory stimuli (pure tones: 1 kHz standards, 2 kHz targets) were administered during four continuous background (auditory steady-state) stimulation conditions: (1) no stimulation, (2) 24 Hz, (3) 40 Hz, and (4) 88 Hz. The modulation of the auditory steady-state response (aSSR) and the evoked responses to the transient stimuli were quantified and compared across groups. In comparison to healthy participants, the schizophrenia group showed greater disruption of the ongoing aSSR by targets regardless of steady-state frequency, and reduced amplitude of both M100 and M300 event-related field components. During the no-stimulation condition, schizophrenia patients showed accentuation of left hemisphere 40 Hz response to both standard and target stimuli, indicating an effort to enhance local stimulus processing. Together, these findings suggest abnormalities in auditory stimulus relevance processing in schizophrenia patients stem from insufficient amplification of salient stimuli. PMID:26933842

  4. A steady state theory for processive cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Olsen, Jens Elmerdahl; Præstgaard, Eigil;

    2013-01-01

    remains to be fully developed. In this paper, we suggest a deterministic kinetic model that relies on a processive set of enzyme reactions and a quasi steady-state assumption. It is shown that this approach is practicable in the sense that it leads to mathematically simple expressions for the steady-state...... rate, and only requires data from standard assay techniques as experimental input. Specifically, it is shown that the processive reaction rate at steady state may be expressed by a hyperbolic function related to the conventional Michaelis–Menten equation. The main difference is a ‘kinetic processivity....... This has significant kinetic implications, for example the maximal specific rate (Vmax/E0) for processive cellulases is much lower than the catalytic rate constant (kcat). We discuss how relationships based on this theory may be used in both comparative and mechanistic analyses of cellulases....

  5. Multiple steady state phenomenon in martensitic transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the basic facts that the martensitic transformation is a physical phenomenon which occurs in non-equilibrium conditions and there exists the feedback mechanism in the martensitic transformation, the dynamical processes of the isothermal and athermal martensitic transformations were analyzed by using nonlinear theory and a bifurcation theory model was established. It is shown that a multiple steady state phenomenon can take place as austenite is cooled, and the transitions of the steady state temperature between the branches of stable steady states can be considered the transformation from austenite to martensite. This model can estimate the starting temperature of the martensitic transformation and explain some experimental features of the martensitic transformation such as the effects of cooling rate, fluctuation and austenitic grain size on the martensitic transformation.

  6. The Impact of Maternal Smoking on Fast Auditory Brainstem Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kable, Julie A.; Coles, Claire D.; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Carroll, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Deficits in auditory processing have been posited as one of the underlying neurodevelopmental consequences of maternal smoking during pregnancy that leads to later language and reading deficits. Fast auditory brainstem responses were used to assess differences in the sensory processing of auditory stimuli among infants with varying degrees of prenatal cigarette exposure. Maternal report of consumption of cigarettes and blood samples were collected in the hospital to assess exposure levels and...

  7. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Goodin

    Full Text Available Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz or Beta (16 Hz frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others.

  8. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carey, Anne-Marie; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  9. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported

  10. Thermodynamics of Stability of Nonequilibrium Steady States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, R. P.; Shabd, Ram

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a concise and critical account of developments in nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion for stability of nonequilibrium steady states is critically examined for consecutive and monomolecular triangular reactions, autocatalytic reactions, auto-inhibited reactions, and the Lotka-Volterra model. (JN)

  11. Steady-state linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response of a four-level quantum dot with phonon-assisted transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-Chao, She; Ting-Ting, Luo; Wei-Xi, Zhang; Mao-Wu, Ran; Deng-Long, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response in a four-level loop configuration GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor quantum dot are analytically studied with the phonon-assisted transition (PAT). It is shown that the changes among a single electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window, a double EIT window and the amplification of the probe field in the absorption curves can be controlled by varying the strength of PAT κ. Meanwhile, double switching from the anomalous dispersion regime to the normal dispersion regime can likely be achieved by increasing the Rabi energy of the external optical control field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the group velocity of the probe field can be practically regulated by varying the PAT and the intensity of the optical control field. In the nonlinear case, it is shown that the large SPM and XPM can be achieved as linear absorption vanishes simultaneously, and the PAT can suppress both third-order self-Kerr and the cross-Kerr nonlinear effect of the QD. Our study is much more practical than its atomic counterpart due to its flexible design and the controllable interference strength, and may provide some new possibilities for technological applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61367003), the Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 12A140), and the Scientific Research Fund of Guizhou Provincial Education Department, China (Grant Nos. KY[2015]384 and KY[2015]446).

  12. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James;

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory-nerve ...

  13. Spectrotemporal resolution tradeoff in auditory processing as revealed by human auditory brainstem responses and psychophysical indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Syed Khaja, Ameenuddin

    2014-06-20

    Auditory filter theory dictates a physiological compromise between frequency and temporal resolution of cochlear signal processing. We examined neurophysiological correlates of these spectrotemporal tradeoffs in the human auditory system using auditory evoked brain potentials and psychophysical responses. Temporal resolution was assessed using scalp-recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by paired clicks. The inter-click interval (ICI) between successive pulses was parameterized from 0.7 to 25 ms to map ABR amplitude recovery as a function of stimulus spacing. Behavioral frequency difference limens (FDLs) and auditory filter selectivity (Q10 of psychophysical tuning curves) were obtained to assess relations between behavioral spectral acuity and electrophysiological estimates of temporal resolvability. Neural responses increased monotonically in amplitude with increasing ICI, ranging from total suppression (0.7 ms) to full recovery (25 ms) with a temporal resolution of ∼3-4 ms. ABR temporal thresholds were correlated with behavioral Q10 (frequency selectivity) but not FDLs (frequency discrimination); no correspondence was observed between Q10 and FDLs. Results suggest that finer frequency selectivity, but not discrimination, is associated with poorer temporal resolution. The inverse relation between ABR recovery and perceptual frequency tuning demonstrates a time-frequency tradeoff between the temporal and spectral resolving power of the human auditory system. PMID:24793771

  14. Steady State Analysis of Towed Marine Cables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; HUANG Guo-liang; DENG De-heng

    2008-01-01

    Efficient numerical schemes were presented for the steady state solutions of towed marine cables. For most of towed systems, the steady state problem can be resolved into two-point boundary-value problem, or initial value problem in some special cases where the initial values are available directly. A new technique was proposed and attempted to solve the two-point boundary-value problem rather than the conventional shooting method due to its algorithm complexity and low efficiency. First, the boundary conditions are transformed into a set of nonlinear governing equations about the initial values, then bisection method is employed to solve these nonlinear equations with the aid of 4th order Runge-Kutta method. In common sense, non-uniform (sheared) current is assumed, which varies in magnitude and direction with depth. The schemes are validated through the DE Zoysa's example, then several numerical examples are also presented to illustrate the numerical schemes.

  15. Development of steady state magnetic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Shigemitsu; Nakayama, Takahide [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nagashima, Akira; Kasai, Satoshi

    1998-12-01

    A prototype of new mechanical sensor based on the steady state electromagnetic force (J x B force) measurement has been developed and tested. The mechanical force sensor is a new type of the magnetic sensor which is available for frequencies smaller than 0.1 Hz. The prototype of the mechanical sensor has been examined, and the following results were obtained; (1) A signal was proportional to simulated force in the load cell tests. (2) A signal drift concerning the temperature was reproducible over the range of the ITER environment. (3) A signal was proportional to the magnetic field in the steady state magnetic field measurement tests. (4) A load cell linearity error did not increase significantly after irradiation of 7.2 x 10{sup 6} Gy. These results indicate that the mechanical sensor will provide the practical feasibility in the long time magnetic field measurement. (author)

  16. Cochlear Responses and Auditory Brainstem Response Functions in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy/ Dys-Synchrony and Individuals with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Physiologic measures of cochlear and auditory nerve function may be of assis¬tance in distinguishing between hearing disorders due primarily to auditory nerve impairment from those due primarily to cochlear hair cells dysfunction. The goal of present study was to measure of co-chlear responses (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response in some adults with auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony and subjects with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: Patients were 16 adults (32 ears in age range of 14-30 years with auditory neu¬ropathy/ dys-synchrony and 16 individuals in age range of 16-30 years from both sexes. The results of transient otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response measures were compared in both groups and the effects of age, sex, ear and degree of hearing loss were studied. Results: The pure-tone average was 48.1 dB HL in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony group and the fre¬quency of low tone loss and flat audiograms were higher among other audiogram's shapes. Transient oto¬acoustic emissions were shown in all auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony people except two cases and its average was near in both studied groups. The latency and amplitude of the biggest reversed co-chlear microphonics response were higher in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients than control peo¬ple significantly. The correlation between cochlear microphonics amplitude and degree of hearing loss was not significant, and age had significant effect in some cochlear microphonics measures. Audi-tory brainstem response had no response in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients even with low stim¬uli rates. Conclusion: In adults with speech understanding worsen than predicted from the degree of hearing loss that suspect to auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony, the frequency of low tone loss and flat audiograms are higher. Usually auditory brainstem response is absent in

  17. Variational methods in steady state diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical variational techniques are used to obtain accurate solutions to the multigroup multiregion one dimensional steady state neutron diffusion equation. Analytic solutions are constructed for benchmark verification. Functionals with cubic trial functions and conservational lagrangian constraints are exhibited and compared with nonconservational functionals with respect to neutron balance and to relative flux and current at interfaces. Excellent agreement of the conservational functionals using cubic trial functions is obtained in comparison with analytic solutions

  18. Steady State versus Pulsed Tokamak DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present report deals with a Review of problems for a Steady state(SS) DEMO, related argument is treated about the models and the present status of comparison between the characteristics of DEMO pulsed versus a Steady state device.The studied SS DEMO Models (SLIM CS, PPCS model C EU-DEMO, ARIES-RS) are analyzed from the point of view of the similarity scaling laws and critical issues for a steady state DEMO. A comparison between steady state and pulsed DEMO is therefore carried out: in this context a new set of parameters for a pulsed (6 — 8 hours pulse) DEMO is determined working below the density limit, peak temperature of 20 keV, and requiring a modest improvement in the confinement factor(HIPBy2 = 1.1) with respect to the H-mode. Both parameters density and confinement parameter are lower than the DEMO models presently considered. The concept of partially non-inductive pulsed DEMO is introduced since a pulsed DEMO needs heating and current drive tools for plasma stability and burn control. The change of the main parameter design for a DEMO working at high plasma peak temperatures Te ∼ 35 keV is analyzed: in this range the reactivity increases linearly with temperature, and a device with smaller major radius (R = 7.5 m) is compatible with high temperature. Increasing temperature is beneficial for current drive efficiency and heat load on divertor, being the synchrotron radiation one of the relevant components of the plasma emission at high temperatures and current drive efficiency increases with temperature. Technology and engineering problems are examined including efficiency and availability R&D issues for a high temperature DEMO. Fatigue and creep-fatigue effects of pulsed operations on pulsed DEMO components are considered in outline to define the R&D needed for DEMO development. (author)

  19. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Terreros, Gonzalo; Delano, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body (MGB), inferior colliculus (IC), cochlear nucleus (CN) and superior olivary complex (SOC) reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear (OC) fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i) colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular; (ii) cortico-(collicular)-OC; and (iii) cortico-(collicular)-CN pathways. Recent experiments demonstr...

  20. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Hinckley Delano

    2015-01-01

    The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body, inferior colliculus, cochlear nucleus and superior olivary complex reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i) colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular, (ii) cortico-(collicular)-olivocochlear and (iii) cortico-(collicular)-cochlear nucleus pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate...

  1. Extracting Steady State Components from Synchrophasor Data Using Kalman Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from phasor measurement units (PMUs may be exploited to provide steady state information to the applications which require it. As PMU measurements may contain errors and missing data, the paper presents the application of a Kalman Filter technique for real-time data processing. PMU data captures the power system’s response at different time-scales, which are generated by different types of power system events; the presented Kalman Filter methods have been applied to extract the steady state components of PMU measurements that can be fed to steady state applications. Two KF-based methods have been proposed, i.e., a windowing-based KF method and “the modified KF”. Both methods are capable of reducing noise, compensating for missing data and filtering outliers from input PMU signals. A comparison of proposed methods has been carried out using the PMU data generated from a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL experimental setup. In addition, a performance analysis of the proposed methods is performed using an evaluation metric.

  2. Siple Dome: Is it in Steady State?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, E. C.; Waddington, E. D.; Nereson, N. A.; Zumberge, M. A.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2001-12-01

    Changes in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet since the end of the last ice age have implications for how we interpret its present behavior, in terms of both its stability and its record of climate history. Siple Dome, the ridge between Ice Streams C and D, is not presently thinning and is close to being in balance with present environmental conditions. We present three independent measurements of ice thickness change in the divide region of Siple Dome: a GPS surface horizontal strain network, fiber optic vertical strain measurements at depth, and precision GPS measurements of vertical motion of near-surface ice ("coffee-can" method). From the horizontal strain network, we calculate the divergence of the horizontal velocity. This divergence is equal to the gradient of vertical velocity at the surface and, with some assumptions about the distribution of strain rates with depth, we can calculate the vertical velocity at the surface. For steady state, the vertical velocity must be balanced by the local accumulation rate. The fiber optic instruments provide a profile of the relative vertical velocity with depth. We fit a theoretical vertical velocity pattern to these data and extrapolate to find the surface vertical velocity. Our third method (coffee-can) directly measures the vertical motion of a marker 20 meters deep using precision GPS and compares it with the local long-term rate of snow accumulation to calculate the net rate of ice sheet thickness change. All three methods reach the same conclusion: Siple Dome is currently very close to being in steady state. This result has two implications. First, ice dynamics models developed to interpret radar images or ice core data can assume steady state behavior, simplifying the models. Second, our result suggests that the central part of the Ross Embayment may have had a low-elevation profile during the late Holocene, even though other areas of the WAIS may have been thicker.

  3. Accelerator based steady state neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2s thermal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of $300-450 M is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source is most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc., with the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs

  4. An accelerator based steady state neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2 s themal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of Dollar 300-450 is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source in most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc. With the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs. (orig.)

  5. Steady state phreatic surfaces in sloping aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loáiciga, Hugo A.

    2005-08-01

    Steady state groundwater flow driven by constant recharge in an unconfined aquifer overlying sloping bedrock is shown to be represented, using the Dupuit approximation, by an ordinary differential equation of the Abel type y(x) . y'(x) + a . y(x) + x = 0, whose analytical solution is derived in this work. This article first investigates the case of zero saturated thickness at the upstream boundary, a flow system reminiscent of perched groundwater created by percolation of precipitation or irrigation in a sloping aquifer fully draining at its downstream boundary. A variant of this flow system occurs when the phreatic surface mounds and produces groundwater discharge toward the upstream boundary. This variant is a generalization of the classical groundwater flow problem involving two lakes connected by an aquifer, the latter being on sloping terrain in this instance. Analytical solutions for the phreatic surface's steady state geometry are derived for the case of monotonically declining hydraulic head as well as for the case of a mounded phreatic surface. These solutions are of practical interest in drainage studies, slope stability, and runoff formation investigations. It is shown that the flow factor a = -$\\sqrt{{\\rm K}/{\\rm N} tan β (where K, N, and tan β are the hydraulic conductivity, vertical recharge, and aquifer slope, respectively) has a commanding role on the phreatic surface's solutions. Two computational examples illustrate the implementation of this article's results.

  6. An auditory-periphery model of the effects of acoustic trauma on auditory nerve responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ian C.; Sachs, Murray B.; Young, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic trauma degrades the auditory nerve's tonotopic representation of acoustic stimuli. Recent physiological studies have quantified the degradation in responses to the vowel eh and have investigated amplification schemes designed to restore a more correct tonotopic representation than is achieved with conventional hearing aids. However, it is difficult from the data to quantify how much different aspects of the cochlear pathology contribute to the impaired responses. Furthermore, extensive experimental testing of potential hearing aids is infeasible. Here, both of these concerns are addressed by developing models of the normal and impaired auditory peripheries that are tested against a wide range of physiological data. The effects of both outer and inner hair cell status on model predictions of the vowel data were investigated. The modeling results indicate that impairment of both outer and inner hair cells contribute to degradation in the tonotopic representation of the formant frequencies in the auditory nerve. Additionally, the model is able to predict the effects of frequency-shaping amplification on auditory nerve responses, indicating the model's potential suitability for more rapid development and testing of hearing aid schemes.

  7. A High-Density EEG Investigation into Steady State Binaural Beat Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation...

  8. Steady-state Compartmentalization of Lipid Membranes by Active Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    -protein assembly reorganizes into a steady-state structure with a typical length scale determined by the strength of the external drive. In the specific case of a mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the gel-fluid coexistence region, it is shown explicitly by computer...... conformational excitations governed by an external drive, and the deexcitation is controlled by interaction of the protein with its lipid surroundings. In response to the flux of energy into the proteins from the environment and the subsequent dissipation of energy into the lipid bilayer, the lipid...

  9. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  10. Weak responses to auditory feedback perturbation during articulation in persons who stutter: evidence for abnormal auditory-motor transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanqing Cai

    Full Text Available Previous empirical observations have led researchers to propose that auditory feedback (the auditory perception of self-produced sounds when speaking functions abnormally in the speech motor systems of persons who stutter (PWS. Researchers have theorized that an important neural basis of stuttering is the aberrant integration of auditory information into incipient speech motor commands. Because of the circumstantial support for these hypotheses and the differences and contradictions between them, there is a need for carefully designed experiments that directly examine auditory-motor integration during speech production in PWS. In the current study, we used real-time manipulation of auditory feedback to directly investigate whether the speech motor system of PWS utilizes auditory feedback abnormally during articulation and to characterize potential deficits of this auditory-motor integration. Twenty-one PWS and 18 fluent control participants were recruited. Using a short-latency formant-perturbation system, we examined participants' compensatory responses to unanticipated perturbation of auditory feedback of the first formant frequency during the production of the monophthong [ε]. The PWS showed compensatory responses that were qualitatively similar to the controls' and had close-to-normal latencies (∼150 ms, but the magnitudes of their responses were substantially and significantly smaller than those of the control participants (by 47% on average, p<0.05. Measurements of auditory acuity indicate that the weaker-than-normal compensatory responses in PWS were not attributable to a deficit in low-level auditory processing. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that stuttering is associated with functional defects in the inverse models responsible for the transformation from the domain of auditory targets and auditory error information into the domain of speech motor commands.

  11. Seeing the song: left auditory structures may track auditory-visual dynamic alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Mossbridge

    Full Text Available Auditory and visual signals generated by a single source tend to be temporally correlated, such as the synchronous sounds of footsteps and the limb movements of a walker. Continuous tracking and comparison of the dynamics of auditory-visual streams is thus useful for the perceptual binding of information arising from a common source. Although language-related mechanisms have been implicated in the tracking of speech-related auditory-visual signals (e.g., speech sounds and lip movements, it is not well known what sensory mechanisms generally track ongoing auditory-visual synchrony for non-speech signals in a complex auditory-visual environment. To begin to address this question, we used music and visual displays that varied in the dynamics of multiple features (e.g., auditory loudness and pitch; visual luminance, color, size, motion, and organization across multiple time scales. Auditory activity (monitored using auditory steady-state responses, ASSR was selectively reduced in the left hemisphere when the music and dynamic visual displays were temporally misaligned. Importantly, ASSR was not affected when attentional engagement with the music was reduced, or when visual displays presented dynamics clearly dissimilar to the music. These results appear to suggest that left-lateralized auditory mechanisms are sensitive to auditory-visual temporal alignment, but perhaps only when the dynamics of auditory and visual streams are similar. These mechanisms may contribute to correct auditory-visual binding in a busy sensory environment.

  12. Seeing the song: left auditory structures may track auditory-visual dynamic alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossbridge, Julia A; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Auditory and visual signals generated by a single source tend to be temporally correlated, such as the synchronous sounds of footsteps and the limb movements of a walker. Continuous tracking and comparison of the dynamics of auditory-visual streams is thus useful for the perceptual binding of information arising from a common source. Although language-related mechanisms have been implicated in the tracking of speech-related auditory-visual signals (e.g., speech sounds and lip movements), it is not well known what sensory mechanisms generally track ongoing auditory-visual synchrony for non-speech signals in a complex auditory-visual environment. To begin to address this question, we used music and visual displays that varied in the dynamics of multiple features (e.g., auditory loudness and pitch; visual luminance, color, size, motion, and organization) across multiple time scales. Auditory activity (monitored using auditory steady-state responses, ASSR) was selectively reduced in the left hemisphere when the music and dynamic visual displays were temporally misaligned. Importantly, ASSR was not affected when attentional engagement with the music was reduced, or when visual displays presented dynamics clearly dissimilar to the music. These results appear to suggest that left-lateralized auditory mechanisms are sensitive to auditory-visual temporal alignment, but perhaps only when the dynamics of auditory and visual streams are similar. These mechanisms may contribute to correct auditory-visual binding in a busy sensory environment. PMID:24194873

  13. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Venail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement, electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device. The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = −0.11 ± 0.02, P<0.01, the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = −8.50 ± 1.97, P<0.01, and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF. Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  14. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venail, Frederic; Mura, Thibault; Akkari, Mohamed; Mathiolon, Caroline; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Piron, Jean Pierre; Sicard, Marielle; Sterkers-Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement), electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device). The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry) algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = -0.11 ± 0.02, P electrodes (β = -8.50 ± 1.97, P < 0.01), and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF). Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas. PMID:26236725

  15. The auditory brainstem response in two lizard species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tang, Yezhong;

    2010-01-01

    Although lizards have highly sensitive ears, it is difficult to condition them to sound, making standard psychophysical assays of hearing sensitivity impractical. This paper describes non-invasive measurements of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in both Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko; nocturnal...... in most bird species....

  16. Auditory Brainstem Evoked Responses in Newborns with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Phan, Ha T. T.; Gardner, Judith M.; Miroshnichenko, Inna; Gordon, Anne; Karmel, Bernard Z.

    2009-01-01

    Auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs) were compared in 15 newborns with Down syndrome and 15 sex-, age-, and weight-matched control newborns. Participants had normal ABRs based upon values specific to 32- to 42-weeks postconceptional age. Although Wave III and Wave V component latencies and the Wave I-III interpeak latency (IPL) were shorter…

  17. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  18. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  19. Middle components of the auditory evoked response in bilateral temporal lobe lesions. Report on a patient with auditory agnosia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, A; Salomon, G; Elberling, Claus;

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the middle components of the auditory evoked response (10--50 msec post-stimulus) in a patient with auditory agnosia is reported. Bilateral temporal lobe infarctions were proved by means of brain scintigraphy, CAT scanning, and regional cerebral blood flow measurements. The mi...

  20. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Tomkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's Disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients.

  1. Constrained optimal steady-state control for isolated traffic intersections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jack HADDAD; David MAHALEL; Ilya IOSLOVICH; Per-Olof GUTMAN

    2014-01-01

    The steady-state or cyclic control problem for a simplified isolated traffic intersection is considered. The optimization problem for the green-red switching sequence is formulated with the help of a discrete-event max-plus model. Two steady-state control problems are formulated: optimal steady-state with green duration constraints, and optimal steady-state control with lost time. In the case when the criterion is a strictly increasing, linear function of the queue lengths, the steady-state control problems can be solved analytically. The structure of constrained optimal steady-state traffic control is revealed, and the effect of the lost time on the optimal solution is illustrated.

  2. Measuring the dynamics of neural responses in primary auditory cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Depireux, Didier A; Simon, Jonathan Z.; Shamma, Shihab A.

    1998-01-01

    We review recent developments in the measurement of the dynamics of the response properties of auditory cortical neurons to broadband sounds, which is closely related to the perception of timbre. The emphasis is on a method that characterizes the spectro-temporal properties of single neurons to dynamic, broadband sounds, akin to the drifting gratings used in vision. The method treats the spectral and temporal aspects of the response on an equal footing.

  3. Defining Features of Steady-State Timbres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to define steady -state features of timbre for a group of well-trained musicians. Experiment 1 evaluated whether or not pairs of three critical dimensions of timbre--spectral slope (6 or 12 dB/octave), formant structure (/a/ or /i/ vowel), and inharmonicity of partials (harmonic or inharmonic)--were processed in a separable or integral fashion. Accuracy and speed for classification of values along one dimension were examined under different conditions of variability along a second dimension (fixed, correlated, or orthogonal). Spectral slope and formant structure were integral, with classification speed for the target dimension depending upon variability along the orthogonal dimension. In contrast, evidence of asymmetric separability was obtained for inharmonicity. Classification speed for slope and formant structure did not depend on inharmonicity, whereas RT for the target dimension of inharmonicity was strongly influenced by variability along either slope or formant structure. Since the results of Experiment 1 provided a basis for manipulating spectral slope and formant structure as a single feature, these dimensions were correlated in Experiment 2. Subjects searched for targets containing potential features of timbre within arrays of 1-4 inharmonic distractor pitches. Distractors were homogeneous with respect to the dimensions of timbre. When targets had /a/ formants with shallow spectral slopes, search time increased nonlinearly with array size in a manner consistent with the parallel processing of items, and thus feature search. Feature search was not obtained for targets with /i/ formants and steep slopes. Thus, the feature was coded as the presence or absence of /a/ formants with shallow spectral slopes. A search task using heterogeneous distractor values along slope/formant structure was used in Experiment 3 to evaluate whether or not the feature of timbre and pitch were automatically conjoined (integral). Search times for

  4. ITER steady-state magnetic sensors: design status and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (private communication); [2] P. Moreau et al, Fusion Engineering and Design 84 (2009) 1344-1350; [3] ITER Design Description Document 55.A5,A6 Outer Vessel Steady State Sensors (private communication); [4] GRT047 Technical Report on Equilibrium reconstruction in ITER using external pick-up and steady state sensors, in preparation (private communication); [5] GRT047 Technical Report on Total toroidal current reconstruction in ITER using external pick-up and steady state sensors, in preparation (private communication). (authors)

  5. The impact of severity of hypertension on auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdev Lal Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response is an objective electrophysiological method for assessing the auditory pathways from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to correlate and to assess the degree of involvement of peripheral and central regions of brainstem auditory pathways with increasing severity of hypertension, among the patients of essential hypertension. Method: This study was conducted on 50 healthy age and sex matched controls (Group I and 50 hypertensive patients (Group II. Later group was further sub-divided into - Group IIa (Grade 1 hypertension, Group IIb (Grade 2 hypertension, and Group IIc (Grade 3 hypertension, as per WHO guidelines. These responses/potentials were recorded by using electroencephalogram electrodes on a root-mean-square electromyography, EP MARC II (PC-based machine and data were statistically compared between the various groups by way of one-way ANOVA. The parameters used for analysis were the absolute latencies of Waves I through V, interpeak latencies (IPLs and amplitude ratio of Wave V/I. Result: The absolute latency of Wave I was observed to be significantly increased in Group IIa and IIb hypertensives, while Wave V absolute latency was highly significantly prolonged among Group IIb and IIc, as compared to that of normal control group. All the hypertensives, that is, Group IIa, IIb, and IIc patients were found to have highly significant prolonged III-V IPL as compared to that of normal healthy controls. Further, intergroup comparison among hypertensive patients revealed a significant prolongation of Wave V absolute latency and III-V IPL in Group IIb and IIc patients as compared to Group IIa patients. These findings suggest a sensory deficit along with synaptic delays, across the auditory pathways in all the hypertensives, the deficit being more markedly affecting the auditory processing time at pons to midbrain (IPL III-V region of auditory pathways among Grade 2 and 3

  6. The role of vowel perceptual cues in compensatory responses to perturbations of speech auditory feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Dougherty, Kathleen E.

    2013-01-01

    The perturbation of acoustic features in a speaker's auditory feedback elicits rapid compensatory responses that demonstrate the importance of auditory feedback for control of speech output. The current study investigated whether responses to a perturbation of speech auditory feedback vary depending on the importance of the perturbed feature to perception of the vowel being produced. Auditory feedback of speakers' first formant frequency (F1) was shifted upward by 130 mels in randomly selecte...

  7. Positive Steady States of a Competitor-Competitor-Mutualist Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-yan Chen; Ming-xin Wang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we deal with the positive steady states of a Competitor-Competitor-Mutualist model with diffusion and homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions.We rst give the necessary conditions,and then establish the su cient conditions for the existence of positive steady states.

  8. Steady State of Pedestrian Flow in Bottleneck Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Weichen; Seyfried, Armin; Chraibi, Mohcine; Drzycimski, Kevin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with pedestrians could depend strongly on initial conditions. Comparisons of the results of such experiments require to distinguish carefully between transient state and steady state. In this work, a feasible algorithm - Cumulative Sum Control Chart - is proposed and improved to automatically detect steady states from density and speed time series of bottleneck experiments. The threshold of the detection parameter in the algorithm is calibrated using an autoregressive model. Comparing the detected steady states with previous manually selected ones, the modified algorithm gives more reproducible results. For the applications, three groups of bottleneck experiments are analysed and the steady states are detected. The study about pedestrian flow shows that the difference between the flows in all states and in steady state mainly depends on the ratio of pedestrian number to bottleneck width. When the ratio is higher than a critical value (approximately 115 persons/m), the flow in all states is almost ...

  9. Steady-State Performance of Kalman Filter for DPLL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yi; CUI Xiaowei; LU Mingquan; FENG Zhenming

    2009-01-01

    For certain system models, the structure of the Kalman filter is equivalent to a second-order vari-able gain digital phase-locked loop (DPLL). To apply the knowledge of DPLLs to the design of Kalman filters, this paper studies the steady-state performance of Kalman filters for these system models. The results show that the steady-state Kalman gain has the same form as the DPLL gain. An approximate simple form for the steady-state Kalman gain is used to derive an expression for the equivalent loop bandwidth of the Kalman filter as a function of the process and observation noise variances. These results can be used to analyze the steady-state performance of a Kalman filter with DPLL theory or to design a Kalman filter model with the same steady-state performance as a given DPLL.

  10. Auditory Evoked Potential Response and Hearing Loss: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Paulraj, M. P; Subramaniam, Kamalraj; Yaccob, Sazali Bin; Adom, Abdul H. Bin; Hema, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoacusis is the most prevalent sensory disability in the world and consequently, it can lead to impede speech in human beings. One best approach to tackle this issue is to conduct early and effective hearing screening test using Electroencephalogram (EEG). EEG based hearing threshold level determination is most suitable for persons who lack verbal communication and behavioral response to sound stimulation. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a type of EEG signal emanated from the brain scalp...

  11. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  12. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  13. Auditory responses of engrailed and invected-expressing Johnston's Organ neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Pézier

    Full Text Available The roles of the transcription factor Engrailed (En, and its paralogue Invected (Inv, in adult Drosophila Johnston's Organ sensory neurons are unknown. We used en-GAL4 driven CD8-GFP and antibody staining to characterize these neurons in the pedicel (second antennal segment. The majority of En and Inv-expressing Johnston's Organ neurons (En-JONs are located in the ventral part of the posterior group of JONs, with only a few in the medial group. Anatomical classification of En-JON axon projections shows they are mainly type A and E, with a few type B. Extracellular recording of sound-evoked potentials (SEPs from the antennal nerve was used along with Kir2.1 silencing to assess the contribution that En-JONs make to the auditory response to pure-tone sound stimuli. Silencing En-JONs reduces the SEP amplitude at the onset of the stimulus by about half at 100, 200 and 400 Hz, and also reduces the steady-state response to 200 Hz. En-JONs respond to 82 dB and 92 dB sounds but not 98 dB. Despite their asymmetrical distribution in the Johnston's Organ they respond equally strongly to both directions of movement of the arista. This implies that individual neurons are excited in both directions, a conclusion supported by reanalysis of the morphology of the pedicel-funicular joint. Other methods of silencing the JONs were also used: RNAi against the voltage-gated Na⁺ channel encoded by the para gene, expression of attenuated diphtheria toxin, and expression of a modified influenza toxin M2(H37A. Only the latter was found to be more effective than Kir2.1. Three additional JON subsets were characterized using Flylight GAL4 lines. inv-GAL4 88B12 and Gycβ100B-GAL4 12G03 express in different subsets of A group neurons and CG12484-GAL4 91G04 is expressed in B neurons. All three contribute to the auditory response to 200 Hz tones.

  14. Effects of Hyperbilirubinemia on Auditory Brainstem Response of Neonates Treated with Phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Salehi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion:  The results of this study underline the importance of the Auditory Brainstem Response Test as an efficient tool for monitoring the auditory brainstem pathway in neonates who are at risk of neurotoxicity and for diagnosing the earliest stages of auditory damage caused by high levels of bilirubin.

  15. A Note on Equations for Steady-State Optimal Landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.

    2010-06-15

    Based on the optimality principle (that the global energy expenditure rate is at its minimum for a given landscape under steady state conditions) and calculus of variations, we have derived a group of partial differential equations for describing steady-state optimal landscapes without explicitly distinguishing between hillslopes and channel networks. Other than building on the well-established Mining's equation, this work does not rely on any empirical relationships (such as those relating hydraulic parameters to local slopes). Using additional constraints, we also theoretically demonstrate that steady-state water depth is a power function of local slope, which is consistent with field data.

  16. Auditory ERP response to successive stimuli in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ao; Peter, Varghese; Burnham, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Auditory Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) are useful for understanding early auditory development among infants, as it allows the collection of a relatively large amount of data in a short time. So far, studies that have investigated development in auditory ERPs in infancy have mainly used single sounds as stimuli. Yet in real life, infants must decode successive rather than single acoustic events. In the present study, we tested 4-, 8-, and 12-month-old infants' auditory ERPs to musical melodies comprising three piano notes, and examined ERPs to each individual note in the melody. Methods. Infants were presented with 360 repetitions of a three-note melody while EEG was recorded from 128 channels on the scalp through a Geodesic Sensor Net. For each infant, both latency and amplitude of auditory components P1 and N2 were measured from averaged ERPs for each individual note. Results. Analysis was restricted to response collected at frontal central site. For all three notes, there was an overall reduction in latency for both P1 and N2 over age. For P1, latency reduction was significant from 4 to 8 months, but not from 8 to 12 months. N2 latency, on the other hand, decreased significantly from 4 to 8 to 12 months. With regard to amplitude, no significant change was found for either P1 or N2. Nevertheless, the waveforms of the three age groups were qualitatively different: for the 4-month-olds, the P1-N2 deflection was attenuated for the second and the third notes; for the 8-month-olds, such attenuation was observed only for the middle note; for the 12-month-olds, the P1 and N2 peaks show relatively equivalent amplitude and peak width across all three notes. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that the infant brain is able to register successive acoustic events in a stream, and ERPs become better time-locked to each composite event over age. Younger infants may have difficulties in responding to late occurring events in a stream, and the onset response to the

  17. Neural responses to complex auditory rhythms: the role of attending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HeatherLChapin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the role of attention in pulse and meter perception using complex rhythms. We used a selective attention paradigm in which participants attended to either a complex auditory rhythm or a visually presented word list. Performance on a reproduction task was used to gauge whether participants were attending to the appropriate stimulus. We hypothesized that attention to complex rhythms – which contain no energy at the pulse frequency – would lead to activations in motor areas involved in pulse perception. Moreover, because multiple repetitions of a complex rhythm are needed to perceive a pulse, activations in pulse related areas would be seen only after sufficient time had elapsed for pulse perception to develop. Selective attention was also expected to modulate activity in sensory areas specific to the modality. We found that selective attention to rhythms led to increased BOLD responses in basal ganglia, and basal ganglia activity was observed only after the rhythms had cycled enough times for a stable pulse percept to develop. These observations suggest that attention is needed to recruit motor activations associated with the perception of pulse in complex rhythms. Moreover, attention to the auditory stimulus enhanced activity in an attentional sensory network including primary auditory, insula, anterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortex, and suppressed activity in sensory areas associated with attending to the visual stimulus.

  18. Homogenization of steady-state creep of porous metals using three-dimensional microstructural reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Boccaccini, Dino; Persson, Åsa Helen; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    The effective steady-state creep response of porous metals is studied by numerical homogenization and analytical modeling in this paper. The numerical homogenization is based on finite element models of three-dimensional microstructures directly reconstructed from tomographic images. The effects of...... model size, representativeness, and boundary conditions on the numerical results are investigated. Two analytical models for creep rate of porous bodies are derived by extending the Hashin-Shtrikman bound and the Ramakrishnan-Arunchalam model in linear elasticity to steady-state creep based on nonlinear...

  19. Enhancement of the steady-state magnetization in TROSY experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the condition that the longitudinal relaxation time of spin I is shorter than the longitudinal relaxation time of spin S the steady-state magnetization in [S,I]-TROSY-type experiments can be enhanced by intermediate storage of a part of the steady-state magnetization of spin I on spin S with a pulse sequence element during the relaxation delay. It is demonstrated with samples ranging in size from the 1 kDa cyclosporin to the 110 kDa 15N,2H-labeled dihydroneopterin Aldolase that intermediate storage of steady-state magnetization in a [15N,1H]-TROSY experiment yields a signal gain of 10-25%. The method proposed here for intermediate storage of steady-state magnetization can be implemented in any [15N,1H]-TROSY-type experiments

  20. Steady-state current transfer and scattering theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Moshe, Vered; Rai, Dhurba; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    The correspondence between the steady state theory of current transfer and scattering theory in a system of coupled tight-binding models of 1-dimensional wires is explored. For weak interwire coupling both calculations give nearly identical results, except at singular points associated with band edges. The effect of decoherence in each of these models is studied using a generalization of the Liouville-von Neuman equation suitable for steady-state situations. An example of a single impurity mo...

  1. Steady-state leaching of tritiated water from silica gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, H.A.; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion.......Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion....

  2. TRANSIENT AND STEADY-STATE DYNAMICS OF GRANULAR SHEAR FLOWS

    OpenAIRE

    Losert, W.; Kwon, G.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and steady-state dynamics of granular shear flow are investigated experimentally in a Couette geometry with independently moveable outer and inner cylinders. The motion of particles on the top surface is analyzed using fast imaging. During steady state rotation of both cylinders at different rates, a shear band develops close to the inner cylinder for all combinations of speeds of each cylinder we investigated. Experiments on flow initiation were carried out with one of the cyl...

  3. Non-constant positive steady-states of a diffusive predator-prey system in homogeneous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonlyul; Ryu, Kimun

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and non-existence of non-constant positive steady-states of a diffusive predator-prey interaction system under homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. In homogeneous environment, we show that the predator-prey model with Leslie-Gower functional response has no non-constant positive solution, but the system with a general functional response may have at least one non-constant positive steady-state under some conditions.

  4. Effects of Hyperbilirubinemia on Auditory Brainstem Response of Neonates Treated with Phototherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Negin; Bagheri, Fereshte; Ramezani Farkhani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most common pathologies in neonates is hyperbilirubinemia, which is a good marker for damage to the central nervous system. The sensitivity of the auditory system to bilirubin has been previously documented, with much discrepancy in its effects on Auditory Brainstem Response results. Thus the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hyperbilirubinemia on Auditory Brainstem Response of neonates treated with phototherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-two t...

  5. Auditory ERP response to successive stimuli in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ao; Peter, Varghese; Burnham, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Auditory Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) are useful for understanding early auditory development among infants, as it allows the collection of a relatively large amount of data in a short time. So far, studies that have investigated development in auditory ERPs in infancy have mainly used single sounds as stimuli. Yet in real life, infants must decode successive rather than single acoustic events. In the present study, we tested 4-, 8-, and 12-month-old infants’ auditory ERPs to m...

  6. Lake contamination models for evolution towards steady state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan C. VAREKAMP

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Most lakes are in an average steady state for water but contaminants may not yet have reached steady state or are gradually being flushed out in a clean-up program. The evolution towards steady state for fully mixed or stratified lakes can be described by basic equations of mass flow. The time-concentration paths for fully mixed lakes are asymptotic toward a steady state concentration, which is reached in about 6 contaminant residence times (and clean-up also takes about 6 residence times. Stratified lakes also evolve towards a whole-lake steady state concentration but show oscillating patterns of concentration versus time, with the amplitude and dampening period depending on the volume ratio of epilimnion to total lake volume. In most natural lakes, the compositional contrast between epilimnion and hypolimnion will become almost erased in 2-4 residence times. An acid lake in North-Patagonia is used as an example of contamination of a thermally stratified lake by volcanic effluents.

  7. Modeling auditory-nerve responses to electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) directly stimulate the auditory nerve (AN), bypassing the mechano-electricaltransduction in the inner ear. Trains of biphasic, charge-balanced pulses (anodic and cathodic) areused as stimuli to avoid damage of the tissue. The pulses of either polarity are capable of producing...... andcathodic stimulation of the AN of cat [4]. The models' responses to the electrical pulses of variousshapes [5] were also analyzed. It was found that, while the models can account for the ring rates inresponse to various biphasic pulse shapes, they fail to correctly describe the timing of AP in response to...... monophasic pulses. Strategies for improving the model performance with respect to correct AP timing are discussed. Eventually, a model that is able to account for correct spike timing in electrichearing will be useful for objective evaluation and improvement of CI stimulation strategies....

  8. Nonequilibrium steady states in fluids of platelike colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Markus; van Roij, René

    2008-02-01

    Nonequilibrium steady states in an open system connecting two reservoirs of platelike colloidal particles are investigated by means of a recently proposed phenomenological dynamic density functional theory [M. Bier and R. van Roij, Phys. Rev. E 76, 021405 (2007)]. The platelike colloidal particles are approximated within the Zwanzig model of restricted orientations, which exhibits an isotropic-nematic bulk phase transition. Inhomogeneities of the local chemical potential generate a diffusion current which relaxes to a nonvanishing value if the two reservoirs coupled to the system sustain different chemical potentials. The relaxation process of initial states towards the steady state turns out to comprise two regimes: a smoothening of initial steplike structures followed by an ultimate relaxation of the slowest diffusive mode. The position of a nonequilibrium interface and the particle current of steady states depend nontrivially on the structure of the reservoirs due to the coupling between translational and orientational degrees of freedom of the fluid.

  9. Stable MIMO Constrained Predictive Control with Steady state Objective Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage multi-objective optimization model-predictive control algorithms(MPC) strategy is pre sented. A domain MPC controller with input constraints is used to increase freedom for steady-state objective and enhance stabilization of the controller. A steady-state objective optimization algorithm oriented to transient process is adopted to realize optimization of objectives else than dynamic control. It is proved that .the stabilization for both dynamic control and steady-state objective optimization can be guaranteed. The theoretical results are demonstrated and discussed using a distillation tower as the model. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that this control strategy is efficient and provides a good strategic solution to practical process control.

  10. From Steady-State To Cyclic Metal Forming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2007-05-01

    Continuous processes often exhibit a high proportion of steady state, and have been modeled with steady-state formulations for thirty years, resulting in very CPU-time efficient computations. On the other hand, incremental forming processes generally remain a challenge for FEM software, because of the local nature of deformation compared with the size of the part to be formed, and of the large number of deformation steps needed. Among them however, certain semi-continuous metal forming processes can be characterized as periodic, or cyclic. In this case, an efficient computational strategy can be derived from the ideas behind the steady-state models. This will be illustrated with the example of pilgering, a seamless tube cold rolling process.

  11. Avoiding Rebound through a Steady-State Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    conditions in many parts of the world, the transition towards a steady-state economy needs to begin first in the affluent countries, including the Nordic countries from where most of the information in this chapter is drawn. The politicians in these countries are not seeking a steady-state economy, but some...... only buy some time. From this perspective, the environmental problem with the rebound effect is not the higher energy efficiency, which pushes towards lower flows of resources through the economy, but rather the conventional economy which rebounds the savings, because of its quest for higher flows. In...... this chapter, I shall take the rebound debate further by discussing the possible role of energy efficiency in a sustainable economy that is based on the notion of ‘sufficiency’. The assumption is that globally we need to achieve a ‘steady-state economy’. Considering the urgent need for better material...

  12. Free Boundary Problem of Ono—steady State Seepage Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaomingGUO; Ying-SUN; 等

    1999-01-01

    Along with the vigorous developing construction,the number of various underground engineerings is greatly increasing,Such as:the foundations of dams and high-rise multistoried houses,subways and tunnels,water and oil wells etc., where the close attention is always payed to the seepage behaviour in the media around the strutures.The Variatonal Inequality formulation and its FEM solution for the free boundary problem of 2D steady state seepage flow was given by the authors,In this paper a further investigation is made on the non-steady state seepage problem,taken the seepage flow of wells as an example.The presented approach-Variational Inequality and its FEM solution-is also very beneficial to the non-steady state problems,where the transient free boundary can also be defined directly without conventional iterations.

  13. Thermalization of Starlight in the Steady-State Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Ibison, M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the fate of starlight in the Steady-State Cosmology. We discover that it is largely unaffected by the presence of ions in intergalactic space as it gets progressively red-shifted from the visible all the way down to the plasma frequency of the intergalactic matter. At that point, after about 450 Gyr - and contrary to previously published claims - the radiation will be thermalized. Under the assumptions adopted by Gold, Bondi, Hoyle, Narlikar, Burbidge and others concerning the creation of matter in the Steady-State Cosmology, and using reasonable estimates for the baryonic mass-density and mass-fraction of 4He, the analysis predicts a universal radiation field matching the CMB, i.e. having a black-body spectrum and temperature of about 2.7 K. The Steady-state Cosmology predicts that this radiation field will appear to originate from the intergalactic plasma.

  14. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  15. Steady-state and transient wellbore temperatures during drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, W.J.

    1976-05-20

    An extensive literature search was made to locate technical publications and computer programs relating to wellbore temperatures during drilling operations. The search confirmed the need for knowledge of transient and steady state circulating temperatures in the design of geothermal bits. Two approaches were used in calculating borehole temperatures. The steady state solution of Holmes and Swift was programmed and 2100 cases calculated for various borehole configurations. For transient temperature studies, calculations were made for ten borehole configurations. These calculations help emphasize the need for better high temperature bit performance and improved engineering procedures in drilling. The conclusions and recommendations are based on latest available technology for calculating wellbore temperatures.

  16. Correlation Between Steady State and Impulse Earth Resistance Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Nor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presented experimental results of earthing systems under low-magnitude currents and under high impulse currents. The details of the measuring circuit involved for both types of testing were described. Three field sites were selected. At each site, three earth electrodes configurations were used. This makes up to nine earthing systems. From both low magnitude and impulse tests, the correlation between the steady state earth resistance value and the earth resistance under fast impulse currents can be observed. The relation between the calculated and measured steady state earth resistance is also shown in this study.

  17. Steady-state entanglement activation in optomechanical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Alessandro; Ciccarello, Francesco; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    Quantum discord, and related indicators, are raising a relentless interest as a novel paradigm of nonclassical correlations beyond entanglement. Here, we discover a discord-activated mechanism yielding steady-state entanglement production in a realistic continuous-variable setup. This comprises two coupled optomechanical cavities, where the optical modes (OMs) communicate through a fiber. We first use a simplified model to highlight the creation of steady-state discord between the OMs. We show next that such discord improves the level of stationary optomechanical entanglement attainable in the system, making it more robust against temperature and thermal noise.

  18. Electric machines steady state, transients, and design with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2009-01-01

    Part I: Steady StateIntroductionElectric Energy and Electric MachinesBasic Types of Transformers and Electric MachinesLosses and EfficiencyPhysical Limitations and RatingsNameplate RatingsMethods of AnalysisState of the Art and Perspective Electric TransformersAC Coil with Magnetic Core and Transformer Principles Magnetic Materials in EMs and Their LossesElectric Conductors and Their Skin EffectsComponents of Single- and 3-Phase TransformersFlux Linkages and Inductances of Single-Phase TransformersCircuit Equations of Single-Phase Transformers With Core LossesSteady State and Equivalent Circui

  19. Influence of the epithermal effects on the MCF steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the correct interpretation of the steady-state parameters of the muon catalyzed fusion (MCF) process in a D/T mixture. Previously the influence of the epithermal effects (dtμ-molecule formation by 'hot', non-thermalized tμ atoms) on the steady-state parameters was studied only for measurements with a low-density target (density φ=0.01 relative to the liquid hydrogen density). We suggest a new method allowing direct determination of the necessary corrections to the MCF cycling rate for high-density data (φ≥0.4)

  20. Maturational differences in thalamocortical white matter microstructure and auditory evoked response latencies in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Lanza, Matthew R.; Dell, John; Qasmieh, Saba; Hines, Katherine; Blaskey, Lisa; Zarnow, Deborah M.; Levy, Susan E; Edgar, J. Christopher; Berman, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    White matter diffusion anisotropy in the acoustic radiations was characterized as a function of development in autistic and typically developing children. Auditory-evoked neuromagnetic fields were also recorded from the same individuals and the latency of the left and right middle latency superior temporal gyrus auditory ~50ms response (M50)1 was measured. Group differences in structural and functional auditory measures were examined, as were group differences in associations between white ma...

  1. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Källstrand, Johan; Olsson, Olle; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Ling, Mia; Nielzén, Sören

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS). Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16), schizophrenic patients (n = 16) and attention defici...

  2. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Nielzen, Soren

    2010-01-01

    Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward...

  3. KIR channel activation contributes to onset and steady-state exercise hyperemia in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Luckasen, Gary J.; Dennis G Larson; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels and Na+-K+-ATPase, two pathways that lead to hyperpolarization of vascular cells, contributes to both the onset and steady-state hyperemic response to exercise. We also determined whether after inhibiting these pathways nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs) are involved in the hyperemic response. Forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) was determined during rhythmic handgrip exercise at 10% maxi...

  4. Hemodynamic responses in human multisensory and auditory association cortex to purely visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Simon

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings of a tight coupling between visual and auditory association cortices during multisensory perception in monkeys and humans raise the question whether consistent paired presentation of simple visual and auditory stimuli prompts conditioned responses in unimodal auditory regions or multimodal association cortex once visual stimuli are presented in isolation in a post-conditioning run. To address this issue fifteen healthy participants partook in a "silent" sparse temporal event-related fMRI study. In the first (visual control habituation phase they were presented with briefly red flashing visual stimuli. In the second (auditory control habituation phase they heard brief telephone ringing. In the third (conditioning phase we coincidently presented the visual stimulus (CS paired with the auditory stimulus (UCS. In the fourth phase participants either viewed flashes paired with the auditory stimulus (maintenance, CS- or viewed the visual stimulus in isolation (extinction, CS+ according to a 5:10 partial reinforcement schedule. The participants had no other task than attending to the stimuli and indicating the end of each trial by pressing a button. Results During unpaired visual presentations (preceding and following the paired presentation we observed significant brain responses beyond primary visual cortex in the bilateral posterior auditory association cortex (planum temporale, planum parietale and in the right superior temporal sulcus whereas the primary auditory regions were not involved. By contrast, the activity in auditory core regions was markedly larger when participants were presented with auditory stimuli. Conclusion These results demonstrate involvement of multisensory and auditory association areas in perception of unimodal visual stimulation which may reflect the instantaneous forming of multisensory associations and cannot be attributed to sensation of an auditory event. More importantly, we are able

  5. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    OpenAIRE

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory...

  6. On the steady states of weakly reversible chemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Jian; Jones, Christopher; Feinberg, Martin; Nachman, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    A natural condition on the structure of the underlying chemical reaction network, namely weak reversibility, is shown to guarantee the existence of an equilibrium (steady state) in each positive stoichiometric compatibility class for the associated mass-action system. Furthermore, an index formula is given for the set of equilibria in a given stoichiometric compatibility class.

  7. Optimising performance in steady state for a supermarket refrigeration system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Kinnaert, Michel; Razavi-Far, Roozbeh; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    Using a supermarket refrigeration system as an illustrative example, the paper postulates that by appropriately utilising knowledge of plant operation, the plant wide performance can be optimised based on a small set of variables. Focusing on steady state operations, the total system performance is...

  8. Plasticity, Fracture and Friction in Steady-State Plate Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1997-01-01

    A closed form solution to the problem of steady-state wedge cutting through a ductile metal plate is presented. The considered problem is an idealization of a ship bottom raking process, i.e. a continuous cutting damage of a ship bottom by a hard knife-like rock in a grounding event. A new...

  9. Plasticity, Fracture and Friction in Steady-State Plate Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1997-01-01

    A closed form solution to the problem of steady-state wedge cutting through a ductile metal plate is presented. The considered problem is an idealization of a ship bottom raking process, i.e. a continuous cutting damage of a ship bottom by a hard knife-like rock in a grounding event. A new kinema...

  10. SBWR Model for Steady-State and Transient Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes; Alejandro Nuñez-Carrera

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) to analyze the steady-state and transient behavior. The SBWR model is based on approximations of lumped and distributed parameters to consider neutronics and natural circulation processes. The main components of the model are vessel dome, downcomer, lower plenum, core (ch...

  11. Dark Entangled Steady States of Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasari, Durga; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    their short-lived excited states lead to rapid, dissipative formation of an entangled steady state. We show that for a wide range of physical parameters, this entangled state is formed on a time scale given by the strengths of coherent Raman and Rabi fields applied to the atoms, while it is only weakly...

  12. A displacement based FE formulation for steady state problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Yuhong

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis a new displacement based formulation is developed for elasto-plastic deformations in steady state problems. In this formulation the displacements are the primary variables, which is in contrast to the more common formulations in terms of the velocities as the primary variables. In a s

  13. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  14. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  15. Extending the quasi-steady state approximation by changing variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de; Segel, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The parameter domain for which the quasi-steady state assumption is valid can be considerably extended merely by a simple change of variable. This is demonstrated for a variety of biologically significant examples taken from enzyme kinetics, immunology and ecology.

  16. Steady state nutrition by transpiration controlled nutrient supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, W.G.; Labe, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Programmed nutrient addition with a constant relative addition rate has been advocated as a suitable research technique for inducing steady state nutrition in exponentially growing plants. Transpiration controlled nutrient supply is proposed as an alternative technique for plants with a short or no

  17. Analysis of steady-state hydraulic tests in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the analysis of steady-state hydraulic injection tests into single fractures of a rock-mass is presented, and solved analytically. It is used to obtain a probability distribution for the transmissivities of fractures in Cornish granite. (author)

  18. Pitch-induced responses in the right auditory cortex correlate with musical ability in normal listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Özyurt, Jale; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Thiel, Christiane M

    2013-10-23

    Previous work compellingly shows the existence of functional and structural differences in human auditory cortex related to superior musical abilities observed in professional musicians. In this study, we investigated the relationship between musical abilities and auditory cortex activity in normal listeners who had not received a professional musical education. We used functional MRI to measure auditory cortex responses related to auditory stimulation per se and the processing of pitch and pitch changes, which represents a prerequisite for the perception of musical sequences. Pitch-evoked responses in the right lateral portion of Heschl's gyrus were correlated positively with the listeners' musical abilities, which were assessed using a musical aptitude test. In contrast, no significant relationship was found for noise stimuli, lacking any musical information, and for responses induced by pitch changes. Our results suggest that superior musical abilities in normal listeners are reflected by enhanced neural encoding of pitch information in the auditory system. PMID:23995293

  19. EVALUATION OF AUDITORY & BRAINSTEM RESPONSES IN HYPERBILIRUBINEMIC INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Jaundice is a common finding in neonates affecting 70% of term and 80% of preterm neonates during the first week of life. So the objective of this study is to evaluate auditory and brainstem responses in hyper bilirubinemic infants and to see if there is any statistically significant increase in latencies of wave I and V waves. To initiate rehabilitative procedure as early in life as possible a screening method to detect auditory disabilities in hyper bilirubinemic infants is of great importance. So the present study is done to know the incidence of hearing loss in hyper bilirubinemic infants & to evaluate the waves I and V in those subjects. METHODS: 45 Infants with hyper bilirubinemia>12mg% & with no other risk factor who visited pediatric OPD of Bapuji Child Health Centre were evaluated using RMS EMG. EP MARK –II machine. Latencies of Waves I and V and interpeak latency of I-V were recorded. RESULTS: On one sample t-test, latency of wave I and IPL I-V were significantly increased (p-value <0.001, latency of V was prolonged which was statistically significant (p-value <0.01. Hearing impairment in the affected infants and complete deafness where none of the waves were recorded signify that it is a risk factor for deafness. CONCLUSION: Since hyper bilirubinemia is a risk factor for hearing impairment, their hearing screening by BERA at the earliest will help in their earliest initiation of rehabilitation when the brain is sensitive to the development of speech & language.

  20. Exploration of trade-offs between steady-state and dynamic properties in signaling cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the intracellular signaling networks that regulate important cell processes, the base pattern comprises the cycle of reversible phosphorylation of a protein, catalyzed by kinases and opposing phosphatases. Mathematical modeling and analysis have been used for gaining a better understanding of their functions and to capture the rules governing system behavior. Since biochemical parameters in signaling pathways are not easily accessible experimentally, it is necessary to explore possibilities for both steady-state and dynamic responses in these systems. While a number of studies have focused on analyzing these properties separately, it is necessary to take into account both of these responses simultaneously in order to be able to interpret a broader range of phenotypes. This paper investigates the trade-offs between optimal characteristics of both steady-state and dynamic responses. Following an inverse sensitivity analysis approach, we use systematic optimization methods to find the biochemical and biophysical parameters that simultaneously achieve optimal steady-state and dynamic performance. Remarkably, we find that even a single covalent modification cycle can simultaneously and robustly achieve high ultrasensitivity, high amplification and rapid signal transduction. We also find that the response rise and decay times can be modulated independently by varying the activating- and deactivating-enzyme-to-interconvertible-protein ratios. (paper)

  1. Speech motor learning changes the neural response to both auditory and somatosensory signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takayuki; Coppola, Joshua H.; Ostry, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we present evidence for the idea that speech motor learning is accompanied by changes to the neural coding of both auditory and somatosensory stimuli. Participants in our experiments undergo adaptation to altered auditory feedback, an experimental model of speech motor learning which like visuo-motor adaptation in limb movement, requires that participants change their speech movements and associated somatosensory inputs to correct for systematic real-time changes to auditory feedback. We measure the sensory effects of adaptation by examining changes to auditory and somatosensory event-related responses. We find that adaptation results in progressive changes to speech acoustical outputs that serve to correct for the perturbation. We also observe changes in both auditory and somatosensory event-related responses that are correlated with the magnitude of adaptation. These results indicate that sensory change occurs in conjunction with the processes involved in speech motor adaptation. PMID:27181603

  2. IRF8-dependent DCs Play a Key Role in the Regulation of CD8 T Cell Responses to Epithelial-derived Antigen in the Steady State but not in Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joeris, Thorsten; Gomez-Casado, Cristina; Holmkvist, Petra; Agace, William Winston; Luda, Katarzyna

    The intestinal immune system has the complex task of generating tolerance towards harmless antigens derived from our diet, commensal microflora or tissue, while maintaining the ability to mount protective immune responses to mucosal pathogens. Much of our understanding regarding the regulation of...

  3. 横向稳定杆对汽车稳态响应性能影响的仿真分析%Simulation and Analysis on the Effect of the Stabilizer Bar on the Automobile Steady State Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟杰; 张凯

    2012-01-01

      The effect of the stabilizer bar on the automobile steady response is analyzed through the theory of au⁃tomobile steady response. And a model of a whole vehicle is established utilizing ADAMS/Car. Besides, a dynam⁃ical equivalent of the stabilizer bar is built by modifying the spring stiffness of suspension, and a simulation test, which is called constant radius cornering, is executed. The test result shows that the stabilizer bar is able to prove the automobile steady response and improves the automobile handling stability, and that the ADAMS/Car software has the ability to execute accurate simulation test.%  运用汽车操纵稳定性能理论分析了横向稳定杆对于汽车稳态响应性能的影响。利用ADAMS/Car 仿真软件建立了整车模型,通过改变悬架弹簧刚度实现横向稳定杆的动力学等效,并进行了常半径转向的操作稳定性仿真试验。试验结果表明,通过安装横向稳定杆可以改善汽车的稳态响应,提高汽车的操作稳定性能。

  4. The Steady State Calculation for SMART with MIDAS/SMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI is developing a new concept of reactor that all the main components such as the steam generator, the coolant pumps and the pressurizer are located inside the reactor vessel. Before the severe accident sequences are estimated, it is prerequisite that MIDAS code predicts the steady state conditions properly. But MIDAS code does not include the heat transfer model for the helical tube. Therefore, the heat transfer models for the helical tube from TASS/SMR-S were implemented into MIDAS code. To estimate the validity of the implemented heat transfer correlations for the helical tube and the input data, the steady state was recalculated with MIDAS/SMR based on design level 2 and compared with the design values

  5. The Steady State Calculation for SMART with MIDAS/SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Dong Ha; Chung, Young Jong; Park, Sun Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seong Won [KORTIC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    KAERI is developing a new concept of reactor that all the main components such as the steam generator, the coolant pumps and the pressurizer are located inside the reactor vessel. Before the severe accident sequences are estimated, it is prerequisite that MIDAS code predicts the steady state conditions properly. But MIDAS code does not include the heat transfer model for the helical tube. Therefore, the heat transfer models for the helical tube from TASS/SMR-S were implemented into MIDAS code. To estimate the validity of the implemented heat transfer correlations for the helical tube and the input data, the steady state was recalculated with MIDAS/SMR based on design level 2 and compared with the design values

  6. Nonequilibrium Steady States of a Stochastic Model System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiwei

    We study the nonequilibrium steady state of a stochastic lattice gas model, originally proposed by Katz, Lebowitz and Spohn (Phys. Rev. B 28: 1655 (1983)). Firstly, we solve the model on some small lattices exactly in order to see the general dependence of the steady state upon different parameters of the model. Nextly, we derive some analytical results for infinite lattice systems by taking some suitable limits. We then present some renormalization group results for the continuum version of the model via field theoretical techniques, the supersymmetry of the critical dynamics in zero field is also explored. Finally, we report some very recent 3-D Monte Carlo simulation results, which have been obtained by applying Multi-Spin-Coding techniques on a CDC vector supercomputer - Cyber 205 at John von Neumann Center.

  7. Steady-state current transfer and scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moshe, Vered; Rai, Dhurba; Skourtis, Spiros S; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The correspondence between the steady-state theory of current transfer and scattering theory in a system of coupled tight-binding models of one-dimensional wires is explored. For weak interwire coupling both calculations give nearly identical results, except at singular points associated with band edges. The effect of decoherence in each of these models is studied using a generalization of the Liouville-von Neuman equation suitable for steady-state situations. An example of a single impurity model is studied in detail, leading to a lattice model of scattering off target that affects both potential scattering and decoherence. For an impurity level lying inside the energy band, the transmission coefficient diminishes with increasing dephasing rate, while the opposite holds for impurity energy outside the band. The efficiency of current transfer in the coupled wire system decreases with increasing dephasing. PMID:20707524

  8. Theory of minimum dissipation of energy for the steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic configuration of an inductively driven steady-state plasma bounded by a surface (or two adjacent surfaces) on which B·n = 0 is force-free: ∇xB = 2αB, where α is a constant, in time and in space. α is the ratio of the Poynting flux to the magnetic helicity flux at the boundary. It is also the ratio of the dissipative rates of the magnetic energy to the magnetic helicity in the plasma. The spatial extent of the configuration is noninfinitesimal. This global constraint is a result of the requirement that, for a steady-state plasma, the rate of change of the vector potential, ∂A/∂t, is constant in time and uniform in space

  9. Steady-state propagation of interface corner crack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state propagation of interface cracks close to three-dimensional corners has been analyzed. Attention was focused on modeling the shape of the interface crack front and calculating the critical stress for steady-state propagation of the crack. The crack propagation was investigated by...... estimating the fracture mechanics parameters that includes the strain energy release rate, crack front profiles and the three-dimensional mode-mixity along the interface crack front. A numerical approach was then applied for coupling the far field solutions based on the Finite Element Method to the near...... field (crack tip) solutions based on the J-integral. The adopted two-dimensional numerical approach for the calculation of fracture mechanical properties was compared with three-dimensional models for quarter-circular and straight sided crack front shapes. A quantitative approach was formulated based on...

  10. Steady states of the parametric rotator and pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzas, Antonio O

    2011-01-01

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the damped, non-linear equation of motion of the parametric rotator and pendulum perturbatively for small parametric excitation and damping, although our perturbative approach can be extended to other regimes as well. Our treatment involves only ordinary second-order differential equations with constant coefficients, and provides numerically accurate perturbative solutions in terms of elementary functions. Some of the steady-state rotation and oscillation modes studied here have not been discussed in the previous literature. Other well-known ones, such as parametric resonance and the inverted pendulum, are extended to elliptic parametric excitation tilted with respect to gravi...

  11. Master equation based steady-state cluster perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Martin; Dorn, Gerhard; Dorda, Antonius; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    A simple and efficient approximation scheme to study electronic transport characteristics of strongly correlated nanodevices, molecular junctions, or heterostructures out of equilibrium is provided by steady-state cluster perturbation theory. In this work, we improve the starting point of this perturbative, nonequilibrium Green's function based method. Specifically, we employ an improved unperturbed (so-called reference) state ρ̂S, constructed as the steady state of a quantum master equation within the Born-Markov approximation. This resulting hybrid method inherits beneficial aspects of both the quantum master equation as well as the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. We benchmark this scheme on two experimentally relevant systems in the single-electron transistor regime: an electron-electron interaction based quantum diode and a triple quantum dot ring junction, which both feature negative differential conductance. The results of this method improve significantly with respect to the plain quantum master equation treatment at modest additional computational cost.

  12. Steady State Dynamic Operating Behavior of Universal Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khan Burdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed investigation of the universal motor is developed and used for various dynamic steady state and transient operating conditions of loads. In the investigation, output torque, motor speed, input current, input/output power and efficiency are computed, compared and analyzed for different loads. While this paper discusses the steady-state behavior of the universal motor, another companion paper, ?Transient dynamic behavior of universal motor?, will discuss its transient behavior in detail. A non-linear generalized electric machine model of the motor is considered for the analysis. This study was essential to investigate effect of output load on input current, power, speed and efficiency of the motor during operations. Previously such investigation is not known

  13. Steady-state Physics, Effective Temperature Dynamics in Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Using the gauge-gravity duality, we argue that for a certain class of out-of-equilibrium steady-state systems in contact with a heat bath at a given temperature, the macroscopic physics can be captured by an effective thermodynamic description. The steady-state is obtained by applying a constant electric field that results in a stationary current flow. Within holography, we consider generic probe systems where an open string equivalence principle and an open string metric govern the effective thermodynamics. This description comes equipped with an effective temperature, which is larger than the bath temperature, and a corresponding effective entropy. For conformal or scale-invariant theories, certain scaling behaviours follow immediately. In general, in the large electric field limit, this effective temperature is also observed to obey certain generic relations with various physical parameters in the system.

  14. Persistent Probability Currents in Non-equilibrium Steady States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Royce; Mellor, Andrew; Mobilia, Mauro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Weiss, Jeffrey

    For many interesting phenomena in nature, from all life forms to the global climate, the fundamental hypothesis of equilibrium statistical mechanics does not apply. Instead, they are perhaps better characterized by non-equilibrium steady states, evolving with dynamical rules which violate detailed balance. In particular, such dynamics leads to the existence of non-trivial, persistent probability currents - a principal characteristic of non-equilibrium steady states. In turn, they give rise to the notion of 'probability angular momentum'. Observable manifestations of such abstract concepts will be illustrated in two distinct contexts: a heterogeneous nonlinear voter model and our ocean heat content. Supported in part by grants from the Bloom Agency (Leeds, UK) and the US National Science Foundation: OCE-1245944. AM acknowledges the support of EPSRC Industrial CASE Studentship, Grant No. EP/L50550X/1.

  15. Steady state test on PWR steam generator thermohydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental activity on U-tube steam generator thermal hydraulics is under way at CISE and SIET in the framework of ENEA's LWR safety research programme. The test section includes 9 tubes. Hot side and cold side can be separated simulated, with primary and secondary fluid in full thermalhydraulic conditions. The experimental matrix includes: steady state tests (in both adiabatic and diabatic conditions); transients tests that simulate various accidents. Some steady state tests are reported. The secondary side average density, measured by the quick closing valve technique can be accurately calculated by the Zuber-Dix and Zuber-Rohuani correlations. Continuous pressure drops can be very well predicted by an adapted version of Thom correlation and CISE DIF-3 correlation: the development of an empirical correlation was, instead, necessary for assessment of the local pressure drops across spacer grids

  16. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  17. Non-equilibrium steady states for chains of four rotors

    OpenAIRE

    Cuneo, Noé; Eckmann, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study a chain of four interacting rotors (rotators) connected at both ends to stochastic heat baths at different temperatures. We show that for non-degenerate interaction potentials the system relaxes, at a stretched exponential rate, to a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). Rotors with high energy tend to decouple from their neighbors due to fast oscillation of the forces. Because of this, the energy of the central two rotors, which interact with the heat baths only through the external ...

  18. Steady-State Oscillations in Resonant Electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvesters

    OpenAIRE

    Blokhina, Elena; Galayko, Dimitri; Basset, Philippe; Feely, Orla

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a formal analysis and description of the steady-state behavior of an electrostatic vibration energy harvester operating in constant-charge mode and using different types of electromechanical transducers. The method predicts parameter values required to start oscillations, allows a study of the dynamics of the transient process, and provides a rigorous description of the system, necessary for further investigation of the related nonlinear phenomena and for the optimis...

  19. Simulation of Power Electronic Converters Using Quasi Steady State Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Predrag Pejović

    2012-01-01

    A new method to compute voltage and current waveforms of power electronic converters is proposed in the paper. The method relies on simulation result of averaged circuit model, and superimposes the ripple of the inductor currents to the obtained average values, assuming that the linear ripple approximation applies. To determine the amplitude of the switching ripple, a quasi steady state approximation is proposed. After the inductor currents are obtained, currents of switching components are c...

  20. A Steady State Tokamak Operation by Use of Magnetic Monopoles

    OpenAIRE

    Narihara, K.

    1991-01-01

    A steady state tokamak operation based on a magnetic monopole circuit is considered. Circulation of a chain of iron cubes which trap magnetic monopoles generates the needed loop voltage. The monopole circuit is enclosed by a series of solenoid coils in which the magnetic field is feedback controlled so that the force on the circuit balance against the mechanical friction. The driving power is supplied through the current sources of poloidal, ohmic and solenoid coils. The current drive efficie...

  1. Steady State Plasma Accelerators and their Applications in Thermonuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state plasma accelerators make it possible in principle to obtain plasma fluxes of high energy and large flow rate. This is of interest in thermonuclear research for two reasons. Firstly, the accelerator can be used for injecting plasma into existing traps; secondly, it can be used to design new-types of thermonuclear reactors, which might be referred to as, ''Flow-type Reactors'' in which a positive yield is-realised during the time the material passes through the reactor system. The main types of accelerating mechanisms operating in this accelerator are described and a brief review is given of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations carried out by the author and his colleagues. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the processes taking place in coaxial steady state accelerators revealed the possible existence of steady-state compressive flows during which the applied electromagnetic energy is not converted into kinetic plasma energy but is used for compression of the plasma. When the compressed flow is allowed to expand its thermal energy is converted into kinetic energy. Devices in which compressive flow is attained are referred to as magnetic plasma compressors. At the present stage the existence of compressive flows has been confirmed experimentally. To ensure a positive yield in-the region of compression a density of 1020 - 1020 cm-3 is essential. The possibility of obtaining a positive yield in linear ''Flow type Reactors'' is discussed. Such reactors consist of magnetic plasma guides of length ∼ 100 m, in which a flow of hot plasma is produced by a steady state plasma accelerator. (author)

  2. Pediatric central auditory processing disorder showing elevated threshold on pure tone audiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yukihide; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Nagayasu, Rie; Sugaya, Akiko; Omichi, Ryotaro; Kariya, Shin; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) is a condition in which dysfunction in the central auditory system causes difficulty in listening to conversations, particularly under noisy conditions, despite normal peripheral auditory function. Central auditory testing is generally performed in patients with normal hearing on the pure tone audiogram (PTA). This report shows that diagnosis of CAPD is possible even in the presence of an elevated threshold on the PTA, provided that the normal function of the peripheral auditory pathway was verified by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR), and auditory steady state response (ASSR). Three pediatric cases (9- and 10-year-old girls and an 8-year-old boy) of CAPD with elevated thresholds on PTAs are presented. The chief complaint was difficulty in listening to conversations. PTA showed elevated thresholds, but the responses and thresholds for DPOAE, ABR, and ASSR were normal, showing that peripheral auditory function was normal. Significant findings of central auditory testing such as dichotic speech tests, time compression of speech signals, and binaural interaction tests confirmed the diagnosis of CAPD. These threshold shifts in PTA may provide a new concept of a clinical symptom due to central auditory dysfunction in CAPD. PMID:26922127

  3. Towards steady-state tokamak operation with double transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal Transport Barriers characteristic for the Optimised Shear regime and an edge transport barrier of an ELMy H-mode regime have been superposed in the Double Barrier mode. In DT discharges the Double Barrier mode has resulted in 50% higher fusion power output and a factor 2 higher fusion gain Q than in conventional sawtoothing steady-state ELMy H-mode plasmas. Steady-state conditions in temperature and density profiles have been approached in Double Barrier discharges in deuterium. The Double Barrier mode has been routinely established in the new Gas Box divertor configuration on JET. Off-axis LHCD has been used for current profile control during the high performance phase. In preparation of a new DTE2 campaign on JET the potential of the Double Barrier mode for sustained high fusion performance has been explored in modelling studies. Steady-state operation on ITER has been studied in transport code modelling for Advanced Tokamak scenarios in the Double Barrier mode. (author)

  4. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillermin, Christophe [Schneider Electric Industries S.A.S., 37 quai Paul-Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rain, Pascal [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et de Materiaux Dielectriques (LEMD), CNRS, 25 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, Stephen W [Schneider Electric Industries S.A.S., 37 quai Paul-Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-02-07

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature T{sub g} = 65 deg. C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm{sup -1} with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above T{sub g}, transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below T{sub g}, the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm{sup -1} have been measured.

  5. Steady state theta pinch concept for slow formation of FRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A steady state high beta plasma flow through a channel along the magnetic field increasing downstream can be regarded as a ''steady state theta pinch'', because if we see the plasma riding on the flow we should observe very similar process taking place in a theta pinch. Anticipating to produce an FRC without using very high voltage technics such as the ones required in a conventional theta pinch, we have studied after the analogy a ''steady state reversed field theta pinch'' which is brought about by steady head-on collision of counter plasma streams along the channel as ejected from two identical co-axial plasma sources mounted at the both ends of the apparatus. The ideal Poisson and shock adiabatic flow models are employed for the analysis of the steady colliding process. It is demonstrated that an FRC involving large numbers of particles is produced only by the weak shock mode which is achieved in case energetic plasma flow is decelerated almost to be stagnated through Poisson adiabatic process before the streams are collided. (author)

  6. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed that includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures that minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in a reactor the size of the International Tokamak Reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T /SUB e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T /SUB i/ approx. = 17 to 21 keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E /SUB b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E /SUB b/ about 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  7. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature Tg = 65 deg. C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm-1 with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above Tg, transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below Tg, the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm-1 have been measured

  8. SBWR Model for Steady-State and Transient Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of a simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR to analyze the steady-state and transient behavior. The SBWR model is based on approximations of lumped and distributed parameters to consider neutronics and natural circulation processes. The main components of the model are vessel dome, downcomer, lower plenum, core (channel and fuel, upper plenum, pressure, and level controls. Further consideration of the model is the natural circulation path in the internal circuit of the reactor, which governs the safety performance of the SBWR. To demonstrate the applicability of the model, the predictions were compared with plant data, manufacturer_s predictions, and RELAP5 under steady-state and transient conditions of a typical BWR. In steady-state conditions, the profiles of the main variables of the SBWR core such as superficial velocity, void fraction, temperatures, and convective heat transfer coefficient are presented and analyzed. The transient behavior of SBWR was analyzed during the closure of all main steam line isolation valves (MSIVs. Our results in this transient show that the cooling system due to natural circulation in the SBWR is around 70% of the rated core flow. According to the results shown here, one of the main conclusions of this work is that the simplified model could be very helpful in the licensing process.

  9. Small steady-state tokamak (TST) for divertor testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TST is a small steady-state tokamak designed for testing diverters under conditions similar to those anticipated in future large tokamaks. An initial design has R0/a = 2.5, R0 = 0.75 m, a = 0.3 m, and Bt0 = 2.2 T with full inductive capability. With heating and current drive power of 4.5 MW, the heat flux at the plasma edge Q perpendicular can be as high as 0.3 MW/m2. Plasma currents Ip above 500 kA can be maintained by 1 MW of lower hybrid power (2.45 GHz) for average densities ne up to 3 x 1019 m-3. Additional power via ICRF (2 MW) and neutral beams (1.5 MW) maintain current for ne up to 5 x 1019 m-3. Fully demountable, actively cooled, steady-state toroidal field coils permit ample access for the auxiliary systems and diverter cassettes. The toroidal field magnets require a steady-state supply of less than 40 MW. The size and cost of the TST can be reduced by eliminating the solenoid, reducing Bt0 to 1.4 T, and lowering R0/a to 1.7. This option permits low-R0/a experimentation while maintaining the capability for testing divertors but requires successful noninductive current initiation and maintenance in the low-R0/a regime

  10. Optimization of steady-state beam-driven tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in neutral beam technology prompt us to reconsider the prospects for steady-state tokamak reactors. A mathematical reactor model is developed which includes the physics of beam-driven currents and reactor power balance, as well as reactor and beam system costs. This model is used to find the plasma temperatures which minimize the reactor cost per unit of net electrical output. The optimum plasma temperatures are nearly independent of β and are roughly twice as high as the optimum temperatures for ignited reactors. If beams of neutral deuterium atoms with near-optimum energies of 1 to 2 MeV are used to drive the current in an INTOR-sized reactor, then the optimum temperatures are typically T/sub e/ approx. = 12 to 15 keV and T/sub i/ approx. = keV for a wide range of model parameters. Net electrical output rises rapidly with increasing deuterium beam energy for E/sub b/ less than or equal to 400 keV, but rises only slowly above E/sub b/ approx. 1 MeV. We estimate that beam-driven steady-state reactors could be economically competitive with pulsed-ignition reactors if cyclic-loading problems limit the toroidal magnetic field strength of pulsed reactors to less than or equal to 85% of that allowed in steady-state reactors

  11. Reduced object related negativity response indicates impaired auditory scene analysis in adults with autistic spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veema Lodhia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Auditory Scene Analysis provides a useful framework for understanding atypical auditory perception in autism. Specifically, a failure to segregate the incoming acoustic energy into distinct auditory objects might explain the aversive reaction autistic individuals have to certain auditory stimuli or environments. Previous research with non-autistic participants has demonstrated the presence of an Object Related Negativity (ORN in the auditory event related potential that indexes pre-attentive processes associated with auditory scene analysis. Also evident is a later P400 component that is attention dependent and thought to be related to decision-making about auditory objects. We sought to determine whether there are differences between individuals with and without autism in the levels of processing indexed by these components. Electroencephalography (EEG was used to measure brain responses from a group of 16 autistic adults, and 16 age- and verbal-IQ-matched typically-developing adults. Auditory responses were elicited using lateralized dichotic pitch stimuli in which inter-aural timing differences create the illusory perception of a pitch that is spatially separated from a carrier noise stimulus. As in previous studies, control participants produced an ORN in response to the pitch stimuli. However, this component was significantly reduced in the participants with autism. In contrast, processing differences were not observed between the groups at the attention-dependent level (P400. These findings suggest that autistic individuals have difficulty segregating auditory stimuli into distinct auditory objects, and that this difficulty arises at an early pre-attentive level of processing.

  12. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Frederic Venail; Thibault Mura; Mohamed Akkari; Caroline Mathiolon; Sophie Menjot de Champfleur; Jean Pierre Piron; Marielle Sicard; Françoise Sterkers-Artieres; Michel Mondain; Alain Uziel

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement), electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the ...

  13. Sensory Responses during Sleep in Primate Primary and Secondary Auditory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Issa, Elias B.; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2008-01-01

    Most sensory stimuli do not reach conscious perception during sleep. It has been thought that the thalamus prevents the relay of sensory information to cortex during sleep, but the consequences for cortical responses to sensory signals in this physiological state remain unclear. We recorded from two auditory cortical areas downstream of the thalamus in naturally sleeping marmoset monkeys. Single neurons in primary auditory cortex either increased or decreased their responses during sleep comp...

  14. Role of irregular otolith afferents in the steady-state nystagmus during off-vertical axis rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Perachio, A. A.; Mustari, M. J.; Strunk, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    1. During constant velocity off-vertical axis rotations (OVAR) in the dark a compensatory ocular nystagmus is present throughout rotation despite the lack of a maintained signal from the semicircular canals. Lesion experiments and canal plugging have attributed the steady-state ocular nystagmus during OVAR to inputs from the otolith organs and have demonstrated that it depends on an intact velocity storage mechanism. 2. To test whether irregularly discharging otolith afferents play a crucial role in the generation of the steady-state eye nystagmus during OVAR, we have used anodal (inhibitory) currents bilaterally to selectively and reversibly block irregular vestibular afferent discharge. During delivery of DC anodal currents (100 microA) bilaterally to both ears, the slow phase eye velocity of the steady-state nystagmus during OVAR was reduced or completely abolished. The disruption of the steady-state nystagmus was transient and lasted only during the period of galvanic stimulation. 3. To distinguish a possible effect of ablation of the background discharge rates of irregular vestibular afferents on the velocity storage mechanism from specific contributions of the dynamic responses from irregular otolith afferents to the circuit responsible for the generation of the steady-state nystagmus, bilateral DC anodal galvanic stimulation was applied during optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN). No change in OKN and OKAN was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Analytical determination of transition time between transient and steady state water infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassabatere, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The hydraulic characterization of soil hydraulic properties is a prerequisite to the modelling of flow in the vadose zone. Since many years, numerous methods were developed to determine soil hydraulic properties. Many of these methods rely on water infiltration experiments and their analysis using analytical or numerical models. At the beginning, most models were developed for water infiltration at steady state. These models had the advantage to be easy to develop from a theoretical point of view. Yet, many drawbacks remain including the need to wait for a long time, leading to time-consuming experiments, the risk to infiltrate water in large volumes of soil, leading to a response affected by soil variability, and the uncertainty regarding the attainment of steady state (i.e. constant infiltration rate). More recently, infiltration models and mathematical developments addressed the case of consecutive transient and steady states. Yet, one main problem remain. In the field, the operator is never sure about the state of water infiltration data. This paper present analytical formulations for the estimation of a transition time. We consider the model developed by Haverkamp et al. (1994) linking 1D infiltration flux to cumulative infiltration and related approximated expansions. An analytical method based on scaling is proposed to define transition time values in terms of both scaled cumulative infiltration and times. Dimensional times are then calculated for a large variety of soils and initial conditions. These time database can be considered as a relevant tool for the guidance for operators who conduct water infiltration experiments and wants to know when to stop and also for modelers who want to know how to select the data to fit transient or steady state models. Haverkamp, R., Ross, P. J., Smetten, K. R. J., Parlange, J. Y. (1994), Three-dimensional analysis of infiltration from the disc infiltrometer: 2 Physically based infiltration equation. Water Resour. Res

  16. Steady-state and transient analysis of a squeeze film damper bearing for rotor stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, L. E.; Gunter, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the steady-state and transient response of the squeeze film damper bearing is presented. Both the steady-state and transient equations for the hydrodynamic bearing forces are derived. The bearing equivalent stiffness and damping coefficients are determined by steady-state equations. These coefficients are used to find the bearing configuration which will provide the optimum support characteristics based on a stability analysis of the rotor-bearing system. The transient analysis of rotor-bearing systems is performed by coupling the bearing and journal equations and integrating forward in time. The effects of unbalance, cavitation, and retainer springs are included in the analysis. Methods of determining the stability of a rotor-bearing system under the influence of aerodynamic forces and internal shaft friction are discussed with emphasis on solving the system characteristic frequency equation and on producing stability maps. It is shown that for optimum stability and low force transmissability the squeeze bearing should operate at an eccentricity ratio epsilon 0.4.

  17. Impact of the steady state uncertainties on transient codes' RIA predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need of defining new RIA safety criteria has pointed out the importance of evaluating the uncertainties affecting the transient simulation tools. The present work is devoted to analyze how the steady state uncertainties affect the transient codes predictions. For that purpose, a UA methodology based on Monte Carlo analysis supported by deterministic reduction methods (OAT and RSM) has been developed and successfully applied to the CIP0-1 experiment. To do so, the FRAPCON-3.4 (steady state) and the SCANAIR-7.2 (transient) codes have been chosen. After analyzing four transient outputs closely linked to failure criteria, the fuel and clad roughness and the Pu radial profile (burnup model) are found to be the most relevant FRAPCON-3.4 variables. The codes predictions present a suitable precision and accuracy values; however the resulting uncertainty bands still keeps estimates far away from measurements, that is, the steady state uncertainties seem not to be responsible for the deviations of SCANAIR-7.2 predictions from the experimental data available.

  18. Effect of airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation and infection on steady-state bronchiectasis in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Li, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in clinically stable bronchiectasis in mainland China remains unclear. Objective To compare the inflammation and lung function impairment in bronchiectasis patients isolated or infected with PA, potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) and commensals, and to identify factors associated with PA isolation and infection. Methods Patients with steady-state bronchiectasis and healthy subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to determine inflammatory markers and bacterial loads in steady-state bronchiectasis and health. Spirometry and diffusing capacity were also measured. Results We enrolled 144 bronchiectasis patients and 23 healthy subjects. PA isolation and infection accounted for 44 and 39 patients, who demonstrated significant inflammatory responses and markedly impaired spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, compared with healthy subjects and patients isolated with other PPMs and commensals (all P, 4 or more exacerbations within 2 years (OR: 3.74 for PA isolation, OR: 2.95 for PA infection) and cystic bronchiectasis (OR: 3.63 for PA isolation, OR: 4.47 for PA infection) were the factors consistently associated with PA isolation and infection. Conclusions PA elicits intense inflammation and lung function impairment in steady-state bronchiectasis. The density of PA does not correlate with most clinical indices. PA infection is associated with females, frequent exacerbations and cystic bronchiectasis. PMID:25973228

  19. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  20. Speech sound discrimination training improves auditory cortex responses in a rat model of autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal T Engineer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism often have language impairments and degraded cortical responses to speech. Extensive behavioral interventions can improve language outcomes and cortical responses. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA increases the risk for autism and language impairment. Prenatal exposure to VPA also causes weaker and delayed auditory cortex responses in rats. In this study, we document speech sound discrimination ability in VPA exposed rats and document the effect of extensive speech training on auditory cortex responses. VPA exposed rats were significantly impaired at consonant, but not vowel, discrimination. Extensive speech training resulted in both stronger and faster anterior auditory field responses compared to untrained VPA exposed rats, and restored responses to control levels. This neural response improvement generalized to non-trained sounds. The rodent VPA model of autism may be used to improve the understanding of speech processing in autism and contribute to improving language outcomes.

  1. Steady state free radical budgets and ozone photochemistry during TOPSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Christopher A.; Mauldin, L.; Zondlo, M.; Eisele, F.; Kosciuch, E.; Shetter, R.; Lefer, B.; Hall, S.; Campos, T.; Ridley, B.; Walega, J.; Fried, A.; Wert, B.; Flocke, F.; Weinheimer, A.; Hannigan, J.; Coffey, M.; Atlas, E.; Stephens, S.; Heikes, B.; Snow, J.; Blake, D.; Blake, N.; Katzenstein, A.; Lopez, J.; Browell, E. V.; Dibb, J.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.; Talbot, R.

    2003-02-01

    A steady state model, constrained by a number of measured quantities, was used to derive peroxy radical levels for the conditions of the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) campaign. The analysis is made using data collected aboard the NCAR/NSF C-130 aircraft from February through May 2000 at latitudes from 40° to 85°N, and at altitudes from the surface to 7.6 km. HO2 + RO2 radical concentrations were measured during the experiment, which are compared with model results over the domain of the study showing good agreement on the average. Average measurement/model ratios are 1.04 (σ = 0.73) and 0.96 (σ = 0.52) for the MLB and HLB, respectively. Budgets of total peroxy radical levels as well as of individual free radical members were constructed, which reveal interesting differences compared to studies at lower latitudes. The midlatitude part of the study region is a significant net source of ozone, while the high latitudes constitute a small net sink leading to the hypothesis that transport from the middle latitudes can explain the observed increase in ozone in the high latitudes. Radical reservoir species concentrations are modeled and compared with the observations. For most conditions, the model does a good job of reproducing the formaldehyde observations, but the peroxide observations are significantly less than steady state for this study. Photostationary state (PSS) derived total peroxy radical levels and NO/NO2 ratios are compared with the measurements and the model; PSS-derived results are higher than observations or the steady state model at low NO concentrations.

  2. Small steady-state tokamak (TST) for divertor testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Y.M.; Colchin, R.J.; Swain, D.W.; Nelson, B.E.; Monday, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Blevins, J.; Delisle, M.; Stringer, J. (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Bonoli, P.; Luckhardt, S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Pauletti, R. (Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil))

    1992-01-01

    The TST is a small steady-state tokamak designed for testing diverters under conditions similar to those anticipated in future large tokamaks. An initial design has R{sub 0}/a = 2.5, R{sub 0} = 0.75 m, a = 0.3 m, and Bt{sub 0} = 2.2 T with full inductive capability. With heating and current drive power of 4.5 MW, the heat flux at the plasma edge Q{perpendicular} can be as high as 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. Plasma currents I{sub p} above 500 kA can be maintained by 1 MW of lower hybrid power (2.45 GHz) for average densities n{sub e} up to 3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Additional power via ICRF (2 MW) and neutral beams (1.5 MW) maintain current for n{sub e} up to 5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Fully demountable, actively cooled, steady-state toroidal field coils permit ample access for the auxiliary systems and diverter cassettes. The toroidal field magnets require a steady-state supply of less than 40 MW. The size and cost of the TST can be reduced by eliminating the solenoid, reducing Bt{sub 0} to 1.4 T, and lowering R{sub 0}/a to 1.7. This option permits low-R{sub 0}/a experimentation while maintaining the capability for testing divertors but requires successful noninductive current initiation and maintenance in the low-R{sub 0}/a regime.

  3. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Jarzynski, C.

    2016-04-01

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents. To generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters—also known as a stochastic pump (SP)—reaches a periodic state with nonvanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between nonequilibrium stationary states and stochastic pumps. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents, and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: They show that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics. Nonequilibrium steady states and stochastic pumps are often used to model, respectively, biomolecular motors driven by chemical reactions and artificial molecular machines steered by the variation of external, macroscopic parameters. Our results loosely suggest that anything a biomolecular machine can do, an artificial molecular machine can do equally well. We illustrate this principle by showing that kinetic proofreading, a NESS mechanism that explains the low error rates in biochemical reactions, can be effectively mimicked by a constrained periodic driving.

  4. Simultaneous extratympanic electrocochleography and auditory brainstem responses revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Minaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to revisit the two-channel, simultaneous click-evoked extratympanic electrocochleography and auditory brainstem response (ECoG/ABR recording technique for clinical use in normal hearing participants. Recording the compound action potential (AP of the ECoG simultaneously with ABR may be useful when Wave I of the ABR is small or diminished in patients with sensorineural or retrocochlear disorder and minimizes overall test time. In contrast to some previous studies that used the extratympanic electrode both as non-inverting electrode for the ECoG and inverting electrode for ABR, this study maintained separate recording channel montages unique to conventional click-evoked ECoG and ABR recordings. That is, the ABR was recorded using a vertical channel (Cz to ipsilateral earlobe, while the ECoG with custom extratympanic electrode was recorded using a horizontal channel (tympanic membrane to contralateral earlobe. The extratympanic electrode is easy to fabricate inhouse, or can be purchased commercially. Maintaining the conventional ABR montage permits continued use of traditional normative data. Broadband clicks at a fixed level of 85 dB nHL were presented with alternating polarity at stimulus rates of 9.3, 11.3, and 15.3/s. Different stimulation rates were explored to identify the most efficient rate without sacrificing time or waveform morphology. Results revealed larger ECoG AP than ABR Wave I, as expected, and no significant difference across stimulation rate and no interaction effect. Extratympanic electrode placement takes little additional clinic time and may improve the neurodiagnostic utility of the ABR.

  5. Steady-State Plasmas in KT5D Magnetized Torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhenhua; LIU Wandong; WAN Baonian; ZHAO Yanping; LI Jiangang; YAN Longwen; YANG Qingwei; DING Xuantong; XU Min; YU Yi; WANG Zhijiang; LU Ronghua; WEN Yizhi; YU Changxuan; MA Jinxiu; WAN Shude

    2007-01-01

    Steady-state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) wave in the KT5D magnetized torus was studied using a fast high-resolution camera and Langmuir probes. It was found that both the discharge patterns taken by the camera and the plasma parameters measured by the probes were very sensitive to the working gas pressure and the magnetic configuration of the torus both without and with vertical fields. There existed fast vertical motion of the plasma. Tentative discussion is presented about the observed phenomena such as the bright resonance layer at a high gas pressure and the wave absorption mechanism at a low pressure. Further explanations should be found.

  6. Steady State of the Dusty Plasma in a dc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马锦秀; 郁明阳; 梁小平; 郑坚; 刘万东; 俞昌旋

    2002-01-01

    The steady state formed by the diffusion of plasma particles in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma is investigated theoretically and compared with our previous experimental results /Nucl. Fusion Plasma Phys. 20(2000)180 (in Chinese); Phys. Plasmas 8(2001)1459]. The negatively charged dust grains with an average charge number of the order of 105 on a single grain enhance the plasma inhomogeneity by decreasing the diffusion velocity, and can cause significant depletion of electrons. The theoretical electron density profile is in good agreement with the experiment, and the theoretical profile of the electron-to-ion density ratio is in reasonable agreement with experimentally estimated data.

  7. Long Pulse Operation on Tore-Supra: Towards Steady State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental programme of Tore Supra is devoted to the study of technology and physics issues associated to long-duration high performance discharges. This new domain of operation requires simultaneously and in steady state: heat removal capability, particle exhaust, fully non-inductive current drive, advanced technology integration and real time plasma control. The long discharge allows for addressing new time scale physic such as the wall particle retention and erosion. Moreover, the physics of fully non-inductive discharges is full of novelty, namely: the MHD stability, the slow spontaneous oscillation of the central electron temperature or the outstanding inward particle pinch

  8. Steady-state and transient wellbore temperatures during drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, W.J.

    1976-05-20

    An extensive literature search was made to locate technical publications and computer programs relating to wellbore temperatures during drilling operations. Publications obtained are listed in the References. Two approaches were used in calculating borehole temperatures: The steady state solution of Holmes and Swift was programmed and 2100 cases calculated for various borehole configurations. For transient temperature studies, Exxon Production Research Co. made calculations for ten borehole configurations under subcontract. These calculations emphasize the need for better high temperature bit performance and improved engineering procedures in drilling.

  9. Literature review: Steady-state modelling of loop heat pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Siedel, B.; Sartre, V.; Lefèvre, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are efficient and reliable heat transfer systems whose operation is based on the liquid–vapour phase-change phenomenon. They use the capillary pressure generated in a porous structure to passively circulate the fluid from a heat source to a heat sink. In this paper, an exhaustive literature review is carried out in order to investigate the existing steady-state models of LHPs. These models can be divided into three categories: numerical models of the entire system, nume...

  10. Analysis of steady-state ductile crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The fracture strength under quasi-static steady-state crack growth in an elastic-plastic material joined by a laser weld is analyzed. Laser welding gives high mismatch between the yield stress within the weld and the yield stress in the base material. This is due to the fast termic cycle, which the...... fracture zone. Both models predict that in general a thinner laser weld gives higher interface strength. Furthermore, both fracture criteria show, that the preferred path of the crack is close outside the weld material; a phenomenon also observed in experiments....

  11. Steady-state organization of binary mixtures by active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Gilhøj, Henriette; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    The structural reorganization of a phase-separated binary mixture in the presence of an annealed dilution of active impurities is studied by computer-simulation techniques via a simple two-dimensional lattice-gas model. The impurities, each of which has two internal states with different affinity...... for the two species, become active by an external driving of a transition between the two impurity states, leading to an energy flow from the impurities into the binary mixture. In steady state, the drive is found to break down the phase-separated state and lead to a new finite length scale controlled...

  12. Control algorithms for quasi-steady-state reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specialized algorithms for digitally controlling the quasi-steady-state operation of reactors can be derived from the well-known neutron and energy balance equations for reactors. Utilizing the appropriate assumptions, these equations can be reduced to yield the classical proportional-integral-derivative feedback control approach. This method may be applied to single- or multiple-region reactors to control fuel temperature or neutron flux by manipulating system reactivity, specifically control rod reactivity. This paper discusses the development of single- and multiple-region flux and temperature control as well as numerical and experimental testing of these algorithms

  13. Skewness of steady-state current fluctuations in nonequilibrium systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, Roman; Cohen, E. G. D.; Wong, Chun-Shang; Goree, John A.; Feng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A skewness of the probability for instantaneous current fluctuations, in a nonequilibrium steady state, is observed experimentally in a dusty plasma. This skewness is attributed to the spatial asymmetry, which is imminent to the nonequilibrium systems due to the external hydrodynamic gradient. Using the modern framework of the large deviation theory, we extend the Onsager-Machlup ansatz for equilibrium fluctuations to systems with a preferred spatial direction, and provide a modulated Gaussian probability distribution, which is tested by simulations. This probability distribution is also of potential interest for other statistical disciplines. Connections with the principles of statistical mechanics, due to Boltzmann and Gibbs, are discussed as well.

  14. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels

  15. Curva de Laffer para Portugal, perspetiva de steady state

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Diogo Ricardo Reis

    2014-01-01

    São analisadas as receitas de imposto sobre o trabalho, consumo e capital, em termos de curva de Laffer, através da aplicação de um modelo neoclássico, especialmente calibrado para a economia Portuguesa, envolvendo o período de tempo de 1995 a 2012. Foi encontrada a evidência, robusta, de curvas de Laffer para a tributação sobre o trabalho e capital. Este estudo concluiu que Portugal tem margem para aumentar impostos, numa perspetiva de steady state, sendo que Portugal pode aumentar a sua rec...

  16. Steady-state capabilities for hydroturbines with OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of a high quality Open Source CFD simulation platform like OpenFOAM offers new R and D opportunities by providing direct access to models and solver implementation details. Efforts have been made by Hydro-Quebec to adapt OpenFOAM to hydroturbines for the development of steady-state capabilities. The paper describes the developments that have been made to implement new turbomachinery related capabilities: Multiple Frame of Reference solver, domain coupling interfaces (GGI, cyclicGGI and mixing plane) and specialized boundary conditions. Practical use of the new turbomachinery capabilities are demonstrated for the analysis of a 195-MW Francis hydroturbine.

  17. Evaluation of Auditory Brain Stems Evoked Response in Newborns With Pathologic Hyperbilirubinemia in Mashhad, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Okhravi, Tooba; Tarvij Eslami, Saeedeh; Hushyar Ahmadi, Ali; Nassirian, Hossain; Najibpour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal jaundice is a common cause of sensorneural hearing loss in children. Objectives: We aimed to detect the neurotoxic effects of pathologic hyperbilirubinemia on brain stem and auditory tract by auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) which could predict early effects of hyperbilirubinemia. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was performed on newborns with pathologic hyperbilirubinemia. The inclusion criteria were healthy term and near term (35 - 37 weeks) newbor...

  18. Psychophysical Responses Comparison in Spatial Visual, Audiovisual, and Auditory BCI-Spelling Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Moonjeong; Nishikawa, Nozomu; Cai, Zhenyu; Makino, Shoji; Rutkowski, Tomasz M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a pilot study conducted with spatial visual, audiovisual and auditory brain-computer-interface (BCI) based speller paradigms. The psychophysical experiments are conducted with healthy subjects in order to evaluate a difficulty and a possible response accuracy variability. We also present preliminary EEG results in offline BCI mode. The obtained results validate a thesis, that spatial auditory only paradigm performs as good as the traditional visual and audiovisual speller B...

  19. Diminished Auditory Responses during NREM Sleep Correlate with the Hierarchy of Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman-Haran, Edna; Arzi, Anat; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Malach, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Natural sleep provides a powerful model system for studying the neuronal correlates of awareness and state changes in the human brain. To quantitatively map the nature of sleep-induced modulations in sensory responses we presented participants with auditory stimuli possessing different levels of linguistic complexity. Ten participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the waking state and after falling asleep. Sleep staging was based on heart rate measures validated independently on 20 participants using concurrent EEG and heart rate measurements and the results were confirmed using permutation analysis. Participants were exposed to three types of auditory stimuli: scrambled sounds, meaningless word sentences and comprehensible sentences. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, we found diminishing brain activation along the hierarchy of language processing, more pronounced in higher processing regions. Specifically, the auditory thalamus showed similar activation levels during sleep and waking states, primary auditory cortex remained activated but showed a significant reduction in auditory responses during sleep, and the high order language-related representation in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) cortex showed a complete abolishment of responses during NREM sleep. In addition to an overall activation decrease in language processing regions in superior temporal gyrus and IFG, those areas manifested a loss of semantic selectivity during NREM sleep. Our results suggest that the decreased awareness to linguistic auditory stimuli during NREM sleep is linked to diminished activity in high order processing stations. PMID:27310812

  20. Diminished Auditory Responses during NREM Sleep Correlate with the Hierarchy of Language Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meytal Wilf

    Full Text Available Natural sleep provides a powerful model system for studying the neuronal correlates of awareness and state changes in the human brain. To quantitatively map the nature of sleep-induced modulations in sensory responses we presented participants with auditory stimuli possessing different levels of linguistic complexity. Ten participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during the waking state and after falling asleep. Sleep staging was based on heart rate measures validated independently on 20 participants using concurrent EEG and heart rate measurements and the results were confirmed using permutation analysis. Participants were exposed to three types of auditory stimuli: scrambled sounds, meaningless word sentences and comprehensible sentences. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, we found diminishing brain activation along the hierarchy of language processing, more pronounced in higher processing regions. Specifically, the auditory thalamus showed similar activation levels during sleep and waking states, primary auditory cortex remained activated but showed a significant reduction in auditory responses during sleep, and the high order language-related representation in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG cortex showed a complete abolishment of responses during NREM sleep. In addition to an overall activation decrease in language processing regions in superior temporal gyrus and IFG, those areas manifested a loss of semantic selectivity during NREM sleep. Our results suggest that the decreased awareness to linguistic auditory stimuli during NREM sleep is linked to diminished activity in high order processing stations.

  1. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Males with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Joanne; Hennon, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Kathleen; Roush, Jackson; Gravel, Judith; Skinner, Martie; Misenheimer, Jan; Reitz, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation resulting in developmental delays in males. Atypical outer ear morphology is characteristic of FXS and may serve as a marker for abnormal auditory function. Despite this abnormality, studies of the hearing of young males with FXS are generally lacking. A few studies…

  2. Auditory Long Latency Responses to Tonal and Speech Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swink, Shannon; Stuart, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of type of stimuli (i.e., nonspeech vs. speech), speech (i.e., natural vs. synthetic), gender of speaker and listener, speaker (i.e., self vs. other), and frequency alteration in self-produced speech on the late auditory cortical evoked potential were examined. Method: Young adult men (n = 15) and women (n = 15), all with…

  3. Steady states of the parametric rotator and pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzas, Antonio O, E-mail: abouzas@fis.mda.cinvestav.m [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-IPN, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km. 6, Apdo Postal 73 ' Cordemex' , Merida 97310, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the damped, nonlinear equation of motion of the parametric rotator and pendulum perturbatively for small parametric excitation and damping, although our perturbative approach can be extended to other regimes as well. Our treatment involves only ordinary second-order differential equations with constant coefficients, and provides numerically accurate perturbative solutions in terms of elementary functions. Some of the steady-state rotation and oscillation modes studied here have not been discussed in the previous literature. Other well-known ones, such as parametric resonance and the inverted pendulum, are extended to elliptic parametric excitation tilted with respect to gravity. The results presented here should be accessible to advanced undergraduates, and of interest to graduate students and specialists in the field of nonlinear mechanics.

  4. A steady-state measurement system for total hemispherical emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A steady-state calorimetric technique was developed for measuring the total hemispherical emissivity of a conductive material. The system uses a thin strip of the conductive sample electrically heated by alternating current to high temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The emissivity was measured in a central region of the sample with an approximately uniform temperature distribution. Considering the influences of the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas and conductive heat loss from the region to the rest of the strip, the emissivity was accurately determined by solving the inverse one-dimension steady-state heat transfer problem. The emissivities of various metal samples (nickel and 45# steel) were measured to verify the system accuracy. And the results were then analyzed to estimate the relative errors of emissivity arising from the gray body assumption, wire heat losses, effects of residual gas, non-uniform temperature distribution and the measurement uncertainty of emissivity. In the temperature range from 700 to 1300 K, the accuracy is acceptable for practical applications within the total measurement uncertainties of 1.1%. To increase the system applicability, some issues related to sample specifications, heating power control and temperature uniformity of sample test section were discussed. Thus, this system can provide accurate measurements of the total hemispherical emissivity of conductive samples at high temperatures. (paper)

  5. Concept study of the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept has been proposed as a realistic fusion power reactor to be built in the near future. An overall concept of SSTR is introduced which is based on a small extension of the present day physics and technologies. The major feature of SSTR is the maximum utilization of a bootstrap current in order to reduce the power required for the steady state operation. This requirement leads to the choice of moderate current (12 MA), and high βp (2.0) for the device, which are achieved by selecting high aspect ratio (A=4) and high toroidal magnetic field (16.5 T). A negative-ion-based neutral beam injection system is used both for heating and central current drive. Notable engineering features of SSTR are: the use of a uniform vacuum vessel and periodical replacements of the first wall and blanket layers and significant reduction of the electromagnetic force with the use of functionally gradient material. It is shown that a tokamak machine comparable to ITER in size can become a power reactor capable of generating about 1 GW of electricity with a plant efficiency of ∼30%. (author)

  6. Steady states of the parametric rotator and pendulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the damped, nonlinear equation of motion of the parametric rotator and pendulum perturbatively for small parametric excitation and damping, although our perturbative approach can be extended to other regimes as well. Our treatment involves only ordinary second-order differential equations with constant coefficients, and provides numerically accurate perturbative solutions in terms of elementary functions. Some of the steady-state rotation and oscillation modes studied here have not been discussed in the previous literature. Other well-known ones, such as parametric resonance and the inverted pendulum, are extended to elliptic parametric excitation tilted with respect to gravity. The results presented here should be accessible to advanced undergraduates, and of interest to graduate students and specialists in the field of nonlinear mechanics.

  7. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  8. Nonequilibrium many-body steady states via Keldysh formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    Many-body systems with both coherent dynamics and dissipation constitute a rich class of models which are nevertheless much less explored than their dissipationless counterparts. The advent of numerous experimental platforms that simulate such dynamics poses an immediate challenge to systematically understand and classify these models. In particular, nontrivial many-body states emerge as steady states under nonequilibrium dynamics. While these states and their phase transitions have been studied extensively with mean-field theory, the validity of the mean-field approximation has not been systematically investigated. In this paper, we employ a field-theoretic approach based on the Keldysh formalism to study nonequilibrium phases and phase transitions in a variety of models. In all cases, a complete description via the Keldysh formalism indicates a partial or complete failure of the mean-field analysis. Furthermore, we find that an effective temperature emerges as a result of dissipation, and the universal behavior including the dynamics near the steady state is generically described by a thermodynamic universality class.

  9. Steady-state operation of spheromaks by inductive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to maintain a steady-state spheromak configuration inductively using the S-1 Spheromak device is described. The S-1 Spheromak formation apparatus can be utilized to inject magnetic helicity continuously (C.W., not pulsed or D.C.) into the spheromak configuration after equilibrium is achieved in the linked mode of operation. Oscillation of both poloidal- and toroidal-field currents in the flux core (psi-phi Pumping), with proper phasing, injects a net time-averaged helicity into the plasma. Steady-state maintenance relies on flux conversion, which has been earlier identified. Relevant experimental data from the operation of S-1 are described. Helicity flow has been measured and the proposed injection scheme simulated. In a reasonable time practical voltages and frequencies can inject an amount of helicity comparable to that in the initial plasma. Plasma currents can be maintained or increased. This pumping technique is similar to F-THETA Pumping of a Reversed-Field-Pinch but is applied to this inverse-pinch formation

  10. Non-steady state tidal heating of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, D.; Hussmann, H.; Sohl, F.; Kurita, K.

    2014-06-01

    Enceladus is one of the most geologically active bodies in the Solar System. The satellite's diverse surface suggests that Enceladus was subject to past episodic heating. It is largely probable that the activity of Enceladus is not in a steady state. In order to analyze the non-steady state heating, thermal and orbital coupled calculation is needed because they affect each other. We perform the coupled calculation assuming conductive ice layer and low melting temperature. Although the heating state of Enceladus strongly depends on the rheological parameters used, episodic heating is induced if the Q-value of Saturn is less than 23,000 and Enceladus' core radius is less than 161 km. The duration of one episodic heating cycle is around one hundred million years. The cyclic change in ice thickness is consistent with the origin of a partial ocean which is suggested by plume emissions and diverse surface states of Enceladus. Although the obtained tidal heating rate is smaller than the observed heat flux of a few giga watt, other heating mechanisms involving e.g., liquid water and/or specific chemical reactions may be initiated by the formation of a partial or global subsurface ocean.

  11. Cortical contributions to the auditory frequency-following response revealed by MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Emily B J; Herholz, Sibylle C; Chepesiuk, Alexander M P; Baillet, Sylvain; Zatorre, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The auditory frequency-following response (FFR) to complex periodic sounds is used to study the subcortical auditory system, and has been proposed as a biomarker for disorders that feature abnormal sound processing. Despite its value in fundamental and clinical research, the neural origins of the FFR are unclear. Using magnetoencephalography, we observe a strong, right-asymmetric contribution to the FFR from the human auditory cortex at the fundamental frequency of the stimulus, in addition to signal from cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and medial geniculate. This finding is highly relevant for our understanding of plasticity and pathology in the auditory system, as well as higher-level cognition such as speech and music processing. It suggests that previous interpretations of the FFR may need re-examination using methods that allow for source separation. PMID:27009409

  12. Effect of RF field strength on steady-state NOE enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady-state properties of a spin system irradiated by RF field are analysed. The steady-state NOE experiment is described by the extended Solomon equations. The steady-state NOE enhancement factor is obtained and verified by the experiments of liquids and solids

  13. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C; Thompson, Elaine C; Woodruff Carr, Kali; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R; Kraus, Nina

    2015-10-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But this auditory learning rarely occurs in ideal listening conditions-children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3-5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features-even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response

  14. Physics studies for steady state operation coordinated by the ITPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) aims at cooperation on an international level in development of the physics basis for burning tokamak plasmas, supporting the preparation of ITER operation, and tokamak research worldwide. The topical group on 'Integrated Operation Scenarios' coordinates research in the following 4 areas: First, IEA collaboration experiments, coordinated by the ITPA. These experiments, performed as joint experiments in several different machines, mainly concern the validation of ITER operation scenarios, including the hybrid and steady state scenarios for ITER. Specific access conditions of these two scenarios are studied together with operation close to ITER conditions. For the heating systems, specific experiments are coordinated to study the coupling of ICRH and LHCD. Secondly, modelling and benchmarking of heating systems (actuators). Benchmarking of the actuators available for heating and current drive is an important area of international collaboration. They have been performed and completed in recent years for LHCD, for ICRH and for NBCD. In particular, LHCD at high plasma density have been studied and compared to experimental data. Thirdly, the coordinated modelling of ITER scenarios. Simulations for hybrid and steady state scenarios have a particular focus on comparing code to code results (benchmarking). For hybrid scenarios the current rise phase and the current profile evolution toward q(0)=1 were modelled with various integrated modelling codes. ITER H-mode scenarios at low plasma density have been modelled showing that the burn can be sustained for > 1000 s, suitable for neutron fluence studies in ITER. The effectiveness of the ITER day-1 heating systems for obtaining steady state scenarios as well as potential heating and current drive upgrades for ITER have been evaluated. Fourth, real time control requirements. Control of burning plasma remains a focus of research

  15. Processamento auditivo e potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral (BERA Auditory precessing and auditory brainstem response (ABR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pfeiffer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar relação existente entre os potenciais auditivos de tronco cerebral e a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo. MÉTODOS: foi realizada em um grupo de 60 meninas residentes de Paraíba do Sul na idade de nove a 12 anos com limiares tonais dentro dos padrões de normalidade e timpanometria tipo A com presença dos reflexos acústicos. Os testes utilizados para a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo foram: avaliação simplificada do processamento auditivo, teste de fala no ruído, teste de dissílabos alternados e teste dicótico não verbal. Após a avaliação do processamento auditivo, as crianças foram subdivididas em dois grupos, G1 (sem alteração no processamento auditivo e G2 (com alteração no processamento auditivo e submetidas aos potenciais auditivos de tronco cerebral. Os parâmetros utilizados na comparação dos dois grupos foram: latência absoluta das ondas I, III e V; latência interpicos das ondas I-III, I-V, III-V; diferença interaural da latência interpico I-V; e diferença interaural da latência da onda V. RESULTADOS: foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas nos parâmetros de latência interpico das ondas I-V na orelha esquerda (p=0,009, diferença interaural da latência interpico de ondas I-V (p=0,020 e diferença da latência interpico de ondas I e V da orelha direita para a esquerda entre os grupos G1 e G2 (p=0,025. CONCLUSÃO: foi possível encontrar relação dos potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral com a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo nos parâmetros de latência interpico entre as ondas I e V da orelha esquerda e diferença interaural da latência interpico I-V na orelha esquerda.PURPOSE: to investigate the correlation of auditory brainstem response (ABR and behavioral auditory processing evaluation. METHODS: sixty girls, from Paraíba do Sul, ranging from 9 to 12-year-old were evaluated. In order to take part in the study

  16. Stress analysis in a functionally graded disc under mechanical loads and a steady state temperature distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hasan Çallioğlu

    2011-02-01

    An analytical thermoelasticity solution for a disc made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) is presented. Infinitesimal deformation theory of elasticity and power law distribution for functional gradation are used in the solution procedure. Some relative results for the stress and displacement components along the radius are presented due to internal pressure, external pressure, centrifugal force and steady state temperature. From the results, it is found that the grading indexes play an important role in determining the thermomechanical responses of FG disc and in optimal design of these structures.

  17. Computation of Effective Steady-State Creep of Porous Ni–YSZ Composites with Reconstructed Microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effective steady-state creep response of porous Ni–YSZ composites used in solid oxide fuel cell applications by numerical homogenization based on three-dimensional microstructural reconstructions and steadystate creep properties of the constituent phases. The Ni phase is...... found to carry insignificant stress in the composite and has a negligible role in the effective creep behavior. Thus, when determining effective creep, porous Ni–YSZ composites can be regarded as porous YSZ in which the Ni phase is counted as additional porosity. The stress exponents of porous YSZ are...

  18. Movement-related changes in cortical excitability: A steady-state SEP approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtis, D.; Seiss, E; Praamstra, P

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the use of steady-state somatosensory evoked potentials (ssSEPs) as a continuous probe on the excitability of the somatosensory cortex during the foreperiod and the response time of a cued choice reaction time task. ssSEPs were elicited by electrical median nerve stimulation at the left and right wrist, using a stimulation frequency of 22.2 Hz. Scalp-recorded ssSEPs were analysed by means of dipole source analysis to achieve optimal separation of left and right hemisphere ...

  19. Dominant negative autoregulation limits steady-state repression levels in gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsey, Szabolcs; Krishna, Sandeep; Erdossy, János; Horváth, Péter; Orosz, László; Sneppen, Kim; Adhya, Sankar

    2009-07-01

    Many transcription factors repress transcription of their own genes. Negative autoregulation has been shown to reduce cell-cell variation in regulatory protein levels and speed up the response time in gene networks. In this work we examined transcription regulation of the galS gene and the function of its product, the GalS protein. We observed a unique operator preference of the GalS protein characterized by dominant negative autoregulation. We show that this pattern of regulation limits the repression level of the target genes in steady states. We suggest that transcription factors with dominant negative autoregulation are designed for regulating gene expression during environmental transitions. PMID:19429616

  20. Homotopy Algorithms for Finding DC and Steady-State Solutions of Nonlinear Circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC operating points, steady state, and transient responses of electronic circuits are essential tasks in electrical circuit simulation and involve solving nonlinear differential/algebraic equations. Traditional methods for solving such systems of equations often fail, are difficult to converge, and, often cannot find all the solutions. We investigate the application of homotopy methods to solving nonlinear, equations describing circuits consisting of bipolar junction and MOS transistors that traditionally pose simulation difficulties. In this talk, I will describe experiments with homotopies that led to better understanding of homotopy algorithms and the behavior of nonlinear circuits, and, ultimately, to the development of better circuit simulation tools. (Author)

  1. Dynamic Effects Related to Steady-State Multiplicity in Continous Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Frede; Olsson, Lisbeth; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2004-01-01

    The behavioral differences between chemostat and productostat cultivation of aerobic glucose-limited Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Three types of experiments were conducted: a chemostat, where the dilution rate was shifted up or down in stepwise manner; and a productostat, with either...... stepwise changed or a rampwise increased ethanol setpoint, i.e., an accelero-productostat. The transient responses from chemostat and productostat experiments were interpreted using a simple metabolic flux model. In a productostat it was possible to obtain oxido-reductive steady states at dilution rates...

  2. Steady-state fusion fission reactor concepts based on stellarator-mirror and mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron sources and hybrid reactors offer a possibility for application of fusion in a not too distant future. Steady-state operation on a time scale of a year without interruption is essential for such applications. In response to this need, our studies are focused on concepts which are not limited by pulsed operation. Special attention is put on mirror machines and a stellarator-mirror concept with localized neutron production. Reactor safety, magnetic coils, power amplification by fission, plasma heating, a radial constant of motion which provides a bounded radial motion in the collision free approximation are some of the issues addressed

  3. Brainstem reflexes and brainstem auditory evoked responses in Huntington's chorea.

    OpenAIRE

    Bollen, E; Arts, R.J.; Roos, R A; van der Velde, E A; Buruma, O J

    1986-01-01

    Blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw reflex, exteroceptive suppression in masseter muscles and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were measured in 20 patients with Huntington's chorea and 12 controls. A significantly increased latency of the second component of the homolateral and heterolateral blink reflex was found in the patient group as compared with the controls. The other investigations revealed no significant differences between patients and controls except for some facilitation of the ...

  4. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    OpenAIRE

    van Wassenhove, Virginie; Grzeczkowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al., 2010). Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient color changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the “where” and the “when” of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or cen...

  5. A model of auditory nerve responses to electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    peripheral for the cathodic phase. This results in an average difference of 200 μs in spike latency for AP generated by anodic vs cathodic pulses. It is hypothesized here that this difference is large enough to corrupt the temporal coding in the AN. To quantify effects of pulse polarity on auditory...... as a framework to test various stimulation strategies and to quantify their effect on the performance of CI listeners in psychophysical tasks....

  6. Steady-state negative Wigner functions of nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Rips, Simon; Wilson-Rae, Ignacio; Hartmann, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare nanomechanical oscillators in non-classical steady states, characterized by a pronounced negative Wigner function. In our optomechanical approach, the mechanical oscillator couples to multiple laser driven resonances of an optical cavity. By lowering the resonant frequency of the oscillator via an inhomogeneous electrostatic field, we significantly enhance its intrinsic geometric nonlinearity per phonon. This causes the motional sidebands to split into separate spectral lines for each phonon number and transitions between individual phonon Fock states can be selectively addressed. We show that this enables preparation of the nanomechanical oscillator in a single phonon Fock state. Our scheme can for example be implemented with a carbon nanotube dispersively coupled to the evanescent field of a state of the art whispering gallery mode microcavity.

  7. Steady-state negative Wigner functions of nonlinear nanomechanical oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a scheme for preparing nanomechanical oscillators in nonclassical steady states, characterized by a pronounced negative Wigner function. In our optomechanical approach, the mechanical oscillator couples to multiple laser-driven resonances of an optical cavity. By lowering the resonance frequency of the oscillator via an inhomogeneous electrostatic field, we significantly enhance its intrinsic geometric nonlinearity per phonon. This causes the motional sidebands to split into separate spectral lines for each phonon number and transitions between individual phonon Fock states can be selectively addressed. We show that this enables the preparation of the nanomechanical oscillator in a single-phonon Fock state. Our scheme can, for example, be implemented with a carbon nanotube dispersively coupled to the evanescent field of a state of the art whispering gallery mode microcavity. (paper)

  8. Waveguides formed by quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Matthew; Duree, Galen; Salamo, Gregory; Segev, Mordechai

    1995-10-01

    We show that a quasi-steady-state photorefractive spatial soliton forms a waveguide structure in the bulk of a photorefractive material. Although the optically induced waveguide is formed by a very low-power (microwatts) soliton beam, it can guide a powerful (watt) beam of a longer wavelength at which the medium is nonphotosensitive. Furthermore, the waveguide survives, either in the dark or when guiding the longer-wavelength beam, for a long time after the soliton beam is turned off. We take advantage of the solitons' property of evolution from a relatively broad input beam into a narrow channel and show that the soliton induces a tapered waveguide (an optical funnel) that improves the coupling efficiency of light into the waveguiding structure.

  9. Steady State Rheological Characteristic of Semisolid Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal compressive experiments at different temperatures, strain rates and holding time for semisolid AZ91D, Zr modified AZ91D and MB15 alloy with higher solid volume fraction were carried out by using Gleeble-15000 simulator and the true stress-strain curves were given directly. The relationship of apparent viscosity vs temperature, shear rate and holding time of the three kinds of semi-solid magnesium alloys, as well as isothermal steady state rheological characteristic and mechanical behavior were studied. The results show that the three magnesium alloys had the characteristic of shear-thinning. The rheological characteristic of the semi-solid MB15 is different from that of semi-solid AZ91D. The semi-solid MB15 has higher apparent viscosity and deformation resistance.

  10. NASA Lewis Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Ye; Tower, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed the LERCHP code. The PC-based LERCHP code can be used to predict the steady-state performance of heat pipes, including the determination of operating temperature and operating limits which might be encountered under specified conditions. The code contains a vapor flow algorithm which incorporates vapor compressibility and axially varying heat input. For the liquid flow in the wick, Darcy s formula is employed. Thermal boundary conditions and geometric structures can be defined through an interactive input interface. A variety of fluid and material options as well as user defined options can be chosen for the working fluid, wick, and pipe materials. This report documents the current effort at GRC to update the LERCHP code for operating in a Microsoft Windows (Microsoft Corporation) environment. A detailed analysis of the model is presented. The programming architecture for the numerical calculations is explained and flowcharts of the key subroutines are given

  11. Relativistic Hydrodynamics and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    CERN Document Server

    Spillane, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We review recent interest in the relativistic Riemann problem as a method for generating a non-equilibrium steady state. In the version of the problem under con- sideration, the initial conditions consist of a planar interface between two halves of a system held at different temperatures in a hydrodynamic regime. The new double shock solutions are in contrast with older solutions that involve one shock and one rarefaction wave. We use numerical simulations to show that the older solutions are preferred. Briefly we discuss the effects of a conserved charge. Finally, we discuss deforming the relativistic equations with a nonlinear term and how that deformation affects the temperature and velocity in the region connecting the asymptotic fluids.

  12. Factorised steady states and condensation transitions in nonequilibrium systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Evans

    2005-06-01

    Systems driven out of equilibrium can often exhibit behaviour not seen in systems in thermal equilibrium – for example phase transitions in one-dimensional systems. In this talk I will review a simple model of a nonequilibrium system known as the `zero-range process' and its recent developments. The nonequilibrium stationary state of this model factorises and this property allows a detailed analysis of several `condensation' transitions wherein a finite fraction of the constituent particles condenses onto a single lattice site. I will then consider a more general class of mass transport models, encompassing continuous mass variables and discrete time updating, and present a necessary and sufficient condition for the steady state to factorise. The property of factorisation again allows an analysis of the condensation transitions which may occur.

  13. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  14. Simulation of Power Electronic Converters Using Quasi Steady State Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Pejović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method to compute voltage and current waveforms of power electronic converters is proposed in the paper. The method relies on simulation result of averaged circuit model, and superimposes the ripple of the inductor currents to the obtained average values, assuming that the linear ripple approximation applies. To determine the amplitude of the switching ripple, a quasi steady state approximation is proposed. After the inductor currents are obtained, currents of switching components are computed by multiplying them with appropriate switching functions. The algorithmprovides an efficient tool to generate the converter waveforms in order to compute their spectra, mean and RMS values, which are of interest in designing filters and estimating converter losses.

  15. Steady-state, cavity-less, multimode superradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Joel A

    2012-01-01

    The study of collective light-matter interactions, where the dynamics of an individual scatterer depend on the state of the entire multi-scatterer system, has recently received much attention in the areas of fundamental research and photonic technologies. Cold atomic vapors represent an exciting system for studying such effects because light-based manipulation of internal and center-of-mass atomic states lead to reduced instability thresholds and new phonomena. Previous investigations required single-mode cavities to realize strong light mediated atom-atom interactions, though, which limits the observable phenomena. Here we demonstrate steady-state, mirrorless superradiance in a cold vapor pumped by weak optical fields. Beyond a critical pumping strength, the vapor spontaneously transforms into a spatially self-organized state: a density grating forms. Scattering of the pump beams off this grating generates new optical fields that act back on the vapor to enhance the atomic organization. This system has appli...

  16. The thermal vacuum for non-equilibrium steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryosuke; Kuwahara, Yukiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiya

    Our purpose is to construct a theoretical description of non-equilibrium steady state (NESS), employing thermo field dynamics (TFD). TFD is the operator-based formalism of thermal quautum field theory, where every degree of freedom is doubled and thermal averages are given by expectation values of the thermal vacuum. To specify the thermal vacuum for NESS is a non-trivial issue, and we attempt it on the analogy between the superoperator formalism and TFD. Using the thermal vacuum thus obtained, we analyze the NESS which is realized in the two-reservoir model. It will be shown that the NESS vacuum of the model coincides with the fixed point solutions of the quantum transport equation derived by the self-consistent renormalization of the self-energy in non-equilibrium TFD.

  17. Avoiding Rebound through a Steady-State Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The debate on the rebound effect as presented in most chapters in this book is based upon experience from the past more than visions of the future. The analyses are dominated by conventional economic theory, which implicitly assumes insatiable demand for energy services. Material consumption is...... only buy some time. From this perspective, the environmental problem with the rebound effect is not the higher energy efficiency, which pushes towards lower flows of resources through the economy, but rather the conventional economy which rebounds the savings, because of its quest for higher flows. In...... this chapter, I shall take the rebound debate further by discussing the possible role of energy efficiency in a sustainable economy that is based on the notion of ‘sufficiency’. The assumption is that globally we need to achieve a ‘steady-state economy’. Considering the urgent need for better material...

  18. Stationary Distribution and Thermodynamic Relation in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2010-01-01

    We describe our recent attempts toward statistical mechanics and thermodynamics for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) realized, e.g., in a heat conducting system. Our first result is a simple expression of the probability distribution (of microscopic states) of a NESS. Our second result is a natural extension of the thermodynamic Clausius relation and a definition of an accompanying entropy in NESS. This entropy coincides with the normalization constant appearing in the above mentioned microscopic expression of NESS, and has an expression similar to the Shannon entropy (with a further symmetrization). The NESS entropy proposed here is a clearly defined measurable quantity even in a system with a large degrees of freedom. We numerically measure the NESS entropy in hardsphere fluid systems with a heat current, by observing energy exchange between the system and the heat baths when the temperatures of the baths are changed according to specified protocols.

  19. Stabilization of unstable steady states by variable delay feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    We report on a dramatic improvement of the performance of the classical time-delayed autosynchronization method (TDAS) to control unstable steady states, by applying a time-varying delay in the TDAS control scheme in a form of a deterministic or stochastic delay-modulation in a fixed interval around a nominal value $T_0$. The successfulness of this variable delay feedback control (VDFC) is illustrated by a numerical control simulation of the Lorenz and R\\"{o}ssler systems using three different types of time-delay modulations: a sawtooth wave, a sine wave, and a uniform random distribution. We perform a comparative analysis between the VDFC method and the standard TDAS method for a sawtooth-wave modulation by analytically determining the domains of control for the generic case of an unstable fixed point of focus type.

  20. Transient and steady state modelling of a coupled WECS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, G. K.; Tan, J. K.

    The paper presents a method for simulation of a wind turbine using a dc motor. The armature and field voltages of the dc motor are independently regulated to obtain torque-speed characteristics which correspond to those of a wind turbine at different wind speeds. The mass moment of inertia of the wind turbine is represented by adding a rotating mass to a parallel shaft which is positively coupled to the motor shaft. To verify the method of simulation, an American multiblade wind turbine is chosen, loaded by coupling to a centrifugal pump. Using the principle of conservation of energy and characteristics of both constituent units, two mathematical models are proposed: one for steady state operation and another for the transient state. The close comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results validates the proposed models and the method of simulation. The experimental method is described and the results of the experimental and theoretical investigation are presented.

  1. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duan-Ming; He, Min-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Pan, Gui-Jun; Sun, Hong-Zhang; Su, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Fan; Yin, Yan-Ping; Li, Rui; Liu, Dan

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady states of epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  2. Charged particle creation in the steady state universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The birth of a particle of charge q(0), initial mass m(0), and radius a in the steady state universe is studied. With the particle's birth, in accord with causality, gravity, and Coulomb fields propagate away from it with the speed of light. Field energies are supplied by the particle's mass which subsequently decays in time. Asymptotic solution to a nonlinear equation for the remaining mass gives the criterion m(0) is greater that q(0)2/2ac2 as a necessary condition for the initial mass to survive the field expansion. The resulting radius of a classical charged particle is found to be greater than the standard value obtained by equating self- and rest-mass energies of the initial particle. 12 refs

  3. Steady-state solution methods for open quantum optical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, P D

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the numerical solution methods available when solving for the steady-state density matrix of a time-independent open quantum optical system, where the system operators are expressed in a suitable basis representation as sparse matrices. In particular, we focus on the difficulties posed by the non-Hermitian structure of the Lindblad super operator, and the numerical techniques designed to mitigate these pitfalls. In addition, we introduce a doubly iterative inverse-power method that can give reduced memory and runtime requirements in situations where other iterative methods are limited due to poor bandwidth and profile reduction. The relevant methods are demonstrated on several prototypical quantum optical systems where it is found that iterative methods based on iLU factorization using reverse Cuthill-Mckee ordering tend to outperform other solution techniques in terms of both memory consumption and runtime as the size of the underlying Hilbert space increases. For eigenvalue solving, Krylov iterat...

  4. An Adsorption Equilibria Model for Steady State Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Azhar Bin

    2016-02-29

    The investigation of adsorption isotherms is a prime factor in the ongoing development of adsorption cycles for a spectrum of advanced, thermally-driven engineering applications, including refrigeration, natural gas storage, and desalination processes. In this work, a novel semi-empirical mathematical model has been derived that significantly enhances the prediction of the steady state uptake in adsorbent surfaces. This model, a combination of classical Langmuir and a novel modern adsorption isotherm equation, allows for a higher degree of regression of both energetically homogenous and heterogeneous adsorbent surfaces compared to several isolated classical and modern isotherm models, and has the ability to regress isotherms for all six types under the IUPAC classification. Using a unified thermodynamic framework, a single asymmetrical energy distribution function (EDF) has also been proposed that directly relates the mathematical model to the adsorption isotherm types. This fits well with the statistical rate theory approach and offers mechanistic insights into adsorption isotherms.

  5. Entanglement structure of non-equilibrium steady states

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Raghu; Mumford, Sam; Tubman, Norm; Swingle, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of calculating transport properties of interacting quantum systems, specifically electrical and thermal conductivities, by computing the non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) of the system biased by contacts. Our approach is based on the structure of entanglement in the NESS. With reasonable physical assumptions, we show that a NESS close to local equilibrium is lightly entangled and can be represented via a computationally efficient tensor network. We further argue that the NESS may be found by dynamically evolving the system within a manifold of appropriate low entanglement states. A physically realistic law of dynamical evolution is Markovian open system dynamics, or the Lindblad equation. We explore this approach in a well-studied free fermion model where comparisons with the literature are possible. We study both electrical and thermal currents with and without disorder, and compute entropic quantities such as mutual information and conditional mutual information. We conclude with a di...

  6. Fast Prediction Method for Steady-State Heat Convection

    KAUST Repository

    Wáng, Yì

    2012-03-14

    A reduced model by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Galerkin projection methods for steady-state heat convection is established on a nonuniform grid. It was verified by thousands of examples that the results are in good agreement with the results obtained from the finite volume method. This model can also predict the cases where model parameters far exceed the sample scope. Moreover, the calculation time needed by the model is much shorter than that needed for the finite volume method. Thus, the nonuniform POD-Galerkin projection method exhibits high accuracy, good suitability, and fast computation. It has universal significance for accurate and fast prediction. Also, the methodology can be applied to more complex modeling in chemical engineering and technology, such as reaction and turbulence. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Steady state asymmetric planetary electrical induction. [by solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, B. L.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic solution is presented for the steady state electric and magnetic fields induced by the motional electric field of the solar wind in the atmosphere or interior of a planet that is asymmetrically surrounded by solar wind plasma. The electrically conducting ionosphere or interior must be in direct electrical contact with the solar wind over the day side of the planet. The conducting region of the planet is modeled by a sphere or a spherical shell of arbitrarily stratified electrical conductivity. A monoconducting cylindrical cavity is assumed to extend downstream on the night side of the planet. The solar wind is assumed to be highly conducting so that the induced fields are confined to the planet and cavity. Induced currents close as sheet currents at the solar wind-cavity and solar wind-planet interfaces. Numerical evaluations of the analytic formulas are carried out for a uniformly conducting spherical model.

  8. Preliminary design study of a steady state tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary design study has been made for a steady tokamak with the plasma current of 10MA, as the next to the JT-60U experimental programs. The goal of the research program is the integrated study of steady state, high-power physics and technology. Present candidate design is to use superconducting TF and PF magnet systems and long pulse operation of 100's-1000's of sec with non inductive current drive mainly by 500keV negative ion beam injection of 60MW. Low activation material such as titanium alloy is chosen for the water tank type vacuum vessel, which is also the nuclear shield for the superconducting coils. The present preliminary design study shows that the device can meet the existing JT-60U facility capability. (author)

  9. Determining "small parameters" for quasi-steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeke, Alexandra; Walcher, Sebastian; Zerz, Eva

    2015-08-01

    For a parameter-dependent system of ordinary differential equations we present a systematic approach to the determination of parameter values near which singular perturbation scenarios (in the sense of Tikhonov and Fenichel) arise. We call these special values Tikhonov-Fenichel parameter values. The principal application we intend is to equations that describe chemical reactions, in the context of quasi-steady state (or partial equilibrium) settings. Such equations have rational (or even polynomial) right-hand side. We determine the structure of the set of Tikhonov-Fenichel parameter values as a semi-algebraic set, and present an algorithmic approach to their explicit determination, using Groebner bases. Examples and applications (which include the irreversible and reversible Michaelis-Menten systems) illustrate that the approach is rather easy to implement.

  10. Steady-state dynamic behavior of an auxiliary bearing supported rotor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Lawrence, Charles

    1995-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping is studied. It is found that imbalance may change the rotor responses dramatically in terms of frequency contents at certain operating speeds. Subharmonic responses of 2nd order through 10th order are all observed except the 9th order. Chaotic phenomenon is also observed. Jump phenomena (or double-valued responses) of both hard-spring type and soft-spring type are shown to occur at low operating speeds for systems with low auxiliary bearing damping or large clearance even with relatively small imbalance. The effect of friction between the shaft and the inner race of the bearing is also discussed.

  11. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

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    Francisco Jose Alvarez

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets.Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6 and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10. ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline, after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury.Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant.The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  12. (Amusicality in Williams syndrome: Examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music

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    Miriam eLense

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder, is of keen interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and typically developing individuals with and without amusia.

  13. Auditory cortical and hippocampal-system mismatch responses to duration deviants in urethane-anesthetized rats.

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    Timo Ruusuvirta

    Full Text Available Any change in the invariant aspects of the auditory environment is of potential importance. The human brain preattentively or automatically detects such changes. The mismatch negativity (MMN of event-related potentials (ERPs reflects this initial stage of auditory change detection. The origin of MMN is held to be cortical. The hippocampus is associated with a later generated P3a of ERPs reflecting involuntarily attention switches towards auditory changes that are high in magnitude. The evidence for this cortico-hippocampal dichotomy is scarce, however. To shed further light on this issue, auditory cortical and hippocampal-system (CA1, dentate gyrus, subiculum local-field potentials were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats. A rare tone in duration (deviant was interspersed with a repeated tone (standard. Two standard-to-standard (SSI and standard-to-deviant (SDI intervals (200 ms vs. 500 ms were applied in different combinations to vary the observability of responses resembling MMN (mismatch responses. Mismatch responses were observed at 51.5-89 ms with the 500-ms SSI coupled with the 200-ms SDI but not with the three remaining combinations. Most importantly, the responses appeared in both the auditory-cortical and hippocampal locations. The findings suggest that the hippocampus may play a role in (cortical manifestation of MMN.

  14. Laguna Verde BWRs operational experience: steady-state fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two BWR at Laguna Verde nuclear power station are finishing 21 and 15 years of continuous successful operation as of 2010. During Unit 1 and 2 commercial operations only Ge/GNF fuel designs have been employed; fuel lattice designs 8 x 8 and 10 x 10 were used at the reactor, with an original licensed thermal power (OLTP: 1931 MWt) and the reactor's first power up-rates of 5%. GNF fuel will be also used for the second EPU to reach 120% of OLTP in the near future. Thermal and gamma traversing in-core probes (Tip) are used for power monitoring purposes along with the Ge (now GNF-A) core monitoring system, 3-dimensional MonicoreTM. GNF-A has also participated by preparing the core management plan that is regularly fine-tuned in collaboration with Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE owner of the Laguna Verde reactors). For determination of thermal margins and eigenvalue prediction, GNF-A employs the NRC-licensed steady-state core simulator PANAC11. Tip comparisons are routinely used to adapt power distributions for a better thermal margin calculation. Over the years, several challenges have appeared in the near and long term fuel management planning such as increasing cycle length, optimization of the thermal margins, rated power increase, etc. Each challenge has been successfully overcome via operational strategy, code improvements and better fuel designs. This paper summarizes Laguna Verde Unit 1 and 2 steady-state performance from initial commercial operation, with a discussion of the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic design features, as well as of the operational strategies that set and interesting benchmark for future fuel applications, code development and operation of the BWRs. (Author)

  15. Steady-state spectroscopy of new biological probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2007-02-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and (2,2'-bipyridine)-3,3'-diol (BP(OH) II) were studied here free in solution and in human serum albumin (HSA) in order to test their applicability as new biological probes. HBO and BP(OH) II are known to undergo intramolecular proton transfers in the excited state. Their absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to environmental change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, thus allowing the opportunity to use them as environment-sensitive probes. The effect of water on the steady state spectra of the two molecules also shows unique features which may position them as water sensors in biological systems. For HBO in buffer, fluorescence is only due to the syn-keto tautomer, whereas in HSA the fluorescence is due to four species in equilibrium in the excited state (the syn-keto tautomer, the anti-enol tautomer, the solvated syn-enol tautomer, and the anion species of HBO). Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of HBO in HSA indicates that HBO is exposed to less water in the HBO:HSA complex. For the BP(OH) II molecule, unique absorption due to water was observed in the spectral region of 400-450 nm. This absorption decreases in the presence of HSA due to less accessibility to water as a result of binding to HSA. Fluorescence of BP(OH) II is due solely to the di-keto tautomer after double proton transfer in the excited state. The fluorescence peak of BP(OH) II shows a red-shift upon HSA recognition which is attributed to the hydrophobic environment inside the binding site of HSA. We discuss also the effect of probe-inclusion inside well-defined hydrophobic cavities of cyclodextrins.

  16. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N., E-mail: bnwan@ipp.ac.cn; Li, J. G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-12-10

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H{sub 98}∼1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te∼4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  17. A mathematical model of pan evaporation under steady state conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wee Ho; Roderick, Michael L.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of changing climate, global pan evaporation records have shown a spatially-averaged trend of ∼ -2 to ∼ -3 mm a-2 over the past 30-50 years. This global phenomenon has motivated the development of the "PenPan" model (Rotstayn et al., 2006). However, the original PenPan model has yet to receive an independent experimental evaluation. Hence, we constructed an instrumented US Class A pan at Canberra Airport (Australia) and monitored it over a three-year period (2007-2010) to uncover the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. The experimental investigations of pan evaporation enabled theoretical formulation and parameterisation of the aerodynamic function considering the wind, properties of air and (with or without) the bird guard effect. The energy balance investigation allowed for detailed formulation of the short- and long-wave radiation associated with the albedos and the emissivities of the pan water surface and the pan wall. Here, we synthesise and generalise those earlier works to develop a new model called the "PenPan-V2" model for application under steady state conditions (i.e., uses a monthly time step). Two versions (PenPan-V2C and PenPan-V2S) are tested using pan evaporation data available across the Australian continent. Both versions outperformed the original PenPan model with better representation of both the evaporation rate and the underlying physics of a US Class A pan. The results show the improved solar geometry related calculations (e.g., albedo, area) for the pan system led to a clear improvement in representing the seasonal cycle of pan evaporation. For general applications, the PenPan-V2S is simpler and suited for applications including an evaluation of long-term trends in pan evaporation.

  18. Modulation of auditory cortex response to pitch variation following training with microtonal melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Delhommeau, Karine; Zarate, Jean Mary

    2012-01-01

    We tested changes in cortical functional response to auditory patterns in a configural learning paradigm. We trained 10 human listeners to discriminate micromelodies (consisting of smaller pitch intervals than normally used in Western music) and measured covariation in blood oxygenation signal to increasing pitch interval size in order to dissociate global changes in activity from those specifically associated with the stimulus feature that was trained. A psychophysical staircase procedure with feedback was used for training over a 2-week period. Behavioral tests of discrimination ability performed before and after training showed significant learning on the trained stimuli, and generalization to other frequencies and tasks; no learning occurred in an untrained control group. Before training the functional MRI data showed the expected systematic increase in activity in auditory cortices as a function of increasing micromelody pitch interval size. This function became shallower after training, with the maximal change observed in the right posterior auditory cortex. Global decreases in activity in auditory regions, along with global increases in frontal cortices also occurred after training. Individual variation in learning rate was related to the hemodynamic slope to pitch interval size, such that those who had a higher sensitivity to pitch interval variation prior to learning achieved the fastest learning. We conclude that configural auditory learning entails modulation in the response of auditory cortex to the trained stimulus feature. Reduction in blood oxygenation response to increasing pitch interval size suggests that fewer computational resources, and hence lower neural recruitment, is associated with learning, in accord with models of auditory cortex function, and with data from other modalities. PMID:23227019

  19. Modulation of auditory cortex response to pitch variation following training with microtonal melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Zatorre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested changes in cortical functional response to auditory configural learning by training ten human listeners to discriminate micromelodies (consisting of smaller pitch intervals than normally used in Western music. We measured covariation in blood oxygenation signal to increasing pitch-interval size in order to dissociate global changes in activity from those specifically associated with the stimulus feature of interest. A psychophysical staircase procedure with feedback was used for training over a two-week period. Behavioral tests of discrimination ability performed before and after training showed significant learning on the trained stimuli, and generalization to other frequencies and tasks; no learning occurred in an untrained control group. Before training the functional MRI data showed the expected systematic increase in activity in auditory cortices as a function of increasing micromelody pitch-interval size. This function became shallower after training, with the maximal change observed in the right posterior auditory cortex. Global decreases in activity in auditory regions, along with global increases in frontal cortices also occurred after training. Individual variation in learning rate was related to the hemodynamic slope to pitch-interval size, such that those who had a higher sensitivity to pitch-interval variation prior to learning achieved the fastest learning. We conclude that configural auditory learning entails modulation in the response of auditory cortex specifically to the trained stimulus feature. Reduction in blood oxygenation response to increasing pitch-interval size suggests that fewer computational resources, and hence lower neural recruitment, is associated with learning, in accord with models of auditory cortex function, and with data from other modalities.

  20. Reevaluation of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospers, J. Mirjam Boeschen; Smits, Niels; Smits, Cas; Stam, Mariska; Terwee, Caroline B.; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We reevaluated the psychometric properties of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1995) using item response theory. Item response theory describes item functioning along an ability continuum. Method: Cross-sectional data from 2,352 adults with and without hearing…

  1. Electrophysiological Auditory Responses and Language Development in Infants with Periventricular Leukomalacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avecilla-Ramirez, G. N.; Ruiz-Correa, S.; Marroquin, J. L.; Harmony, T.; Alba, A.; Mendoza-Montoya, O.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents evidence suggesting that electrophysiological responses to language-related auditory stimuli recorded at 46 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) are associated with language development, particularly in infants with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). In order to investigate this hypothesis, electrophysiological responses to a set…

  2. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Isotope techniques are widely applied in ecosystem studies. For example, isoflux models are used to separate soil evaporation from transpiration in ecosystems. These models often assume that plant transpiration occurs at isotopic steady state, i.e. that the transpired water shows the same isotopic signature as the source water. Yet, several studies found that transpiration did not occur at isotopic steady state, under both controlled and field conditions. Here we focused on identifying the internal and external factors which drive the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the effect of both environmental variables and leaf physiological traits on δ18OT was investigated under controlled conditions. Six plant species with distinct leaf physiological traits were exposed to step changes in relative air humidity (RH), their response in δ18OT and gas exchange parameters and their leaf physiological traits were assessed. Moreover, two functionally distinct plant types (tree, i.e. Quercus suber, and grassland) of a semi-arid Mediterranean oak-woodland where observed under natural conditions throughout an entire growth period in the field. The species differed substantially in their leaf physiological traits and their turn-over times of leaf water. They could be grouped in species with fast (240 min.) turn-over times, mostly due to differences in stomatal conductance, leaf water content or a combination of both. Changes in RH caused an immediate response in δ18OT, which were similarly strong in all species, while leaf physiological traits affected the subsequent response in δ18OT. The turn-over time of leaf water determined the speed of return to the isotopic steady or a stable δ18OT value (Dubbert & Kübert et al., in prep.). Under natural conditions, changes in environmental conditions over the diurnal cycle had a huge impact on the diurnal development of δ18OT in both observed plant functional types. However, in

  3. KIR channel activation contributes to onset and steady-state exercise hyperemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecelius, Anne R; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2014-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, two pathways that lead to hyperpolarization of vascular cells, contributes to both the onset and steady-state hyperemic response to exercise. We also determined whether after inhibiting these pathways nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs) are involved in the hyperemic response. Forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) was determined during rhythmic handgrip exercise at 10% maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min in the following conditions: control [saline; trial 1 (T1)]; with combined inhibition of KIR channels and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alone [via barium chloride (BaCl2) and ouabain, respectively; trial 2 (T2)]; and with additional combined nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase inhibition [ketorolac; trial 3 (T3)]. In T2, the total hyperemic responses were attenuated ~50% from control (P 120 ± 15 ml/min; -29 ± 3%; P < 0.05 vs. T2). In protocol 3 (n = 8), BaCl2 alone reduced FBF during onset (~50%) and steady-state exercise (~30%) as observed in protocols 1 and 2, respectively, and addition of ouabain had no further impact. Our data implicate activation of KIR channels as a novel contributing pathway to exercise hyperemia in humans. PMID:24973385

  4. Mismatch responses in the awake rat: evidence from epidural recordings of auditory cortical fields.

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    Fabienne Jung

    Full Text Available Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN, a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs, reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats.

  5. Steady-state compact neutron sources with HTS magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Recent advantages in the development of high temperature superconductors (HTS), and encouraging results of first tests of HTS coils on a tokamak [1], open new prospects for compact high field TF magnets for Spherical Tokamaks (STs). High β (ratio of the plasma pressure to magnetic pressure) values have been achieved in STs, which opens a path to compact Fusion devices, as the Fusion power is proportional to β2Bt4V. To make advantages of high β in compact STs, the toroidal field should be maximised, which is challenging, and all present STs operate at fields < 1 T. The favourable dependence of confinement on Bt recently found in STs [2] may allow enhanced performance in high-field STs, also encouraging increase in Bt. We investigate feasibility of HTS magnets in next-step STs and compare such designs with proposed conventional aspect ratio designs with HTS magnets (VECTOR, VULCAN etc). Main issues are: - the capital cost (will the use of HTS increase the capital cost?); - running cost (can the use of HTS reduce the running cost?); - will increase in the field in STs easy requirements on current drive?; - how much use of HTS will affect the size (e.g. the cost) of a neutron source (divertor, blanket maintenance options, shielding etc.)? Several physics aspects of a low- and medium-power steady-state neutron source will be discussed. These include fast particle and alpha particle losses, effect of increase in Bt on micro-stability etc. The demonstration of reliable steady state operations in a compact ST even at the level of a few MW Fusion output (which easy application of HTS) as a first step will significantly advance not only the mainstream Fusion for Energy research, but also the commercial exploitation of Fusion Power. [1] M Gryaznevich et al., 'Progress in applications of High Temperature Superconductor in Tokamak Magnets', Fusion Engineering and Design, accepted for publication, (2013). [2] M. Valovic et al, Nucl

  6. Is the auditory evoked P2 response a biomarker of learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Kelly L; Ross, Bernhard; Inoue, Kayo; McClannahan, Katrina; Collet, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Even though auditory training exercises for humans have been shown to improve certain perceptual skills of individuals with and without hearing loss, there is a lack of knowledge pertaining to which aspects of training are responsible for the perceptual gains, and which aspects of perception are changed. To better define how auditory training impacts brain and behavior, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have been used to determine the time course and coincidence of cortical modulations associated with different types of training. Here we focus on P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked responses (AEP), as there are consistent reports of gains in P2 amplitude following various types of auditory training experiences; including music and speech-sound training. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if the auditory evoked P2 response is a biomarker of learning. To do this, we taught native English speakers to identify a new pre-voiced temporal cue that is not used phonemically in the English language so that coinciding changes in evoked neural activity could be characterized. To differentiate possible effects of repeated stimulus exposure and a button-pushing task from learning itself, we examined modulations in brain activity in a group of participants who learned to identify the pre-voicing contrast and compared it to participants, matched in time, and stimulus exposure, that did not. The main finding was that the amplitude of the P2 auditory evoked response increased across repeated EEG sessions for all groups, regardless of any change in perceptual performance. What's more, these effects are retained for months. Changes in P2 amplitude were attributed to changes in neural activity associated with the acquisition process and not the learned outcome itself. A further finding was the expression of a late negativity (LN) wave 600-900 ms post-stimulus onset, post-training exclusively for the group that learned to identify the pre-voiced contrast

  7. Is the auditory evoked P2 response a biomarker of learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eTremblay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though auditory training exercises for humans have been shown to improve certain perceptual skills of individuals with and without hearing loss, there is a lack of knowledge pertaining to which aspects of training are responsible for the perceptual gains, and which aspects of perception are changed. To better define how auditory training impacts brain and behavior, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography have been used to determine the time course and coincidence of cortical modulations associated with different types of training. Here we focus on P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked responses (AEP, as there are consistent reports of gains in P2 amplitude following various types of auditory training experiences; including music and speech-sound training. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if the auditory evoked P2 response is a biomarker of learning. To do this, we taught native English speakers to identify a new pre-voiced temporal cue that is not used phonemically in the English language so that coinciding changes in evoked neural activity could be characterized. To differentiate possible effects of repeated stimulus exposure and a button-pushing task from learning itself, we examined modulations in brain activity in a group of participants who learned to identify the pre-voicing contrast and compared it to participants, matched in time, and stimulus exposure, that did not. The main finding was that the amplitude of the P2 auditory evoked response increased across repeated EEG sessions for all groups, regardless of any change in perceptual performance. What’s more, these effects were retained for months. Changes in P2 amplitude were attributed to changes in neural activity associated with the acquisition process and not the learned outcome itself. A further finding was the expression of a late negativity (LN wave 600-900 ms post-stimulus onset, post-training, exclusively for the group that learned to identify the pre

  8. Transcriptional monitoring of steady state and effects of anaerobic phases in chemostat cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penttilä Merja

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemostat cultures are commonly used in production of cellular material for systems-wide biological studies. We have used the novel TRAC (transcript analysis with aid of affinity capture method to study expression stability of approximately 30 process relevant marker genes in chemostat cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei and its transformant expressing laccase from Melanocarpus albomyces. Transcriptional responses caused by transient oxygen deprivations and production of foreign protein were also studied in T. reesei by TRAC. Results In cultures with good steady states, the expression of the marker genes varied less than 20% on average between sequential samples for at least 5 or 6 residence times. However, in a number of T. reesei cultures continuous flow did not result in a good steady state. Perturbations to the steady state were always evident at the transcriptional level, even when they were not measurable as changes in biomass or product concentrations. Both unintentional and intentional perturbations of the steady state demonstrated that a number of genes involved in growth, protein production and secretion are sensitive markers for culture disturbances. Exposure to anaerobic conditions caused strong responses at the level of gene expression, but surprisingly the cultures could regain their previous steady state quickly, even after 3 h O2 depletion. The main effect of producing M. albomyces laccase was down-regulation of the native cellulases compared with the host strain. Conclusion This study demonstrates the usefulness of transcriptional analysis by TRAC in ensuring the quality of chemostat cultures prior to costly and laborious genome-wide analysis. In addition TRAC was shown to be an efficient tool in studying gene expression dynamics in transient conditions.

  9. A simplified system for steady state process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system described in this report represents an attempt to apply the function of industrial flow sheet simulators to tritium processing applications. To overcome some of the difficulties associated with the use of larger simulation packages, report formats have been designed to accommodate wide ranges of component concentrations; and physical property data requirements have been designed around commonly available data. The simulation system includes a predefined structure for storage of stream and component data, unit operation block parameters, and the other data needed to describe a simulation. Other support subroutines, which are needed to perform computations common to different unit operation subroutines, are included, along with some of the more common unit operation modules. To perform a simulation, the user codes an executive routine that calls the appropriate support and unit operation subroutines - as well as any additional support or unit operation subroutines not already part of the system. This code is then compiled and linked to a library, which contains the existent parts of the system, to produce an executable program. This program is run, with the user's data file as input, to compute the steady state performance of the flow sheet being simulated. The existent part of the system is coded in Microsoft FORTRAN-77, which should be largely compatible with other FORTRAN compilers. The simulation system has been compiled and placed in a library which is usable by a Microsoft linkage editor on an IBM PC

  10. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Oren; Subasi, Yigit; Jarzynski, Christopher

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents: to generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters - also known as a stochastic pump (SP) - reaches a periodic state with non-vanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems we establish a mapping between NESS and SP. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: they show that SP are able to mimic the behavior of NESS, and vice-versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics.

  11. Steady state relativistic stellar dynamics around a massive black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Or, Ben

    2015-01-01

    A massive black hole (MBH) consumes stars whose orbits evolve into the small phase-space volume of unstable orbits, the "loss-cone", which take them directly into the MBH, or close enough to interact strongly with it. The resulting phenomena: tidal heating and tidal disruption, binary capture and hyper-velocity star ejection, gravitational wave (GW) emission by inspiraling compact remnants, or hydrodynamical interactions with an accretion disk, are of interest as they can produce observable signatures and thereby reveal the existence of the MBH, affect its mass and spin evolution, probe strong gravity, and provide information on stars and gas near the MBH. The continuous loss of stars and the processes that resupply them shape the central stellar distribution. We investigate relativistic stellar dynamics near the loss-cone of a non-spinning MBH in steady-state analytically and by Monte Carlo simulations of the diffusion of the orbital parameters. These take into account Newtonian mass precession due to enclos...

  12. Comparison of Gene Regulatory Networks via Steady-State Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungchan Kim

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of genetic regulatory networks is becoming increasingly widespread in the study of biological systems. In the abstract, one would prefer quantitatively comprehensive models, such as a differential-equation model, to coarse models; however, in practice, detailed models require more accurate measurements for inference and more computational power to analyze than coarse-scale models. It is crucial to address the issue of model complexity in the framework of a basic scientific paradigm: the model should be of minimal complexity to provide the necessary predictive power. Addressing this issue requires a metric by which to compare networks. This paper proposes the use of a classical measure of difference between amplitude distributions for periodic signals to compare two networks according to the differences of their trajectories in the steady state. The metric is applicable to networks with both continuous and discrete values for both time and state, and it possesses the critical property that it allows the comparison of networks of different natures. We demonstrate application of the metric by comparing a continuous-valued reference network against simplified versions obtained via quantization.

  13. Comparison of Gene Regulatory Networks via Steady-State Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Woonjung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of genetic regulatory networks is becoming increasingly widespread in the study of biological systems. In the abstract, one would prefer quantitatively comprehensive models, such as a differential-equation model, to coarse models; however, in practice, detailed models require more accurate measurements for inference and more computational power to analyze than coarse-scale models. It is crucial to address the issue of model complexity in the framework of a basic scientific paradigm: the model should be of minimal complexity to provide the necessary predictive power. Addressing this issue requires a metric by which to compare networks. This paper proposes the use of a classical measure of difference between amplitude distributions for periodic signals to compare two networks according to the differences of their trajectories in the steady state. The metric is applicable to networks with both continuous and discrete values for both time and state, and it possesses the critical property that it allows the comparison of networks of different natures. We demonstrate application of the metric by comparing a continuous-valued reference network against simplified versions obtained via quantization.

  14. Steady-state growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J. (Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA); SooHoo, J.B.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1980-09-01

    Seasonal studies of the vertical distribution of nitrate, nitrite, and phytoplankton in the oceans and studies using /sup 15/N as a tracer of nitrate metabolism indicate that the reduction of nitrate by phytoplankton is a source of nitrite in the upper waters of the ocean. To better understand this process, the relationship between nitrate uptake and nitrite production has been examined with continuous cultures of the small marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. In a turbidostat culture, the rates of nitrite production by T. Pseudonana increase with light intensity. This process is only loosely coupled to rates of nitrate assimilation since the ratio of net nitrite production to total nitrate assimilation increases with increased rates of growth. In continuous cultures where steady-state concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were varied, T. pseudonana produced nitrite at rates which increased with increasing concentrations of nitrate. Again, the rates of nitrite production were uncoupled from rates of nitrate assimilation. The study was used to derive a mathematical description of nitrate and nitrite metabolism by T. pseudonana. The validity of this model was supported by the results of a study in which /sup 15/N-labeled nitrite was introduced into the continuous culture, and the model was used to examine patterns in distribution of nitrite in the Antarctic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea.

  15. Steady-state growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seasonal studies of the vertical distribution of nitrate, nitrite, and phytoplankton in the oceans and studies using 15N as a tracer of nitrate metabolism indicate that the reduction of nitrate by phytoplankton is a source of nitrite in the upper waters of the ocean. To better understand this process, the relationship between nitrate uptake and nitrite production has been examined with continuous cultures of the small marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. In a turbidostat culture, the rates of nitrite production by T. Pseudonana increase with light intensity. This process is only loosely coupled to rates of nitrate assimilation since the ratio of net nitrite production to total nitrate assimilation increases with increased rates of growth. In continuous cultures where steady-state concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were varied, T. pseudonana produced nitrite at rates which increased with increasing concentrations of nitrate. Again, the rates of nitrite production were uncoupled from rates of nitrate assimilation. The study was used to derive a mathematical description of nitrate and nitrite metabolism by T. pseudonana. The validity of this model was supported by the results of a study in which 15N-labeled nitrite was introduced into the continuous culture, and the model was used to examine patterns in distribution of nitrite in the Antarctic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea

  16. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013)]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state. PMID:26764644

  17. Development of the ITER Advanced Steady State and Hybrid Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full discharge simulations are performed to examine the plasma current rampup, flattop and rampdown phases self-consistently with the poloidal field (PF) coils and their limitations, plasma transport evolution, and heating/current drive (H/CD) sources. Steady state scenarios are found that obtain 100% non-inductive current with Ip = 7.3-10.0 MA, ΒN ∼ 2.5 for H98 = 1.6, Q's range from 3 to 6, n/nGr = 0.75-1.0, and NB, IC, EC, and LH source have been examined. The scenarios remain within CS/PF coil limits by advancing the pre-magnetization by 40 Wb. Hybrid scenarios have been identified with 35-40% non-inductive current for Ip = 12.5 MA, H98 ∼ 1.25, with q(0) reaching 1 at or after the end of rampup. The equilibrium operating space for the hybrid shows a large range of scenarios can be accommodated, and access 925-1300 s flattop burn durations.

  18. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS d+1-background, for d = 2, 4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d = 2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1 + 1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d = 6.

  19. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.240405]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state.

  20. Estimation of the Maximal Lactate Steady State in Endurance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llodio, I; Gorostiaga, E M; Garcia-Tabar, I; Granados, C; Sánchez-Medina, L

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to predict the velocity corresponding to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSSV) from non-invasive variables obtained during a maximal multistage running field test (modified University of Montreal Track Test, UMTT), and to determine whether a single constant velocity test (CVT), performed several days after the UMTT, could estimate the MLSSV. Within 4-5 weeks, 20 male runners performed: 1) a modified UMTT, and 2) several 30 min CVTs to determine MLSSV to a precision of 0.25 km·h(-1). Maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) was the best predictor of MLSSV. A regression equation was obtained: MLSSV=1.425+(0.756·MAV); R(2)=0.63. Running velocity during the CVT (VCVT) and blood lactate at 6 (La6) and 30 (La30) min further improved the MLSSV prediction: MLSSV=VCVT+0.503 - (0.266·ΔLa30-6); R(2)=0.66. MLSSV can be estimated from MAV during a single maximal multistage running field test among a homogeneous group of trained runners. This estimation can be further improved by performing an additional CVT. In terms of accuracy, simplicity and cost-effectiveness, the reported regression equations can be used for the assessment and training prescription of endurance runners. PMID:27116348

  1. Hyperbolic method for magnetic reconnection process in steady state magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Hubert; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    A recent numerical approach for solving the advection-diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations is extended for the first time to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, aiming in particular consistent improvements over classical methods for investigating the magnetic reconnection process. In this study, we mainly focus on a two-dimensional incompressible set of resistive MHD equations written in flux-vorticity scalar variables. The originality of the method is based on hyperbolic reformulation of the dissipative terms, leading to the construction of an equivalent hyperbolic first-order (spatial derivatives) system. This enables the use of approximate Riemann solvers for handling dissipative and advective flux in the same way. A simple second-order finite-volume discretization on rectangular grids using an upwind flux is employed. The advantages of this method are illustrated by a comparison to two particular analytical steady state solutions of the inviscid magnetic reconnection mechanism, namely the magnetic annihilation and the reconnective diffusion problems. In particular, the numerical solution is obtained with the same order of accuracy for the solution and gradient for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers, without any deterioration characteristic of more conventional schemes. The amelioration of the hyperbolic method and its extension to time-dependent MHD problems related to solar flares mechanisms is also discussed.

  2. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis. XX. The Steady State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.; Massini, Peter

    1952-09-01

    The separation of the phenomenon of photosynthesis in green plants into a photochemical reaction and into the light-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide is discussed, The reduction of carbon dioxide and the fate of the assimilated carbon were investigated with the help of the tracer technique (exposure of the planks to the radioactive C{sup 14}O{sub 2}) and of paper chromatography. A reaction cycle is proposed in which phosphoglyceric acid is the first isolable assimilations product. Analyses of the algal extracts which had assimilated radioactive carbon dioxide in a stationary condition ('steady-state' photosynthesis) for a long time provided further information concerning the proposed cycle and permitted the approximate estimation, for a number of compounds of what fraction of each compound was taking part in the cycle. The earlier supposition that light influences the respiration cycle was confirmed. The possibility of the assistance of {alpha}-lipoic acid, or of a related substance, in this influence and in the photosynthesis cycle, is discussed.

  3. Interplanetary cosmic ray radial gradients with steady state modulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potgieter, M.S.; Le Roux, J.A.; Burger, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have used steady state modulation models of increasing complexity, with emphasis on drift models, to establish to what extent these models can simulate the observed cosmic ray integral radial gradient (energygreater than or equal to60--70 MeV/nucleon) in the heliosphere from 1977 to 1986. Special attention has been given to the apparent asymmetric behavior of the radial gradient with respect to the recent interplanetary magnetic field polarity reversal, and the remarkable constant radial gradient for the years 1977--1982. Instead of using differential intensities at specific energies, we presented integral radial gradients calculated from the computed integral intensities which made comparison with observations more realistic. We found that nondrift models had difficulties producing constant radial gradients over several years of increasing solar activity, because these models depend primarily on changes of the radial diffusion coefficient K/sub r//sub r/ to simulate an 11-year cycle and therefore produce, in general, radial gradients symmetric with respect to solar maximum activity. Making these models independent of changes in K/sub r//sub r/ needs, in our opinion, unrealistic changes in the conventional modulation parameters.

  4. Kinematical Analysis along Maximal Lactate Steady State Swimming Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Figueiredo, Rafael Nazario, Marisa Sousa, Jailton Gregório Pelarigo, João Paulo Vilas-Boas, Ricardo Fernandes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to conduct a kinematical analysis during swimming at the intensity corresponding to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS. Thirteen long distance swimmers performed, in different days, an intermittent incremental protocol of n x 200 m until exhaustion and two to four 30-min submaximal constant speed bouts to determine the MLSS. The video analysis, using APAS System (Ariel Dynamics Inc., USA, allowed determining the following relevant swimming determinants (in five moments of the 30-min test: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%: stroke rate, stroke length, trunk incline, intracyclic velocity variation, propelling efficiency, index of coordination and the time allotted to propulsion per distance unit. An ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare the parameters mean values along each moment of analysis. Stoke rate tended to increase and stroke length to decrease along the test; a tendency to decrease was also found for intracyclic velocity variation and propelling efficiency whereas the index of coordination and the propulsive impulse remained stable during the MLSS test. It can be concluded that the MLSS is not only an intensity to maintain without a significant increase of blood lactate concentration, but a concomitant stability for some biomechanical parameters exists (after an initial adaptation. However, efficiency indicators seem to be more sensitive to changes occurring during swimming at this threshold intensity.

  5. Dynamic steady-state of periodically-driven quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yudin, V I; Basalaev, M Yu; Kovalenko, D

    2015-01-01

    Using the density matrix formalism, we prove an existence theorem of the periodic steady-state for an arbitrary periodically-driven system. This state has the same period as the modulated external influence, and it is realized as an asymptotic solution ($t$$\\to$$+\\infty$) due to relaxation processes. The presented derivation simultaneously contains a simple computational algorithm non-using both Floquet and Fourier theories, i.e. our method automatically guarantees a full account of all frequency components. The description is accompanied by the examples demonstrating a simplicity and high efficiency of our method. In particular, for three-level $\\Lambda$-system we calculate the lineshape and field-induced shift of the dark resonance formed by the field with periodically modulated phase. For two-level atom we obtain the analytical expressions for signal of the direct frequency comb spectroscopy with rectangular light pulses. In this case it was shown the radical dependence of the spectroscopy lineshape on pul...

  6. Auditory cues increase the hippocampal response to unimodal virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreano, Joseph; Liang, Kevin; Kong, Lingjun; Hubbard, David; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Wiederhold, Mark D

    2009-06-01

    Previous research suggests that the effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy should increase as the experience becomes more immersive. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the experience of immersion are not yet well understood. To address this question, neural activity during exposure to two virtual worlds was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Two levels of immersion were used: unimodal (video only) and multimodal (video plus audio). The results indicated increased activity in both auditory and visual sensory cortices during multimodal presentation. Additionally, multimodal presentation elicited increased activity in the hippocampus, a region well known to be involved in learning and memory. The implications of this finding for exposure therapy are discussed. PMID:19500000

  7. Comparison of cochlear delay estimates using otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Pigasse, Gilles; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Different attempts have been made to directly measure frequency specific basilar membrane (BM) delays in animals, e.g., laser velocimetry of BM vibrations and auditory nerve fiber recordings. The present study uses otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to estimate B...... synaptic delays. This allows a comparison between individual OAE and BM delays over a large frequency range in the same subjects, and offers support to the theory that OAEs are reflected from a tonotopic place and carried back to the cochlear base via a reverse traveling wave....

  8. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  9. Brainstem auditory evoked responses and ophthalmic findings in llamas and alpacas in eastern Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Aubrey A.; Cullen, Cheryl L.; Lamont, Leigh A.

    2006-01-01

    Seventeen llamas and 23 alpacas of various coat and iris colors were evaluated for: 1) deafness by using brainstem auditory evoked response testing; and 2) for ocular abnormalities via complete ophthalmic examination. No animals were deaf. The most common ocular abnormalities noted were iris-to-iris persistent pupillary membranes and incipient cataracts.

  10. Modelling the level-dependent latency of the auditory brainstem response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James;

    2011-01-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) are used for both clinical and research purposes to objectively assess human hearing. A prominent feature of the transient evoked ABR is the level-dependent latency of the distinct peaks in its waveform. The latency of the most prominent peak, wave-V, is about 8...

  11. Can auditory stady-state responses reflect place-specific cochlear dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten

    . Previous studies showed the applicability of auditory evoked potentials (AEP) to investigate cochlear dispersion along the basilar membrane (BM) (e.g. Dau et al., 2000). In contrast to those studies, the present study maximizes the response in a given frequency region, aiming to objectively estimate local...

  12. Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported Speech-in-Noise Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR) to predict subjective ratings of speech understanding in noise on the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ; Gatehouse & Noble, 2004) relative to the predictive ability of the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN; Killion, Niquette,…

  13. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  14. Altered auditory BOLD response to conspecific birdsong in zebra finches with stuttered syllables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning U Voss

    Full Text Available How well a songbird learns a song appears to depend on the formation of a robust auditory template of its tutor's song. Using functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging we examine auditory responses in two groups of zebra finches that differ in the type of song they sing after being tutored by birds producing stuttering-like syllable repetitions in their songs. We find that birds that learn to produce the stuttered syntax show attenuated blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD responses to tutor's song, and more pronounced responses to conspecific song primarily in the auditory area field L of the avian forebrain, when compared to birds that produce normal song. These findings are consistent with the presence of a sensory song template critical for song learning in auditory areas of the zebra finch forebrain. In addition, they suggest a relationship between an altered response related to familiarity and/or saliency of song stimuli and the production of variant songs with stuttered syllables.

  15. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  16. Steady State Performance Investigation of a Three Phase Induction Motor Running Off Unbalanced Supply Voltages

    OpenAIRE

    Aslan Sabahaldeen Jalal Abdi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the performance of a conventional three phase induction motor supplied by unbalanced voltages. An effort to study the motor steady state performance under this disturbance is introduced. Using per phase equivalent circuit analysis with the concept of symmetrical components approach, the steady state performance is theoretically calculated. Also, a model for the induction motor with the MATLAB/Simulink SPS tools has been implemented and steady state...

  17. A Review of Fusion and Tokamak Research Towards Steady-State Operation: A JAEA Contribution

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    2010-01-01

    Providing a historical overview of 50 years of fusion research, a review of the fundamentals and concepts of fusion and research efforts towards the implementation of a steady state tokamak reactor is presented. In 1990, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) best utilizing the bootstrap current was developed. Since then, significant efforts have been made in major tokamaks, including JT-60U, exploring advanced regimes relevant to the steady state operation of tokamaks. In this paper, the fund...

  18. Attention and response control in ADHD. Evaluation through integrated visual and auditory continuous performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Inmaculada; Delgado-Pardo, Gracia; Roldán-Blasco, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses attention and response control through visual and auditory stimuli in a primary care pediatric sample. The sample consisted of 191 participants aged between 7 and 13 years old. It was divided into 2 groups: (a) 90 children with ADHD, according to diagnostic (DSM-IV-TR) (APA, 2002) and clinical (ADHD Rating Scale-IV) (DuPaul, Power, Anastopoulos, & Reid, 1998) criteria, and (b) 101 children without a history of ADHD. The aims were: (a) to determine and compare the performance of both groups in attention and response control, (b) to identify attention and response control deficits in the ADHD group. Assessments were carried out using the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test (IVA/CPT, Sandford & Turner, 2002). Results showed that the ADHD group had visual and auditory attention deficits, F(3, 170) = 14.38; p ADHD showed inattention, mental processing speed deficits, and loss of concentration with visual stimuli. Both groups yielded a better performance in attention with auditory stimuli. PMID:25734571

  19. Steady State Analysis of Multiple Effect Evaporation (MEE) Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life without water is not possible. Like other natural resources, the global resources of fresh water are unevenly distributed. The world population is increasing at very rapid rate while the natural water resources remain constant. This gap is expected to widen dramatically in the near future. Our country like most countries in the east suffer from water stressed condition. Desalination is only the logical or available solution. In MED units, the feed seawater sprayed individually in each effect is heated to form pure vapors, which condense to form product water. Irrespective of the continuous development of the desalination industry the thermal desalination is still expensive. The study presented in this thesis is motivated by, to study the impact of various cost controlling parameters on the performance of MEE desalination process. KANUPP has two desalination plants (RO and NDDP). The NDDP has parallel feed cross flow multiple effect evaporation (MEE-PC) configurations. The study presented in this thesis describes a simplified steady state mathematical model to analyze the MED systems. The results obtained by the model are compared with the NDDP data. The developed model is used to investigate the effect of the parameters controlling the product water cost. These parameters includes thermal performance ratio, cooling water flow rate and heat transfer area. It can also be used to study the effect of variation in the operating conditions of the plant on the plant performance. The effect of the process variables on the performance of MED is carried out. This includes the effect of number of effects, intake seawater salinity and heating stream temperature, vacuum condition in term of vapor temperature of last effect. (author)

  20. Kinematical Analysis along Maximal Lactate Steady State Swimming Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Nazario, Rafael; Sousa, Marisa; Pelarigo, Jailton Gregório; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a kinematical analysis during swimming at the intensity corresponding to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Thirteen long distance swimmers performed, in different days, an intermittent incremental protocol of n x 200 m until exhaustion and two to four 30-min submaximal constant speed bouts to determine the MLSS. The video analysis, using APAS System (Ariel Dynamics Inc., USA), allowed determining the following relevant swimming determinants (in five moments of the 30-min test: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%): stroke rate, stroke length, trunk incline, intracyclic velocity variation, propelling efficiency, index of coordination and the time allotted to propulsion per distance unit. An ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare the parameters mean values along each moment of analysis. Stoke rate tended to increase and stroke length to decrease along the test; a tendency to decrease was also found for intracyclic velocity variation and propelling efficiency whereas the index of coordination and the propulsive impulse remained stable during the MLSS test. It can be concluded that the MLSS is not only an intensity to maintain without a significant increase of blood lactate concentration, but a concomitant stability for some biomechanical parameters exists (after an initial adaptation). However, efficiency indicators seem to be more sensitive to changes occurring during swimming at this threshold intensity. Key Points In MLSS swimming intensity, stability of the stroke length and stroke frequency occurs after an initial adaptation. Efficiency indicators seem to be more sensitive to possible changes occurring through time at MLSS intensity. MLSS is a useful and practical swimming intensity to be maintained for a long period of time, but some constraints in technique can occur. PMID:25177189

  1. Impact of aquifer desaturation on steady-state river seepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J.; Miracapillo, Cinzia; Mehl, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    Flow exchange between surface and ground water is of great importance be it for beneficial allocation and use of the water resources or for the proper exercise of water rights. That exchange can take place under a saturated or unsaturated flow regime. Which regimes occur depend on conditions in the vicinity of the interactive area. Withdrawals partially sustained by seepage may not bring about desaturation but greater amounts eventually will. The problem considered in this paper deals only with the steady-state case. It is meant as a first step toward a simple, yet accurate and physically based treatment of the transient situation. The primary purpose of the article is to provide simple criteria for determination of the initiation of desaturation in an aquifer originally in saturated hydraulic connection with a river or a recharge area. The extent of the unsaturated zone in the aquifer will increase with increasing withdrawals while at the same time the seepage rate from the river increases. However the seepage increase will stop once infiltration takes place strictly by gravity in the aquifer and is no longer opposed by the capillary rise from the water table below the riverbed. Following desaturation simple criteria are derived and simple analytical formulae provided to estimate the river seepage based on the position of the water table mound below the clogging layer and at some distance away from the river bank. They fully account for the unsaturated flow phenomena, including the existence of a drainage entry pressure. Two secondary objectives were to verify that (1) the assumption of uniform vertical flow through a clogging layer and that (2) the approximation of the water table mound below the seepage area as a flat surface were both reasonably legitimate. This approach will be especially advantageous for the implementation of the methodology in large-scale applications of integrated hydrologic models used for management.

  2. A new perspective on steady-state cosmology: from Einstein to Hoyle

    CERN Document Server

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the discovery of an unpublished manuscript by Albert Einstein in which he attempted a 'steady-state' model of the universe, i.e., a cosmic model in which the expanding universe remains essentially unchanged due to a continuous formation of matter from empty space. The manuscript was apparently written in early 1931, many years before the steady-state models of Fred Hoyle, Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold. We compare Einstein's steady-state cosmology with that of Hoyle, Bondi and Gold and consider the reasons Einstein abandoned his model. The relevance of steady-state models for today's cosmology is briefly reviewed.

  3. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2009-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical curre...

  4. Sex differences and endocrine regulation of auditory-evoked, neural responses in African clawed frogs (Xenopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ian C; Woolley, Sarah M N; Kwong-Brown, Ursula; Kelley, Darcy B

    2016-01-01

    Mating depends on the accurate detection of signals that convey species identity and reproductive state. In African clawed frogs, Xenopus, this information is conveyed by vocal signals that differ in temporal patterns and spectral features between sexes and across species. We characterized spectral sensitivity using auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs), commonly known as the auditory brainstem response, in males and females of four Xenopus species. In female X. amieti, X. petersii, and X. laevis, peripheral auditory sensitivity to their species own dyad-two, species-specific dominant frequencies in the male advertisement call-is enhanced relative to males. Males were most sensitive to lower frequencies including those in the male-directed release calls. Frequency sensitivity was influenced by endocrine state; ovariectomized females had male-like auditory tuning while dihydrotestosterone-treated, ovariectomized females maintained female-like tuning. Thus, adult, female Xenopus demonstrate an endocrine-dependent sensitivity to the spectral features of conspecific male advertisement calls that could facilitate mating. Xenopus AEPs resemble those of other species in stimulus and level dependence, and in sensitivity to anesthetic (MS222). AEPs were correlated with body size and sex within some species. A frequency following response, probably encoded by the amphibian papilla, might facilitate dyad source localization via interaural time differences. PMID:26572136

  5. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Källstrand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS. Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16, schizophrenic patients (n = 16 and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16, respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005, which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases.Keywords: asperger syndrome, auditory brainstem response, forward masking, psychoacoustics

  6. Restoration of auditory evoked responses by human ES-cell-derived otic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Jongkamonwiwat, Nopporn; Abbas, Leila; Eshtan, Sarah Jacob; Johnson, Stuart L; Kuhn, Stephanie; Milo, Marta; Thurlow, Johanna K; Andrews, Peter W; Marcotti, Walter; Moore, Harry D; Rivolta, Marcelo N

    2012-10-11

    Deafness is a condition with a high prevalence worldwide, produced primarily by the loss of the sensory hair cells and their associated spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Of all the forms of deafness, auditory neuropathy is of particular concern. This condition, defined primarily by damage to the SGNs with relative preservation of the hair cells, is responsible for a substantial proportion of patients with hearing impairment. Although the loss of hair cells can be circumvented partially by a cochlear implant, no routine treatment is available for sensory neuron loss, as poor innervation limits the prospective performance of an implant. Using stem cells to recover the damaged sensory circuitry is a potential therapeutic strategy. Here we present a protocol to induce differentiation from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) using signals involved in the initial specification of the otic placode. We obtained two types of otic progenitors able to differentiate in vitro into hair-cell-like cells and auditory neurons that display expected electrophysiological properties. Moreover, when transplanted into an auditory neuropathy model, otic neuroprogenitors engraft, differentiate and significantly improve auditory-evoked response thresholds. These results should stimulate further research into the development of a cell-based therapy for deafness. PMID:22972191

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopic imaging of stimulus-related hemodynamic responses on the neonatal auditory cortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotilahti, Kalle; Nissila, Ilkka; Makela, Riikka; Noponen, Tommi; Lipiainen, Lauri; Gavrielides, Nasia; Kajava, Timo; Huotilainen, Minna; Fellman, Vineta; Merilainen, Pekka; Katila, Toivo

    2005-04-01

    We have used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study hemodynamic auditory evoked responses on 7 full-term neonates. Measurements were done simultaneously above both auditory cortices to study the distribution of speech and music processing between hemispheres using a 16-channel frequency-domain instrument. The stimulation consisted of 5-second samples of music and speech with a 25-second silent interval. In response to stimulation, a significant increase in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin ([HbO2]) was detected in 6 out of 7 subjects. The strongest responses in [HbO2] were seen near the measurement location above the ear on both hemispheres. The mean latency of the maximum responses was 9.42+/-1.51 s. On the left hemisphere (LH), the maximum amplitude of the average [HbO2] response to the music stimuli was 0.76+/- 0.38 μ M (mean+/-std.) and to the speech stimuli 1.00+/- 0.45 μ+/- μM. On the right hemisphere (RH), the maximum amplitude of the average [HbO2] response was 1.29+/- 0.85 μM to the music stimuli and 1.23+/- 0.93 μM to the speech stimuli. The results indicate that auditory information is processed on both auditory cortices, but LH is more concentrated to process speech than music information. No significant differences in the locations and the latencies of the maximum responses relative to the stimulus type were found.

  8. The diffusion equation and the steady state. Chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We shall now study the equations that govern the neutron field in a reactor. These equations are based on the concept of local neutron balance, which takes into account the reaction rates in an element of volume and the net leakage rates out of the volume. The reaction rates are written in terms of the local cross sections, assumed known from a preprocessed database (e.g., ENDF/B-VI). The starting equation is the Maxwell-Boltzmann transport equation, in its integro-differential form. The various approximations required to go from the transport equation to the neutron diffusion equation will be presented first, because all finite-reactor calculations are based on the diffusion approximation. We shall then discuss the multi-group formalism of the diffusion equations and study the mathematical properties of this equation in steady state. This preliminary step will allow us to derive in a more accurate way, in the next chapter, the reactor point-kinetics equations. In the diffusion approximation, neutrons diffuse from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration, just as heat diffuses from regions of high temperature to those of low temperature, or, rather, as gas molecules diffuse to reduce spatial variations in concentration. While it is sufficiently accurate to treat the transport of gas molecules as a diffusion process, this approach is too limiting for neutron transport. In contrast to a gas, where collisions are very frequent, the cross sections for the interaction of neutrons with nuclei are relatively small, as we saw in chapter 1 (of the order of barns, i.e., 10-24cm2) . This implies that neutrons traverse appreciable distances (of the order of a centimetre) between collisions. This relatively long neutron mean free path, together with the heterogeneity of the physical medium, requires that a more complete treatment be carried out, taking account of variations in the angular distribution of neutron speed in the vicinity of highly absorbing

  9. Progress towards high-performance, steady-state spherical torus.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.G (Korea Basic Science Institute, Taejon, Republic of Korea); Kugel, W. (Princeton University, NJ); Efthimion, P. C. (Princeton University, NJ); Kissick, M. W. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Bourdelle, C. (CEA Cadarache, France); Kim, J.H (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon, Republic of Korea); Gray, T. (Princeton University, NJ); Garstka, G. D. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Fonck, R. J. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Doerner, R. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Diem, S.J. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Pacella, D. (ENEA, Frascati, Italy); Nishino, N. (Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan); Ferron, J. R. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Skinner, C. H. (Princeton University, NJ); Stutman, D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Soukhanovskii, V. (Princeton University, NJ); Choe, W. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon, Republic of Korea); Chrzanowski, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Mau, T.K. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Bell, Michael G. (Princeton University, NJ); Raman, R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Peng, Y-K. M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ono, M. (Princeton University, NJ); Park, W. (Princeton University, NJ); Hoffman, D. (Princeton University, NJ); Maqueda, R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kaye, S. M. (Princeton University, NJ); Kaita, R. (Princeton University, NJ); Jarboe, T.R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Hill, K.W. (Princeton University, NJ); Heidbrink, W. (University of California, Irvine, CA); Spaleta, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Sontag, A.C (University of Wisconsin, WI); Seraydarian, R. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Schooff, R.J. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Sabbagh, S.A. (Columbia University, New York, NY); Menard, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Mazzucato, E. (Princeton University, NJ); Lee, K. (University of California, Davis, CA); LeBlanc, B. (Princeton University, NJ); Probert, P. H. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Blanchard, W. (Princeton University, NJ); Wampler, William R.; Swain, D. W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ryan, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Rosenberg, A. (Princeton University, NJ); Ramakrishnan, S. (Princeton University, NJ); Phillips, C.K. (Princeton University, NJ); Park, H.K. (Princeton University, NJ); Roquemore, A. L. (Princeton University, NJ); Paoletti, F. (Columbia University, New York, NY); Medley, S. S. (Princeton University, NJ); Fredrickson, E. D. (Princeton University, NJ); Kessel, C. E. (Princeton University, NJ); Stevenson, T. (Princeton University, NJ); Darrow, D. S. (Princeton University, NJ); Majeski, R. (Princeton University, NJ); Bitter, M. (Princeton University, NJ); Neumeyer, C. (Princeton University, NJ); Nelson, B.A. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Paul, S. F. (Princeton University, NJ); Manickam, J. (Princeton University, NJ); Ostrander, C. N. (University of Wisconsin, WI); Mueller, D. (Princeton University, NJ); Lewicki, B.T (University of Wisconsin, WI); Luckhardt, S. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Johnson, D.W. (Princeton University, NJ); Grisham, L.R. (Princeton University, NJ); Kubota, Shigeru (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Gates, D.A. (Princeton University, NJ); Bush, C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Synakowski, E.J. (Princeton University, NJ); Schaffer, M. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Boedo, J. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Maingi, R. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Redi, M. (Princeton University, NJ); Pinsker, R. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Bigelow, T. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, R. E. (Princeton University, NJ)

    2004-06-01

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta ({beta}), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values {beta}{sub T} of up to 35% with a near unity central {beta}{sub T} have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where {beta}{sub T} up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fast wave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX

  10. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; W. Blanchard; J. Boedo; C. Bourdelle; C. Bush; W. Choe; J. Chrzanowski; D.S. Darrow; S.J. Diem; R. Doerner; P.C. Efthimion; J.R. Ferron; R.J. Fonck; E.D. Fredrickson; G.D. Garstka; D.A. Gates; T. Gray; L.R. Grisham; W. Heidbrink; K.W. Hill; D. Hoffman; T.R. Jarboe; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; C. Kessel; J.H. Kim; M.W. Kissick; S. Kubota; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; K. Lee; S.G. Lee; B.T. Lewicki; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; R. Majeski; J. Manickam; R. Maqueda; T.K. Mau; E. Mazzucato; S.S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; B.A. Nelson; C. Neumeyer; N. Nishino; C.N. Ostrander; D. Pacella; F. Paoletti; H.K. Park; W. Park; S.F. Paul; Y.-K. M. Peng; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; P.H. Probert; S. Ramakrishnan; R. Raman; M. Redi; A.L. Roquemore; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Schaffer; R.J. Schooff; R. Seraydarian; C.H. Skinner; A.C. Sontag; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; T. Stevenson; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; X. Tang; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; K.L. Tritz; E.A. Unterberg; A. Von Halle; J. Wilgen; M. Williams; J.R. Wilson; X. Xu; S.J. Zweben; R. Akers; R.E. Barry; P. Beiersdorfer; J.M. Bialek; B. Blagojevic; P.T. Bonoli; M.D. Carter; W. Davis; B. Deng; L. Dudek; J. Egedal; R. Ellis; M. Finkenthal; J. Foley; E. Fredd; A. Glasser; T. Gibney; M. Gilmore; R.J. Goldston; R.E. Hatcher; R.J. Hawryluk; W. Houlberg; R. Harvey; S.C. Jardin; J.C. Hosea; H. Ji; M. Kalish; J. Lowrance; L.L. Lao; F.M. Levinton; N.C. Luhmann; R. Marsala; D. Mastravito; M.M. Menon; O. Mitarai; M. Nagata; G. Oliaro; R. Parsells; T. Peebles; B. Peneflor; D. Piglowski; G.D. Porter; A.K. Ram; M. Rensink; G. Rewoldt; P. Roney; K. Shaing; S. Shiraiwa; P. Sichta; D. Stotler; B.C. Stratton; R. Vero; W.R. Wampler; G.A. Wurden

    2003-10-02

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been

  11. Progress towards high-performance, steady-state spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D. S.; Diem, S. J.; Doerner, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ferron, J. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Garstka, G. D.; Gates, D A; Gray, T.; Grisham, L. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K. W.; Hoffman, D.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J. H.; Kissick, M. W.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K.; Lee, S. G.; Lewicki, B. T.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mau, T. K.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ostrander, C. N.; Pacella, D.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H. K.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Peng, Y-K M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Probert, P. H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Redi, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schaffer, M.; Schooff, R. J.; Seraydarian, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Sontag, A. C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Tritz, K. L.; Unterberg, E. A.; Halle, A. Von.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Xu, X.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J. M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Carter, M. D.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Gilmore, M.; Goldston, R. J.; Hatcher, R. E.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Houlberg, W.; Harvey, R.; Jardin, S. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lowrance, J.; Lao, L. L.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, N. C.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Menon, M. M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Porter, G. D.; Ram, A. K.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B. C.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W. R.; Wurden, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (β), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values βT of up to 35% with a near unity central βT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where βT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction (~ 60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fast wave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX to

  12. Progress Towards High-Performance, Steady-State Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-01-04

    Research on the spherical torus (or spherical tokamak) (ST) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The ST experiments are being conducted in various US research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium sized ST research facilities: PEGASUS at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta ({beta}), non-inductive sustainment, Ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values {beta}{sub T} of up to 35% with a near unity central {beta}{sub T} have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where {beta}{sub T} up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for non-inductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta poloidal regime, where discharges with a high non-inductive fraction ({approx}60% bootstrap current+NBI current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency (RF) based heating and current drive utilizing high harmonic fastwave and electron Bernstein wave is also pursued on NSTX, PEGASUS, and CDX-U. For non-inductive start-up, the coaxial helicity injection, developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted on NSTX

  13. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction (∼60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted

  14. Neural Hyperactivity of the Central Auditory System in Response to Peripheral Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly appreciated that cochlear pathology is accompanied by adaptive responses in the central auditory system. The cause of cochlear pathology varies widely, and it seems that few commonalities can be drawn. In fact, despite intricate internal neuroplasticity and diverse external symptoms, several classical injury models provide a feasible path to locate responses to different peripheral cochlear lesions. In these cases, hair cell damage may lead to considerable hyperactivity in the central auditory pathways, mediated by a reduction in inhibition, which may underlie some clinical symptoms associated with hearing loss, such as tinnitus. Homeostatic plasticity, the most discussed and acknowledged mechanism in recent years, is most likely responsible for excited central activity following cochlear damage.

  15. Wave Number Method for Three-Dimensional Steady-State Acoustic Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fei; HE Zeng; WEI Jun-hong; PENG Wei-cai

    2007-01-01

    Based on the indirect Trefftz approach, a wave number method (WNM) is proposed to deal with three-dimensional steady-state acoustic problems. In the WNM, the dynamic pressure response variable is approximated by a set of wave functions, which exactly satisfy the Helmholtz equation. The set of wave functions comprise the exact solutions of the homogeneous part of the governing equations and some particular solution functions. The unknown coefficients of the wave functions can be obtained by enforcing the pressure approximation to satisfy the boundary conditions. Compared with the boundary element method (BEM), the WNM have a smaller system matrix, and is applicable to the radiation problems since the wave functions are independent of the domain size. A 3D acoustic cavity is exemplified to show the properties of the method. The results show that the wave number method is more efficient than the BEM, and it is fairly accurate.

  16. Differentiation and function of mouse monocyte-derived dendritic cells in steady state and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Pilar M; Ardavín, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Although monocytes were originally described as precursors to all the different subpopulations of macrophages found in the steady state and formed under inflammatory and infectious conditions, recent data have demonstrated conclusively that monocytes can also differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs). Monocytes are the precursors to different subsets of DCs, such as Langerhans cells and DCs found in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. In addition, monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs), newly formed during inflammatory reactions, appear to fulfill an essential role in defense mechanisms against pathogens by participating in the induction of both adaptive and innate immune responses. In this regard, moDCs have the capacity to activate antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses and to cross-prime CD8(+) T cells, during viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. In addition, monocytes have been recently described as the precursors to a subset of DCs specialized in innate immunity against pathogens, named TipDCs [for TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor-alpha)-iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase)-producing DCs] that display a remarkable microbicidal activity and also provide iNOS-dependent help for antibody production by B cells. Importantly, in contrast to DCs developing in the steady state, moDCs formed during inflammatory and infectious processes are subjected to diverse soluble mediators that determine the multiple functional specificities displayed by moDCs, as a result of the remarkable developmental plasticity of monocytes. In this review, we discuss recent findings dealing with the differentiation and functional relevance of moDCs that have widened the frontiers of DC immunobiology in relation to innate and adaptive immunity and the etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:20193014

  17. Investigation of the effects of thermostatic and electronic expansion valves on the steady-state and transient performance of commercial chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassou, S.A.; Al-Nizari, H.O. (West London Univ., Brunel (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state performance and transient response of a commercial fixed-speed on-off controlled chiller and presents comparative performance results obtained during operation with a thermostatic and with an electronic expansion valve. The aim was to establish the effect of the two valves on the transient and steady-state performance of the chiller and to quantify the effects of on-off cycling losses during part-load operation. The results indicate that the chiller has a very fast response during start-up and that cycling losses are very low. The thermostatic expansion valve gives a slightly faster response than the electronic expansion valve with the penalty, however, of less stable operation with larger superheat oscillations at steady-state conditions. (author).

  18. Altered Neural Responses to Sounds in Primate Primary Auditory Cortex during Slow-Wave Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Issa, Elias B.; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    How sounds are processed by the brain during sleep is an important question for understanding how we perceive the sensory environment in this unique behavioral state. While human behavioral data have indicated selective impairments of sound processing during sleep, brain imaging and neurophysiology studies have reported that overall neural activity in auditory cortex during sleep is surprisingly similar to that during wakefulness. This responsiveness to external stimuli leaves open the questi...

  19. Clinical Experience of Auditory Brainstem Response Testing on Pediatric Patients in the Operating Room

    OpenAIRE

    Wheaton Hinchion; Briana Dornan; Guangwei Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To review our experience of conducting auditory brainstem response (ABR) test on children in the operating room and discuss the benefits versus limitations of this practice. Methods. Retrospective review study conducted in a pediatric tertiary care facility. A total of 267 patients identified with usable data, including ABR results, medical and surgical notes, and follow-up evaluation. Results. Hearing status successfully determined in all patients based on the ABR results form th...

  20. Restoration of auditory evoked responses by human ES cell-derived otic progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei; Jongkamonwiwat, Nopporn; Abbas, Leila; Eshtan, Sarah Jacob; Johnson, Stuart L.; Kuhn, Stephanie; Milo, Marta; Thurlow, Johanna K.; Peter W Andrews; Marcotti, Walter; Moore, Harry D.; Rivolta, Marcelo N

    2012-01-01

    Deafness is a condition with a high prevalence worldwide, produced primarily by the loss of the sensory hair cells and their associated spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Of all the forms of deafness, auditory neuropathy is of a particular concern. This condition, defined primarily by damage to the SGNs with relative preservation of the hair cells 1 , is responsible for a substantial proportion of patients with hearing impairment 2 . While the loss of hair cells can be circumvented partially by ...

  1. Frequency difference beyond behavioral limen reflected by frequency following response of human auditory Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qin; Gong, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study investigated whether the frequency-following response (FFR) of the auditory brainstem can represent individual frequency-discrimination ability. Method We measured behavioral frequency-difference limens (FDLs) in normal hearing young adults. Then FFRs were evoked by two pure tones, whose frequency difference was no larger than behavioral FDL. Discrimination of FFRs to individual frequencies was conducted as the neural representation of stimulus frequency differenc...

  2. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

    OpenAIRE

    Thuróczy György; Kubinyi Györgyi; Molnár Ferenc; Kellényi Lóránd; Stefanics Gábor; Hernádi István

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young ...

  3. Using Concha Electrodes to Measure Cochlear Microphonic Waveforms and Auditory Brainstem Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    During electrocochleography, that is, ECochG or ECoG, a recording electrode can be placed in the ear canal lateral to the tympanic membrane. We designed a concha electrode to record both sinusoidal waveforms of cochlear microphonics (CMs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). The amplitudes of CM waveforms and Wave I or compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded at the concha were greater than those recorded at the mastoid but slightly lower than those recorded at the ear canal. Wave V amp...

  4. Steady-state and dynamic behavior of a moderated molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Steady-state and transient coupled calculation scheme. • Study of impact of the substance properties on the operating conditions and on the reactivity feedback coefficients. • Several pump-driven and temperature induced full power transients calculated and discussed. - Abstract: The moderated Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is an attractive breeder reactor. However, the temperature feedback coefficient of such a system can be positive due to the contribution of the moderator, an effect that can only be avoided with special measures. A previous study (Nagy et al., 2010) aimed to find a core design that is a breeder and has negative overall temperature feedback coefficient. In this paper, a coupled calculation scheme, which includes the reactor physics, heat transfer and fluid dynamics calculations is introduced. It is used both for steady-state and for dynamic calculations to evaluate the safety of the core design which was selected from the results of the previous study. The calculated feedback coefficients on the salt and graphite temperatures, power and uranium concentration prove that the core design derived in the previous optimization study is safe because the temperature feedback coefficient of the core and of the power is sufficiently negative. Transient calculations are performed to show the inherent safety of the reactor in case of reactivity insertion. As it is shown, the response of the reactor to these transients is initially dominated by the strong negative feedback of the salt. In all the presented transients, the reactor power stabilizes and the temperature of the salt never approaches its boiling point

  5. Dual-Fuel Fluidized Bed Combustor Prototype for Residential Heating: Steady-State and Dynamic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Antonio; Chirone, Riccardo; Miccio, Michele; Sollmene, Roberto; Urcluohr, Massimo

    Fluidized bed combustion of biogenic fuels can be recognized as an attractive option for an ecologically sustainable use of biofuels in residential applications. Nevertheless, biomass combustion in fluidized bed reactors presents some drawbacks that are mainly related to mixing/segregation of fuel particles/volatile matter during devolatilization inside the bed and in the freeboard or to bed agglomeration. A prototype of a 30-50 kWth fluidized bed boiler for residential heating has been designed to burn either a gaseous combustible or a solid biomass fuel or both fuels at the same time. The prototype has been equipped with a gas burner located in the wind-box to optimize the start-up stage of the boiler and with a fluidized bed characterized by a conical geometry ("Gulf Stream" circulation) to improve the mixing of the fuel particles during both devolatilization and char burn-out. The operation of the combustor adopting wood pellets as fuel has been investigated to evaluate their use in residential combustion applications. Steady-state thermally stable regimes of operation have been recognized analyzing both boiler temperatures and gaseous emissions. The optimization of the steady-state operation of the boiler in terms of gaseous emissions has been achieved by varying the nominal thermal power and air excess. An ad-hoc experimental campaign has been carried out to analyze the dynamic performance of the prototype as a response to changes of the demanded thermal power. On the basis of the experimental data, an interpretation of the dynamic behavior of the fluidized bed boiler has been proposed.

  6. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  7. Directionality of auditory nerve fiber responses to pure tone stimuli in the grassfrog, Rana temporaria. I. Spike rate responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M B; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    1997-01-01

    We studied the directionality of spike rate responses of auditory nerve fibers of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria, to pure tone stimuli. All auditory fibers showed spike rate directionality. The strongest directionality was seen at low frequencies (200-400 Hz), where the spike rate could change by...

  8. Auditory responses in the amygdala to social vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadziola, Marie A.

    The underlying goal of this dissertation is to understand how the amygdala, a brain region involved in establishing the emotional significance of sensory input, contributes to the processing of complex sounds. The general hypothesis is that communication calls of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) transmit relevant information about social context that is reflected in the activity of amygdalar neurons. The first specific aim analyzed social vocalizations emitted under a variety of behavioral contexts, and related vocalizations to an objective measure of internal physiological state by monitoring the heart rate of vocalizing bats. These experiments revealed a complex acoustic communication system among big brown bats in which acoustic cues and call structure signal the emotional state of a sender. The second specific aim characterized the responsiveness of single neurons in the basolateral amygdala to a range of social syllables. Neurons typically respond to the majority of tested syllables, but effectively discriminate among vocalizations by varying the response duration. This novel coding strategy underscores the importance of persistent firing in the general functioning of the amygdala. The third specific aim examined the influence of acoustic context by characterizing both the behavioral and neurophysiological responses to natural vocal sequences. Vocal sequences differentially modify the internal affective state of a listening bat, with lower aggression vocalizations evoking the greatest change in heart rate. Amygdalar neurons employ two different coding strategies: low background neurons respond selectively to very few stimuli, whereas high background neurons respond broadly to stimuli but demonstrate variation in response magnitude and timing. Neurons appear to discriminate the valence of stimuli, with aggression sequences evoking robust population-level responses across all sound levels. Further, vocal sequences show improved discrimination among stimuli

  9. Auditory event-related responses to diphthongs in different attention conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David J; Steinmetzger, Kurt; Tøndering, John

    2016-07-28

    The modulation of auditory event-related potentials (ERP) by attention generally results in larger amplitudes when stimuli are attended. We measured the P1-N1-P2 acoustic change complex elicited with synthetic overt (second formant, F2Δ=1000Hz) and subtle (F2Δ=100Hz) diphthongs, while subjects (i) attended to the auditory stimuli, (ii) ignored the auditory stimuli and watched a film, and (iii) diverted their attention to a visual discrimination task. Responses elicited by diphthongs where F2 values rose and fell were found to be different and this precluded their combined analysis. Multivariate analysis of ERP components from the rising F2 changes showed main effects of attention on P2 amplitude and latency, and N1-P2 amplitude. P2 amplitude decreased by 40% between the attend and ignore conditions, and by 60% between the attend and divert conditions. The effect of diphthong magnitude was significant for components from a broader temporal window which included P1 latency and N1 amplitude. N1 latency did not vary between attention conditions, a finding that may be related to stimulation with a continuous vowel. These data show that a discernible P1-N1-P2 response can be observed to subtle vowel quality transitions, even when the attention of a subject is diverted to an unrelated visual task. PMID:27158036

  10. Early changes of auditory brain stem evoked response after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma - a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, S.K.; Wei, W.I.; Sham, J.S.T.; Choy, D.T.K.; Hui, Y. (Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong))

    1992-10-01

    A prospective study of the effect of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma on hearing was carried out on 49 patients who had pure tone, impedance audiometry and auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) recordings before, immediately, three, six and 12 months after radiotherapy. Fourteen patients complained of intermittent tinnitus after radiotherapy. We found that 11 initially normal ears of nine patients developed a middle ear effusion, three to six months after radiotherapy. There was mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing impairment after radiotherapy. Persistent impairment of ABR was detected immediately after completion of radiotherapy. The waves I-III and I-V interpeak latency intervals were significantly prolonged one year after radiotherapy. The study shows that radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma impairs hearing by acting on the middle ear, the cochlea and the brain stem auditory pathway. (Author).

  11. Effect of Infant Prematurity on Auditory Brainstem Response at Preschool Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hasani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm birth is a risk factor for a number of conditions that requires comprehensive examination. Our study was designed to investigate the impact of preterm birth on the processing of auditory stimuli and brain structures at the brainstem level at a preschool age.   Materials and Methods: An auditory brainstem response (ABR test was performed with low rates of stimuli in 60 children aged 4 to 6 years. Thirty subjects had been born following a very preterm labor or late-preterm labor and 30 control subjects had been born following a full-term labor.   Results: Significant differences in the ABR test result were observed in terms of the inter-peak intervals of the I–III and III–V waves, and the absolute latency of the III wave (P

  12. Pre-steady-state Kinetics for Hydrolysis of Insoluble Cellulose by Cellobiohydrolase Cel7A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Olsen, Jens Elmerdahl; Præstgaard, Eigil; Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The transient kinetic behavior of enzyme reactions prior to the establishment of steady state is a major source of mechanistic information, yet this approach has not been utilized for cellulases acting on their natural substrate, insoluble cellulose. Here, we elucidate the pre-steady-state regime...... for the exo-acting cellulase Cel7A using amperometric biosensors and an explicit model for processive hydrolysis of cellulose. This analysis allows the identification of a pseudo-steady-state period and quantification of a processivity number as well as rate constants for the formation of a threaded...

  13. A new perspective on steady-state cosmology: from Einstein to Hoyle

    OpenAIRE

    O Raifeartaigh, Cormac; Mitton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the discovery of an unpublished manuscript by Albert Einstein in which he attempted a 'steady-state' model of the universe, i.e., a cosmic model in which the expanding universe remains essentially unchanged due to a continuous formation of matter from empty space. The manuscript was apparently written in early 1931, many years before the steady-state models of Fred Hoyle, Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold. We compare Einstein's steady-state cosmology with that of Hoyle, Bondi...

  14. Elimination of Thermodynamically Infeasible Loops in Steady-State Metabolic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Schellenberger, Jan; Lewis, Nathan E.; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2011-01-01

    The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) framework has been widely used to study steady-state flux solutions in genome-scale metabolic networks. One shortcoming of current COBRA methods is the possible violation of the loop law in the computed steady-state flux solutions. The loop law is analogous to Kirchhoff's second law for electric circuits, and states that at steady state there can be no net flux around a closed network cycle. Although the consequences of the loop law hav...

  15. Steady State Performance Characteristics of Micropolar Lubricated Hydrodynamic Journal Bearings with Flexible Liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Pikesh; Chattopadhyay, Ajit Kumar; Agrawal, Vishnu Prakash

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to theoretically determine the steady state characteristics of hydrodynamic oil journal bearings considering the effect of deformation of liner and with micropolar lubrication. Modified Reynolds equation based on micropolar lubrication theory is solved using finite difference method to obtain steady state film pressures. Minimum film thickness is calculated taking into consideration the deformation of the liner. Parametric study has been conducted and steady state characteristics for journal bearing with elasticity of bearing liner are plotted for various values of eccentricity ratio, deformation factor, characteristic length and coupling number.

  16. Constructive interference in steady state(CISS) 3DFT MR imaging of the inner ear and adjacent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the value of 3 dimensional fourier transformation interference in steady state magnetic resonance imaging(3DFT CISS MRI) in depicting the inner ear and vascular structures. Using 3DFT CISS axial and coronal MRI scans of both ears with 17.1msec/8.0msec/50 degree(TR/TE/FA) and 0.9mm in nominal thickness, we studied 68 normal ears of 34 volunteers aged between 15 and 54 years. We assessed the visualization of the membranous labyrinth, and of cranial nerves VII and VIII in the inner ear canal. We analyzed the location of the vascular loop of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in relation to cranial nerves VII and internal auditory canal. To define the three-dimensional images of the membranous labyrinth, MIP reconstruction of axial images was carried out. The very high signal of the intralabyrinth fluid enabled one hundred percent of the membranous labrynth to be seen There was a lack of contrast between soft tissue and bone such as the facial verve canal, vestibular aqueduct and canal of the subarcuate artery. In 25% of cases, the vascular loop was recognized in the porus acusticus, and in 6% of cases, inside the internal auditory canal. 3DFT CISS MRI is useful for determining the detailed anatomy of the inner ear and the nearby vascular loop. This special MR technique can be added as a routine protocol in the study of diseases of the inner ear

  17. Neural plasticity expressed in central auditory structures with and without tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E Roberts

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sensory training therapies for tinnitus are based on the assumption that, notwithstanding neural changes related to tinnitus, auditory training can alter the response properties of neurons in auditory pathways. To address this question, we investigated whether brain changes induced by sensory training in tinnitus sufferers and measured by EEG are similar to those induced in age and hearing loss matched individuals without tinnitus trained on the same auditory task. Auditory training was given using a 5 kHz 40-Hz amplitude-modulated sound that was in the tinnitus frequency region of the tinnitus subjects and enabled extraction of the 40-Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR and P2 transient response known to localize to primary and nonprimary auditory cortex, respectively. P2 amplitude increased with training equally in participants with tinnitus and in control subjects, suggesting normal remodeling of nonprimary auditory regions in tinnitus. However, training-induced changes in the ASSR differed between the tinnitus and control groups. In controls ASSR phase advanced toward the stimulus waveform by about ten degrees over training, in agreement with previous results obtained in young normal hearing individuals. However, ASSR phase did not change significantly with training in the tinnitus group, although some participants showed phase shifts resembling controls. On the other hand, ASSR amplitude increased with training in the tinnitus group, whereas in controls this response (which is difficult to remodel in young normal hearing subjects did not change with training. These results suggest that neural changes related to tinnitus altered how neural plasticity was expressed in the region of primary but not nonprimary auditory cortex. Auditory training did not reduce tinnitus loudness although a small effect on the tinnitus spectrum was detected.

  18. Missing and delayed auditory responses in young and older children with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopher Edgar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of left and right superior temporal gyrus (STG 50ms (M50 and 100ms (M100 auditory responses in typically developing children (TD and in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD was examined. It was hypothesized that (1 M50 responses would be observed equally often in younger and older children, (2 M100 responses would be observed more often in older than younger children indicating later development of secondary auditory areas, and (3 M100 but not M50 would be observed less often in ASD than TD in both age groups, reflecting slower maturation of later developing auditory areas in ASD. Methods: 35 typically developing controls, 63 ASD without language impairment (ASD-LI, and 38 ASD with language impairment (ASD+LI were recruited.The presence or absence of a STG M50 and M100 was scored. Subjects were grouped into younger (6 to 10-years-old and older groups (11 to 15-years-old. Results: Although M50 responses were observed equally often in older and younger subjects and equally often in TD and ASD, left and right M50 responses were delayed in ASD-LI and ASD+LI. Group comparisons showed that in younger subjects M100 responses were observed more often in TD than ASD+LI (90% vs 66%, p=0.04, with no differences between TD and ASD-LI (90% vs 76% p=0.14 or between ASD-LI and ASD+LI (76% vs 66%, p=0.53. In older subjects, whereas no differences were observed between TD and ASD+LI, responses were observed more often in ASD-LI than ASD+LI. Conclusions: Although present in all groups, M50 responses were delayed in ASD, suggesting delayed development of earlier developing auditory areas. Examining the TD data, findings indicated that by 11 years a right M100 should be observed in 100% of subjects and a left M100 in 80% of subjects. Thus, by 11years, lack of a left and especially right M100 offers neurobiological insight into sensory processing that may underlie language or cognitive impairment.

  19. Source analysis of magnetic field responses from the human auditory cortex elicited by short speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, S; Okita, Y; Hirata, Y

    1995-01-01

    We made a detailed source analysis of the magnetic field responses that were elicited in the human brain by different monosyllabic speech sounds, including vowel, plosive, fricative, and nasal speech. Recordings of the magnetic field responses from a lateral area of the left hemisphere of human subjects were made using a multichannel SQUID magnetometer, having 37 field-sensing coils. A single source of the equivalent current dipole of the field was estimated from the spatial distribution of the evoked responses. The estimated sources of an N1m wave occurring at about 100 ms after the stimulus onset of different monosyllables were located close to each other within a 10-mm-sided cube in the three-dimensional space of the brain. Those sources registered on the magnetic resonance images indicated a restricted area in the auditory cortex, including Heschl's gyri in the superior temporal plane. In the spatiotemporal domain the sources exhibited apparent movements, among which anterior shift with latency increase on the anteroposterior axis and inferior shift on the inferosuperior axis were common in the responses to all monosyllables. However, selective movements that depended on the type of consonants were observed on the mediolateral axis; the sources of plosive and fricative responses shifted laterally with latency increase, but the source of the vowel response shifted medially. These spatiotemporal movements of the sources are discussed in terms of dynamic excitation of the cortical neurons in multiple areas of the human auditory cortex. PMID:7621933

  20. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  1. Stress and Auditory Responses of the Otophysan Fish, Cyprinella venusta, to Road Traffic Noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna A Crovo

    Full Text Available Noise pollution from anthropogenic sources is an increasingly problematic challenge faced by many taxa, including fishes. Recent studies demonstrate that road traffic noise propagates effectively from bridge crossings into surrounding freshwater ecosystems; yet, its effect on the stress response and auditory function of freshwater stream fishes is unexamined. The blacktail shiner (Cyprinella venusta was used as a model to investigate the degree to which traffic noise impacts stress and hearing in exposed fishes. Fish were exposed to an underwater recording of traffic noise played at approximately 140 dB re 1 μPa. Waterborne cortisol samples were collected and quantified using enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Auditory thresholds were assessed in control and traffic exposed groups by measuring auditory evoked potentials (AEPs. After acute exposure to traffic noise, fish exhibited a significant elevation in cortisol levels. Individuals exposed to 2 hours of traffic noise playback had elevated hearing thresholds at 300 and 400 Hz, corresponding to the most sensitive bandwidth for this species.

  2. Technical challenges in the construction of the steady-state stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next step in the Wendelstein stellarator line is the large superconducting device Wendelstein 7-X, currently under construction in Greifswald, Germany. Steady-state operation is an intrinsic feature of stellarators, and one key element of the Wendelstein 7-X mission is to demonstrate steady-state operation under plasma conditions relevant for a fusion power plant. Steady-state operation of a fusion device, on the one hand, requires the implementation of special technologies, giving rise to technical challenges during the design, fabrication and assembly of such a device. On the other hand, also the physics development of steady-state operation at high plasma performance poses a challenge and careful preparation. The electron cyclotron resonance heating system, diagnostics, experiment control and data acquisition are prepared for plasma operation lasting 30 min. This requires many new technological approaches for plasma heating and diagnostics as well as new concepts for experiment control and data acquisition. (special topic)

  3. A generalised correlation for the steady state flow in single-phase natural circulation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish the heat transport capability of natural circulation loops, it is essential to know the flow rate. A generalized correlation for steady state flow valid for uniform and non-uniform diameter loops has been theoretically derived

  4. Steady State Performance Characteristics of a Single Pad Externally Adjustable Fluid Film Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Satish B.; Pai, Raghuvir

    The steady state performance characteristics of centrally loaded 60 degree single pad externally adjustable partial arc bearing is studied theoretically. Principal feature of the bearing is the facility to control its radial clearance and circumferential film thickness gradient, during operation. The bearing has aspect ratios of 1.0, 0.5 and 0.25 and operates over a wide range of eccentricity ratios and adjustments. Steady state performance characteristics of the bearing are presented in terms of attitude angle, load carrying capacity, oil flow and friction variable. The steady state form of Reynolds equation in two dimensions is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The effect of tilt and the radial adjustments on the steady state performance characteristics are presented in the form of plots. A comparative study predicts that negative radial and negative tilt adjustment results in better load carrying capacity with reduced oil flow and friction.

  5. Measurements of Gene Expression at Steady State Improve the Predictability of Part Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqian M; Chen, Shuobing; Shi, Handuo; Ji, Weiyue; Zong, Yeqing; Ouyang, Qi; Lou, Chunbo

    2016-03-18

    Mathematical modeling of genetic circuits generally assumes that gene expression is at steady state when measurements are performed. However, conventional methods of measurement do not necessarily guarantee that this assumption is satisfied. In this study, we reveal a bi-plateau mode of gene expression at the single-cell level in bacterial batch cultures. The first plateau is dynamically active, where gene expression is at steady state; the second plateau, however, is dynamically inactive. We further demonstrate that the predictability of assembled genetic circuits in the first plateau (steady state) is much higher than that in the second plateau where conventional measurements are often performed. By taking the nature of steady state into consideration, our method of measurement promises to directly capture the intrinsic property of biological parts/circuits regardless of circuit-host or circuit-environment interactions. PMID:26652307

  6. A steady-state fluid model of the coaxial plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma layer in a coaxial plasma gun is considered as a shock front driven by expanding magnetic fields. Analytical steady-state solutions of the fluid equations yield the plasma properties, allowing the scaling of plasma focus devices. (Auth.)

  7. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  8. Steady state performance of subcritical and supercritical pressure natural circulation in the same test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For supercritical pressure natural circulation loops, explicit correlation for steady state flow are not available. While using the subcritical natural circulation flow correlation for supercritical pressure data, it has been observed that subcritical flow correlation is not able to predict the steady state flow accurately near supercritical pressure condition. A generalized correlation has been proposed to estimate the steady state flow in supercritical pressure natural circulation loop based on a relationship between dimensionless density and dimensionless enthalpy reported in literature. This generalized correlation has been tested with the steady state supercritical pressure CO2 data and found to be in good agreement. Subsequently supercritical pressure data for different working fluids reported in literature has also been compared with the proposed correlation. It is observed that the same generalized correlation is applicable for other fluids also. The present paper deals with the details of the test facility, the derivation of the generalized correlation and comparison with experimental data. (author)

  9. Potential multiple steady-states in the long-term carbon cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Tennenbaum, Stephen; Schwartzman, David

    2013-01-01

    Modelers of the long term carbon cycle in Earth history have previously assumed there is only one stable climatic steady state. Here we investigate the possibility of multiple steady states. We find them in Abiotic World, lacking any biotic influence, resulting from possible variations in planetary albedo in different temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide level regimes, with the same weathering forcing balancing a volcanic source to the atmosphere, ocean pool. In Plant World modeling relevant to the Phanerozoic, we include the additional effects of biotic enhancement of weathering on land, organic carbon burial, oxidation of reduced organic carbon in terrestrial sediments and the variation of biotic productivity with temperature, finding a second stable steady state appearing between twenty and fifty degrees C. The very warm early Triassic climate may be the prime candidate for an upper temperature steady state. Given our results, the anthropogenic driven rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide could potentially...

  10. Steady state of active systems is characterized by unique effective temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Saroj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the properties of active matter systems, consisting of particles capable of taking up and dissipating energy and thus driven out of equilibrium, is important as it provides the possibility of a unified framework to analyze a diverse class of biological systems. Analysis of a large number of such systems shows an extension of equilibrium-like ideas are, sometimes, capable of capturing the steady state properties and a thermodynamic formulation of the problem might be possible. Investigating the detailed steady state properties and how the systems depart from equilibrium is important for such a formulation. Here we address the question through the framework of mode-coupling theory for dense active systems. We obtain a generic nonequilirbium theory for such systems and then taking the steady state limit of the theory we show that the system is characterized by a unique effective temperature, unlike other driven systems like a glass under shear. We discuss the differences of the steady states of an ...

  11. A Review of Fusion and Tokamak Research Towards Steady-State Operation: A JAEA Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Providing a historical overview of 50 years of fusion research, a review of the fundamentals and concepts of fusion and research efforts towards the implementation of a steady state tokamak reactor is presented. In 1990, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR best utilizing the bootstrap current was developed. Since then, significant efforts have been made in major tokamaks, including JT-60U, exploring advanced regimes relevant to the steady state operation of tokamaks. In this paper, the fundamentals of fusion and plasma confinement, and the concepts and research on current drive and MHD stability of advanced tokamaks towards realization of a steady-state tokamak reactor are reviewed, with an emphasis on the contributions of the JAEA. Finally, a view of fusion energy utilization in the 21st century is introduced.

  12. Identifying the Threshold of Iron Deficiency in the Central Nervous System of the Rat by the Auditory Brainstem Response

    OpenAIRE

    Greminger, Allison R.; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of anemia on auditory nerve (AN) development have been well investigated; however, we have previously reported that significant functional consequences in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) can also occur as a consequence of marginal iron deficiency (ID). As the ABR has widespread clinical use, we evaluated the ability of this electrophysiological method to characterize the threshold of tissue ID in rats by examining the relationship between markers of tissue ID and...

  13. Continued Maturation of the Click-Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Emily; White-Schwoch, Travis; Carr, Kali Woodruff; Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Background Click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) are a valuable tool for probing auditory system function and development. Although it has long been thought that the human auditory brainstem is fully mature by age 2 yr, recent evidence indicates a prolonged developmental trajectory. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the time course of ABR maturation in a preschool population and fill a gap in the knowledge of development. Research Design Using a cross-sectional design, we investigated the effect of age on absolute latencies, interwave latencies, and amplitudes (waves I, III, V) of the click-evoked ABR. Study Sample A total of 71 preschoolers (ages 3.12–4.99 yr) participated in the study. All had normal peripheral auditory function and IQ. Data Collection and Analysis ABRs to a rarefaction click stimulus presented at 31/sec and 80 dB SPL (73 dB nHL) were recorded monaurally using clinically-standard recording and filtering procedures while the participant sat watching a movie. Absolute latencies, interwave latencies, and amplitudes were then correlated to age. Results Developmental changes were restricted to absolute latencies. Wave V latency decreased significantly with age, whereas wave I and III latencies remained stable, even in this restricted age range. Conclusions The ABR does not remain static after age 2 yr, as seen by a systematic decrease in wave V latency between ages 3 and 5 yr. This finding suggests that the human brainstem has a continued developmental time course during the preschool years. Latency changes in the age 3–5 yr range should be considered when using ABRs as a metric of hearing health. PMID:25597458

  14. Open-circuit gas exchange analysis in the non-steady-state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R L; Kowalchuk, J M; Prime, W M; Green, H J

    1980-03-01

    The serial measurement of oxygen uptake (VO2) of four subjects was calculated during the transition from rest to constant-load cycle ergometer work using an open-circuit gas exchange analysis system. In calculating VO2, the mixed expired gas concentrations were matched with the ventilatory volume by various delay factors. A delay factor equivalent to the passing of 20 L of expired ventilation through the mixing chamber yielded results which were most similar to the VO2 obtained by a computerized breath-by-breath analysis. Previous checks of the response of the system to changes in calibrating gas mixtures had indicated that it was necessary to pass approximately 20-25 L of gas through the system before a plateau response was observed. This volume remained relatively constant, independent of flow rate. It is proposed that an understanding of the response characteristics of an open circuit system will enable the accurate calculation of VO2 over short time intervals in the non-steady-state. PMID:7389042

  15. Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment Display Reduced Auditory Event-Related Delta Oscillatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Event-related oscillations (ERO may provide a useful tool for the identification of cognitive deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer's disease (AD. In the present study, we investigate peak-to-peak amplitude of auditory event-related delta oscillations of MCI subjects. Method. The study included twenty-two consecutive patients with MCI recruited in neurology clinic and 21 age- and education-matched normal elderly controls. A classical auditory oddball paradigm was used in the experiments. EEG was recorded from F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, P3, Pz, P4, O1, Oz, and O2 locations. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes for each subject’s averaged delta response (0.5–2.2 Hz were measured. Results. The amplitudes between groups differed significantly at the frontal and mid-centroparietal locations. ANOVA on delta responses revealed a significant effect for groups (F(1.41 = 4.84, P=0.033, indicating a larger delta response for healthy controls than MCI subjects. Post hoc comparisons revealed that peak-to-peak delta response was significantly larger for healthy controls than for MCI over electrode sites F3, Fz, F4, Cz, C4, and Pz. Discussion. Event-related delta frequency band seems to be the most affected oscillatory response in cognitive impairment due to AD. Therefore, it deserves to be investigated as a candidate electrophysiological biomarker in further studies.

  16. Customized Steady-State Constraints for Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Ordinary Differential Equation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Marcus; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ordinary differential equation models have become a wide-spread approach to analyze dynamical systems and understand underlying mechanisms. Model parameters are often unknown and have to be estimated from experimental data, e.g., by maximum-likelihood estimation. In particular, models of biological systems contain a large number of parameters. To reduce the dimensionality of the parameter space, steady-state information is incorporated in the parameter estimation process. For non-linear models, analytical steady-state calculation typically leads to higher-order polynomial equations for which no closed-form solutions can be obtained. This can be circumvented by solving the steady-state equations for kinetic parameters, which results in a linear equation system with comparatively simple solutions. At the same time multiplicity of steady-state solutions is avoided, which otherwise is problematic for optimization. When solved for kinetic parameters, however, steady-state constraints tend to become negative for particular model specifications, thus, generating new types of optimization problems. Here, we present an algorithm based on graph theory that derives non-negative, analytical steady-state expressions by stepwise removal of cyclic dependencies between dynamical variables. The algorithm avoids multiple steady-state solutions by construction. We show that our method is applicable to most common classes of biochemical reaction networks containing inhibition terms, mass-action and Hill-type kinetic equations. Comparing the performance of parameter estimation for different analytical and numerical methods of incorporating steady-state information, we show that our approach is especially well-tailored to guarantee a high success rate of optimization. PMID:27243005

  17. Non-equilibrium Steady States in Kac's Model Coupled to a Thermostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Josephine

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the existence, uniqueness and convergence to non-equilibrium steady states in Kac's model with an external coupling. We work in both Fourier distances and Wasserstein distances. Our methods work in the case where the external coupling is not a Maxwellian equilibrium. This provides an example of a non-equilibrium steady state. We also study the behaviour as the number of particles goes to infinity and show quantitative estimates on the convergence rate of the first marginal.

  18. Analysis of steady state creep behaviour of 9-12% chromium ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimmler, G.; Weinert, P.; Cerjak, H. [Graz University of Technology (Austria). Institute of Materials Science

    2004-12-15

    The present work deals with the creep behaviour of 9-12% Cr steels in the steady state (secondary) creep regime in order to enable a more detailed and exact description of the creep rupture strength on the basis of the Monkman-Grant relationship. Special attention is paid to the microstructural aspects. The steady state creep behaviour has been investigated by evaluating the creep rate and the change of stress exponent of already established grades of high temperature creep resistant steels. (author)

  19. Cycle kinetics, steady state thermodynamics and motors-a paradigm for living matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integration of the stochastic mathematical models for motor proteins with Hill's steady state thermodynamics yields a rather comprehensive theory for molecular motors as open systems in the nonequilibrium steady state. This theory, a natural extension of Gibbs' approach to isothermal molecular systems in equilibrium, is compared with other existing theories with dissipative structures and dynamics. The theory of molecular motors might be considered as an archetype for studying more complex open biological systems such as biochemical reaction networks inside living cells

  20. Uniform Sampling of Steady-State Flux Spaces: Means to Design Experiments and to Interpret Enzymopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Nathan D; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2004-01-01

    Reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks is now possible using multiple different data types. Constraint-based modeling is an approach to interrogate capabilities of reconstructed networks by constraining possible cellular behavior through the imposition of physicochemical laws. As a result, a steady-state flux space is defined that contains all possible functional states of the network. Uniform random sampling of the steady-state flux space allows for the unbiased appraisal of its c...

  1. Finite element modelling of creep process - steady state stresses and strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element modelling of steady state creep process has been described. Using an analogy of visco-plastic problem with a described procedure, the finite element method has been used to calculate steady state stresses and strains in 2D problems. An example of application of such a procedure have been presented, using real life problem - cylindrical pipe with longitudinal crack at high temperature, under internal pressure, and estimating its residual life, based on the C*integral evaluation.

  2. Terminal Value Techniques in Equity Valuation - Implications of the Steady State Assumption

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Joakim; Olsson, Per M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the conditions necessary for calculating steady state terminal values in equity (company) valuation models. We make explicit use of the fact that a company's income statements and balance sheets can be modeled as a system of difference equations. From these difference equations, we derive conditions for steady state. The conditions ensure that the company remains qualitatively similar year by year after the valuation horizon and that it has a stable development of earnings...

  3. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of TRIGA Research Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mizanur Rahman; Mohammad Abdur R. Akond; Mohammad Khairul Basher; Md. Quamrul Huda

    2014-01-01

    The COOLOD-N2 and PARET computer codes were used for a steady-state thermal hydraulic and safety analysis of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor located at Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The objective of the present study is to ensure that all important safety related thermal hydraulic parameters uphold margins far below the safety limits by steady-state calculations at full power. We, therefore, have calculated the hot channel fuel centreline ...

  4. Control of unstable steady states by extended time-delayed feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Dahms, Thomas; Hoevel, Philipp; Schoell, Eckehard

    2007-01-01

    Time-delayed feedback methods can be used to control unstable periodic orbits as well as unstable steady states. We present an application of extended time delay autosynchronization introduced by Socolar et al. to an unstable focus. This system represents a generic model of an unstable steady state which can be found for instance in a Hopf bifurcation. In addition to the original controller design, we investigate effects of control loop latency and a bandpass filter on the domain of control. ...

  5. Advanced Control Scenario of High-Performance Steady-State Operation for JT-60 Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Tamai; Y. Kamada; A. Sakasai; S. Ishida; G. Kurita; M. Matsukawa; K. Urata; S. Sakurai; K. Tsuchiya; A. Morioka; Y. M. Miura; K. Kizu

    2004-01-01

    Plasma control on high-βN steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting modification is discussed. Accessibility to high-βN exceeding the free-boundary limit is investigated with the stabilising wall of reduced-activated ferritic steel and the active feedback control of the in-vessel non-axisymmetric field coils. Taking the merit of superconducting magnet, advanced plasma control for steady-state high performance operation could be expected.

  6. The Effects of High Intensity Interval Training vs Steady State Training on Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Carl; Farland, Courtney V.; Guidotti, Flavia; Harbin, Michelle; Roberts, Brianna; Schuette, Jeff; Tuuri, Andrew; Doberstein, Scott T.; Porcari, John P.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has become an increasingly popular form of exercise due to its potentially large effects on exercise capacity and small time requirement. This study compared the effects of two HIIT protocols vs steady-state training on aerobic and anaerobic capacity following 8-weeks of training. Fifty-five untrained college-aged subjects were randomly assigned to three training groups (3x weekly). Steady-state (n = 19) exercised (cycle ergometer) 20 minutes at 90% of ...

  7. Effects of impulse noise and continuous steady state noise on hearing.

    OpenAIRE

    Mäntysalo, S; Vuori, J

    1984-01-01

    In this study the effects on hearing induced by occupational exposure to impulse noise were compared with those induced by exposure to continuous steady state noise. Three groups exposed to impulse noise, one group exposed to continuous steady state noise, and an unexposed control group were studied. The hearing thresholds of the groups were measured by a puretone audiometer three times in two workdays. None of the groups showed significant differences between the hearing thresholds measured ...

  8. Steady-state priors and Bayesian variable selection in VAR forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Louzis, Dimitrios P.

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes methods for estimating Bayesian vector autoregressions (VARs) with an automatic variable selection and an informative prior on the unconditional mean or steady-state of the system. We show that extant Gibbs sampling methods for Bayesian variable selection can be efficiently extended to incorporate prior beliefs on the steady-state of the economy. Empirical analysis, based on three major US macroeconomic time series, indicates that the out-of-sample forecasting accuracy of ...

  9. Steady-state particle tracking in the object-oriented regional groundwater model ZOOMQ3D

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of a steady-state particle tracking code for use in conjunction with the object-oriented regional groundwater flow model, ZOOMQ3D (Jackson, 2001). Like the flow model, the particle tracking software, ZOOPT, is written using an object-oriented approach to promote its extensibility and flexibility. ZOOPT enables the definition of steady-state pathlines in three dimensions. Particles can be tracked in both the forward and reverse directions en...

  10. Steady-state entanglement of a Bose-Einstein condensate and a nanomechanical resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Asjad, Muhammad; 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.033606

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the steady-state entanglement between Bose-Einstein condensate trapped inside an optical cavity with a moving end mirror (nanomechanical resonator) driven by a single mode laser. The quantized laser field mediates the interaction between the Bose-Einstein condensate and nanomechanical resonator. In particular, we study the influence of temperature on the entanglement of the coupled system, and note that the steady-state entanglement is fragile with respect to temperature.

  11. Steady State Analysis of Convex Combination of Affine Projection Adaptive Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhika

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to propose an adaptive algorithm using convex combinational approach to have both fast convergence and less steady state error simultaneously. For this purpose, we have used two affine projection adaptive filters with complementary nature (both in step size and projection order as the component filters. The first component filter has high projection order and large step size which makes it to have fast convergence at the cost of more steady state error. The second component filter has slow convergence and less steady state error due to the selection of small step size and projection order. Both are combined using convex combiner so as to have best final output with fast convergence and less steady state error. Each of the component filters are updated using their own error signals and stochastic gradient approach is used to update the convex combiner so as to have minimum overall error. By using energy conservation argument, analytical treatment of the combination stage is made in stationary environment. It is found that during initial stage the proposed scheme converges to the fast filter which has good convergence later it converges to either of the two (whichever has less steady state error and towards the end, the final output converges to slow filter which is superior in lesser steady state error. Experimental results proved that the proposed algorithm has adopted the best features of the component filters.

  12. Analysis of steady-state and dynamical radially-symmetric problems of nonlinear viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Alexey B.

    This thesis treats radially symmetric steady states and radially symmetric motions of nonlinearly elastic and viscoelastic plates and shells subject to dead-load and hydrostatic pressures on their boundaries and with the plate subject to centrifugal force. The plates and shells are described by specializations of the exact (nonlinear) equations of three-dimensional continuum mechanics. The treatment in every case is very general and encompasses large classes of constitutive functions (characterizing the material response). We first treat the radially symmetric steady states of plates and shells and the radially symmetric steady rotations of plates. We show that the existence, multiplicity, and qualitative behavior of solutions for problems accounting for the live loads due to hydrostatic pressure and centrifugal force depend critically on the material properties of the bodies, physically reasonable refined descriptions of which are given and examined here with great care, and on the nature of boundary conditions. he treatment here, giving new and sharp results, employs several different mathematical tools, ranging from phase-plane analysis to the mathematically more sophisticated direct methods of the Calculus of Variations, fixed-point theorems, and global continuation methods, each of which has different strengths and weaknesses for handling intrinsic difficulties in the mechanics. We then treat the initial-boundary-value problems for the radially symmetric motions of annular plates and spherical shells that consist of a nonlinearly viscoelastic material of strain-rate type. We discuss a range of physically natural constitutive equations. We first show that when the material is strong in a suitable sense relative to externally applied loads, solutions exist for all time, depend continuously on the data, and consequently are unique. We study the role of the constitutive restrictions and that of the regularity of the data in ensuring the preclusion of a total

  13. FRAPCON-1: a computer code for the steady state analysis of oxide fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A.; Bohn, M. P.; Coleman, D. R.; Lanning, D. D.

    1978-08-01

    FRAPCON is a FORTRAN IV computer code which predicts the steady state long-term burnup response of a light water reactor fuel rod. The coupled effects of fuel and cladding deformation, temperature, and internal gas pressure on the behavior of the fuel rod are considered in determining fuel rod response. The cladding deformation model includes multi-axial, elasto-plastic analysis and considers both primary and secondary creep. The fuel temperature model considers the effects of fuel cracking and relocation in determining the fuel temperature distribution. Burnup dependent fission gas generation and release is included in calculating fuel rod internal pressure. An integral fuel rod failure subcode determines failure and failure modes based on the operating conditions at each timestep. The material property subcode, MATPRO, provides gas, fuel and cladding properties to the computational subcodes in FRAPCON. No material properties need to be supplied by the code user. FRAPCON is a completely modular code with each major computational subcode isolated within the code and coupled to the main code by subroutine calls and data transfer through argument lists. FRAPCON is soft-coupled to the transient fuel rod code, FRAP-T, to provide initial conditions to initiate analysis of such off-normal transients as a loss-of-coolant accident. The code is presently programmed and running on a CDC 7600 computer.

  14. Positive Steady States of a Prey-predator Model with Diffusion and Non-monotone Conversion Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui PENG; Ming Xin WANG; Wen Yan CHEN

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we study the positive steady states of a prey-predator model with di .usion throughout and a non-monotone conversion rate under the homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition. We obtain some results of the existence and non-existence of positive steady states.The stability and uniqueness of positive steady states are also discussed.

  15. Task-specific modulation of human auditory evoked responses in a delayed-match-to-sample task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eRong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus our investigation on task-specific cognitive modulation of early cortical auditory processing in human cerebral cortex. During the experiments, we acquired whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG data while participants were performing an auditory delayed-match-to-sample (DMS task and associated control tasks. Using a spatial filtering beamformer technique to simultaneously estimate multiple source activities inside the human brain, we observed a significant DMS-specific suppression of the auditory evoked response to the second stimulus in a sound pair, with the center of the effect being located in the vicinity of the left auditory cortex. For the right auditory cortex, a non-invariant suppression effect was observed in both DMS and control tasks. Furthermore, analysis of coherence revealed a beta band (12 ~ 20 Hz DMS-specific enhanced functional interaction between the sources in left auditory cortex and those in left inferior frontal gyrus, which has been shown to involve in short-term memory processing during the delay period of DMS task. Our findings support the view that early evoked cortical responses to incoming acoustic stimuli can be modulated by task-specific cognitive functions by means of frontal-temporal functional interactions.

  16. Steady state flow evaluations for passive auxiliary feedwater system of APR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly introduces a methodology to evaluate steady state flow of APR+ Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System (PAFS). The PAFS is being developed as a safety grade passive system to completely replace the existing active Auxiliary Feedwater System (AFWS). Natural circulation cooling can be generally classified into the single-phase, two-phase, and boiling-condensation modes. The PAF is designed to be operated in a boiling-condensation natural circulation mode. The steady-state flow rate should be equal to the steady-state boiling/condensation rate determined by the steady-state energy and momentum balances in the PAFS. The determined steady-state flow rate can be used in the design optimization for the natural circulation loop of the PAFS through the steady-state momentum balance. Since the retarding force, which is to be balanced by the driving force in the natural circulation system design depends on the reliable evaluation of the success of a natural circulation system design depends on the reliable evaluation of the pressure loss coefficients. In PAFS, the core decay heat is released by natural circulation flow between the S G secondary side and the Passive Condensation Heat Exchanger (PCHX) that is immersed in the Passive Condensation Cooling Tank (PCCT). The PCCT is located on the top of Auxiliary building The driving force is determined by the difference between the S/G (heat Source) secondary water level and condensation liquid (heat sink) level. It will overcome retarding force at flowrate in the system, which is determined by vaporization and condensation of the steam which is generated at the S/G by the latent heat in system. In this study, the theoretical method to estimate the steady state flow rate in boiling-condensation natural circulation system is developed and compared with test results

  17. (A)musicality in Williams syndrome: examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Shivers, Carolyn M.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder, is of keen interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing (TD) population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and TD individuals with and without amusia. PMID:23966965

  18. Single-molecule measurement of the effective temperature in non-equilibrium steady states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2015-11-01

    Temperature is a well-defined quantity for systems in equilibrium. For glassy systems, it has been extended to the non-equilibrium regime, showing up as an effective quantity in a modified version of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. However, experimental evidence supporting this definition remains scarce. Here, we present the first direct experimental demonstration of the effective temperature by measuring correlations and responses in single molecules in non-equilibrium steady states generated under external random forces. We combine experiment, analytical theory and simulations for systems with different levels of complexity, ranging from a single bead in an optical trap to two-state and multiple-state DNA hairpins. From these data, we extract a unifying picture for the existence of an effective temperature based on the relative order of various timescales characterizing intrinsic relaxation and external driving. Our study thus introduces driven small systems as a fertile ground to address fundamental concepts in statistical physics, condensed-matter physics and biophysics.

  19. Steady-state sinusoidal thermal characterization at chip level by internal infrared-laser deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perpina, Xavier; Jorda, Xavier; Vellvehi, Miquel [Centre Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Altet, Josep [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Mestres, NarcIs [Institut de Ciencia dels Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-08-07

    A new approach is reported for thermally characterizing microelectronic devices and integrated circuits under a steady-state sinusoidal regime by internal infrared-laser deflection (IIR-LD). It consists of extracting the amplitude and phase Bode plots of the temperature profile inside the chip (depth-resolved measurements in the frequency domain). As a consequence, not only are the IIR-LD performances significantly improved (accuracy, robustness to noise, control of boundary conditions and heat flux confinement) but also the direct temperature measurement is feasible when thin regions are inspected and thermal parameters can be easily extracted (thermal diffusivity). In order to show the efficiency of this technique, a thermal test chip (TTC) is used. The TTC is thermally excited by imposing a cosine-like voltage waveform. As a result, a vertical temperature profile inside the die is obtained depending on the heating frequency. Repeating this procedure at several frequencies, the frequency response of the chip internal temperature profile is derived. By comparing the experimental results with the model predictions, good agreement is achieved. This technique allows evaluation of the thermal behaviour at the chip level; also it could be useful for failure analysis.

  20. A lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady state visual evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    Objective. We have developed an asynchronous brain-machine interface (BMI)-based lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). Approach. By decoding electroencephalography signals in real-time, users are able to walk forward, turn right, turn left, sit, and stand while wearing the exoskeleton. SSVEP stimulation is implemented with a visual stimulation unit, consisting of five light emitting diodes fixed to the exoskeleton. A canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for the extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP was used in combination with k-nearest neighbors. Main results. Overall, 11 healthy subjects participated in the experiment to evaluate performance. To achieve the best classification, CCA was first calibrated in an offline experiment. In the subsequent online experiment, our results exhibit accuracies of 91.3 ± 5.73%, a response time of 3.28 ± 1.82 s, an information transfer rate of 32.9 ± 9.13 bits/min, and a completion time of 1100 ± 154.92 s for the experimental parcour studied. Significance. The ability to achieve such high quality BMI control indicates that an SSVEP-based lower limb exoskeleton for gait assistance is becoming feasible.

  1. Steady-state modelling of the universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor is a well-established device which was developed for the measurement of relative air fuel ratio in internal combustion engines. There is, however, little information available which allows for the prediction of the UEGO's behaviour when exposed to arbitrary gas mixtures, pressures and temperatures. Here we present a steady-state model for the sensor, based on a solution of the Stefan–Maxwell equation, and which includes a momentum balance. The response of the sensor is dominated by a diffusion barrier, which controls the rate of diffusion of gas species between the exhaust and a cavity. Determination of the diffusion barrier characteristics, especially the mean pore size, porosity and tortuosity, is essential for the purposes of modelling, and a measurement technique based on identification of the sensor pressure giving zero temperature sensitivity is shown to be a convenient method of achieving this. The model, suitably calibrated, is shown to make good predictions of sensor behaviour for large variations of pressure, temperature and gas composition. (paper)

  2. Epoxide hydrolase-catalyzed enantioselective conversion of trans-stilbene oxide: Insights into the reaction mechanism from steady-state and pre-steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archelas, Alain; Zhao, Wei; Faure, Bruno; Iacazio, Gilles; Kotik, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A detailed kinetic study based on steady-state and pre-steady-state measurements is described for the highly enantioselective epoxide hydrolase Kau2. The enzyme, which is a member of the α/β-hydrolase fold family, preferentially reacts with the (S,S)-enantiomer of trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) with an E value of ∼200. The enzyme follows a classical two-step catalytic mechanism with formation of an alkyl-enzyme intermediate in the first step and hydrolysis of this intermediate in a rate-limiting second step. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching during TSO conversion appears to correlate with alkylation of the enzyme. The steady-state data are consistent with (S,S) and (R,R)-TSO being two competing substrates with marked differences in kcat and KM values. The high enantiopreference of the epoxide hydrolase is best explained by pronounced differences in the second-order alkylation rate constant (k2/KS) and the alkyl-enzyme hydrolysis rate k3 between the (S,S) and (R,R)-enantiomers of TSO. Our data suggest that during conversion of (S,S)-TSO the two active site tyrosines, Tyr(157) and Tyr(259), serve mainly as electrophilic catalysts in the alkylation half-reaction, polarizing the oxirane oxygen of the bound epoxide through hydrogen bond formation, however, without fully donating their hydrogens to the forming alkyl-enzyme intermediate. PMID:26714303

  3. The cat's meow: A high-field fMRI assessment of cortical activity in response to vocalizations and complex auditory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amee J; Butler, Blake E; Lomber, Stephen G

    2016-02-15

    Sensory systems are typically constructed in a hierarchical fashion such that lower level subcortical and cortical areas process basic stimulus features, while higher level areas reassemble these features into object-level representations. A number of anatomical pathway tracing studies have suggested that the auditory cortical hierarchy of the cat extends from a core region, consisting of the primary auditory cortex (A1) and the anterior auditory field (AAF), to higher level auditory fields that are located ventrally. Unfortunately, limitations on electrophysiological examination of these higher level fields have resulted in an incomplete understanding of the functional organization of the auditory cortex. Thus, the current study uses functional MRI in conjunction with a variety of simple and complex auditory stimuli to provide the first comprehensive examination of function across the entire cortical hierarchy. Auditory cortex function is shown to be largely lateralized to the left hemisphere, and is concentrated bilaterally in fields surrounding the posterior ectosylvian sulcus. The use of narrowband noise stimuli enables the visualization of tonotopic gradients in the posterior auditory field (PAF) and ventral posterior auditory field (VPAF) that have previously been unverifiable using fMRI and pure tones. Furthermore, auditory fields that are inaccessible to more invasive techniques, such as the insular (IN) and temporal (T) cortices, are shown to be selectively responsive to vocalizations. Collectively, these data provide a much needed functional correlate for anatomical examinations of the hierarchy of cortical structures within the cat auditory cortex. PMID:26658927

  4. Pre-Steady-State Kinetic Analysis of Single-Nucleotide Incorporation by DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Peter Guengerich, F

    2016-01-01

    Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis is a powerful and widely used method to obtain multiple kinetic parameters. This protocol provides a step-by-step procedure for pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of single-nucleotide incorporation by a DNA polymerase. It describes the experimental details of DNA substrate annealing, reaction mixture preparation, handling of the RQF-3 rapid quench-flow instrument, denaturing polyacrylamide DNA gel preparation, electrophoresis, quantitation, and data analysis. The core and unique part of this protocol is the rationale for preparation of the reaction mixture (the ratio of the polymerase to the DNA substrate) and methods for conducting pre-steady-state assays on an RQF-3 rapid quench-flow instrument, as well as data interpretation after analysis. In addition, the methods for the DNA substrate annealing and DNA polyacrylamide gel preparation, electrophoresis, quantitation and analysis are suitable for use in other studies. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248785

  5. Discrimination of steady state and transient state of dither extremum seeking control via sinusoidal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Baojie; Li, Yaoyu; Seem, John E.

    2016-08-01

    A major class of extremum seeking control (ESC) is based on the use of periodic dither perturbation of plant input for extracting the gradient information. Presence of the dither input into the steady state operation is undesirable in practice due to the possible excessive wear of actuators. It is thus beneficial to stop the dithering action after the ESC reaches its steady state. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically discriminating between the steady state and the transient state modes of extremum seeking control process using the sinusoidal detection techniques. Some design guidelines are proposed for the parameter selection of the relevant sinusoidal detection scheme. The proposed scheme is validated with simulation study on dynamic virtual plant of two building HVAC systems.

  6. Obtaining pure steady states in nonequilibrium quantum systems with strong dissipative couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkov, Vladislav; Presilla, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative preparation of a pure steady state usually involves a commutative action of a coherent and a dissipative dynamics on the target state. Namely, the target pure state is an eigenstate of both the coherent and dissipative parts of the dynamics. We show that working in the Zeno regime, i.e., for infinitely large dissipative coupling, one can generate a pure state by a noncommutative action, in the above sense, of the coherent and dissipative dynamics. A corresponding Zeno regime pureness criterion is derived. We illustrate the approach, looking at both its theoretical and applicative aspects, in the example case of an open X X Z spin-1 /2 chain, driven out of equilibrium by boundary reservoirs targeting different spin orientations. Using our criterion, we find two families of pure nonequilibrium steady states, in the Zeno regime, and calculate the dissipative strengths effectively needed to generate steady states which are almost indistinguishable from the target pure states.

  7. EFFICIENT STEADY-STATE ANALYSIS METHOD FOR CLOSED-LOOP PWM SWITCHING CONVERTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Youwei; Ma Xikui

    2006-01-01

    An analysis technique of steady state and stability for closed-loop PWM DC/DC switching converters is presented. Using this method, the closed-loop switching converter is transformed into an open-loop system. By means of the fact that in steady state, the two boundary values are equal in one switching period. The exponential matrix is evaluated by precise time-domain-integration method, and then the related curve between feedback duty cycle and the input one is obtained. Not only can the steady-state duty cycle be found from the curve, but also the stability and stable domain of the system. Compared with other methods, it features with simplicity and less calculation, and fit for numerical simulation and analysis for closed-loop switching converters. The simulation results of examples indicate the correctness of the presented method.

  8. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Bincheng, E-mail: bcli@ioe.ac.cn [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  9. Paracetamol decreases steady-state exposure to lamotrigine by induction of glucuronidation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastrup, Sandra; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Fruekilde, Palle Bach Nielsen;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Patients receiving lamotrigine therapy frequently use paracetamol concomitantly. While one study suggests a possible, clinically relevant drug-drug interaction, practical recommendations of the concomitant use are inconsistent. We performed a systematic pharmacokinetic study in healthy...... volunteers to quantify the effect of 4-day treatment of paracetamol on the metabolism of steady-state lamotrigine. METHODS: Twelve healthy, male volunteers participated in an open-label, sequential interaction study. Lamotrigine was titrated to steady state (100 mg daily) over 36 days, and blood and urine...... sampling was performed in a non-randomised order with and without paracetamol (1 g four times daily). The primary endpoint was change in steady-state area under the plasma concentration-time curve of lamotrigine. Secondary endpoints were changes in total apparent oral clearance, renal clearance...

  10. Time Reversibility, Correlation Decay and the Steady State Fluctuation Relation for Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis J. Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluctuation relations for nonequilibrium systems are under intense investigation because of their important practical implications in nanotechnology and biology. However the precise conditions under which they hold need clarification. Using the dissipation function, which is related to the entropy production of linear irreversible thermodynamics, we show time reversibility, ergodic consistency and a recently introduced form of correlation decay, called T-mixing, are sufficient conditions for steady state fluctuation relations to hold. Our results are not restricted to a particular model and show that the steady state fluctuation relation for the dissipation function holds near or far from equilibrium subject to these conditions. The dissipation function thus plays a comparable role in nonequilibrium systems to thermodynamic potentials in equilibrium systems.

  11. Steady-state and transient DNB experiments for double-flat-core HCPWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical heat flux (CHF) experiments were performed using triangular pitched 7-rod assemblies simulating the double-flat-core type HCPWR. The onset of steady-state CHR was predicted within the uncertainty of 10 % with the KfK correlation coupled with the subchannel analysis code COBRA-IV-I. Transient CHF's under flow reduction, power increase and flow and power simultaneous variation were predicted with the quasi-steady-state method within the same uncertainty as the steady-state cases. The predictive capability did not depend on the transient speed within 30 %/s of low reduction rate and within 120 %/s of power increase rate. A large DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) margin under accident conditions was confirmed. (author)

  12. Steady states in hierarchical structured populations with distributed states at birth

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, J Z

    2010-01-01

    We address the existence and linearised stability of steady states of a quasilinear first order hyperbolic partial integro-differential equation. The model describes the evolution of a hierarchical structured population with distributed states at birth. Hierarchical size-structured models describe the dynamics of populations when individuals experience size-specific environment. This is the case for example in a population where individuals exhibit cannibalistic behaviour. The other distinctive feature of the model we treat is that individuals may be recruited into the population at arbitrary size, that is, individuals may have infinite states at birth. This assumption amounts to an infinite rank integral operator describing the recruitment process. First we establish conditions for the existence of a positive steady state of the model. Our method uses a fixed point result of nonlinear maps in conical shells of Banach spaces. Then we study stability properties of steady states using results from the theory of...

  13. History-independence of steady-state in simultaneous two-phase flow through porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Erpelding, Marion; Tallakstad, Ken Tore; Hansen, Alex; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the transient behavior during drainage or imbibition in multiphase flow in porous media strongly depends on the history and initial condition of the system. However, when the steady-state regime is reached and both drainage and imbibition take place at the pore level, the influence of the evolution history and initial preparation is an open question. Here, we present an extensive experimental and numerical work investigating the history dependence of simultaneous steady-state two-phase flow through porous media. Our experimental system consists of a Hele-Shaw cell filled with glass beads which we model numerically by a network of disordered pores transporting two immiscible fluids. From the measurements of global pressure evolution, histogram of saturation and cluster-size distributions, we find that when both phases are flowing through the porous medium, the steady state does not depend on the initial preparation of the system or on the way it has been reached.

  14. Open Markov processes: A compositional perspective on non-equilibrium steady states in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Pollard, Blake S

    2016-01-01

    In recent work, Baez, Fong and the author introduced a framework for describing Markov processes equipped with a detailed balanced equilibrium as open systems of a certain type. These `open Markov processes' serve as the building blocks for more complicated processes. In this paper, we describe the potential application of this framework in the modeling of biological systems as open systems maintained away from equilibrium. We show that non-equilibrium steady states emerge in open systems of this type, even when the rates of the underlying process are such that a detailed balanced equilibrium is permitted. It is shown that these non-equilibrium steady states minimize a quadratic form which we call `dissipation.' In some circumstances, the dissipation is approximately equal to the rate of change of relative entropy plus a correction term. On the other hand, Prigogine's principle of minimum entropy production generally fails for non-equilibrium steady states. We use a simple model of membrane transport to illus...

  15. Technical Challenges in the Construction of the Steady-State Stellarator Wendelsetin 7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The 'fully-optimized' stellarator Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, presently under construction in Greifswald, combines a quasi-isodynamic magnetic field configuration sustained by superconducting coils with a steady-state exhaust concept, steady-state heating at high power, and a size sufficient to reach reactor-relevant nΤτ-values. It is the mission of the project to demonstrate the reactor potential of the optimized stellarator line. For the development of a credible stellarator reactor concept, steady-state operation has to be demonstrated with fully integrated discharge scenarios at high heating power with a divertor providing suitable power and particle exhaust. The development of reactor-relevant operation regimes is the chief scientific goal of Wendelstein 7-X. The subject of steady-state operation, however, is of more general interest, as this is also of great concern and interest for future tokamak devices. Consistent with the physics requirements of steady-state plasmas must be the engineering aspects of a steady-state fusion device. We discuss these issues for the design, manufacturing, and assembly of Wendelstein 7-X. The major components of Wendelstein 7-X have been manufactured, tested and delivered: 70 super-conducting coils, 121 superconducting bus-bars for the 7 coil current circuits, about 1000 cryo pipes, 10 half-modules of the central support structure, the plasma vessel and outer vessel, and 254 ports. The main focus of the project has in recent years shifted to the assembly process and considerable progress has been achieved. Although in the early phases of the Wendelstein 7-X construction several schedule delays have accumulated, there have been no major project delays for more than four years and completion of the device is foreseen for mid 2014. A summary of the technological challenges that have been faced in the project and solutions found are discussed in this paper. In addition the route towards completion, commissioning, and

  16. Analysis of physical properties controlling steady-state infiltration rates on tropical savannah soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A knowledge of physical properties influencing the steady-state infiltration rates (ic) of soils is needed for the hydrologic modelling of the infiltration process. In this study evidence is provided to show that effective porosity (Pe) (i.e. the proportion of macro pore spaces with equivalent radius of > 15 μm) and dry bulk density are the most important soil physical properties controlling the steady-state infiltration rates on a tropical savannah with varying land use histories. At a macro porosity value of ≤ 5.0% the steady-state infiltration rate is zero. Total porosity and the proportion of water-retaining pores explained only a small fraction of the variation in this property. Steady-state infiltration rates can also be estimated from either the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) by the equation, ic = 31.1 + 1.06 (Ks), (R2 = 0.8104, p ≤ 0.001) or the soil water transmissivity (A) by the equation, ic = 30.0 + 29.9(A), (R2 = 0.8228, ρ ≤ 0.001). The Philip two-parameter model under predicted steady-state infiltration rates generally. Considering the ease of determination and reliability it is suggested that effective porosity be used to estimate the steady-state infiltration rates of these other soils with similar characteristics. The model is, ic 388.7(Pe) - 10.8(R2 = 0.7265, p ≤ 0.001) where ic is in (cm/hr) and Pe in (cm3/cm3). (author). 20 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  17. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hidekazu (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author).

  18. Auditory brainstem responses in a Rhesus Macaque model of neuro-AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L A; Wallace, D; Berman, N E; Marcario, J; Foresman, L; Joag, S V; Raghavan, R; Narayan, O; Cheney, P D

    1998-10-01

    Nine rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were inoculated with a combination of two passaged strains of SIVmac (R71 and 17E), both of which are known to be neurovirulent. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded at regular intervals from these animals both before and after inoculation. Increases in ABR peak and interpeak latency were observed corresponding to progression of SIV disease. Post-inoculation increases in latency were observed for all five peaks of the ABR and for interpeak intervals I-V and III-V. The largest increases in latency were associated with end-stage disease. Within 14 weeks of inoculation, all but two animals developed end-stage simian AIDS and were euthanized. Histopathological examination revealed multifocal lesions in the cerebral gray and white matter as well as in the auditory structures of the brainstem. In most animals, ABR changes were accompanied by evidence of underlying neuropathology. However, cases of severe neuropathology with no ABR abnormalities and vice versa were also noted. Though in a much shorter time frame, SIVmac R71/17E produced both physiological and histopathological abnormalities similar to those associated with HIV disease in humans. These results further support the SIVmac R71/17E infected rhesus macaque as an animal model of HIV related neurological disease in humans. PMID:9839648

  19. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuróczy György

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young and healthy volunteers (age 18–26 years with normal hearing. ABR data were collected before, and immediately after a 10 minute exposure to 900 MHz pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF emitted by a commercial Nokia 6310 mobile phone. Fifteen subjects were exposed to genuine EMF and fifteen to sham EMF in a double blind and counterbalanced order. Possible effects of irradiation was analyzed by comparing the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after genuine/sham EMF exposure. Results Paired sample t-test was conducted for statistical analysis. Results revealed no significant differences in the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after 10 minutes of genuine/sham EMF exposure. Conclusion The present results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, a single 10 minute exposure of 900 MHz EMF emitted by a commercial mobile phone does not produce measurable immediate effects in the latency of auditory brainstem waves I, III and V.

  20. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author)

  1. Linguistic category structure influences early auditory processing: Converging evidence from mismatch responses and cortical oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharinger, Mathias; Monahan, Philip J; Idsardi, William J

    2016-03-01

    While previous research has established that language-specific knowledge influences early auditory processing, it is still controversial as to what aspects of speech sound representations determine early speech perception. Here, we propose that early processing primarily depends on information propagated top-down from abstractly represented speech sound categories. In particular, we assume that mid-vowels (as in 'bet') exert less top-down effects than the high-vowels (as in 'bit') because of their less specific (default) tongue height position as compared to either high- or low-vowels (as in 'bat'). We tested this assumption in a magnetoencephalography (MEG) study where we contrasted mid- and high-vowels, as well as the low- and high-vowels in a passive oddball paradigm. Overall, significant differences between deviants and standards indexed reliable mismatch negativity (MMN) responses between 200 and 300ms post-stimulus onset. MMN amplitudes differed in the mid/high-vowel contrasts and were significantly reduced when a mid-vowel standard was followed by a high-vowel deviant, extending previous findings. Furthermore, mid-vowel standards showed reduced oscillatory power in the pre-stimulus beta-frequency band (18-26Hz), compared to high-vowel standards. We take this as converging evidence for linguistic category structure to exert top-down influences on auditory processing. The findings are interpreted within the linguistic model of underspecification and the neuropsychological predictive coding framework. PMID:26780574

  2. A quaternionic map for the steady states of the Heisenberg spin-chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the steady states of the classical Heisenberg XXX spin-chain in an external magnetic field can be found by iterations of a quaternionic map. A restricted model, e.g., the xy spin-chain is known to have spatially chaotic steady states and the phase space occupied by these chaotic states is known to go through discrete changes as the field strength is varied. The same phenomenon is studied for the xxx spin-chain. It is seen that in this model the phase space volume varies smoothly with the external field.

  3. A quaternionic map for the steady states of the Heisenberg spin-chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Mitaxi P., E-mail: mitaxi.mehta@ahduni.edu.in [IICT, Ahmedabad University, Opp. IIM, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad (India); Dutta, Souvik; Tiwari, Shubhanshu [BITS-Pilani, K.K. Birla Goa campus, Goa (India)

    2014-01-17

    We show that the steady states of the classical Heisenberg XXX spin-chain in an external magnetic field can be found by iterations of a quaternionic map. A restricted model, e.g., the xy spin-chain is known to have spatially chaotic steady states and the phase space occupied by these chaotic states is known to go through discrete changes as the field strength is varied. The same phenomenon is studied for the xxx spin-chain. It is seen that in this model the phase space volume varies smoothly with the external field.

  4. Analysis on the steady-state coherent synchrotron radiation with strong shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several papers concerning shielding of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by a Gaussian line charge on a circular orbit centered between two parallel conducting plates. Previous asymptotic analyses in the frequency domain show that shielded steady-state CSR mainly arises from harmonics in the bunch frequency exceeding the threshold harmonic for satisfying the boundary conditions at the plates. In this paper the authors extend the frequency-domain analysis into the regime of strong shielding, in which the threshold harmonic exceeds the characteristic frequency of the bunch. The result is then compared to the shielded steady-state CSR power obtained using image charges

  5. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries

  6. Destruction of the family of steady states in the planar problem of Darcy convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider natural convection of an incompressible fluid in a porous medium described by the planar Darcy equation. For some boundary conditions, Darcy problem may have non-unique solutions in form of a continuous family of steady states. We are interested in the situation when these boundary conditions are violated. The resulting destruction of the family of steady states is studied via computer experiments based on a mimetic finite-difference approach. Convection in a rectangular enclosure is considered under different perturbations of boundary conditions (heat sources, infiltration). Two scenario of the family of equilibria are found: the transformation to a limit cycle and the formation of isolated convective patterns

  7. Ways of investigating steady-state condition of steam generators by means of digital simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper steam generators are represented by models in order to get information on the influence of variations of the boundary conditions or the structural design on the steady-state behavior. The description of the models and all the calculations are performed on the simulation language CSMP 10 applying two different methods. By the first method (inductive method) the system of differential equations describing the temperatures as a function of the geometric locus is solved. By the second one (deductive method) control circuits are established enforcing the steady-state condition by levelling the comments of heat. (GL)

  8. Coherent control of long-distance steady state entanglement in lossy resonator arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Angelakis, Dimitris G.; Dai, Li; Kwek, Leong-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We show that coherent control of the steady-state long-distance entanglement between pairs of cavity-atom systems in an array of lossy and driven coupled resonators is possible. The cavities are doped with atoms and are connected through wave guides, other cavities or fibers depending on the implementation. We find that the steady-state entanglement can be coherently controlled through the tuning of the phase difference between the driving fields. It can also be surprisingly high in spite of ...

  9. UNIVERSAL THEORY OF STEADY-STATE ONE-DIMENSIONAL PHOTOREFRACTIVE SOLITONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘劲松

    2001-01-01

    A universal theory of steady-state one-dimensional photorefractive spatial solitons is developed which applies to the steady-state one-dimensional photorefractive solitons under various realizations, including the screening solitons in a biased photorefractive medium, the photovoltaic solitons in open- and closed-circuit photovoltaic-photorefractive media and the screening-photovoltaic solitons in biased photovoltaic-photorefractive media. Previous theories advanced individually elsewhere for these solitons can be obtained by simplifying the universal theory under the appropriate conditions.

  10. 7. IAEA Technical Meeting on Steady State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Booklet of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting has provided an appropriate forum to discuss current issues covering a wide range of technical topics related to the steady state operation issues and also to encourage forecast of the ITER performances. The technical meeting includes invited and contributed papers. The topics that have been dealt with are: 1) Superconducting devices (ITER, KSTAR, Tore-Supra, HT-7U, EAST, LHD, Wendelstein-7-X,...); 2) Long-pulse operation and advanced tokamak physics; 3) steady state fusion technologies; 4) Long pulse heating and current drive; 5) Particle control and power exhaust, and 6) ITER-related research and development issues. This document gathers the abstracts

  11. Comments on steady-state equilibrium profiles in field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents conclusions about the character of equilibrium profiles which may be sustained in steady state in a highly elongated (long-thin) Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). It is shown in this paper that equilibria which can be sustained in a steady state in a long-thin FRC obeying classical diffusion are likely to involve relatively high fluid pressure outside the separatrix - a condition which also leads to rapid particle losses along the open field lines. Thus, suppression of microinstabilities may not actually result in better particle confinement

  12. Seventh meeting of the ITER physics expert group on energetic particles, heating and steady state operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh meeting of the ITER Physics Group on energetic particles, heating and steady state operation was held at CEN/Cadarache from 14 to 18 September 1999. This was the first meeting following the redefinition of the Expert Group structure and it was also the first meeting without participation of US physicists. The main topics covered were: 1. Energetic Particles, 2. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating, 3. Lower Hybrid Current Drive, 4. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive, 5. Neutral Beam Injection, 6. Steady-State Aspects

  13. Steady-state FEL: particle dynamics in the FEL portion of a two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by its use in a Two-Beam Accelerator, we have studied a ''steady-state'' FEL; i.e., a periodic but very long structure in which the electron beam energy is replenished once a period with a short induction acceleration unit. We have studied longitudinal particle motion in such a device using a 1-D simulation code. We show that after an initial start-up section, particle detrapping from the pondermotive wave is minimal in a steady-state FEL of several kilometers. A simple linear model of particle diffusion is shown to describe the numerical results quite well

  14. Critical issues of burning plasma, engineering, economic and environmental assessments on steady-state fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For burning plasma simulation and reactor system analysis on steady-state high beta fusion reactors, TOTAL physics code and PEC engineering code have been developed. From TOTAL analysis, it is clarified that by choosing appropriate external current drive profile, high bootstrap-current fraction is achieved in steady-state. From PEC analysis, it is found that the current drive efficiency should be raised for cost of electricity (COE) and CO2 reductions in rather low-beta reactors. Newly derived scaling formulas on COE and life-cycle CO2 emission rate might contribute to the future reactor design projection. (author)

  15. Evolutionary adaptations for the temporal processing of natural sounds by the anuran peripheral auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrode, Katrina M; Bee, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Sensory systems function most efficiently when processing natural stimuli, such as vocalizations, and it is thought that this reflects evolutionary adaptation. Among the best-described examples of evolutionary adaptation in the auditory system are the frequent matches between spectral tuning in both the peripheral and central auditory systems of anurans (frogs and toads) and the frequency spectra of conspecific calls. Tuning to the temporal properties of conspecific calls is less well established, and in anurans has so far been documented only in the central auditory system. Using auditory-evoked potentials, we asked whether there are species-specific or sex-specific adaptations of the auditory systems of gray treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) and green treefrogs (H. cinerea) to the temporal modulations present in conspecific calls. Modulation rate transfer functions (MRTFs) constructed from auditory steady-state responses revealed that each species was more sensitive than the other to the modulation rates typical of conspecific advertisement calls. In addition, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to paired clicks indicated relatively better temporal resolution in green treefrogs, which could represent an adaptation to the faster modulation rates present in the calls of this species. MRTFs and recovery of ABRs to paired clicks were generally similar between the sexes, and we found no evidence that males were more sensitive than females to the temporal modulation patterns characteristic of the aggressive calls used in male-male competition. Together, our results suggest that efficient processing of the temporal properties of behaviorally relevant sounds begins at potentially very early stages of the anuran auditory system that include the periphery. PMID:25617467

  16. The afferent signaling complex: Regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron responses in the auditory periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijntjes, Daniël O J; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-06-01

    The spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the first action potential generating neurons in the auditory pathway. The type I SGNs contact the sensory inner hair cells via their peripheral dendrites and relay auditory information to the brainstem via their central axon fibers. Individual afferent fibers show differences in response properties that are essential for normal hearing. The mechanisms that give rise to the heterogeneity of afferent responses are very poorly understood but are likely already in place at the peripheral dendrites where synapses are formed and action potentials are generated. To identify these molecular mechanisms, this review synthesizes a variety of literature and comprehensively outlines the cellular and molecular components positioned to regulate SGN afferent dendrite excitability, especially following glutamate release. These components include 1) proteins of the SGN postsynapses and neighboring supporting cells that together shape glutamatergic signaling, 2) the ion channels and transporters that determine the intrinsic excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites, and 3) the neurotransmitter receptors that extrinsically modify this excitability via synaptic input from the lateral olivocochlear efferents. This cellular and molecular machinery, together with presynaptic specializations of the inner hair cells, can be collectively referred to as the type I afferent signaling complex. As this review underscores, interactions of this signaling complex determine excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites and the afferent fiber responses. Moreover, this complex establishes the environmental milieu critical for the development and maintenance of the SGN afferent dendrites and synapses. Motivated by these important functions, this review also indicates areas of future research to elucidate the contributions of the afferent signaling complex to both normal hearing and also hearing loss. PMID:27018296

  17. Infant temperament and the brainstem auditory evoked response in later childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, S A; McManis, M H; Kagan, J; Deldin, P; Snidman, N; Lewis, M; Kahn, V

    2001-07-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs) were evaluated on 10-12-year-old children (N = 56) who had been classified as high or low reactive to unfamiliar stimuli at 4 months of age. BAER measurement was selected because high reactive infants tend to become inhibited or fearful young children, and adult introverts have a faster latency to wave V of the BAER than do extroverts. Children previously classified as high reactive at 4 months had larger wave V components than did low reactive children, a finding that possibly suggests greater excitability in projections to the inferior colliculus. The fact that a fundamental feature of brainstem activity differentiated preadolescent children belonging to two early temperamental groups supports the value of gathering physiological data in temperament research. PMID:11444488

  18. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Susan; Khanbabaee, Ghamartaj; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2016-09-01

    Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group) and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group). Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves I, III, and V) than did the control group (P=0.001). These amplitudes were significantly reduced after 1 year (P=0.001); however, they were still significantly higher than those of the control group (P=0.001). The significant differences were seen regardless of the age and the sex of the participants. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups considering the latency of waves I, III, and V. In conclusion, the higher amplitudes of waves I, III, and V, which were observed in the auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli among the patients with speech delay with unknown causes, might be used as a diagnostic tool to track patients' improvement after treatment. PMID:27582591

  19. Scalp-recorded induced γ-band responses to auditory stimulation and its correlations with saccadic muscle-activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuval-Greenberg, Shlomit; Deouell, Leon Y

    2011-03-01

    We previously showed that the transient broadband induced gamma-band response in EEG (iGBRtb) appearing around 200-300 ms following a visual stimulus reflects the contraction of extra-ocular muscles involved in the execution of saccades, rather than neural oscillations. Several previous studies reported induced gamma-band responses also following auditory stimulation. It is still an open question whether, similarly to visual paradigms, such auditory paradigms are also sensitive to the saccadic confound. In the current study we address this question using simultaneous eye-tracking and EEG recordings during an auditory oddball paradigm. Subjects were instructed to respond to a rare target defined by sound source location, while fixating on a central screen. Results show that, similar to what was found in visual paradigms, saccadic rate displayed typical temporal dynamics including a post-stimulus decrease followed by an increase. This increase was more moderate, had a longer latency, and was less consistent across subjects than was found in the visual case. Crucially, the temporal dynamics of the induced gamma response were similar to those of saccadic-rate modulation. This suggests that the auditory induced gamma-band responses recorded on the scalp may also be affected by saccadic muscle activity. PMID:20665099

  20. Electrophysiological mismatch response recorded in awake pigeons from the avian functional equivalent of the primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Ulrich; Müller, Bernhard W; Kärgel, Christian; Güntürkün, Onur

    2015-03-25

    The neural response to occasional variations in acoustic stimuli in a regular sequence of sounds generates an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-modulated event-related potential in primates and rodents in the primary auditory cortex known as mismatch negativity (MMN). The current study investigated MMN in pigeons (Columba livia L) through intracranial recordings from Field L of the caudomedial nidopallium, the avian functional equivalent of the mammalian primary auditory cortex. Auditory evoked field potentials were recorded from awake birds using a low-frequency (800 Hz) and high-frequency (1400 Hz) deviant auditory oddball procedure with deviant-as-standard (flip-flop design) and multiple-standard control conditions. An MMN-like field potential was recorded and blocked with systemic 5 mg/kg ketamine administration. Our results are similar to human and rodent findings of an MMN-like event-related potential in birds suggestive of similar auditory sensory memory mechanisms in birds and mammals that are homologue from a common ancestor 300 million years ago or resulted from convergent evolution. PMID:25646582

  1. Evaluation of small hypothalamic hamartomas with 3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamura, Masayuki; Hirai, Toshinori; Kitajima, Mika; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Ikushima, Ichiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Korogi, Yukunori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Endo, Fumio [Kumamoto University, Department of Pediatrics,Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas are relatively rare, non-neoplastic congenital malformations. With conventional MR images alone, small hypothalamic hamartomas may be difficult to diagnose because of artifacts from cerebrospinal fluid. We present the usefulness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state sequence for evaluating small hypothalamic hamartomas in three pediatric patients. (orig.)

  2. An implicit steady-state initialization package for the RELAP5 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct steady-state initialization (DSSI) method has been developed and implemented in the RELAP5 hydrodynamic analysis program. It provides a means for users to specify a small set of initial conditions which are then propagated through the remainder of the system. The DSSI scheme utilizes the steady-state form of the RELAP5 balance equations for nonequilibrium two-phase flow. It also employs the RELAP5 component models and constitutive model packages for wall-to-phase and interphase momentum and heat exchange. A fully implicit solution of the linearized hydrodynamic equations is implemented. An implicit coupling scheme is used to augment the standard steady-state heat conduction solution for steam generator use. It solves the primary-side tube region energy equations, heat conduction equations, wall heat flux boundary conditions, and overall energy balance equation as a coupled system of equations and improves convergence. The DSSI method for initializing RELAP5 problems to steady-state conditions has been compared with the transient solution scheme using a suite of test problems including; adiabatic single-phase liquid and vapor flow through channels with and without healing and area changes; a heated two-phase test bundle representative of BWR core conditions; and a single-loop PWR model

  3. Steady-state hydrodynamic instabilities of active liquid crystals: Hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenduzzo, D.; Orlandini, E.; Cates, M. E.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2007-09-01

    We report hybrid lattice Boltzmann (HLB) simulations of the hydrodynamics of an active nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between confining walls with various anchoring conditions. We confirm the existence of a transition between a passive phase and an active phase, in which there is spontaneous flow in the steady state. This transition is attained for sufficiently “extensile” rods, in the case of flow-aligning liquid crystals, and for sufficiently “contractile” ones for flow-tumbling materials. In a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, deep in the active phase of flow-aligning materials, our simulations give evidence of hysteresis and history-dependent steady states, as well as of spontaneous banded flow. Flow-tumbling materials, in contrast, rearrange themselves so that only the two boundary layers flow in steady state. Two-dimensional simulations, with periodic boundary conditions, show additional instabilities, with the spontaneous flow appearing as patterns made up of “convection rolls.” These results demonstrate a remarkable richness (including dependence on anchoring conditions) in the steady-state phase behavior of active materials, even in the absence of external forcing; they have no counterpart for passive nematics. Our HLB methodology, which combines lattice Boltzmann for momentum transport with a finite difference scheme for the order parameter dynamics, offers a robust and efficient method for probing the complex hydrodynamic behavior of active nematics.

  4. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to ∼1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is ∼18 deg. C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  5. Integrated modelling of DEMO-FNS current ramp-up scenario and steady-state regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Kuteev, B. V.; Bykov, A. S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Sychugov, D. Yu.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    An approach to the integrated modelling of plasma regimes in the projected neutron source DEMO-FNS based on different codes is developed. The consistency check of the steady-state regime is carried out, namely, the possibility of the plasma current ramp-up, acceptance of growth rates of MHD modes in the steady-state regime, heat loads to the wall and divertor plates and neutron yield value. The following codes are employed for the integrated modelling. ASTRA transport code for calculation of plasma parameters in the steady-state regime, NUBEAM Monte Carlo code for NBI incorporated into the ASTRA code, DINA free boundary equilibrium and evolution code, SPIDER free boundary equilibrium and equilibrium reconstruction code, KINX ideal MHD stability code, TOKSTAB rigid shift vertical stability code, edge and divertor plasma B2SOLPS5.2 code and Semi-analytic Hybrid Model (SHM) code for self-consistent description of the core, edge and divertor plasmas based on the experimental scaling laws. The consistent steady-state regime for the DEMO-FNS plasma and the plasma current ramp-up scenario are developed using the integrated modelling approach. Passive copper coils are suggested to reduce the plasma vertical instability growth rate to below ˜30 s-1.The outer divertor operation in the ‘high-recycling’ regime is numerically demonstrated with a maximal heat flux density of 7-9 MW m-2 that is technically acceptable.

  6. Applications of mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods to transient and steady state creep analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation is applied to transiente and steady state creep problems. Numerical analysis has shown additional stability of this method compared to classical Galerkin formulations. The accuracy of the new formulation is confirmed in some representative examples of two dimensional and axisymmetric problems. (author)

  7. Non-steady state effects in diurnal 180 discrimination by Picea sitchensis branches in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, U; Wingate, L; Berry, J A; Lloyd, J

    2006-05-01

    We report diurnal variations in 18O discrimination (18 delta) during photosynthesis (18 delta A) and respiration (18 delta R) of Picea sitchensis branches measured in branch chambers in the field. These observations were compared with predicted 18 delta (18 delta pred) based on concurrent measurements of branch gas exchange to evaluate steady state and non-steady state (NSS) models of foliage water 18O enrichment for predicting the impact of this ecosystem on the Delta 18O of atmospheric CO2. The non-steady state approach substantially improved the agreement between 18 delta pred and observed 18 delta (18 delta obs) compared with the assumption of isotopic steady state (ISS) for the Delta 18O signature of foliage water. In addition, we found direct observational evidence for NSS effects: extremely high apparent 18 delta values at dusk, dawn and during nocturnal respiration. Our experiments also show the importance of bidirectional foliage gas exchange at night (isotopic equilibration in addition to the net flux). Taken together, neglecting these effects leads to an underestimation of daily net canopy isofluxes from this forest by up to 30%. We expect NSS effects to be most pronounced in species with high specific leaf water content such as conifers and when stomata are open at night or when there is high relative humidity, and we suggest modifications to ecosystem and global models of delta 18O of CO2. PMID:17087476

  8. Formulation of Non-steady-state Dust Formation Process in Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya

    2013-01-01

    The non-steady-state formation of small clusters and the growth of grains accompanied by chemical reactions are formulated under the consideration that the collision of key gas species (key molecule) controls the kinetics of dust formation process. The formula allows us to evaluate the size distribution and condensation efficiency of dust formed in astrophysical environments. We apply the formulation to the formation of C and MgSiO3 grains in the ejecta of supernovae, as an example, to investigate how the non-steady effect influences the formation process, condensation efficiency f_{con}, and average radius a_{ave} of newly formed grains in comparison with the results calculated with the steady-state nucleation rate. We show that the steady-state nucleation rate is a good approximation if the collision timescale of key molecule tau_{coll} is much smaller than the timescale tau_{sat} with which the supersaturation ratio increases; otherwise the effect of the non-steady state becomes remarkable, leading to a lo...

  9. Analysis of Plasticity, Fracture and Friction in Steady State Plate Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1996-01-01

    A closed form solution to the problem of steady state wedge cutting through a ductile metal plate is presented. The considered problem is an idealization of a ship bottom raking process, i.e. a continuous cutting damage of a ship bottom by a hard knife-like rock in a grounding event. A new...

  10. Elimination of thermodynamically infeasible loops in steady-state metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Jan; Lewis, Nathan E; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2011-02-01

    The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) framework has been widely used to study steady-state flux solutions in genome-scale metabolic networks. One shortcoming of current COBRA methods is the possible violation of the loop law in the computed steady-state flux solutions. The loop law is analogous to Kirchhoff's second law for electric circuits, and states that at steady state there can be no net flux around a closed network cycle. Although the consequences of the loop law have been known for years, it has been computationally difficult to work with. Therefore, the resulting loop-law constraints have been overlooked. Here, we present a general mixed integer programming approach called loopless COBRA (ll-COBRA), which can be used to eliminate all steady-state flux solutions that are incompatible with the loop law. We apply this approach to improve flux predictions on three common COBRA methods: flux balance analysis, flux variability analysis, and Monte Carlo sampling of the flux space. Moreover, we demonstrate that the imposition of loop-law constraints with ll-COBRA improves the consistency of simulation results with experimental data. This method provides an additional constraint for many COBRA methods, enabling the acquisition of more realistic simulation results. PMID:21281568

  11. Physical design of MW-class steady-state spherical tokamak, QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    QUEST (R=0.68 m, a=0.4 m) focuses on the steady state operation of the spherical tokamak (ST) by controlled PWI and electron Bernstain wave (EBW) current drive (CD). The QUEST project will be developed along two phases, phase I: steady state operation with plasma current, Ip=20-30 kA on open divertor configuration and phase II: steady state operation with Ip = 100 kA and β of 10% in short pulse on closed divertor configuration. Feasibility of the missions on QUEST was investigated and the suitable machine size of QUEST was decided based on the physical view of plasma parameters. Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) current drive are planned to establish the maintenance of plasma current in steady state. Mode conversion efficiency to EBW was calculated and the conversion of 95% will be expected. A new type antenna for QUEST has been fabricated to excite EBW effectively. The situation of heat and particle handling is challenging, and W and high temperature wall is adopted. The start-up scenario of plasma current was investigated based on the driven current by energetic electron and the most favorable magnetic configuration for start-up is proposed. (author)

  12. Thermal shock behaviour of blisters on W surface during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal shock behaviour of blister-covered W surfaces during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The W samples were first exposed to steady-state D plasma to induce blisters on the surface, and then the blistered surfaces were exposed to steady-state/pulsed plasma. Growth and cracking of blisters were observed after the exposure to the steady-state/pulsed plasma, while no obvious damage occurred on the surface area not covered with blisters. The results confirm that blisters induced by D plasma might represent weak spots on the W surface when exposed to transient heat load of ELMs. The cracks on blisters were different from the cracks due to the transient heat loads reported before, and they were assumed to be caused by stress and strain due to the gas expansion inside the blisters during the plasma pulses. Moreover, most of cracks were found to appear on the blisters formed on grains with surface orientation near [1 1 1].

  13. Parallel shooting methods for finding steady state solutions to engine simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Parallel single- and multiple shooting methods were tested for finding periodic steady state solutions to a Stirling engine model. The model was used to illustrate features of the methods and possibilities for optimisations. Performance was measured using simulation of an experimental data set as...

  14. Modeling of steady-state flow in heated (BWR) parallel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FIBWR computer code has been developed to predict the distributions of quality and void fraction in Boiling Water Reactors. This study describes the analytical methodology used to solve the conservation equations of continuity, momentum and energy in steady-state, heated, parallel channel, two-phase flow. 11 refs

  15. Variational Principle for Non-Equilibrium Steady States of the XX Model

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, T

    2003-01-01

    We show that non-equilibrium steady states of the one dimensional exactly solved XY model can be characterized by the variational principle of free energy of a long range interaction and that they cannot be a KMS state for any C$^*$-dynamical system.

  16. Experimental and numerical analysis of the steady-state behaviour of a beam system with impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorst, E.L.B. van de; Heertjes, M.F.; Campen, D.H. van; Kraker, A. de; Fey, R.H.B.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the steady state behaviour of a beam system with a periodically moving support and an elastic stop is analysed both numerically and experimentally. In the numerical analysis a continuous model for the elastic stop is used based on the contact force law of Hertz. The beam is modelled us

  17. Analytical steady-state solutions for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems mod...

  18. Effect of vacuum conditions on the operation of a steady-state plasma engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The features of a steady-state plasma engine (SPE) operating in a vacuum chamber are considered. A review is given of papers that elucidate the effect of the gas pressure in the vacuum chamber on the discharge current, jet thrust, and efficiency of the engine. The effect on the SPE operation of the negative ions created by the target bombardment is discussed

  19. A constitutive analysis of transient and steady-state elongational viscosities of bidisperse polystyrene blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Manfred H.; Rolon-Garrido, Victor H.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann;

    2008-01-01

    The transient and steady-state elongational viscosity data of three bidisperse polystyrene blends were investigated recently by Nielsen et al. [J. Rheol. 50, 453-476 (2006)]. The blends contain a monodisperse high molar mass component (M-L= 390 kg/ mol) in a matrix of a monodisperse small molar m...

  20. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU TA

    2009-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  1. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  2. Thin Film Equations with Soluble Surfactant and Gravity: Modeling and Stability of Steady States

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Laurençot, Philippe; Walker, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A thin film on a horizontal solid substrate and coated with a soluble surfactant is considered. The governing degenerate parabolic equations for the film height and the surfactant concentrations on the surface and in the bulk are derived using a lubrication approximation when gravity is taken into account. It is shown that the steady states are asymptotically stable.

  3. Steady-State Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion Extended-Release In Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Birmaher, Boris; Rudolph, George R.; Melhem, Imad; Axelson, David A.; Brent, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine in children and adolescents the 24-hour, steady-state clinical pharmacokinetics of an extended-release (XL) formulation of bupropion (Wellbutrin XL). Method: Subjects were six male and four female patients (ages 11.5-16.2 years) prescribed bupropion XL in morning daily doses of either 150 mg (n = 5) or 300 mg (n = 5) for at…

  4. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different mathematical methods are used to calculate the nuclear transmutation in steady-state and pulsed neutron irradiation. These methods are the Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation of the matrix exponential function. In the case of the linear decay chain approximation, a simple algorithm is used to evaluate the transition matrices

  5. Performance of the steam generators of Phenix in steady-state operation - comparison with predicted values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental performances in steady state conditions of the prototype modules and the commercial unit of the Phenix Steam Generator were compared. It is shown that, as early as 1969, our computer code allowed us a fair prediction of the required heat transfer area, and of the full load performance of the Phenix Steam Generator. (author)

  6. Energy Transport in the Steady State Plasma Sustained by DC Helicity Current Drive

    OpenAIRE

    K. Itoh; Itoh, S.-I.; Fukuyama, A.

    1992-01-01

    Steady state operation of tokamaks which is sustained by the DC helicity current drive near edge is studied. The necessary value of the current diffusivity is obtained. Relation between the current diffusivity and the thermal diffusivity, which are governed by the microscopic turbulence, indicates that this requires too large thermal transport for the parameters in present day experiments.

  7. A general theory of kinetics and thermodynamics of steady-state copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of steady-state copolymerization has been investigated since the 1940s. Irreversible terminal and penultimate models were successfully applied to a number of comonomer systems, but failed for systems where depropagation is significant. Although a general mathematical treatment of the terminal model with depropagation was established in the 1980s, a penultimate model and higher-order terminal models with depropagation have not been systematically studied, since depropagation leads to hierarchically-coupled and unclosed kinetic equations which are hard to solve analytically. In this work, we propose a truncation method to solve the steady-state kinetic equations of any-order terminal models with depropagation in a unified way, by reducing them into closed steady-state equations which give the exact solution of the original kinetic equations. Based on the steady-state equations, we also derive a general thermodynamic equality in which the Shannon entropy of the copolymer sequence is explicitly introduced as part of the free energy dissipation of the whole copolymerization system. (paper)

  8. TRACE GAS EMISSIONS IN CHAMBERS: A NON-STEADY-STATE DIFFUSION MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-steady-state (NSS) chambers are widely used to measure trace gas emissions from the Earth’s surface in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, traditional interpretations of time-dependent chamber concentrations often systematically underestimate predeployment exchange rates because they do not accuratel...

  9. Steady-state hydrodynamic instabilities of active liquid crystals: hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E; Cates, M E; Yeomans, J M

    2007-09-01

    We report hybrid lattice Boltzmann (HLB) simulations of the hydrodynamics of an active nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between confining walls with various anchoring conditions. We confirm the existence of a transition between a passive phase and an active phase, in which there is spontaneous flow in the steady state. This transition is attained for sufficiently "extensile" rods, in the case of flow-aligning liquid crystals, and for sufficiently "contractile" ones for flow-tumbling materials. In a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, deep in the active phase of flow-aligning materials, our simulations give evidence of hysteresis and history-dependent steady states, as well as of spontaneous banded flow. Flow-tumbling materials, in contrast, rearrange themselves so that only the two boundary layers flow in steady state. Two-dimensional simulations, with periodic boundary conditions, show additional instabilities, with the spontaneous flow appearing as patterns made up of "convection rolls." These results demonstrate a remarkable richness (including dependence on anchoring conditions) in the steady-state phase behavior of active materials, even in the absence of external forcing; they have no counterpart for passive nematics. Our HLB methodology, which combines lattice Boltzmann for momentum transport with a finite difference scheme for the order parameter dynamics, offers a robust and efficient method for probing the complex hydrodynamic behavior of active nematics. PMID:17930285

  10. Multiple steady states detection in a packed-bed reactive distillation column using bifurcation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramzan, Naveed; Faheem, Muhammad; Gani, Rafiqul; Witt, Werner

    2010-01-01

    A packed reactive distillation column producing ethyl tert-butyl ether from tert-butyl alcohol and ethanol was simulated for detection of multiple steady states using Aspen Plus®. A rate-based approach was used to make the simulation model more realistic. A base-case was first developed and fine-tuned...

  11. In-air hearing of a diving duck: A comparison of psychoacoustic and auditory brainstem response thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-05-01

    Auditory sensitivity was measured in a species of diving duck that is not often kept in captivity, the lesser scaup. Behavioral (psychoacoustics) and electrophysiological [the auditory brainstem response (ABR)] methods were used to measure in-air auditory sensitivity, and the resulting audiograms were compared. Both approaches yielded audiograms with similar U-shapes and regions of greatest sensitivity (2000-3000 Hz). However, ABR thresholds were higher than psychoacoustic thresholds at all frequencies. This difference was least at the highest frequency tested using both methods (5700 Hz) and greatest at 1000 Hz, where the ABR threshold was 26.8 dB higher than the behavioral measure of threshold. This difference is commonly reported in studies involving many different species. These results highlight the usefulness of each method, depending on the testing conditions and availability of the animals. PMID:27250191

  12. Advancing the detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials in brain–computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Peer, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Spatial filtering has proved to be a powerful pre-processing step in detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials and boosted typical detection rates both in offline analysis and online SSVEP-based brain–computer interface applications. State-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby share many common foundations as they all build upon the second order statistics of the acquired Electroencephalographic (EEG) data, that is, its spatial autocovariance and cross-covariance with what is assumed to be a pure SSVEP response. The present study aims at highlighting the similarities and differences between these methods. Approach. We consider the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method as a basis for the theoretical and empirical (with real EEG data) analysis of the state-of-the-art detection methods and the spatial filters used thereby. We build upon the findings of this analysis and prior research and propose a new detection method (CVARS) that combines the power of the canonical variates and that of the autoregressive spectral analysis in estimating the signal and noise power levels. Main results. We found that the multivariate synchronization index method and the maximum contrast combination method are variations of the CCA method. All three methods were found to provide relatively unreliable detections in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regimes. CVARS and the minimum energy combination methods were found to provide better estimates for different SNR levels. Significance. Our theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that the proposed CVARS method outperforms other state-of-the-art detection methods when used in an unsupervised fashion. Furthermore, when used in a supervised fashion, a linear classifier learned from a short training session is able to estimate the hidden user intention, including the idle state (when the user is not attending to any stimulus), rapidly, accurately and reliably.

  13. CPR methodology with new steady-state criterion and more accurate statistical treatment of channel bow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of existing CPR design criteria and the methods used in BWR reload analysis to evaluate the impact of channel bow on CPR margins. Potential weaknesses in today's methodologies are discussed. Westinghouse in collaboration with KKL and Axpo - operator and owner of the Leibstadt NPP - has developed an optimized CPR methodology based on a new criterion to protect against dryout during normal operation and with a more rigorous treatment of channel bow. The new steady-state criterion is expressed in terms of an upper limit of 0.01 for the dryout failure probability per year. This is considered a meaningful and appropriate criterion that can be directly related to the probabilistic criteria set-up for the analyses of Anticipated Operation Occurrences (AOOs) and accidents. In the Monte Carlo approach a statistical modeling of channel bow and an accurate evaluation of CPR response functions allow the associated CPR penalties to be included directly in the plant SLMCPR and OLMCPR in a best-estimate manner. In this way, the treatment of channel bow is equivalent to all other uncertainties affecting CPR. Emphasis is put on quantifying the statistical distribution of channel bow throughout the core using measurement data. The optimized CPR methodology has been implemented in the Westinghouse Monte Carlo code, McSLAP. The methodology improves the quality of dryout safety assessments by supplying more valuable information and better control of conservatisms in establishing operational limits for CPR. The methodology is demonstrated with application examples from the introduction at KKL. (authors)

  14. Auditory Learning. Dimensions in Early Learning Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigmond, Naomi K.; Cicci, Regina

    The monograph discusses the psycho-physiological operations for processing of auditory information, the structure and function of the ear, the development of auditory processes from fetal responses through discrimination, language comprehension, auditory memory, and auditory processes related to written language. Disorders of auditory learning…

  15. Analytical models of steady-state plumes undergoing sequential first-order degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnell, Daniel K; Mercer, James W; Sims, Lawrence S

    2012-01-01

    An exact, closed-form analytical solution is derived for one-dimensional (1D), coupled, steady-state advection-dispersion equations with sequential first-order degradation of three dissolved species in groundwater. Dimensionless and mathematical analyses are used to examine the sensitivity of longitudinal dispersivity in the parent and daughter analytical solutions. The results indicate that the relative error decreases to less than 15% for the 1D advection-dominated and advection-dispersion analytical solutions of the parent and daughter when the Damköhler number of the parent decreases to less than 1 (slow degradation rate) and the Peclet number increases to greater than 6 (advection-dominated). To estimate first-order daughter product rate constants in advection-dominated zones, 1D, two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) steady-state analytical solutions with zero longitudinal dispersivity are also derived for three first-order sequentially degrading compounds. The closed form of these exact analytical solutions has the advantage of having (1) no numerical integration or evaluation of complex-valued error function arguments, (2) computational efficiency compared to problems with long times to reach steady state, and (3) minimal effort for incorporation into spreadsheets. These multispecies analytical solutions indicate that BIOCHLOR produces accurate results for 1D steady-state, applications with longitudinal dispersion. Although BIOCHLOR is inaccurate in multidimensional applications with longitudinal dispersion, these multidimensional multispecies analytical solutions indicate that BIOCHLOR produces accurate steady-state results when the longitudinal dispersion is zero. As an application, the 1D advection-dominated analytical solution is applied to estimate field-scale rate constants of 0.81, 0.74, and 0.69/year for trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride, respectively, at the Harris Palm Bay, FL, CERCLA site. PMID:21883193

  16. Quasi-steady-state calculation methods. Casement windows in office buildings and school buildings; Quasi-steady-state bepalingsmethode. Opengaande ramen in kantoren en scholen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethals, K.; Janssens, A. [Onderzoeksgroep Bouwfysica, Constructie en Klimaatbeheersing, Faculteit Ingenieurswetenschappen, Universiteit Gent, Gent (Belgium)

    2011-02-15

    To promote in Belgium passive cooling techniques, quasi-steady-state calculation methods should be developed and implemented. Starting from the European standard EN 13790, the authors of the paper developed an assessment method for opening windows in offices and schools without active cooling. Alongside the flow rate, a temperature correction factor and a time fraction of operation determine the extra heat loss. The authors derived two last-mentioned factors from dynamic Trnsys-simulations of three buildings. The validation results show a dear correlation between the overheating indicator derived from the EPB-calculation and the temperature excess hours predicted by Trnsys. [Dutch] Om in Belgie passieve koeltechnieken te stimuleren, moeten quasi-steady-state bepalingsmethodes ontwikkeld en ingevoerd worden. Uitgaande van de Europese norm EN 13790 ontwikkelden de auteurs van dit artikel een bepalingsmethode voor opengaande ramen in kantoren en scholen zonder actieve koeling. Samen met het ventilatiedebiet bepalen een temperatuurcorrectiefactor en een tijdsfractie van gebruik het extra ventilatieverlies. De auteurs leidden de twee laatstgenoemde factoren af aan de hand van dynamische Trnsys-simulaties van drie referentiegebouwen. De validatieresultaten tonen een duidelijk verband tusssen de oververhittingindicator, afgeleid uit de EPB-berekening en de temperatuuroverschrijdingen voorspeld door Trnsys.

  17. Effects of ZNF804A on auditory P300 response in schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, T

    2014-01-01

    The common variant rs1344706 within the zinc-finger protein gene ZNF804A has been strongly implicated in schizophrenia (SZ) susceptibility by a series of recent genetic association studies. Although associated with a pattern of altered neural connectivity, evidence that increased risk is mediated by an effect on cognitive deficits associated with the disorder has been equivocal. This study investigated whether the same ZNF804A risk allele was associated with variation in the P300 auditory-evoked response, a cognitively relevant putative endophenotype for SZ. We compared P300 responses in carriers and noncarriers of the ZNF804A risk allele genotype groups in Irish patients and controls (n=97). P300 response was observed to vary according to genotype in this sample, such that risk allele carriers showed relatively higher P300 response compared with noncarriers. This finding accords with behavioural data reported by our group and others. It is also consistent with the idea that ZNF804A may have an impact on cortical efficiency, reflected in the higher levels of activations required to achieve comparable behavioural accuracy on the task used.

  18. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Lili, Li; Wang, Jing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xu, Guang-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054 (China)

    2015-03-10

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  19. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces nn with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method

  20. Spectral and Temporal Acoustic Features Modulate Response Irregularities within Primary Auditory Cortex Columns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Carrasco

    Full Text Available Assemblies of vertically connected neurons in the cerebral cortex form information processing units (columns that participate in the distribution and segregation of sensory signals. Despite well-accepted models of columnar architecture, functional mechanisms of inter-laminar communication remain poorly understood. Hence, the purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effects of sensory information features on columnar response properties. Using acute recording techniques, extracellular response activity was collected from the right hemisphere of eight mature cats (felis catus. Recordings were conducted with multichannel electrodes that permitted the simultaneous acquisition of neuronal activity within primary auditory cortex columns. Neuronal responses to simple (pure tones, complex (noise burst and frequency modulated sweeps, and ecologically relevant (con-specific vocalizations acoustic signals were measured. Collectively, the present investigation demonstrates that despite consistencies in neuronal tuning (characteristic frequency, irregularities in discharge activity between neurons of individual A1 columns increase as a function of spectral (signal complexity and temporal (duration acoustic variations.