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Sample records for au site pilote

  1. Strontium and caesium transport in unsaturated soil from Chernobyl Pilot Site under steady flow conditions; Transfert de radioelements en zone non saturee. Etude experimentale et modelisation appliquees au Site Pilote de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szenknect, St

    2003-10-15

    This work is devoted to the quantification and the identification of the predominant processes involved in strontium and caesium transport in unsaturated soil from Chernobyl Pilot Site under steady flow conditions. The transport and fate of radionuclides in the subsurface is affected by various physical and chemical processes including advective and diffusive transport as well as chemical and biological transformations. Laboratory experiments and the use of a multiple tracer approach allow to isolate the contributions of each elementary process and to control the physico-chemical conditions in the system. To be more representative of the field conditions, we decided to perform column miscible displacement experiments. We perform batch and flow-through reactor experiments to characterize the radionuclides sorption mechanisms. Miscible displacement experiments within homogeneous columns and modeling allow to characterize the hydrodynamic properties of the soil and to describe the radionuclides behaviour under dynamic conditions at different water contents. We show that the water content of porous media affect the transport behaviour of inert and strongly sorbing radionuclides. Our results demonstrate that a parametrized transport model that was calibrated under completely saturated conditions was not able to describe the advective-dispersive transport of reactive solutes under unsaturated steady state conditions. Under our experimental conditions, there is no effect of a decrease of the mean water content on the sorption model parameters, but the transport parameters are modified. We established for the studied soil the relation between hydrodynamic dispersion and water content and the relation between pore water velocity and water content. (author)

  2. Site characterization and site response in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Susan E.; Yong, Alan K.; Altidor, Jean Robert; Anglade, Dieuseul; Given, Douglas D.; Mildor, Saint-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Waveform analysis of aftershocks of the Mw7.0 Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 reveals amplification of ground motions at sites within the Cul de Sac valley in which Port-au-Prince is situated. Relative to ground motions recorded at a hard-rock reference site, peak acceleration values are amplified by a factor of approximately 1.8 at sites on low-lying Mio-Pliocene deposits in central Port-au-Prince and by a factor of approximately 2.5–3 on a steep foothill ridge in the southern Port-au-Prince metropolitan region. The observed amplitude, predominant periods, variability, and polarization of amplification are consistent with predicted topographic amplification by a steep, narrow ridge. A swath of unusually high damage in this region corresponds with the extent of the ridge where high weak-motion amplifications are observed. We use ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) imagery to map local geomorphology, including characterization of both near-surface and of small-scale topographic structures that correspond to zones of inferred amplification.

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  4. Site-specific growth of Au particles on ZnO nanopyramids under ultraviolet illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Kexin

    2011-01-01

    In this work, wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals with unique "pyramid" morphology were firstly prepared via solvothermal synthesis. It was determined that the ZnO nanopyramids are grown along the polar c-axis with the vertexes pointing to the [001] direction. When the mixture of ZnO nanopyramids and Au precursor (HAuCl4) was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Au particles were site-specifically formed on the vertexes of ZnO nanopyramids. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposite showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the bare ZnO nanopyramids. First-principles based calculations well explained the formation of ZnO nanopyramids as well as the site-specific growth of Au, and revealed that during the photocatalysis process the Au particles can accommodate photoelectrons and thus facilitate the charge separation. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Site-specific growth of Au particles on ZnO nanopyramids under ultraviolet illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ke Xin; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Lan; Zeng, Hua Chun; Han, Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this work, wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals with unique ``pyramid'' morphology were firstly prepared via solvothermal synthesis. It was determined that the ZnO nanopyramids are grown along the polar c-axis with the vertexes pointing to the [001] direction. When the mixture of ZnO nanopyramids and Au precursor (HAuCl4) was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Au particles were site-specifically formed on the vertexes of ZnO nanopyramids. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposite showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the bare ZnO nanopyramids. First-principles based calculations well explained the formation of ZnO nanopyramids as well as the site-specific growth of Au, and revealed that during the photocatalysis process the Au particles can accommodate photoelectrons and thus facilitate the charge separation.In this work, wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals with unique ``pyramid'' morphology were firstly prepared via solvothermal synthesis. It was determined that the ZnO nanopyramids are grown along the polar c-axis with the vertexes pointing to the [001] direction. When the mixture of ZnO nanopyramids and Au precursor (HAuCl4) was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Au particles were site-specifically formed on the vertexes of ZnO nanopyramids. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposite showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the bare ZnO nanopyramids. First-principles based calculations well explained the formation of ZnO nanopyramids as well as the site-specific growth of Au, and revealed that during the photocatalysis process the Au particles can accommodate photoelectrons and thus facilitate the charge separation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of Au/ZnO nanocomposites with Au nanoparticles in different sizes, density of states of Au55 and Au20 deposited on ZnO (001) surface, and the first-principles calculation details. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10685f

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CY 2000 Site Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2000 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2000 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protect ion Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2000. The format of this report follows guidance offered in a June 1, 2001 memo from DOE's Office of Policy and Guidance with the subject ''Guidance for the preparation of Department of Energy (DOE) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2000.'' WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2000, no evidence was found of any adverse

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CY 2000 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC; Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc.

    2001-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2000 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2000 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protect ion Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2000. The format of this report follows guidance offered in a June 1, 2001 memo from DOE's Office of Policy and Guidance with the subject ''Guidance for the preparation of Department of Energy (DOE) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2000.'' WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2000, no

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2001 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above Orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2001. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2001, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, Inc.

    2002-09-20

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2001 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above Orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2001. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2001, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment.

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Roy B.; Adams, Amy; Martin, Don; Morris, Randall C.; Reynolds, Timothy D.; Warren, Ronald W.

    2000-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)Carlsbad Area Office and the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 1999 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during calendar year 1999. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 1999, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment. Radionuclide concentrations in the environment surrounding WIPP were not statistically higher in 1999 than in 1998.

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2003-09-17

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  12. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

  14. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  15. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-26

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Enviromnetal Services

    2009-09-21

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  20. Tenure Issues in REDD+ Pilot Project Sites in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Dokken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available REDD+ has been proposed as a viable option for addressing climate change in the near term, and at relatively low cost. There is a broad consensus that clearly defined tenure rights are important for the implementation and success of REDD+, both to manage forests effectively and to protect local communities’ livelihoods. We use primary data from 23 villages in six REDD+ pilot sites in Tanzania to identify causes of deforestation and forest degradation, and tenure rights issues, at the village level prior to project implementation. Further, interviews with project proponents and examination of project documents yields insights into how the proponents plan to address tenure issues. Most villages perceive their tenure as secure and have exclusion rights, while collective action challenges are prevalent in villages experiencing deforestation and forest degradation. These findings suggest that the main tenure issues are related to internal institutional arrangements. While we find that tenure is high on the agenda for all the project proponents, they are mainly focusing on formalization and securing tenure rights from state to community level. Though we do find this to be a precondition for reducing deforestation and degradation, some of their focus should be shifted to strengthening village institutions and enhancing internal compliance.

  1. Hanford site as it relates to an alternative site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: an environmental description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of basalt at Hanford as an alternative for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would require that the present Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) at Hanford be expanded to incorporate the planned WIPP functions, namely the permanent storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This report discusses: program costs, demography, ecology, climatology, physiography, hydrology, geology, seismology, and historical and archeological sites

  2. Hanford site as it relates to an alternative site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: an environmental description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, K.R. (ed.)

    1978-12-01

    The use of basalt at Hanford as an alternative for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would require that the present Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) at Hanford be expanded to incorporate the planned WIPP functions, namely the permanent storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This report discusses: program costs, demography, ecology, climatology, physiography, hydrology, geology, seismology, and historical and archeological sites. (DLC)

  3. Pilot demonstration for containment using in situ soil mixing techniques at a chemical disposal superfund site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiber Environmental Services, Inc. (Kiber), under contract to McLaren-Hart Corporation and the site PRP group, performed technical oversight and on-site sampling and analyses at the confidential site located in Texas. The site consists of 15,000 cubic meters (20,000 cubic yards) of contaminated materials that were to be solidified on-site. The contaminants included heavy metals, PAHs, oil and grease, and volatile organics. Groundwater is less than 1 meter from the surface. Kiber was retained after several unsuccessful efforts to find on-site containment methods that effectively solidified the waste pits while achieving the performance goals. The PRP group then contracted with Kiber to perform the treatability and pilot oversight studies. The full-scale pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con. Pilot-scale treatment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ solidification treatment at achieving the site specific performance criteria, including an unconfined compressive strength of greater than 170 kPa (25 psi) and a permeability of less than 1x10-6 cm/sec. Technical oversight and on-site sampling and analysis were provided to evaluate pilot-scale application of the selected technology and verify treatment effectiveness. The project was divided into several subtasks. First, laboratory treatability testing was conducted to verify that performance specifications were achievable using the proposed reagent formulations. Next, a pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con using a Manotowoc 4000 crane equipped with a 1.5-meter diameter auger to evaluate shallow soil mixing. The final task included a comparative study between the performance of test specimens collected using wet sampling techniques versus in situ post-treatment coring

  4. Pilot demonstration for containment using in situ soil mixing techniques at a chemical disposal superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarlinski, S.J.; Kingham, N.W.; Semenak, R. [Kiber Environmental Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Kiber Environmental Services, Inc. (Kiber), under contract to McLaren-Hart Corporation and the site PRP group, performed technical oversight and on-site sampling and analyses at the confidential site located in Texas. The site consists of 15,000 cubic meters (20,000 cubic yards) of contaminated materials that were to be solidified on-site. The contaminants included heavy metals, PAHs, oil and grease, and volatile organics. Groundwater is less than 1 meter from the surface. Kiber was retained after several unsuccessful efforts to find on-site containment methods that effectively solidified the waste pits while achieving the performance goals. The PRP group then contracted with Kiber to perform the treatability and pilot oversight studies. The full-scale pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con. Pilot-scale treatment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ solidification treatment at achieving the site specific performance criteria, including an unconfined compressive strength of greater than 170 kPa (25 psi) and a permeability of less than 1x10{sup -6} cm/sec. Technical oversight and on-site sampling and analysis were provided to evaluate pilot-scale application of the selected technology and verify treatment effectiveness. The project was divided into several subtasks. First, laboratory treatability testing was conducted to verify that performance specifications were achievable using the proposed reagent formulations. Next, a pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con using a Manotowoc 4000 crane equipped with a 1.5-meter diameter auger to evaluate shallow soil mixing. The final task included a comparative study between the performance of test specimens collected using wet sampling techniques versus in situ post-treatment coring.

  5. Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

  6. Estimation of Wave Conditions at Svåheia SSG Pilot Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Margheritini, Lucia; Stratigaki, V.;

    The purpose of the project described in the present report is to estimate the local wave conditions at the proposed location for a SSG pilot at the Svåheia site in the south western part of Norway. Focus is put on estimating the everyday conditions to enable an evaluation of the power production...... potential for the SSG pilot at the proposed location. The work in the project has been performed in three parts: 1. Establishing the offshore wave conditions and bathymetry of the area. 2. Transformation of offshore waves to near shore, through numerical wave modeling. 3. Evaluation of the transformed...

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

    1983-04-01

    A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area

  9. Construction of the Active Site of Metalloenzyme on Au NC Micelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG, Zhiming; FU, Qiuan; HUANG, Xin; XU, Jiayun; LIU, Junqiu; SHEN, Jiacong

    2009-01-01

    For developing an efficient nanoenzyme system with self-assembly strategy, gold nanocrystal micelles (Au NC micelles) with inserted catalytic Zn(Ⅱ) centers were constructed by self-assembly of a catalytic ligand [N,N-bis(2-aminoethyl)-N'dodecylethylenediamine] Zn(Ⅱ) complexes (Zn(Ⅱ)L) on the surface of Au NC via hy- drophobic interaction. The functionalized Au NC micelles acted as an excellent nanoenzyme model for imitating ribonuclease. The catalytic capability of the Au NC micelles was evaluated by accelerating the cleavage of 2-hydroxypropyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP). These functionalized Au NC micelles exhibited considerable ri- bonuclease-like activities by a factor of 4.9×104 (kcat/kuncat) for the cleavage of HPNP in comparison to the sponta- neous cleavage of HPNP at 37℃. The catalytic capability of the functionalized Au NC micelles can be considera- bly compared to other models reported previously as nanoenzymes under the comparable conditions.

  10. Effets de site : évalutation expérimentale et modélisations multidimensionnelles : application au site test EURO-SEISTEST (Grèce)

    OpenAIRE

    Riepl, Judith

    1997-01-01

    L'objectif de cette thèse est, l'étude fine des effets d'amplification suite à la géologie locale, notamment dans des bassins sédimentaires, ainsi que l'évaluation des avantages et Iimites des méthodes d'estimations. La partie expérimentale est basée sur des données acquises au site test EURO-SEISTEST, le premier site-test en Europe occidentale proche de Thessalonique (Grèce). Après une évaluation des effets d'amplification au site même et une étude de leur stabilité en fonction de plusieurs ...

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014. Emended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year (CY); Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE environmental sustainability goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  12. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: PILOT STUDY OF ENCLOSED THERMAL SOIL AERATION FOR REMOVAL OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CONTAMINATION AT THE MCKIN SUPERFUND SITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports on the results of a pilot study that treated vadose zone soil contaminated with VOCs in an enclosed thermal aeration system. The McKin site, an NPL site in Grey, Maine, was the location of the pilot study. The pilot study was chosen to demonstrate the viabili...

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This is the 1989 Site Environmental Report (SER) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a government owned and contractor-operated facility. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of the WIPP is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. This report provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at the WIPP during calendar year 1989. The WIPP facility will not receive waste until all concerns affecting opening the WIPP are addressed to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Energy. Therefore, this report describes the status of the preoperational activities of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance (RES) program, which are outlined in the Radiological Baseline Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTSD-TME-057). 72 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  14. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  15. Field Experiment on CO2 Back-production at the Ketzin Pilot Site

    OpenAIRE

    S. Martens; T. Kempka; A. Liebscher; F. Möller; Cornelia Schmidt-Hattenberger; M. Streibel; Alexandra Szizybalski; Martin Zimmer

    2015-01-01

    At the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage, 67 kt of CO2 were injected between 2008 and 2013 in to a saline aquifer. In October 2014, part of the formerly injected CO2 was retrieved from the reservoir. 240 t of CO2 and 55 m3 of brine were back-produced and an interdisciplinary monitoring accompanied the field experiment. It indicates that a safe CO2 back-production is feasible and can be performed at both, stable reservoir and wellbore conditions.

  16. Injection operation and operational pressure-temperature monitoring at the CO2 storage pilot site Ketzin, Germany - Design, results, recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Axel Liebscher; Fabian Möller; A. Bannach; S. Köhler; J. Wiebach; Cornelia Schmidt-Hattenberger; Weiner, M.; C Pretschner; K. Ebert; J. Zemke

    2013-01-01

    The Ketzin pilot site for geological storage of CO2 in the German Federal State of Brandenburg about 25 km west of Berlin is the only German CO2 storage site and has been the first European pilot site for on-shore storage of CO2 in saline aquifers. Continuous injection of CO2 started on June 30th, 2008, and a total of 61,396 t of CO2 have been injected by September 2012. The injected CO2 was predominantly food-grade with a purity > 99.9%, only from May to June 2011, 1515 t CO2 from the Schwar...

  17. Environmental Baseline Characteristics for a Pilot Project Site for Integrated Solid Waste Management in Makurdi, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Irtwange

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the pilot project site for integrated solid waste management in Makurdi, Nigeria wasconducted to establish the environmental baseline characteristics as part of an Environmental ImpactAssessment (EIA process. Survey of literature was conducted to generate information on climate, geology, andthe general physical, chemical and biological status of the environment as well as identify information gaps.This was achieved through the consultation of existing studies/survey reports, technical publications, textbooks,etc. Field data gathering exercise was conducted to fill information gap identified from desk survey and alsoto validate existing information. It entailed visual observation, interviews, on-site measurements and collectionof samples for laboratory analysis and testing. The study covered terrain/topography, climate and meteorology,land ownership, land use and zoning, soil quality, geological formations underneath the project site, hydrologyand water quality, groundwater geophysical survey, hydro geology, ambient air quality, ecology of the projectsite and surroundings, baseline noise levels and public consultation. The results of the study indicates that theenvironmental components of the site were within natural background levels of the environment except theoutcrops of the Makurdi sandstone in the designated land fill areas having served as a road constructionexcavation site in the past. The study also shows that apart from the nearby stream, there are no existingenvironmental stresses or pollution within the area.

  18. Creative use of pilot points to address site and regional scale heterogeneity in a variable-density model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dausman, Alyssa M.; Doherty, John; Langevin, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot points for parameter estimation were creatively used to address heterogeneity at both the well field and regional scales in a variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport model designed to test multiple hypotheses for upward migration of fresh effluent injected into a highly transmissive saline carbonate aquifer. Two sets of pilot points were used within in multiple model layers, with one set of inner pilot points (totaling 158) having high spatial density to represent hydraulic conductivity at the site, while a second set of outer points (totaling 36) of lower spatial density was used to represent hydraulic conductivity further from the site. Use of a lower spatial density outside the site allowed (1) the total number of pilot points to be reduced while maintaining flexibility to accommodate heterogeneity at different scales, and (2) development of a model with greater areal extent in order to simulate proper boundary conditions that have a limited effect on the area of interest. The parameters associated with the inner pilot points were log transformed hydraulic conductivity multipliers of the conductivity field obtained by interpolation from outer pilot points. The use of this dual inner-outer scale parameterization (with inner parameters constituting multipliers for outer parameters) allowed smooth transition of hydraulic conductivity from the site scale, where greater spatial variability of hydraulic properties exists, to the regional scale where less spatial variability was necessary for model calibration. While the model is highly parameterized to accommodate potential aquifer heterogeneity, the total number of pilot points is kept at a minimum to enable reasonable calibration run times.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include meteorological, air quality, soil properties, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, no waste has been received; therefore, certain elements required by Order DOE 5400.1 are not presented in this report. 15 figs. 19 tabs.

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) five-year Site Specific Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development facility vested with the vital mission of demonstrating the safe disposal of radioactive transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from our nation's defense activities and programs. It is the only facility in the United States specifically designed and constructed for the long-term storage of transuranic wastes. Since the inception of the WIPP project, work has continued to prepare the facility to receive TRU waste. A multitude of studies have been and continue to be conducted to demonstrate the safety of the WIPP facility in accordance with federal and state laws, state agreements, DOE Orders, etc. This Site Specific Plan outlines the implementation of activities at the WIPP project. 12 figs

  1. Hydraulic Testing of Salado Formation Evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, Richard L.; Domski, Paul S.; Roberts, Randall M.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted in bedded evaporates of the Salado Formation from May 1992 through May 1995 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes from the nation's defense programs. The WIPP disposal horizon is located in the lower portion of the Permian Salado Formation. The hydraulic tests discussed in this report were performed in the WIPP underground facility by INTERA inc. (now Duke Engineering and Services, Inc.), Austin, Texas, following the Field Operations Plan and Addendum prepared by Saulnier (1988, 1991 ) under the technical direction of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  2. Hydraulic Testing of Salado Formation Evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted in bedded evaporates of the Salado Formation from May 1992 through May 1995 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes from the nation's defense programs. The WIPP disposal horizon is located in the lower portion of the Permian Salado Formation. The hydraulic tests discussed in this report were performed in the WIPP underground facility by INTERA inc. (now Duke Engineering and Services, Inc.), Austin, Texas, following the Field Operations Plan and Addendum prepared by Saulnier (1988, 1991 ) under the technical direction of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report, for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires DOE facilities, that conduct environmental protection programs, to annually prepare a Site Environmental Report (SER). The purpose of the SER is to provide an abstract of environmental assessments conducted in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit. The content of this SER is not restricted to a synopsis of the required data, in addition, information pertaining to new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1995 calendar year are also included. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). The EMP provides inclusive guidelines implemented to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater. air, soil, and biotic matrices are monitored for an array of radiological and nonradiological factors. The baseline radiological surveillance program encompasses a broader geographic area that includes nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Most elements of nonradiological assessments are conducted within the geographic vicinity of the WIPP site.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report, for calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires DOE facilities, that conduct environmental protection programs, to annually prepare a Site Environmental Report (SER). The purpose of the SER is to provide an abstract of environmental assessments conducted in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit. The content of this SER is not restricted to a synopsis of the required data, in addition, information pertaining to new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1995 calendar year are also included. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). The EMP provides inclusive guidelines implemented to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater. air, soil, and biotic matrices are monitored for an array of radiological and nonradiological factors. The baseline radiological surveillance program encompasses a broader geographic area that includes nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Most elements of nonradiological assessments are conducted within the geographic vicinity of the WIPP site

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE facility that conducts significant environmental protection programs to prepare an Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER). The purpose of the ASER is to summarize environmental data in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts. This ASER not only documents the required data, it also documents new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1994 calendar year. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) (DOE/WIPP 94-024). The EMP defines a comprehensive set of parameters that must be monitored to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radiological and nonradiological activity levels. The baseline radiological surveillance program covers the broader geographic area that encompasses nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Nonradiological studies focus on the area immediately surrounding the WIPP site

  6. Ecological baseline studies at the site of the Barstow 10 MWe pilot solar thermal power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, F.B. (ed.)

    1979-11-01

    Baseline ecological measurements and observations were made in 1978 and 1979 at the site of the Barstow pilot 10 MWe solar thermal power system. The station will be constructed on Southern California Edison's Coolwater property. The climate of the area is typical of the Mojave Desert, with high summer temperatures (monthly means of up to 31/sup 0/C), and low rainfall (annual mean of 94 mm). About 66% of the rain falls in winter and spring. About 75% of winds are from the west-southwest to northwest, and mean monthly wind velocities during spring and summer are around 15 to 20 km hr/sup -1/. Surface soils of the site are sandy, but soils below 3 m are generally well graded sand with some silt and gravel. Some of the soils are highly saline, to an extent precluding plant growth. All soils are alkaline, with pH values as high as 9. Over 130 species of plants have been identified on the site, 18 of which are non-native. Estimated aggregate densities of annual plants range from around 600 to almost 9000 m/sup -2/, depending on sampling locale. Aggregate densities of perennials (including herbaceous species) range from as low as 0.2 to 4.4 m/sup -2/. Creosotebush supports a varied assemblage of sap-feeding and defoliating insects, principally homopterans and orthopterans. Other shrubs are populated with hemipterans, mealybugs, thrips, phytophagous beetles and moth larvae. Common ground-dwelling species are ants, tenebrionid beetles, weevils, various orthopterans, and predatory arachnids. Some 300 different kinds of arthropods were distinguished in samples from the site. The most commonly trapped rodents were kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami, D. deserti), pocket mice (Perognathus formosus) and ground squirrels (Spermophilus tereticaudus). Over 60 kinds of birds were observed around the site, many associated with evaporating ponds adjoining the Coolwater Generating Station.

  7. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Three seismic reflection (Vibroseis) surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described. Volume I describes the purpose, field parameters, and data processing parameters. Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps. Data interpretations will be the subject of the subsequent reports. The data collected during these three surveys total 77 line miles; 72 line miles of this are on or very near the WIPP site. The first of the surveys (1976 SAN) covered 25 line miles and was conducted similarly to previous petroleum industry surveys in the area. 1976 SAN supplemented existing petroleum industry data. The two subsequent surveys (1977 X and 1978 Y) used shorter geophone spacings (110'), higher signal frequencies (up to 100 Hz), and higher data sampling rates (2 ms.) to better define the shallow zone (less than 4000') of primary interest. 1977 X contained 47 line miles on or near the WIPP site and over several structural features northwest of the site. 1978 Y contains 5 line miles over a one square mile area near the center of the WIPP site. These data show increasing discrimination of shallow reflectors as data collection parameters were modified. Data tables of recording and processing parameters are included. A fourth Vibroseis survey was conducted at the WIPP site in 1978 by Grant Geophysical Company for Bechtel; the data are not in final form and are not included. Petroleum industry data and an inconclusive weight-drop survey, conducted in 1976, are also not included in this report.

  8. TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION. ON-SITE TESTING WITH MOBILE PILOT PLANT TRAILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeded water treatment using a SALA high gradient magnetic separator pilot plant system was conducted on combined sewer overflows and raw sewage at SALA Magnetics in Cambridge, MA and at on-site locations in the Boston area. Special emphasis was placed on specific design and oper...

  9. Awareness of households to the development of wind energy sites - Reporting on a survey; Receptivite des menages au developpement des sites eoliens. Rapport d'enquete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisard, M.

    2000-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy presents in tables and diagrams the results of a survey involving 421 households in Switzerland, about their awareness to energy issues and, in particular, to all what regards wind energy and wind power plants. Globally, 80% of the persons asked for their opinion believe that electric power demand will continue to increase. 66% of them are in favour of increased use of renewable energy sources and would consequently agree with a 10% more expensive end-user energy price. 89% of the persons taking part to the survey approve the installation of wind energy farms in Switzerland. Moreover, statistics indicates that the households living in regions already equipped with wind farms are significantly more favorable to the creation of new wind energy sites than those not living in these regions. By the end of the day, it turns out that the main reasons for accepting wind energy are environmental concerns as well as the fear of being obliged to use nuclear power. [French] Ce rapport presente par des graphiques et des tableaux le resultat d'un sondage d'opinion aupres de 421 menages en Suisse, sur la sensibilite du public aux problemes de l'energie et plus particulierement sur sa perception de tout ce qui concerne l'energie du vent et son exploitation par l'implantation d'eoliennes. Globalement, 80% des menages pensent que la demande d'energie electrique va poursuivre sa croissance. 66% d'entre eux sont favorables au developpement des energies renouvelables et prets a accepter en consequence une augmentation du prix de l'energie allant jusqu'a 10%. 89% des personnes interrogees sont favorables au developpement des eoliennes en Suisse. De plus, la statistique montre de maniere significative que les menages des regions dans lesquelles sont deja implantes des sites eoliens sont plus favorables au developpement des eoliennes que les autres. Finalement, le respect de l

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) defined a comprehensive set of parameters which are monitored to detect potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future environmental evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radioactivity levels. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air, water quality, soil properties, meteorological measurements and determination of the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the WIPP site with emphasis on the salt storage pile. The baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in its preoperational phase (i.e., no waste has been received) certain operational requirements of DOE Orders 5400.1, 5400.5, and the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T) are not relevant. Therefore, this report does not discuss items such as radionuclide emissions and effluents and subsequent doses to the public

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) defined a comprehensive set of parameters which are monitored to detect potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future environmental evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radioactivity levels. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air, water quality, soil properties, meteorological measurements and determination of the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the WIPP site with emphasis on the salt storage pile. The baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in its preoperational phase (i.e., no waste has been received) certain operational requirements of DOE Orders 5400.1, 5400.5, and the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T) are not relevant. Therefore, this report does not discuss items such as radionuclide emissions and effluents and subsequent doses to the public.

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental Impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental Impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air quality, water quality, soil properties, meteorological, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area Including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, and no waste has been received; certain elements required by DOE Order 5400.1 are not presented In this report. The most significant addition to the 1991 report is the inclusion of the first four appendices, the Radiological Baseline Program (DOE/WIPP 92-037), the Salt Impact Studies (DOE/WIPP 92-038), the Disturbed Land Reclamation Techniques (DOE/WIPP 92-039), and the Background Water Characterization for the WIPP (DOE/WIPP 92-013). These appendices are independently published and available to interested parties by the DOE reference number. These summaries will not be published in future ASER'S. They will, however, be referenced as a basis for evaluating similar data collected during the Test and subsequent Operational phases of the WIPP

  13. La mise en place de systèmes d'information dédiés au management de la qualité et de l'environnement de la production agricole : une opération pilote appliquée au secteur des grandes cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, C

    2001-01-01

    Le projet SIREME conduit par le Cemagref a pour objectif de contribuer à la mise en place de systèmes d'information à référence spatiale (SIRS), aptes à servir de support aux démarches qualité et environnement en développement au niveau de la production agricole. Cet article présente une opération pilote appliquée au secteur des grandes cultures : la conception d'un SIRS partagé dédié au suivi de contrats de production sous assurance qualité et environnement Agriconfiance, liant des coopérati...

  14. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-09-01

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30

  15. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30

  16. MIIT:8 Nonferrous Metals Enterprises Listed as Pilot Sites for Brand Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>MIIT released "Notice on Deepening Pilot Work of Industrial Enterprises for Brand Cultivation"(hereinafter referred to as "Notice"). According to the notice,the Technology Department of MIIT,on the basis of the requirements of "Notice on Implementing Pilot Work

  17. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy Chaboyer; Vinah Anderson; Joan Webster; Anne Sneddon; Lukman Thalib; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-01-01

    Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS) and also the feasibility of conducting a defi...

  18. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (-6 m2/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10-6 m2/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow

  19. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  20. Pilot-scale ISCO treatment of a MtBE contaminated site using a Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Ivan; Verginelli, Iason; Massetti, Felicia; Piscitelli, Daniela; Gavasci, Renato; Baciocchi, Renato

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports about a pilot-scale feasibility study of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) application based on the use of stabilized hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by naturally occurring iron minerals (Fenton-like process) to a site formerly used for fuel storage and contaminated by MtBE. The stratigraphy of the site consists of a 2-3 meter backfill layer followed by a 3-4 meter low permeability layer, that confines the main aquifer, affected by a widespread MtBE groundwater contamination with concentrations up to 4000 μg/L, also with the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons. The design of the pilot-scale treatment was based on the integration of the results obtained from experimental and numerical modeling accounting for the technological and regulatory constraints existing in the site to be remediated. In particular, lab-scale batch tests allowed the selection of the most suitable operating conditions. Then, this information was implemented in a numerical software that allowed to define the injection and monitoring layout and to predict the propagation of hydrogen peroxide in groundwater. The pilot-scale field results confirmed the effective propagation of hydrogen peroxide in nearly all the target area (around 75 m(2) using 3 injection wells). As far as the MtBE removal is concerned, the ISCO application allowed us to meet the clean-up goals in an area of 60 m(2). Besides, the concentration of TBA, i.e. a potential by-product of MtBE oxidation, was actually reduced after the ISCO treatment. The results of the pilot-scale test suggest that ISCO may be a suitable option for the remediation of the groundwater plume contaminated by MtBE, providing the background data for the design and cost-estimate of the full-scale treatment.

  1. Radiological survey of the former uranium recovery pilot and process sites, Gardinier, Incorporated, Tampa, Florida. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiological survey was conducted at a former uranium recovery plant near Tampa, Florida, operated as a part of a phosphoric acid plant. The uranium recovery operations were conducted from 1951 through 1960, the primary goal being the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid. Pilot operations were first carried out at a small plant, and full-scale extraction was later carried out at a larger adjacent process plant. The survey included measurement of the followng: beta-gamma dose rates at 1 cm from surfaces and external gamma radiation levels at the surfaces and 1 m above the floor inside the pilot operations building and process building and outdoors in areas around these buildings; fixed and transferable alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels on the floor, walls, ceilings, and roof of the process building and on the floor, walls, and ceiling of the pilot plant offices; concentrations of 226Ra and 238U in soil samples taken at grid points around the buildings and in residue samples taken inside the process building; concentrations of 226Ra and 238U in water and sediment samples taken outdoors on the site and the concentration of these same nuclides in background samples collected off the site. It was found that beta-gamma and/or alpha contamination levels on surfaces exceed current guidelines for the release of property for unrestricted use at some points inside the process building and in the outdoor area near the process building and pilot operations building. Some samples of soil and residue taken from the floor and equipment on the second level of the process building contained natural uranium in excess of 0.05% by weight and contained natural radium in excess of 900 pCi/g

  2. Monitoring Concept for CO2 Storage at the Pilot Site Ketzin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipki, Mario; Liebscher, Axel; Lüth, Stefan; Ivanova, Alexandra; Möller, Fabian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Rippe, Dennis; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Between 2008 and 2013, the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ has injected more than 67 kt of CO2 at the Pilot Site in Ketzin, 25 km west of Berlin. The CO2 was stored in porous sandstones of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation at a depth of 630 to 650 m. In more than a decade, GFZ has developed and tested an extraordinary multi-monitoring concept for onshore CO2 storages which mainly comprises the following methods: Time-lapse 3D seismic surveying is the most commonly used method for imaging and monitoring a CO2-plume in the deep underground before, during and after the injection phase. Such campaigns require high logistical and financial efforts and can be realised only to a limited extent. At Ketzin, for instance, 3D-seismic repeat surveys were acquired using several thousand surface acquisition points and lasting over two or three months. Alternative approaches include permanently buried seismic receivers. Geoelectric measurements in Ketzin are mainly applied by using a permanent downhole electrode installation (Vertical Electrical Resistivity Array = VERA) which has been implemented in three wells behind the well casings. Measurements between 590 m to 735 m are constantly carried out covering the vertical thickness of the entire CO2 storage horizon. Valuable results were achieved by a combination of inhole, crosshole and surface downhole measurements which has been carried out with appropriate acquisition geometries. For focused areas around monitoring wells, geoelectric methods may support and supplement information from seismic surveys. Borehole monitoring of pressure and temperature are generally indispensable for every underground gas storage type. In Ketzin, a remote monitoring system for all wells has been installed that constantly provides the operators with values for date, time, downhole and wellhead pressure, depth, and temperature. Moreover, all wellheads are checked weekly during onsite inspections. Samples for chemical analysis are

  3. Valuation of potash occurrences within the nuclear waste isolation pilot plant site in southeastern New Mexico. Information circular/1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current production costs and market conditions in the potash industry of the Carlsbad area were studied to determine the potential values of the potash mineral resource that would be lost or foregone if the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility is constructed on the proposed site in that area. The purpose of the WIPP project is to investigate the possibility of developing a nuclear waste disposal plant in the salt formations at the site. Analyses were made of all potash deposits determined to be in the site. Mining and processing under the most favorable recovery systems were considered. Value determinations were based upon estimated operating and capital costs of current mine-mill operations in the Carlsbad area

  4. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps from three seismic reflection surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Data interpretations will be the subject of subsequent reports. (LK)

  5. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report

  6. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L. [and others

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  7. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Electrokinetic remediation of plutonium-contaminated nuclear site wastes: Results from a pilot-scale on-site trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnew, Kieran [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Berks RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Cundy, Andrew B., E-mail: A.Cundy@brighton.ac.uk [School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Hopkinson, Laurence [School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Croudace, Ian W.; Warwick, Phillip E. [GAU-Radioanalytical Laboratories, School of Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Purdie, Philip [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Berks RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-28

    This paper examines the field-scale application of a novel low-energy electrokinetic technique for the remediation of plutonium-contaminated nuclear site soils, using soil wastes from the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) Aldermaston site, Berkshire, UK as a test medium. Soils and sediments with varying composition, contaminated with Pu through historical site operations, were electrokinetically treated at laboratory-scale with and without various soil pre-conditioning agents. Results from these bench-scale trials were used to inform a larger on-site remediation trial, using an adapted containment pack with battery power supply. 2.4 m{sup 3} (ca. 4 tonnes) of Pu-contaminated soil was treated for 60 days at a power consumption of 33 kW h/m{sup 3}, and then destructively sampled. Radiochemical data indicate mobilisation of Pu in the treated soil, and migration (probably as a negatively charged Pu-citrate complex) towards the anodic compartment of the treatment cell. Soil in the cathodic zone of the treatment unit was remediated to a level below free-release disposal thresholds (1.7 Bq/g, or <0.4 Bq/g above background activities). The data show the potential of this method as a low-cost, on-site tool for remediation of radioactively contaminated soils and wastes which can be operated remotely on working sites, with minimal disruption to site infrastructure or operations.

  9. Electrokinetic remediation of plutonium-contaminated nuclear site wastes: results from a pilot-scale on-site trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Kieran; Cundy, Andrew B; Hopkinson, Laurence; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Purdie, Philip

    2011-02-28

    This paper examines the field-scale application of a novel low-energy electrokinetic technique for the remediation of plutonium-contaminated nuclear site soils, using soil wastes from the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) Aldermaston site, Berkshire, UK as a test medium. Soils and sediments with varying composition, contaminated with Pu through historical site operations, were electrokinetically treated at laboratory-scale with and without various soil pre-conditioning agents. Results from these bench-scale trials were used to inform a larger on-site remediation trial, using an adapted containment pack with battery power supply. 2.4 m(3) (ca. 4t onnes) of Pu-contaminated soil was treated for 60 days at a power consumption of 33 kWh/m(3), and then destructively sampled. Radiochemical data indicate mobilisation of Pu in the treated soil, and migration (probably as a negatively charged Pu-citrate complex) towards the anodic compartment of the treatment cell. Soil in the cathodic zone of the treatment unit was remediated to a level below free-release disposal thresholds (1.7 Bq/g, or remediation of radioactively contaminated soils and wastes which can be operated remotely on working sites, with minimal disruption to site infrastructure or operations. PMID:21227583

  10. [Ambulatory care nursing sites in Italy: results of a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Rosaria; Venturini, Giulia; Tartaglini, Daniela; Vellone, Ercole; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to map existing ambulatory care nursing sites in Italy, compare operational and organizational methodologies used, and evaluate visibility of the sites in health institutions and the community. Nurses' level of satisfaction with this work experience was also evaluated. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing and American Nurses Association definition of ambulatory care nursing (1997) was used to select sites for the study. Two hundred fifty ambulatory care sites meeting this definition were listed, most of which provide clinical and educational services to oncology and cardiology patients. Surgical sites provide treatment of surgical wounds and stomas. Results of the study show that ambulatory care nursing sites are not uniformly distributed across Italy and a greater concentration of sites can be found in northern Italy with respect to central and southern Italy. Nurses report having greater professional autonomy and an excellent level of satisfaction. All interviewed nurses attend specific training and continuing education courses. Ambulatory care sites are managed by nurses; medical consultations are requested when necessary and home assistance is assured through coordination with general practitioners. PMID:19629150

  11. Environmental assessment for the reuse of TNX as a multi-purpose pilot plant campus at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental and safety impacts of DOE planning to allow asset reuse of the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include providing for a location for the Centers of Excellence at or adjacent to SRS and entering into a cooperative agreement with a non-profit management and operations (management firm) contractor to operate and market the TNX facilities and equipment. The area (formerly TNX) would be called a Multi-Purpose Pilot Plant Campus (MPPC) and would be used: (1) as location for technology research, development, demonstration, and commercial operations; (2) to establish partnerships with industry to develop applied technologies for commercialization; and (3) serve as administrative headquarters for Centers of Excellence in the program areas of soil remediation, radioecology, groundwater contamination, and municipal solid waste minimization

  12. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO2 Storage in the Paris Basin (GéoCarbone-PICOREF Choix et caractérisation de sites géologiques propices à l’installation d’un pilote pour le stockage de CO2 dans le bassin de Paris (GéoCarbone-PICOREF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brosse É.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the GéoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO2 storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO2 per year. GéoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a “Regional Domain”, ca. 200 × 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: detailed geological data is available, due to 50 years of petroleum exploration; basin-scale deep saline aquifers are present, with a preliminary estimate of storage capacity which is at the Gt CO2 level, namely the carbonate Oolithe Blanche Formation, of Middle Jurassic age, generally located between 1500 and 1800 m depths in the studied area, and several sandstone formations of Triassic age, located between 2000 and 3000 m; several depleted oil fields exist: although offering storage capacities at a much lower level, they do represent very well constrained geological environments, with proven sealing properties; several sources of pure CO2 were identified in the area, at a flow rate compatible with the pilot size, that would avoid capture costs. 750 km of seismic lines were reprocessed and organized in six sections fitted on well logs. This first dataset provided improved representations of: the gross features of the considered aquifers in the Regional Domain; the structural scheme; lateral continuity of the sealing cap rocks. An inventory of the environmental characteristics was also made, including human occupancy, protected areas, water resource, natural hazards, potential conflicts of use with other resources of the subsurface, etc. From all these criteria, a more restricted geographical domain named the “Sector”, ca. 70 × 70 km, was chosen, the most appropriate for further selection of storage site(s. The geological characterization of the Sector has

  13. Improving surveillance system and surgical site infection rates through a network: A pilot study from Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Kasatpibal, Nongyao

    2009-01-01

    Nongyao Kasatpibal1, Mette Nørgaard2, Silom Jamulitrat3, For The Surgical Site Infection Study Group1Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University hospital, Aalborg and Aarhus, Denmark; 3Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, ThailandBackground: Surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) provides data upon which interventions to improve patient safe...

  14. Pedestrian and motorists' actions at pedestrian hybrid beacon sites: findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulugurtha, Srinivas S; Self, Debbie R

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an analysis of pedestrian and motorists' actions at sites with pedestrian hybrid beacons and assesses their effectiveness in improving the safety of pedestrians. Descriptive and statistical analyses (one-tail two-sample T-test and two-proportion Z-test) were conducted using field data collected during morning and evening peak hours at three study sites in the city of Charlotte, NC, before and after the installation of pedestrian hybrid beacons. Further, an analysis was conducted to assess the change in pedestrian and motorists' actions over time (before the installation; 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the installation). Results showed an increase in average traffic speed at one of the pedestrian hybrid beacon sites while no specific trends were observed at the other two pedestrian hybrid beacon sites. A decrease in the number of motorists not yielding to pedestrians, pedestrians trapped in the middle of the street, and pedestrian-vehicle conflicts were observed at all the three pedestrian hybrid beacon sites. The installation of pedestrian hybrid beacons did not have a negative effect on pedestrian actions at two out of the three sites. Improvements seem to be relatively more consistent 3 months after the installation of the pedestrian hybrid beacon.

  15. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  16. Structural-geological models of the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site used for site evaluation, dynamic reservoir simulations, and monitoring purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Ben; Kling, Christian; Frykman, Peter; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2013-04-01

    The saline aquifer of the Stuttgart Formation (Upper Triassic) is used for a carbon dioxide (CO2) storage research project at Ketzin, about 25 km west of Berlin (Germany). The structural and lithological site characterization relies on a comprehensive data set, consisting of former exploration data (hydrocarbon and natural gas storage exploration) and of the recent exploration, production, and monitoring data acquired at the CO2 pilot site. The quality of the data in terms of resolution and documentation is variable, covering also different scales. We present an overview of the structural and lithological characterization of the Ketzin CO2 pilot site that is based on the evolution of the geological models prepared for storage site development and site operation. In order to be able to assess risk elements, especially in the early regulatory and permitting stages of the project, the geological model building concentrated on two scales: Firstly, the site scale (called geo-model, comprising the reservoir and its overburden), and, secondly, the reservoir scale, using a higher resolution. The reservoir scale was applied to the target horizon of the CO2 storage (the Triassic Stuttgart Formation) and the Quaternary to Tertiary layers, presenting the near-surface groundwater system. The first geo-models illustrate the geological setting of the Ketzin site as a part of a salt-anticlinal structure based on seismic legacy data. These models were used to give first estimates on the deep natural groundwater flow and to establish pre-drilling profiles, but could not give reliable information on the existence and distribution of faults. Nevertheless, the estimated bed boundaries of the Stuttgart Formation served as an input for the construction of the first reservoir models of the Stuttgart Formation which were used to illustrate the expected variability and heterogeneity in rock properties. The target formation is lithologically very heterogeneous, reflecting a complex

  17. Hydro-mechanical simulations of well abandonment at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage verify wellbore system integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Victoria; Kempka, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In geological underground utilisation, operating and abandoned wells have been identified as a main potential leakage pathways for reservoir fluids. In the scope of the well abandonment procedure currently carried out at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage in Germany, a hydro-mechanical model was built to carry out a coupled analysis of the integrity in the entire wellbore system. The main aim of the present study was to assess the impacts of stress changes associated with CO2 injection as well as the cement backfill undertaken in the scope of well abandonment. A numerical model comprising cement sheaths, steel casings, tubing, multiple packers and wellbore annuli was implemented to enable a detailed representation of the entire wellbore system. The numerical model grid has a horizontal discretisation of 5 m x 5 m to focus on near wellbore effects, whereby element sizes increase with increasing distance from the wellbore. Vertical grid discretisation uses a tartan grid type over the entire model thickness of 1,500 m to ensure a sufficient discretisation of all wellbore system elements as well as of the reservoir unit. The total number of elements amounts to 210,672. Mechanical model parameters were taken from geological, drilling, logging and laboratory test data based on Ketzin pilot site-specific information as well as related literature (Kempka et al., 2014). The coupled calculations were performed using an elasto-plastic constitutive law, whereby an initial simulation run ensured a static mechanical equilibrium to represent the initial state before the start of CO2 injection. Thereto, gravitational load of the overburden rocks and pore pressure distribution following available well logs were integrated for initial model parameterisation including a normal faulting stress regime defined by a horizontal to vertical total stress ratio of 0.85. A correction accounting for the temperature and pressure dependent CO2 density was carried out in advance of each

  18. Forward modeling of 4D seismic response to the CO2 injection at the Ketzin pilot site with the reflectivity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Alexandra; Ivandic, Monika; Kempka, Thomas; Gil, Magdalena; Bergmann, Peter; Lüth, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    When CO2 replaces brine as a free gas it is well known to affect the elastic properties of porous media considerably. 3D seismic time-lapse surveys (4D seismics) have proven to be a suitable technique for monitoring of injected CO2. Forward modeling of a 4D seismic response to the CO2 fluid substitution in a storage reservoir is an important step in such studies. In order to track the migration of CO2 at the Ketzin pilot site (Germany), 3D time-lapse seismic data were acquired by means of a baseline (pre-injection) survey in 2005 and the monitor surveys in 2009 and 2012. Results of 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method suggest that effects of the injected CO2 on the 4D seismic data at the Ketzin pilot site are significant regarding both seismic amplitudes and time delays. They prove the corresponding observations in the real 4D seismic data at the Ketzin pilot site. However reservoir heterogeneity and seismic resolution, as well as random and coherent seismic noise are negative factors to be considered while the interpretation. In spite of these negative factors, results of 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method support the conclusion that the injected CO2 can be monitored at the Ketzin pilot site both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  19. Production of gas from coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland in the post-injection period of an ECBM pilot site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Krzystolik, P.; Wageningen, N. van; Pagnier, H.; Jura, B.; Skiba, J.; Winthaegen, P.; Kobiela, Z.

    2009-01-01

    A pilot site for CO2 storage in coal seams was set-up in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland in the scope of the RECOPOL project, funded by the European Commission. About 760 tons CO2 were injected into the reservoir from August 2004 to June 2005. Breakthrough of the injected CO2 was established

  20. Evaluation of soil bioassays for use at Washington state hazardous waste sites: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) is developing guidelines to assess soil toxicity at hazardous waste sites being investigated under the Washington Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. To evaluate soil toxicity, Ecology selected five bioassay protocols -- Daphnia, Earthworm, Seedling, Fathead Minnow, and Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay Xenopus (FETAX) -- for use as screening level assessment tools at six State hazardous waste sites. Sites contained a variety of contaminants including metals, creosote, pesticides, and petroleum products (leaking underground storage tanks). Three locations, representing high, medium, and low levels of contamination, were samples at each site. In general, the high contaminant samples resulted in the highest toxic response in all bioassays. The order of site toxicity, as assessed by overall toxic response, is creosote, petroleum products, metals, and pesticides. Results indicate that human health standards, especially for metals, may not adequately protect some of the species tested. The FETAX bioassay had the greatest overall number of toxic responses and lowest variance. The seedling and Daphnia bioassays had lower and similar overall toxic response results, followed by the earthworm and fathead minnow. Variability was markedly highest for the seedling. The Daphnia and fathead minnow variability were similar to the FETAX level, while the earthworm variability was slightly higher

  1. Syntheses and structural analyses of variable-stoichiometric Au-Pt-Ni carbonyl/phosphine clusters, Pt3(Pt(1-x)Ni(x))(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)(PPh3)3 and Pt2(Pt(2-y)Ni(y))(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)2(PPh3)2, with ligation-induced site-specific Pt/Ni substitutional disorder within butterfly-based Pt3(Pt(1-x)Ni(x))Au2 and Pt2(Pt(2-y)Ni(y))Au2 core-geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Namal; Nichiporuk, Rita V; Dahl, Lawrence F

    2006-05-21

    In ongoing attempts of directed synthesis of high-nuclearity Au-Pt carbonyl/phosphine clusters with [Ni6(CO)12]2- used as reducing agent and CO source, we have isolated and characterized two new closely related variable-stoichiometric trimetallic clusters, Pt3(Pt(1-x)Ni(x))(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)(PPh3)3 (1) and Pt2(Pt(2-y)Ni(y))(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)2(PPh3)2 (2). Their M4Au2 cores may be envisioned as substitutional disordered butterfly-based M4Au2 frameworks (M = Pt/Ni) formed by connections of the two basal M(B) atoms with both (Au-Au)-linked Au(PPh3) moieties. Based upon low-temperature CCD X-ray diffraction studies of eight crystals obtained from different samples, ligation-induced site-specific Pt/Ni substitutional disorder (involving formal insertion of Ni in place of Pt) in a given crystal was found to occur only at the one OC-attached basal M(B) site in 1 or at both OC-attached basal M(B) sites in 2 corresponding to a crystal composite of the Pt3(Pt(1-x)Ni(x))Au2 core in 1 or of the Pt2(Pt(2-y)Ni(y))Au2 core in 2; the Ph3P-attached M(B) site (M(B) = Pt) in 1 and two wingtip M(w) sites (M(w) = Pt) in 1 and 2 were not substitutionally disordered. The resulting variable stoichiometry of the M4Au2 core in 1 may be viewed as a crystal composite of two superimposed individual stereoisomers, Pt4(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)(PPh3)3 (1a) and Pt3Ni(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)(PPh3)3 (1b), in the averaged unit cell of a given crystal. Likewise, 2 represents the crystal-averaged composite of three individual stereoisomers, Pt4(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)2(PPh3)2 (2a), Pt3Ni(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)2(PPh3)2 (2b), and Pt2Ni2(AuPPh3)2(mu2-CO)4(CO)2(PPh3)2 (2c). Formal Ni substitution for Pt at only the basal M(B) site(s) in the four crystal composites each of 1 and 2 was found to vary widely from 17% to 79% Ni in 1 and from 21% to 95% Ni in 2. Nevertheless, reasonably close Pt/Ni occupancy factors were found within each of the four pairs of composite crystals selected from samples obtained from

  2. PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF CONTAMINATED SLUDGES FROM THE BOFORS-NOBEL SUPERFUND SITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed test program was performed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Incineration Research Facility (IRF) to help determine the effectiveness of incineration in treating two contaminated lagoon sludges from the Bofors-Nobel Superfund site in Mus...

  3. Oil refinery hazardous effluents minimization by membrane filtration: An on-site pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno; Crespo, João G; Santos, Maria António; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-10-01

    Experiments for treating two different types of hazardous oil refinery effluents were performed in order to avoid/minimize their adverse impacts on the environment. First, refinery wastewater was subjected to ultrafiltration using a ceramic membrane, treatment, which did not provide an adequate reduction of the polar oil and grease content below the maximal contaminant level allowed. Therefore the option of reducing the polar oil and grease contamination at its main emission source point in the refinery - the spent caustic originating from the refinery kerosene caustic washing unit - using an alkaline-resistant nanofiltration polymeric membrane treatment was tested. It was found that at a constant operating pressure and temperature, 99.9% of the oil and grease and 97.7% of the COD content were rejected at this emission point. Moreover, no noticeable membrane fouling or permeate flux decrease were registered until a spent caustic volume concentration factor of 3. These results allow for a reuse of the purified permeate in the refinery operations, instead of a fresh caustic solution, which besides the improved safety and environmentally related benefits, can result in significant savings of 1.5 M€ per year at the current prices for the biggest Portuguese oil refinery. The capital investment needed for nanofiltration treatment of the spent caustic is estimated to be less than 10% of that associated with the conventional wet air oxidation treatment of the spent caustic that is greater than 9 M€. The payback period was estimated to be 1.1 years. The operating costs for the two treatment options are similar, but the reuse of the nanofiltration spent caustic concentrate for refinery pH control applications can further reduce the operating expenditures. Overall, the pilot plant results obtained and the process economics evaluation data indicate a safer, environmentally friendly and highly competitive solution offered by the proposed nanofiltration treatment, thus

  4. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of 239,24OPu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual 239Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with 239,24OPu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10-6, 6 x 10-5, and 5 x 10-4, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung

  5. Thermal conductivity of rocksalt and other geologic materials from the site of the proposed waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, J.N.; McCreight, J.E.

    1980-03-19

    The measurements first reported by Acton on the thermal conductivity of samples taken from a borehole at the site of the proposed nuclear waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, have been extended to include additional samples and higher temperature measurements. Samples for measurements were taken from several depths of three wells, including the well AEC 8 from which Acton obtained his samples. These samples ranged from relatively pure rocksalt (NaCl) with small amounts of interstitial anhydrite to essentially nonsalt samples composed of gypsum or clay. The measurements in this latest series were conducted at Sandia, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), and at Dynatech Corp. In general, the data from the three laboratories agreed reasonably well for similar coarse grained translucent rock salt samples, with the LASL and Sandia results typically being about 20% higher than those of Dynatceh. On the basis of these experiments, it is concluded that the thermal conductivity of materials found at the site can be predicted to an accuracy +-30% from knowledge of the composition and grain size of these materials.

  6. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  7. Pilot-scale demonstration of surfactant-enhanced PCE solubilization at the Bachman Road site. 1. Site characterization and test design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriola, Linda M; Drummond, Chad D; Hahn, Ernest J; Hayes, Kim F; Kibbey, Tohren C G; Lemke, Lawrence D; Pennell, Kurt D; Petrovskis, Erik A; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Rathfelder, Klaus M

    2005-03-15

    A pilot-scale demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) was conducted to recover dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethene (PCE) from a sandy glacial outwash aquifer underlying a former dry cleaning facility at the Bachman Road site in Oscoda, MI. Part one of this two-part paper describes site characterization efforts and a comprehensive approach to SEAR test design, effectively integrating laboratory and modeling studies. Aquifer coring and drive point sampling suggested the presence of PCE-DNAPL in a zone beneath an occupied building. A narrow PCE plume emanating from the vicinity of this building discharges into Lake Huron. The shallow unconfined aquifer, characterized by relatively homogeneous fine-medium sand deposits, an underlying clay layer, and the absence of significant PCE transformation products, was judged suitable for the demonstration of SEAR. Tween 80 was selected for application based upon its favorable solubilization performance in batch and two-dimensional sand tank treatability studies, biodegradation potential, and regulatory acceptance. Three-dimensional flow and transport models were employed to develop a robust design for surfactant delivery and recovery. Physical and fiscal constraints led to an unusual hydraulic design, in which surfactant was flushed across the regional groundwater gradient, facilitating the delivery of concentrations of Tween 80 exceeding 1% (wt) throughout the treatment zone. The potential influence of small-scale heterogeneity on PCE-DNAPL distribution and SEAR performance was assessed through numerical simulations incorporating geostatistical permeability fields based upon available core data. For the examined conditions simulated PCE recoveries ranged from 94to 99%. The effluent treatment system design consisted of low-profile air strippers coupled with carbon adsorption to trap off-gas PCE and discharge of treated aqueous effluent to a local wastewater treatment plant. The

  8. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO2 Storage in the Paris Basin (GéoCarbone-PICOREF)

    OpenAIRE

    Brosse É.; Badinier G.; Blanchard F.; Caspard E.; Collin P.Y.; Delmas J.; Dezayes C.; Dreux R.; Dufournet A.; Durst P.; Fillacier S.; Garcia D.; Grataloup S.; Hanot F.; Hasanov V.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the GéoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO2 storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO2 per year. GéoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a “Regional Domain”, ca. 200 × 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: detailed...

  9. Experiences gained from the Ketzin pilot site, Brandenburg, the sole German national CO2 storage project

    OpenAIRE

    Axel Liebscher; Sonja Martens; Fabian Möller; Michael Kühn

    2013-01-01

    Geological storage and sequestration represents one of the most important routes for carbon dioxide storage, be it in saline aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs or coal beds. Understanding the mechanisms of capture, the potential and actual storage capacity of particular sites, and ways to manage, monitor and mitigate the threat from any potential leakage or seepage is critical to the future of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) and the power industry. The first part of this book provides ...

  10. Improving surveillance system and surgical site infection rates through a network: A pilot study from Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Nørgaard, Mette; Jamulitrat, Silom

    2009-01-01

    Background: Surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) provides data upon which interventions to improve patient safety can be based. In Thailand, however, SSI surveillance has not yet been standardized. Objectives: To develop a standardized SSI surveillance system and to monitor SSI rates after introduction of such a system. Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 17,752 patients who underwent surgery in ten hospitals in Thailand from April 2004 to May 2005. The SSI rates were co...

  11. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  12. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I. (ed.)

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  13. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis, E-mail: subhasis.ghoshal@mcgill.ca

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Aeration and moisture addition alone caused extensive hydrocarbon biodegradation. • 30-day slurry reactor remediation endpoints attained in 385 days in biopiles. • High nitrogen concentrations inhibited hydrocarbon degradation. • Inhibition of biodegradation linked to lack of shifts in soil microbial community. - Abstract: Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16–C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15 °C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16–C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day{sup −1} in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day{sup −1} in slurry bioreactors for C16–C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction

  14. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2014-09-15

    Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15°C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16-C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day(-1) in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day(-1) in slurry bioreactors for C16-C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction were comparable in these two systems.

  15. Radiometric dating of Ochoan (Permian) evaporites, WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] site, Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have attempted radiometric dating of halide-sulfate salts and clay minerals from the Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA, as part of geochemical study of the stability of the evaporite sequence at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - a US DOE facilty) site. We undertook this dating to determine: (1) primary age of evaporite genesis or time(s) of recrystallization; (2) if previously undated evaporite minerals (leonite, polyhalite, kieserite) give useful data; and (3) if the detrital clay minerals have been radiometrically reset at any time following their incorporation into the evaporite medium. We have shown earlier that polyhalites can indeed be successfully dated by the K-Ar method, and once corrections are applied for admixed halide minerals, dates of 210-230 Ma for the Delaware Basin are obtained. Rb-Sr isochrons from early stage sylvites-polyhalites- anhydrites yield 220 +- 10 Ma, even when some sylvites yield lower K-Ar dates due to loss of *40-Ar. K-Ar dates on leonites and kieserities are also low due to *40-Ar loss, but their Rb-Sr dates are higher. Detrital clay minerals from the Delaware Basin collectively yield a highly scattered isochron (390 +- 77 Ma), but samples from a local area, such as the WIPP Site, give a much better age of 428 +- 7 Ma. These dates show that the interaction between the clay minerals and the evaporitic brines was insufficient to reset the clay minerals Rb-Sr systematics. In a related study, we note that a dike emplaced into the evaporite at 34 Ma had only very limited effect on the intruded rocks; contact phenomena were all within 2 m of the dike. All of our geochemical (radio-metric and trace element) studies of the WIPP site argue for preservation of the isotopic and chemical integrity of the major minerals for the past 200 Ma

  16. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and {sup 137}Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

  17. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and [sup 137]Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

  18. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and 137Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor

  19. Analysis of solutes in groundwaters from the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    Between 1976 and 1986, groundwater samples from more than 60 locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were collected and analyzed for a variety of major, minor, and trace solutes. Most of the samples were from the Rustler Formation (the Culebra Dolomite, the Magenta Dolomite, or the zone at the contact between the Rustler and underlying Salado Formations) or the Dewey Lake Red Beds. The analytical data from the laboratories are presented here with accompanying discussions of sample collection methods, supporting field measurements, and laboratory analytical methods. A comparison of four data sets and a preliminary evaluation of the data for the major solutes (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg) shows that the data for samples analyzed by UNC/Bendix for SNL seem to be the most reliable, but that at some locations, samples representative of the native, unperturbed groundwater have not been collected. At other locations, the water chemistry has apparently changed between sampling episodes.

  20. Residents' Attitudes Towards Tourism in a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems Pilot Site:a Case Study in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yehong; Min Qingwen; Cheng Shengkui

    2009-01-01

    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) is a wide program to promote the conservation and adaptive management of such systems and their associated landscapes,biodiversity,knowledge systems and cultures.Rice-Fish Systems (RFS) in Longxian village of China,as a traditional agricultural system,was selected as one of the five pilot sites of GIAHS in 2005.Researchers have paid more attention to the dynamic conservation and adaptive management of RFS because it is under severe threats from global development challenges.Tourism is suggested to be brought into the RFS conservation program as an alternative industry.This paper presents a comparative study of residents in three types of farm household in Longxian,seeking attitudes to the RFS conservation and tourism development and ways in which such information may guide future strategies.Results show residents,belonging to the household type in which most family members are abroad,have the most positive attitudes to RFS conservation and tourism development;while residents,as other household type in which less than 50% of family members are abroad,are the least sensitive group in these three household types,due to the motivation of moving abroad weakening their enthusiasm to participate in the local activities.Implications are discussed in the context of how resident attitudes will affect the future management of GIAHS conservation and tourism development,and then measures are put forward to foster tourism cooperation and multistakeholders process establishment.

  1. Zero-Offset VSP Monitoring of CO2 Storage: Impedance Inversion and Wedge Modelling at the Ketzin Pilot Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Götz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At the CO2 storage pilot site near the town of Ketzin (35 km west of Berlin, Germany the sandstone reservoir at 630 m–650 m depth is thin and heterogeneous. The time-lapse analysis of zero-offset VSP measurements shows that CO2-induced amplitude changes can be observed on near-well corridor stacks. Further, we investigate whether CO2-induced amplitude changes in the monitoring data can be used to derive geometrical and petrophysical parameters governing the migration of CO2 within a brine saturated sandstone aquifer. 2D seismic-elastic modelling is done to test the processing workflow and to perform a wedge modelling study for estimation of the vertical expansion of the CO2 plume. When using the NRMS error as a measure for the similarity between the modelled and recorded repeat traces, the best match is achieved for a plume thickness of 6-7 m within the reservoir sandstone of 8 m thickness. With band limited impedance inversion a velocity reduction at the top of the reservoir of 30%, influenced by casing reverberations as well as CO2 injection, is found. The relation of seismic amplitude to CO2 saturated layer thickness and CO2-induced changes in P-wave velocities are important parameters for the quantification of the injected CO2 volume.

  2. Interaction of radionuclides with geomedia associated with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the potential of geological media from the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in Southeastern New Mexico for retardation of radionuclide migration in an aqueous carrier was conducted. The survey included the measurement of sorption coefficients (Kd) for twelve radionuclides between three natural water simulants and ten samples from various geological strata. The nuclides included 137Cs, 85Sr, 131I, 99Tc, 125Sb, 144Ce, 152Eu, 153Gd, 106Ru, 243Am, 244Cm, and 238Pu. The compositions of the simulant solutions were those expected of water in contact with potash minerals or halite deposits in the area and in a typical groundwater found in the Delaware Basin. The geological samples were obtained from potential aquifers above and below the proposed repository horizons and from bedded salt deposits in the repository horizons. In brine solutions, Tc and I were not significantly adsorbed by any of the minerals and Cs and Sr showed minimal adsorption (Kd's 103 and Ru and Sb Kd's varied in the range of 25 to > 103. In the groundwater simulant, Tc and I showed the same behavior, but the Kd's of the other nuclides were generally higher. Some initial parametric studies involving pH, trace organic constituents in the simulant solutions, and radionuclide concentrations were carried out. Significant differences in the observed Kd's can result from varying one or more of these solution parameters

  3. Launching of the site selection proceeding for new nuclear power plants in United-Kingdom; Lancement de la selection des sites pour les futurs reacteurs au Royaume Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-01-15

    The British government has launched the proceeding for the selection of sites for the construction of new nuclear plants. Those sites have to be located in Wales and in England because of the opposition of the authorities of Scotland and Northern Ireland to the construction of nuclear power plants on their territories, moreover manufacturers favor places close to existing sites. EdF-Energy has proposed 5 sites from which 2 (Sizewell and Hinckley Point) may home 4 EPR while the 3 other sites (Heysham, Hartlepool and Dungeness) will be given to rival groups as EdF agreed to do it when it purchased British Energy. New partnerships have been signed between European energy operators wishing to take part into this program of new nuclear power plants: RWE (Germany) and EON (Germany), IBERDROLA (spain) and Scottish and Southern Energy (Great-Britain), GDF-Suez (France) and IBERDROLA. (A.C.)

  4. Monitoring Shallow Subsurface CO2 Migration using Electrical Imaging Technique, Pilot Site in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, A.; Chang, H. K.; Moreira, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Geological Sequestration (CCGS or CCS) is one of the main technological strategies targeting Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions reduction, with special emphasis on carbon dioxide (CO2) coming from industrial sources. CCGS integrates the so called Carbon Management Strategies, as indicated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and is the basis of main technical route likely to enable substantial emission reduction in a safe, quick and cost-effective way. Currently one of the main challenges in the area of CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient measuring, monitoring and verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. The implementation of the first CO2 MMV field lab in Brazil, located in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina state, offered an excellent opportunity for running controlled release experiments in a real open air environment. The purpose of this work is to present the results of a time lapse monitoring experiment of CO2 migration in both saturated and unsaturated sand-rich sediments, using electrical imaging technique. The experiment covered an area of approximately 6300 m2 and CO2 was continuously injected at depth of 8 m, during 12 days, at an average rate of 90 g/ day, totalizing 1080 g of injected CO2. 2D and 3D electrical images using Wenner array were acquired daily during 13 consecutive days. Comparison of post injection electrical imaging results with pre injection images shows change in resistivity values consistent with migration pathways of CO2. A pronounced increase in resistivity values (up to ~ 500 ohm.m) with respect to the pre-injection values occurs in the vicinity of the injection well. Background values of 530 ohm.m have changed to 1118 ohm.m, right after injection. Changes in resistivity values progressively diminish outward of the well, following

  5. Dépollution par méthode électrocinétique d'un matériau argileux dopé au cadmium. essai pilote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Pascal; Broquet, Paul; Baticle, Pascal

    1999-01-01

    Electrokinetic treatment is a remediation technique for fine-grained soils. The feasibility and efficiency of transporting cadmium with this treatment are investigated at pilot scale in a 3.25 t clayey medium specimen spiked with cadmium nitrate solution and at an electrode spacing of 100 cm. Sulfuric acid is added to catholyte to neutralize the hydroxides generated at the cathode. A constant current density of 0.3 mA-cm -2 is applied. The test is conducted with cadmium at a concentration of 882 mg·kg -1 of dried matter. Cadmium was transported toward the catholyte and plated on the cathode. After 3 259 h of processing and an energy expenditure of 159 kWh·m -3, 98.5 % of the cadmium was removed.

  6. Gas monitoring during the CO2 back production field test at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Kujawa, Christian; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences operates Europe's first on-shore CO2 storage site in Ketzin, a small town near Berlin. From June 2008 until August 2013 about 67 kt of CO2 were injected into Upper Triassic sandstones in 630 to 650 m depth. The injection phase ended with an experiment to evaluate the influence of additives on CO2 storage. During this experiment 32 t N2 and 613 t CO2 were co-injected into the borehole over a period of 25 days followed by the final injection of 66 t pure CO2. At the beginning of the experiment 10,000 l (10 Nm3) Kr were pumped into the borehole, to separate the previous pure CO2 and the CO2-N2 mixture. For the same reason, CO2 with a different isotopic composition (δ13C = -3.4±0.2o instead of δ13C = -30.6±0.4) was used for the first 548 t of the total 613 t. To demonstrate that the stored CO2 is retrievable a field test was carried out in October 2014 during a period of two weeks. Of interest, in this context, is the composition of the back-produced gas which delivers key information on possible interactions between the CO2, formation fluid and rocks. In total 240 t of gas were produced via the former injection well. The flow rates ranged between 800 and 3,200 kg gas/h. The gas was sampled after the gas/water separator and continuously analysed using a mass spectrometer, a gas chromatograph and a photoacoustic sensor, thus covering all gas components and concentrations. In addition, gas samples were collected for stable carbon isotopes investigations in the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the produced gas consists of > 97% CO2 plus mainly N2. The N2 was detected from the beginning, although the injection in 2013 ended with pure CO2. The N2 concentration decreased from about 3% to 1% during the two weeks of the experiment. In addition to these major components CH4, CO and H2 (up to 0.01%) as well as Kr and SF6 (up to 0.001%, both were used as tracers in 2013) were detected. The gas composition of natural

  7. Post-injection feasibility study with the reflectivity method for the Ketzin pilot site, Germany (CO2 storage in a saline aquifer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Alexandra; Kempka, Thomas; Huang, Fei; Diersch [Gil], Magdalena; Lüth, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    3D time-lapse seismic surveys (4D seismic) have proven to be a suitable technique for monitoring of injected CO2, because when CO2 replaces brine as a free gas it considerably affects elastic properties of porous media. Forward modeling of a 4D seismic response to the CO2-fluid substitution in a storage reservoir is an inevitable step in such studies. At the Ketzin pilot site (CO2 storage) 67 kilotons of CO2 were injected into a saline aquifer between 2008 and 2013. In order to track migration of CO2 at Ketzin, 3D time-lapse seismic data were acquired by means of a baseline pre-injection survey in 2005 and 3 monitor surveys: in 2009, 2012 and in 2015 (the 1st post-injection survey). Results of the 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method suggest that effects of the injected CO2 on the 4D seismic data at Ketzin are significant regarding both seismic amplitudes and time delays. These results prove the corresponding observations in the real 4D seismic data at the Ketzin pilot site. But reservoir heterogeneity and seismic resolution, as well as random and coherent seismic noise are negative factors to be considered in this interpretation. Results of the 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method support the conclusion that even small amounts of injected CO2 can be monitored in such post-injected saline aquifer as the CO2 storage reservoir at the Ketzin pilot site both qualitatively and quantitatively with considerable uncertainties (Lüth et al., 2015). Reference: Lueth, S., Ivanova, A., Kempka, T. (2015): Conformity assessment of monitoring and simulation of CO2 storage: A case study from the Ketzin pilot site. - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 42, p. 329-339.

  8. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural pathogens. Collection, preservation and analysis of samples for both organic compounds and microbial characterization add a great degree of complication to the sampling and preservation protocols and a

  9. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The 3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods were used for Hg, Se, total C, and carbonate-C on this same size fraction. Only Ag, In, and Te had a large percentage of concentrations below the detection limit. Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural

  10. Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10-14 to 10-11 m/s (permeabilities of about 10-21 to 10-18 m2) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects

  11. Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

  12. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation Uranium Recovery Pilot Plant, Nichols, Florida. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a radiological survey conducted at the site of a former uranium recovery pilot plant operated by the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation is presented. All that remains of this operation is a concrete pad situated within the boundary of a phosphate products plant now operated by Conserv, Inc., at the Nichols, Florida site. The survey included measurements designed to characterize the residual radioactivity in the vicinity of this pilot plant and to compare the quantities with federal guidelines for the release of decontaminated property for unrestricted use. The results of this survey indicate that only small quantities of radioactivity exist above normal background levels for that area. Some soil contamination was found in the vicinity of a concrete pad on which the pilot plant stood. Much of this contamination was due to 226Ra and 238U. Some beta-gamma dose rates in excess of applicable guidelines were observed in this same area. External gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground range from 20 to 100 μR/hr. None of the direct measurements of alpha contamination were above guideline levels

  13. Geophysical Methods, Tracer Leakage, and Flow Modeling Studies at the West Pearl Queen Carbon Sequestration/EOR Pilot Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromhal, G. S.; Wilson, T. H.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Smith, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    Recently, a few thousand tons of CO2 were injected into the West Pearl Queen field, a depleted oil reservoir in southeastern New Mexico, for a pilot carbon sequestration project. Small amounts of 3 different perfluorocarbon tracers were injected with the CO2. Approximately 50 capillary absorption tube samplers (CATS) were located across the field within 2m of the grounds surface to detect the tracers in extremely small (~10-13L) quantities. After only several days, the CATS detected quantities of tracers at distances of up to 350m from the injection well. Greater amounts of tracers were detected in the different directions. The underground transport mechanism(s) are uncertain; however, appearance of tracer in the CATS after only a 6 day period suggests that CO2 movement may have occurred through near-surface processes. Subsequent tracer measurements made over 10 and 54 day time periods revealed continued tracer leakage. To try to understand the tracer information, we conducted lineament interpretations of the area using a black and white aerial photo taken in 1949, digital orthophotos, and Landsat TM imagery. Lineament interpretations revealed distinct northeast and northwest trending lineament sets. These directions coincided roughly with the direction of tracer-leakage into areas northwest and southwest of the injection well. The near-surface geology consists of a few-feet thick veneer of late Pleistocene and Holocene sand dunes covering the middle Pleistocene Mescalero caliche. A survey of the caliche was made using ground penetrating radar (GPR) to attempt to identify any preferential migration pathways. Modeling studies also were performed to identify the potential leakage pathways at the site. Because of the relatively fast appearance of tracers at large distances from the injection well, simple diffusion through the surface layers was ruled out. Wind patterns in the area have also made transport through the atmosphere and back into the ground highly unlikely

  14. The value of site-based observations complementary to naturalistic driving observations : a pilot study on the right turn manoeuvre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, N. van Christoph, M.W.T. Hoedemaeker, M. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    Naturalistic driving studies are increasingly applied in different shapes and sizes. The European project PROLOGUE has investigated the value and feasibility of a large-scale naturalistic driving study in Europe. Within PROLOGUE several pilot studies have been conducted in different countries. The D

  15. The value of site-based observations complematary to naturalistic driving observations : a pilot study on the right turn manoeuvre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, N. van Christoph, M.W.T. Hoedemaeker, M. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    Naturalistic driving studies are increasingly applied in different shapes and sizes. The European project PROLOGUE has investigated the value and feasibility of a large-scale naturalistic driving study in Europe. Within PROLOGUE several pilot studies have been conducted in different countries. The D

  16. A Geochemical Approach for Monitoring a CO2 Pilot Site: Rousse, France. A Major gases, CO2-Carbon Isotopes and Noble Gases Combined Approach Une méthode géochimique pour la surveillance d’un site pilote de stockage de CO2 : Rousse, France. Approche combinant les gaz majeurs, l’isotopie du carbone du CO2 et les gaz rares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia B.

    2012-02-01

    storage pilot suggest that noble gas compositions produced by oxyfuel process are sufficiently exotic compared to compositions found in nature (reservoir, aquifer and air to be directly used as tracers of the injected CO2, and to detect and quantify leaks at soil and aquifer levels. Ce papier presente la caracterisation geochimique des differents gaz, naturels et anthropogeniques, impliques dans un pilote de stockage de CO2 en champ de gaz naturel appauvri (Rousse, France. Dans ce pilote, le CO2 est produit par oxycombustion d’un gaz naturel transforme en gaz domestique a l’usine de Lacq. Ce CO2 est transporte dans un pipeline de 30 km de longueur jusqu’au reservoir de gaz appauvri de Rousse. Les gaz produits a Rousse avant injection de CO2, le gaz commercial de Lacq et le CO2 resultant de l’oxycombustion ont ete echantillonnes, ainsi que les gaz situes dans un puits de surveillance (a une profondeur de 45 m et les gaz du sol situes au voisinage de Rousse. Pour tous ces echantillons, la composition en gaz majeurs, la signature isotopique du carbone ainsi que l’abondance et signature isotopique des gaz rares ont ete determinees. Les compositions gazeuses du gaz naturel de Rousse sont comparables a celle du gaz domestique de Lacq avec le methane comme compose principal et la fraction C2-C5 et CO2 comme gaz residuels. Les gaz des sols refletent typiquement des melanges entre l’air (pole pur et le CO2 d’origine biogenique (avec des teneurs maximales de l’ordre de 9-10 %, tandis que les gaz presents dans le puits de monitoring refletent typiquement la composition de l’air sans exces de CO2. Le gaz de Rousse et le gaz domestique du site de Lacq ont une composition isotopique δ13CCH4 egale a –41,0 ‰ et –43,0 ‰ respectivement. Le CO2 injecte sur Rousse a une composition isotopique δ13CCO2 egale a –40,0 ‰ a la sortie de la chambre d’oxycombustion, tandis que la composition isotopique δ13CCO2 des gaz des sols est comprise entre –15 et –25

  17. CERN pilot greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot installation was situated near Bld. BA6 opposite to the main entrance of the Meyrin site, with respect to Route de Meyrin. See Weekly Bulletin 3/83, and also photo 8305594X, 8505898X, 8302200.

  18. Enhanced activity for supported Au clusters: Methanol oxidation on Au/TiO2(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Samuel A.; Cagg, Brett A.; Levine, Mara S.; He, Wei; Manandhar, Kedar; Chen, Donna A.

    2012-08-01

    Gold clusters supported on TiO2(110) exhibit unusual activity for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. Temperature programmed desorption studies of methanol on Au clusters show that both Au and titania sites are necessary for methanol reaction. Isotopic labeling experiments with CD3OH demonstrate that reaction occurs via Osbnd H bond scission to form a methoxy intermediate. When the TiO2 surface is oxidized with 18O2 before or after Au deposition, methanol reaction produces H218O below 300 K, indicating that oxygen from titania promotes Osbnd H bond scission and is incorporated into desorbing products. XPS experiments provide additional evidence that during methanol reaction on the Au/TiO2 surface, methanol adsorption occurs on TiO2, given that the titania support becomes slightly oxidized after exposure to methanol in the presence of Au clusters. While the role of TiO2 is to dissociate the Osbnd H bond and form the reactive methoxy intermediate, the role of the Au sites is to remove hydrogen from the surface as H2, thus preventing the recombination of methoxy and hydrogen to methanol. The decrease in formaldehyde yield with increasing Au coverage above 0.25 ML suggests that reaction occurs at Au-titania interfacial sites; scanning tunneling microscopy images of various Au coverages confirm that the number of interfacial sites at the perimeter of the Au clusters decreases as the Au coverage is increased between 0.25 and 5 ML.

  19. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs.

  20. Soil Fertility in relation to Landscape Position and Land Use/Cover Types: A Case Study of the Lake Kivu Pilot Learning Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majaliwa Mwanjalolo Jackson-Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the change and distribution of land-uses/covers along the landscape, and evaluated the nutrient status of the top soil layer in the Lake Kivu Pilot Learning Site (LKPLS benchmarked micro-catchments. Soil physical and chemical properties were quantified using triplicate soil samples collected from each land-use/cover at two depths (0–15 and 15–30 cm in three LK PLS Learning Innovation Platform (IP sites (Bufundi in Uganda, Mupfuni-Shanga in D.R. Congo, Gataraga in Rwanda. Small scale agriculture has increased in all the benchmarked micro-catchments at the expense of other land-uses/covers. In the settlement areas land-use/cover distribution along the landscape varied across sites and countries; the major one being eucalyptus woodlots, wetland, and perennials and annuals crops in Bufundi; annuals and perennials crops in Mupfuni-Shanga; and annuals crops in Gataraga. Perennial crops tended to occur at the footslope and valley bottoms, while the annuals occurred at the upper backslopes and summits. Available P and K were relatively higher and C/N ratio (7.28 was the lowest in Mupfuni Shanga. Annual crops had the lowest available P and N across site (P<0.05. The key nutrients N, P and K were below the critical values for plant growth for Bufundi.

  1. Radiological characterization of the Kellex site. Publication No. 45020. [Metal fabrication; pilot plant to demonstrate units for gaseous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, S.W.

    1981-03-01

    A radiological characterization has been conducted at the former Kellex Corporation site in Jersey City, New Jersey. Although several prior surveys and a remedial action were conducted, there was still a need for more information about the radiological condition of the site. A grid was established on the site and the surface was surveyed by a mobile in situ detection system. Trenches were systematically dug in an attempt to find subsurface areas of contamination. Material from the trenches was surveyed by the in situ measurement system and trench sidewalls were soil sampled and surveyed using portable dose rate and count rate instrumentation. Results of the survey indicated that radioactivity levels on the site were at or near background. Small amounts of contaminated material were found but not enough to exceed the guideline specified.

  2. Influence of bathymetry in manganese nodule pilot mine site selection: A case study from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    Although manganese nodules are observed in all world oceans, known reserves cannot be only criterion in future mine sites selection and sizing. Detailed and accurate depth data is another major prerequisite. With the advent of multibeam swath...

  3. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa - The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Careful site characterization is critical for successful geologic sequestration of CO2, especially for sequestration in brine-bearing formations that have not been previously used for other purposes. Traditional site characterization techniques such as geophysical imaging, well logging, core analyses, interference well testing, and tracer testing are all valuable. However, the injection and monitoring of CO2 itself provides a wealth of additional information. Rather than considering a ri...

  4. A dynamic flow simulation code benchmark study addressing the highly heterogeneous properties of the Stuttgart formation at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Class, Holger; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Norden, Ben; Kolditz, Olaf; Kühn, Michael; Walter, Lena; Wang, Wenqing; Zehner, Björn

    2013-04-01

    CO2 injection at the Ketzin pilot site located in Eastern Germany (Brandenburg) about 25 km west of Berlin is undertaken since June 2008 with a scheduled total amount of about 70,000 t CO2 to be injected into the saline aquifer represented by the Stuttgart Formation at a depth of 630 m to 650 m until the end of August 2013. The Stuttgart Formation is of fluvial origin determined by high-permeablity sandstone channels embedded in a floodplain facies of low permeability indicating a highly heterogeneous distribution of reservoir properties as facies distribution, porosity and permeability relevant for dynamic flow simulations. Following the dynamic modelling activities discussed by Kempka et al. (2010), a revised geological model allowed us to history match CO2 arrival times in the observation wells and reservoir pressure with a good agreement (Martens et al., 2012). Consequently, the validated reservoir model of the Stuttgart Formation at the Ketzin pilot site enabled us to predict the development of reservoir pressure and the CO2 plume migration in the storage formation by dynamic flow simulations. A benchmark study of industrial (ECLIPSE 100 as well as ECLIPSE 300 CO2STORE and GASWAT) and scientific dynamic flow simulations codes (TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N, OpenGeoSys and DuMuX) was initiated to address and compare the simulator capabilities considering a highly complex reservoir model. Hence, our dynamic flow simulations take into account different properties of the geological model such as significant variation of porosity and permeability in the Stuttgart Formation as well as structural geological features implemented in the geological model such as seven major faults located at the top of the Ketzin anticline. Integration of the geological model into reservoir models suitable for the different dynamic flow simulators applied demonstrated that a direct conversion of reservoir model discretization between Finite Volume and Finite Element flow simulators is not feasible

  5. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- monitoring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate existing proven technologies for the monitoring of hazardous waste sites during remediation activities and to protect the health and safety of all related entities while complying with government regulations. The study began with a literature search to determine manufacturers and related instrumentation which would be applicable to the most complex (in terms of toxicity and mediums affected) sites. Criteria for monitoring and analyses were established and a functional analysis was performed to select the most appropriate instrumentation available. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry is the most widely accepted method for generating quantitative data given the characterization of the Winfield site. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, while not a new technology, has the distinct advantage of measuring simultaneously hundreds of gaseous pollutants which can also be sparged from water and this technology received the highest score as per the functional analysis. To protect workers and the public surrounding remediation sites which are known to contain VOCs, on site monitoring prior to, and during the excavation operations, is recommended until enough data are obtained to assess the health risks to workers. The conclusion of this study is to recommend evaluation of both the mobile GC/MS and FTIR systems simultaneously in identical operating conditions

  6. Pilot-scale field tests for the methanotrophic technology cometabolic bioreactor demonstration at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Herbes, S.E.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes a demonstration of cometabolic technology for bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated and aromatic solvents conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The technology demonstration is located at a seep from the K-1070-C/D Classified Burial Ground at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Funding for this demonstration is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Program, Office of Technology Development.

  7. Design and realisation of a pilot site for monitoring Infiltrated soil water under a real on-site treatment system; evaluation of soil functions

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Behzad; Fouché, Olivier; Saillé, Christophe; Ramier, David; Seidl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    13 p. International audience The knowledge of soil and water movement in vadose zone is essential for a wide range of scientific and practical fields. One of the main but less studied media is the soil under the Undrained On-Site Treatment Systems (UOSTS). In situ monitoring is necessary to interpret most physical and hydric properties of soil and to determine the chemical composition of seepage water as a key aspect in sustainable management of soils. In this paper the design and instr...

  8. Preliminary Seismic Time-lapse Results of the First Post-injection Monitoring at the Ketzin Pilot Site for CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Monika, Ivandic; Julin, Christopher; Lüth, Stefan; Bergmann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse surface seismic monitoring methods have proven to be notably successful in imaging the development of the CO2 plume injected into the 630-650 meters deep saline aquifer at the Ketzin pilot site. A 3D baseline survey was acquired in the autumn of 2005 prior to CO2 injection, followed by two 3D repeat surveys conducted in the same season of 2009 and 2012 after injection of about 22 and 61 kt of CO2, respectively. These repeat surveys showed that the CO2 plume was concentrated around the injection well with a preferred WNW propagating trend due to reservoir heterogeneity. The CO2 induced amplitude anomaly continued to grow with more CO2 injected into the reservoir. The CO2 injection ended on August 29, 2013 after a total of about 67 kt injected CO2. In the autumn of 2015, a third 3D repeat survey with a nominal fold of 25 was acquired during the post-injection phase. The acquisition was implemented with an identical template scheme and acquisition parameters as in the previous surveys. About 5500 source points were acquired during the 57 days of active acquisition. The same processing steps as used before were carried out from pre-stack to post-stack. In order to minimize changes unrelated to the site operations, cross-calibration was applied to the data. Preliminary results of the time-lapse analysis show that the obtained amplitude anomaly at the reservoir level is smaller in size than the one observed at the time of the second repeat survey. This may indicate that CO2 dissolution is active, especially east of the injection site, where permeability and flow rate appear to be lower. In comparison to the previous surveys, the maximum amplitude anomaly has moved towards the west, which is consistent with the previously observed propagating tendency of the CO2 plume within the reservoir. No CO2 leakage is observed within the overburden.

  9. Geochemical influence of waste trench no. 22T at Chernobyl Pilot Site at the aquifer: Long-term trends, governing processes, and implications for radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses and analyzes data for geochemical monitoring of groundwater, collected in 1998–2008 at the international experimental radioecological study site (Chernobyl Pilot Site) located in the Red Forest radioactive waste dump site in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Groundwater in the zone of influence of the studied waste trench no. 22T was characterized by a specific geochemistry. Along with a high content of 90Sr (of an order of n × 1000–n × 10,000 Bq/L) groundwater showed elevated concentrations of Ca, K, NO3-, SO42- and of some trace elements (in particular stable Sr), and had more acidic pH values compared to “background” aquifer conditions. The observed water quality changes are apparently related to degradation of organic matter (pine forest remnants, litter, humus containing topsoil layer) buried inside trench no. 22T, which have lead to acidification of groundwater and leaching of cations adsorbed on the exchange complex of soils buried inside the trench. Regime monitoring data for the project period of 1998–2008 shows a progressive decrease of concentrations of the leached ions accompanied by an increase of pH in the chemical plume emerging from the trench. This can be explained by a combined effect of a gradual decrease of the inventory, humification of the original organic matter inside the trench, and of nutrient element uptake by roots of the newly planted pine forest on top of the trench. The identified trends of evolution of geochemical regime favor attenuation of subsurface migration of 90Sr from Red Forest waste dumps due to an increase of the 90Sr distribution coefficients, and stabilization of plumes of contaminated groundwater.

  10. Advanced and Integrated Petrophysical Characterization for CO2 Storage: Application to the Ketzin Site Caractérisation pétrophysique intégrée pour le stockage de CO2 : application au site de Ketzin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleury M.

    2013-06-01

    perméabilité. La pression d’entrée a également été évaluée. Les diagraphies RMN et de résistivité ont également été utilisées pour estimer de manière continue la saturation irréductible et juger de la représentativité des échantillons analysés au laboratoire. Pour le site de Ketzin, la zone de stockage est un grès argileux d’origine fluviatile localement très cimenté d’une porosité d’environ 30 % et d’une perméabilité variant de 100 à 300 mD. Deux zones se distinguent par des saturations irréductibles variant de 15 à 35 %. La courbe de perméabilité relative à l’eau présente une forte pente et suggère qu’une saturation inférieure à 50 % n’est pas atteignable en pratique. L’exposant de saturation de l’indice de résistivité est de 1,7, plus faible que la valeur standard de 2. La couverture a une perméabilité de 27 nD, une porosité de 15 % et une diffusivité de 0,8 x 10-9 m2/s.

  11. Alterations in the infrared spectral signature of avian feathers reflect potential chemical exposure: a pilot study comparing two sites in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabjani, Valon; Malik, Riffat N; Trevisan, Júlio; Hoti, Valmira; Ukpebor, Justina; Shinwari, Zabta K; Moeckel, Claudia; Jones, Kevin C; Shore, Richard F; Martin, Francis L

    2012-11-01

    Chemical contamination of ecosystems is a global issue with evidence that pollutants impact on living organisms in a harmful fashion. Developing sensor approaches that would allow the derivation of biomarkers or signatures of effect in target sentinel organisms and monitor environmental chemical contamination in a high throughput manner is of utmost importance. As biomolecules absorb infrared (IR), signature vibrational spectra related to structure and function can be derived. In light of this, we tested the notion that IR spectra of bird feathers might reflect environmental chemical contaminant exposure patterns. Feathers were collected from monospecific heronries of cattle egret based in two independent locations (Trimu vs. Mailsi) in the Punjab province of Pakistan; these sites were found to differ in their chemical contamination patterns. Feather samples were chemically analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, organochlorines and heavy metals. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to derive a spectral signature of individual feathers. Resultant IR spectra were then subjected to canonical correspondence analysis (CAA) to determine whether feather spectral signatures correlate to chemical exposure. Additionally, we explored if principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) could be applied to distinguish site-specific differences; linear discriminant function (LDF) was also applied to classify sites. The sampled feathers varied in their chemical exposure patterns depending on whether they were sourced from one site associated with heavy metal exposure or the other which suggested high organic pollutant exposures. CCA of chemical and spectral data showed a correlation between spectral signatures and chemical exposure. PCA-LDA readily distinguished feathers from the two different sites. Discriminating alterations were identified and these were associated with

  12. Characterization of Sediments from the Soil Desiccation Pilot Test (SDPT) Site in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Truex, Michael J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Chang, Hyun-shik; Clayton, Ray E.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Ward, Anderson L.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Baum, Steven R.; Smith, David M.

    2009-09-25

    This technical report documents the results of laboratory geochemical and hydrologic measurements of sediments collected from new borehole 299-E13-65 (C7047) and comparison of the results with those of nearby borehole 299-13E-62 (C5923) both drilled in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area. The total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants will be used to update contaminant-distribution conceptual models and to provide more data for improving baseline risk predictions and remedial alternative selections. Improved understanding of subsurface conditions and methods to remediate these principal contaminants can be also used to evaluate the application of specific technologies to other contaminants across the Hanford Site.

  13. Pilot-Scale Test Results Of A Thin Film Evaporator System For Management Of Liquid High-Level Wastes At The Hanford Site Washington USA -11364

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

  14. Process performance of the pilot-scale in situ vitrification of a simulated waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process feasibility studies have been successfully performed on three developmental scales to determine the potential for applying in situ vitrification to intermediate-level (low-level) waste placed in seepage pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the laboratory, testing was performed in crucibles containing a mixture of 50% ORNL soil and 50% limestone. In an engineering-scale test at Pacific Northwest Laboratory a /1/12/-scale simulation of an ORNL waste trench was constructed and vitrified, resulting in a waste product containing soil and limestone concentrations of 68 wt % and 32 wt %, respectively. In the pilot-scale test a /3/8/-scale simulation of the same trench was constructed and vitrified at ORNL, resulting in soil and limestone concentrations of 80% and 20%, respectively, in the waste product. Results of the three scales of testing indicate that the ORNL intermediate-level (low-level) waste sites can be successfully processed by in situ vitrification; the waste form will retain significant quantities of the cesium and strontium. Because cesium-137 and strontium-90 are the major components of the radionuclide inventory in the ORNL seepage pits and trenches, final field process decontamination factors (i.e., losses to the off-gas system relative to the waste inventory) of 1.0 E + 4 are desired to minimize activity buildup in the off-gas system. 17 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs

  15. Process performance of the pilot-scale in situ vitrification of a simulated waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.G.; Koegler, S.S.; Bates, S.O.

    1988-06-01

    Process feasibility studies have been successfully performed on three developmental scales to determine the potential for applying in situ vitrification to intermediate-level (low-level) waste placed in seepage pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the laboratory, testing was performed in crucibles containing a mixture of 50% ORNL soil and 50% limestone. In an engineering-scale test at Pacific Northwest Laboratory a /1/12/-scale simulation of an ORNL waste trench was constructed and vitrified, resulting in a waste product containing soil and limestone concentrations of 68 wt % and 32 wt %, respectively. In the pilot-scale test a /3/8/-scale simulation of the same trench was constructed and vitrified at ORNL, resulting in soil and limestone concentrations of 80% and 20%, respectively, in the waste product. Results of the three scales of testing indicate that the ORNL intermediate-level (low-level) waste sites can be successfully processed by in situ vitrification; the waste form will retain significant quantities of the cesium and strontium. Because cesium-137 and strontium-90 are the major components of the radionuclide inventory in the ORNL seepage pits and trenches, final field process decontamination factors (i.e., losses to the off-gas system relative to the waste inventory) of 1.0 E + 4 are desired to minimize activity buildup in the off-gas system. 17 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ''Geostatistics Test Problem'' is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1

  17. Le site d’Ajakagytma et le complexe culturel de Kel’teminar au sein des processus de néolithisation en Asie centrale

    OpenAIRE

    Brunet, Frédérique; Hudžanazarov, Muhiddin; Szymczak, Karol

    2014-01-01

    La recherche menée dans le cadre de la MAFANAC s’intéresse au Néolithique et plus largement à la période des processus de néolithisation qui voit à partir de la fin du Pléistocène, en Asie centrale, l’émergence de profondes et multiples modifications dans les domaines culturel, technique, économique, social et symbolique. En Ouzbékistan, l’étude réalisée en partenariat avec l’Institut d’archéologie de l’Académie des sciences de cette République (Samarcande) est focalisée sur le Néolithique de...

  18. A partnership approach to providing on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees: a pilot study from Alabama, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Bronwen; Barber, Brad Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV in the United States is concentrated in the South, an impoverished region with marked health disparities and high rates of incarceration, particularly among African Americans. In the Deep South state of Alabama, a policy directive to reduce prison overcrowding has diverted large numbers of convicted felons to community supervision. Probation and parole offices have yet to provide the HIV education and testing services that are offered in state prisons. This study sought to implement on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees through an intersectoral programme involving law enforcement, university and HIV agency employees. The three main objectives were to (1) involve probation/parole officers in planning, execution and assessment of the programme, (2) provide HIV education to the officers and (3) offer voluntary pretest HIV counselling and testing to probationers and parolees. Methods The partnered programme was conducted between October and December 2015. Offenders who were recently sentenced to probation (“new offenders”), received HIV education during orientation. Offenders already under supervision prior to the programme (“current offenders”) learned about the on-site services during scheduled office visits. Outcomes were measured through officer assessments, informal feedback and uptake of HIV services among offenders. Results A total of 86 new and 249 current offenders reported during the programme (N=335). Almost one-third (31.4%) of new offenders sought HIV testing, while only 3.2% of current offenders were screened for HIV. Refusals among current offenders invoked monogamy, time pressures, being tested in prison, fear of positive test results and concerns about being labelled as gay or unfaithful to women partners. Officers rated the programme as worthwhile and feasible to implement at other offices. Conclusions The partnership approach ensured support from law enforcement and intersectoral cooperation throughout the

  19. A partnership approach to providing on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees: a pilot study from Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwen Lichtenstein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV in the United States is concentrated in the South, an impoverished region with marked health disparities and high rates of incarceration, particularly among African Americans. In the Deep South state of Alabama, a policy directive to reduce prison overcrowding has diverted large numbers of convicted felons to community supervision. Probation and parole offices have yet to provide the HIV education and testing services that are offered in state prisons. This study sought to implement on-site HIV services for probationers and parolees through an intersectoral programme involving law enforcement, university and HIV agency employees. The three main objectives were to (1 involve probation/parole officers in planning, execution and assessment of the programme, (2 provide HIV education to the officers and (3 offer voluntary pretest HIV counselling and testing to probationers and parolees. Methods: The partnered programme was conducted between October and December 2015. Offenders who were recently sentenced to probation (“new offenders”, received HIV education during orientation. Offenders already under supervision prior to the programme (“current offenders” learned about the on-site services during scheduled office visits. Outcomes were measured through officer assessments, informal feedback and uptake of HIV services among offenders. Results: A total of 86 new and 249 current offenders reported during the programme (N=335. Almost one-third (31.4% of new offenders sought HIV testing, while only 3.2% of current offenders were screened for HIV. Refusals among current offenders invoked monogamy, time pressures, being tested in prison, fear of positive test results and concerns about being labelled as gay or unfaithful to women partners. Officers rated the programme as worthwhile and feasible to implement at other offices. Conclusions: The partnership approach ensured support from law enforcement and intersectoral cooperation

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in cervical dystonia: effect of site and repetition in a randomized pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pirio Richardson

    Full Text Available Dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing due to sustained muscle contraction, which leads to pain and significant disability. New therapeutic targets are needed in this disorder. The objective of this randomized, sham-controlled, blinded exploratory study is to identify a specific motor system target for non-invasive neuromodulation and to evaluate this target in terms of safety and tolerability in the cervical dystonia (CD population. Eight CD subjects were given 15-minute sessions of low-frequency (0.2 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the primary motor cortex (MC, dorsal premotor cortex (dPM, supplementary motor area (SMA, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and a sham condition with each session separated by at least two days. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS score was rated in a blinded fashion immediately pre- and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes included physiology and tolerability ratings. The mean change in TWSTRS severity score by site was 0.25 ± 1.7 (ACC, -2.9 ± 3.4 (dPM, -3.0 ± 4.8 (MC, -0.5 ± 1.1 (SHAM, and -1.5 ± 3.2 (SMA with negative numbers indicating improvement in symptom control. TWSTRS scores decreased from Session 1 (15.1 ± 5.1 to Session 5 (11.0 ± 7.6. The treatment was tolerable and safe. Physiology data were acquired on 6 of 8 subjects and showed no change over time. These results suggest rTMS can modulate CD symptoms. Both dPM and MC are areas to be targeted in further rTMS studies. The improvement in TWSTRS scores over time with multiple rTMS sessions deserves further evaluation.

  1. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO{sub 2} Storage in the Paris Basin (GeoCarbone-PICOREF); Choix et caracterisation de sites geologiques propices a l'installation d'un pilote pour le stockage de CO{sub 2} dans le bassin de Paris (GeoCarbone-PICOREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosse, E.; Delmas, J.; Dufournet, A.; Houel, P.; Vidal-Gilbert, S.; Ruffier-Meray, V.; Poutrel, A.; Monnet, M.; Mougin, P. [Institut francais du petrole, IFP, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Hasanov, V. [Air Liquide, 78 - Jouy-en-Josas (France); Blanchard, F.; Dezayes, C.; Durst, P.; Grataloup, S.; Hanot, F.; Kervevan, C.; Lansiart, M.; Menjoz, A.; Rachez, X.; Thinon, I. [BRGM, 45 - Orleans (France); Garcia, D. [Ecole des Mines, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France); Badinier, G.; Dreux, R.; Rigollet, C.; Saysset, S. [GDF-Suez, 93 - Saint-Denis-La-Plaine (France); Fillacier, S.; Renoux, P. [Geostock, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Nedelec, B.; Thoraval, A. [INERIS, Ecole des Mines, 54 - Nancy (France); Lescanne, M. [Total, 64 - Pau (France); Caspard, E.; Collin, P.Y. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7193, ISTeP, 75 - Paris (France); Collin, P.Y. [CNRS, UMR 7193, ISTeP, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of the GeoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO{sub 2} storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO{sub 2} per year. GeoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a 'Regional Domain', ca. 200 * 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: 1)detailed geological data is available, due to 50 years of petroleum exploration; 2)basin-scale deep saline aquifers are present, with a preliminary estimate of storage capacity which is at the Gt CO{sub 2} level, namely the carbonate Oolithe Blanche Formation, of Middle Jurassic age, generally located between 1500 and 1800 m depths in the studied area, and several sandstone formations of Triassic age, located between 2000 and 3000 m; 3)several depleted oil fields exist: although offering storage capacities at a much lower level, they do represent very well constrained geological environments, with proven sealing properties; 4)several sources of pure CO{sub 2} were identified in the area, at a flow rate compatible with the pilot size, that would avoid capture costs. 750 km of seismic lines were reprocessed and organized in six sections fitted on well logs. This first dataset provided improved representations of: 1)the gross features of the considered aquifers in the Regional Domain; 2)the structural scheme; 3)lateral continuity of the sealing cap rocks. An inventory of the environmental characteristics was also made, including human occupancy, protected areas, water resource, natural hazards, potential conflicts of use with other resources of the subsurface, etc. From all these criteria, a more restricted geographical domain named the 'Sector', ca. 70 * 70 km, was chosen, the most appropriate for further selection of storage site(s). The geological

  2. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.;

    2012-01-01

    implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  3. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.;

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...... implementation, and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can...

  4. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au-CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, John T

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au-CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au-CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10(-8) to 10(-4) Torr (dosage up to 10(6) langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au-CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au-CO complex result from the reduced Au-Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au-CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO(δ+)) on Au. Our studies indicate that the mobile Au-CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers. PMID:26754257

  5. Demosite - Demonstration of the integration of photovoltaic elements in buildings; DEMOSITE. Site de demonstration d'elements de construction photovoltaiques integres au batiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roecker, C.; Affolter, P.; Muller, A.N.; Ould-Yenia, A.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy summarises Phase 4 of the DEMOSITE project and concludes 10 years of DEMOSITE activities. The DEMOSITE project, started in 1992, demonstrates various ways of integrating photovoltaic elements in buildings by providing stands, pavilions and monitoring facilities at its site in Lausanne, Switzerland. Here, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, roof-mounted installations can be found as well as mock-ups of buildings and roofing systems that also serve as covered parking facilities. The DEMOSITE web site and graphical presentations are also reviewed. Furthermore, the six newest pavilions are presented in detail. The report also presents several sets of data from measurements made on the installations and discusses the dissemination of information and results obtained from the project. A comprehensive annex provides illustrations of examples of building-integrated photovoltaics from around the world.

  6. Comparison of long-term numerical simulations at the Ketzin pilot site using the Schlumberger ECLIPSE and LBNL TOUGH2 simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, T.; Norden, B.; Tillner, E.; Nakaten, B.; Kühn, M.

    2012-04-01

    Geological modelling and dynamic flow simulations were conducted at the Ketzin pilot site showing a good agreement of history matched geological models with CO2 arrival times in both observation wells and timely development of reservoir pressure determined in the injection well. Recently, a re-evaluation of the seismic 3D data enabled a refinement of the structural site model and the implementation of the fault system present at the top of the Ketzin anticline. The updated geological model (model size: 5 km x 5 km) shows a horizontal discretization of 5 x 5 m and consists of three vertical zones, with the finest discretization at the top (0.5 m). According to the revised seismic analysis, the facies modelling to simulate the channel and floodplain facies distribution at Ketzin was updated. Using a sequential Gaussian simulator for the distribution of total and effective porosities and an empiric porosity-permeability relationship based on site and literature data available, the structural model was parameterized. Based on this revised reservoir model of the Stuttgart formation, numerical simulations using the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N and Schlumberger Information Services (SIS) ECLIPSE 100 black-oil simulators were undertaken in order to evaluate the long-term (up to 10,000 years) migration of the injected CO2 (about 57,000 t at the end of 2011) and the development of reservoir pressure over time. The simulation results enabled us to quantitatively compare both reservoir simulators based on current operational data considering the long-term effects of CO2 storage including CO2 dissolution in the formation fluid. While the integration of the static geological model developed in the SIS Petrel modelling package into the ECLIPSE simulator is relatively flawless, a work-flow allowing for the export of Petrel models into the TOUGH2-MP input file format had to be implemented within the scope of this study. The challenge in this task was mainly determined by the presence of a

  7. Olivine dissolution in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria (Pseudomonas reactants) extracted from Icelandic groundwater of the CO2 injection pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Liudmila; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Benezeth, Pascale; Gerard, Emmanuelle; Menez, Benedicte; Alfredsson, Helgi

    2010-05-01

    This work is aimed at experimental modeling of the effect of heterotrophic bacteria on dissolution of important rock-forming mineral, olivine, at the conditions of CO2 storage and sequestration. Heterotrophic aerobic gram-negative bacteria were extracted from deep underground water (HK31, 1700 m deep and, t = 25-30°C) of basaltic aquifer located within the Hellisheidi CO2 injection pilot site (Iceland). Following this sampling, we separated, using culture on nutrient agar plates, four different groups of gram-negative aerobic bacteria. The enzymatic activity of studied species has been evaluated using Biolog Ecoplates and their genetic identification was performed using 18-S RNA analysis. The optimal growth conditions of bacteria on Brain Hearth Broth nutrient have been determined as 5 to 37°C and growth media pH varied from 7.0-8.2. Culturing experiments allowed determining the optimal physico-chemical conditions for bacteria experiments in the presence of basic Ca, Mg-containing silicates. Olivine (Fo92) was chosen as typical mineral of basalt, widely considered in carbon dioxide sequestration mechanisms. Dissolution experiments were performed in constant-pH (7 to 9), bicarbonate-buffered (0.001 to 0.05 M) nutrient-diluted media in batch reactors at 0-30 bars of CO2 in the presence of various biomass of Pseudomonas reactants. The release rate of magnesium, silica and iron was measured as a function of time in the presence of live, actively growing, dead (autoclaved or glutaraldehyde-treated) cells and bacteria exometabolites. Both nutrient media diluted 10 times (to 100 mg DOC/L) and inert electrolyte (NaCl, no DOC) were used. Our preliminary results indicate that the pH and dissolved organic matter are the first-order parameters that control the element release from olivine at far from equilibrium conditions. The SEM investigation of reacted surfaces reveal formation of surface roughness with much stronger mineral alteration in the presence of live bacteria

  8. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabari, Anil [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States); Fadipe, Oloruntomi [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  9. Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and d+Au collisions:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    In this talk I will review PHOBOS data on charged particle multiplicities, obtained in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC. The general features of the Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions results will be discussed and compared to those of /line{p}p collisions. The total charged particle multiplicity, scaled by the number of participant pairs, is observed to be about 40% higher in Au+Au collisions than in /line{p}p and d+Au systems, but, surprisingly at the same level of e+e- collisions. Limiting fragmentation scaling is seen to be obeyed in Au+Au collisions.

  10. Recommandations essentielles de sécurité relatives au travail du personnel des laboratoires géologiques de chantier Essential Safety Recommendations Concerning Work by Personnel in Well Site Mud Logging Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambre Syndicale du Pétrole

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le personnel travaillant dans les cabines géologiques sur chantiers de forage doit respecter des règles de sécurité pour la prévention des accidents et doit connaître nécessairement les consignes à suivre en cas de danger. Ces recommandations sont relatives à l'installation des cabines géologiques et aux problèmes créés par leur équipement très diversifié, comprenant notamment de nombreux capteurs dispersés sur le chantier et leur réseau de câbles de liaison. Huit annexes rappellent les risques inhérents à la présence d'hydrogène sulfuré et les conditions d'utilisation des appareils de protection, les problèmes liés aux fours à micro-ondes éventuellement installés, ceux liés à la présence de sources radioactives. Une large part de ces recommandations est consacrée au stockage, à la manipulation et à l'élimination des produits chimiques couramment présents dans les cabines. Dix-neuf fiches de prévention simplifiées rappellent les risques que ces produits chimiques font courir au personnel et précisent les premiers soins à appliquer. Les deux dernières annexes traitent de la définition des zones classées pour les forages à terre et les forages en mer. The personnel working in mud logging units at well sites must respect safety rules for the prevention of accidents and must know the instructions to be followed in case of danger. These recommendations concern the installation of logging units and the problems created by the highly diversified equipment in such units, including in particular numerous sensors scattered around the site and the network of cables linking the sensors to the unit. Eight appendixes review the risks inherent in the presence of hydrogen sulfide and the conditions for using protective equipment, the problems linked to any microwave ovens that may be installed, and the problems linked to the presence of radioactive sources. A large portion of these recommen-dations is devoted to

  11. Decision support for the definition of wind turbine systems adequacy to site specificities and weak electrical networks; Aide a la decision pour la definition d'un systeme eolien, adequation au site et a un reseau faible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbaoui, A

    2006-10-15

    A decision support system for the definition of wind turbine systems is developed by taking into account the wind and site characteristics, the wind turbine components and the electrical network properties close to the site. The approach is based on functional analysis, on the investigation of the functional fluxes and on the definition of a model suitable for supporting decision at the preliminary stages of wind turbine design. The complete set of solutions derived from the model is determined using a Constraint Satisfaction Problem solver. The intrinsic capability of the model to support decision is derived from the investigation of the model parsimony, precision, exactness and specialization. The model takes into account performance criteria resulting from knowledge of manufacturers, distributors and investors. These criteria are used to discriminate design alternatives. Design alternatives correspond to choices of site (wind, electric network) and wind turbine architectures (related to 7 design variables). Performance criteria are the cost of electric kWh, the amount of energy being produced and the discounted total cost of the project. Electric network connection to wind turbines is taken into account through slow variations of the voltage and Flickers phenomenon. First, the maximal rate of penetration of the wind turbine energy production is determined. Next, two design alternatives have been investigated to improve wind turbine system integration in electric distribution networks. These alternatives are a reactive power control system and an inertial energy storage system. Inertial storage systems seem to be more expensive than reactive power control systems for this type of application. The influence of site specificities on decision making process has been established through three different sites (a Mediterranean site and two sites located in northern Europe). Profits relative to the cost of kWh appear to be high for Mediterranean sites. Most of the

  12. FloodProBE Project WP 3: Reliability of Urban Flood Defences. Guidebook for Using Helicopter-Borne Lidar to Contribute to Levee Assessment – Experiment on “Val d’Orléans” Pilot Site

    OpenAIRE

    Auriau, L.; Mériaux, P.; Royet, P.; Tourment, R.; Lacombe, S.; Maurin, J.; Boulay, A.

    2012-01-01

    In support of a real case of application (“Val d’Orléans” Pilot Site), our research work provide a methodology for using remote sensing LiDAR data and high-resolution aerial imagery – acquired in “dry conditions” (e.g. not in a flood context) - to contribute efficiently to a rural or urban flood defence structure diagnostic or assessment. The main objective of our task 3.2.2 is resolutely operational: to put in practice the developed methodology, it is n...

  13. On the value, conservation and sustainable development of GIAHS pilot sites in China%中国GIAHS保护试点:价值、问题与对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵庆文; 何露; 孙业红; 张丹; 袁正; 徐远涛; 白艳莹

    2012-01-01

    severe threat of globalization and inappropriate government interventions. The disappearance of these important agri-heritage systems and their unique agricultural legacy constitutes loss of future opportunities to enjoy the related environmental and cultural benefits. In order to conserve these systems, a program called "Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)" was initiated by Food and Agriculture Organization of United States (FAO) in 2002. The main objective of GIAHS was the dynamic conservation and adaptive management of traditional agricultural systems. There are already four pilot sites in China, including Qingtian Rice-Fish Culture System in Zheji-ang Province, Hani Rice Terraces System in Yunnan Province, Wannian Rice Culture System in Jiangxi Province and Traditional Dong's Rice-Fish-Duck Agroecosystem in Guizhou Province. There are also two candidate sites, including the Traditional Pu'er Tea Agroecosystem in Yunnan Province and Aohan Dryland Farming System in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Re-gion. This study depicted the full picture of GIAHS sites in China, including basic information, system value, system threats and proposed conservations. Based on the above analysis, future directions of agri-heritage system conservation were proposed. There existed different GIAHS values, including ecological values, economic values, socio-cultural values, scientific demonstration values, etc. Ecological values were very important in agri-heritage systems as ecological mechanisms reduced use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides in a sustainable manner. Threats to agri-heritage systems, including decrease in comparative advantage, labor outflow and modern development concepts/technology, were also severe. Based on value and threat analysis, the following proposals were suggested regarding conservation of rice-fish culture: 1) utilization of dynamic conservation methods to improve local farmer livelihoods; 2) enhancement, popularization and building of

  14. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send...... ethnographic component of the dissertation consists of four articles, all emphasizing the au pairs’ agency by viewing their migration as a dynamic personal and social experience. Arguing that Filipina au pairs tend to be understood primarily from the perspective of their precarious situation as domestic...... of their Danish host families. Based on their migratory status as au pairs, these young migrants must therefore negotiate the different moral and contractual rights and obligations that characterize the local and transnational family ties in which they are engaged. This study of Filipina au pair migration through...

  15. First principles investigation of the activity of thin film Pt, Pd and Au surface alloys for oxygen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    . This is particularly challenging for alloys containing Au due to a high propensity of Au to segregate to the surface. We also show that once Au is on the surface it will diffuse to defect sites, explaining why small amounts of Au retard dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. For the PtPd thin films there is no pronounced...

  16. Density Functional Study on Adsorption of NO on AuSe (010) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU,Xiang-Lan; CHEN,Wen-Kai; WANG,Xia; SUN,Bao-Zhen; LI,Yi; LU,Chun-Hai

    2008-01-01

    NO molecule adsorption on (010) surface of gold selenide (AuSe) has been studied with a periodic slab model by means of the GGA-PW91 exchange-correlation functional within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Four different on-top adsorption sites Au(1), Au(2), Se(1) and Se(2) were considered for α-AuSe and three on-top adsorption sites Au(1), Au(2) and Se(1) for β-AuSe. N-end and O-end adsorptions of NO were investigated for the above sites. The results show that N-end adsorptions are preferred for α- and β-AuSe and O-end adsorptions are not feasible and thought as physisorption with the weak adsorption energies from 6.0 to 10.8 kJ/mol. For the N-end adsorptions on α-and β-AuSe (010) surfaces, Au(2) sites are most favorable with the adsorption energies 89.0 and 78.0 kJ/mol for α-and β-AuSe, respectively. However, the adsorptions at Au1 sites are very weak with the adsorption energies of 27.8 and 7.5 kJ/mol, respectively. In case of the adsorption of N-down orientations of NO at Se sites for α-and β-AuSe (010) surfaces, the adsorption activities of Se(1) and Se(2) sites on the α-AuSe (010) surface and Se(1) site on the β-AuSe (010) surface are almost the same with the adsorption energies 51.2, 52.7 and 49.2 kJ/mol. The geometric optimizations for adsorption configurations were calculated along with accounting for stretching frequency and density of states in our work.

  17. Analysis of empty ATLAS pilot jobs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The pilot model used by the ATLAS production system has been in use for many years. The model has proven to be a success with many advantages over push models. However one of the negative side-effects of using a pilot model is the presence of 'empty pilots' running on sites which consume a small amount of walltime and not running a useful payload job. The impact on a site can be significant with previous studies showing a total 0.5% walltime usage with no benefit to either the site or to ATLAS. Another impact is the number of empty pilots being processed by a site's Compute Element and batch system which can be 5% of the total number of pilots being handled. In this paper we review the latest statistics using both ATLAS and site data and highlight edge cases where the number of empty pilots dominate. We also study the effect of tuning the pilot factories to reduce the number of empty pilots.

  18. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  19. Market access for agro-enterprise diversity in the Lake Kivu Pilot Learning Site of the sub-Saharan Africa Challenge Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuri, Wanjiku; Birachi, Eliud; Buruchara, Robin; Adekunle, Wale; Fatunbi, Oluwole; Pali, Pamela N; Wimba, Benjamin; Bizosa, Alfred; Nyamurinda, Birasa; Nyamwaro, Sospeter O; Habumugisha, Pascal; Tuyisenge, Jacqueline; Bonabana-Wabbi, Jackline; Karume, Katcho; Kasenge, Valentine

    2013-01-01

    The Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) commissioned a pilot study to understand the role of markets and marketing systems in African agriculture and to test the Integrated Agricultural Research for Development (IAR4D) and its innovation platforms (IPs) as a new strategy for wealth creation. This was in response to the fact that Sub-Saharan Africa’s small-scale farmers seem to have been trapped in cycles of poverty, and that the regional economy has stagnated. Using a market ba...

  20. Tuning the chemical activity through PtAu nanoalloying: a first principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-06-21

    The electronic structure and adsorption properties of 1.5 nm sized Pt, Au, and PtAu nanoclusters are studied by density functional theory. We explain the recent experimental finding that 20% Au content in PtAu nanoparticles is optimal to induce a dramatically different catalytic behavior. Our results show that the d-band center together with the density of states at the Fermi energy can be used as an indicator of the chemical activity of PtAu nanoclusters. The most favorable adsorption sites on the cluster surfaces as a function of the Pt/Au ratio are identified using atomic H as a probe.

  1. A Computerized Data-Base System for Land-Use and Land-Cover Data Collected at Ground-Water Sampling Sites in the Pilot National Water Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jonathon C.

    1989-01-01

    Data-base software has been developed for the management of land-use and land-cover data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a pilot program to test and refine concepts for a National Water-Quality Assessment Program. This report describes the purpose, use, and design of the land-use and land-cover data-base software. The software provides capabilities for interactive storage and retrieval of land-use and land-cover data collected at ground-water sampling sites. Users of the software can add, update, and delete land-use and land-cover data. The software also provides capabilities to group, print, and summarize the data. The land-use and land-cover data-base software supports multiple data-base systems so that data can be accessed by persons in different offices. Data-base systems are organized in a tiered structure. Each data-base system contains all the data stored in the data-base systems located in the lower tiers of the structure. Data can be readily transmitted from lower tiers to high tiers of the structure. Therefore, the data-base system at the highest tier of the structure contains land-use and land-cover data for the entire pilot program.

  2. A Geochemical Approach for Monitoring a CO2 Pilot Site: Rousse, France. A Major gases, CO2-Carbon Isotopes and Noble Gases Combined Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the geochemical characterization of various gas end-members involved in a depleted gas field CO2 storage pilot (Rousse, France). In this pilot, CO2 is produced by oxy-combustion from natural gas transformed into fuel gas at the Lacq plant, and transported in a pipeline 30 km away to the depleted gas reservoir of Rousse. Gases produced at Rousse before CO2 injection, the Lacq fuel gas and the CO2 resulting from the oxy-fuel combustion were sampled, together with gases from a - 45 m monitoring well and from soils in the vicinity of the Rousse structure. For all samples, the bulk gas composition, the carbon isotopic compositions and the abundance and isotopic signatures of the noble gases were determined. The bulk gas compositions of the Rousse natural gas are comparable to the Lacq fuel gas with methane as the main compound with residual C2-C5 and CO2. Soil gases are typical mixtures of air with biogenic CO2 (up to 9-10%), while the monitoring well gases display typical air compositions with no excess CO2. The Rousse gas and the Lacq fuel gas have δ13(CH4) values of - 41.0 per thousand and - 43.0 per thousand respectively. The injected CO2 out of the oxy-combustion chamber has a δ13(CO2) of - 40.0 per thousand, whereas δ13(CO2) value for soils samples is comprised between - 15 and - 25 per thousand. The Rousse natural gas and the Lacq fuel gas are both characterized by a high He enrichment, and depletion in Ne, Ar and Kr compared to the air values. The oxy-fuel combustion process provides a CO2 with the He enrichment of the Lacq fuel gas, and a Ne, Ar and Kr composition reflecting that of the oxygen produced at the Air Separation Unit (ASU). Indeed, Ne is depleted relatively to the air, while Kr is enriched up to tenfold, which results from the cryogenic separation of the air noble gases within the ASU. Soil samples noble gas compositions are equivalent to that of the air. In the light of these results, the compositions of the various end

  3. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads.

  4. Structured Pd-Au/Cu-fiber catalyst for gas-phase hydrogenolysis of dimethyl oxalate to ethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Han, Lupeng; Zhao, Guofeng; Chai, Ruijuan; Zhang, Qiaofei; Liu, Ye; Lu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Galvanic co-deposition of 0.5 wt% Au and 0.1 wt% Pd on a microfibrous-structure using 8 μm Cu-fibers delivers a Pd-Au/Cu-fiber catalyst, which is highly active, selective and stable for the hydrogenolysis of dimethyl oxalate to ethylene glycol. Au and Pd synergistically promote the hydrogenolysis activity of Cu(+) sites, while Au also critically stabilizes Cu(+) sites to prevent deep reductive deactivation. PMID:26040855

  5. A Pilot Study of the Interface Design of Cross-Cultural Web Sites through Usability Testing of Multilanguage Web Sites and Determining the Preferences of Taiwanese and American Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David Tawei; Chang, Chia-Chi

    2014-01-01

    By conducting usability testing on a multilanguage Web site, this study analyzed the cultural differences between Taiwanese and American users in the performance of assigned tasks. To provide feasible insight into cross-cultural Web site design, Microsoft Office Online (MOO) that supports both traditional Chinese and English and contains an almost…

  6. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  7. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

  8. Surgical site infection in high-energy peri-articular tibia fractures with intra-wound vancomycin powder: a retrospective pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Keerat; Bauer, Jennifer M.; LaChaud, Gregory Y.; Bible, Jesse E.; Mir, Hassan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSI) continue to be a significant source of morbidity despite the introduction of perioperative intravenous antibiotics. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of local vancomycin powder on lowering deep SSI rates in high-energy tibial plateau and pilon fractures. Materials and methods A retrospective review of all tibial plateau and pilon fractures treated in 2012 at our level I trauma center identified 222 patients. Of these, 107 patients sustained hig...

  9. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ''Pneumatic Excavator'' which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions

  10. Atomic and electronic structures of Si(1 1 1)-(√3 x √3)R30°-Au and (6 × 6)-Au surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C H

    2015-12-01

    Si(1 1 1)-Au surfaces with around one monolayer of Au exhibit many ordered structures and structures containing disordered domain walls. Hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations presented here reveal the origin of these complex structures and tendency to form domain walls. The conjugate honeycomb chain trimer (CHCT) structure of the [Formula: see text]-Au phase contains Si atoms with non-bonding surface states which can bind Au atoms in pairs in interstices of the CHCT structure and make this surface metallic. Si adatoms adsorbed on the [Formula: see text]-Au surface induce a gapped surface through interaction with the non-bonding states. Adsorption of extra Au atoms in interstitial sites of the [Formula: see text]-Au surface is stabilized by interaction with the non-bonding orbitals and leads to higher coverage ordered structures including the [Formula: see text]-Au phase. Extra Au atoms bound in interstitial sites of the [Formula: see text]-Au surface result in top layer Si atoms with an SiAu4 butterfly wing configuration. The structure of a [Formula: see text]-Au phase, whose in-plane top atomic layer positions were previously determined by an electron holography technique (Grozea et al 1998 Surf. Sci. 418 32), is calculated using total energy minimization. The Patterson function for this structure is calculated and is in good agreement with data from an in-plane x-ray diffraction study (Dornisch et al 1991 Phys. Rev. B 44 11221). Filled and empty state scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images are calculated for domain walls and the [Formula: see text]-Au structure. The [Formula: see text]-Au phase is 2D chiral and this is evident in computed and actual STM images. [Formula: see text]-Au and domain wall structures contain the SiAu4 motif with a butterfly wing shape. Chemical bonding within the Si-Au top layers of the [Formula: see text]-Au and [Formula: see text]-Au surfaces is analyzed and an explanation for the SiAu4 motif structure is given. PMID

  11. Etre touareg au Mali

    OpenAIRE

    Edmond BERNUS

    1992-01-01

    Après une présentation générale de leur espace, de leur culture commune, des stéréotypes dont ils font l'objet, les Touaregs maliens sont décrits dans leurs diversités régionales. Les révoltes passées, celle de Firhoun, le héros de 1916, puis celle de l'Adrar des Iforas en 1963-64 contre le gouvernement de Modibo Keita, précédent la révolte qui s'étend depuis 1990 au Niger et au Mali avec des guerriers sachant manier armes et voitures. Attaques et répression sauvage se succèdent dans une spir...

  12. Introduction au droit commercial

    OpenAIRE

    Thirion, Nicolas; Delvaux, Thierry; Benoit-Moury, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Le cours d'introduction au droit commercial, destiné à des non-juristes, a pour objet de décrire, dans ses grandes lignes, le régime juridique applicable à l'organisation et au fonctionnement de l'économie. Les liens avec des disciplines autres que le droit, notamment l'économie et l'histoire, seront privilégiés, afin d'adapter la matière aux besoins et centres d'intérêts d'étudiants en sciences humaines. Après une introduction générale, le cours s'articule autour de la trilogie fondamentale ...

  13. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts. PMID:26266615

  14. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  15. Density functional theory investigation of benzenethiol adsorption on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nara, Jun; Higai, Shin’ichi; Morikawa, Yoshitada;

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of benzenethiol molecules on the Au(111) surface by using first principles total energy calculations. A single thiolate molecule is adsorbed at the bridge site slightly shifted toward the fcc-hollow site, and is tilted by 61degrees from the surface normal. As for th...

  16. Quantitative three-dimensional methodology to assess volumetric and profilometric outcome of subepithelial connective tissue grafting at pontic sites: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín, Oscar; Veltri, Mario; Moráguez, Osvaldo; Belser, Urs C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a technique for the assessment of soft tissue volumetric and profilometric changes. The technique has been applied at the alveolar contour of mild to moderate horizontal ridge defects after soft tissue augmentation at pontic sites. A quantitative three-dimensional (3D) analysis based on laser scanning was used for the measurement of volume gain and horizontal changes of alveolar profile 5 months after a subepithelial connective tissue graft using a pouch approach in five patients. All the surgical sites healed uneventfully. A mean soft tissue volume increase of 35.9 mm3 was measured 5 months after the grafting procedure. The linear measurements showed that, in the area where the augmentation was performed, the distance between the preoperative vestibular profile and the postoperative one ranged from 0.16 to 2 mm. The described quantitative measurements based on 3D laser scanning appear to be an effective method for assessment of soft tissue changes in future studies. Additionally, within the limitation of a small sample size, the present data suggest that the investigated surgical technique can be considered when corrections of mild to moderate alveolar horizontal ridge atrophies at maxillary lateral incisor edentulous gaps are necessary.

  17. Potential energies of characteristic atoms on basis of experimental heats of formation of AuCu and AuCu_3 compounds (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE You-qing; LIU Xin-bi; LI Xiao-bo; PENG Hong-jian; NIE Yao-zhuang

    2009-01-01

    The systematic science of alloys(SSA) is a framework of the total energy and total volume able to be separated. The potential energy sequences of characteristic atoms at the central sites of the basic clusters in the fcc-based lattice Au-Cu system are separated out from smaller experimental heats of formation of L10-AuCu and L1_2-AuCu_3 compounds only, by nine potential energy E-functions and through the use of structural unit inversion method. From these potential energy sequences, the potential energies and heats of formation of the disordered Au1-xCux alloys at 0 K are calculated. The potential energies, heats of formation and Tc-temperatures of order-disorder transitions of the L1_0-AuCu, L1_2-Au_3Cu and L1_2-AuCu_3 compounds, as well as the Au_3Cu-, AuCu- and AuCu_3~- type ordered alloys with maximal ordering degrees are calculated too. The results show that the 5th E-function may be chosen for developing it into the free energy-, enthalpy-, vibrational energy- and vibrational entropy-functions for describing thermodynamic properties of the compounds, ordered and disordered phases and for establishing the phase diagram of the Au-Cu system in the future.

  18. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.; Okada, T.

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr1-cAuc with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn1-cAuc with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ3d due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ3d and EF in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  19. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Preparation and characterization of planar Ni–Au bimetallic model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fan, E-mail: fan.yang@chem.tamu.edu; Yao, Yunxi; Yan, Zhen; Min, Hlaing; Goodman, D. Wayne

    2013-10-15

    Ni–Au bimetallic model catalysts were prepared as thin films on Re(0 0 0 1) or Ru(0 0 0 1) single crystal substrates. Surface compositions and electronic structures of the Ni–Au thin films were characterized by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Surface alloys were prepared by annealing Ni–Au thin films from 500 to 800 K, resulting in substantial surface enrichment of Au. Annealing a Ni–Au thin film with a 1:1 bulk composition ratio at 700 K for 10 min resulted in a surface alloy with 84% (atomic concentration) of Au in the outermost surface layer. The surface atomic structure was investigated using CO as probe molecules, which exclusively adsorbs on the Ni atoms rather than on the Au atoms at room temperature. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy of CO adsorption on Ni–Au surface alloys showed that CO adsorption on two-fold bridge sites decreased and finally disappeared with an increase of Au surface concentration. The absence of Ni bridge site CO adsorption indicated that Ni atoms were isolated by Au atoms on Ni–Au alloyed surface.

  1. Gold-tin ordering in SrAu{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwickert, Christian; Gerke, Birgit; Poettgen, Rainer [Univ. Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2014-07-15

    Samples of the solid solutions SrAu{sub x}Sn{sub 4-x} (1.7 ≤ x ≤ 2.2) were obtained by high-frequency melting of the elements in sealed niobium ampoules. Powder and single-crystal X-ray data confirmed the CaBe{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type structure, space group P4/nmm. The structures of SrAu{sub 1.76}Sn{sub 2.24}, SrAu{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}, SrAu{sub 2.16}Sn{sub 1.84} (crystal A), SrAu{sub 2.16}Sn{sub 1.84} (crystal B), and SrAu{sub 2.22}Sn{sub 1.78} were refined from single-crystal diffractometer data. Only the SrAu{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} crystal shows complete Au-Sn ordering while all other crystals show substantial mixed occupancies on the four crystallographically independent sites of the polyanionic networks in which the strontium atoms fill cages of coordination number 16. Temperature-dependent susceptibility measurements have revealed diamagnetism for SrAu{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}. {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopic data of a bulk SrAu{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} sample have resolved the tetrahedral and square-pyramidal tin sites but point to substantial Au-Sn disorder.

  2. Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Program - Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221-HET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    2001-01-24

    This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. This heterogeneous debris transuranic waste stream was generated after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration, equipment, process operations and waste management practices. Information contained in this report was obtained from numerous sources including: facility safety basis documentation, historical document archives, generator and storage facility waste records and documents, and interviews with cognizant personnel.

  3. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were 137Cs and 90Sr, with lesser amounts of 6OCo, 241Am, and 239,240Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the 137Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of 90Sr, 241Am, or 239,240Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500 degrees C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms

  4. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  5. Unique Bonding Properties of the Au36(SR)24 Nanocluster with FCC-Like Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Daniel M; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng; Zeng, Chenjie; Jin, Rongchao

    2013-10-01

    The recent discovery on the total structure of Au36(SR)24, which was converted from biicosahedral Au38(SR)24, represents a surprising finding of a face-centered cubic (FCC)-like core structure in small gold-thiolate nanoclusters. Prior to this finding, the FCC feature was only expected for larger (nano)crystalline gold. Herein, we report results on the unique bonding properties of Au36(SR)24 that are associated with its FCC-like core structure. Temperature-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at the Au L3-edge, in association with ab initio calculations, show that the local structure and electronic behavior of Au36(SR)24 are of more molecule-like nature, whereas its icosahedral counterparts such as Au38(SR)24 and Au25(SR)18 are more metal-like. Moreover, site-specific S K-edge XAS studies indicate that the bridging motif for Au36(SR)24 has different bonding behavior from the staple motif from Au38(SR)24. Our findings highlight the important role of "pseudo"-Au4 units within the FCC-like Au28 core in interpreting the bonding properties of Au36(SR)24 and suggest that FCC-like structure in gold thiolate nanoclusters should be treated differently from its bulk counterpart.

  6. The nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of virion host shutoff RNase is enabled by pUL47 and an embedded nuclear export signal and defines the sites of degradation of AU-rich and stable cellular mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Minfeng; Taddeo, Brunella; Roizman, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus host shutoff RNase (VHS-RNase) is the major early block of host responses to infection. VHS-RNase is introduced into cells during infection and selectively degrades stable mRNAs made before infection and the normally short-lived AU-rich stress response mRNAs induced by sensors of innate immunity. Through its interactions with pUL47, another tegument protein, it spares from degradation viral mRNAs. Analyses of embedded motifs revealed that VHS-RNase contains a nuclear export signal (NES) but not a nuclear localization signal. To reconcile the potential nuclear localization with earlier studies showing that VHS-RNase degrades mRNAs in polyribosomes, we constructed a mutant in which NES was ablated. Comparison of the mutant and wild-type VHS-RNases revealed the following. (i) On infection, VHS-RNase is transported to the nucleus, but only the wild-type protein shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. (ii) Both VHS-RNases localized in the cytoplasm following transfection. On cotransfection with pUL47, a fraction of VHS-RNase was translocated to the nucleus, suggesting that pUL47 may enable nuclear localization of VHS-RNase. (iii) In infected cells, VHS-RNase lacking NES degraded the short-lived AU-rich mRNAs but not the stable mRNAs. In transfected cells, both wild-type and NES mutant VHS-RNases effectively degraded cellular mRNAs. Our results suggest that the stable mRNAs are degraded in the cytoplasm, whereas the AU-rich mRNAs may be degraded in both cellular compartments. The selective sparing of viral mRNAs may take place during the nuclear phase in the course of interaction of pUL47, VHS-RNase, and nascent viral mRNAs.

  7. Air quality assessments in support of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Oregon Air Contaminant Discharge Permit (ACDP) and Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council certificate (EFSC) for the Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houck, J.E. [AGI Technologies, Portland, OR (United States); McClain, D.W. [CE Newberry, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Air quality monitoring, emission predictions and impact modeling have been performed in support of the regulatory process for the Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project located near Newberry Crater, Oregon. The proposed power plant will generate 33 NM of power utilizing double flash technology. Air emissions from construction activities, well drilling, wellfield testing and operation, power plant operation, and unplanned upsets were evaluated. Wellfield and plant emission rates for hydrogen sulfide and other air pollutants were developed based on expected resource chemistry and operational scenarios. In addition, nitrogen dioxide and particulate emissions were estimated for drill rig diesel engines and construction activities, respectively. Air pollutant impacts at property boundaries, inside the Newberry National Volcanic Monument and at the nearest Class I area (Three Sisters Wilderness) were predicted using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency dispersion models. Cooling tower plume dimensions were predicted using an Electric Power Research Institute model. The deposition and impact of airborne heavy metals and hydrogen sulfide on two nearby watersheds were calculated. The effect of cooling tower plume drift was also evaluated. Preconstruction background air quality was estimated from published data. The results of the studies have demonstrated that good air quality can be expected at the proposed project site.

  8. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  9. Vivre, vivre au Japon

    OpenAIRE

    Tardits, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Comment faire face au caractère récurrent des catastrophes naturelles et liées à l’homme ? À la prévention, on se doit d’adjoindre une vision écologique plus large et renouvelée. Un débat sur le modèle énergétique du nucléaire et sur nos modèles de développement urbains et sociétaux s’impose.

  10. Des femmes au tribunal

    OpenAIRE

    Le Pape, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Les archives judiciaires constituent une source essentielle pour les études des sociabilités africaines en situation coloniale. Cet article prend appui sur l’analyse des procès tenus, entre 1923 et 1939, au tribunal du premier degré d’Abidjan, il vise à décrire les argumentations contradictoires par lesquelles femmes et hommes expliquent leurs différends dans l’espace du prétoire. Les registres issus des « juridictions indigènes » permettent également d’apprécier sur quels repères se fondent ...

  11. Des ignames au riz

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanoff, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    L'igname a toujours été une nourriture importante pour les populations littorales et nomades du monde insulindien. Cependant, avec l'installation du héros civilisateur Gaman le Malais chez le peuple de la reine Sibian, le riz va devenir la composante essentielle des repas moken. En intégrant Gaman en son sein, la société moken va devoir répondre au double défi posé par la menace de la riziculture et de l'islam. En donnant femme à Gaman, en adoptant le nomadisme pour échapper à l'islam ...

  12. Introduction au titre I

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pline a eu dans sa carrière d’homme public à défendre les intérêts de l’Etat et des particuliers, à épurer des comptes, à juger et arbitrer. Ainsi le voulait l’ordonnancement du cursus honorum du Bas-Empire, héritier sur tous ces points de la tradition des charges publiques de la République. Les premières tâches du petiturus furent essentiellement judiciaires - on songe au vigintivirat - et elles se poursuivirent par des fonctions de moyenne importance (préture consulat) puis de haute adminis...

  13. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular 13C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the 13C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic 13C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular 13C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic 13C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ13Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ13Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results

  14. Site-specific {sup 13}C content by quantitative isotopic {sup 13}C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst [Firmenich SA, Corporate R and D Division, P.O. Box 239, 1211 Geneva 8 (Switzerland); Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Pagelot, Alain [Bruker Biospin SAS, 34 rue de l‘Industrie, 67166 Wissembourg Cedex (France); Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor [Bruker Biospin AG, Industriestrasse 26, 8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Schleucher, Jürgen [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude [European Commission, Joint Research Centre – Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the {sup 13}C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic {sup 13}C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ{sup 13}C{sub i} profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ{sup 13}C{sub i} in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  15. Cosmetic outcome and surgical site infection rates of antibacterial absorbable (Polyglactin 910) suture compared to Chinese silk suture in breast cancer surgery: a randomized pilot research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhong-tao; Jessica Shen; Martin Weisberg; ZHANG Hong-wei; FANG Xue-dong; WANG Li-ming; LI Xiao-xi; LI Ya-fen; SUN Xiao-wei; Judith Carver; Dorella Simpkins

    2011-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this multicenter post-market study was to compare the cosmetic outcome of triclosan-coated VICRYL* Plus sutures with Chinese silk sutures for skin closure of modified radical mastectomy. A secondary objective was to assess the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI).Methods Patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy were randomly assigned to coated VICRYL* Plus antibacterial (Polyglactin 910) suture or Chinese silk suture. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at days 12 (±2) and 30 (±5), and the evidence of SSI was assessed at days 3, 5, 7, 12 (±2), 30 (±5), and 90 (±7). Cosmetic outcomes were independently assessed via visual analogue scale (VAS) score evaluations of blinded incision photographs (primary endpoint) and surgeon-assessed modified Hollander Scale (mHCS) scores (secondary endpoint).SSI assessments used both CDC criteria and ASEPSIS scores.Results Six Chinese hospitals randomized 101 women undergoing modified radical mastectomy to closure with coated VICRYL* Plus suture (n=51) or Chinese silk suture (n=50). Mean VAS cosmetic outcome scores for antibacterial suture (67.2) were better than for Chinese silk (45.4) at day 30 (P<0.0001)). Mean mHCS cosmetic outcome total scores, were also higher for antibacterial suture (5.7) than for Chinese silk (5.0) at day 30 (P=0.002).Conclusions Patients using coated VICRYL* Plus suture had significantly better cosmetic outcomes than those with Chinese silk sutures. Patients using coated VICRYL* Plus suture had a lower SSI incidence compared to the Chinese silk sutures, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00768222)

  16. Laparo-Endoscopic Single-Site Surgery for Radical and Cytoreductive Nephrectomy, Renal Vein Thrombectomy, and Partial Nephrectomy: A Prospective Pilot Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithaar H. Derweesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS may diminish morbidity of laparoscopic surgery. We prospectively evaluated feasibility and outcomes of LESS-Radical Nephrectomy (LESS-RN and Partial Nephrectomy (LESS-PN. Methods. 10 patients underwent LESS-RN (6 and LESS-PN (4 between 2/2009-5/2009. LESS-RN included 2 with renal vein thrombectomy, one of which was also cytoreductive. Transperitoneal LESS access was obtained by periumbilical incision. Patient/tumor characteristics, oncologic, and quality of life (QoL outcomes were analyzed. Results. 3 Men/7 Women (mean age 58.7 years, median follow-up 9.8 months underwent LESS. 9/10 cases were completed successfully. All had negative margins. Mean operative time was 161 minutes, estimated blood loss was 125 mL, and incision size was 4.4 cm. Median tumor size for LESS-RN and -PN was 5.0 and 1.7 cm (=.045. Median LESS-PN ischemia time was 24 minutes; mean preoperative/postoperative creatinine were 0.7/0.8 mg/dL (=.19. Mean pain score at discharge was 1.3. Mean preoperative, 3-, and 6-month postoperative SF-36 QoL Score was 73.8, 74.4 and 77.1 (=.222. All patients are currently alive. Conclusions. LESS-RN, renal vein thrombectomy, and PN are technically feasible and safe while maintaining adherence to oncologic principles, with excellent QoL preservation and low discharge pain scores. Further study is requisite.

  17. Pilot Boarding Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage...

  18. Photoelectrochemical studies of DNA-tagged biomolecules on Au and Au/Ni/Au multilayer nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan Viswanathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of nanowires (NWs for labeling, sensing, and sorting is the basis of detecting biomolecules attached on NWs by optical and magnetic properties. In spite of many advantages, the use of biomolecules-attached NWs sensing by photoelectrochemical (PEC study is almost non-existent. In this article, the PEC study of dye-attached single-stranded DNA on Au NWs and Au-Ni-Au multilayer NWs prepared by pulse electrodeposition are investigated. Owing to quantum-quenching effect, the multilayer Au NWs exhibit low optical absorbance when compared with Au NWs. The tagged Au NWs show good fluorescence (emission at 570 nm, indicating significant improvement in the reflectivity. Optimum results obtained for tagged Au NWs attached on functionalized carbon electrodes and its PEC behavior is also presented. A twofold enhancement in photocurrent is observed with an average dark current of 10 μA for Au NWs coated on functionalized sensing electrode. The importance of these PEC and optical studies provides an inexpensive and facile processing platform for Au NWs that may be suitable for biolabeling applications.

  19. Structure and Mobility of Metal Clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd Clusters in MOF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Walton, Krista S.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal–organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density...... functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au8, Pd8, and Au4Pd4 we find that the organic part of the MOF...... is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster...

  20. Le futur site Web du Centre de Documentation Tiers-Monde de Paris : concevoir un outil convivial, au sens du concept développé par Ivan Illitch dans "Tools for conviviality"

    OpenAIRE

    Cathelineau, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    Les outils de la documentation sont censés être utilisés et élaborés au service des usagers, en répondant à leurs besoins réels en information.Pourtant, le constat est souvent dressé d'outils et de systèmes d'information qui répondent mal à ces besoins : l'orientation système pourtant récusée par les sciences de l'information n'est pas encore partout vaincue par les approches orientées usagers. Les professionnels de la gestion de l'information, les premiers sans doute, ont à se poser la quest...

  1. Le marketing au concret

    OpenAIRE

    Gaglio, Gérald

    2010-01-01

    Le terme “marketing” suscite généralement la méfiance, car il est spontanément associé à l’idée de manipulation. Au-delà, que font, concrètement, les “gens du marketing” ? Afin d’apporter des pistes de réponse à cette question, nous nous penchons dans cet article sur les enjeux relatifs à un matériau censé alimenter les réflexions et décisions des marketeurs : les études qualitatives de marketing research réalisées dans le cadre de réunions de consommateurs. Cette approche nous conduit à expl...

  2. Introduction au titre II

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    159. L’objet de notre propos est de démontrer que l’Administration dispose, à la suite du juge, d’un véritable pouvoir normatif. L’admettre suppose d’en identifier les différentes manifestations qui s’expriment essentiellement par voie de circulaires administratives, de réponses ministérielles et d’avis administratifs et qui ne sauraient être assimilées au pouvoir réglementaire que l’Administration détient par ailleurs. L’ordre logique de la démonstration sera donc semblable à celui adopté po...

  3. Biofuels 2.0 move to pilot plant; Les biocarburants 2.0 passent au pilote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, L

    2010-02-15

    The second generation of biofuels, which use the non-energy parts of plants, do not compete with the food industry. These biofuels have been tried and tested at the laboratory but challenges are occurring with the transition to industrial plants. Demonstrators and prototypes are developing in Germany, Japan, USA and France and bet on two different processes, the biochemical way (enzymatic reaction and fermentation) and the thermochemical way (gasification and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis). Research is in progress on a possible third generation of biofuels which will use micro-algae. The interest of this third way is triple: no competition with the food industry, no land use (production in bioreactors), and enhanced CO{sub 2} capture. (J.S.)

  4. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  5. A pilot study on the assessment of trace organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products from on-site wastewater treatment systems along Skaneateles Lake in New York State, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bikram; Codru, Neculai; Dziewulski, David M; Wilson, Lloyd R; Xue, Jingchuan; Yun, Sehun; Braun-Howland, Ellen; Minihane, Christine; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-04-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs or septic systems) are designed to treat and dispose effluents on the same property that produces the wastewater. Approximately 25% of the U.S. population is served by such facilities. Nevertheless, studies on the treatment efficiency and discharge of organic contaminants through septic effluents are lacking. This pilot study showed the occurrence of organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), perfluoroalkyl surfactants (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in septic effluents, adjacent lake water samples, household drinking water in homes that use lake water or a well adjacent to the lake as a source of drinking water, and offshore lake water samples. Septic effluent as well as lake and tap water samples were collected from several households with OWTSs around Skaneateles Lake located in central New York. The advanced on-site systems were installed in some households for the purpose of limiting nutrient levels in the effluent to protect the local surface water. Additionally, because many of these systems serve homes with limited land, advanced treatment systems were needed. The median concentrations of ten PPCPs (ranged from 0.45 to 388 ng/L) and eleven PFASs (ranged from 0.20 to 14.6 ng/L) in septic water were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) than in lake water samples. The median concentrations of PPCPs and PFASs in lake and tap water samples were not significantly different (p ≥ 0.65). The median concentrations of ∑PBDEs in septic, lake, and tap water samples were 7.47, 3.49, and 2.22 ng/L, respectively, and those for ∑PCBs were 33.1, 29.2, and 28.6 ng/L, respectively. The mass flux of PPCPs (i.e. the mass flow of PPCPs per unit area per unit time) through the disposal of treated septic effluent from textile biofilter and aerobic treatments to the dispersal unit ranged from 12 (carbamazepine) to 66900 μg/m(2)/day

  6. A pilot study on the assessment of trace organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products from on-site wastewater treatment systems along Skaneateles Lake in New York State, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bikram; Codru, Neculai; Dziewulski, David M; Wilson, Lloyd R; Xue, Jingchuan; Yun, Sehun; Braun-Howland, Ellen; Minihane, Christine; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-04-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs or septic systems) are designed to treat and dispose effluents on the same property that produces the wastewater. Approximately 25% of the U.S. population is served by such facilities. Nevertheless, studies on the treatment efficiency and discharge of organic contaminants through septic effluents are lacking. This pilot study showed the occurrence of organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), perfluoroalkyl surfactants (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in septic effluents, adjacent lake water samples, household drinking water in homes that use lake water or a well adjacent to the lake as a source of drinking water, and offshore lake water samples. Septic effluent as well as lake and tap water samples were collected from several households with OWTSs around Skaneateles Lake located in central New York. The advanced on-site systems were installed in some households for the purpose of limiting nutrient levels in the effluent to protect the local surface water. Additionally, because many of these systems serve homes with limited land, advanced treatment systems were needed. The median concentrations of ten PPCPs (ranged from 0.45 to 388 ng/L) and eleven PFASs (ranged from 0.20 to 14.6 ng/L) in septic water were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) than in lake water samples. The median concentrations of PPCPs and PFASs in lake and tap water samples were not significantly different (p ≥ 0.65). The median concentrations of ∑PBDEs in septic, lake, and tap water samples were 7.47, 3.49, and 2.22 ng/L, respectively, and those for ∑PCBs were 33.1, 29.2, and 28.6 ng/L, respectively. The mass flux of PPCPs (i.e. the mass flow of PPCPs per unit area per unit time) through the disposal of treated septic effluent from textile biofilter and aerobic treatments to the dispersal unit ranged from 12 (carbamazepine) to 66900 μg/m(2)/day

  7. Venus project : experimentation at ENEA's pilot site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document describes the ENEA's (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) experience in the Venus Project (Esprit III 6398). Venus is an advanced visual interface based on icon representation that permits to end-user to inquiry databases. VENUS interfaces to ENEA's databases: cometa materials Module, Cometa Laboratories Module and European Programs. This report contents the results of the experimentation and of the validation carried out in ENEA's related to the Venus generations. Moreover, the description of the architecture, the user requirements syntesis and the validation methodology of the VENUS systems have been included

  8. Amperometric Immunosensor for Carbofuran Detection Based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-Antibody Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyou Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3. The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication.

  9. Amperometric immunosensor for carbofuran detection based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-antibody conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Cao, Yaoyao; Sun, Xia; Wang, Xiangyou

    2013-04-19

    In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au) nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE) via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab) and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3). The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication.

  10. Au/ZnO nanocomposites: Facile fabrication and enhanced photocatalytic activity for degradation of benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hang; Ming, Hai; Zhang, Hengchao; Li, Haitao; Pan, Keming [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Fang; Gong, Jingjing [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Au nanoparticles supported on highly uniform one-dimensional ZnO nanowires (Au/ZnO hybrids) have been successfully fabricated through a simple wet chemical method, which were first used for photodegradation of gas-phase benzene. Compared with bare ZnO nanowires, the as-prepared Au/ZnO hybrids were found to possess higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of benzene under UV and visible light (degradation efficiencies reach about 56.0% and 33.7% after 24 h under UV and visible light irradiation, respectively). Depending on excitation happening on ZnO semiconductor or on the surface plasmon band of Au, the efficiency and operating mechanism are different. Under UV light irradiation, Au nanoparticles serve as an electron buffer and ZnO nanowires act as the reactive sites for benzene degradation. When visible light is used as the light irradiation source, Au nanoparticles act as the light harvesters and photocatalytic sites alongside of charge-transfer process, simultaneously. -- Graphical abstract: Under visible light irradiation, Au nanoparticles, which are supported on ZnO nanowires, dominate their catalytic properties in gas-phase degradation benzene reaction. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composites that Au nanoparticles supported on ZnO nanowires were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au/ZnO composites were firstly used as effective photocatalysts for benzene degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two operating mechanisms were proposed depending on excitation wavelength.

  11. Photoluminescence enhancement in few-layer WS2 films via Au nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Yuk Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-composites of two-dimensional atomic layered WS2 and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs have been fabricated by sulfurization of sputtered W films followed by immersing into HAuCl4 aqueous solution. The morphology, structure and AuNPs distribution have been characterized by electron microscopy. The decorated AuNPs can be more densely formed on the edge and defective sites of triangle WS2. We have compared the optical absorption and photoluminescence of bare WS2 and Au-decorated WS2 layers. Enhancement in the photoluminescence is observed in the Au-WS2 nano-composites, attributed to localized surface plasmonic effect. This work provides the possibility to develop photonic application in two-dimensional materials.

  12. Face au risque

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian; November, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Ce volume collectif sur le risque inaugure la collection L'ÉQUINOXE. Ancré dans l'histoire pour mesurer les continuités et les ruptures, il illustre la manière dont les sciences humaines évaluent et mesurent les enjeux collectifs du risque sur les plans politiques, scientifiques, énergétiques, juridiques et éthiques. Puisse-t-il nourrir la réflexion sur la culture et la prévention du risque. Ses formes épidémiques, écologiques, sociales, terroristes et militaires nourrissent les peurs actuelles, structurent les projets sécuritaires et constituent - sans doute - les défis majeurs à notre modernité. Dans la foulée de la richesse scientifique d'Equinoxe, L'ÉQUINOXE hérite de son esprit en prenant à son tour le pari de contribuer - non sans risque - à enrichir en Suisse romande et ailleurs le champ éditorial des sciences humaines dont notre société a besoin pour forger ses repères. Après Face au risque suivra cet automne Du sens des Lumières. (MICHEL PORRET Professeur Ordinaire à la F...

  13. Wastewater treatment pilot

    OpenAIRE

    Paraskevopoulos, Christos Alkiviadis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the functionality of the wastewater treatment pilot and produce a learning manual-handout, as well as to define the parameters of wastewater clarification by studying the nutrient removal and the effluent clarification level of the processed wastewater. As part of the Environmental Engineering studies, Tampere University of Applied Sciences has invested on a Wastewater Treatment Pilot. The pilot simulates the basic wastewater treatment practices u...

  14. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-Zr system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志华; 金展鹏; 刘华山

    2003-01-01

    Au-Zr binary system was reassessed by using the calculation phase diagram (CALPHAD) technique based on experimental thermodynamic data and newly reported phase diagrams. The excess Gibbs energies of the three terminal solutions and the liquid phases were formulated with Redlich-Kister polynomial. All the intermetallic phases were treated as stoichiometric compounds with the exception of ZrAu which is modeled by a two-sublattice model, (Au,Zr) : (Au, Zr). The results show that there exist seven intermetallics: Zr3Au, Zr2Au, Zr5Au4,Zr7Au10, ZrAu2 , ZrAu3, and ZrAu4 in the system. The eutectoid reaction: β(Zr) →α(Zr)+Zr3Au takes place at 1 048 K and the maximal solubility of Au in α-Zr is 4.7 % (mole fraction). The maximal solubility of Zr in Au is 6.0%(mole fraction) at 1 347 K. The homogeneity range of ZrAu phase is about 44.5%-52.9%(mole fraction) of Au. The present assessment fits experimental data very well.

  15. L’outil numérique au service de l’intelligence collective des territoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianney Gerils

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Le contexte socio-économique actuel impose aux collectivités locales, de maitriser la dépense publique, d’optimiser leurs actions et de maintenir une qualité de vie et de services pour les populations. L’efficacité d’usage des aménagements est donc un enjeu majeur pour les gestionnaires territoriaux. Aujourd’hui, la connaissance numérique partagée par les décisionnaires, les usagers (open data, data visualisation est un principe premier dans le processus de conception-production des espaces de vie. Dans ce cadre, les outils numériques sont un moyen technique indispensable de mobilisation de cette connaissance, de stimulation de l’intelligence collective au service de l’aménagement durable des territoires. Cet article présente l’état actuel de nos recherches : la conception et l’application d’un outil numérique de diagnostic et de visualisation territoriale pour une aide à la décision planifiée. Notre terrain d’investigation se localise dans le Département du Val de Marne (site pilote avec pour ambitions de collecter, de partager, et de visualiser cartographiquement la donnée : un outil de recherches fondamentales, un support d’actions opérationnelles.

  16. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Au-electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles-coated conducting oxide for the quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeung-Pil; Kim, Jae-Hong; Kang, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Hyunsoo; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kim, Kyong-Kook; Ahn, Kwang-Soon

    2014-08-01

    Au was electrodeposited potentiostatically at 0.3 V for 5 min on nanoporous Pt nanoparticle-coated F-doped SnO2 (FTO/Pt) substrates. For comparison, Au-electrodeposited FTO (FTO/Au) and Au-uncoated FTO/Pt were prepared. FTO/Au showed large-sized Au clusters dispersed sparsely over FTO, which resulted in lower electrocatalytic activity than FTO/Pt. In contrast, FTO/Pt exhibited poor stability unlike FTO/Au due to poisoning by the adsorption of sulfur species. The Au-electrodeposited FTO/Pt (FTO/Pt/Au) consisted of small Au clusters deposited over the entire area of Pt due to the effective Au nucleation provided by nanoporous metallic Pt. FTO/Pt/Au exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability because the small Au particles well-dispersed over the nanoporous metallic Pt network provided numerous electrochemical reaction sites, and the Pt surface was not exposed to the electrolyte. When FTO/Pt/Au was used as the counter electrode (CE) of a quantum dot-sensitized solar cell, the significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the FTO/Pt/Au CE facilitated the reduction reaction of Sn2- + 2e- (CE) → Sn-12- + S2- at the CE/electrolyte interface, resulting in a significantly hindered recombination reaction, Sn2- + 2e- (TiO2 in the photoanode) → Sn-12- + S2-, and significantly improved overall energy conversion efficiency.

  17. Organisation and Control of Nanoscale Structures on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov;

    2001-01-01

    We address the formation and characterisation of three different nanoscale systems on single-crystal Au(lll) electrode surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The systems are investigated particularly by single-crystal electrochernistry and in situ scanning tunnelling rnicroscopy (STM). The [mt...... constitutes a new case for the lise of in situ STM as a tool for manufacturing nanoscale pit structures on IDe Au(lll) surface at small bias voltage. Individually and in combination these data hold perspectives for preparation of atornically planar electrochernical surfaces willi controlled functionalisation......, orientation of functional biological macromolecules, nanoscale biological sensing, and controlled adsorption sites for enzymes and otter reactive molecules....

  18. 4D Joint Stratigraphic Inversion of Prestack Seismic Data: Application to the CO2 Storage Reservoir (Utsira Sand Formation at Sleipner Site Inversion stratigraphique jointe 4D de données sismiques avant sommation : application au réservoir de stockage de CO2 (Formation Utsira du site de Sleipner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labat K.

    2012-04-01

    éservoirs au cours de leur production. Nous présentons ici une méthodologie d'inversion stratigraphique 4D qui fournit une estimation des variations d'impédances des ondes P et S dans le réservoir, par inversion de données de sismiques répétées avant-sommation. L'inversion 4D est implémentée dans le domaine temps et nécessite une loi de mise à l'échelle des temps de trajets pour chaque jeu de données de sismique répétée (aussi appelé "millésime" afin de mettre en correspondance les temps d'arrivée d'événements homologues observés sur les jeux de données appelés référence et monitors. Cette opération est souvent appelée "warping". L'inversion 4D est une méthodologie qui comporte trois étapes : la première étape consiste à inverser chaque millésime sismique séparément, pour produire autant de distributions en impédances P et S que de jeux de données considérés. La seconde étape utilise l'information des impédances P disponibles pour résoudre le problème du warping, qui est un point clé pour la troisième et dernière étape : l'inversion jointe de tous les millésimes sismiques disponibles. Cette séquence d'inversion 4D a été appliquée aux jeux de données enregistrés sur le réservoir de stockage de CO2 du site norvégien de Sleipner (Mer du Nord. Ce dernier est devenu un site industriel de référence pour le stockage à long terme du dioxyde de carbone (CO2 dans un aquifère salin, la formation des sables de l'Utsira. Nous avons focalisé notre étude sur l'inversion 4D des millésimes 1994 et 2006, acquise respectivement avant et dix ans après le début de l'injection de CO2. Le warping a fourni une loi de mise à l'échelle des temps de propagation avec un retard maximum d'environ 45 ms à la base de l'aquifère Utsira. L'inversion 4D jointe a donné des résultats plus cohérents que les inversions 3D : l'inversion 4D fournit en particulier des impédances P pour les grès saturés en CO2 qui sont très proches des

  19. STM observation of sulfur dimerization in alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au{111}

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Colm

    2005-01-01

    We present for the first time, direct microscopical observation by STM of sulfur dimer formation on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on sputtered Au substrates. The sulfur dimers are observed when imaging at a bias where the tip-molecule interaction occurs, and are formed by displacement of sulfur atoms from their normal three-fold hollow site residence of the (4 × 2) superlattice to nearest-neighbor bridge-site residence between two Au atoms. The displacement is ...

  20. Carbon dioxide cleaning pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989, radioactive-contaminated metal at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) was cleaned using a solvent paint stripper (Methylene chloride). One-third of the radioactive material was able to be recycled; two-thirds went to the scrap pile as low-level mixed waste. In addition, waste solvent solutions also required disposal. Not only was this an inefficient process, it was later prohibited by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 268. A better way of doing business was needed. In the search for a solution to this situation, it was decided to study the advantages of using a new technology - pelletized carbon dioxide cleaning. A proof of principle demonstration occurred in December 1990 to test whether such a system could clean radioactive-contaminated metal. The proof of principle demonstration was expanded in June 1992 with a pilot project. The purpose of the pilot project was three fold: (1) to clean metal so that it can satisfy free release criteria for residual radioactive contamination at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP); (2) to compare two different carbon dioxide cleaning systems; and (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of decontamination process in a production situation and compare the cost of shipping the metal off site for waste disposal. The pilot project was completed in August 1993. The results of the pilot project were: (1) 90% of those items which were decontaminated, successfully met the free release criteria , (2) the Alpheus Model 250 was selected to be used on plantsite and (3) the break even cost of decontaminating the metal vs shipping the contaminated material offsite for disposal was a cleaning rate of 90 pounds per hour, which was easily achieved

  1. Hydrogen evolution on Au(111) covered with submonolayers of Pd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten; Karlberg, Gustav; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    . The energetics of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on/from different types of sites on the Pd-Au(111) surface are assessed by means of density functional theory calculations combined with thermodynamic modeling. Based on the density functional and Monte Carlo data, the hydrogen evolution activity......A theoretical investigation of electrochemical hydrogen evolution on Au(111) covered with submonolayers of Pd is presented. The size and shape of monoatomically high Pd islands formed on the Au(111) surface are determined using Monte Carlo simulations, for Pd coverages varying from 0.02 to 0.95 ML...... line defects for Pd island formation and hydrogen evolution are discussed. It is argued, with support from theoretical data, that this kind of defects is likely to be responsible for a dramatic increase in activity observed experimentally [ChemPhysChem 7, 985 (2006); Electrochim. Acta 52, 5548 (2007...

  2. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  3. Preparing Pilots for Takeoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravage, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Why would schools consider partnering with a vendor to operate a pilot? Why not just wait until the final product is released? For starters, pilots provide schools with a golden opportunity to get an early look at the software, take it for a test flight, and ask for changes tailored to their operating environment and business needs. In some cases,…

  4. Bienvenue au CERN !

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    CERN, the Laboratory which invented the World-Wide Web has re-invented its public Web site. The new face of CERN has gone live at http://www.cern.ch/ Public . CERN's new Web pages have been designed to give visitors an informative introduction to the fascinating world of particle physics. For those whose whirl around the Web only allows a short stop, there's the 'CERN in two minutes' page.

  5. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  6. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-09

    The structure and chemical ordering of PtAu nanoclusters of 79, 135, and 201 atoms are studied via a combination of a basin hopping atom-exchange technique (to locate the lowest energy homotops at fixed composition), a symmetry orbit technique (to find the high symmetry isomers), and density functional theory local reoptimization (for determining the most stable homotop). The interatomic interactions between Pt and Au are derived from the empirical Gupta potential. The lowest energy structures show a marked tendency toward PtcoreAushell chemical ordering by enrichment of the more cohesive Pt in the core region and of Au in the shell region. We observe a preferential segregation of Pt atoms to (111) facets and Au atoms to (100) facets of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active sites. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Bimetallic Au-decorated Pd catalyst for the liquid phase hydrodechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Chen, Huan; Chen, Quanyuan; Huang, Zhaolu

    2016-11-01

    Monometallic and bimetallic Pd-Au catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with varied Au cooperation amounts were prepared using the complexing-reduction method in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF). The liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was investigated over these bimetallic catalysts. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and H2 chemisorption. Characterization results showed that the co-reduction of Pd and Au mainly formed alloy-like structure. The bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger numbers of exposed active site than that of monometallic catalysts. In addition, compared with Pd(1.7)/CNTs and Au(0.4)/CNTs, the binding energies of Pd 3d5/2 shifted to higher positions while that of Au 4f7/2 had negative shifts in the Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts, which can be ascribed to the electrons transferred from metal Pd to Au and the cationization of Pd particles was enhanced. Accordingly, the bimetallic Pd-Au particles with different Au contents in the catalysts exhibited varied synergistic effects for the catalytic HDC of 2,4-DCP, with Pd(1.8)Au(0.4)/CNTs having the highest catalytic activity. For the bimetallic catalysts, a disproportional increase of turnover frequency (TOF) was observed with increasing Au content due to the enhanced cationization of Pd particles. Moreover, the dechlorination of 2,4-DCP over the supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts proceeded via both the stepwise and concerted pathway, and the concerted pathway became predominant with Au decoration amount in the catalyst.

  8. Incendie au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    At 9.15 a.m. on 26 January a fire broke out when part of a particle detector was being dismantled. This apparatus comprised 80 plates of depleted uranium which is used for its strong particle absorption power. Depleted uranium is only very slightly radioactive. The work was being done by two people from a specialist company inside a sealed tent with an entrance lock. The tent itself was located in the large North Experimental Hall on the Prévessin site.

  9. A pilot eduroam service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Eduroam is a secure, worldwide roaming Wi-Fi access service developed for the international research and education community. It allows people from participating institutions to obtain an Internet connection when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop.   A pilot eduroam service has been available in IT for some months. Now this pilot service will be extended to most parts of the CERN site from early January. Introduction of this pilot service brings two advantages: CERN users who register with the eduroam service here at CERN will have easy and quick access to Wi-Fi services at many other academic institutions across Europe and beyond;   People visiting CERN from other eduroam institutes will be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network at CERN without waiting for a network connection request to be approved. Being a eduroam user obviously has advantages but, like many computing services, eduroam provides a way for malicious people to steal passwords...

  10. A pilot eduroam service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Eduroam is a secure, worldwide roaming Wi-Fi access service developed for the international research and education community. It allows people from participating institutions to obtain an Internet connection when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop.   A pilot eduroam service has been available in IT for some months. Now this pilot service will be extended to most parts of the CERN site from early January. Introduction of this pilot service brings two advantages: CERN users who register with the eduroam service here at CERN will have easy and quick access to Wi-Fi services at many other academic institutions across Europe and beyond;   People visiting CERN from other eduroam institutes will be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network at CERN without waiting for a network connection request to be approved. Being a eduroam user obviously has advantages but, like many computing services, eduroam provides a way for malicious people to steal passwords...

  11. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Au-Island Ripening on Au(100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kleiner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multiscale modeling hierarchy for the particular case of Au-island ripening on Au(100. Starting at the microscopic scale, density functional theory was used to investigate a limited number of self-diffusion processes on perfect and imperfect Au(100 surfaces. The obtained structural and energetic information served as basis for optimizing a reactive forcefield (here ReaxFF, which afterwards was used to address the mesoscopic scale. Reactive force field simulations were performed to investigate more diffusion possibilities at a lower computational cost but with similar accuracy. Finally, we reached the macroscale by means of kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC simulations. The reaction rates for the reaction process database used in the kMC simulations were generated using the reactive force field. Using this strategy, we simulated nucleation, aggregation, and fluctuation processes for monoatomic high islands on Au(100 and modeled their equilibrium shape structures. Finally, by calculating the step line tension at different temperatures, we were able to make a direct comparison with available experimental data.

  13. First-principles Study on Adsorption of Au Atom on Hydroxylated SiO2 Surfaee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Miao; HE Kaihua; CHEN QiH; HONG Hanlie

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of single gold (Au) atom at three kinds of sites (hollow,bridge and top) on the hydroxylated β-cristobalite SiO2 (111) surface was studied using the first-principles calculations with general gradient approximation (GGA).The results of adsorption energies and density of electronic states (DOS)suggest that the hollow and bridge sites have the basically equal capability of binding Au,while the ability of the Top site is weaker.Two new energy levels emerge after the adsorption at all sites; in DOS of the Hollow configuration,one locates at -0.15 eV,composed of Au 5d and O 2p electronic states,another just crosses through the Fermi level,consisting of Au 6s,H 1s and O 2p.In addition,Mulliken population analyses indicate that electron transfer takes place between the Au atom and the surface H and O atoms in the Hollow and Bridge configurations,which can be used to interpret the adsorption of Au onto the positions.However,neither H nor O chemically bonds with Au atom.

  14. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  15. Oxygen reduction reaction activity and structural stability of Pt-Au nanoparticles prepared by arc-plasma deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Chiba, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi; Endo, Shota; Hayashi, Takehiro; Todoroki, Naoto; Wadayama, Toshimasa

    2015-07-28

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability of various Au(x)/Pt100 nanoparticles (where x is the atomic ratio of Au against Pt) are evaluated herein. The samples were fabricated on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate at 773 K through sequential arc-plasma depositions of Pt and Au. The electrochemical hydrogen adsorption charges (electrochemical surface area), particularly the characteristic currents caused by the corner and edge sites of the Pt nanoparticles, decrease with increasing Au atomic ratio (x). In contrast, the specific ORR activities of the Au(x)/Pt100 samples were dependent on the atomic ratios of Pt and Au: the Au28/Pt100 sample showed the highest specific activity among all the investigated samples (x = 0-42). As for ORR durability evaluated by applying potential cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO4, Au28/Pt100 was the most durable sample against the electrochemical potential cycles. The results clearly showed that the Au atoms located at coordinatively-unsaturated sites, e.g. at the corners or edges of the Pt nanoparticles, can improve the ORR durability by suppressing unsaturated-site-induced degradation of the Pt nanoparticles. PMID:26118789

  16. Infrared studies of propene and propene oxide adsorption on nanoparticulate Au/TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotov, Dimitar; McEntee, Monica; Burrows, Steve; Driscoll, Darren; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Morris, John

    2016-10-01

    Direct gas-phase epoxidation of propene to propene oxide over a heterogeneous catalyst holds the potential to revolutionize production of one of the world's major commodity chemicals. New research into fundamental aspects of propene chemistry on nanoparticulate catalysts will help guide strategies for materials development. In the current study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) have been employed to explore the molecular-level details of propene and propene oxide binding at a Au/TiO2 catalyst. Competitive binding studies for propene and carbon monoxide reveal that propene readily displaces CO from: first, interfacial Au ||TiO2 sites, then low coordinated Au sites at particulate corners and edges, and finally terrace regions of the particles. DFT calculations show that the Cdbnd C bond of propene weakens upon coordination to Au, which suggests that these sites may activate the molecule for epoxidation. Like propene, propene oxide adsorbs on both Au sites and Ti sites. In addition, Ti-OH sites also readily bind the oxide. However, competitive binding experiments show that the propene oxide adsorption is favored relative to propene on all sites, which would likely passivate the catalyst at room temperature.

  17. Nanoporous Au-based chronocoulometric aptasensor for amplified detection of Pb(2+) using DNAzyme modified with Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Lai, Cui; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Tang, Lin; Yang, Chunping; Zhou, Yaoyu; Qin, Lei; Cheng, Min

    2016-07-15

    The authors herein described an amplified detection strategy employing nanoporous Au (NPG) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to detect Pb(2+) ions in aqueous solution. The thiol modified Pb(2+)-specific DNAzyme was self-assembled onto the surface of the NPG modified electrode for hybridizing with the AuNPs labeled oligonucleotide and for forming the DNA double helix structure. Electrochemical signal, redox charge of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), was measured by chronocoulometry. Taking advantage of amplification effects of the NPG electrode for increasing the reaction sites of capture probe and DNA-AuNPs complexes for bringing about the adsorption of large numbers of RuHex molecules, this electrochemical sensor could detect Pb(2+) quantitatively, in the range of 0.05-100nM, with a limit of detection as low as 0.012nM. Selectivity measurements revealed that the sensor was specific for Pb(2+) even with interference by high concentrations of other metal ions. This sensor was also used to detect Pb(2+) ions from samples of tap water, river water, and landfill leachate samples spiked with Pb(2+) ions, and the results showed good agreement with the found values determined by an atomic fluorescence spectrometer. This simple aptasensor represented a promising potential for on-site detecting Pb(2+) in drinking water. PMID:26921553

  18. Relative Distribution of Au48+ ~ Au52+ in Au Plasma by Ionization Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-Yan; ZHU Zheng-He; JIANG Gang

    2003-01-01

    The present work proposes a theoretical method called ionization dynamics to derive the ionic charge state distribution. Using relativistic quantum mechanics to calculate the energy level lifetime and average ionic lifetime of each ion, the first-order ionization rate constant can be obtained. Based on these data, from the solution of differential equations for consecutive-irreversible ionization reactions, one will be able to derive the ionic charge state distribution.The calculated average positive charge 49.24 of Au48+ ~ Au52+ and their relative distribution are in good agreement with the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  19. AU Political Solution in Libya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    May 3,2011 The African Union(AU),through its High-Level ad hoc Committee on the Situation in Libya and the Commission, is driven by the conviction that, ultimately,only a political solution will make it possible to promote,in a sustainable way,the legitimate aspira-

  20. Recent Improvements in the ATLAS PanDA Pilot

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) in the ATLAS experiment uses pilots to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. The pilots are designed to deal with different runtime conditions and failure scenarios, and support many storage systems. This talk will give a brief overview of the PanDA pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including CernVM File System integration, the job retry mechanism, advanced job monitoring including JEM technology, and validation of new pilot code using the HammerCloud stress-testing system. PanDA is used for all ATLAS distributed production and is the primary system for distributed analysis. It is currently used at over 100 sites world-wide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, EGI and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its further evolution.

  1. Pilot projects in Water Management

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Ker Rault; Wil Thissen; Jill Slinger; Heleen Vreugdenhil

    2010-01-01

    Pilot projects appear in many forms in policy making and management. In an effort to understand the nature and use of pilot projects and improve their effectiveness, we undertake a practice-based and theoretical study of the pilot project phenomenon. First, we examine the roles assigned to pilot projects in the policy development literature and explore their use in a Dutch water innovation platform. Second, we determine characteristics of pilot projects to deepen insights into the nature of t...

  2. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  3. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, B I; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; De Phillips, M; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; García-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; La Pointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C H; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Kolk, N; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-01-01

    The system created in non-central relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Due to spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN}=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed global polarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. The obtained upper limit, |P_{Lambda,anti-Lambda}| <= 0.02, is compared to the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

  4. Onset of nuclear matter expansion in Au+Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Crochet, Philippe; Gobbi, A; Donà, R; Coffin, J P; Fintz, P; Guillaume, G; Jundt, F; Kühn, C E; Roy, C; De Schauenburg, B; Tizniti, L; Wagner, P; Alard, J P; Amouroux, V; Andronic, A; Basrak, Z; Bastid, N; Belyaev, I; Best, D; Biegansky, J; Butà, A; Caplar, R; Cindro, N; Dupieux, P; Dzelalija, M; Fan, Z G; Fodor, Z; Fraysse, L; Freifelder, R P; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Hong, B H; Jeong, S C; Kecskeméti, J; Kirejczyk, M; Koncz, P; Korolija, M; Kotte, R; Lebedev, A; Leifels, Y; Man'ko, V I; Moisa, D; Mösner, J; Neubert, W; Pelte, D; Petrovici, M; Pinkenburg, C H; Pras, P; Ramillien, V; Reisdorf, W; Ritman, J L; Sadchikov, A G; Schüll, D; Seres, Z; Sikora, B; Simion, V; Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Sodan, U; Teh, K M; Trzaska, M; Vasilev, M A; Wang, G S; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Wisniewski, K; Wohlfarth, D; Zhilin, A V

    1997-01-01

    Using the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, excitation functions of collective flow components were measured for the Au+Au system, in the reaction plane and out of this plane, at seven incident energies ranging from 100AMeV to 800AMeV. The threshold energies, corresponding to the onset of sideward-flow (balance energy) and squeeze-out effect (transition energy), are extracted from extrapolations of these excitation functions toward lower beam energies for charged products with Z>2. The transition energy is found to be larger than the balance energy. The impact parameter dependence of both balance and transition energies, when extrapolated to central collisions, suggests comparable although slightly higher values than the threshold energy for the radial flow. The relevant parameter seems to be the energy deposited into the system in order to overcome the attractive nuclear forces.

  5. Charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Xu(蔡勖); ZHOU; Daimei(周代梅); SA; Benhao(萨本豪)

    2003-01-01

    A hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, together with the corresponding Monte Carlo eventgenerator, has been employed in this paper to investigate further the charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at√Snn= 130 GeV. The default JPCIAE calculations are in good agreement with PHENIX and STAR data. Wefound that the thermal predictions for the π gas, the resonance π gas and quark matter deviate, respectively,from the corresponding dynamical simulations from the JPCIAE model. The discrepancies were also foundbetween the π charge fluctuations and the charge fluctuations of all species of hadrons. However the chargefluctuations for "π from ρ and ω decay" and for all the hadrons from resonance decay are close to each other,indicating the correlation between positively and negatively charged hadrons is not sensitive to the species ofhadrons. This work shows further that it is questionable to use the charge fluctuations as a signature of QGP.

  6. Nuclear Modification of Jet Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Zachary; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of energy in the quark gluon plasma is facilitated by measurements of modifications to the observed jet fragmentation. A favorable channel of study relies on direct photons created in the initial parton interactions of heavy ion collisions. Such a photon traverses the created medium unscathed and grants us a proxy for the transverse momentum of an away side jet. PHENIX Au+Au data recorded at √{sNN} = 200 GeV during RHIC run 14 benefit from the background rejection capability of the silicon vertex detector, enabling the extraction of a higher purity hadron signal. This advantage, combined with a larger integrated luminosity, allows previous PHENIX measurements of fragmentation functions to be extended to greater jet energies. In this talk, the status of the analysis of direct photon hadron correlations with the new data set will be discussed.

  7. Structural and morphological peculiarities of hybrid Au/nanodiamond engineered nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, Roberto; Orlanducci, Silvia; Reina, Giacomo; Cassani, Maria Cristina; Passeri, Daniele; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured Au nano-platelets have been synthesized from an Au(III) complex by growth process triggered by nanodiamond (ND). An electroless synthetic route has been used to obtain 2D Au/ND architectures, where individual nanodiamond particles are intimately embedded into face-centered cubic Au platelets. The combined use of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), was able to reveal the unusual organization of these hybrid nanoparticles, ascertaining the existence of preferential crystallographic orientations for both nanocrystalline species and highlighting their mutual locations. Detailed information on the sample microstructure have been gathered by fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) of HR-TEM images, allowing us to figure out the role of Au defects, able to anchor ND crystallites and to provide specific sites for heteroepitaxial Au growth. Aggregates constituted by coupled ND and Au, represent interesting systems conjugating the best optoelectronics and plasmonics properties of the two different materials. In order to promote realistically the applications of such outstanding Au/ND materials, the cooperative mechanisms at the basis of material synthesis and their influence on the details of the hybrid nanostructures have to be deeply understood.

  8. Structural and morphological peculiarities of hybrid Au/nanodiamond engineered nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, Roberto; Orlanducci, Silvia; Reina, Giacomo; Cassani, Maria Cristina; Passeri, Daniele; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured Au nano-platelets have been synthesized from an Au(III) complex by growth process triggered by nanodiamond (ND). An electroless synthetic route has been used to obtain 2D Au/ND architectures, where individual nanodiamond particles are intimately embedded into face-centered cubic Au platelets. The combined use of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), was able to reveal the unusual organization of these hybrid nanoparticles, ascertaining the existence of preferential crystallographic orientations for both nanocrystalline species and highlighting their mutual locations. Detailed information on the sample microstructure have been gathered by fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) of HR-TEM images, allowing us to figure out the role of Au defects, able to anchor ND crystallites and to provide specific sites for heteroepitaxial Au growth. Aggregates constituted by coupled ND and Au, represent interesting systems conjugating the best optoelectronics and plasmonics properties of the two different materials. In order to promote realistically the applications of such outstanding Au/ND materials, the cooperative mechanisms at the basis of material synthesis and their influence on the details of the hybrid nanostructures have to be deeply understood. PMID:27514638

  9. Structural and morphological peculiarities of hybrid Au/nanodiamond engineered nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, Roberto; Orlanducci, Silvia; Reina, Giacomo; Cassani, Maria Cristina; Passeri, Daniele; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured Au nano-platelets have been synthesized from an Au(III) complex by growth process triggered by nanodiamond (ND). An electroless synthetic route has been used to obtain 2D Au/ND architectures, where individual nanodiamond particles are intimately embedded into face-centered cubic Au platelets. The combined use of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), was able to reveal the unusual organization of these hybrid nanoparticles, ascertaining the existence of preferential crystallographic orientations for both nanocrystalline species and highlighting their mutual locations. Detailed information on the sample microstructure have been gathered by fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) of HR-TEM images, allowing us to figure out the role of Au defects, able to anchor ND crystallites and to provide specific sites for heteroepitaxial Au growth. Aggregates constituted by coupled ND and Au, represent interesting systems conjugating the best optoelectronics and plasmonics properties of the two different materials. In order to promote realistically the applications of such outstanding Au/ND materials, the cooperative mechanisms at the basis of material synthesis and their influence on the details of the hybrid nanostructures have to be deeply understood. PMID:27514638

  10. Tailoring metal-oxide interfaces of inverse catalysts of TiO2/nanoporous-Au under hydrogen oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Kamran; Quynh, Bui Thi Phuong; Lee, Hyosun; Moon, Song Yi; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-06-14

    Engineering metal-oxide interfaces in TiO2/nanoporous (np) Au inverse catalysts results in enhancement of H2 oxidation activity. While the intrinsic activity of the novel np-Au prepared from a Au-Si alloy is low, the activity increased as the weight fraction of the TTIP (amount of TiO2) was increased to 0.5 weight%. We correlate the change in activity with the active sites at the perimeter interface between the TiO2 and np-Au. PMID:25959456

  11. Formic Acid Decomposition on Au catalysts: DFT, Microkinetic Modeling, and Reaction Kinetics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Suyash; Li, Sha; Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Alba-Rubio, Ana C.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach is presented that uses a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model, reaction kinetics experiments, and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging to unravel the reaction mechanism and provide insights into the nature of active sites for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Au/SiC catalysts. All input parameters for the microkinetic model are derived from periodic, self-consistent, generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PW91) density functional theory calculations on the Au(111), Au(100), and Au(211) surfaces and are subsequently adjusted to describe the experimental HCOOH decomposition rate and selectivity data. It is shown that the HCOOH decomposition follows the formate (HCOO) mediated path, with 100% selectivity toward the dehydrogenation products (CO21H2) under all reaction conditions. An analysis of the kinetic parameters suggests that an Au surface in which the coordination number of surface Au atoms is 4 may provide a better model for the active site of HCOOH decomposition on these specific supported Au catalysts.

  12. Development of 1000kW-class MCFC pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooue, M.; Yasue, H. [MCFC Research Association, Mie (Japan); Takasu, K.; Tsuchitori, T.

    1996-12-31

    This pilot plant is a part of the New Sunshine Program which has proceeded by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MCFC Research Association is entrusted with the development of the pilot plant, and constructing it at Kawagoe site. Following items will be verified by this pilot plant operation. (a) Development of 250kW class stack and confirmation of stack performance and decay rate. (b) System verification such as basic process, control system and operation characteristics, toward commercialization. (c) To get design data for demonstration plant.

  13. Interaction of carbon monoxide and oxygen at the surface of inverse titania/Au model catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.

    2007-07-01

    Interaction of carbon monoxide and oxygen on the surface of titania/Au(1 1 1) inverse model catalyst held at 200 K has been studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. It was found that CO adsorbs on the oxide/Au perimeter interface, whereas no or very weak adsorption was observed on Au(1 1 1) or titania surface, respectively. Exposing of such species to oxygen results in their decay possibly due to carbon dioxide formation. Efficiency of this effect is higher at lower CO initial concentration which points at the importance of free surface sites for the reaction process.

  14. Investigation of the Adsorption and Self Assembly of Isocyanide Derivatives on Au(111) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Jun-Hong; SHI,Liang-Wei; ZHANG,Tao; CHEN,Min-Bo

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption and self-assembly of isocyanide derivatives on Au(111) surface were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulation. The calculation for phenyl isocyanide by DFT was based on cluster and slab models. The self-assembled monolayers of 2-isocyanoazulene and 1,3-diethoxycarbonyl2-isocyanoazulene on Au(111) were simulated using Au-C force field parameters developed by us. It was found that the top site was the most preferred position, and the isocyanoazulene and its derivatives could form the ordered face to edge self-assembled monolayer on gold surface indeed, and the molecules stood on the gold surface vertically.

  15. Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide-nafion/Au Nanoparticle Modified Electrode for Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yajie Lv; Fang Wang; Hui Zhu; Xiaorong Zou; Cheng-an Tao; Jianfang Wang

    2016-01-01

    n this paper, a non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor, based on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) electrodepos‐ ited on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide(ER‐ GO)-Nafion modified glass carbon electrode (GCE), was reported. The graphene oxide-(GO-)Nafion nanocompo‐ sites were first assembled on the GCE surface to produce a GO-Nafion electrode. GO was then electrochemically reduced to produce an ERGO-Nafion modified GCE (to be subsequently denoted as GCE/ERGO-Nafion). Afterwards, AuNPs ...

  16. Impact of temperature-induced coalescence on SERS properties of Au nanoparticles deposited on GaN nano-columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzięcielewski, Igor; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Bańkowska, Małgorzata; Sochacki, Tomasz; Khachapuridze, Alexandr; Weyher, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured GaN surfaces sputtered with Au provide very promising and reproducible platforms for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The enhancement factor (EF) in SERS is expected to depend strongly on the local metal (Au) surface structure (size, distribution and morphology). Herein we show how temperature-induced coalescence followed by recrystallization of Au on GaN nano-columns occurs well below the melting point of gold. This process is reflected in SEM, TEM images and SERS spectra of Au/GaN - bound p-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA), a model Raman scatterer. SERS signals of 4-MBA bound to Au/GaN reach minimum for platforms exposed to t = 350 °C before regaining the intensity when annealed in the range of 450-900 °C. The results have been discussed in the light of the nature of SERS active sites - so called "hot spots" and structure of Au nanoparticles.

  17. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  18. Tailoring the electrical properties of MoS2 field effect transistors by depositing Au nanoparticles and alkanethiol molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyungjune; Jeong, Hyunhak; Kim, Tae-Young; Pak, Jinsu; Kim, Jae-Keun; Choi, Barbara Yuri; Lee, Takhee

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated and characterized MoS2 field effect transistors. First, we measured the electrical properties of MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) that were made with mechanically exfoliated MoS2 flakes. Then, we deposited Au nanoparticles on the MoS2 channel and measured the electrical properties. We observed whether the source-drain current increased or decreased after the Au particles were deposited. The deposited Au particles either formed an extra current path and increased the current or behaved as charge-withdrawing sites and decreased the current. Next, we deposited alkanethiol molecules on the Au particles to reduce the work function of the Au. Alkanethiol molecules are known to form a self-assembled monolayer on the Au surface, and the electric dipole moment of the molecules causes the work function of the Au to decrease. Au particles can capture electrons from the MoS2 channel due to their high work function. However, the decreased work function of the Au particles subjected to alkanethiol treatment could cause captured electrons to be released from the Au particles to MoS2. Therefore, the current increased after alkanethiol treatment. This study may provide useful methods to utilize surface treatments with particles and molecules to tailor the electrical properties of MoS2-based FETs.

  19. Tailoring the electrical properties of MoS2 field effect transistors by depositing Au nanoparticles and alkanethiol molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyungjune; Jeong, Hyunhak; Kim, Tae-Young; Pak, Jinsu; Kim, Jae-Keun; Choi, Barbara Yuri; Lee, Takhee

    2016-05-11

    We fabricated and characterized MoS2 field effect transistors. First, we measured the electrical properties of MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) that were made with mechanically exfoliated MoS2 flakes. Then, we deposited Au nanoparticles on the MoS2 channel and measured the electrical properties. We observed whether the source-drain current increased or decreased after the Au particles were deposited. The deposited Au particles either formed an extra current path and increased the current or behaved as charge-withdrawing sites and decreased the current. Next, we deposited alkanethiol molecules on the Au particles to reduce the work function of the Au. Alkanethiol molecules are known to form a self-assembled monolayer on the Au surface, and the electric dipole moment of the molecules causes the work function of the Au to decrease. Au particles can capture electrons from the MoS2 channel due to their high work function. However, the decreased work function of the Au particles subjected to alkanethiol treatment could cause captured electrons to be released from the Au particles to MoS2. Therefore, the current increased after alkanethiol treatment. This study may provide useful methods to utilize surface treatments with particles and molecules to tailor the electrical properties of MoS2-based FETs.

  20. Introduction au filtre de Kalman

    OpenAIRE

    Alazard, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Ce document est une introduction au filtre optimal de Kalman appliquée aux systèmes linéaires. On suppose connues la théorie des asservissements linéaires et du filtrage fréquentiel (continu et discret) ainsi que les notions d'états pour représenter les systèmes dynamiques linéaires.

  1. L’apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    En 1961, sur la base du constat que l’évolution du marché du travail nécessitait un besoin croissant de personnel qualifié, le 1er accord entre la République et canton de Genève et le CERN fut signé. Cet accord avait notamment pour objet la formation professionnelle de jeunes électroniciens et techniciens de laboratoires en physique. Le CERN, acteur local économique d’importance, soulignait par cet accord sa volonté de participer au développement économique et social local. Le 1er apprenti arriva au CERN en 1965. En 1971, le centre d’apprentissage fut créé ; il accueille aujourd’hui plus d’une vingtaine d’apprentis au total, à raison d’environ six nouveaux apprentis chaque année. Cet apprentissage est dédié aux jeunes âgés e...

  2. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  3. Active and selective conversion of CO2 to CO on ultrathin Au nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yin-Jia; Zhang, Hongyi; Lv, Haifeng; Li, Qing; Michalsky, Ronald; Peterson, Andrew A; Sun, Shouheng

    2014-11-19

    In this communication, we show that ultrathin Au nanowires (NWs) with dominant edge sites on their surface are active and selective for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO. We first develop a facile seed-mediated growth method to synthesize these ultrathin (2 nm wide) Au NWs in high yield (95%) by reducing HAuCl4 in the presence of 2 nm Au nanoparticles (NPs). These NWs catalyze CO2 reduction to CO in aqueous 0.5 M KHCO3 at an onset potential of -0.2 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode). At -0.35 V, the reduction Faradaic efficiency (FE) reaches 94% (mass activity 1.84 A/g Au) and stays at this level for 6 h without any noticeable activity change. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the excellent catalytic performance of these Au NWs is attributed both to their high mass density of reactive edge sites (≥16%) and to the weak CO binding on these sites. These ultrathin Au NWs are the most efficient nanocatalyst ever reported for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO.

  4. Monitoring continu de site pollué : mise au point d'une méthodologie de contrôle en continu d'un site pollué en phase de surveillance ou de dé pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Portet, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the Contaminated Site Monitoring (CSM) is to develop a real time management methodology for PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) contaminated aquifer resulting from the coal activity. For the full-scale experimentation, an old coking plant site has been was instrumented (sensors, analysers, datalogger, programmable logic controller, etc.) in June 2000. Its follow-up currently continues with remote supervision, via telecom connection.It is the first time that a CSM is installe...

  5. Hydrodechlorination Catalysis of Pd-on-Au Nanoparticles Varies with Particle Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzer, Lori A.; Song, Hyun J.; Fang, Yu-Lun; Zhao, Zhun; Guo, Neng; Wu, Tianpin; Arslan, Ilke; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Wong, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    The dependence of bimetallic PdAu catalytic activity on the relative ratios of Pd and Au has been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed for a number of reactions. Trichloroethene (TCE), a common carcinogenic solvent that is difficult to remove from contaminated groundwater in many industrialized nations, can be chemically degraded especially rapidly with Au nanoparticles partially coated with Pd ("Pd-on-Au NPs"). These NPs catalyze the room-temperature water-phase TCE hydrodechlorination (HDC) reaction with activities that follow a volcano-shape dependence on Pd surface coverage. The effect of particle size is not known, though. Pd-on-Au NPs synthesized with 3, 7, and 10 nm Au NPs and Pd surface coverages between 0 and 150% were studied in detail. Volcano-shape dependence on Au particle size and Pd surface coverage was observed, with 7 nm Au NPs with a Pd coverage of 60-70% having the highest TCE HDC activity. Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) revealed the correlation was strongest between catalytic activity and the presence of non-oxidized Pd ensembles of ~2-3 atoms in contact with ~8-10 Au atoms. Isolated Pd atoms and Pd ensembles were visualized for the first time through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This study provides the most direct evidence yet for Pd-on-Au NPs containing 2-dimensional Pd ensembles as the active sites for TCE HDC and likely for other chemical reactions. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This research was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. Service Catalog Pilot Project Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the ServCat pilot project and offers recommendations for the full-scale implementation of the database. During the pilot project a total of...

  7. User Participation in Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Pilot implementations provide users with real-work experiences of how a system will affect their daily work before the design of the system is finalized. On the basis of a pilot implementation of a system for coordinating the transport of patients by hospital porters, we investigate pilot...... implementation as a method for participatory design. We find that to foster participation and learning about user needs a pilot implementation must create a space for reflecting on use, in addition to the space for using the pilot system. The space for reflection must also exist during the activities preparing...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  9. Pilot selection and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Personality and situational factors relevant to individual and group performance in highly demanding environments, such as those faced by astronauts or by jet transport crew, are discussed. It is emphasized that although technical competence and proficiency in pilot selection are prerequisites for safety, operating a modern jet transport is a group endeavor that requires the effective coordination of the entire crew. A self-report test battery for measuring positive and negative personality traits of pilot candidates, termed the Personal Characteristics Inventory, is described.

  10. PILOT optical alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  11. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow;

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...... pilot projects as enabler of transition. Aspects of how to create trust and deal with distrust during a transition are addressed. The transition in focus is the concept of New Public Management and how it is applied in the management of the Employment Service in Denmark. The transition regards...

  12. Initial state geometry and fluctuations in Au+Au, Cu+Au and U+U collisions at RHIC

    OpenAIRE

    Schenke, Bjoern; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-01-01

    We study within the IP-Glasma and two-component MC-Glauber models the effects of initial state geometry and fluctuations on multiplicities and eccentricities for several collision species at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These include copper-gold (Cu+Au), gold-gold (Au+Au), and uranium-uranium (U+U) collisions. The multiplicity densities per participant pair are very similar in all systems studied. Ellipticities vary strongly between collision systems, most significantly for cen...

  13. Kinetics of low-temperature CO oxidation on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuening, Theodore; Walker, Joshua; Adams, Heather; Furlong, Octavio; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide on oxygen-modified Au(111) surfaces is studied using a combination of reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). TPD reveals that CO desorbs in two states with the low-temperature state have a peak temperature between ~ 130 and 150 K, and the higher-temperature state having a peak temperature that varies from ~ 175 to ~ 220 K depending on the initial oxygen and CO coverages. Infrared spectroscopy indicates that the low-temperature CO desorption state is predominantly associated with CO adsorbed on Auδ + sites, while the higher-temperature states are due to CO on Au0 sites. No additional vibrational features are detected indicating that CO reacts directly with adsorbed atomic oxygen on gold to form CO2. Estimates of the activation energy for CO2 formation suggest that they are in the same range and found for supported gold catalysts at reaction temperature below ~ 300 K.

  14. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  15. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  16. Development of morin-conjugated Au nanoparticles: Exploring the interaction efficiency with BSA using spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hua-Li; Hu, Yan-Jun; Huang, Hong-Gui; Jiang, Shan; Tu, Bao

    2014-09-01

    In order to enhance its interaction efficiency with biomacromolecules for the usage as a therapeutic agent, we have conjugated morin, an antioxidant activity and anti-tumor drug, with citrate-coated Au nanoparticles (M-C-AuNPs). M-C-AuNPs were prepared by reducing chloroauric acid using trisodium citrate in the boiling condition, and the resulted M-C-AuNPs were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. In this article, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interactions between M-C-AuNPs and bovine serum albumin (BSA), C-AuNPs and BSA in a phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. By comparing the quenching constant KSV, effective quenching constant Ka, binding constant Kb and the number of binding sites n, it is clearly suggested that M-C-AuNPs could enhance the binding force of morin with BSA, which would pave the way for the design of nanotherapeutic agents with improved functionality.

  17. Evaluatie pilot elektronische volgsystemen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, F.; Post, B.

    2006-01-01

    Naast het uitvoeren van een onderzoek naar de ervaringen met EVS (Elektronisch Volgsysteem) in het buitenland, worden er bij de sectoren GW (Gevangeniswezen), jeugd en tbs een aantal pilot-projecten opgestart waarbij gebruik wordt gemaakt van elektronische volgsystemen met GPS-techniek (GPS = Global

  18. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  19. Hydrogen adsorption on bimetallic PdAu(111) surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takehiro, Naoki; Liu, Ping; Bergbreiter, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen on structurally well defined PdAu-Pd(111) monolayer surface alloys was investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical study, aiming at a quantitative understanding of the adsorption and desorption properties of individual PdAu nanostructures. Combining...... the structural information obtained by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in particular on the abundance of specific adsorption ensembles at different Pd surface concentrations, with information on the adsorption properties derived from temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopy...... and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) provides conclusions on the minimum ensemble size for dissociative adsorption of hydrogen and on the adsorption energies on different sites active for adsorption. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations give detailed insight...

  20. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  1. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Montipora Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Montipora in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  2. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  3. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  4. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is located between the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe, and includes the Au'au Channel as well as parts of the Kealaikahiki, Alalakeiki...

  5. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  6. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for all mesophotic corals in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to...

  7. A Study of Parton Energy Loss in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC using Transport Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nara, Y.; Vance, S. E.; Csizmadia, P.

    2001-01-01

    Parton energy loss in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies is studied by numerically solving the relativistic Boltzmann equation for the partons including $2 \\leftrightarrow 2$ and $2 \\to 2 + final state radiation$ collision processes. Final particle spectra are obtained using two hadronization models; the Lund string fragmentation and independent fragmentation models. Recent, preliminary $\\pi^0$ transverse momentum distributions from central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are reproduced using gluon-g...

  8. Synthesis, characterization and photo-epoxidation performance of Au-loaded photocatalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Van-Huy Nguyen; Hsiang-Yu Chan; Jeffrey C S Wu

    2013-07-01

    Titanium silicalite-1 (TS-1) was synthesized by hydrothermal crystallization. Au-loaded TS-1 (Au/TS-1) was prepared by the photo-deposition method. The prepared photocatalysts have been fully characterized by Raman, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet visible light spectroscopy to reveal their structure, surface morphology and chemical composition. Photocatalytic activity of these photocatalysts was ascertained by gas phase photo-epoxidation of propylene-to-propylene oxide in the presence of molecular oxygen only under light irradiation. No sacrificial reductant such as hydrogen was used during the photoreaction. Au/TS-1 photocatalyst remained highly stable under reaction conditions. It is found that the increased Ti3+ sites due to the incorporation of Au will not only enhance the selectivity of the photocatalyst to form epoxide but also its stability during C3H6 conversion.

  9. Le site paléo-indien de Piedra Museo (Patagonie). Sa contribution au débat sur le premier peuplement du continent américainThe palaeo-indian site of Piedra Museo (Patagonia). Its contribution to the debate on the peopling of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando V.; d'Errico, Francesco; Zarate, Marcelo

    2000-08-01

    The Piedra Museo site (Santa Cruz, Argentina), excavated over the past nine years has yielded a rich archaeological record, which contributes to the discussion on the first peopling of the Americas. We present here a new study of the site, based on an analysis of the stratigraphy, spatial distribution of archaeological remains, bone taphonomy, and discussion of new AMS- 14C dates. We conclude that remains of extinct species with cut-marks from the lower levels are contemporaneous of stone tools and cores from the same levels. This demonstrates that humans were present in the southern part of Patagonia around 10 300 and 11 100 years BP and suggests that hunting of large mammals was a part of their subsistence strategies.

  10. Bright, NIR-emitting Au23 from Au25: characterization and applications including biolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Kumar, R C Arun; Paul, Soumya; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai Vyomakesannair; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2009-10-01

    A novel interfacial route has been developed for the synthesis of a bright-red-emitting new subnanocluster, Au(23), by the core etching of a widely explored and more stable cluster, Au(25)SG(18) (in which SG is glutathione thiolate). A slight modification of this procedure results in the formation of two other known subnanoclusters, Au(22) and Au(33). Whereas Au(22) and Au(23) are water soluble and brightly fluorescent with quantum yields of 2.5 and 1.3 %, respectively, Au(33) is organic soluble and less fluorescent, with a quantum yield of 0.1 %. Au(23) exhibits quenching of fluorescence selectively in the presence of Cu(2+) ions and it can therefore be used as a metal-ion sensor. Aqueous- to organic-phase transfer of Au(23) has been carried out with fluorescence enhancement. Solvent dependency on the fluorescence of Au(23) before and after phase transfer has been studied extensively and the quantum yield of the cluster varies with the solvent used. The temperature response of Au(23) emission has been demonstrated. The inherent fluorescence of Au(23) was used for imaging human hepatoma cells by employing the avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19711391

  11. Initial state geometry and fluctuations in Au+Au, Cu+Au and U+U collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Schenke, Bjoern; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-01-01

    We study within the IP-Glasma and two-component MC-Glauber models the effects of initial state geometry and fluctuations on multiplicities and eccentricities for several collision species at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These include copper-gold (Cu+Au), gold-gold (Au+Au), and uranium-uranium (U+U) collisions. The multiplicity densities per participant pair are very similar in all systems studied. Ellipticities vary strongly between collision systems, most significantly for central collisions, while fluctuation driven odd moments vary little between systems. Event-by-event distributions of eccentricities in mid-central collisions are wider in Cu+Au relative to Au+Au and U+U systems. An anti-correlation between multiplicity and eccentricity is observed in ultra central U+U collisions which is weaker in the IP-Glasma model than the two-component MC-Glauber model. In ultra central Au+Au collisions the two models predict opposite signs for the slope of this correlation. Measurements of elliptic flo...

  12. Au 6x6 on Si(111): Evidence for a 2D pseudoglass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, L.D.; Grozea, D.; Feidenhans'l, R.;

    1998-01-01

    The atomic structure of the Au 6 x 6 on Si(111) phase has been determined using direct methods and surface X-ray diffraction data. This surface structure is very complicated, with 14 independent gold atoms, relaxations in 24 independent silicon sites and three partially occupied gold sites. In one...... sense the structure can be described as microdomains of the parent root 3 x root 3 Au on Si(111) structure. A better description is in terms of a tiling of incomplete pentagonal and trimer units, essentially a pseudopentagonal glass. In terms of these structural units it appears possible to explain all...

  13. Au@Ag/Au nanoparticles assembled with activatable aptamer probes as smart ``nano-doctors'' for image-guided cancer thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Ye, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Cui, Wensi; He, Dinggeng; Li, Duo; Jia, Xuekun

    2014-07-01

    Although nanomaterial-based theranostics have increased positive expectations from cancer treatment, it remains challenging to develop in vivo ``nano-doctors'' that provide high-contrast image-guided site-specific therapy. Here we designed an activatable theranostic nanoprobe (ATNP) via self-assembly of activatable aptamer probes (AAPs) on Au@Ag/Au nanoparticles (NPs). As both quenchers and heaters, novel Au@Ag/Au NPs were prepared, showing excellent fluorescence quenching and more effective near-infrared photothermal therapy than Au nanorods. The AAP comprised a thiolated aptamer and a fluorophore-labeled complementary DNA; thus, the ATNP with quenched fluorescence in the free state could realize signal activation through target binding-induced conformational change of the AAP, and then achieve on-demand treatment under image-guided irradiation. By using S6 aptamer as the model, in vitro and in vivo studies of A549 lung cancer verified that the ATNP greatly improved imaging contrast and specific destruction, suggesting a robust and versatile theranostic strategy for personalized medicine in future.Although nanomaterial-based theranostics have increased positive expectations from cancer treatment, it remains challenging to develop in vivo ``nano-doctors'' that provide high-contrast image-guided site-specific therapy. Here we designed an activatable theranostic nanoprobe (ATNP) via self-assembly of activatable aptamer probes (AAPs) on Au@Ag/Au nanoparticles (NPs). As both quenchers and heaters, novel Au@Ag/Au NPs were prepared, showing excellent fluorescence quenching and more effective near-infrared photothermal therapy than Au nanorods. The AAP comprised a thiolated aptamer and a fluorophore-labeled complementary DNA; thus, the ATNP with quenched fluorescence in the free state could realize signal activation through target binding-induced conformational change of the AAP, and then achieve on-demand treatment under image-guided irradiation. By using S6 aptamer as

  14. Highly accessible Pt nanodots homogeneously decorated on Au nanorods surface for sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Seed-growth of highly-dispersed catalytic Pt nanodot on Au nanorod (PtND@AuNR). • Good accessibility of catalytic sites was evidenced by its peroxidase-like activity. • Excellent assay performances of H2O2 at PtND@AuNR-based sensor. - Abstract: Some nanostructures are reported to possess enzyme-mimetic activities similar to those of natural enzymes. Herein, highly-dispersed Pt nanodots on Au nanorods (HD- PtNDs@AuNRs) with mimetic peroxidase activity were designed as an active electrode modifier for fabrication of a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) electrochemical sensor. The HD-PtNDs@AuNRs were synthesized by a seed-mediated growth approach and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The electrochemical and catalytical performances of HD-PtNDs@AuNRs towards H2O2 reduction were investigated in detail by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. The HD-PtNDs@AuNRs modified electrode displayed a high catalytic activity to H2O2 at −0.10 V (versus SCE), a rapid response within 5 s, a wide linear range of 2.0–3800.0 μM, a detection limit of 1.2 μM (S/N = 3), and a high sensitivity of 181 μA mM−1 cm−2. These results suggested a promising potential of fabricating H2O2 electrochemical sensor using HD- PtNDs@AuNRs

  15. Highly accessible Pt nanodots homogeneously decorated on Au nanorods surface for sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xun [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Xin [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shi, Hongyan; Huang, Hao [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Xiaochun [CAS Key Laboratory of Standardization and Measurement for Nanotechnology, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Song, Wenbo, E-mail: wbsong@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Seed-growth of highly-dispersed catalytic Pt nanodot on Au nanorod (PtND@AuNR). • Good accessibility of catalytic sites was evidenced by its peroxidase-like activity. • Excellent assay performances of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at PtND@AuNR-based sensor. - Abstract: Some nanostructures are reported to possess enzyme-mimetic activities similar to those of natural enzymes. Herein, highly-dispersed Pt nanodots on Au nanorods (HD- PtNDs@AuNRs) with mimetic peroxidase activity were designed as an active electrode modifier for fabrication of a hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) electrochemical sensor. The HD-PtNDs@AuNRs were synthesized by a seed-mediated growth approach and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The electrochemical and catalytical performances of HD-PtNDs@AuNRs towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction were investigated in detail by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. The HD-PtNDs@AuNRs modified electrode displayed a high catalytic activity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at −0.10 V (versus SCE), a rapid response within 5 s, a wide linear range of 2.0–3800.0 μM, a detection limit of 1.2 μM (S/N = 3), and a high sensitivity of 181 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. These results suggested a promising potential of fabricating H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrochemical sensor using HD- PtNDs@AuNRs.

  16. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Au-electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles-coated conducting oxide for the quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeung-Pil; Kim, Jae-Hong; Ahn, Kwang-Soon, E-mail: kstheory@ynu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon-Hyung [Department of Chemistry Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyunsoo; Choi, Chel-Jong [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyong-Kook, E-mail: kim.kk@kpu.ac.kr [Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung 429-793 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-25

    Au was electrodeposited potentiostatically at 0.3 V for 5 min on nanoporous Pt nanoparticle-coated F-doped SnO{sub 2} (FTO/Pt) substrates. For comparison, Au-electrodeposited FTO (FTO/Au) and Au-uncoated FTO/Pt were prepared. FTO/Au showed large-sized Au clusters dispersed sparsely over FTO, which resulted in lower electrocatalytic activity than FTO/Pt. In contrast, FTO/Pt exhibited poor stability unlike FTO/Au due to poisoning by the adsorption of sulfur species. The Au-electrodeposited FTO/Pt (FTO/Pt/Au) consisted of small Au clusters deposited over the entire area of Pt due to the effective Au nucleation provided by nanoporous metallic Pt. FTO/Pt/Au exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability because the small Au particles well-dispersed over the nanoporous metallic Pt network provided numerous electrochemical reaction sites, and the Pt surface was not exposed to the electrolyte. When FTO/Pt/Au was used as the counter electrode (CE) of a quantum dot-sensitized solar cell, the significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the FTO/Pt/Au CE facilitated the reduction reaction of S{sub n}{sup 2− }+ 2e{sup −} (CE) → S{sub n−1}{sup 2−} + S{sup 2−} at the CE/electrolyte interface, resulting in a significantly hindered recombination reaction, S{sub n}{sup 2− }+ 2e{sup −} (TiO{sub 2} in the photoanode) → S{sub n-1}{sup 2−} + S{sup 2−}, and significantly improved overall energy conversion efficiency.

  17. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Au-electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles-coated conducting oxide for the quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au was electrodeposited potentiostatically at 0.3 V for 5 min on nanoporous Pt nanoparticle-coated F-doped SnO2 (FTO/Pt) substrates. For comparison, Au-electrodeposited FTO (FTO/Au) and Au-uncoated FTO/Pt were prepared. FTO/Au showed large-sized Au clusters dispersed sparsely over FTO, which resulted in lower electrocatalytic activity than FTO/Pt. In contrast, FTO/Pt exhibited poor stability unlike FTO/Au due to poisoning by the adsorption of sulfur species. The Au-electrodeposited FTO/Pt (FTO/Pt/Au) consisted of small Au clusters deposited over the entire area of Pt due to the effective Au nucleation provided by nanoporous metallic Pt. FTO/Pt/Au exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability because the small Au particles well-dispersed over the nanoporous metallic Pt network provided numerous electrochemical reaction sites, and the Pt surface was not exposed to the electrolyte. When FTO/Pt/Au was used as the counter electrode (CE) of a quantum dot-sensitized solar cell, the significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the FTO/Pt/Au CE facilitated the reduction reaction of Sn2− + 2e− (CE) → Sn−12− + S2− at the CE/electrolyte interface, resulting in a significantly hindered recombination reaction, Sn2− + 2e− (TiO2 in the photoanode) → Sn-12− + S2−, and significantly improved overall energy conversion efficiency.

  18. L’olivier au Maroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mouhtadi Issam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available L’olivier est une culture traditionnelle sur le pourtour de la Méditerranée. Il est donc naturel de trouver cet arbre au Maroc où il est présent depuis des siècles. Cultivé surtout traditionnellement jusqu’à ses dernières années, il fait l’objet maintenant d’un plan de valorisation très ambitieux pour non seulement garder le Royaume à son niveau actuel (2e producteur mondial pour l’olive de conserve et 6e pour l’huile d’olive mais pour conquérir de nouveaux marchés au niveau mondial et profiter ainsi de l’engouement que connaît cette huile reconnue pour ses bienfaits. Le plan national « Maroc Vert » permet ainsi, grâce à des subventions conséquentes, non seulement de renouveler les vergers existant avec la variété traditionnelle picholine du Maroc, mais également la plantation de nouvelles variétés en super-intensif dans le but d’industrialiser au maximum de nouveaux vergers. Il en est de même pour la transformation des olives en huile de bonne qualité avec la mise en place d’unités de trituration modernes qui doivent supplanter à terme la multitude de « maâsra » et réduire ainsi l’impact environnemental dû aux margines. L’olive ne sera plus dans l’avenir que représentée par son huile et ses formes comestibles, mais les résidus de son extraction seront valorisés soit sous forme de combustible élaboré pour le grignon, soit sous forme d’une base de chimie verte pour les sous-produits du raffinage. D’autres applications sont actuellement à l’étude, car le Maroc à compris, comme tous les autres grands pays producteurs, que l’olive était un nouveau gisement de richesses.

  19. Study of Au+Au relativistic collisions with the Fopi-Phase I detector; Etude des collisions relativistes Au+Au avec le detecteur Fopi-Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupieux, P.

    1995-01-01

    Au+Au relativistic collisions, in a 100-1000 MeV energy domain per nucleon, are described. Experiments have been carried out with the SIS accelerator at GSI/Darmstadt. Data are analysed with the FOPI-phase I detector. These data are compared with IQMD model (Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics) Predictions. (S.G). 80 refs., 77 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. English for au pairs the au pair's guide to learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    English for Au Pairs has interlinked stories about a group of au pairs new to England. Marta, an 18-year-old from Poland arrives in the UK to work as an au pair. Throughout her year-long stay she has many different experiences - some bad, some good - but with the support of her host family she finds new friends and improves her English. English for Au Pairs offers insight into the joys and difficulties of being an au pair while at the same time reinforcing English language learning through grammar explanations and exercises.

  1. Characteristic atom occupation patterns of Au3Cu, AuCu3, AuCuⅠ and AuCuⅡ based on experimental data of disordered alloys%以无序合金的实验数据为基础的Au3Cu,AuCu3,AuCuⅠ和AuCuⅡ的特征原子占据图

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢佑卿; 李艳芬; 刘心笔; 李晓波; 彭红建; 聂耀庄

    2011-01-01

    根据无序Au1-xCux合金的实验生成热和晶格常数得到只考虑近邻原子组态的特征原子的势能、体积和电子结构,计算L12-Au3Cu,L12-AuCu3和L10-AuCu化合物的特征原子占据(CAO)图、电子结构、能量和体积性质.Johasson-Linde(J-L)模型的CAO图表明,AuCuⅠ-AuCuⅡ转变是一个放热且体积缩小的反应,但正好与实验现象相反.根据Guymont-Feutelais-Legendre(G-F-L)模型的CAO图,AuCuⅡ晶胞由两个周期反相(PAD)的AuCuⅠ区域和两个PAD边界区域组成;从G-F-L模型的CAO图得出的公式可用来计算PAD AuCuⅠ区域和PAD边界区域的能量性质、体积性质和有序度及AuCuⅡ相的平均性质,计算结果与实验现象相吻合.%The potential energies, volumes and electronic structures of characteristic atoms coordinated by neighboring configurations were obtained from the experimental heats of formation and lattice parameters of disordered Au1-xCux alloys. From characteristic atom occupation (CAO) patterns of L12-Au3Cu, L12-AuCu3 and L10-AuCu compounds, their electronic structures, volumetric and energetic properties were calculated. The CAO pattern of Johasson-Linde(J-L) model shows that the transition AuCuⅠ→ AuCuⅡ is an exothermic and volume contraction reaction, which is opposite from experimental phenomena. According to CAO pattern of Guymont-Feutelais-Legendre(G-F-L) model, the AuCuⅡ cell consists of two periodic antidirection (PAD) AuCuⅠ regions and two PAD boundary regions. The equations derived from CAO pattern of G-F-L model can be used to calculate energetic properties, volumetric properties and ordering degrees of the PAD AuCul region and PAD boundary region, as well as corresponding average properties of the AuCuⅡ phase. The results are consistent with experimental phenomena.

  2. Nitrogen treatment from digestat of biogas plants in a moving bed biofilm reactor; Projet de recherche pilote. Traitement de l'azote des digestats issus d'installations de biogaz au moyen d'un reacteur a biofilm sur support mobile - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roches, S.; Bakx, T.; Membrez, Y. [EREP SA, Aclens (Switzerland); Baggenstos, M.; Chappaz, A. [Wabag Water Technology Ltd, Winterthur (Switzerland); Holliger, Ch. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    Ammonia emissions are a source for polluting ecosystems, causing in particular acidification and eutrophication of the affected areas. In Switzerland 90% of the atmospheric ammonia emissions are due to agriculture, mostly during storage and use of animal manures and slurries. Anaerobic digestion of these manures and slurries produces renewable energy and stabilises the agricultural effluents. However, it does not solve the ammonia problem; on the contrary, it releases an additional amount of ammonium while mineralizing a large part of the organic nitrogen. A previous study dealing with the biological removal of ammonia from digested manures was conducted at the Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, EPFL. It has shown that it is possible to obtain simultaneously a conversion of ammonium and nitrogen removal in a same continuously aerated aerobic reactor, using a mobile support for fixing the biomass. The obtained efficiencies were high, with 90% of the ammonium being converted of which 80% as N{sub 2}-gas. This current study proposed to test the process at pilot scale, to evaluate the transferability of the technique to a full-scale application and to determine the operating parameter. The results are as follows: (i) It is possible to obtain high nitrification and denitrification rates without pre-treating the digestat or adding a carbon source; (ii) Biochemical reactions are extremely sensitive to the oxygenation rate, which in turn is very sensitive to the liquid characteristics in the reactor, such as the dry matter content. It fairly complicates maintaining simultaneous nitrification and denitrification; (iii) At a minimum hydraulic residence time of 4 days, over 90% of the ammonium is converted and 85% of it is removed. These results provide the basic design parameters for a full-scale installation. Depending on the performance desired, it would have a volume going from 30 to 60 m{sup 3} for a 400 m{sup 3} digester. The aeration rate would be between 300

  3. Agricultural Pilot's Audiological Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foltz, Lucas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The agricultural airplane pilot are daily exposed to intense noises, being susceptible to the noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL and its auditory and extra auditory effects. Objective: To analyze the audiological profile of this population, verifying the work's influence on its hearing. Method: It was realized a retrospective, individual, observational, and cross-sectional study through the data obtained by means of a questionnaire and audiometric thresholds of 41 agricultural pilots. To the statistical analysis were utilized the chi-square, Spearman, and Wilcoxon tests with significance level of 5%. Results: It was verified that 95,1% of the pilots use PPE ( personal protective equipment during flight and 58,5% have contact with pesticides. More than half of individuals referred to feel auditory and extra auditory symptoms, being the buzz the more frequent (29,1%. It has the occurrence of 29,3% of NIHL suggestive hearing loss and 68,3% of normality, taking this presence of unilateral notch in 24,4% and bilateral notch in 31,7%. It was found correlation statistically significant in the associations between time of service and the average of the acute frequencies in the right ear (p=0038, and in the left ear (p=0,010. It has a statistical tendency in the association between audiometric configuration and contact with pesticides (p=0,088. Conclusion: The hearing loss prevalence in this study was showed high. More than half of the sample has normal audiometric thresholds with notch configuration. Such data lead to the conclusion that the agricultural pilots, even with PPE use, they still suffer with the damages caused by noise, needing best proposals of hearing loss prevention.

  4. AU-EU “Strategic Partnership”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen; Okeke, Jide

    2013-01-01

    This article appraises strategic partnership between the African Union (AU) and European Union (EU). It examines the context and nature of AU and EU security relations and explores the conditions under which partnership has a positive impact in this regard. This includes an evaluation of converge......This article appraises strategic partnership between the African Union (AU) and European Union (EU). It examines the context and nature of AU and EU security relations and explores the conditions under which partnership has a positive impact in this regard. This includes an evaluation...... of convergence between the two organizations and its effect or lack thereof on African security. The article concludes that events leading up to and initiatives following the 2007 Joint Africa–European Union Strategy have produced a degree of AU and EU convergence, which has had limited impact on the efficacy...

  5. Le curriculum scolaire au Chili

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Cristián

    2012-01-01

    L’article examine l’usage historique du terme « curriculum » au Chili. Il aborde la configuration actuelle de la prescription curriculaire nationale : des « objectifs et contenus minimums », des « programmes d’études », et des « cartes de progrès des apprentissages ». On y décrit les institutions et les processus qui rendent compte de la genèse des définitions curriculaires en vigueur en 2010. Elles sont le résultat de deux étapes de réformes caractérisées par des processus consultatifs et pa...

  6. Portraits de femmes au Biafra

    OpenAIRE

    Ugochukwu, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Cette étude considère l’impact de la guerre civile nigériane sur la vie quotidienne et les relations interpersonnelles des Biafrais telle qu’elle est présentée dans Femmes en guerre et autres nouvelles d’Achebe et Blow the Fire de Leslie Ofoegbu. Ces deux écrivains, dont l’un, déjà traduit dans plusieurs langues, a été le premier à projeter le pays igbo sur la scène internationale, et dont l’autre est une Écossaise mariée à un Nigérian et qui vécut au Biafra pendant les années de guerre, offr...

  7. Strain distributions of confined Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄红华; 章英; 刘晓山; 骆兴芳; 袁彩雷; 叶双莉

    2015-01-01

    The strain distributions of Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles confined in the Al2O3 matrix with different core sizes are investigated by using the finite element method, respectively. The simulation results clearly indicate that the compressive strains exerted on the Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles can be induced by the Al2O3 matrix. Moreover, it can be found that the strain gradient existing in a Au/Ag nanoparticle is much larger than that in a Ag/Au nanoparticle, which could be due to the larger Young’s modulus of Au than that of Ag. With the core size increasing, the strain gradient existing in the Au/Ag nanoparticle becomes larger, while the strain gradient existing in the Ag/Au nanoparticle keeps constant. These different strain distributions may have significant infl uences on the structures and morphologies of the Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles, leading to the different physical properties for potential applications.

  8. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  9. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Vinod; K.G.Gopchandran

    2014-01-01

    Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  10. Low temperature fabrication and doping concentration analysis of Au/Sb ohmic contacts to n-type Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates low temperature ohmic contact formation of Au/Sb to n-type Si substrates through AuSb/NiCr/Au metal stacks. Liquid epitaxy growth is utilized to incorporate Sb dopants into Si substrate in AuSi melt. The best specific contact resistivity achieved is 0.003 Ω ⋅ cm2 at 425 oC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals inverted pyramidal crater regions at the metal/semiconductor interface, indicating that AuSi alloying efficiently occurs at such sites. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) shows that Sb atoms are successfully incorporated into Si as doping impurities during the anneal process, and the Sb doping concentration at the contact interface is found to be higher than the solid solubility limit in a Si crystal. This ohmic contacts formation method is suitable for semiconductor fabrication processes with limited thermal budget, such as post CMOS integration of MEMS

  11. Gold nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica: origin of high activity and role of Au NPs in selective oxidation of cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pingping; Bai, Peng; Yan, Zifeng; Zhao, George X. S.

    2016-01-01

    Homogeneous immobilization of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) on mesoporous silica has been achieved by using a one-pot synthesis method in the presence of organosilane mercapto-propyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The resultant Au NPs exhibited an excellent catalytic activity in the solvent-free selective oxidation of cyclohexane using molecular oxygen. By establishing the structure-performance relationship, the origin of the high activity of mesoporous supported Au catalyst was identified to be due to the presence of low-coordinated Au (0) sites with high dispersion. Au NPs were confirmed to play a critical role in the catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane by promoting the activation of O2 molecules and accelerating the formation of surface-active oxygen species.

  12. Low temperature fabrication and doping concentration analysis of Au/Sb ohmic contacts to n-type Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J. Q.; Wang, C.; Zhu, T.; Wu, W. J. [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Fan, J.; Tu, L. C., E-mail: tlc@hust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Geophysics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-11-15

    This paper investigates low temperature ohmic contact formation of Au/Sb to n-type Si substrates through AuSb/NiCr/Au metal stacks. Liquid epitaxy growth is utilized to incorporate Sb dopants into Si substrate in AuSi melt. The best specific contact resistivity achieved is 0.003 Ω ⋅ cm{sup 2} at 425 {sup o}C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals inverted pyramidal crater regions at the metal/semiconductor interface, indicating that AuSi alloying efficiently occurs at such sites. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) shows that Sb atoms are successfully incorporated into Si as doping impurities during the anneal process, and the Sb doping concentration at the contact interface is found to be higher than the solid solubility limit in a Si crystal. This ohmic contacts formation method is suitable for semiconductor fabrication processes with limited thermal budget, such as post CMOS integration of MEMS.

  13. First-principles Study of the Au surfactant on the growth of Zn vacancies in ZnO nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亚明

    2007-01-01

    Influence of Au surfactant on the growth of Zn atom vacancies in ZnO nanostructures has been investigated by using first-principles slab calculations based on density functional theory.The adsorption of Au atoms on the Zn -terminated(0001)polar surface with a(2×2)sudace unit cell is studied by using a standard supercell model.It is found that (1)the binding energies of Au atoms on (0001)-Zn increase and the most stable position of the Au atom is invariable;(2)on the (0001)surface,the preferred sites for Zn atom vacancy are on the first layer of Zn atoms;(3)Under the Au surfactant,the Zn atom vacancies become more difficult to form.

  14. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  15. Investigation of the Phase Equilibria of Sn-Cu-Au Ternary and Ag-Sn-Cu-Au Quaternary Systems and Interfacial Reactions in Sn-Cu/Au Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yee-Wen; Jao, Chien-Chung; Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yung; Lee, Chiapyng

    2007-02-01

    The phase equilibria of the Sn-Cu-Au ternary, Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary systems and interfacial reactions between Sn-Cu alloys and Au were experimentally investigated at specific temperatures in this study. The experimental results indicated that there existed three ternary intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and a complete solid solubility between AuSn and Cu6Sn5 phases in the Sn-Cu-Au ternary system at 200°C. No quaternary IMC was found in the isoplethal section of the Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary system. Three IMCs, AuSn, AuSn2, and AuSn4, were found in all couples. The same three IMCs and (Au,Cu)Sn/(Cu,Au)6Sn5 phases were found in all Sn-Cu/Au couples. The thickness of these reaction layers increased with increasing temperature and time. The mechanism of IMC growth can be described by using the parabolic law. In addition, when the reaction time was extended and the Cu content of the alloy was increased, the AuSn4 phase disappeared gradually. The (Au, Cu)Sn and (Cu,Au)6Sn5 layers played roles as diffusion barriers against Sn in Sn-Cu/Au reaction couple systems.

  16. Fire at a dry material burial site in Pierrefonds : atmospheric emissions of pollutants and health impacts; Incendie au site d'enfouissement de materiaux secs de Pierrefonds : emissions de polluants a l'atmosphere et impacts sur la sante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausoleil, M.

    2005-05-01

    The Quebec Health Agency for the City of Montreal was asked to evaluate the health risk associated with the atmospheric emissions associated with a fire that occurred at a dry material burial site in Pierrefonds in December 2004. The fire lasted several weeks, resulting in a release of pollutants into the ambient air of a residential district located near the site. Air emission concentration measurements were taken at 3 intervals in order to evaluate the health risks that the chemical substances posed to the residents in the area. During the few hours when the fire was out of control and while flames were visible, the concentrations of aldehydes, acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and particulates in the plume of smoke were very high, causing residents to experience respiratory problems and irritations to eyes, nose and throat. However, as soon as the fire was controlled, the concentrations of these pollutants decreased quickly. Fire extinction efforts continued for several weeks. Although the concentrations of pollutants measured in the ambient air of the residential district were higher than those generally measured in this district and elsewhere on the island of Montreal, they were in the same order of magnitude as those measured occasionally in certain districts under similar circumstances. The fire was extinguished in February 2005 at which time the measured concentrations were very similar to those generally measured in the urban environment. However, the strong and unpleasant odours that persist, particularly in the evening, correspond to the high values of hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S). The Health Agency has reassured the residents that these values do not present long term health risks, but recognizes that the situation constitutes a reduction in the quality of life for the residents that can have psychosocial impacts of which the long-term repercussions are difficult to measure. refs., tabs., figs.

  17. MPI support in the DIRAC Pilot Job Workload Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Hamar, V.

    2012-12-01

    Parallel job execution in the grid environment using MPI technology presents a number of challenges for the sites providing this support. Multiple flavors of the MPI libraries, shared working directories required by certain applications, special settings for the batch systems make the MPI support difficult for the site managers. On the other hand the workload management systems with Pilot Jobs became ubiquitous although the support for the MPI applications in the Pilot frameworks was not available. This support was recently added in the DIRAC Project in the context of the GISELA Latin American Grid Initiative. Special services for dynamic allocation of virtual computer pools on the grid sites were developed in order to deploy MPI rings corresponding to the requirements of the jobs in the central task queue of the DIRAC Workload Management System. Pilot Jobs using user space file system techniques install the required MPI software automatically. The same technique is used to emulate shared working directories for the parallel MPI processes. This makes it possible to execute MPI jobs even on the sites not supporting them officially. Reusing so constructed MPI rings for execution of a series of parallel jobs increases dramatically their efficiency and turnaround. In this contribution we describe the design and implementation of the DIRAC MPI Service as well as its support for various types of MPI libraries. Advantages of coupling the MPI support with the Pilot frameworks are outlined and examples of usage with real applications are presented.

  18. MPI support in the DIRAC Pilot Job Workload Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel job execution in the grid environment using MPI technology presents a number of challenges for the sites providing this support. Multiple flavors of the MPI libraries, shared working directories required by certain applications, special settings for the batch systems make the MPI support difficult for the site managers. On the other hand the workload management systems with Pilot Jobs became ubiquitous although the support for the MPI applications in the Pilot frameworks was not available. This support was recently added in the DIRAC Project in the context of the GISELA Latin American Grid Initiative. Special services for dynamic allocation of virtual computer pools on the grid sites were developed in order to deploy MPI rings corresponding to the requirements of the jobs in the central task queue of the DIRAC Workload Management System. Pilot Jobs using user space file system techniques install the required MPI software automatically. The same technique is used to emulate shared working directories for the parallel MPI processes. This makes it possible to execute MPI jobs even on the sites not supporting them officially. Reusing so constructed MPI rings for execution of a series of parallel jobs increases dramatically their efficiency and turnaround. In this contribution we describe the design and implementation of the DIRAC MPI Service as well as its support for various types of MPI libraries. Advantages of coupling the MPI support with the Pilot frameworks are outlined and examples of usage with real applications are presented.

  19. Transferring manual ultrasonic inspection procedures - results of a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.; Taylor, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kadenko, I. [Ukraine Nondestructive Training and Certification Facility (Ukraine)

    2002-07-01

    Results of a manual ultrasonic pilot study for NDE specialists at RBMK nuclear reactor sites are presented. Probabilities of detection and false calls, using two different grading criteria, are estimated. Analyses of performance parameters lead to conclusions regarding attributes for improved test discrimination capabilities. (orig.)

  20. Tuning the spin, chirality, and adsorption site of metal-phthalocyanine on Au(111) surface with hydrogen atoms%氢原子吸附对金表面金属酞菁分子的吸附位置、自旋和手征性的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖文德; 刘立巍; 杨锴; 张礼智; 宋博群; 杜世萱; 高鸿钧

    2015-01-01

    Metal-phthalocyanines (MPcs) and their derivates have attracted increasing interest in recent years, due to their potential applications in molecular electronics, spintronics, sensors, and so on. To this end, it is essential to tune the structural, electronic and spin properties of MPcs. Using the low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), we demonstrate that the spin, chirality and adsorption site of MnPc on Au(111) surface can be tuned by hydrogen atoms. STM experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the preferential adsorption sites for the MnPc molecules may switch from the fcc regions to the hcp regions on the Au(111) surface after a hydrogen atom is adsorbed on top of the central Mn ion of each MnPc molecule. Moreover, the molecular spin decreases from S=3/2 to S =1 and the molecule-substrate coupling is weakened after the adsorption of a hydrogen atom on a MnPc molecule, leading to the quenching of Kondo effect at 4.2 K. However, the molecular spin and Kondo effect can be recovered by local voltage pulse or sample heating. Adsorption of three hydrogen atoms on a MnPc molecule not merely lowers the molecular symmetry from 4-to 2-fold, but also breaks down the mirror symmetry of the entire adsorbate complex (molecule and surface), thus rendering it to become chiral without any realignment at the surface. Dehydrogenation of the adsorbate by means of inelastic electron tunneling can also restore the mirror symmetry of the adsorbate complex. STM experiments as well as DFT calculations show that the chirality is actually imprinted into the molecular electronic system by the surface, i.e., the lowest unoccupied orbital is devoid of mirror symmetry. Our novel reversible spin and hand control scheme can be easily realized at single-molecule level, thus opening up a new avenue to broader applications based on the molecular electronic and spin states.%实现单个功能有机分子构型、电子结构和自旋态的可逆调

  1. Vibrational properties at the ordered metallic surface alloy system Au(110)-1×2-Pd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheffache, Sedik; Chadli, Rabah; Khater, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    We present a calculation for the vibrational properties of the ordered surface alloy Au(110)-1×2-Pd on a crystalline substrate of Au. The surface phonon dispersion curves and the local vibrations densities of states (LDOS) are calculated in the harmonic approximation for the system, using the phase field matching theory (PFMT) method and associated real space Green’s functions. In particular, it is shown that the surface alloy presents optic vibrational modes above the Au bulk bands, along the directions of high-symmetry ΓX¯, XS¯, SY¯ and Y Γ¯ of the corresponding two-dimensional Brillouin zone. Measurements of the surface phonon dispersion branches can hence be made by different techniques such as helium atom scattering (HAS) to compare with. The calculated LDOS for Au and Pd atomic sites in the four top surface atomic layers span a wider range of frequencies than those for the individual Au(110) or Pd(110) metallic surfaces. These LDOS provide a spectral signature for the progressive transition from the surface dynamics to that of the Au crystal bulk. Knowledge of these LDOS for the surface alloy can also serve as an input for modeling the diffusion and reaction rates of chemical species at its surface.

  2. Au nanoparticles on tryptophan-functionalized graphene for sensitive detection of dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Qianwen; Luo, Ai; An, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhuang; Guo, Yongyang; Zhang, Dongxia [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China); Xue, Zhonghua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China); Zhou, Xibin, E-mail: zhouxb@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China); Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: Luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, 730070, Lanzhou (China)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel AuNPs/Trp-GR composite was fabricated by directly electrochemical deposition. • The composite exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards DA. • The proposed method was applied to real samples. - Abstract: A novel and uniform gold nanoparticles/tryptophan-functionalized graphene nanocomposite (AuNPs/Trp-GR) has been successfully fabricated by directly electrochemical depositing gold onto the surface of tryptophan-functionalized graphene (Trp-GR). The nanostructure of AuNPs/Trp-GR was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was demonstrated that Au nanoparticles were well dispersed on the surface of Trp-GR which might attribute to the more binding sites provided by Trp-GR for the formation of Au nanoparticles. The electrocatalytic activity of the AuNPs/Trp-GR towards the dopamine (DA) was systematically investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under optimum conditions, a wide and valuable linear range (0.5–411 μM), a low detection limit (0.056 μM, S/N = 3), good repeatability and stability were obtained for the determination of DA. Furthermore, the modified electrode was successfully applied to real samples analysis.

  3. Preparation and Catalytic Activity for Aerobic Glucose Oxidation of Crown Jewel Structured Pt/Au Bimetallic Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Liqiong; Lu, Lilin; Toshima, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the “structure-activity” relations for catalysts at an atomic level has been regarded as one of the most important objectives in catalysis studies. Bimetallic nanoclusters (NCs) in its many types, such as core/shell, random alloy, cluster-in-cluster, bi-hemisphere, and crown jewel (one kind of atom locating at the top position of another kind of NC), attract significant attention owing to their excellent optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. PVP-protected crown jewel-structured Pt/Au (CJ-Pt/Au) bimetallic nanoclusters (BNCs) with Au atoms located at active top sites were synthesized via a replacement reaction using 1.4-nm Pt NCs as mother clusters even considering the fact that the replacement reaction between Pt and Au3+ ions is difficult to be occurred. The prepared CJ-Pt/Au colloidal catalysts characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, HR-TEM and HAADF-STEM-EELS showed a high catalytic activity for aerobic glucose oxidation, and the top Au atoms decorating the Pt NCs were about 15 times more active than the Au atoms of Au NCs with similar particle size.

  4. Controlled Synthesis of Au@AgAu Yolk-Shell Cuboctahedra with Well-Defined Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono-Calderon, Alejandra; Bahena, Daniel; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of Au@AgAu yolk-shell cuboctahedra nanoparticles formed by galvanic replacement in a seed-mediated method is described. Initially, single-crystal Au seeds are used for the formation of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes, which serve as the template material for the deposition of an external Au layer. The well-controlled synthesis yields the formation of cuboctahedra nanoparticles with smooth inner and outer Au/Ag surfaces. The deposition/oxidation process is described to understand the formation of cuboctahedra and octahedra nanoparticles. The Au core maintains the initial morphology of the seed and remains static at the center of the yolk-shell because of residual Ag. Structural analysis of the shell indicates intrinsic stacking faults (SFs) near the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analysis show an Au-Ag nonordered alloy forming the shell. The three-dimensional structure of the nanoparticles presented open facets on the [111] as observed by electron tomography SIRT reconstruction over a stack of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The geometrical model was validated by analyzing the direction of streaks in coherent nanobeam diffraction (NBD). The catalytic activity was evaluated using a model reaction based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NTP) by NaBH4 in the presence of Au@AgAu yolk-shell nanoparticles. PMID:27385583

  5. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-La and Au-Er binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, H.Q., E-mail: hongqun.dong@aalto.fi [Department of Electronics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, FIN-02601 Espoo (Finland); Tao, X.M. [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Liu, H.S. [Scientific Center of Phase Diagrams and Materials Design, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Laurila, T.; Paulastro-Kroeckel, M. [Department of Electronics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, FIN-02601 Espoo (Finland)

    2011-03-31

    Research highlights: > It's the first time that Au-La and Au-Er binary systems were thermodynamically assessed since 1985. > Besides, in the present work, the ab initio approach has been employed to calculate the formation enthalpies of the IMCs involved in Au-Er and Au-La binary systems, and then, by combining with all of the available experimental information, these two-system were thermodynamically optimized via CALPHAD method. Therefore, a more reliable thermodynamic description has been obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Phase relationships in Au-La and Au-Er binary systems have been thermodynamically assessed by using the CALPHAD technique. The existing thermodynamic descriptions of the systems were improved by incorporating the ab initio calculated enthalpies of formation of the intermetallic compounds, except for the Au{sub 51}La{sub 14} and Au{sub 10}Er{sub 7} phases. All the binary intermetallic compounds were treated as stoichiometric phases, while the solution phases, including liquid, fcc, bcc, and dhcp, were treated as substitutional solution phases and the excess Gibbs energies were formulated with Redlich-Kister polynomial function. As a result, two self-consist thermodynamic data sets for describing the Au-La and Au-Er binary systems were obtained.

  6. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Program (62 FR 48693). A request for participation in the Pilot Program must be initiated by the filing of... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... (SJU) preliminary application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program...

  7. Facile synthesis of Au/ZnO nanoparticles and their enhanced photocatalytic activity for hydroxylation of benzene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hang Yu; Hai Ming; Jingjing Gong; Haitao Li; Hui Huang; Keming Pan; Yang Liu; Zhenhui Kang; Jie Wei; Dongtian Wang

    2013-06-01

    Au/ZnO nanocomposites have been prepared by a simple chemical method. For the first time, the nanocomposites were directly used as photocatalysts for hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbons under UV and visible light irradiation. The results show that the as-prepared photocatalysts display high photocatalytic activity for UV and visible catalytic hydroxylation of benzene. Without the assistance of any solvent or additive, high selectivity and high conversion efficiency were still obtained. Different photocatalytic mechanisms were proposed depending on whether excitation happens on ZnO semiconductor or on the surface plasmon band of Au. The former is Au nanoparticles act as electron buffer due to irradiation by UV light and ZnO nanoparticles as reactive sites for hydroxylation of benzene, the latter is that Au nanoparticles act as light harvesters and inject electrons into ZnO conduction band and as photocatalytic sites under visible light irradiation.

  8. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ...'' (74 FR 12500), which revised the training, qualification, certification, and operating requirements... their test on the first attempt is not a change from the existing rule.'' 74 FR 42500, 42538. The use of... Administration 14 CFR Part 141 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification...

  9. Innovation et recomposition territoriale au Maroc

    OpenAIRE

    Boujrouf, Saïd

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Les processus de recomposition territoriale au Maroc se caractérisent par une dynamique continue, reflet des grands changements qui ont affecté les différents secteurs du pays au cours du xxe siècle. Le renouvellement territorial au Maroc est un processus de recomposition permanent, depuis les trames traditionnelles (qu’elles soient tribale, confessionnelle liée aux confréries ou encore « seigneuriale » caïdale) jusqu’aux maillages territoriaux les plus récents en communes et rég...

  10. Être notable au Maghreb

    OpenAIRE

    Abouhani, Abdelghani; Amri-Salameh, Nelly; Blili, Leïla; Boubrik, Rahal; Boujarra, Hussein; Cattedra, Raffaele; CATUSSE, Myriam; Cheraï, Ahmed; Ettayeb, Mahmoud; Feneyrol, Olivier; Hénia, Abdelhamid; Jaïdi, Houcine; Kenbib, Mohammed; Khouaja, Ahmed; Lafi, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Le discours dominant dans les pays du Maghreb continue de stigmatiser les figures de notables dits traditionnels au nom de la modernité. L’usage scientifique de la notion de notable n’est pas pour autant disqualifié. Le présent ouvrage s’intéresse au système élitaire au Maghreb sur la longue durée, de l’Antiquité à nos jours. Il en étudie la dynamique en rapport avec les formes historiques du pouvoir et montre comment la notabilité a pris avec le temps des figures changeantes et des nominatio...

  11. Becoming independent through au pair migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    . This article argues that, despite this critique, au pairing does play an important formative role for young Filipinas because it opens up for experiences abroad that enable them to be recognised as independent adults in Philippine society. Rather than autonomy, however, au pairs define their independence...... in terms of their capacity to assume responsibility for others, thereby achieving a position of social respect. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Denmark and the Philippines, this article explores how young Filipinas use the social, economic, and cultural resources they gain from their au pair stay abroad...

  12. Clinical evaluation of short-life radioactive source Au-198 grain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au-198 grain has been used as a new source in brachytherapy instead of Rn-seed since September 1975 in Japan. A total of 60 cases with malignant tumors of the oral cavity treated with Au-198 grain during the period of September 1975 to November 1978 were analyzed. Nineteen cases were treated with Au-198 grain alone, twenty-nine were with combined external beam therapy and the other twelve were treated as a boost implant for Radium needles or as a recurrent disease. Two-year local recurrence free rates were 78% (7/9) by Au-198 grain alone and 67% (10/15) by Au-198 grain combined with external beam therapy. The frequency of local necrosis following the combined therapy was inevitably higher than Au-198 grain alone. However, these results were somewhat better than the results obtained from treatment of tongue cancer using Rn seed with or without external beam which reported previously. An analysis was also made of the local condition of the treated area applying with the TDF values. A suitable permanent implant dose of Au-198 grain might be slightly lower than Rn seed considering from the TDF value analysis. The Au-198 grain technique seemed to be an excellent choice of treatment as far as the lesion was small or superficial enough, or the lesion was locating in the sites anatomically to be not able to apply Radium needles. The technique has also an advantage to be applicable without severe discomfort to the patient and less exposure to the operator compared to the Radium needle technique. (author)

  13. Synthesis of vinyl-terminated Au nanoprisms and nanooctahedra mediated by 3-butenoic acid: direct Au@pNIPAM fabrication with improved SERS capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Rodriguez, M A; Sanchez-Molina, M; Lucena-Serrano, A; Lucena-Serrano, C; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, B; Algarra, M; Diaz, A; Valpuesta, M; Lopez-Romero, J M; Perez-Juste, J; Contreras-Caceres, R

    2016-02-28

    Here we describe the first seedless synthesis of vinyl-terminated Au nanotriangular prisms (AuNTPs) and nanooctahedra (AuNOC) in aqueous media. This synthesis is performed by chemical reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) with 3-butenoic acid (3BA) in the presence of benzyldimethylammonium chloride (BDAC). The principal novelties of the presented method are the use of a mixture of 3BA and BDAC, the synthesis of gold prisms and octahedra with controllable size, and the presence of terminal double bonds on the metal surface. Initially this method produces a mixture of triangular gold nanoprisms and octahedra; however, both morphologies are successfully separated by surfactant micelle induced depletion interaction, reaching percentages up to ∼90%. Moreover, the alkene moieties present on the gold surface are exploited for the fabrication of hybrid core@shell particles. Gold octahedra and triangular prisms are easily encapsulated by free radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM). Finally, in order to obtain a gold core with the most number of tips, AuNTP@pNIPAM microgels were subjected to gold core overgrowth, thus resulting in star-shaped nanoparticles (AuSTs@pNIPAM). We use 4-amino-benzenethiol as the model analyte for SERS investigations. As expected, gold cores with tips and high curvature sites produced the highest plasmonic responses.

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  16. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f-oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase transformation from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) is observed upon coating the hcp Au square sheets with Pt or Pd under ambient conditions. The prepared fcc Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates demonstrate unique (101)f orientation (picture shows a typical fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplate). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Rapid Processing of Turner Designs Model 10-Au-005 Internally Logged Fluorescence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous recording of dye fluorescence using field fluorometers at selected sampling sites facilitates acquisition of real-time dye tracing data. The Turner Designs Model 10-AU-005 field fluorometer allows for frequent fluorescence readings, data logging, and easy downloading t...

  18. The Rustler Formation at the WIPP [Waste Isolations Pilot Plant] site: Report of a workshop on the geology and hydrology of the Rustler Formation as it relates to the WIPP Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop contained eight papers characterizing the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site in New Mexico. Four of these reports were processed separately for the data bases. Information contained in the four remaining papers is available in journal articles or in the reports of other conferences and included discussions of ground water flow through the Rustler Formation, the potential migration of leached radionuclides in this rock, the effects of mineral dissolution on the removal of underlying salt deposits, and a possible pathway for radionuclide migration into the biosphere

  19. SUGAR Site Gas Hydrates as a new energy source - Reconnaissance of a pilot location for the SUGAR project - Cruise No. MSM34, December 06, 2013 - January 16, 2014, Varna, Bulgaria - Varna, Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Bialas, Jörg; Klaucke, Ingo; Haeckel, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Cruise MSM34 of R/V MARIA S. MERIAN aimed to investigate a possible test site location for the German SUGAR project. The well sealed gas hydrate deposit should be accessible by the mobile drilling device MeBo 200. During the two legs of cruise MSM34 of R/V MARIA S. MERIAN regional 2D seismic surveying, high resolution 2D and 3D seismic imaging, geo-chemical sampling, heatflow measurements and long-term piezometer installations were undertaken. A grid of 28 2D seismic profiles was collected ac...

  20. Pilot factory - a Condor-based system for scalable Pilot Job generation in the Panda WMS framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Po-Hsiang; Potekhin, Maxim

    2010-04-01

    The Panda Workload Management System is designed around the concept of the Pilot Job - a "smart wrapper" for the payload executable that can probe the environment on the remote worker node before pulling down the payload from the server and executing it. Such design allows for improved logging and monitoring capabilities as well as flexibility in Workload Management. In the Grid environment (such as the Open Science Grid), Panda Pilot Jobs are submitted to remote sites via mechanisms that ultimately rely on Condor-G. As our experience has shown, in cases where a large number of Panda jobs are simultaneously routed to a particular remote site, the increased load on the head node of the cluster, which is caused by the Pilot Job submission, may lead to overall lack of scalability. We have developed a Condor-inspired solution to this problem, which is using the schedd-based glidein, whose mission is to redirect pilots to the native batch system. Once a glidein schedd is installed and running, it can be utilized exactly the same way as local schedds and therefore, from the user's perspective, Pilots thus submitted are quite similar to jobs submitted to the local Condor pool.

  1. Pilot factory - a Condor-based system for scalable Pilot Job generation in the Panda WMS framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Panda Workload Management System is designed around the concept of the Pilot Job - a 'smart wrapper' for the payload executable that can probe the environment on the remote worker node before pulling down the payload from the server and executing it. Such design allows for improved logging and monitoring capabilities as well as flexibility in Workload Management. In the Grid environment (such as the Open Science Grid), Panda Pilot Jobs are submitted to remote sites via mechanisms that ultimately rely on Condor-G. As our experience has shown, in cases where a large number of Panda jobs are simultaneously routed to a particular remote site, the increased load on the head node of the cluster, which is caused by the Pilot Job submission, may lead to overall lack of scalability. We have developed a Condor-inspired solution to this problem, which is using the schedd-based glidein, whose mission is to redirect pilots to the native batch system. Once a glidein schedd is installed and running, it can be utilized exactly the same way as local schedds and therefore, from the user's perspective, Pilots thus submitted are quite similar to jobs submitted to the local Condor pool.

  2. Governing the morphology of Pt-Au heteronanocrystals with improved electrocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Chirea, Mariana; Zanaga, Daniele; Altantzis, Thomas; Mitrakas, Manasis; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Platinum-gold heteronanostructures comprising either dimer (Pt-Au) or core-satellite (Pt@Au) configurations were synthesized by means of a seeded growth procedure using platinum nanodendrites as seeds. Careful control of the reduction kinetics of the gold precursor can be used to direct the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles on either one or multiple surface sites simultaneously, leading to the formation of either dimers or core-satellite nanoparticles, respectively, in high yields. Characterization by electron tomography and high resolution electron microscopy provided a better understanding of the actual three-dimensional particle morphology, as well as the Au-Pt interface, revealing quasi-epitaxial growth of Au on Pt. The prepared Pt-Au bimetallic nanostructures are highly efficient catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution, showing accurate selectivity, high sensitivity, and improved efficiency by generating higher current densities than their monometallic counterparts.Platinum-gold heteronanostructures comprising either dimer (Pt-Au) or core-satellite (Pt@Au) configurations were synthesized by means of a seeded growth procedure using platinum nanodendrites as seeds. Careful control of the reduction kinetics of the gold precursor can be used to direct the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles on either one or multiple surface sites simultaneously, leading to the formation of either dimers or core-satellite nanoparticles, respectively, in high yields. Characterization by electron tomography and high resolution electron microscopy provided a better understanding of the actual three-dimensional particle morphology, as well as the Au-Pt interface, revealing quasi-epitaxial growth of Au on Pt. The prepared Pt-Au bimetallic nanostructures are highly efficient catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution, showing accurate selectivity, high sensitivity, and improved efficiency by generating higher current densities than their

  3. Propylene epoxidation over biogenic Au/TS-1 catalysts by Cinnamomum camphora extract in the presence of H2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingming; Huang, Jiale; Sun, Daohua; Li, Qingbiao

    2016-03-01

    The Au/TS-1 catalysts with different Au nanoparticles (NPs) sizes ranging from 3.1 to 8.4 nm but the same Au loading of 0.5 wt% were prepared by Cinnamomum camphora (CC) extract, and were used for propylene epoxidation. The results showed that the interaction between Au and TS-1 support surface is important for propylene epoxidation and much smaller Au NPs (<3 nm) are the dominant active sites. After reaction of 100 h, there is no decreasing in both the activity and the PO selectivity for the Au/TS-1 catalysts, and only 1.8 wt% of the carbonaceous deposits on the surface of the catalyst after reaction, suggesting that the desorption of the product from the modified catalysts surface by residual biomolecules is much easier.

  4. Et pourquoi pas au CERN ?

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Télétravail ou travail à distance, aménagement des horaires de travail et autres évolutions favorables à un meilleur équilibre vie privée et vie professionnelle sont adoptés par nombre d’entreprises et d’organisations !   Rendu possible grâce au développement de nouvelles technologies dont Internet, le travail à distance séduit de plus en plus de personnels, ainsi que de plus en plus de sociétés qui y trouvent des avantages en matière de gestion de l’espace, de sécurité (moins de trajets domicile-entreprise), de développement durable (moins de pollution), de motivation et de bien-être de leurs personnels. Les horaires aménagés, voire les « core-hours1 », sont également des pratiques de plus e...

  5. Longitudinal scaling of net-protons in AuAu and pp collisions at RHIC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Flemming

    2008-10-01

    BRAHMS has studied net-protons distributions in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Net-proton distributions reflect the net-baryon yields and can be used to extract the nuclear stopping in the collisions, thus providing information on baryon number transport and energy available for particle production. The talk will present final and preliminary results from the above mentioned systems. It will be shown that in p+p and in Au+Au central collisions that net-proton distributions exhibit longitudinal scaling once the target contribution to the projectile rapidity range is corrected for. The difference between p+p and Au+Au will be discussed. Aspects of future measurements at the LHC of net-baryons at mid-rapidity will be brought forth.

  6. Studying of the photoluminescence characteristics of Au(0)@Au(I)-thiolate core–shell nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoluminescence characteristics of Au(0)@Au(I)-thiolate Core–shell nanoclusters (Au-NCs), whose size is <2 nm, are investigated. We use the time-resolved single-photon counting technique and the transient absorption technique to distinguish the mechanism of the photoluminescence of Au-NCs. The dynamic spectral data show that the photoluminescence mechanism should be composed of the fluorescence and the phosphorescence. Meanwhile, Au-NCs have the aggregation induced photoluminescence enhancement property, which is attributed to the suppression of conversion from the singlet state to triplet state when they aggregated together. In addition, the photoluminescence characteristics of aggregated Au-NCs should be further improved through infiltrating them into photonic crystals

  7. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  8. Direct methods determination of the Si(111)-(6x6)Au surface structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grozea, D.; Landree, E.; Marks, L.D.;

    1998-01-01

    The atomic structure of the Au 6 x 6 on Si(111) phase has been determined using direct methods and surface X-ray diffraction data. This surface structure is very complicated, with 14 independent gold atoms, relaxations in 24 independent silicon sites and three partially occupied gold sites. In on...... the gold structures in the coverage range 0.8-1.5 monolayers as pseudo-glasses with strong short-range order but varying degrees of long-range order. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......The atomic structure of the Au 6 x 6 on Si(111) phase has been determined using direct methods and surface X-ray diffraction data. This surface structure is very complicated, with 14 independent gold atoms, relaxations in 24 independent silicon sites and three partially occupied gold sites. In one...

  9. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  10. Site-selective nanoscale-polymerization of pyrrole on gold nanoparticles via plasmon induced charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Furukawa, Y; Ishida, T; Yamada, S

    2016-04-28

    We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs.

  11. Electrical conduction through self-assembled monolayers in molecular junctions: Au/molecules/Au versus Au/molecule/PEDOT:PSS/Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We fabricated and characterized a large number of octanedithiol (denoted as DC8) molecular devices as vertical metal-molecule-metal structure with or without using an intermediate conducting polymer layer of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) stabilized with poly(4-styenesulfonic acid) (called as PEDOT:PSS). The electronic transport properties of DC8 molecular devices with and without PEDOT:PSS layer were statistically compared in terms of current density and device yield. The yields of the working molecular devices were found to be ∼ 1.75% (84 out of 4800 devices) for Au/DC8/Au junctions and ∼ 58% (74 out of 128 devices) for Au-DC8/PEDOT:PSS/Au junctions. The tunneling decay constants were obtained with the Simmons tunneling model and a multibarrier tunneling model for two kinds of molecular devices with and without PEDOT:PSS layer.

  12. Feasibility of Seismic Monitoring at a Potential CO2 Injection Test Site in the Paris Basin Évaluation des apports de la sismique à la surveillance d’un test d’injection de CO2 sur un site pilote potentiel du Bassin de Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becquey M.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Seismic effects of the injection of CO2 into a partially depleted oil field have been evaluated. Seismic modelling yields small time-lapse effects, including 0.4 ms time-shifts and 4 to 6% amplitude variations at the top and bottom of the reservoir. Amplitude variations at the reservoir level should be slightly larger at large incidence angles, but wave equation modelling shows that picking these reflections will not be easy, because of the presence of shear waves generated at upper interfaces. In-situ fracturation generates azimuthal anisotropy with velocity and amplitude variations with the propagation direction. These variations bear some information about the crack density, about the relation between the fracture nets and the porous medium, and about the fluid content in the pores and fractures. All these effects are however weak and their measurement requires careful seismic data acquisition and processing. Les effets sismiques de l’injection de dioxyde de carbone dans un gisement de petrole deplete ont fait l’objet d’une simulation. Ces effets sont faibles. On peut s’attendre a une variation des temps d’arrivee des reflexions sur des interfaces situees en dessous des reservoirs, de l’ordre de la demi-milliseconde, et a une variation d’amplitude au toit et au mur du reservoir de l’ordre de 6 %. La variation d’amplitude sera legerement plus forte pour les reflexions a grand deport, mais le pointe des reflexions et la mesure des amplitudes seront probablement plus difficiles, en raison de la presence d’ondes converties. La mesure de l’anisotropie azimutale, due a la presence de fractures, peut nous donner des informations sur l’etat de fracturation du reservoir et sur la connexion entre ces fractures et la matrice poreuse. La mesure de ces variations subtiles necessitera une acquisition soignee et un traitement precautionneux des donnees.

  13. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  14. Proton channeling in Au at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic energy loss for low velocity protons channeled in the direction single crystal Au is calculated. The spatial distribution of valence electronic density in Au is calculated using Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Method. The proton trajectories are determined by numerical integration of the classical motion equation, and the energy loss is evaluated using the calculated valence electronic density in the friction term. The results allow to describe qualitatively the non linear behavior of energy loss with ion velocity observed experimentally. (author)

  15. Surface structures of Au-Pt bimetallic nanoclusters on thin film Al2O3/NiAl(100) probed with CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. D.; Hong, T. C.; Liao, T. W.; Luo, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    With infrared reflection absorption spectra and temperature-programmed desorption of CO as a probe molecule, we investigated the surface structure of Au-Pt bimetallic nanoclusters on thin-film Al2O3/NiAl(100) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Vapor Au and Pt (0.0-2.0 ML) were sequentially deposited onto Al2O3/NiAl(100) at 300 K to form bimetallic clusters; under the kinetic constraint, the order of the metal deposition made a variation in the surface structure of the grown clusters. For the deposition of Au onto Pt clusters (first Pt and then Au), the deposited Au decorated preferentially and then aggregated the edge sites of Pt clusters, instead of decorating the rest of Pt surface. For the metal deposition in the reverse order, the deposited Pt covered uniformly the surface of existing Au clusters and no preferential adsorption site was indicated. The infrared absorption for CO on Au sites was significantly enhanced when alloying occurred; this enhancement is primarily a local field effect depending on the coordination of CO-binding Au, and hence provides additional structural characterization of the grown clusters.

  16. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna Trzeciakiewicz; Jose Esteves-Villanueva; Rania Soudy; Kamaljit Kaur; Sanela Martic-Milne

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto t...

  17. Unravelling Thiol’s Role in Directing Asymmetric Growth of Au Nanorod–Au Nanoparticle Dimers

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-12-15

    Asymmetric nanocrystals have practical significance in nanotechnologies but present fundamental synthetic challenges. Thiol ligands have proven effective in breaking the symmetric growth of metallic nanocrystals but their exact roles in the synthesis remain elusive. Here, we synthesized an unprecedented Au nanorod-Au nanoparticle (AuNR-AuNP) dimer structure with the assistance of a thiol ligand. On the basis of our experimental observations, we unraveled for the first time that the thiol could cause an inhomogeneous distribution of surface strains on the seed crystals as well as a modulated reduction rate of metal precursors, which jointly induced the asymmetric growth of monometallic dimers. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  18. Apprentissages techniques : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGES TECHNIQUES GESTION ET DEVELOPPEMENT DU PERSONNEL HR/PMD L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 7 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L'apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9ème du Cycle d'orientation genevois (3ème en France) • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgiqu...

  19. Evidence of final-state suppression of high-p{_ T} hadrons in Au + Au collisions using d + Au measurements at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with pT 2 GeV/c). In contrast, the d + Au nuclear modification factor exhibits no suppression of the high-pT yields. These measurements suggest a large energy loss of the high-pT particles in the highly interacting medium created in the central Au + Au collisions. The lack of suppression in d + Au collisions suggests that it is unlikely that initial state effects can explain the suppression in the central Au + Au collisions. PACS: 25.75.-q

  20. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    CERN Document Server

    Stagni, F; McNab, A; Luzzi, C

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be s...

  1. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  2. Art rupestre préhistorique au Yémen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel-Alain Garcia

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Afin de compléter notre documentation, nous avions projeté pour cette année une courte mission à Saada sur les sites déjà étudiés les années passées. C'est le récit d'un militaire ayant séjourné dans le wadi Nushur qui nous a décidé à entreprendre une prospection nouvelle dans ce secteur au nord-ouest de la grande zone ornée de Saada, sur la route menant à Kifa. Notre espoir de trouver un nouveau site n'a pas été déçu car dans un affluent du Nushur, le wadi Gulat, nous avons découvert une sér...

  3. Le Mégalithisme au Yémen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Steimer-Herbet

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Nécropole de Jabal Ruwaik (YémenLes comptes rendus d’explorations, de missions archéologiques, de fouilles, font état de nombreux monuments funéraires mégalithiques dont l’étude reste encore très sommaire. Cette année deux missions françaises au Yémen, l’une dans le cadre d’une prospection systématique des sites de la période islamique sur les côtes du Hadramawt et du Mahra, et l’autre suivant un programme de prospection recherchant principalement des sites de l’âge du Bronze dans les région...

  4. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance study on Au-supported Pt adlayers for electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol in alkaline solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Underpotential deposition(UPD) of Cu on an Au electrode followed by redox replacement reaction(RRR) of CuUPD with a Pt source(H2PtCl6 or K2PtCl4) yielded Au-supported Pt adlayers(for short,Pt(CuUPD-Pt4+)n/Au for H2PtCl6,or Pt(CuUPD-Pt2+)n/Au for K2PtCl4,where n denotes the number of UPD-redox replacement cycles).The electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance(EQCM) technique was used for the first time to quantitatively study the fabricated electrodes and estimate their mass-normalized specific electrocatalytic activity(SECA) for methanol oxidation in alkaline solution.In comparison with Pt(CuUPD-Pt2+)n/Au,Pt(CuUPD-Pt4+)n/Au exhibited a higher electrocatalytic activity,and the maximum SECA was obtained to be as high as 35.7 mA ?g?1 at Pt(CuUPD-Pt4+)3/Au.The layer-by-layer architecture of Pt atoms on Au is briefly discussed based on the EQCM-revealed redox replacement efficiency,and the calculated distribution percentages of bare Au sites agree with the experimental results deduced from the charge under the AuOx-reduction peaks.The EQCM is highly recommended as an efficient technique to quantitatively examine various electrode-supported catalyst adlayers,and the highly efficient catalyst adlayers of noble metals are promising in electrocatalysis relevant to biological,energy and environmental sciences and technologies.

  5. 76 FR 54095 - Pilot in Command Proficiency Check and Other Changes to the Pilot and Pilot School Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ...) published on August 31, 2009, (74 FR 44779) included 16 proposed changes to the FAA's existing pilot, flight... Nos. 61-128, 91-324, 141-15, and 142-7] RIN 2120-AJ18 Pilot in Command Proficiency Check and Other Changes to the Pilot and Pilot School Certification Rules AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  6. Suppression of ϒ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report measurements of ϒ meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ϒ yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for ϒ(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of RdAu=0.79±0.24(stat.)±0.03(syst.)±0.10(p+p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of RAA=0.49±0.1(stat.)±0.02(syst.)±0.06(p+psyst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state ϒ mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made

  7. Monodisperse Au nanoparticles for selective electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenlei; Michalsky, Ronald; Metin, Önder; Lv, Haifeng; Guo, Shaojun; Wright, Christopher J; Sun, Xiaolian; Peterson, Andrew A; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-11-13

    We report selective electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide on gold nanoparticles (NPs) in 0.5 M KHCO3 at 25 °C. Among monodisperse 4, 6, 8, and 10 nm NPs tested, the 8 nm Au NPs show the maximum Faradaic efficiency (FE) (up to 90% at -0.67 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE). Density functional theory calculations suggest that more edge sites (active for CO evolution) than corner sites (active for the competitive H2 evolution reaction) on the Au NP surface facilitates the stabilization of the reduction intermediates, such as COOH*, and the formation of CO. This mechanism is further supported by the fact that Au NPs embedded in a matrix of butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate for more efficient COOH* stabilization exhibit even higher reaction activity (3 A/g mass activity) and selectivity (97% FE) at -0.52 V (vs RHE). The work demonstrates the great potentials of using monodisperse Au NPs to optimize the available reaction intermediate binding sites for efficient and selective electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to CO.

  8. First-principles study toward CO adsorption on Au/Ni surface alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu Cheng; Du, Jin Yan; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Su Fan

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of a second metal, gold, into a nickel matrix can effectively improve the catalytic performance and thermal stability of the catalysts toward steam reforming of methane. To investigate the effect of Au on the adsorption properties and electronic structure of the Ni(111) surface, we chose CO as a probe molecule and examined CO adsorption on various Au/Ni surfaces. It was revealed that Au addition weakened the absorbate-substrate interactions on the Ni(111) surface. With increasing gold concentration, the binding energy declines further. The variation of the binding energies has been interpreted by exploring the electronic structure of surface nickel atoms. The effect of gold can be quantitatively characterized by the slopes of the fitting equations between the binding energy and the number of gold atoms surrounding the adsorption site. Our results show that the binding energy at top sites can be approximately estimated by counting the number of surrounding gold atoms. On one specific surface, the relative magnitude of the binding energy can be simply judged by the distance between gold and the geometrical center of the adsorption site. This empirical rule holds true for C, H, and O adsorption on the Au/Ni surface. It may be applicable to a system in which a doped atom of larger atomic size is incorporated into the host metal surface by forming a surface alloy. PMID:23047643

  9. Addressing the Pilot security problem with gLExec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfiligoi, I.; /Fermilab; Koeroo, O.; Venekamp, G.; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Yocum, D.; /Fermilab; Groep, D.; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Petravick, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The Grid security mechanisms were designed under the assumption that users would submit their jobs directly to the Grid gatekeepers. Many groups are however starting to use pilot-based infrastructures, where users submit jobs to a centralized queue and are successively transferred to the Grid resources by the pilot infrastructure. While this approach greatly improves the user experience, it does introduce several security and policy issues, the more serious being the lack of system level protection between the users and the inability for Grid sites to apply fine grained authorization policies. One possible solution to the problem is provided by gLExec, a X.509 aware suexec derivative. By using gLExec, the pilot workflow becomes as secure as any traditional one.

  10. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  11. Automatic Pilot For Flight-Test Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Jones, Frank P.; Roncoli, Ralph B.

    1992-01-01

    Autopilot replaces pilot during automatic maneuvers. Pilot, based on ground, flies aircraft to required altitude, then turns control over to autopilot. Increases quality of maneuvers significantly beyond that attainable through remote manual control by pilot on ground. Also increases quality of maneuvers because it performs maneuvers faster than pilot could and because it does not have to repeat poorly executed maneuvers.

  12. 49 CFR 230.110 - Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilots. 230.110 Section 230.110 Transportation... and Equalizing System § 230.110 Pilots. (a) General provisions. Pilots shall be securely attached... clearance. The minimum clearance of pilot above the rail shall be 3 inches and the maximum clearance...

  13. 77 FR 67433 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... CA Pilot Program (76 FR 9626). The CA Pilot Program was introduced to increase the number of SBA... FR 56262). SBA continues to refine and improve the design of the CA Pilot Program and, on February 8... 18, 2011 Federal Register Notice introducing the CA Pilot Program (76 FR 9626), SBA required all...

  14. 76 FR 56262 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... Community Advantage Pilot Program (``CA Pilot Program'') (76 FR 9626). Pursuant to the authority provided to... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice of change to Community Advantage Pilot Program. SUMMARY: On February 18, 2011, SBA published a...

  15. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A person who is a military pilot or former military... airline transport pilot certification level; and (2) Has passed an official U.S. military pilot check and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military...

  16. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Trzeciakiewicz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides.

  17. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-). The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  18. Identified particles in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Wosiek, Barbara; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The yields of identified particles have been measured at RHIC for Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV using the PHOBOS spectrometer. The ratios of antiparticle to particle yields near mid-rapidity are presented. The first measurements of the invariant yields of charged pions, kaons and protons at very low transverse momenta are also shown.

  19. Strangelet search in Au+Au collisions at VsNN=200 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Benedosso, F.; Botje, M.A.J.; Grebenyuk, O.; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; Russcher, M.J.; Snellings, R.J.M.; van der Kolk, N.

    2007-01-01

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4%) Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order ⩾0.1 n

  20. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fauad Rami

    2003-05-01

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed.

  1. EVENT STRUCTURE AT RHIC FROM P-P TO AU-AU.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRAINOR,T.A.; (FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION)

    2004-03-15

    Several correlation analysis techniques are applied to p-p and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. Strong large-momentum-scale correlations are observed which can be related to local charge and momentum conservation during hadronization and to minijet (minimum-bias parton fragment) correlations.

  2. Study of Au+Au relativistic collisions with the Fopi-Phase I detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au+Au relativistic collisions, in a 100-1000 MeV energy domain per nucleon, are described. Experiments have been carried out with the SIS accelerator at GSI/Darmstadt. Data are analysed with the FOPI-phase I detector. These data are compared with IQMD model (Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics) Predictions. (S.G). 80 refs., 77 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) was authorized by Public Law 96-164 to provide a research and development facility for demonstrating the safe permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes from national defense activities and programs of the United States exempted from regulations by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico near Carlsbad, was constructed to determine the efficacy of an underground repository for disposal of TRU wastes. In accordance with the 1981 and 1990 Records of Decision (ROD), the development of the WIPP was to proceed with a phased approach. Development of the WIPP began with a siting phase, during which several sites were evaluated and the present site selected based on extensive geotechnical research, supplemented by testing. The site and preliminary design validation phase (SPDV) followed the siting phase, during which two shafts were constructed, an underground testing area was excavated, and various geologic, hydrologic, and other geotechnical features were investigated. The construction phase followed the SPDV phase during which surface structures for receiving waste were built and underground excavations were completed for waste emplacement

  5. An evaluation of the management system verification pilot at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Management System (CMS), currently under development at Hanford, was used as the ''test program'' for pilot testing the value added aspects of the Chemical Manufacturers Association's (CMA) Management Systems Verification (MSV) process. The MSV process, which was developed by CMA's member chemical companies specifically as a tool to assist in the continuous improvement of environment, safety and health (ESH) performance, represents a commercial sector ''best practice'' for evaluating ESH management systems. The primary purpose of Hanford's MSV Pilot was to evaluate the applicability and utility of the MSV process in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment. However, because the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is the framework for ESH management at Hanford and at all DOE sites, the pilot specifically considered the MSV process in the context of a possible future adjunct to Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) efforts at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex. The pilot involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with four separate panels of individuals with functional responsibilities related to the CMS including the Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL), Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and FDH's major subcontractors (MSCS). A semi-structured interview process was employed by the team of three ''verifiers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels regarding the development, integration and effectiveness of management systems necessary to ensure the sustainability of the CMS effort. An ''MSV Pilot Effectiveness Survey'' also was completed by each panel participant immediately following the interview

  6. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhenjun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL; Tysoe, Wilfred [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  7. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  8. Alkaline earth-gold-aluminides. Synthesis and structure of SrAu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, SrAu{sub 2.83}Al{sub 2.17}, BaAu{sub 2.89}Al{sub 2.11} and BaAu{sub 7.09}Al{sub 5.91}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Birgit; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2015-07-01

    New alkaline earth-gold-aluminides were synthesized from the elements in sealed tantalum or quartz ampoules in muffle furnaces at maximum annealing temperatures of 1325 K. The structures were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data. SrAu{sub 3}Al{sub 2} crystallizes in an ordered version of the LT-SrZn{sub 5} structure: Pnma, a = 1315.9(3), b = 549.0(1), c = 684.5(3) pm, wR2 = 0.0232, 930 F{sup 2} values, 35 variables. SrAu{sub 2.83}Al{sub 2.17} (a = 1065.0(2), b = 845.0(2), c = 548.1(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0416, 452 F{sup 2} values, 22 variables) and BaAu{sub 2.89}Al{sub 2.11} (a = 1096.1(3), b = 835.7(3), c = 554.0(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0280, 501 F{sup 2} values, 22 variables) both adopt the BaZn{sub 5} type, space group Cmcm with Au/Al mixing on the 4c site. The gold and aluminum atoms in both types form three-dimensional networks of condensed tetrahedra with the strontium and barium atoms in large cavities. BaAu{sub 7.09}Al{sub 5.91} is a new member of the NaZn{sub 13} type: Fm anti 3c, a = 1257.6(2) pm, wR2 = 0.0267, 168 F{sup 2} values, 12 variables. Both the 96i and 8b sites show Au/Al mixing. The crystal chemical details are discussed.

  9. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S

    2013-01-01

    The transverse momentum (p_T) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (\\pi^+/-, K^+/-, p, p^bar) produced in sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to p_T=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to p_T=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate p_T region, between 2--5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon to meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions, and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The p_T dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

  10. Open Heavy Flavor Production in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X

    2006-01-01

    PHENIX results for open charm production from semi-lepton decay in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions in a wide rapidity ranges at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200$ GeV are presented. Keywords: Relativistic Heavy-ion Collision, Open Charm production, Nuclear Medium Effect PACS: 25.75.-q, 25.75 Dw, 13.20.Gd

  11. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2013-08-01

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (π±, K±, p, p¯) produced in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to pT=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to pT=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate pT region, between 2 and 5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon-to-meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The pT-dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

  12. An intermetallic Au24Ag20 superatom nanocluster stabilized by labile ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Gell, Lars; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-04-01

    An intermetallic nanocluster containing 44 metal atoms, Au24Ag20(2-SPy)4(PhC≡C)20Cl2, was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal analysis and density funtional theory computations. The 44 metal atoms in the cluster are arranged as a concentric three-shell Au12@Ag20@Au12 Keplerate structure having a high symmetry. For the first time, the co-presence of three different types of anionic ligands (i.e., phenylalkynyl, 2-pyridylthiolate, and chloride) was revealed on the surface of metal nanoclusters. Similar to thiolates, alkynyls bind linearly to surface Au atoms using their σ-bonds, leading to the formation of two types of surface staple units (PhC≡C-Au-L, L = PhC≡C(-) or 2-pyridylthiolate) on the cluster. The co-presence of three different surface ligands allows the site-specific surface and functional modification of the cluster. The lability of PhC≡C(-) ligands on the cluster was demonstrated, making it possible to keep the metal core intact while removing partial surface capping. Moreover, it was found that ligand exchange on the cluster occurs easily to offer various derivatives with the same metal core but different surface functionality and thus different solubility.

  13. Relative Distribution of Au48+~Au52+ in Au Plasma by Ionization Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUZhi-Yan; ZHUZheng-He; JIANGGang

    2003-01-01

    The present work proposes a theoretical method called ionization dynamics to derive the ionic charge state distribution. Using relativistic quantum mechanics to calculate the energy level lifetime and average ionic lifetime of each ion, the first-order ionization rate constant can be obtained. Based on these data, from the solution of differential equations for consecutive-irreversible ionization reactions, one will be able to derive the ionic charge state distribution.The calculated average positive charge 49.24 of Au48+ ~ Au52+ and their relative distribution are in good agreement with the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  14. Polymerase chain reaction of Au nanoparticle-bound primers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hebai; HU Min; YANG Zhongnan; WANG Chen; ZHU Longzhang

    2005-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a useful technique for in vitro amplification of a DNA fragment. In this paper, a PCR procedure using Au nanoparticle (AuNP) -bound primers was systemically studied. The 5′-SH- (CH2)6-modified primers were covalently attached to the AuNP surface via Au-S bonds, and plasmid pBluescript SK was used as a template. The effects of the concentration of AuNP-bound primers, annealing temperature and PCR cycles were evaluated, respectively. The results indicate that PCR can proceed successfully under optimized condition, with either forward or reverse primers bound to the AuNP surface or with both the two primers bound to the AuNP surface. Development of PCR procedure based on AuNPs not only makes the isolation of PCR products very convenient, but also provides novel methods to prepare AuNP-bound ssDNA and nanostructured material.

  15. Engineering the strain in graphene layers with Au decoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannu, Compesh, E-mail: compesh@gmail.com; Singh, Udai B.; Kumar, Sunil; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Avasthi, D.K., E-mail: dka4444@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    Graphene sheets decorated with Au nanodots are synthesized by deposition of Au of three different thicknesses and subsequent annealing at 400 °C. Different thicknesses of Au film for the formation of Au nanodots on graphene are measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and morphology is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy indicates 3–6-fold increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio depending on the content of Au deposited on graphene. The increase in disorder in Au decorated graphene layers is explained on the basis of interaction of Au atoms with Π bonds of graphene. The splitting and blueshift in G band signifies compressive strain in Au deposited graphene. X-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation source confirm compressive strain in graphene, which increases with increase of Au film thickness.

  16. Rockfish Pilot Permit Program (RPP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rockfish Pilot Program was a five-year project that allowed harvesters to form voluntary cooperatives and receive an exclusive harvest privilege for groundfish...

  17. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  18. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelo, T.E., E-mail: tenovelo@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua, Chihuahua Mexico (Mexico); Amézaga-Madrid, P. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua, Chihuahua Mexico (Mexico); Maldonado, R.D. [Universidad Anáhuac-Mayab, Carretera Mérida-Progreso Km. 15.5 A.P. 96-Cordemex, CP. 97310 Mérida, Yucatán Mexico (Mexico); Oliva, A.I. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados el IPN Unidad Mérida, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Km 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán Mexico (Mexico); Alonzo-Medina, G.M. [Universidad Anáhuac-Mayab, Carretera Mérida-Progreso Km. 15.5 A.P. 96-Cordemex, CP. 97310 Mérida, Yucatán Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-03-15

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} and Au{sub 3}Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au{sub 3}Cu and Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation.

  19. First principle calculations of nitric oxide on metallic Pt (1 1 1) and Pt (1 0 0), and bimetallic Au/Pt (1 1 1) and Au/Pt (1 0 0) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The chemisorption of NO on Pt (1 1 1), Pt (1 0 0), Au/Pt (1 1 1) and Au/Pt (1 0 0) has been investigated. • The adsorptive position of NO on metal surface has been discussed. • The interaction between NO and metal surface is mainly NO 5σ/2π* and metal d-bands. • Different compositions and facets can produce varied catalytic effects. - Abstract: The chemisorption of NO on pure Pt (1 1 1) and Pt (1 0 0), bimetallic Au/Pt (1 1 1) and Au/Pt (1 0 0) surfaces has been investigated using the pseudo-potential plane-wave method within the generalized-gradient approximation density functional theory (GGA + DFT). The results show that different surfaces have various effects on the adsorption of NO. NO tends to be adsorbed on site coordinated with more Pt atoms, and the substitution number of the top-layer Pt by Au atoms affect the d-band center and adsorption energy. The local density of states of various surfaces are calculated. With the increasing atomic number of surface Au, the d-band center moves away from the Fermi level, and the adsorption energies decrease. The further electronic states analysis reveals that the interaction between NO and metal surfaces is mainly via the hybridization of NO 5σ/2π* orbitals and metal d-bands. And when the top-layer concentrations of Au are equal, Au/Pt (1 0 0) exhibits better catalytic toward NO adsorption than Au/Pt (1 1 1). It indicates that different compositions and facets can produce varied catalytic effects

  20. Plasmonic Au islands on polymer nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoben, Wout; Brongersma, Sywert H; Crego-Calama, Mercedes, E-mail: wout.knoben@imec-nl.nl [Holst Centre/IMEC, High Tech Campus 31, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-07-22

    The refractive index sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance sensors can be improved by placing the plasmonic metal particles on pillars instead of on a planar substrate. In this paper, a simple and versatile colloidal lithography method for the fabrication of plasmonic Au islands on top of polymer nanopillars is described. The pillar height is controlled by varying the thickness of the initial polymer film. An increased pillar height results in a blue shift of the absorption spectrum of the Au islands. This is explained by a decreased effective refractive index around the islands. For pillars higher than approximately 40 nm no further blue shift is observed, in agreement with the decay length of the electromagnetic field around the islands. Pillar-supported Au islands were also fabricated on a flexible foil, demonstrating the potential of the method described here for the fabrication of flexible plasmonic substrates. Benefits and limitations of the method and of using polymers as the pillar material are discussed.

  1. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  2. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  3. Violence et ordre politique au Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Fourchard, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    International audience De nombreuses analyses ont associé le retour d'un régime civil au Nigeria en 1999 au développement d'organisations armées privées et au regain de conflits dits religieux, inter-ethniques ou communautaires. L'application controversée de la charia dans douze Etats du nord et les actions de guérilla dans la région pétrolière du delta ont ainsi largement focalisé l'attention des médias. Le retour de la " démocratie " témoignerait-t-il d'un déclin de l'Etat ? Ces violence...

  4. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales Perez, M; Delgado Macuil, R; Rojas Lopez, M; Gayou, V L [Centro de Investigacion en BiotecnologIa Aplicada del IPN, Tepetitla Tlaxcala Mexico C.P. 90700 (Mexico); Sanchez Ramirez, J F, E-mail: mrosalespe@ipn.m [CICATA Legaria Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm{sup -1} due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  5. A complete remediation process for a uranium-contaminated site and application to other sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer of 1996 the authors were able to test, at the pilot scale, the concept of leaching uranium (U) from contaminated soils. The results of this pilot scale operation showed that the system they previously had developed at the laboratory scale is applicable at the pilot scale. The paper discusses these results, together with laboratory scale results using soil from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Ohio. These FEMP results show how, with suitable adaptations, the process is widely applicable to other sites. The purpose of this paper is to describe results that demonstrate remediation of uranium-contaminated soils may be accomplished through a leach scheme using sodium bicarbonate

  6. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  7. A velocity map imaging study of gold-rare gas complexes: Au-Ar, Au-Kr, and Au-Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, W. Scott; Woodham, Alex P.; Plowright, Richard J.; Wright, Timothy G.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2010-06-01

    The ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the gold-rare gas atom van der Waals complexes (Au-RG, RG=Ar, Kr, and Xe) have been studied by velocity map imaging. Photofragmentation of Au-Ar and Au-Kr at several wavelengths permits extrapolation to zero of the total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra as monitored in the Au(P23/2∘[5d106p]) fragment channel, facilitating the determination of ground state dissociation energies of D0″(Au-Ar)=149±13 cm-1 and D0″(Au-Kr)=240±19 cm-1, respectively. In the same spectral region, transitions to vibrational levels of an Ω'=1/2 state of the Au-Xe complex result in predissociation to the lower Au(P21/2∘[5d106p])+Xe(S10[5p6]) fragment channel for which TKER extrapolation yields a value of D0″(Au-Xe)=636±27 cm-1. Asymmetric line shapes for transitions to the v'=14 level of this state indicate coupling to the Au(P23/2∘[5d106p])+Xe(S10[5p6]) continuum, which allows us to refine this value to D0″(Au-Xe)=607±5 cm-1. The dissociation dynamics of this vibrational level have been studied at the level of individual isotopologues by fitting the observed excitation spectra to Fano profiles. These fits reveal a remarkable variation in the predissociation dynamics for different Au-Xe isotopologues. For Au-Ar and Au-Xe, the determined ground state dissociation energies are in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations; the agreement of the Au-Kr value with theory is less satisfactory.

  8. Plasmonic Fano resonance and dip of Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chen, Huang-Chih; Kuo, Mao-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    This study theoretically investigates Fano resonances and dips of an Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka that is excited by a nearby electric dipole. An analytical solution of dyadic Green's functions is used to analyze the radiative and nonradiative power spectra of a radial dipole in the proximity of a nanomatryoshka. From these spectra, the plasmon modes and Fano resonances that accompany the Fano dips are identified. In addition, the scattering and absorption spectra of a nanomatryoshka that is illuminated by a plane wave are investigated to confirm these modes and Fano dips. Our results reveal that a Fano dip splits each of the dipole and quadrupole modes into bonding and anti-bonding modes. The Fano dip and resonance result from the destructive interference of the plasmon modes of the Au shell and the Au core. The Fano factors that are obtained from the nonradiative power spectra of the Au shell and the Au core of a nanomatryoshka are in accordance with those obtained from the absorption cross section spectra. Moreover, these Fano factors increase as the plasmonic coupling of the Au shell with the core increases for both dipole and quadrupole modes. PMID:24206789

  9. Ω production in p+p, Au+Au and U+U collisions at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report STAR's high precision measurements on Ω production at mid-rapidity from √(s)=200 GeVp+p, central √(sNN)=200 GeVAu+Au, and central √(sNN)=193 GeVU+U collisions. With the significantly reduced uncertainty in p+p reference, we observe that the Ω enhancement factors at RHIC are in between SPS and LHC, while enhancement factors are systematically larger in central U+U collisions than in central Au+Au collisions. The ΩRAA is much larger than protons and pions for pT up to 4 GeV/c in central Au+Au collisions. The ratio of ΩRAA in central U+U to that in central Au+Au collisions is above unity for pT up to 6 GeV/c, which indicates coalescence/recombination to be the dominant production mechanism for Ω in these collisions for the measured pT range

  10. glideinWMS - A generic pilot-based Workload Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The Grid resources are distributed among hundreds of independent Grid sites, requiring a higher level Workload Management System (WMS) to be used efficiently. Pilot jobs have been used for this purpose by many communities, bringing increased reliability, global fair share and just in time resource matching. GlideinWMS is a WMS based on the Condor glidein concept, i.e. a regular Condor pool, with the Condor daemons (startds) being started by pilot jobs, and real jobs being vanilla, standard or MPI universe jobs. The glideinWMS is composed of a set of Glidein Factories, handling the submission of pilot jobs to a set of Grid sites, and a set of VO Frontends, requesting pilot submission based on the status of user jobs. This paper contains the structural overview of glideinWMS as well as a detailed description of the current implementation and the current scalability limits.

  11. H2S 为毒物对乙炔氢氯化反应中 AuCl3/AC 催化剂催化活性的影响%Poisoning effect of H2S on catalytic performance of AuCl3/AC in acetylene hydrochlorination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代斌; 张春丽; 康丽华; 朱明远

    2015-01-01

    A study about poisoning effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the catalytic performance of AuCl3/AC during acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation is described and discussed. 1% AuCl3/AC catalyst is prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation technique. The activity tests demonstrate that H2S poisoning results in the rapid and irreversible deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst in acetylene hydrochlorination. Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) show that H2S addition can effectively accelerate active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0. The formation of metal sulfide may also be another reason for catalyst deactivation in the presence of H2S, which is supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion X-ray spectrometer (EDX) techniques. In other words, with the increase of H2S added to the feed gases, the content of Au3+ is greatly reduced to metallic Au0. Moreover, the active sites are covered with Au-S compound. Both of them could reduce the effective active component, leading to the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst.%采用等体积浸渍法制备了 1% AuCl3/AC 催化剂,探究了硫化氢(H2S)为毒物对乙炔氢氯化反应中催化剂催化活性的影响及失活机理.催化活性测试结果表明,以 H2S 为毒物可导致乙炔氢氯化反应中的 AuCl3/AC 催化剂的失活,且是一个不可逆过程;程序升温还原(TPR)和 X 射线光电子能谱(XPS)分析结果表明,H2S 的加入可有效地加快 Au3+还原为 Au0;透射电镜能谱(TEM-EDX)观测分析形成的 Au-S 化合物也可导致催化剂失活,即随着 H2S 量的增大,更多的 Au3+被还原为 Au0,且形成的 Au-S 化合物覆盖在活性位点,使有效的活性组分降低进而导致 AuCl3/AC 催化剂失活.

  12. Polymer Science Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Mary L.

    1996-07-01

    Natural polymers such as cellulose, proteins, and DNA have been part of earth's store of chemicals long before chemists existed. However, polymers synthesized by chemists first appeared on this planet only sixty years ago. A veritable explosion of materials first known as plastics, later polymers, followed. Today polymers, natural and synthetic, are everywhere, and it is appropriate to include an introduction to polymers in the education of future scientists. The Polymer Science Pilot Program consists of a sequence of experiences with polymers, designed to focus upon the ways in which these materials resemble and/or compare with nonpolymers in physical properties, versatility, and function. The modular format makes it possible for educators to select specific sections of the program for integration into other college chemistry courses. The team learning aspect of he program can also be recommended to educators who select a specific module. When this program was presented at a Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, some attendees were concerned about the limited number of participants as compared with the seemingly large number of college instructors. It was explained that the concentrated format of the four day program necessitates this instructor-to-student ratio; one class consisting of eighteen participants was tried and it was found that some aspects of the program, especially the research paper preparation, were not as thoroughly moderated.

  13. The Marcoule pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Marcoule spent fuel reprocessing pilot facility was built in 1960-1961 for extended testing of the PUREX process with various types of fuel under conditions similar to those encountered in a production plant. Extensive modification work was undertaken on the facility in 1983 in the scope of the TOR project, designed with the following objectives: - increase the throughput capacity to at least 5 metric tons of PHENIX equivalent fuel per year, - extend equipment and process R and D capability, - improve job safety by maximum use of remote handling facilities, - maximize waste conditioning treatments to produce waste forms suitable for direct storage, - provide a true industrial process demonstration in continuous operation under centralized control using computerized procedures. The redesigned plant is scheduled to begin operation during the second half of 1986. The proximity of the Industrial Prototypes Service and the ATALANTE radiochemical research laboratory scheduled to begin operation in 1990, will provide a synergistic environment in which R and D program may be carried out under exceptional conditions

  14. Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts: understanding alloy effects from planar models and (supported) nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Goodman, Wayne D.

    2012-12-21

    Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts often display enhanced catalytic activities and selectivities compared with Pd-alone catalysts. This enhancement is often caused by two alloy effects, i.e., ensemble and ligand effects. The ensemble effect is dilution of surface Pd by Au. With increasing surface Au coverages, contiguous Pd ensembles disappear and isolated Pd ensembles form. For certain reactions, for example vinyl acetate synthesis, this effect is responsible for reaction rate enhancement via the formation of highly active surface sites, e.g., isolated Pd pairs. The disappearance of contiguous Pd ensembles also switches off side reactions catalyzed by these sites. This explains selectivity increase of certain reactions, for example direct H2O2 synthesis. The ligand effect is electronic perturbation of Au to Pd. By direct charge transfer or affecting bond length, the ligand effect causes the Pd d band to be more filled and the d-band center away from the Fermi level. Both changes make Pd more "atomic like" therefore binding reactants and products weaker. For certain reactions, this eliminates the so-called "self poisoning" and enhances activity/selectivity.

  15. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and eta in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, R_AA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  16. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  17. Revisiting the S-Au(111) interaction: Static or Dynamic?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Friend, C M

    2004-08-17

    The chemical inertness typically observed for Au does not imply a general inability to form stable bonds with non-metals but is rather a consequence of high reaction barriers. The Au-S interaction is probably the most intensively studied interaction of Au surfaces with non-metals as, for example, it plays an important role in Au ore formation, and controls the structure and dynamics of thiol-based self-assembled-monolayers (SAMs). In recent years a quite complex picture of the interaction of sulfur with Au(111) surfaces emerged, and a variety of S-induced surface structures was reported under different conditions. The majority of these structures were interpreted in terms of a static Au surface, where the positions of the Au atoms remain essentially unperturbed. Here we demonstrate that the Au(111) surface exhibits a very dynamic character upon interaction with adsorbed sulfur: low sulfur coverages modify the surface stress of the Au surface leading to lateral expansion of the surface layer; large-scale surface restructuring and incorporation of Au atoms into a growing two-dimensional AuS phase were observed with increasing sulfur coverage. These results provide new insight into the Au-S surface chemistry, and reveal the dynamic character of the Au(111) surface.

  18. The effect of CNTs on structures and catalytic properties of AuPd clusters for H2O2 synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-feng; Xie, Peng-yang; Yu, Hui-you; Li, Xiao-nian; Wang, Jian-guo

    2012-12-28

    The structures and catalytic properties of AuPd clusters supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for H(2)O(2) synthesis have been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations. Firstly, the structures of AuPd clusters are strongly influenced by CNTs, in which the bottom layers are mainly composed of Pd and the top layers are a mix of Au and Pd due to the stronger binding of Pd than Au on CNTs. Especially, it is found that O(2) adsorption on the Pd/CNTs interfacial sites is much weaker than that on the only Pd sites, which is in contrast to transition metal oxide (for example TiO(2), Al(2)O(3), CeO(2)) supported metal clusters. Furthermore, Pd ensembles on the interfacial sites have far superior catalytic properties for H(2)O(2) formation than those away from CNT supports due to the changes in electronic structures caused by the CNTs. Therefore, our study provides a physical insight into the enhanced role of carbon supports in H(2)O(2) synthesis over supported AuPd catalysts. PMID:23032860

  19. Test pilot Michael R. Swann

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Michael R. Swann joined the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center on June 5, 1978, transferring from the NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, as a research pilot. Swann attended North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, from September 1968 to February 1977, where he earned his Masters in Physics. He was a member of three national honorary scholastic fraternities. Prior to joining NASA Swann served concurrently as an Aerospace Defense Command Interceptor pilot in the Air National Guard for five years and as a college physics instructor at North Dakota State University for two years. While at Johnson Space Center Mike was a pilot on high altitude earth resources and air sampling missions. He was also an instructor and check pilot for the Astronaut Space Flight Readiness Training program. As a Dryden research pilot Mike was involved with the F-111 #778 Transonic Aircraft Technology (TACT) program, F-15 # 281 Shuttle Tile tests, programs on the F-8C #802 and the PA-30 #808 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicle. He flew the Bell 47G #822 helicopter in support of research with the three-eighths-scale F-15 Spin Research Vehicle. On March 28, 1979, Mike made a pilot familiarization flight in the YF-12A #935. He also flew support flights in the F-104, C-47, T-37, T-38, and the Jetstar aircraft. Michael R. Swann was born June 5, 1949, in Fargo, North Dakota; he was fatally injured in a recreational glider accident on July 28, 1981, near California City, California.

  20. Thermoelectric properties of Au-containing type-I clathrates Ba{sub 8}Au{sub x}Ga{sub 16−3x}Ge{sub 30+2x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zuxin; Cho, Jung Young; Tessema, Misle M. [Optimal Inc., Plymouth, MI 48170 (United States); Salvador, James R., E-mail: james.salvador@gm.com [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors Global R and D, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Waldo, Richard A. [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors Global R and D, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Yang, Jihui [Department of Materials, University of Washington (United States); Wang, Hsin; Cai, W.; Kirkham, M.J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Wenqing [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China)

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Ba{sub 8}Au{sub x}Ga{sub 16−3x}Ge{sub 30+2x} were prepared, and the solubility limit of Au is x = 5.4. • Glass like thermal conduction at low temperature was found for p-type materials. • Higher DOS effective masses carriers were found in higher Au content samples. • Au was found to preferentially substitute at the 6c Wyckoff site. • ZT = 0.6 at 750 K was found for Ba{sub 8}Au{sub x}Ga{sub 16−3x}Ge{sub 30+2x} (x = 1, 5, and 5.33). -- Abstract: Type I clathrates, with compositions based on Ba{sub 8}Ga{sub 16}Ge{sub 30}, are a class of promising thermoelectric materials due to their intrinsically low thermal conductivity. It has been demonstrated previously that the thermoelectric performance can be improved by transition metal substitution of the framework atoms. In this study, the effects of Au substitution for Ga/Ge on thermal and electrical transport properties of type I clathrate compounds have been investigated. Polycrystalline samples with a large range of Au content have been synthesized using conventional solid state techniques with the actual compositions of resulting materials approximately following Zintl-Klemm rules. The charge carrier type changes from electrons (n) to holes (p) as the Au content increases. The Seebeck coefficient (S) and power factor (S{sup 2}/ρ where ρ is the electrical resistivity) were improved by Au substitution and the resulting overall thermoelectric properties were enhanced by Au substitution as compared to polycrystalline Ba{sub 8}Ga{sub 16}Ge{sub 30}. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT attains a value of 0.63 at 740 K for the composition Ba{sub 8}Au{sub 5.47}Ge{sub 39.96}, a value that is somewhat lower than those reported previously. The results presented herein show that Au-containing type I clathrates are promising p-type thermoelectric materials for high temperature applications.

  1. 2010 Port-au-Prince, Haiti Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — According to official estimates, 222,570 people killed, 300,000 injured, 1.3 million displaced, 97,294 houses destroyed and 188,383 damaged in the Port-au-Prince...

  2. Surface structure of AU3Cu(001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, G.A.; Maupai, S.; Dakkouri, A.S.;

    1999-01-01

    The surface morphology, composition, and structure of Au3Cu(001) as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and surface x-ray diffraction are presented. Atomic resolution STM images reveal distinctive geometric features. The analysis of the surface x-ray diffraction data provides clear evidence...... for the surface structure. [S0163-1829(99)04535-X]....

  3. Didaktik des außerschulischen Lernens

    CERN Document Server

    Sauerborn, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Kernprobleme schulischer Bildung sind die zunehmenden Verluste an Realitäts- und Praxisbezug sowie die einseitige Betonung der fachwissenschaftlichen Kenntnisse. In jüngster Zeit werden insbesondere moderne didaktisch-methodische Konzepte näher diskutiert und praktiziert. So finden sich etwa die Stichwörter Handlungsorientierter Unterricht und Offener Unterricht in der fachdidaktischen Diskussion wieder. Eine wesentlich aktuellere Form stellt das außerschulische Lernen dar. Ein modernes pädagogisches Verständnis sieht den Unterricht heute nicht mehr als ausschließliche Tätigkeit des Lehrers an, sondern als Aktivität der Lernenden. Außerschulisches Lernen beschreibt die originale Begegnung im Unterricht außerhalb des Klassenzimmers. An außerschulischen Lernorten findet eine unmittelbare AuseinanderSetzung des Lernenden mit seiner räumlichen Umgebung statt. Charakteristisch sind hierbei vor allem die aktive(Mit-)Gestaltung sowie die eigenständige Wahrnehmung mehrperspektivischer Bildungsinhalte d...

  4. Overview of 1000kV UHVAC Pilot Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    UHV transmission technology is characterized with long transmission distance, large transmission capacity, low line loss and less land use. In China, SGCC had completed its 1 000 kV UHVAC pilot project by the end of 2008. This paper reviews the construction of the project from the aspects of technology research and development, engineering design, equipment development, transportation and on-site construction, commissioning and operation. Since put into operation, the project has shown excellent performance...

  5. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prachi Chandrachud; Kavita Joshi; Sailaja Krishnamurty; D G Kanhere

    2009-05-01

    We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the stability of the smallest gold cages, namely Au16 and Au17, at finite temperatures. First, we obtain the ground state structure along with at least 50 distinct isomers for both the clusters. This is followed by the finite temperature simulations of these clusters. Each cluster is maintained at 12 different temperatures for a time period of at least 150 ps. Thus, the total simulation time is of the order of 2.4 ns for each cluster. We observe that the cages are stable at least up to 850 K. Although both clusters melt around the same temperature, i.e. around 900 K, Au17 shows a peak in the heat capacity curve in contrast to the broad peak seen for Au16.

  6. Dispersion and STM Characterization of Au-CdSe Nanohybrids on Au(111)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Gao; Yan-min Kuang; Yuan Liao; Zhen-chao Dong

    2012-01-01

    We report the dispersion and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterization of isolated Au-CdSe nanohybrids on atomically flat Au(111) through surface modifications.The top terminal groups of spacer molecules self-assembled on the surface are found critical for locking the nanohybrids into a well-separated state.The STM results indicate that both thiol and carboxylic terminals are effective in this aspect by making strong interaction with the Au portions of the nanohybrids.An argon ion sputtering technique is also proposed to clean up organic contaminants on the surface for improved STM imaging of individual Au-CdSe nanohybrids.These observations help to enrich technical approaches to dispersing individual nanostructures on the surface and provide opportunities to explore their local electroluminescent and energy transfer properties at the nanoscale.

  7. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

  8. Forward-backward multiplicity correlation in Au+Au collisions at RHIC with transport model PACIAE

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yu-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Li, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Hai-Liang; Sa, Ben-Hao

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the charged particle forward-backward multiplicity correlation strength in 0-10% most central Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 GeV by a parton and hadron cascade model, PACIAE based on PYTHIA. The real (total), statistical, and NBD (Negative Binomial Distribution) correlation strengths are calculated, respectively, with the real events, mixed events, and NBD fitting the charged particle multiplicity distribution. The corresponding STAR data are well reproduced by the real one. If the discrepancy between real and statistical correlation strengths is identified as dynamical correlation strength, the dynamical correlation strength is then just counted few percent of the total correlation strength. In addition, we also calculated the 0-5 and 5% most central Au+Au collisions and turned out that the correlation strength increases monotonously with increasing size of the centrality bin.

  9. Simulation of energy scan of pion interferometry in central Au+Au collisions at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry for the central Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 3, 5, 7, 11, 17, 27, 39, 62, 130 and 200 GeV/c with the help of a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. Emission source-size radius parameters Rlong, Rout, Rside and the chaotic parameter λ are extracted and compared with the experimental data. Transverse momentum and azimuthal angle dependencies of the HBT radii are also discussed for central Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV/c. The results show that the HBT radii in central collisions do not change much above 7 GeV/c. For central collisions at 200 GeV/c, the radii decrease with the increasing of transverse momentum pT but are not sensitive to the azimuthal angle. These results provide a theoretical reference for the energy scan program of the RHIC-STAR experiment. (authors)

  10. Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-Wei; JIANG Zhi-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Glauber model, we present the formulas for calculating the numbers of participants,spectators and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. Based on this work, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles as the function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations made by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV in different centrality bins over the whole pseudorapidity range.

  11. Baryonic Effect on XcJ Suppression in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ru; XU Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Dai-Cui

    2004-01-01

    @@ We predict that xcJ mesons at low transverse momentum in the central rapidity region are almost dissociated by nucleons and antinucleons in hadronic matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at relativistic high-ion collider (RHIC) energies √SNN = 130 and 200 GeV. In the calculations the nucleon and antinucleon distributions in hadronic matter are results of evolution from their freeze-out distributions which well fit the experimental transverse momentum spectra of proton and antiproton.

  12. Flow and bose-einstein correlations in Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Manly, Steven; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyinski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    Argonne flow and Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured in Au-Au collisions at S=130 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. The systematic dependencies of the flow signal on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity, and centrality of the collision, as well as the beam energy are shown. In addition, results of a 3-dimensional analysis of two-pion correlations in the 200 GeV data are presented.

  13. Results from experiment E917 for Au + Au collisions at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of baryon stopping and its resulting energy deposition on the dynamics of Au + Au collisions at 6, 8 and 10.8 GeV/nucleon are explored with recent results from the AGS experiment E917. Current analyses of stopping, collective flow signals and HBT parameters are presented. Strangeness and anti-baryon production is examined using the yields of anti-lambdas and anti-protons

  14. Net baryon density in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, S A; Srivastava, D K; Bass, Steffen A.; Müller, Berndt; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the net baryon rapidity distribution in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the framework of the Parton Cascade Model (PCM). Parton rescattering and fragmentation leads to a substantial increase in the net baryon density at mid-rapidity over the density produced by initial primary parton-parton scatterings. The PCM is able to describe the measured net baryon density at RHIC.

  15. Some thoughts on di-jet correlation in Au + Au collisions from PHENIX

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, J

    2006-01-01

    PHENIX has measured the two particle azimuth correlation in Au + Au at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV. Jet shape and yield at the away side are found to be strongly modified at intermediate and low $p_T$, and the modifications vary dramatically with $p_T$ and centrality. At high $p_T$, away side jet peak reappears but the yield is suppressed. We discuss the possible physics pictures leading to these complicated modifications.

  16. Anti-flow of K$^0_s$ Mesons in 6 AGeV Au + Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, P; Alexander, J M; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J L; Cole, B; Crowe, K M; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Klay, J L; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lauret, J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L; Srivastava, B; BStone, N T; Symons, T J M; Wienold, T; Whitfield, R W J; Wood, L; Zhang Wei Ning

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the sideward flow of neutral strange ($K^0_s$) mesons in 6 AGeV Au + Au collisions. A prominent anti-flow signal is observed for an impact parameter range (b $\\lesssim 7$ fm) which spans central and mid-central events. Since the $K^0_s$ scattering cross section is relatively small in nuclear matter, this observation suggests that the in-medium kaon vector potential plays an important role in high density nuclear matter.

  17. Critical Behavior in Peripheral Au + Au Collisions at 35 MeV/u

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, M; Belkacem, M; Agostino, M D; Milazzo, P M; Vannini, G; Bowman, D R; Dinius, J D; Ferrero, A; Fiandri, M L; Gelbke, C K; Glasmacher, T; Gramegna, F; Handzy, D O; Horn, D; Hsi, W C; Huang, M; Iori, I; Kunde, G J; Lisa, M A; Lynch, W G; Margagliotti, G V; Montoya, C P; Moroni, A; Peaslee, G F; Rui, R; Schwarz, C; Tsang, M B; Williams, C; Latora, V; Bonasera, A

    1996-01-01

    The signals theoretically predicted for the occurrence of a critical behavior (conditional moments of charge distributions, Campi scatter plot, fluctuations of the size of the largest fragment, power law in the charge distribution, intermittency) have been found for peripheral events in the reaction Au+Au at 35 MeV/u. The same signals have been studied with a dynamical model which foresees phase transition, like the Classical Molecular Dynamics.

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2005 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2006-10-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to make WIPP environmental information available to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2004. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through defense activities and programs. TRU waste is defined, in the WIPP LWA, as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting TRU isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years except for high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools; sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management,defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated disposal rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel of seven rooms has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. One of the main attributes of salt, as a rock formation in which to isolate radioactive waste, is the ability of the salt to creep, that is, to deform continuously over time. Excavations into which the waste-filled drums are placed will close eventually, flowing around the drums and sealing them within the formation.

  19. Venus project : experimentation at ENEA`s pilot site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargellini, M.L.; Fontana, F. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Bucci, C.; Ferrara, F.; Sottile, P.A. [GESI s.r.l., Rome (Italy); Niccolai, L.; Scavino, G. [Rome Univ. Sacro Cuore (Italy); Mancini, R.; Levialdi, S. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza (Italy). Dip. di Scienze dell`Informazione

    1996-12-01

    The document describes the ENEA`s (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) experience in the Venus Project (Esprit III ). Venus is an advanced visual interface based on icon representation that permits to end-user to inquiry databases. VENUS interfaces to ENEA`s databases: cometa materials Module, Cometa Laboratories Module and European Programs. This report contents the results of the experimentation and of the validation carried out in ENEA`s related to the Venus generations. Moreover, the description of the architecture, the user requirements syntesis and the validation methodology of the VENUS systems have been included.

  20. Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Pilot Phase 2 web site

    Science.gov (United States)

    The value of nature's benefits is difficult to consider in environmental decision-making since ecosystem goods and services are usually not well measured or quantified in economic terms. The Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council, the U.S. Environmental Pr...

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2003 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-09-03

    The purpose of this report is to provide information needed by the DOE to assess WIPP's environmental performance and to convey that performance to stakeholders and members of the public. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A and DOE guidance. This report documents WIPP's environmental monitoring programs and their results for 2003. The WIPP Project is authorized by the DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-164). After more than 20 years of scientific study and public input, WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. Located in southeastern New Mexico, WIPP is the nation's first underground repository permitted to safely and permanently dispose of TRU radioactive and mixed waste (as defined in the WIPP LWA) generated through the research and production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. TRU waste is defined in the WIPP LWA as radioactive waste containing more than 100 nanocuries (3,700 becquerels [Bq]) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years. Exceptions are noted as high-level waste, waste that has been determined not to require the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations, and waste the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved for disposal. Most TRU waste is contaminated industrial trash, such as rags and old tools, and sludges from solidified liquids; glass; metal; and other materials from dismantled buildings. A TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP if it has been generated in whole or in partby one or more of the activities listed in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §10101, et seq.), including naval reactors development, weapons activities, verification and control technology, defense nuclear materials production, defense nuclear waste and materials by-products management, defense nuclear materials security and safeguards and security investigations, and defense research and development. The waste must also meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria. When TRU waste arrives at WIPP, it is transported into the Waste Handling Building. The waste containers are removed from the shipping containers, placed on the waste hoist, and lowered to the repository level of 655 m (2,150 ft; approximately 0.5 mi) below the surface. Next, the containers of waste are removed from the hoist and placed in excavated storage rooms in the Salado Formation, a thick sequence of evaporite beds deposited approximately 250 million years ago (Figure 1.1). After each panel has been filled with waste, specially designed closures are emplaced. When all of WIPP's panels have been filled, at the conclusion of WIPP operations, seals will be placed in the shafts. Salt under pressure is relatively plastic, and mine openings will be allowed to creep closed for final disposal, encapsulating and isolating the waste.

  3. New Positioning Products and Pilot Service for Natural Hazard Monitorin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Miller, K. J.; Miller, M. A.; Khachikyan, R.; Meyer, R. F.; Vallisneri, M.; Liu, Z.; Song, Y. T.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new pilot service from JPL's Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System that provides positioning solutions for hundreds of GNSS tracking sites, from both global and regional networks, aiming to monitor ground motion in the immediate aftermath of earthquakes. The new service provides site position time series solutions at 1 Hz, based on GNSS tracking data. Recognizing the tradeoff between latency and accuracy, the solutions are provided at multiple latencies, ranging from one second to one hour. Individual site solution accuracy strongly depends on the local tracking data. The median site position accuracies ranges from ~one cm 1DRMs for the to most latent solution to ~five cm 1DRMS for the one-second solutions. We discuss the tradeoff between accuracy and latency and explain the choice of product latencies in terms of this trade and in terms of the benefits to agencies responsible for issuing alarms and managing natural disasters. We describe and demonstrate a simple user algorithm to seamlessly merge the disparate latent solutions into a single, optimal record of site motion. The positioning service is integrated with automated earthquake notices from the USGS to support calculations of co-seismic displacements. Finally we describe the current scope of the pilot project, its innovative user-interface, and our ultimate plans to serve all real-time GNSS sites.

  4. Dissociative adsorption of water on Au/MgO/Ag(001) from first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalaita, J.; Häkkinen, H.; Honkala, K.

    2015-10-01

    The molecular and dissociative adsorption of water on a Ag-supported 1 ML, 2 ML and 3 ML-a six atomic layer-thick MgO films with a single Au adatom is investigated using density functional theory calculations. The obtained results are compared to a bulk MgO(001) surface with an Au atom. On thin films the negatively charged Au strengthens the binding of the polar water molecule due to the attractive Au-H interaction. The adsorption energy trends of OH and H with respect to the film thickness depend on an adsorption site. In the case OH or H binds atop Au on MgO/Ag(001), the adsorption becomes more exothermic with the increasing film thickness, while the reverse trend is seen when the adsorption takes place on bare MgO/Ag(001). This behavior can be explained by different bonding mechanisms identified with the Bader analysis. Interestingly, we find that the rumpling of the MgO film and the MgO-Ag interface distance correlate with the charge transfer over the thin film and the interface charge, respectively. Moreover, we employ a modified Born-Haber-cycle to analyze the effect of film thickness to the adsorption energy of isolated Au and OH species on MgO/Ag(001). The analysis shows that the attractive Coulomb interaction between the negatively charged adsorbate and the positive MgO-Ag-interface does not completely account for the weaker binding with increasing film thickness. The redox energy associated with the charge transfer from the interface to the adsorbate is more exothermic with the increasing film thickness and partly compensates the decrease in the attractive Coulomb interaction.

  5. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Borggren, N; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Cassano, N; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Orazio, L D; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1Au+Au collisions, the R_AA of phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is lin...

  6. Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hill, K; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wimsatt, G; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.67 +/- 0.12 (stat.) +/- 0.04 (sys.) +/- 0.08 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.36 +/- 0.09 (stat.) +/- 0.01 (sys.) +/- 0.04 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matte...

  7. The point-defect of carbon nanotubes anchoring Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Y. A.; Cui, Y. H.; Li, X. N.;

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of the interaction between Au and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is very important since Au/CNTs composites have wide applications in many fields. In this study, we investigated the dispersion of Au nanoparticles on the CNTs by transmission electron microscopy and the bonding mechanism...

  8. La situation politique du Jawf au Ier millénaire avant J.-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Arbach

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available La région du Jawf, située à une centaine de kilomètres au nord-est de Sanaa, possède un nombre important de sites archéologiques sudarabiques. Les plus importants sont, du sud-est au nord-ouest : Barâqish, l’antique Yathill, dont l’enceinte est l’ouvrage défensif le mieux conservé parmi les sites préislamiques ; Ma‘în, l’antique Qarnaw, capitale du royaume de Ma‘în ; Kharibat Hamdân, l’antique Haram ; Kamna, l’antique Kaminahû ; al-Sawdâ’, l’antique Nashshân ; et al-Baydâ’, l’antique Nashq. L...

  9. Bonding, Luminescence, Metallophilicity in Linear Au3 and Au2Ag Chains Stabilized by Rigid Diphosphanyl NHC Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Carrara, Serena; De Cola, Luisa; Tobon, Yeny; Giovanella, Umberto; Botta, Chiara; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The heterofunctional and rigid ligand N,N'-diphosphanyl-imidazol-2-ylidene (PCNHCP; P = P(t-Bu)2), through its phosphorus and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors, stabilizes trinuclear chain complexes, with either Au3 or AgAu2 cores, and dinuclear Au2 complexes. The two oppositely situated PCNHCP (L) ligands that "sandwich" the metal chain can support linear and rigid structures, as found in the known tricationic Au(I) complex [Au3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 (OTf = CF3SO3; [Au3L2](OTf)3; Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 103-105) now also obtained by transmetalation from [Ag3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Ag3L2](OTf)3), or in the mixed-metal tricationic [Au2Ag(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Au2AgL2](OTf)3). The latter was obtained stepwise by the addition of AgOTf to the digold(I) complex [Au2(μ2-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC)2](OTf)2 ([Au2L2](OTf)2). The latter contains two dangling P donors and displays fluxional behavior in solution, and the Au···Au separation of 2.8320(6) Å in the solid state is consistent with metallophilic interactions. In the solvento complex [Au3Cl2(tht)(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)](OTf)·MeCN ([Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN), which contains only one L and one tht ligand (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the metal chain is bent (148.94(2)°), and the longer Au···Au separation (2.9710(4) Å) is in line with relaxation of the rigidity due to a more "open" structure. Similar features were observed in [Au3Cl2(SMe2)L](OTf)·2MeCN. A detailed study of the emission properties of [Au3L2](OTf)3, [Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN, [Au2L2](OTf)2, and [Au2AgL2](OTf)3 was performed by means of steady state and time-resolved photophysical techniques. The complex [Au3L2](OTf)3 displays a bright (photoluminescence quantum yield = 80%) and narrow emission band centered at 446 nm with a relatively small Stokes' shift and long-lived excited-state lifetime on the microsecond timescale, both in solution and in the solid state. In line with the very narrow emission

  10. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  11. Enhanced strange baryon production in Au+Au collisions compared to p+p at sqrts = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, B I; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Callner, J; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; De Phillips, M; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; García-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; La Pointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C H; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sugarbaker, E R; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Kolk, N; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-01-01

    We report on the observed differences in production rates of strange and multi-strange baryons in Au+Au collisions at sqrts = 200 GeV compared to p+p interactions at the same energy. The yields in Au+Au collisions, when scaled by the number of participants, are larger than those measured in the p+p data. The magnitudes of the differences grow with the strangeness of the baryon and with increasing centrality. The enhancements of the Au+Au yields are close to those measured in sqrts = 17.3 GeV collisions. Further, when the binary scaled p+p pT spectra are compared to those of Au+Au the heavy-ion yields exceed binary scaling in the pT range 1 < pT< 4 GeV/c.

  12. The gold-rich indide Eu{sub 5}Au{sub 17.7}In{sub 4.3} and its relation with the structures of SrAu{sub 4.76}In{sub 1.24} and BaLi{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muts, Ihor [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Ivan Franko National Univ. of Lviv (Ukraine). Inorganic Chemistry Dept.; Rodewald, Ute C.; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Zaremba, Vasyl' I.; Pavlosyuk, Orest [Ivan Franko National Univ. of Lviv (Ukraine). Inorganic Chemistry Dept.

    2012-02-15

    The gold-rich indide Eu{sub 5}Au{sub 17.7}In{sub 4.3} was synthesized from the elements in a sealed tantalum ampoule that was heated in a high-frequency furnace. Eu{sub 5}Au{sub 17.7}In{sub 4.3} crystallizes with a new monoclinic structure type: C2/m, a = 902.7(2), b = 722.8(3), c = 1734.1(4) pm, {beta} = 94.31(3) , wR2 = 0.0907, 2640 F{sup 2} values and 74 variables. Eu{sub 5}Au{sub 17.7}In{sub 4.3} has a pronounced gold substructure with Au.Au distances ranging from 278 to 300 pm. The striking structural motifs in the gold substructure are networks of Au6 hexagons and discrete units of corner- and edge-sharing Au{sub 4} tetrahedra. Eu{sub 5}Au{sub 17.70}In{sub 4.30} exhibits a small homogeneity range with In/Au mixing on two Wyckoff sites. Geometrically, the Eu{sub 5}Au{sub 17.7}In{sub 4.3} structure can be explained as an intergrowth variant of slightly distorted SrAu{sub 4.76}In{sub 1.24}- and BaLi{sub 4}-related slabs. The europium coordination in the BaLi{sub 4} slabs is similar to binary EuAu{sub 2}. (orig.)

  13. Solvent-induced desorption of alkanethiol ligands from Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yao, Tao; Yang, Lina; Bao, Jie; Huang, Ting; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-06-21

    Removing surfactants from a colloidal metal nanoparticle surface is necessary for their realistic applications, and how they could be stripped is a subject of active investigation. Here, we report a solvent-induced desorption of dodecanethiol ligands from the gold nanoparticle surface, and traced this desorption process using a combination of in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. In situ analysis results reveal that the solvent exchange of ethanol with tetrahydrofuran (THF) can effectively remove dodecanethiol ligands while keeping the particle morphology unchanged. Upon increasing the THF/ethanol ratio from 0 : 1 to 5 : 1, the surface coverage of thiol on the Au surface is reduced from 0.47 to 0.07, suggesting the depletion of ligands first from the nanoparticle facet sites, then from the edge sites, while the ligands at the corner sites are intact. This work enriches our knowledge on surfactant removal and may pave the way towards preparing surface-clean nanoparticles for practical applications. PMID:27241025

  14. Radioactive waste examination pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is a contact-handled radioactive waste examination pilot facility at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plant determines through computerized nondestructive examination (NDE) whether transuranic waste now stored at the INEL qualifies for shipment to DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico or whether it needs further processing. As a container proceeds through the plant it is weighed, x-rayed with real-time radiography to determine actual contents, assayed to determine fissile contents, ultrasonically examined to determine container integrity, and surveyed for surface radiation and contamination. Because the facility handles transuranic waste, proper information management is essential. A microprocessor-based data management system has been developed for this purpose; a key feature is its direct communication with the computerized NDE equipment and with a mainframe computer on which the data is stored permanently. 4 references, 2 figures

  15. 76 FR 63183 - Pilot in Command Proficiency Check and Other Changes to the Pilot and Pilot School Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 54095). In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to revise the pilot, flight..., 2011 (76 FR 54095), the FAA published a final rule that amended the pilot, flight instructor, and pilot... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) published on August 31, 2009 (74 FR 44779), the FAA proposed...

  16. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities. PMID:16090462

  17. Centrality Dependence of Direct Photon Production in √(SNN)=200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au+Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities

  18. Volcano-like behavior of Au-Pd core-shell nanoparticles in the selective oxidation of alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago A G; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; López, Núria; Rossi, Liane M

    2014-01-01

    Gold-palladium (AuPd) nanoparticles have shown significantly enhanced activity relative to monometallic Au and Pd catalysts. Knowledge of composition and metal domain distributions is crucial to understanding activity and selectivity, but these parameters are difficult to ascertain in catalytic experiments that have primarily been devoted to equimolar nanoparticles. Here, we report AuPd nanoparticles of varying Au:Pd molar ratios that were prepared by a seed growth method. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol was used as a model reaction to study catalytic activity and selectivity changes that occurred after varying the composition of Pd in bimetallic catalysts. We observed a remarkable increase in catalytic conversion when using a 10:1 Au:Pd molar ratio. This composition corresponds to the amount of Pd necessary to cover the existing Au cores with a monolayer of Pd as a full-shell cluster. The key to increased catalytic activity derives from the balance between the number of active sites and the ease of product desorption. According to density functional theory calculations, both parameters are extremely sensitive to the Pd content resulting in the volcano-like activity observed. PMID:25042537

  19. Chemial Bond and Stability of Adsorption of[Au(AsS3)]2- on the Surface of Kaolinite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xin-min; CHEN Yun; HONG Han-lie

    2004-01-01

    Density function theory and discrete variation method (DFT-DVM) were used to study the adsorption of [Au(AsS3 ) ]2- on the surface of kaolinite. The correlation among structure, chemical bond and stability was discussed. Several models were selected with [ Au( AsS3 ) ]2- in different directions and sites. The resultsshow that the models with gold on the edge of kaolinite basal layer contain pincerlike bond among gold and severaloxygen atoms and form strong Au - O covalent bond, so these models are more stable than those with gold aboveor under the layer. The models with gold near to [ AlO2(OH)4 ] octahedra are more stable than those with goldnear to the vacancy without aluminium. These two stable tendencies in kaolinite- [ Au( AsS3 ) ]2- are stronger thanthat in kaolinite-Au systems. The interaction between [ Au( AsS3 ) ]2- and kaolinite is stronger than that betweengold and kaolinite, and this interaction is strong enough to form the surface complexes.

  20. DNA-templated synthesis of PtAu bimetallic nanoparticle/graphene nanocomposites and their application in glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jing; Wang, Wen-Min; Lu, Li-Min; Bai, Ling; Qiu, Xin-Lan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) is demonstrated to functionalize graphene (GR) and to further guide the growth of PtAu bimetallic nanoparticles (PtAuNPs) on GR with high densities and dispersion. The obtained nanocomposites (PtAuNPs/ss-DNA/GR) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and electrochemical techniques. Then, an enzyme nanoassembly was prepared by self-assembling glucose oxidase (GOD) on PtAuNP/ss-DNA/GR nanocomposites (GOD/PtAuNPs/ss-DNA/GR). The nanocomposites provided a suitable microenvironment for GOD to retain its biological activity. The direct and reversible electron transfer process between the active site of GOD and the modified electrode was realized without any extra electron mediator. Thus, the prepared GOD/PtAuNP/ss-DNA/GR electrode was proposed as a biosensor for the quantification of glucose. The effects of pH, applied potential, and temperature on the performance of the biosensor were discussed in detail and were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed a linearity with glucose concentration in the range of 1.0 to 1,800 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 μM (S/N = 3). The results demonstrate that the developed approach provides a promising strategy to improve the sensitivity and enzyme activity of electrochemical biosensors.

  1. Des atomes d'antihydrogene produits en quantites substantielles au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sevestre, G

    2002-01-01

    "Des quantites relativement substantielles d'atomes d'antihydrogene a basse temperature ont ete produites cet ete au Laboratoire europeen de physique des particules, le CERN a Geneve, ouvrant la voie a une etude approfondie de cette antimatiere qui pourrait remettre en cause les theories actuelles, a annonce mercredi sur le site Internet de la revue Nature une equipe internationale de chercheurs" (1 page).

  2. Mg-AI Mixed Oxides Supported Bimetallic Au-Pd Nanoparticles with Superior Catalytic Properties in Aerobic Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol and Glycerol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亮; 张伟; 曾尚景; 苏党生; 孟祥举; 肖丰收

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized Au and Pd catalysts are favorable for oxidations with molecular oxygen, and the preparation of this kind of nanoparticles with high catalytic activities is strongly desirable. We report a successful synthesis of bimetal- lic Au-Pd nanoparticles with rich edge and comer sites on unique support of Mg-AI mixed oxides (Au-Pd/MAO), which are favorable for producing metal nanoparticles with high degree of coordinative unsaturation of metal atoms The systematic microscopic characterizations confirm the bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticles are present as Au-Pd alloy The irregular shape of the bimetallic nanoparticles are directly observed in HRTEM images. As we expected, Au-Pd/MAO gives very excellent catalytic performances in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol and glycerol. For example, Au-Pd/MAO shows very high TOF of 91000 h i at 433 K with molecular oxygen at air pressure in solvent-free oxidation of benzyl alcohol; this catalyst also shows relatively high selectivity for tartronic acid (TA- RAC, 36.6%) at high conversion (98.5%) in aerobic oxidation of glycerol. The superior catalytic properties of Au-Pd/MAO would be potentially important tbr production of fine chemicals.

  3. 76 FR 19267 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... entitled, ``Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Final Rule'' (74 FR 42500). That...: The FAA is correcting a final rule published on August 21, 2009 (74 FR 42500). In that rule, the FAA... Administration 14 CFR Part 61 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification;...

  4. 49 CFR 381.400 - What is a pilot program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is a pilot program? 381.400 Section 381.400... PILOT PROGRAMS Initiation of Pilot Programs § 381.400 What is a pilot program? (a) A pilot program is a... that would be subject to the regulations. (b) During a pilot program, the participants would be...

  5. 14 CFR 121.437 - Pilot qualification: Certificates required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot qualification: Certificates required... Pilot qualification: Certificates required. (a) No pilot may act as pilot in command of an aircraft (or... pilots) unless he holds an airline transport pilot certificate and an appropriate type rating for...

  6. In-situ STM study of phosphate adsorption on Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu/Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaup, Christian; Horch, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu-covered Au(111) electrodes with a neutral phosphate buffer solution has been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM). Under low potential conditions, both the Cu(111) and the Au(111...

  7. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, P; Stewart, G

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment’s computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ’pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to retrieve a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single VO, and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO’s distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new or improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is hig...

  8. Pilot biobased bekers : tips, achtergrondinformatie en evaluatie van de pilot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolck, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dit document is primair bedoeld als hulpmiddel bij de inkoop en/of aanbesteding van de verzorging van koffie in kantoorgebouwen. In het document is een negen tal praktische tips verwerkt. Dit zijn tips die in de pilot zijn meegegeven aan de beoordelaars van de offertes: professionals actief in facil

  9. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions at STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Adamczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum-bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  10. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.(Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University, Irvington, NY, U.S.A.); Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.

    2013-01-01

    The transverse momentum (p_T) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (\\pi^+/-, K^+/-, p, p^bar) produced in sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to p_T=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to p_T=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate p_T region, between 2--5 GeV/c, a significant enhanceme...

  11. Di-Hadron Correlations with Identified Leading Hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelwahab, N M; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    The STAR collaboration presents new two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of quark recombination. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the \\emph{ridge region}, is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  12. LES SCEAUX DE CERTIFICATION DES SITES WEB : UN OUTIL DE CONFIANCE, OUTIL DE CONFUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Martel, Louise; St-Germain, René

    2002-01-01

    Avec l'évolution des technologies, les entreprises doivent s'adapter au nouveau concept de commerce électronique; les clients aussi. Comment garder leur confiance et ce, au bout des doigts. Ce texte présente un cadre conceptuel de la certification de conformité des sites Web ainsi qu'une typologie des sceaux de certification (labels) existants.

  13. "Dealloying" Phase Separation during Growth of Au on Ni(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L. Pleth; Besenbacher, Flemming; Stensgaard, I.;

    1995-01-01

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy and ion-scattering studies have revealed a new "dealloying" phase transition during the growth of Au on Ni(110). The Au atoms, which initially alloy into the Ni(110) surface, phase separate into a vacancy-stabilized Au dimer-trimer chain structure at Au...... coverages larger than 0.4 monolayer. Using the effective-medium theory, we show that the resulting structure as well as the physical mechanism responsible for the phase transition are closely related to the surface stress induced by the substituted Au....

  14. First results on d+Au collisions from PHOBOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV, in the range 0.25 < pT < 6.0 GeV/c. With increasing collision centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-pT hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  15. Thermal desorption of Au from W(001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Blaszczyszyn, R; Godowski, P J

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au-Au and Au-W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment. (author)

  16. Thermal Desorption of Au from W(001) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyszyn, R.; Chrzanowski, J.; Godowski, P. J.

    2000-12-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au--Au and Au--W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment.

  17. 7 CFR 1955.132 - Pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pilot projects. 1955.132 Section 1955.132 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.132 Pilot projects. FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 may conduct pilot projects to test policies...

  18. 75 FR 1591 - Green Technology Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Green Technology Pilot Program ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request...@uspto.gov . Include A0651-0062 Green Technology Pilot Program comment@ in the subject line of the... examination pilot program for patent applications pertaining to green technologies, including greenhouse...

  19. 75 FR 473 - Community Express Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... restructure the Community Express Pilot Program effective October 1, 2008. (73 FR 36950, June 30, 2008) The restructured pilot program was extended through December 31, 2009 (73 FR 36950). Extension of this restructured... ADMINISTRATION Community Express Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION:...

  20. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under the Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C....

  1. 77 FR 6619 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ...'') (76 FR 9626). The CA Pilot Program was introduced to increase SBA-guaranteed loans to small businesses... financings that are approved by SBA. (76 FR 56262) In response to comments received on the CA Pilot Program... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice...

  2. 48 CFR 212.7002 - Pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilot program. 212.7002... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Pilot Program for Transition to Follow-On Contracting After Use of Other Transaction Authority 212.7002 Pilot program....

  3. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR 48693... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C. Section 47134. The...

  4. 46 CFR 15.812 - Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilots. 15.812 Section 15.812 Shipping COAST GUARD....812 Pilots. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (f) of this section, the following vessels, not... direction and control of an individual qualified to serve as pilot under paragraph (b) or (c) of...

  5. 75 FR 64692 - Green Technology Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Green Technology Pilot Program ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request...: ] E-mail: InformationCollection@uspto.gov . Include ``0651- 0062 Green Technology Pilot Program... Office (USPTO) implemented a pilot program on December 8, 2009, that permits patent...

  6. 75 FR 17380 - Patents Ombudsman Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... procedure. See Request for Comments on Patents Ombudsman Pilot Program, 74 FR 55212 (Oct. 27, 2009), 1348... United States Patent and Trademark Office Patents Ombudsman Pilot Program AGENCY: United States Patent... Patents Ombudsman Pilot Program. The majority of the written comments from the patent community...

  7. 75 FR 80561 - Community Express Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... indicated that the restructured pilot program would be extended through December 31, 2009 (73 FR 36950). On... implemented in October 2008, ] the pilot program was extended again through December 31, 2010 (75 FR 473). SBA... ADMINISTRATION Community Express Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION:...

  8. Ground-state properties of ordered, partially ordered, and random Cu-Au and Ni-Pt alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Abrikosov, I. A.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the ground-state properties of ordered, partially ordered, and random Cu-Au and Ni-Pt alloys at the stoichiometric 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 compositions in the framework of the multisublattice single-site (SS) coherent potential approximation (CPA). Charge-transfer effects in the random ...

  9. Photoswitchable Faraday effect in EuS-Au nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Akira; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika [Division of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13 West-8, Kita-ku, 060-8628, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Effective photoswitchable europium sulfide nanocrystals with gold nanoparticles using dithiol (DDT: 1,10-decanedithiol) joint molecules, EuS-Au nanosystems, are demonstrated. The TEM image indicates the formation of EuS-Au nanosystems composed of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals and spherical Au nanoparticles. Under visible-light irradiation, a drastic change of absorption band of EuS-Au nanosystems at around 600 nm was observed. The Faraday effects of EuS-Au nanosystems were estimated using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The effective change of the MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems under visible-light irradiation was successfully observed at around 670 nm for the first time. The effective reversible changes in MCD spectra with the alternative irradiation cycles of visible light (>440 nm) and dark are also presented. The decrease rate of rotation angle at 670 nm of EuS-Au nanosystems is larger than that of absorbance. These results indicate that the effective change of MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems would be dominated not only by a drastic change of absorption band related to enhanced LSPR of Au nanoparticles but also by specific interaction between EuS and Au in nanosystem under irradiation. Illustration of photoswitch and TEM image of EuS-Au nanosystems. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svorcik, V., E-mail: vaclav.svorcik@vscht.c [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Chaloupka, A. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Rezanka, P. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Slepicka, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [Department of Chemistry, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasalkova, N.; Hubacek, T.; Siegel, J. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  11. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švorčík, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Řezanka, P.; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Kasálková, N.; Hubáček, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-03-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  12. 2D chemistry on Au(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauls, Eva; Blankenburg, Stephan; Schmidt, Wolf Gero [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Paderborn (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The design of functional two-dimensional molecular networks has become an area of intense research. The constraint to 2 in contrast to the availability of 3 dimensions has a large impact on many chemical reactions. Chemical reactions between surface adsorbed molecules may lead to products very different from those obtained in solutions or the gas phase. The imide formation between a diaminoterphenyl (DATP) and a PTCDA molecule is one very interesting example in this respect. In scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, it has been observed that the Au surface changes both the reaction path and the reaction product compared to 3D. In order to understand these experimental observations, we have studied the chemical reactions both in solution and on the Au(111) surface by density-functional theory calculations in the generalized-gradient approximation.

  13. Tunable VO2/Au hyperbolic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayakarao, S.; Mendoza, B.; Devine, A.; Kyaw, C.; van Dover, R. B.; Liberman, V.; Noginov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is known to have a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition at ˜68 °C. Therefore, it can be used as a tunable component of an active metamaterial. The lamellar metamaterial studied in this work is composed of subwavelength VO2 and Au layers and is designed to undergo a temperature controlled transition from the optical hyperbolic phase to the metallic phase. VO2 films and VO2/Au lamellar metamaterial stacks have been fabricated and studied in electrical conductivity and optical (transmission and reflection) experiments. The observed temperature-dependent changes in the reflection and transmission spectra of the metamaterials and VO2 thin films are in a good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The demonstrated optical hyperbolic-to-metallic phase transition is a unique physical phenomenon with the potential to enable advanced control of light-matter interactions.

  14. De l’individu postcommuniste au citoyen

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Krasteva

    2013-01-01

    L’article analyse le paradoxe de la conception communiste du citoyen engagé : au niveau idéologique, citoyenneté et engagement sont intrinsèquement liés, au niveau politique ils sont souvent radicalement dissociés. Le citoyen communiste est plus engagé que citoyen. La citoyenneté était dépourvue de plusieurs de ses attributs : de la jouissance de la loi qui établit « l’égalité arithmétique » et minorise les maîtres ; de la citoyenneté active – civile et politique – pour ne jouir que la protec...

  15. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  16. Transition probability studies in 175Au

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, Tuomas; Watkins, H.; Joss, David; Page, Robert; Carroll, R. J.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, Paul; Hackstein, M.; Herzberg, Rolf-Dietmar; Jakobsson, Ulrika; Jones, Peter; Julin, Rauno; Juutinen, Sakari; Ketelhut, Steffen; Kröll, Th

    2013-01-01

    Transition probabilities have been measured between the low-lying yrast states in 175Au by employing the recoil distance Doppler-shift method combined with the selective recoil-decay tagging technique. Reduced transition probabilities and magnitudes of transition quadrupole moments have been extracted from measured lifetimes allowing dramatic changes in nuclear structure within a low excitation-energy range to probed. The transition quadrupole moment data are discussed in terms...

  17. Ion-irradiation induced chemical ordering of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetala, Naidu V. [Department of Physics, Grambling State University, RWE Jones Drive, Carver Hall 81, Grambling, LA 71245 (United States)]. E-mail: naidusv@gram.edu; Harrell, J.W. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Lawson, Jeremy [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Nikles, David E. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Williams, John R. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We have studied the effect of ion-beam irradiation on reducing the ordering temperature of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles. FePt and FePt(Au14%) 4 nm particles dispersed on a Si-substrate were irradiated by 300 keV Al-ions with a dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 43 {sup o}C using a water-cooled flange in order to minimize the vacancy migration and voids formation within the collision cascades. Partial chemical ordering has been observed in as-irradiated particles with coercivity of 60-130 Oe. Post-irradiation annealing at 220 {sup o}C enhanced chemical ordering in FePt nanoparticles with coercivity of 3500 Oe, magnetic anisotropy of 1.5 x 10{sup 7} erg/cc, and thermal stability factor of 130. A much higher 375 {sup o}C post-irradiation annealing was required in FePtAu, presumably because Au atoms were trapped at Fe/Pt lattice sites at lower temperatures. As the annealing temperature increased, anomalous features in the magnetization reversal curves were observed that disappeared at higher annealing temperatures.

  18. Nanoporous Au-TiMCM-41 - An inorganic hybrid photocatalyst toward visible photooxidation of methyl orange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathish Kumar, Panneer Selvam; Ruby Raj, Michael; Anandan, Sambandam [Nanomaterials and Solar Energy Conversion Lab, Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Trichy 620 015 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Modification of MCM-41 nanopore materials was found to improve the catalyst activity because it would provide an effective environment for increasing the number of active surface sites for molecular interaction. Hence in this article, with an attempt to extend light absorption of TiMCM-41 based photocatalyst toward the visible light range and to eliminate the rapid recombination of excited electrons/holes during photoreaction, a new type of photocatalyst Au/TiMCM-41 was prepared. The crystal phase composition and surface morphology of the Au/TiMCM-41 photocatalyst were comprehensively examined by X-ray differential detection and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The analytical results of UV-visible diffused reflectance spectra indicated that the absorbance in the visible region above 500 nm for Au/TiMCM-41 photocatalyst made it possible to be excited by visible light. The experiment demonstrated that the photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange using Au/TiMCM-41 photocatalyst was significantly higher than that using TiMCM-41 photocatalyst. Possibilities to enhance catalyst performance further by using electron acceptors are also discussed. (author)

  19. Energetics and the magnetic state of Mn2 adsorbed on Au(111): Dimer bond distance dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, S.; Mejía-López, J.; Munoz, Francisco; Calles, A.; Morán-López, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a theoretical study of the adsorption Mn2 dimer on the Au(111) surface. Here we use the density functional theory to construct a map of adsorption energies, EA, of Mn2 on a Au(111) surface as a function of interatomic bond distance, dMn-Mn, among Mn atoms. We employed a 4×4 supercell of Au(111) surface which lead us to reach dMn-Mn values in the range from 2.6 to 6.8 Å. To make a full study of the adsorption energies we considered the antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) states of the Mn2 on the surface. The energy landscape contains local minima when the Mn atoms are adsorbed above triangular sites and barriers that the Mn adatoms have to overcome when they move across the Au(111) surface along various paths. Our results show that the lowest energy state corresponds to the state in which the Mn atoms are next-nearest neighbors and are antiferromagnetically coupled. Furthermore, all the local minima with higher bonding energy are also those in the antiferromagnetic state. Nevertheless we find a short interval in which the FM state has lower energy than the AFM one. Finally, scanning tunneling microscope simulations for various dimer configurations on surface are reported.

  20. Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles on the Au(111) Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, J; Farfan-Arribas, E; Biener, M M; Friend, C M; Madix, R J

    2005-01-11

    The growth of titanium oxide nanoparticles on reconstructed Au(111) surfaces was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ti was deposited by physical vapor deposition at 300 K. Regular arrays of titanium nanoparticles form by preferential nucleation of Ti at the elbow sites of the herringbone reconstruction. Titanium oxide clusters were synthesized by subsequent exposure to O{sub 2} at 300 K. Two- and three-dimensional titanium oxide nanocrystallites form during annealing in the temperature range from 600 to 900 K. At the same time, the Au(111) surface assumes a serrated, <110> oriented step-edge morphology, suggesting step-edge pinning by titanium oxide nanoparticles. The oxidation state of these titanium oxide nanoparticles varies with annealing temperature. Specifically, annealing to 900 K results in the formation of stoichiometric TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals as judged by the observed XPS binding energies. Nano-dispersed TiO{sub 2} on Au(111) is an ideal system to test the various models explaining the enhanced catalytic reactivity of supported Au nanoparticles.