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Sample records for attosecond electron-hole dynamics

  1. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  2. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy has enabled resolving electron-hole dynamics in real time. The correlated electron-hole dynamics and the resulted coherence are directly related to how fast the ionization is completed. How the laser-induced electron-hole coherence evolves and whether it can be utilized to probe the core dynamics are among the key questions in attosecond physics or even attosecond chemistry. In this work, we propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attosecond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  3. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attoscond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  4. Attosecond VUV Coherent Control of Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ranitovic, P; Riviere, P; Palacios, A; Tong, X M; Toshima, N; Gonzalez-Castrillo, A; Martin, L; Martin, F; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic light sources make it possible to access attosecond time-scales, thus opening up the prospect of manipulating electronic wave packets for steering molecular dynamics. However, two decades after the birth of attosecond physics, the concept of attosecond chemistry has not yet been realized. This is because excitation and manipulation of molecular orbitals requires precisely controlled attosecond waveforms in the deep ultraviolet, which have not yet been synthesized. Here, we present a novel approach using attosecond vacuum ultraviolet pulse-trains to coherently excite and control the outcome of a simple chemical reaction in a deuterium molecule in a non-Born Oppenheimer regime. By controlling the interfering pathways of electron wave packets in the excited neutral and singly-ionized molecule, we unambiguously show that we can switch the excited electronic state on attosecond timescales, coherently guide the nuclear wave packets to dictate the way a neutral molecule vibrates, and steer and manipula...

  5. Ultrafast electron dynamics in phenylalanine initiated by attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, F.; Ayuso, D.; Trabattoni, A.; Belshaw, L.; De Camillis, S.; Anumula, S.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; Palacios, A.; Decleva, P.; Greenwood, J. B.; Martín, F.; Nisoli, M.

    2014-10-01

    In the past decade, attosecond technology has opened up the investigation of ultrafast electronic processes in atoms, simple molecules, and solids. Here, we report the application of isolated attosecond pulses to prompt ionization of the amino acid phenylalanine and the subsequent detection of ultrafast dynamics on a sub-4.5-femtosecond temporal scale, which is shorter than the vibrational response of the molecule. The ability to initiate and observe such electronic dynamics in polyatomic molecules represents a crucial step forward in attosecond science, which is progressively moving toward the investigation of more and more complex systems.

  6. Attosecond clocking of scattering dynamics in dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    In the past few years electronic-device scaling has progressed rapidly and miniaturization has reached physical gate lengths below 100 nm, heralding the age of nanoelectronics. Besides the effort in size scaling of integrated circuits, tremendous progress has recently been made in increasing the switching speed where strong-field-based ``dielectric-electronics'' may push it towards the petahertz frontier. In this contest, the investigation of the electronic collisional dynamics occurring in a dielectric material is of primary importance to fully understand the transport properties of such future devices. Here, we demonstrate attosecond chronoscopy of electron collisions in SiO2. In our experiment, a stream of isolated aerodynamically focused SiO2 nanoparticles of 50 nm diameter was delivered into the laser interaction region. Photoemission is initiated by an isolated 250 as pulse at 35 eV and the electron dynamics is traced by attosecond streaking using a delayed few-cycle laser pulse at 700 nm. Electrons were detected by a kilohertz, single-shot velocity-map imaging spectrometer, permitting to separate frames containing nanoparticle signals from frames containing the response of the reference gas only. We find that the nanoparticle photoemission exhibits a positive temporal shift with respect to the reference. In order to understand the physical origin of the shift we performed semi-classical Monte-Carlo trajectory simulations taking into account the near-field distributions in- and outside the nanoparticles as obtained from Mie theory. The simulations indicate a pronounced dependence of the streaking time shift near the highest measured electron energies on the inelastic scattering time, while elastic scattering only shows a small influence on the streaking time shift for typical dielectric materials. We envision our approach to provide direct time-domain access to inelastic scattering for a wide range of dielectrics.

  7. Attosecond dynamics of electrons in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Hans Jakob

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss two recent experiments carried out in our group that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18 s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. We advance high-harmonic spectroscopy to resolve spatially and temporally the migration of an electron hole immediately following ionization of iodoacetylene, while simultaneously demonstrating extensive control over the process. A multidimensional approach, based on the measurement of both even and odd harmonic orders, enables us to reconstruct both quantum amplitudes and phases of the electronic states with a resolution of ~ 100 as. We separately reconstruct quasi-field-free and laser-controlled charge migration as a function of the spatial orientation of the molecule and determine the shape of the hole created by ionization. The second experiment is carried out on a free-flowing microjet of liquid water. We use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from liquid water using the RABBIT technique. We measure a delay on the order of 50 as between electrons emitted from the HOMO of liquid water compared to that of gas-phase water and a substantially reduced modulation contrast of the corresponding sidebands. Since our measurements on solvated water molecules are referenced to isolated ones, the measured delays reflect (i) the photoionization delays caused by electron transport through the aqueous environment and (ii) the effect of solvation on the parent molecule. The relative modulation contrast, in turn, contains information on (iii) the modification of transition amplitudes and (iv) dephasing processes. These experiments make the liquid phase and its fascinating

  8. Correlated proton-electron hole dynamics in protonated water clusters upon extreme ultraviolet photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ultrafast nuclear and electronic dynamics of protonated water clusters H+(H2On after extreme ultraviolet photoionization is investigated. In particular, we focus on cluster cations with n = 3, 6, and 21. Upon ionization, two positive charges are present in the cluster related to the excess proton and the missing electron, respectively. A correlation is found between the cluster's geometrical conformation and initial electronic energy with the size of the final fragments produced. For situations in which the electron hole and proton are initially spatially close, the two entities become correlated and separate in a time-scale of 20 to 40 fs driven by strong non-adiabatic effects.

  9. Real-Time Probing of Electron Dynamics Using Attosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond science has paved the way for direct probing of electron dynamics in gases and solids. This review provides an overview of recent attosecond measurements, focusing on the wealth of knowledge obtained by the application of isolated attosecond pulses in studying dynamics in gases and solid-state systems. Attosecond photoelectron and photoion measurements in atoms reveal strong-field tunneling ionization and a delay in the photoemission from different electronic states. These measurements applied to molecules have shed light on ultrafast intramolecular charge migration. Similar approaches are used to understand photoemission processes from core and delocalized electronic states in metal surfaces. Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to follow the real-time motion of valence electrons and to measure the lifetimes of autoionizing channels in atoms. In solids, it provides the first measurements of bulk electron dynamics, revealing important phenomena such as the timescales governing the switching from an insulator to a metallic state and carrier-carrier interactions.

  10. Spin dynamics in bilayer graphene: Role of electron-hole puddles and Dyakonov-Perel mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Adam, Shaffique; Roche, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We report on spin transport features which are unique to high quality bilayer graphene, in the absence of magnetic contaminants and strong intervalley mixing. The time-dependent spin polarization of a propagating wave packet is computed using an efficient quantum transport method. In the limit of vanishing effects of substrate and disorder, the energy dependence of the spin lifetime is similar to monolayer graphene with an M -shaped profile and minimum value at the charge neutrality point, but with an electron-hole asymmetry fingerprint. In sharp contrast, the incorporation of substrate-induced electron-hole puddles (characteristics of supported graphene either on SiO2 or hBN ) surprisingly results in a large enhancement of the low-energy spin lifetime and a lowering of its high-energy values. Such a feature, unique to the bilayer, is explained in terms of a reinforced Dyakonov-Perel mechanism at the Dirac point, whereas spin relaxation at higher energies is driven by pure dephasing effects. This suggests further electrostatic control of the spin transport length scales in graphene devices.

  11. Probing attosecond pulse structures by XUV-induced hole dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    You, Jhih-An; Dahlström, Jan Marcus

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a two-photon ionization process in neon by an isolated attosecond pump pulse and two coherent extreme ultraviolet probe fields. The probe fields, tuned to the 2s-2p transition in the residual ion, allow for coherent control of the photoelectron via indirect interactions with the hole. We show that the photoelectron-ion coincidence signal contains an interference pattern that can be used to reconstruct the temporal structure of attosecond pump pulses. Our results are supported by simulations based on time-dependent configuration-interaction singles and lowest-order perturbation theory within second quantization.

  12. Attosecond dynamics through a Fano resonance: Monitoring the birth of a photoelectron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruson, V.; Barreau, L.; Jiménez-Galan, Á.; Risoud, F.; Caillat, J.; Maquet, A.; Carré, B.; Lepetit, F.; Hergott, J.-F.; Ruchon, T.; Argenti, L.; Taïeb, R.; Martín, F.; Salières, P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of quantum systems are encoded in the amplitude and phase of wave packets. However, the rapidity of electron dynamics on the attosecond scale has precluded the complete characterization of electron wave packets in the time domain. Using spectrally resolved electron interferometry, we were able to measure the amplitude and phase of a photoelectron wave packet created through a Fano autoionizing resonance in helium. In our setup, replicas obtained by two-photon transitions interfere with reference wave packets that are formed through smooth continua, allowing the full temporal reconstruction, purely from experimental data, of the resonant wave packet released in the continuum. In turn, this resolves the buildup of the autoionizing resonance on an attosecond time scale. Our results, in excellent agreement with ab initio time-dependent calculations, raise prospects for detailed investigations of ultrafast photoemission dynamics governed by electron correlation, as well as coherent control over structured electron wave packets.

  13. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalewski, Markus; Rouxel, Jérémy R; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry an additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences and demonstrate how it offers a novel tool to monitor non-adiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can enhance the time resolution and provide direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  14. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-01

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences. We demonstrate how streaked photoelectrons offer a novel tool for monitoring nonadiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can provide high time resolution direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  15. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jérémy R; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-22

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences. We demonstrate how streaked photoelectrons offer a novel tool for monitoring nonadiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can provide high time resolution direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  16. Attosecond Electron Processes in Materials: Excitons, Plasmons, and Charge Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-19

    carrier dynamics in gallium arsenide thin films, and real time investigations of plasmon dynamics in SiO2 covered gold nanospheres. Moreover, the...Measurement of Interlayer Screening Length of Layered Graphene by Plasmonic Nanostructure Resonances,” J. Phys. Chem. C 117, 22211 (2013). 21. P. M

  17. Attosecond-correlated dynamics of two electrons in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sharma; N Camus; B Fischer; M Kremer; A Rudenko; B Bergues; M Kuebel; N G Johnson; M F Kling; T Pfeifer; J Ullrich; R Moshammer

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explored strong field-induced decay of doubly excited transient Coulomb complex Ar** → Ar2++2. We measured the correlated two-electron emission as a function of carrier envelop phase (CEP) of 6 fs pulses in the non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) of argon. Classical model calculations suggest that the intermediate doubly excited Coulomb complex loses memory of its formation dynamics. We estimated the ionization time difference between the two electrons from NSDI of argon and it is 200 ± 100 as (N Camus et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 073003 (2012)).

  18. Strong-field-induced attosecond dynamics in SiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienberger R.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Striking field-induced changes in the absorption near the Si L-edge of SiO2 exposed to a near-infrared laser field of several V/Å delivered by a few-cycle pulse are observed with sub-100 attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by means of attosecond transient absorption.

  19. State-of-the-art attosecond metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze, M., E-mail: martin.schultze@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wirth, A.; Grguras, I.; Uiberacker, M.; Uphues, T.; Verhoef, A.J.; Gagnon, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hofstetter, M.; Kleineberg, U. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goulielmakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Krausz, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We present a complete setup for investigations with attosecond temporal resoultion. {yields} Few-cycle visible laser pulses are used to generate xray pulses approaching the atomic unit of time. {yields} Attosecond XUV pulses explore ultrafast electronic dynamics in atoms. - Abstract: Tracking and controlling electron dynamics in the interior of atoms, molecules as well as in solids is at the forefront of modern ultrafast science . Time-resolved studies of these dynamics require attosecond temporal resolution that is provided by an ensemble of techniques consolidated under the term 'attosecond metrology'. This work reports the development and commissioning of what we refer to as next-generation attosecond beamline technology: the AS-1 attosecond beamline at the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics. It consists of a phase-stabilized few-cycle laser system, for the generation of XUV radiation, and modules tailored for the spectral filtering and isolation of attosecond pulses as well as for their temporal characterization. The setup produces the shortest attosecond pulses demonstrated to date and combines them with advanced spectroscopic instrumentation (electron-, ion- and XUV-spectrometers). These pulses serve as temporally confined trigger events (attosecond streaking and tunneling spectroscopy) or probe pulses (attosecond absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy) enabling attosecond chronoscopy to be applied to a broad range of systems belonging to the microcosm.

  20. Attosecond Lighthouses

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenti, H

    2011-01-01

    Coherent light beams composed of ultrashort pulses are now increasingly used in different fields of Science, from time-resolved spectroscopy to plasma physics. Under the effect of even simple optical components, the spatial properties of these beams can vary over the duration of the light pulse. In this letter, we show how such spatio-temporally coupled electromagnetic fields can be exploited to produce an attosecond lighthouse, i.e. a source emitting a collection of isolated attosecond pulses, propagating in angularly well-separated light beams. This very general effect not only opens the way to a new generation of attosecond light sources, particularly suitable for pump-probe experiments, but also provides a powerful new tool for ultrafast metrology, for instance giving direct access to fluctuations in the phase of the laser field oscillations with respect to the pulse envelop, right at the focus of even the most intense ultrashort laser beams.

  1. Electron hole tracking PIC simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuteng; Hutchinson, Ian

    2016-10-01

    An electron hole is a coherent BGK mode solitary wave. Electron holes are observed to travel at high velocities relative to bulk plasmas. The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code with fully kinetic ions. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. The electron hole signal is detected and the simulation domain moves by a carefully designed feedback control law to follow its propagation. This approach has the advantage that the length of the simulation domain can be significantly reduced to several times the hole width, which makes high resolution simulations tractable. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and energization effects we call ``jetting''. The work was partially supported by the NSF/DOE Basic Plasma Science Partnership under Grant DE-SC0010491. Computer simulations were carried out on the MIT PSFC parallel AMD Opteron/Infiniband cluster Loki.

  2. Visualization and Interpretation of Attosecond Electron Dynamics in Laser-Driven Hydrogen Molecular Ion using Bohmian Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Takemoto, Norio

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the attosecond electron dynamics in hydrogen molecular ion driven by an external intense laser field using ab-initio numerical simulations of the corresponding time-dependent Schr{\\"{o}}dinger equation and Bohmian trajectories. To this end, we employ a one-dimensional model of the molecular ion in which the motion of the protons is frozen. The results of the Bohmian trajectory calculations do agree well with those of the ab-initio simulations and clearly visualize the electron transfer between the two protons in the field. In particular, the Bohmian trajectory calculations confirm the recently predicted attosecond transient localization of the electron at one of the protons and the related multiple bunches of the ionization current within a half cycle of the laser field. Further analysis based on the quantum trajectories shows that the electron dynamics in the molecular ion can be understood via the phase difference accumulated between the Coulomb wells at the two protons. Modeling of the dynamics ...

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    Investigations of light-matter interactions and motion in the microcosm have entered a new temporal regime, the regime of attosecond physics. It is a main 'spin-off' of strong field (i.e., intense laser) physics, in which nonperturbative effects are fundamental. Attosecond pulses open up new avenues for time-domain studies of multi-electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas, and solids on their natural, quantum mechanical time scale and at dimensions shorter than molecular and even atomic scales. These capabilities promise a revolution in our microscopic knowledge and understanding of matter. The recent development of intense, phase-stabilized femtosecond (10-15 s) lasers has allowed unparalleled temporal control of electrons from ionizing atoms, permitting for the first time the generation and measurement of isolated light pulses as well as trains of pulses on the attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) time scale, the natural time scale of the electron itself (e.g., the orbital period of an electron in the ground state of the H atom is 152 as). This development is facilitating (and even catalyzing) a new class of ultrashort time domain studies in photobiology, photochemistry, and photophysics. These new coherent, sub-fs pulses carried at frequencies in the extreme ultraviolet and soft-x-ray spectral regions, along with their intense, synchronized near-infrared driver waveforms and novel metrology based on sub-fs control of electron-light interactions, are spawning the new science of attosecond physics, whose aims are to monitor, to visualize, and, ultimately, to control electrons on their own time and spatial scales, i.e., the attosecond time scale and the sub-nanometre (Ångstrom) spatial scale typical of atoms and molecules. Additional goals for experiment are to advance the enabling technologies for producing attosecond pulses at higher intensities and shorter durations. According to theoretical predictions, novel methods for intense attosecond pulse generation may in

  4. The Frontiers of Attosecond Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumy, G.; Wheeler, J.; Blaga, C.; Catoire, F.; Chirla, R.; Colosimo, P.; March, A. M.; Agostini, P.; Dimauro, L. F.

    2009-03-01

    The genesis of light pulses with attosecond (10-18 seconds) durations signifies a new frontier in time-resolved physics. The scientific importance is obvious: the time-scale necessary for probing the motion of an electron(s) in the ground state is attoseconds (atomic unit of time = 24 as). The availability of attosecond pulses would allow, for the first time, the study of the time-dependent dynamics of correlated electron systems by freezing the motion, in essence exploring the structure with ultra-fast snapshots, then following the subsequent evolution using pump-probe techniques. This paper examines the fundamental principles of attosecond formation by Fourier synthesis of a high harmonic comb and phase measurements using two-color techniques. Quantum control of the spectral phase, critical to attosecond formation, has its origin in the fundamental response of an atom to an intense electromagnetic field. We will interpret the laser-atom interaction using a semi-classical trajectory model.

  5. Attosecond physics at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Okell, W; Zherebtsov, S; Förg, B; Schötz, J; Seiffert, J L; Fennel, T; Shaaran, T; Zimmermann, T; Chacón, A; Guichard, R; Zaïr, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Witting, T; Braun, A; Maier, S A; Roso, L; Krüger, M; Hommelhoff, P; Kling, M F; Krausz, F; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spati...

  6. Beyond Attoseconds

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, A E

    2012-01-01

    We briefly review the pilot ideas on the generation of EM-pulses much shorter than already available sub-femtosecond pulses, and outline inroads and venues into the physics of pulses mush shorter than an attosecond (10^-18 s), in particular the so called zeptosecond (10^-21 s) and yoctosecond (10^-24 s) pulses that may allow one to operate on QED and nuclear as well as quark-gluon time plasma scales. We also very briefly outline the entire time-scale available in the existing universe, down to the ultimately short the so called Planck time ~ 10^-43 s, which is the time-scale of Big Bang, and the most significant time-scale-posts on the road to it.

  7. Ionization of atoms by chirped attosecond pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Fang; Peng Liang-You; Gong Qi-Huang

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the ionization dynamics of atoms by chirped attosecond pulses using the strong field approximation method. The pulse parameters are carefully chosen in the regime where the strong field approximation method is valid. We analyse the effects of the chirp of attosecond pulses on the energy distributions and the corresponding left-right asymmetry of the ionized electrons. For a single chirped attosecond pulse, the ionized electrons can be redistributed and the left-right asymmetry shows oscillations because of the introduction of the chirp. For time-delayed double attosecond pulses at different intensities with the weaker one chirped, exchanging the order of the two pulses shows a relative shift of the energy spectra, which can be explained by the different effective time delays of different frequency components because of the chirp.

  8. Electron holes in inhomogeneous magnetic field: electron heating and electron hole evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, Ivan; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton; Drake, James

    2016-04-01

    Electron holes are electrostatic non-linear structures widely observed in the space plasma, e.g., in reconnecting current sheets, collisionless bow shocks, Earth auroral region and outer radiation belt etc. In the present paper we analyze the process of energy exchange between trapped electrons, untrapped electrons and electron hole propagating in weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field. We show that as electron hole propagates into the region with stronger magnetic field, trapped electrons are heated due to conservation of the first adiabatic invariant. At the same time electron hole may grow or dissipate in dependence on peculiarities of distribution functions of trapped and resonant untrapped electrons. The energy gain of trapped electrons is due to energy losses of resonant electrons and/or decrease of electron hole energy (electrostatic energy and kinetic energy of non-resonant electrons). We stress that taking into account the energy exchange with resonant untrapped electrons increases the heating factor of trapped electrons that is proportional to the magnetic field magnitude in the region up to what electron holes survive. We illustrate the suggested mechanism for H. Schamel's electron holes and show that during propagation along a positive magnetic field gradient their amplitude should grow. Neglect of energy exchange with resonant untrapped electrons would result electron hole dissipation with only modest heating factor of trapped electrons. We argue that the suggested mechanism may be responsible for generation of energetic electrons in the space plasma.

  9. Attosecond Physics at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, Marcelo F; Perez-Hernandez, J; Landsman, Alexandra; Okell, William; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Förg, Benjamin; Schötz, Johannes; Seiffert, Lennart; Fennel, Thomas; Shaaran, Tahir; Zimmermann, Tomas; Chacón, Alexis; Guichard, Roland; Zair, Amelle; Tisch, John; Marangos, J; Witting, Tobias; Braun, Avi; Maier, Stefan; Roso, Luis; Krüger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter; Kling, Matthias; Krausz, Ferenc; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-01-06

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. For comparison, the revolution of an electron on a 1s orbital of a hydrogen atom is 152 as. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this report on progress we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metal- lic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as above-threshold ionization and high-order harmonic generation. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated

  10. Fundamentals of attosecond optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zenghu

    2011-01-01

    Attosecond optical pulse generation, along with the related process of high-order harmonic generation, is redefining ultrafast physics and chemistry. A practical understanding of attosecond optics requires significant background information and foundational theory to make full use of these cutting-edge lasers and advance the technology toward the next generation of ultrafast lasers. Fundamentals of Attosecond Optics provides the first focused introduction to the field. The author presents the underlying concepts and techniques required to enter the field, as well as recent research advances th

  11. Advances in attosecond science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Francesca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Stagira, Salvatore; Vozzi, Caterina; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond science offers formidable tools for the investigation of electronic processes at the heart of important physical processes in atomic, molecular and solid-state physics. In the last 15 years impressive advances have been obtained from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. Attosecond pulses, in the form of isolated pulses or of trains of pulses, are now routinely available in various laboratories. In this review recent advances in attosecond science are reported and important applications are discussed. After a brief presentation of various techniques that can be employed for the generation and diagnosis of sub-femtosecond pulses, various applications are reported in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter physics.

  12. Attosecond electron-electron collision dynamics of the four-electron escape in Be close to threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanouilidou, A

    2012-01-01

    We explore the escape geometry of four electrons a few eV above threshold following single-photon absorption from the ground state of Be. We find that the four electrons leave the atom on the vertices of a pyramid instead of a previously-predicted tetrahedron. To illustrate the physical mechanisms of quadruple ionization we use a momentum transferring attosecond collision scheme which we show to be in accord with the pyramid break-up pattern.

  13. High-harmonic generation in alpha-quartz by the electron-hole recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Otobe, T

    2016-01-01

    The first-principle calculation for the high-harmonic generation (HHG) in an alpha-quartz employing the time-dependent density-functional theory is reported. The photon energy is set to 1.55 eV, and the cutoff energy of the plateau region is found to be limited at the 19th harmonics (30 eV). The laser intensity dependence of HHG efficiency at the cutoff energy region is consistent with that of the hole density in the lowest-lying valence band. Numerical results indicate that the electron-hole recombination plays a crucial role in HHG in alpha-quartz. It is found that the 200 attosecond pulse train is generated utilizing HHG around the plateau cutoff energy.

  14. High-harmonic generation in α -quartz by electron-hole recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otobe, T.

    2016-12-01

    A calculation of the high-harmonic generation (HHG) in α -quartz using the time-dependent density functional theory is reported. The interband process is attributed to the dominant in HHG above the band gap. The photon energy is set to 1.55 eV, and the cutoff energy of the plateau region is found to be limited at the 19th harmonic (30 eV). The dependence of the HHG efficiency at the cutoff energy region on laser intensity is consistent with that of the hole density in the lowest-lying valence band. Numerical results indicate that electron-hole recombination plays a crucial role in HHG in α -quartz. It is found that a 200 attosecond pulse train is produced using HHG around the plateau cutoff energy.

  15. Theory of attosecond delays in molecular photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykusheva, Denitsa; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-03-01

    We present a theoretical formalism for the calculation of attosecond delays in molecular photoionization. It is shown how delays relevant to one-photon-ionization, also known as Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith delays, can be obtained from the complex dipole matrix elements provided by molecular quantum scattering theory. These results are used to derive formulae for the delays measured by two-photon attosecond interferometry based on an attosecond pulse train and a dressing femtosecond infrared pulse. These effective delays are first expressed in the molecular frame where maximal information about the molecular photoionization dynamics is available. The effects of averaging over the emission direction of the electron and the molecular orientation are introduced analytically. We illustrate this general formalism for the case of two polyatomic molecules. N2O serves as an example of a polar linear molecule characterized by complex photoionization dynamics resulting from the presence of molecular shape resonances. H2O illustrates the case of a non-linear molecule with comparably simple photoionization dynamics resulting from a flat continuum. Our theory establishes the foundation for interpreting measurements of the photoionization dynamics of all molecules by attosecond metrology.

  16. Analysis and simulation of BGK electron holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Muschietti

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations from satellites crossing regions of magnetic-field-aligned electron streams reveal solitary potential structures that move at speeds much greater than the ion acoustic/thermal velocity. The structures appear as positive potential pulses rapidly drifting along the magnetic field, and are electrostatic in their rest frame. We interpret them as BGK electron holes supported by a drifting population of trapped electrons. Using Laplace transforms, we analyse the behavior of one phase-space electron hole. The resulting potential shapes and electron distribution functions are self-consistent and compatible with the field and particle data associated with the observed pulses. In particular, the spatial width increases with increasing amplitude. The stability of the analytic solution is tested by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code with open boundaries. We consider a strongly magnetized parameter regime in which the bounce frequency of the trapped electrons is much less than their gyrofrequency. Our investigation includes the influence of the ions, which in the frame of the hole appear as an incident beam, and impinge on the BGK potential with considerable energy. The nonlinear structure is remarkably resilient

  17. Connecting Lab-Based Attosecond Science with FEL research

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years laboratory-scale femtosecond laser-based research using XUV light has developed dramatically following the successful development of attosecond laser pulses by means of high-harmonic generation. Using attosecond laser pulses, studies of electron dynamics on the natural timescale that electronic processes occur in atoms, molecules and solids can be contemplated, providing unprecedented insight into the fundamental role that electrons play in photo-induced processes. In my talk I will briefly review the present status of the attosecond science research field in terms of present and foreseen capabilities, and discuss a few recent applications, including a first example of the use of attosecond laser pulses in molecular science. In addition, I will discuss very recent results of experiments where photoionization of dynamically aligned molecules is investigated using a high-harmonics XUV source. Photoionization of aligned molecules becomes all the more interesting if the experiment is perfo...

  18. Plasma electron-hole kinematics: momentum conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the kinematic properties of a plasma electron hole: a non-linear self-sustained localized positive electric potential perturbation, trapping electrons, that behaves as a coherent entity. When a hole accelerates or grows in depth, ion and electron plasma momentum is changed both within the hole and outside it, by an energization process we call jetting. We present a comprehensive analytic calculation of the momentum changes of an isolated general one-dimensional hole. The conservation of the total momentum gives the hole's kinematics, determining its velocity evolution. Our results explain many features of the behavior of hole speed observed in numerical simulations, including self-acceleration at formation, and hole pushing and trapping by ion streams.

  19. Observations of slow electron holes at a magnetic reconnection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Vaivads, A; André, M; Fujimoto, M; Retinò, A; Owen, C J

    2010-10-15

    We report in situ observations of high-frequency electrostatic waves in the vicinity of a reconnection site in the Earth's magnetotail. Two different types of waves are observed inside an ion-scale magnetic flux rope embedded in a reconnecting current sheet. Electron holes (weak double layers) produced by the Buneman instability are observed in the density minimum in the center of the flux rope. Higher frequency broadband electrostatic waves with frequencies extending up to f(pe) are driven by the electron beam and are observed in the denser part of the rope. Our observations demonstrate multiscale coupling during the reconnection: Electron-scale physics is induced by the dynamics of an ion-scale flux rope embedded in a yet larger-scale magnetic reconnection process.

  20. Charge Migration in Phenylalanine Initiated by Attosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Jason; Trabattoni, Andrea; Ayuso, David; Belshaw, Louise; de Camillis, Simone; Anumula, Sunil; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Palacios, Alicia; Declava, Piero; Martin, Fernando; Calegari, Francesca; Nisoli, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years attosecond techniques have been implemented for the investigation of ultrafast dynamics in molecules. The generation of isolated attosecond pulses characterized by a relatively high photon flux has opened up new possibilities in the study of molecular dynamics. We report on experimental and theoretical results of ultrafast charge dynamics in a biochemically relevant molecule, namely, the amino acid phenylalanine. The data represent the first experimental demonstration of the generation and observation of a charge migration process in a complex molecule, where electron dynamics precede nuclear motion. The application of attosecond technology to the investigation of electron dynamics in biologically relevant molecules represents a multidisciplinary work, which can open new research frontiers: those in which few femtosecond and even sub-femtosecond electron processes determine the fate of biomolecules.

  1. Manifestation of attosecond XUV fields temporal structures in attosecond streaking spectrogram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanglong Chen; Yunjiu Cao; Dong Eon Kim

    2011-01-01

    @@ The features of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) field are encoded in the attosecond XUV spectrogram.We investigate the effect of the temporal structures of attosecond XUV fields on the attosecond streaking spectrogram.Factors such as the number of attosecond XUV pulses and the temporal chirp of attosecond XUV pulses are considered.Results indicate that unlike the attosecond streaking spectrogram for an attosecond XUV field with two pulses of a half-cycle separation of streaking field, the spectrogram for the attosecond XUV field with three pulses demonstrates fine spectral fringes in separated traces.%The features of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) field are encoded in the attosecond XUV spectrogram. We investigate the effect of the temporal structures of attosecond XUV fields on the attosecond streaking spectrogram. Factors such as the number of attosecond XUV pulses and the temporal chirp of attosecond XUV pulses are considered. Results indicate that unlike the attosecond streaking spectrogram for an attosecond XUV field with two pulses of a half-cycle separation of streaking field, the spectrogram for the attosecond XUV field with three pulses demonstrates fine spectral fringes in separated traces.

  2. Birth of a resonant attosecond wavepacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenti, L.; Gruson, V.; Barreau, L.; Jimenez-Galan, A.; Risoud, F.; Caillat, J.; Maquet, A.; Carre, B.; Lepetit, F.; Hergott, J.-F.; Ruchon, T.; Taieb, R.; Martin, F.; Salieres, P.

    2016-05-01

    Both amplitude and phase are needed to characterize the dynamics of a wavepacket. However, such characterization is difficult when both attosecond and femtosecond timescales are involved, as it is the case for broadband photoionization to a continuum encompassing autoionizing states. Here we demonstrate that Rainbow RABBIT, a new attosecond interferometry, allows the measurement of amplitude and phase of a photoelectron wavepacket created through a Fano resonance with unprecedented precision. In the experiment, a tunable attosecond pulse train is combined with the fundamental laser pulse to induce two-photon transitions in helium via an intermediate autoionizing state. From the energy and time-delay resolved signal, we fully reconstruct the resonant electron wavepacket as it builds up in the continuum. Measurements accurately match the predictions of a new time-resolved multi-photon resonant model, known to reproduce ab initio calculations. This agreement confirms the potential of Rainbow RABBIT to investigate photoemission delays in ultrafast processes governed by electron correlation, as well as to control structured electron wavepackets. now at Univ. Central Florida, Orlando, FL (USA).

  3. Attosecond streaking of photoelectron emission from disordered solids

    CERN Document Server

    Okell, W A; Fabris, D; Arrell, C A; Hengster, J; Ibrahimkutty, S; Seiler, A; Barthelmess, M; Stankov, S; Lei, D Y; Sonnefraud, Y; Rahmani, M; Uphues, Th; Maier, S A; Marangos, J P; Tisch, J W G

    2014-01-01

    Attosecond streaking of photoelectrons emitted by extreme ultraviolet light has begun to reveal how electrons behave during their transport within simple crystalline solids. Many sample types within nanoplasmonics, thin-film physics, and semiconductor physics, however, do not have a simple single crystal structure. The electron dynamics which underpin the optical response of plasmonic nanostructures and wide-bandgap semiconductors happen on an attosecond timescale. Measuring these dynamics using attosecond streaking will enable such systems to be specially tailored for applications in areas such as ultrafast opto-electronics. We show that streaking can be extended to this very general type of sample by presenting streaking measurements on an amorphous film of the wide-bandgap semiconductor tungsten trioxide, and on polycrystalline gold, a material that forms the basis of many nanoplasmonic devices. Our measurements reveal the near-field temporal structure at the sample surface, and photoelectron wavepacket te...

  4. A flexible apparatus for attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, E.; Stanislawski, M.; Uphues, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Neppl, S.; Barth, J. V.; Menzel, D.; Feulner, P. [Physik Department E20, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Cavalieri, A. L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics, Universitaet Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bothschafter, E. M.; Ernstorfer, R.; Kienberger, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik Department E11, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hofstetter, M.; Kleineberg, U.; Krausz, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    We describe an apparatus for attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces, which combines the generation of isolated attosecond extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses by high harmonic generation in gases with time-resolved photoelectron detection and surface science techniques in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. This versatile setup provides isolated attosecond pulses with photon energies of up to 140 eV and few-cycle near infrared pulses for studying ultrafast electron dynamics in a large variety of surfaces and interfaces. The samples can be prepared and characterized on an atomic scale in a dedicated flexible surface science end station. The extensive possibilities offered by this apparatus are demonstrated by applying attosecond XUV pulses with a central photon energy of {approx}125 eV in an attosecond streaking experiment of a xenon multilayer grown on a Re(0001) substrate.

  5. Nonlinear growth of electron holes in cross-field wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Ian; Haakonsen, C. B.; Zhou, C.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-field plasma flow past an obstacle is key to the physics underlying Mach-probes, space-craft charging, and the wakes of non-magnetic bodies: the solar-wind wake of the moon is a typical example. We report associated new nonlinear instability mechanisms. Ions are accelerated along the B-field into the wake, forming two beams, but they are not initially unstable to ion two-stream instabilities. Electron Langmuir waves become unstable much earlier because of an electron velocity-distribution distortion called the ``dimple''. The magnetic field, perpendicular to the flow, defines the 1-D direction of particle dynamics. In high-fidelity PIC simulations at realistic mass ratio, small electron holes--non-linearly self-binding electron density deficits--are spawned by the dimple in fe (v) near the phase-space separatrix. Most holes accelerate rapidly out of the wake, along B. However, some remain at very low speed, and grow until they are large enough to disrupt the two ion-streams, well before the ions are themselves linearly unstable. This non-linear hole growth is caused by the same mechanism that causes the dimple: cross-field drift from a lower to a higher density. Related mechanisms cause plasma near magnetized Langmuir probes to be unsteady. Partially supported by the NSF/DOE Basic Plasma Science Partnership grant DE-SC0010491.

  6. Multiphoton Processes and Attosecond Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Midorikawa, Katsumi; 12th International Conference on Multiphoton Processes; 3rd International Conference on Attosecond Physics

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in ultrashort pulsed laser technology have opened new frontiers in atomic, molecular and optical sciences. The 12th International Conference on Multiphoton Processes (ICOMP12) and the 3rd International Conference on Attosecond Physics (ATTO3), held jointly in Sapporo, Japan, during July 3-8, showcased studies at the forefront of research on multiphoton processes and attosecond physics. This book summarizes presentations and discussions from these two conferences.

  7. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  8. Attosecond experiments on plasmonic nanostructures principles and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schötz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Johannes Schötz presents the first measurements of optical electro-magnetic near-fields around nanostructures with subcycle-resolution. The ability to measure and understand light-matter interactions on the nanoscale is an important component for the development of light-wave-electronics, the control and steering of electron dynamics with the frequency of light, which promises a speed-up by several orders of magnitude compared to conventional electronics. The experiments presented here on metallic nanotips, widely used in experiments and applications, do not only demonstrate the feasibility of attosecond streaking as a unique tool for fundamental studies of ultrafast nanophotonics but also represent a first important step towards this goal. Contents Electron Scattering in Solids Attosecond Streaking from Metal Nanotips Target Groups Lecturers and students of physics, especially in the area of nanophotonics and attosecond physics About the Author Johannes Schötz received his Master's degree in physics and cu...

  9. A Method for Distinguishing Attosecond Single Pulse from Attosecond Pulse Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Yi-Ping; ZENG Zhi-Nan; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    @@ The driving laser field assisted attosecond soft-extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) photo-ionization was used successfully to measure the duration of the attosecond pulse based on the cross-correlation method. However, this method in principle cannot distinguish a single attosecond pulse from the attosecond pulse train. We propose a technique for directly distinguishing attosecond single pulse from attosecond pulse train based on the photo-ionization of atoms by attosecond XUV pulse in the presence of a two-colour strong laser pulse.

  10. Hydrodynamic theory of partially degenerate electron-hole fluids in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Eliasson, B.

    2016-10-01

    A quantum hydrodynamic theory for high-frequency electron-hole Langmuir and acoustic-like oscillations as well as static charge shielding effects in arbitrarily doped semiconductors is presented. The model includes kinetic corrections to the quantum statistical pressure and to the quantum Bohm potential for partially degenerate electrons and holes at finite temperatures. The holes contribute to the oscillations and screening effects in semiconductors in a similar manner as real particles. The dielectric functions are derived in the high-frequency limit for wave excitations and in the low-frequency limit for the study of static screening. The dispersion relation for the Langmuir and acoustic-like oscillations is examined for different parameters of doped silicon (Si). Some interesting properties and differences of electron hole dynamical behavior in N- and P-type Si are pointed out. Holes are also observed to enhance an attractive charge shielding effect when the semiconductor is highly acceptor-doped.

  11. Decoherence in attosecond photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Stefan; Greenman, Loren; Ho, Phay J; Mazziotti, David A; Santra, Robin

    2011-02-04

    The creation of superpositions of hole states via single-photon ionization using attosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses is studied with the time-dependent configuration-interaction singles (TDCIS) method. Specifically, the degree of coherence between hole states in atomic xenon is investigated. We find that interchannel coupling not only affects the hole populations, but it also enhances the entanglement between the photoelectron and the remaining ion, thereby reducing the coherence within the ion. As a consequence, even if the spectral bandwidth of the ionizing pulse exceeds the energy splittings among the hole states involved, perfectly coherent hole wave packets cannot be formed. For sufficiently large spectral bandwidth, the coherence can only be increased by increasing the mean photon energy.

  12. Towards attosecond measurement in molecules and at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangos, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    1) We will present a number of experimental approaches that are being developed at Imperial College to make attosecond timescale measurements of electronic dynamics in suddenly photoionized molecules and at surfaces. A brief overview will be given of some of the unanswered questions in ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in molecules and solids. These questions include the existence of electronic charge migration in molecules and how this process might couple to nuclear motion even on the few femtosecond timescale. How the timescale of photoemission from a surface may differ from that of an isolated atom, e.g. due to electron transport phenomena associated with the distance from the surface of the emitting atom and the electron dispersion relation, is also an open question. 2) The measurement techniques we are currently developing to answer these questions are HHG spectroscopy, attosecond pump-probe photoelectron/photoion studies, and attosecond pump-probe transient absorption as well as attosecond streaking for measuring surface emission. We will present recent advances in generating two synchronized isolated attosecond pulses at different colours for pump-probe measurements (at 20 eV and 90 eV respectively). Results on generation of isolated attosecond pulses at 300 eV and higher photon energy using a few-cycle 1800 nm OPG source will be presented. The use of these resources for making pump-probe measurements will be discussed. Finally we will present the results of streaking measurement of photoemission wavepackets from two types of surface (WO3 and a evaporated Au film) that show a temporal broadening of ~ 100 as compared to atomic streaks that is consistent with the electron mean free path in these materials. Work supported by ERC and EPSRC.

  13. Attosecond double-slit experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F; Schätzel, M G; Walther, H; Baltuska, A; Goulielmakis, E; Krausz, F; Milosević, D B; Bauer, D; Becker, W; Paulus, G G

    2005-07-22

    A new scheme for a double-slit experiment in the time domain is presented. Phase-stabilized few-cycle laser pulses open one to two windows (slits) of attosecond duration for photoionization. Fringes in the angle-resolved energy spectrum of varying visibility depending on the degree of which-way information are measured. A situation in which one and the same electron encounters a single and a double slit at the same time is observed. The investigation of the fringes makes possible interferometry on the attosecond time scale. From the number of visible fringes, for example, one derives that the slits are extended over about 500 as.

  14. Single 100-terawatt attosecond X-ray light pulse generation

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X R; Zhang, Y X; Lu, H Y; Zhang, H; Dromey, B; Zhu, S P; Zhou, C T; Zepf, M; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    The birth of attosecond light sources is expected to inspire a breakthrough in ultrafast optics, which may extend human real-time measurement and control techniques into atomic-scale electronic dynamics. For applications, it is essential to obtain a single attosecond pulse of high intensity, large photon energy and short duration. Here we show that single 100-terawatt attosecond X-ray light pulse with intensity ${1\\times10^{21}}\\textrm{W}/\\textrm{cm}^{{ 2}}$ and duration ${7.9} \\textrm{as}$ can be produced by intense laser irradiation on a capacitor-nanofoil target composed of two separate nanofoils. In the interaction, a strong electrostatic potential develops between two nanofoils, which drags electrons out of the second foil and piles them up in vacuum, forming an ultradense relativistic electron nanobunch. This nanobunch exists in only half a laser cycle and smears out in others, resulting in coherent synchrotron emission of a single pulse. Such an unprecedentedly giant attosecond X-ray pulse may bring us...

  15. Ptychographic reconstruction of attosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchini, M; Ludwig, A; Gallmann, L; Keller, U; Feurer, T

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new attosecond pulse reconstruction modality which uses an algorithm that is derived from ptychography. In contrast to other methods, energy and delay sampling are not correlated, and as a result, the number of electron spectra to record is considerably smaller. Together with the robust algorithm, this leads to a more precise and fast convergence of the reconstruction.

  16. Electron-Hole Counting Approach to Surface Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadi, D. J.

    The observed reconstructions of III-V semiconductor surfaces are shown to be consistent with constraints imposed by a simple "electron-hole" counting rule proposed by Pashley. The rule ensures that the predicted surfaces are nonmetallic, nonpolar, and at least, metastable since the compensation of the "donor" electrons leaves no occupied states in the upper part of the band gap which can easily induce other reconstructions. Applications of the method to the problem of surface structure and passivation are examined.

  17. Probing Time-Dependent Molecular Dipoles on the Attosecond Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidel, Ch.; Klei, J.; Yang, C.-H.; Rouzée, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Klünder, K.; Miranda, M.; Arnold, C. L.; Fordell, T.; L'Huillier, A.; Gisselbrecht, M.; Johnsson, P.; Dinh, M. P.; Suraud, E.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Despré, V.; Marques, M. A. L.; Lépine, F.

    2013-07-01

    Photoinduced molecular processes start with the interaction of the instantaneous electric field of the incident light with the electronic degrees of freedom. This early attosecond electronic motion impacts the fate of the photoinduced reactions. We report the first observation of attosecond time scale electron dynamics in a series of small- and medium-sized neutral molecules (N2, CO2, and C2H4), monitoring time-dependent variations of the parent molecular ion yield in the ionization by an attosecond pulse, and thereby probing the time-dependent dipole induced by a moderately strong near-infrared laser field. This approach can be generalized to other molecular species and may be regarded as a first example of molecular attosecond Stark spectroscopy.

  18. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  19. Ticking terahertz wave generation in attoseconds

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Dongwen; Meng, Chao; Du, Xiyu; Zhou, Zhaoyan; Zhao, Zengxiu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    We perform a joint measurement of terahertz waves and high-order harmonics generated from noble atoms driven by a fundamental laser pulse and its second harmonic. By correlating their dependence on the phase-delay of the two pulses, we determine the generation of THz waves in tens of attoseconds precision. Compared with simulations and models, we find that the laser-assisted soft-collision of the electron wave packet with the atomic core plays a key role. It is demonstrated that the rescattering process, being indispensable in HHG processes, dominant THz wave generation as well but in a more elaborate way. The new finding might be helpful for the full characterization of the rescattering dynamics.

  20. Electron-hole pair contributions to scattering, sticking, and surface diffusion: CO on Cu(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindt, J.T.; Tully, J.C. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Head-Gordon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gomez, M.A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    To assess the importance of coupling to electron-hole pair (ehp) excitations for molecular sticking, scattering, and diffusion dynamics at metal surfaces, simulations of the CO/Cu(100) system were performed using the {open_quotes}molecular dynamics with electronic frictions{close_quotes} method. Over a range of incident translational energies, energy losses to ehp excitations produce a moderate increase in sticking probability and account for 5{percent}{endash}10{percent} of initial translational energy in scattered molecules, significantly less than phonon losses. Vibrational excitation and deexcitation of scattered molecules, while remaining a minor pathway for energy flow, is strongly affected by the inclusion of ehp excitations. Finally, although equilibrium diffusion constants are unaffected by the inclusion of coupling to ehp, it causes a significant quenching of transient mobility following adsorption of translationally hot molecules. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Efficient suppression of back electron/hole recombination in cobalt phosphate surface-modified undoped bismuth vanadate photoanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yimeng; Le Formal, Florian; Kafizas, Andreas; Pendlebury, Stephanie R; Durrant, James R

    2015-11-07

    In this paper, we compared for the first time the dynamics of photogenerated holes in BiVO4 photoanodes with and without CoPi surface modification, employing transient absorption and photocurrent measurements on microsecond to second timescales. CoPi surface modification is known to cathodically shift the water oxidation onset potential; however, the reason for this improvement has not until now been fully understood. The transient absorption and photocurrent data were analyzed using a simple kinetic model, which allows quantification of the competition between electron/hole recombination and water oxidation. The results of this model are shown to be in excellent agreement with the measured photocurrent data. We demonstrate that the origin of the improvement of photocurrent onset resulting from CoPi treatment is primarily due to retardation of back electron/hole recombination across the space charge layer; no evidence of catalytic water oxidation via CoPi was observed.

  2. Transition from excitonic to plasma emission from localized electron-hole pair states in GaAs-AlGaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzke, G.; Richter, F.; Semkat, D.; Burau, G.K.G.; Kieseling, F.; Stolz, H. [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    We present a theoretical analysis of the emission of localized excitons in GaAs-AlGaAs quantum wells, which shows a strong nonlinear behavior with increasing excitation. Considering the influence of dynamical screening both on the one-particle properties of carriers and on the whole spectrum of electron-hole pair states, we are able to explain the nonlinearity as a transition of the emission from excitonic to electron-hole pair states in the continuum (electron-hole plasma). Moreover, our theoretical approach based on the quasi-particle approximation for the carriers states and quantum kinetic effects in the screening describes the observed changes of the shift of the exciton energy from higher to lower energies at a temperature of T = 10 K (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. The effect of electron holes on cyclotron maser emission driven by horseshoe distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, G Q; Feng, H Q; Wu, D J

    2016-01-01

    This Brief Communication presents a quantitative investigation for the effect of electron holes on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) driven by horseshoe distributions. The investigation is based on an integrated distribution function for the horseshoe distributions with electron holes. Results show that the presence of electron holes can significantly enhance the ECM growth rate by 2-3 times in a very narrow waveband. The present study suggests that these electron holes probably are responsible for some fine structures of radiations, such as narrowband events in auroral kilometric radiation and solar microwave spikes.

  4. The effect of electron holes on cyclotron maser emission driven by horseshoe distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chu, Y. H.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    This Brief Communication presents a quantitative investigation for the effect of electron holes on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) driven by horseshoe distributions. The investigation is based on an integrated distribution function for the horseshoe distributions with electron holes. Results show that the presence of electron holes can significantly enhance the ECM growth rate by 2-3 times in a very narrow waveband. The present study suggests that these electron holes probably are responsible for some fine structures of radiations, such as narrowband events in auroral kilometric radiation and solar microwave spikes.

  5. Correlated electron-hole plasma in organometal perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Michele; Cadelano, Michele; Marongiu, Daniela; Chen, Feipeng; Sarritzu, Valerio; Sestu, Nicola; Figus, Cristiana; Aresti, Mauro; Piras, Roberto; Geddo Lehmann, Alessandra; Cannas, Carla; Musinu, Anna; Quochi, Francesco; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites are a class of solution-processed semiconductors holding promise for the realization of low-cost efficient solar cells and on-chip lasers. Despite the recent attention they have attracted, fundamental aspects of the photophysics underlying device operation still remain elusive. Here we use photoluminescence and transmission spectroscopy to show that photoexcitations give rise to a conducting plasma of unbound but Coulomb-correlated electron-hole pairs at all excitations of interest for light-energy conversion and stimulated optical amplification. The conductive nature of the photoexcited plasma has crucial consequences for perovskite-based devices: in solar cells, it ensures efficient charge separation and ambipolar transport while, concerning lasing, it provides a low threshold for light amplification and justifies a favourable outlook for the demonstration of an electrically driven laser. We find a significant trap density, whose cross-section for carrier capture is however low, yielding a minor impact on device performance.

  6. Attosecond probing of state-resolved ionization and superpositions of atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses in the extreme ultraviolet are used to probe strong field ionization and to initiate electronic and vibrational superpositions in atoms and small molecules. Few-cycle 800 nm pulses produce strong-field ionization of Xe atoms, and the attosecond probe is used to measure the risetimes of the two spin orbit states of the ion on the 4d inner shell transitions to the 5p vacancies in the valence shell. Step-like features in the risetimes due to the subcycles of the 800 nm pulse are observed and compared with theory to elucidate the instantaneous and effective hole dynamics. Isolated attosecond pulses create massive superpositions of electronic states in Ar and nitrogen as well as vibrational superpositions among electronic states in nitrogen. An 800 nm pulse manipulates the superpositions, and specific subcycle interferences, level shifting, and quantum beats are imprinted onto the attosecond pulse as a function of time delay. Detailed outcomes are compared to theory for measurements of time-dynamic superpositions by attosecond transient absorption. Supported by DOE, NSF, ARO, AFOSR, and DARPA.

  7. Transport of electron-hole plasma in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, S. J.; Wolfe, J. P.

    1986-08-01

    Time-resolved luminescence imaging techniques are used to observe the spectral and spatial evolution of laser-generated electron-hole plasma in Ge. Both pulsed and cw excitation conditions are examined above and below the critical temperature for electron-hole liquid formation, Tc(LG). For Q-switched Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser excitation, the transport behavior is qualitatively similar above and below Tc(LG), although the luminescence spectrum undergoes significant changes in this temperature range. A rapid initial expansion (v~105 cm/s) is followed by a period of slower growth which gradually reduces as the carriers recombine. The initial velocity for pulsed excitation increases monotonically as the crystal temperature is lowered and saturates near the phonon sound velocity for high-energy excitation. These observations are consistent with phonon-wind driven transport. For intense Q-switched excitation, the motion is characterized by three regimes: (1) During the laser pulse the plasma expands as a large drop with near-unity filling fraction. (2) Expansion at near-sonic velocity continues after the peak of the laser pulse due to a ``prompt'' pulse of ballistic phonons produced by the carrier thermalization process. (3) After this intense phonon wind passes the carrier distribution, the expansion velocity abruptly decreases, but the plasma continues to expand more slowly under the influence of a ``hot spot'' produced at the excitation point. The sound barrier observed on these time scales (>=30 ns) can be explained in terms of nonlinear damping of the plasma motion near the sound velocity. For cw excitation, the expansion is observed to occur at much lower velocities (v~104 cm/s). These expansion rates are much too low to require the inclusion of a drifted Fermi distribution in the spectral analysis as has been previously suggested. Instead, based upon a careful study of corresponding spectral data, an alternative explanation for these spectra is

  8. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...... of the hole in this manner. In a second example, a hole is created in an inner shell by the first pulse, and the second probe pulse couples an even more tightly bound state to that hole. The hole decays in this example by Auger electron emission, and the absorption spectroscopy follows the decay of the hole...

  9. 0.5 keV soft X-ray attosecond continua

    CERN Document Server

    Teichmann, S M; Cousin, S L; Hemmer, M; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    Attosecond light pulses in the extreme ultraviolet have drawn a great deal of attention due to their ability to interrogate electronic dynamics in real time. Nevertheless, to follow charge dynamics and excitations in materials, element selectivity is a prerequisite, which demands such pulses in the soft X-ray region, above 200 eV, to simultaneously cover several fundamental absorption edges of the constituents of the materials. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the exploitation of a transient phase matching regime to generate carrier envelope controlled soft X-ray supercontinua with pulse energies up to 2.9 +/- 0.1 pJ and a flux of (7.3 +/- 0.1)x10^7 photons/s across the entire water window and attosecond pulses with 13 as transform limit. Our results herald attosecond science at the fundamental absorption edges of matter by bridging the gap between ultrafast temporal resolution and element specific probing.

  10. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Nagele, Stefan; Wais, Michael; Wachter, Georg; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric effect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the field-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for effective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes $A$@$\\text{C}_{60}$ and discuss how streaking time shifts are modified due to the interaction of the $\\text{C}_...

  11. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  12. Non-linear Plasma Wake Growth of Electron Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H; Zhou, C

    2015-01-01

    An object's wake in a plasma with small Debye length that drifts \\emph{across} the magnetic field is subject to electrostatic electron instabilities. Such situations include, for example, the moon in the solar wind wake and probes in magnetized laboratory plasmas. The instability drive mechanism can equivalently be considered drift down the potential-energy gradient or drift up the density-gradient. The gradients arise because the plasma wake has a region of depressed density and electrostatic potential into which ions are attracted along the field. The non-linear consequences of the instability are analysed in this paper. At physical ratios of electron to ion mass, neither linear nor quasilinear treatment can explain the observation of large-amplitude perturbations that disrupt the ion streams well before they become ion-ion unstable. We show here, however, that electron holes, once formed, continue to grow, driven by the drift mechanism, and if they remain in the wake may reach a maximum non-linearly stable...

  13. Sound waves and resonances in electron-hole plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the recent experimental signatures of relativistic hydrodynamics in graphene, we investigate theoretically the behavior of hydrodynamic sound modes in such quasirelativistic fluids near charge neutrality, within linear response. Locally driving an electron fluid at a resonant frequency to such a sound mode can lead to large increases in the electrical response at the edges of the sample, a signature, which cannot be explained using diffusive models of transport. We discuss the robustness of this signal to various effects, including electron-acoustic phonon coupling, disorder, and long-range Coulomb interactions. These long-range interactions convert the sound mode into a collective plasmonic mode at low frequencies unless the fluid is charge neutral. At the smallest frequencies, the response in a disordered fluid is quantitatively what is predicted by a "momentum relaxation time" approximation. However, this approximation fails at higher frequencies (which can be parametrically small), where the classical localization of sound waves cannot be neglected. Experimental observation of such resonances is a clear signature of relativistic hydrodynamics, and provides an upper bound on the viscosity of the electron-hole plasma.

  14. Energy Dissipation during Diffusion at Metal Surfaces: Disentangling the Role of Phonons versus Electron-Hole Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmeyer, Simon P.; Ward, David J.; Gütlein, Patrick; Ellis, John; Allison, William; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-11-01

    Helium spin echo experiments combined with ab initio based Langevin molecular dynamics simulations are used to quantify the adsorbate-substrate coupling during the thermal diffusion of Na atoms on Cu(111). An analysis of trajectories within the local density friction approximation allows the contribution from electron-hole pair excitations to be separated from the total energy dissipation. Despite the minimal electronic friction coefficient of Na and the relatively small mass mismatch to Cu promoting efficient phononic dissipation, about (20 ±5 )% of the total energy loss is attributable to electronic friction. The results suggest a significant role of electronic nonadiabaticity in the rapid thermalization generally relied upon in adiabatic diffusion theories.

  15. Generation of coherent terahertz radiation by polarized electron-hole pairs in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, A. V., E-mail: alex.andrianov@mail.ioffe.ru; Alekseev, P. S.; Klimko, G. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Shcheglov, V. L.; Sedova, M. A.; Zakhar' in, A. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The generation of coherent terahertz radiation upon the band-to-band femtosecond laser photoexcitation of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple-quantum-well structures in a transverse electric field at room temperature is investigated. The properties of the observed terahertz radiation suggest that it is generated on account of the excitation of a time-dependent dipole moment as a result of the polarization of nonequilibrium electron-hole pairs in quantum wells by the electric field. The proposed theoretical model taking into account the dynamic screening of the electric field in the quantum wells by nonequilibrium charge carriers describes the properties of the observed terahertz signal.

  16. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  17. Benchmarking Attosecond Physics with Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 Mar 12 – 11 Mar 15 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Benchmarking attosecond physics with atomic hydrogen 5a...AND SUBTITLE Benchmarking attosecond physics with atomic hydrogen 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4025 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-12-1-4025 “ Benchmarking

  18. Attosecond nanoscale near-field sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Förg, Benjamin; Suessmann, Frederik; Foerster, Michael; Krueger, Michael; Ahn, Byung-Nam; Wintersperger, Karen; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Guggenmos, Alexander; Pervak, Vladimir; Kessel, Alexander; Trushin, Sergei; Azzeer, Abdallah; Stockman, Mark; Kim, Dong-Eon; Krausz, Ferenc; Hommelhoff, Peter; Kling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The promise of ultrafast light field driven electronic nanocircuits has stimulated the development of the new research field of attosecond nanophysics. An essential prerequisite for advancing this new area is the ability to characterize optical nearfields from light interaction with nanostructures with sub cycle resolution. Here, we experimentally demonstrate attosecond nearfield retrieval with a gold nanotip using streaking spectroscopy. By comparison of the results from gold nanotips to those obtained for a noble gas, the spectral response of the nanotip near field arising from laser excitation can be extracted. Monte Carlo MC trajectory simulations in near fields obtained with the macroscopic Maxwells equations elucidate the streaking mechanism on the nanoscale.

  19. Attosecond nanoscale near-field sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förg, B.; Schötz, J.; Süßmann, F.; Förster, M.; Krüger, M.; Ahn, B.; Okell, W. A.; Wintersperger, K.; Zherebtsov, S.; Guggenmos, A.; Pervak, V.; Kessel, A.; Trushin, S. A.; Azzeer, A. M.; Stockman, M. I.; Kim, D.; Krausz, F.; Hommelhoff, P.; Kling, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    The promise of ultrafast light-field-driven electronic nanocircuits has stimulated the development of the new research field of attosecond nanophysics. An essential prerequisite for advancing this new area is the ability to characterize optical near fields from light interaction with nanostructures, with sub-cycle resolution. Here we experimentally demonstrate attosecond near-field retrieval for a tapered gold nanowire. By comparison of the results to those obtained from noble gas experiments and trajectory simulations, the spectral response of the nanotaper near field arising from laser excitation can be extracted. PMID:27241851

  20. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  1. Attosecond Steering of Electrons with Optimised Strong Field Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Haessler, S; Fan, G; Witting, T; Squibb, R; Chipperfield, L; Zaïr, A; Andriukaitis, G; Pugžlys, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Baltuška, A

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-free field driven electron trajectories are a key element of strong-field dynamics. Upon recollision with the parent ion, the energy transferred from the field to the electron may be released as attosecond duration XUV emission1,2 in the process of high harmonic generation (HHG). The conventional sinusoidal driver fields set limitations on the maximum value of this energy transfer, and it has been predicted that this limit can be significantly exceeded by an appropriately ramped-up cycle-shape3.Here, we present an experimental realization of such cycle-shaped waveforms and demonstrate control of the HHG process on the single-atom quantum level via attosecond steering of the electron trajectories. With our optimized optical cycles, we boost the field-ionization launching the electron trajectories, increase the subsequent field-to-electron energy transfer, and reduce the trajectory duration, to obtain greatly enhanced HHG efficiency as well as spectral extension compared to sinusoidal drivers. This applic...

  2. The birth of attosecond physics and its coming of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    Classical electromagnetism allows the rapidity of light field oscillations to be inferred from measurement of the speed and wavelength of light. Quantum mechanics connects the rapidity of electronic motion with the energy spacing of the occupied quantum states, accessible by light absorption and emission. According to these indirect measurements, both dynamics, the oscillation of light waves as well as electron wavepackets, evolve within attoseconds. With the birth of attosecond metrology at the dawn of the new millennium, light waving and atomic-scale electronic motion, being mutually the cause of each other, became directly measurable. These elementary motions constitute the primary steps of any change in the physical, chemical, and biological properties of materials and living organisms. The capability of observing them is therefore relevant for the development of new materials and technologies, as well as understanding biological function and malfunction. Here, I look back at milestones along the rocky path to the emergence of this capability, with some details about those my group had the chance to make some contributions to. This is an attempt to show—from a personal perspective—how revolution in science or technology now relies on progress at a multitude of fronts, which—in turn—depend on the collaboration of researchers from disparate fields just as on their perseverance.

  3. Circularly Polarized Attosecond Pulses and Molecular Atto-Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Bandrauk, Andre D

    2014-01-01

    Various schemes are presented for the generation of circularly polarized molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) from molecules. In particular it is shown that combinations of counter-rotating circularly polarized pulses produce the lowest frequency Coriolis forces with the highest frequency recollisions, thus generating new harmonics which are the source of circular polarized attosecond pulses (CPAPs). These can be used to generate circularly polarized electronic currents in molecular media on attosecond time scale. Molecular attosecond currents allow then for the generation of ultrashort magnetic field pulses on the attosecond time scale, new tools for molecular atto-magnetism (MOLAM).

  4. Transient evolution of solitary electron holes in low pressure laboratory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, Subroto

    2015-01-01

    Solitary electrons holes (SEHs) are localized electrostatic positive potential structures in collisionless plasmas. These are vortex-like structures in the electron phase space. Its existence is cause of distortion of the electron distribution in the resonant region. These are explained theoretically first time by Schamel et.al [Phys. Scr. 20, 336 (1979) and Phys. Plasmas 19, 020501 (2012)]. Propagating solitary electron holes can also be formed in a laboratory plasma when a fast rising high positive voltage pulse is applied to a metallic electrode [Kar et. al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102113 (2010)] immersed in a low pressure plasma. The temporal evolution of these structures can be studied by measuring the transient electron distribution function (EDF). In the present work, transient EDF is measured after formation of a solitary electron hole in nearly uniform, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma for applied pulse width and, where and are applied pulse width and inverse of ion plasma frequency respectively. Fo...

  5. Electron Holes in phase-space: what they are and why they matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, I. H.

    2016-10-01

    Plasma electron holes are soliton-like electric potential structures sustained self-consistently by a deficit of phase-space density on trapped orbits. They are a class of Bernstein Green and Kruskal (BGK)-mode phase-space vortices, long studied in basic analytic and computational theory and observed in some experiments. Recently it has become clear from space-craft observations that isolated potential structures with the character of electron holes constitute an important component of space-plasma turbulence. Modern computational simulations of collisionless plasmas also often observe electron holes to form as a nonlinear consequence of kinetic electron instabilities. This tutorial will explain the basic theory of electron hole structure, trace the development of the understanding of electron holes, and survey some of the observational evidence for their significance. It was found early on that unmagnetized multidimensional simulations of electron two-stream instabilities do not show the long lived holes that appear in one dimension. Deliberately-created 1-D slab holes in multiple dimensions experience a transverse instability unless the guiding magnetic field is strong enough. Analysis has yet to identify unequivocally the instability mechanism and threshold; but it can show that spherically symmetric holes in 3-D without magnetic field are essentially impossible. Recent simulations have studied holes' formation, self-acceleration, merging, splitting, and growth. Analytic understanding of many of these phenomena is gained from the kinematics of the hole regarded as a coherent entity, accounting for the plasma momentum changes it induces, and especially the interaction with the ions. Electron holes can travel at up to approximately the electron thermal speed, but not slower (relative to ions) than several times the ion acoustic speed. Some notable current research questions will be described.

  6. 电子动力学及相干辐射的强场调控与阿秒探测*--强场与阿秒物理领域中的重大课题研究进展%Strong-field control and ultrafast detection of electron dynamics and coherent radiation towards attosecond physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵增秀; 袁建民

    2015-01-01

    The control and ultrafast detection of electron dynamics and coherent radiation are among the key questions that may be addressed by strong field physics and attosecond physics. By marrying the best of two worlds, i.e. attosecond science and THz technology, we have demon-strated that by synchronizing attosecond radiation with THz wave emission we may obtain a deep-er understanding of the mechanism of THz generation as well as more insight into the rescattering electron dynamics following tunneling ionization. It indicates that ultrafast dynamics within strong fields can be coherently controlled through gating the propagation of electron wave packet using two-color laser pulses. In addition, we propose and verify a new scheme to measure both the ampli-tude and polarization of the THz field in the time domain, which could promote various applica-tions of polarization-sensitive THz spectroscopy. The technology of blending THz sources and atto-second pulses is expected to go beyond atomic and molecular physics, with significant impact on, for example, the study of carrier dynamics in solids using pump-probe schemes, where the dynam-ics can only be initiated efficiently by THz sources while the probing requires high spatiotemporal resolution.%电子动力学及相干辐射的强场调控与阿秒探测是强场物理与阿秒物理领域中的重大课题。通过同步探测阿秒辐射和太赫兹辐射,文章作者首次实现了阿秒精度的太赫兹产生动力学的探测与控制,表明阿秒物理与太赫兹技术的结合有助于深入理解强场驱动下太赫兹产生机制和电子再散射动力学,展示了利用双色场控制电子波包相干相位,实现超快物理过程强场调控的可能。文章作者所提出的精确刻画太赫兹时域瞬时电场方案,有助于推动极化敏感的太赫兹谱学研究。可以预期,阿秒脉冲与太赫兹源技术不会局限于原子分子物理领域。实现阿秒物

  7. Attosecond pulse shaping around a Cooper minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Schoun, S B; Wheeler, J; Roedig, C; Agostini, P; DiMauro, L F; Schafer, K J; Gaarde, M B

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is used to measure the spectral phase of the recombination dipole matrix element (RDM) in argon over a broad frequency range that includes the 3p Cooper minimum (CM). The measured RDM phase agrees well with predictions based on the scattering phases and amplitudes of the interfering s- and d-channel contributions to the complementary photoionization process. The reconstructed attosecond bursts that underlie the HHG process show that the derivative of the RDM spectral phase, the group delay, does not have a straight-forward interpretation as an emission time, in contrast to the usual attochirp group delay. Instead, the rapid RDM phase variation caused by the CM reshapes the attosecond bursts.

  8. Attosecond physics at a nanoscale metal tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemell Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With few-cycle laser oscillator pulses at 800 nm we observe strong-field and attosecond physics phenomena in electron spectra recorded at a nanoscale tungsten tip. We observe the rescattering plateau as well as a strong carrier-envelope phase dependence of the spectra. We model the results with the semiclassical three-step model as well as with time-dependent density functional theory.

  9. Geminate electron-hole recombination in organic photovoltaic cells. A semi-empirical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Mariusz; Nowak, Artur; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-07

    We propose a semi-empirical theory which describes the geminate electron-hole separation probability in both homogeneous systems and donor-acceptor heterojunction systems applicable in organic photovoltaics. The theory is based on the results of extensive simulation calculations, which were carried out using various lattice models of the medium and different charge-carrier hopping mechanisms, over the parameter ranges typical for organic solar cells. It is found that the electron-hole separation probability can be conveniently described in terms of measurable parameters by a formula whose functional form is derived from the existing recombination theories, and which contains only one empirical parameter. For homogeneous systems, this parameter is determined by the structure of the medium and only weakly depends on the charge-carrier hopping mechanism. In the case of donor-acceptor heterojunction systems, this empirical parameter shows a simple power-law dependence on the product of the dielectric constant and inter-molecular contact distance. We also study the effect of heterojunction structure on the electron-hole separation probability and show that this probability decreases with increasing roughness of the heterojunction. By analyzing the simulation results obtained for systems under the influence of an external electric field, we find that the field effect on the electron-hole separation probability in donor-acceptor heterojunction systems is weaker than in homogeneous systems. We also describe this field effect by a convenient empirical formula.

  10. Nucleation phenomena in the formation of electron-hole drops in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westervelt, R.M.

    1977-09-01

    A detailed theory of the nucleation of electron-hole drops from a gas of free excitons in Ge is presented, together with a systematic experimental study of hysteresis and threshold phenomena in the luminescence of optically excited crystals of ultrapure Ge.

  11. Geminate electron-hole recombination in organic photovoltaic cells. A semi-empirical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Mariusz; Nowak, Artur; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We propose a semi-empirical theory which describes the geminate electron-hole separation probability in both homogeneous systems and donor-acceptor heterojunction systems applicable in organic photovoltaics. The theory is based on the results of extensive simulation calculations, which were carried out using various lattice models of the medium and different charge-carrier hopping mechanisms, over the parameter ranges typical for organic solar cells. It is found that the electron-hole separation probability can be conveniently described in terms of measurable parameters by a formula whose functional form is derived from the existing recombination theories, and which contains only one empirical parameter. For homogeneous systems, this parameter is determined by the structure of the medium and only weakly depends on the charge-carrier hopping mechanism. In the case of donor-acceptor heterojunction systems, this empirical parameter shows a simple power-law dependence on the product of the dielectric constant and inter-molecular contact distance. We also study the effect of heterojunction structure on the electron-hole separation probability and show that this probability decreases with increasing roughness of the heterojunction. By analyzing the simulation results obtained for systems under the influence of an external electric field, we find that the field effect on the electron-hole separation probability in donor-acceptor heterojunction systems is weaker than in homogeneous systems. We also describe this field effect by a convenient empirical formula.

  12. Measurement of Beta Particles Induced Electron-Hole Pairs Recombination in Depletion Region of GaAs PN Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hai-Yang; JIANG Lan; LI Da-Rang

    2011-01-01

    PN junctions and schottky diodes are widely employed as electron-hole pair collectors in electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques and betavoltaic batteries, in which the recombination in depletion regions is ignored.We measured the beta particles induced electron-hole pairs recombination in the depletion region of a GaAs P+ PN+ junction, based on comparisons between measured short currents and ideal values. The results show that only 20% electron-hole pairs in the depletion can be collected, causing the short current. This indicates an electron-hole pair diffusion length of 0.2μm in the depletion region. Hence, it is necessary to evaluate the recombination in the EBIC techniques and betavoltaic design.%@@ PN junctions and schottky diodes are widely employed as electron-hole pair collectors in electron beam induced current(EBIC) techniques and betavoltaic batteries,in which the recombination in depletion regions is ignored.We measured the beta particles induced electron-hole pairs recombination in the depletion region of a GaAs P+ PN+ junction,based on comparisons between measured short currents and ideal values.The results show that only 20% electron-hole pairs in the depletion can be collected,causing the short current.This indicates an electron-hole pair diffusion length of 0.2μm in the depletion region.Hence,it is necessary to evaluate the recombination in the EBIC techniques and betavoltaic design.

  13. Generation of high harmonics and attosecond pulses with ultrashort laser pulse filaments and conical waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Couairon; A Lotti; D Faccio; P Di Trapani; D S Steingrube; E Schulz; T Binhammer; U Morgner; M Kovacev; M B Gaarde

    2014-08-01

    Results illustrating the nonlinear dynamics of ultrashort laser pulse filamentation in gases are presented, with particular emphasis on the filament properties useful for developing attosecond light sources. Two aspects of ultrashort pulse filaments are specifically discussed: (i) numerical simulation results on pulse self-compression by filamentation in a gas cell filled with noble gas. Measurements of high harmonics generated by the pulse extracted from the filament allows for the detection of intensity spikes and subcycle pulses generated within the filament. (ii) Simulation results on the spontaneous formation of conical wavepackets during filamentation in gases, which in turn can be used as efficient driving pulses for the generation of high harmonics and isolated attosecond pulses.

  14. Charge migration induced by attosecond pulses in bio-relevant molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Francesca; Trabattoni, Andrea; Palacios, Alicia; Ayuso, David; Castrovilli, Mattea C.; Greenwood, Jason B.; Decleva, Piero; Martín, Fernando; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    After sudden ionization of a large molecule, the positive charge can migrate throughout the system on a sub-femtosecond time scale, purely guided by electronic coherences. The possibility to actively explore the role of the electron dynamics in the photo-chemistry of bio-relevant molecules is of fundamental interest for understanding, and perhaps ultimately controlling, the processes leading to damage, mutation and, more generally, to the alteration of the biological functions of the macromolecule. Attosecond laser sources can provide the extreme time resolution required to follow this ultrafast charge flow. In this review we will present recent advances in attosecond molecular science: after a brief description of the results obtained for small molecules, recent experimental and theoretical findings on charge migration in bio-relevant molecules will be discussed.

  15. Optical vortices discern attosecond time delay in electron emission from magnetic sublevels

    CERN Document Server

    Wätzel, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Photoionization from energetically distinct electronic states may have a relative time delay of tens of attoseconds. Here we demonstrate that pulses of optical vortices allow measuring such attoseconds delays from magnetic sublevels, even from a spherically symmetric target. The di?erence in the time delay is substantial and exhibits a strong angular dependence. Furthermore, we find an atomic scale variation in the time delays depending on the target orbital position in the laser spot. The findings o?er thus a qualitatively new way for a spatio-temporal sensing of the magnetic states from which the photoelectrons originate, with a spatial resolution way below the di?raction limit of the vortex beam. Our conclusions follow from analytical considerations based on symmetry, complemented and confirmed with full numerical simulations of the quantum dynamics.

  16. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, A.; Bothschafter, E. M.; Sato, S. A.; Jakubeit, C.; Latka, T.; Razskazovskaya, O.; Fattahi, H.; Jobst, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Shirvanyan, V.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Kienberger, R.; Yabana, K.; Karpowicz, N.; Schultze, M.; Krausz, F.

    2016-06-01

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  17. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, A; Bothschafter, E M; Sato, S A; Jakubeit, C; Latka, T; Razskazovskaya, O; Fattahi, H; Jobst, M; Schweinberger, W; Shirvanyan, V; Yakovlev, V S; Kienberger, R; Yabana, K; Karpowicz, N; Schultze, M; Krausz, F

    2016-05-23

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  18. Role of Microstructure in the Electron-Hole Interaction of Hybrid Lead-Halide Perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jarvist M.; Barker, Alex J.; De Bastiani, Michele; Gandini, Marina; Marras, Sergio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Walsh, Aron; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on hybrid inorganic-organic halide perovskites have demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies in a range of architectures. The existence and stability of bound electron-hole pairs in these materials, and their role in the exceptional performance of optoelectronic devices, remains a controversial issue. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of optical spectroscopy and multiscale modeling as a function of the degree of polycrystallinity and temperature, that the electron-hole interaction is sensitive to the microstructure of the material. The long-range order is disrupted by polycrystalline disorder and the variations in electrostatic potential found for smaller crystals suppress exciton formation, while larger crystals of the same composition demonstrate an unambiguous excitonic state. We conclude that fabrication procedures and morphology strongly influence perovskite behaviour, with both free carrier and excitonic regimes possible, with strong implications for optoelectronic devices. PMID:26442125

  19. Modeling of molecular photocells: Application to two-level photovoltaic system with electron-hole interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati Aram, Tahereh; Anghel-Vasilescu, Petrutza; Asgari, Asghar; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Mayou, Didier

    2016-09-28

    We present a novel simple model to describe molecular photocells where the energy conversion process takes place by a single molecular donor-acceptor complex attached to electrodes. By applying quantum scattering theory, an open quantum system method, the coherent molecular photocell is described by a wave function. We analyze photon absorption, energy conversion, and quantum yield of a molecular photocell by considering the effects of electron-hole interaction and non-radiative recombination. We model the exciton creation, dissociation, and subsequent effects on quantum yield in the energy domain. We find that depending on the photocell structure, the electron-hole interaction can normally decrease or abnormally increase the cell efficiency. The proposed model helps to understand the mechanisms of molecular photocells, and it can be used to optimize their yield.

  20. Role of Microstructure in the Electron-Hole Interaction of Hybrid Lead-Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancini, Giulia; Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Frost, Jarvist M; Barker, Alex J; De Bastiani, Michele; Gandini, Marina; Marras, Sergio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Walsh, Aron; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2015-10-01

    Solar cells based on hybrid inorganic-organic halide perovskites have demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies in a range of architectures. The existence and stability of bound electron-hole pairs in these materials, and their role in the exceptional performance of optoelectronic devices, remains a controversial issue. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of optical spectroscopy and multiscale modeling as a function of the degree of polycrystallinity and temperature, that the electron-hole interaction is sensitive to the microstructure of the material. The long-range order is disrupted by polycrystalline disorder and the variations in electrostatic potential found for smaller crystals suppress exciton formation, while larger crystals of the same composition demonstrate an unambiguous excitonic state. We conclude that fabrication procedures and morphology strongly influence perovskite behaviour, with both free carrier and excitonic regimes possible, with strong implications for optoelectronic devices.

  1. Role of microstructure in the electron-hole interaction of hybrid lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancini, Giulia; Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Frost, Jarvist M.; Barker, Alex J.; de Bastiani, Michele; Gandini, Marina; Marras, Sergio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Walsh, Aron; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2015-10-01

    Organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies in solar cells and promising performance in a wide range of optoelectronic devices. The existence and stability of bound electron-hole pairs in these materials and their role in the operation of devices with different architectures remains a controversial issue. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of optical spectroscopy and multiscale modelling as a function of the degree of polycrystallinity and temperature, that the electron-hole interaction is sensitive to the microstructure of the material. The long-range order is disrupted by polycrystalline disorder and the variations in electrostatic potential found for smaller crystals suppress exciton formation, while larger crystals of the same composition demonstrate an unambiguous excitonic state. We conclude that fabrication procedures and morphology strongly influence perovskite behaviour, with both free carrier and excitonic regimes possible, with strong implications for optoelectronic devices.

  2. Electron-hole interaction and optical excitations in solids, surfaces, and polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    The optical properties of a variety of materials have been calculated using a recently developed ab initio method based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation of the two-particle Green's functions. Relevant self-energy and electron-hole interaction effects are included from first-principles. Results on selected semiconductors, insulators, surfaces, and conjugated polymers are discussed. In many of these systems, excitonic effects are shown to dramatically alter the excitation energies a...

  3. Role of Microstructure in the Electron-Hole Interaction of Hybrid Lead-Halide Perovskites

    OpenAIRE

    Grancini, Giulia; Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Frost, Jarvist M.; Barker, Alex J; Bastiani, Michele; Gandini, Marina; Marras, Sergio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Walsh, Aron; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on hybrid inorganic-organic halide perovskites have demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies in a range of architectures. The existence and stability of bound electron-hole pairs in these materials, and their role in the exceptional performance of optoelectronic devices, remains a controversial issue. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of optical spectroscopy and multiscale modeling as a function of the degree of polycrystallinity and temperature, that the ele...

  4. Generation of Bright Isolated Attosecond Soft X-Ray Pulses Driven by Multi-Cycle Mid-Infrared Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, M -C; Mancuso, C; Dollar, F; Galloway, B; Popmintchev, D; Huang, P -C; Walker, B; Plaja, L; Jaron-Becker, A; Becker, A; Popmintchev, T; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest attosecond (as) pulses have been produced only in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we use advanced experiment and theory to demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when mid-infrared lasers are used to drive the high harmonic generation process, the conditions for optimal bright soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2 \\mu m driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, that e...

  5. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  6. Analysis of interference in attosecond transient absorption in adiabatic condition

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Wenpu; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the transient absorption of attosecond pulses of infrared laser-dressed atoms by considering a three-level system with the adiabatic approximation. We study the delay-dependent interference features in the transient absorption spectra of helium atoms from the perspective of the coherent interaction processes between the attosecond pulse and the quasi-harmonics, and find that many features of the interference fringes in the absorption spectra of the attosecond pulse can be attributed to the coherence phase difference. And the modulation signals of laser-induced sidebands of the dark state is found related to the dark state with population modulated by the dressing field.

  7. The attosecond regime of impulsive stimulated electronic Raman excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Ware, Matthew R; Cryan, James P; Haxton, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We have calculated the resonant and nonresonant contributions to attosecond impulsive stimulated electronic Raman scattering (SERS) in regions of autoionizing transitions. Comparison with Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) calculations find that attosecond SERS is dominated by continuum transitions and not autoionizing resonances. These results agree quantitatively with a rate equation that includes second-order Raman and first-and second-order photoionization rates. Such rate models can be extended to larger molecular systems. Our results indicate that attosecond SERS transition probabilities may be understood in terms of two-photon generalized cross sections even in the high-intensity limit for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths.

  8. Orbital-dependent Electron-Hole Interaction in Graphene and Associated Multi-Layer Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tianqi; Su, Haibin

    2015-11-01

    We develop an orbital-dependent potential to describe electron-hole interaction in materials with structural 2D character, i.e. quasi-2D materials. The modulated orbital-dependent potentials are also constructed with non-local screening, multi-layer screening, and finite gap due to the coupling with substrates. We apply the excitonic Hamiltonian in coordinate-space with developed effective electron-hole interacting potentials to compute excitons’ binding strength at M (π band) and Γ (σ band) points in graphene and its associated multi-layer forms. The orbital-dependent potential provides a range-separated property for regulating both long- and short-range interactions. This accounts for the existence of the resonant π exciton in single- and bi-layer graphenes. The remarkable strong electron-hole interaction in σ orbitals plays a decisive role in the existence of σ exciton in graphene stack at room temperature. The interplay between gap-opening and screening from substrates shed a light on the weak dependence of σ exciton binding energy on the thickness of graphene stacks. Moreover, the analysis of non-hydrogenic exciton spectrum in quasi-2D systems clearly demonstrates the remarkable comparable contribution of orbital dependent potential with respect to non-local screening process. The understanding of orbital-dependent potential developed in this work is potentially applicable for a wide range of materials with low dimension.

  9. Methods of Attosecond X-Ray Pulse Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Zholents, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Our attitude towards attosecond x-ray pulses has changed dramatically over the past several years. Not long ago x-ray pulses with a duration of a few hundred attoseconds were just science fiction for most of us, but they are already a tool for some researchers in present days. Breakthrough progress in the generation of solitary soft x-ray pulses of attosecond duration has been made by the laser community. Following this lead, people in the free electron laser community have begun to develop new ideas on how to generate attosecond x-ray pulses in the hard x-ray energy range. In this report I will review some of these ideas.

  10. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Wörner, H. J., E-mail: hwoerner@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Brown, M. A. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bokhoven, J. A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  11. Chlorine doping reduces electron-hole recombination in lead iodide perovskites: time-domain ab initio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-11-19

    Rapid development in lead halide perovskites has led to solution-processable thin film solar cells with power conversion efficiencies close to 20%. Nonradiative electron-hole recombination within perovskites has been identified as the main pathway of energy losses, competing with charge transport and limiting the efficiency. Using nonadiabatic (NA) molecular dynamics, combined with time-domain density functional theory, we show that nonradiative recombination happens faster than radiative recombination and long-range charge transfer to an acceptor material. Doping of lead iodide perovskites with chlorine atoms reduces charge recombination. On the one hand, chlorines decrease the NA coupling because they contribute little to the wave functions of the valence and conduction band edges. On the other hand, chlorines shorten coherence time because they are lighter than iodines and introduce high-frequency modes. Both factors favor longer excited-state lifetimes. The simulation shows good agreement with the available experimental data and contributes to the comprehensive understanding of electronic and vibrational dynamics in perovskites. The generated insights into design of higher-efficiency solar cells range from fundamental scientific principles, such as the role of electron-vibrational coupling and quantum coherence, to practical guidelines, such as specific suggestions for chemical doping.

  12. Layer interdependence of transport in an undoped electron-hole bilayer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The layer interdependence of transport in an undoped electron-hole bilayer (uEHBL) device was studied as a function of carrier density, interlayer electric field, and temperature. The uEHBL device consisted of a density tunable, independently contacted two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) induced via field effect in distinct GaAs quantum wells separated by a 30 nm Al$_{0.9}$Ga$_{0.1}$As barrier. Transport measurements were made simultaneously on each layer u...

  13. High-throughput beamline for attosecond pulses based on toroidal mirrors with microfocusing capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, F; Trabattoni, A; Anumula, S; Sansone, G; Calegari, F; Nisoli, M; Poletto, L

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a novel attosecond beamline designed for attosecond-pump/attosecond probe experiments. Microfocusing of the Extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is obtained by using a coma-compensated optical configuration based on the use of three toroidal mirrors controlled by a genetic algorithm. Trains of attosecond pulses are generated with a measured peak intensity of about 3 × 10(11) W/cm(2).

  14. High-throughput beamline for attosecond pulses based on toroidal mirrors with microfocusing capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it [National Research Council, Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Trabattoni, A.; Anumula, S.; Sansone, G. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Calegari, F. [National Research Council, Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nisoli, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Research Council, Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    We have developed a novel attosecond beamline designed for attosecond-pump/attosecond probe experiments. Microfocusing of the Extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is obtained by using a coma-compensated optical configuration based on the use of three toroidal mirrors controlled by a genetic algorithm. Trains of attosecond pulses are generated with a measured peak intensity of about 3 × 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Temporal structure of attosecond pulses from laser-driven coherent synchrotron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Cousens, S; Dromey, B; Zepf, M

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic dynamics of laser-driven coherent synchrotron emission transmitted through thin foils are investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. For normal incidence interactions, we identify the formation of two distinct electron nanobunches from which emission takes place each half-cycle of the driving laser pulse. These emissions are separated temporally by 130 attoseconds and are dominant in different frequency ranges, which is a direct consequence of the distinct characteristics of each electron nanobunch. This may be exploited through spectral filtering to isolate these emissions, generating electromagnetic pulses of duration ~70 as.

  16. Tuning of Near- and Far-Field Properties of All-dielectric Dimer Nanoantennas via Ultrafast Electron-Hole Plasma Photoexcitation

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, Denis G; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Alu, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Achievement of all-optical ultrafast signal modulation and routing by a low-loss nanodevice is a crucial step towards an ultracompact optical chip with high performance. Here, we propose a specifically designed silicon dimer nanoantenna, which is tunable via photoexcitation of dense electron-hole plasma with ultrafast relaxation rate. Basing on this concept, we demonstrate the effect of beam steering up to 20 degrees via simple variation of incident intensity, being suitable for ultrafast light routing in an optical chip. The effect is demonstrated both in the visible and near-IR spectral regions for silicon and germanium based nanoantennas. We also reveal the effect of electron-hole plasma photoexcitation on local density of states (LDOS) in the dimer gap and find that the orientation averaged LDOS can be altered by 50\\%, whereas modification of the projected LDOS can be even more dramatic: almost 500\\% for transverse dipole orientation. Moreover, our analytical model sheds light on transient dynamics of the...

  17. Minimizing Electron-Hole Recombination on TiO2 Sensitized with PbSe Quantum Dots: Time-Domain Ab Initio Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; English, Niall J; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2014-09-01

    TiO2 sensitized with quantum dots (QDs) gives efficient photovoltaic and photocatalytic systems due to high stability and large absorption cross sections of QDs and rapid photoinduced charge separation at the interface. The yields of the light-induced processes are limited by electron-hole recombination that also occurs at the interface. We combine ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics with analytic theory to investigate the experimentally studied charge recombination at the PbSe QD-TiO2 interface. The time-domain atomistic simulation directly mimics the laser experiment and generates important details of the recombination mechanism. The process occurs due to coupling of the electronic subsystem to polar optical modes of the TiO2 surface. The inelastic electron-phonon scattering happens on a picosecond time scale, while the elastic scattering takes 40 fs. Counter to expectations, the donor-acceptor bonding strengthens at an elevated temperature. An analytic theory extends the simulation results to larger QDs and longer QD-TiO2 bridges. It shows that the electron-hole recombination rate decreases significantly for longer bridges and larger dots and that the main effect arises due to reduced donor-acceptor coupling rather than changes in the donor-acceptor energy gap. The study indicates that by varying QD size or ligands one can reduce charge losses while still maintaining efficient charge separation, providing design principles for optimizing solar cell design and increasing photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies.

  18. Tunneling time in attosecond experiments, intrinsic-type of time. Keldysh, and Mandelstam-Tamm time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullie, Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Tunneling time in attosecond and strong-field experiments is one of the most controversial issues in current research, because of its importance to the theory of time, the time operator and the time-energy uncertainty relation in quantum mechanics. In Kullie (2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 052118) we derived an estimation of the (real) tunneling time, which shows an excellent agreement with the time measured in attosecond experiments, our derivation is found by utilizing the time-energy uncertainty relation, and it represents a quantum clock. In this work, we show different aspects of the tunneling time in attosecond experiments, we discuss and compare the different views and approaches, which are used to calculate the tunneling time, i.e. Keldysh time (as a real or imaginary quantity), Mandelstam-Tamm time, the classical view of the time measurement and our tunneling time relation(s). We draw some conclusions concerning the validity and the relation between the different types of the tunneling time with the hope that they will help to answer the question put forward by Orlando et al (2014 J. Phys. B 47 204002, 2014 Phys. Rev. A 89 014102): tunneling time, what does it mean? However, as we will see, the important question is a more general one: how to understand the time and the measurement of the time of a quantum system? In respect to our result, the time in quantum mechanics can be, in more general fashion, classified in two types, intrinsic dynamically connected, and external dynamically not connected to the system, and consequently (perhaps only) classical Newtonian time remains as a parametric type of time.

  19. Unified ab initio treatment of attosecond photoionization and Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, G. L.; Bondar, D. I.; Patchkovskii, S.; Corkum, P. B.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2009-10-01

    We present a new theoretical approach to attosecond laser-assisted photo- and Compton ionization. Attosecond x-ray absorption and scattering are described by \\hat{\\mathscr{S}}^{(1,2)} -matrices, which are coherent superpositions of 'monochromatic' \\skew{3}\\hat{S}^{(1,2)} -matrices in a laser-modified Furry representation. Besides refining the existing theory of the soft x-ray photoelectron attosecond streak camera and spectral phase interferometry (ASC and ASPI), we formulate a theory of hard x-ray photoelectron and Compton ASC and ASPI. The resulting scheme has a simple structure and leads to closed-form expressions for ionization amplitudes. We investigate Compton electron interference in the separable Coulomb-Volkov continuum with both Coulomb and laser fields treated non-perturbatively. We find that at laser-field intensities below 1013 Wcm-2 normalized Compton lines almost coincide with the lines obtained in the laser-free regime. At higher intensities, attosecond interferences survive integration over electron momenta, and feature prominently in the Compton lines themselves. We define a regime where the electron ground-state density can be measured with controllable accuracy in an attosecond time interval. The new theory provides a firm basis for extracting photo- and Compton electron phases and atomic and molecular wavefunctions from experimental data.

  20. Attosecond Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, several schemes of soft X-ray and hard X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL and their progress are reviewed. Self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE schemes, the high gain harmonic generation (HGHG scheme and various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are discussed, especially in view of the generation of attosecond X-ray pulses. Our recent work on the generation of attosecond hard X-ray pulses is also discussed. In our study, the enhanced SASE scheme is utilized, using electron beam parameters of an XFEL under construction at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL. Laser, chicane and electron beam parameters are optimized to generate an isolated attosecond hard X-ray pulse at 0.1 nm (12.4 keV. The simulations show that the manipulation of electron energy beam profile may lead to the generation of an isolated attosecond hard X-ray of 150 attosecond pulse at 0.1 nm.

  1. Broadband multilayer soft X-ray mirrors for attosecond pulse formation at photon energies above 100 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Michael; Schuster, Joerg; Kleineberg, Ulf [LMU, Physik (Germany); Aquila, Andrew [CXRO (United States); Schulze, Martin; Fiess, Markus; Gouliemakis, Eleftherios; Krausz, Ferenc [MPQ (Germany); Huth, Martin [LMU, Chemie (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We report on the development, fabrication and application of multilayer mirrors as broadband soft-X-ray optical components for the formation of attosecond (1 asec=10{sup -18}s)pulses from high harmonic radiation. Until recently, attosecond physics was merely confined to the photon energy range below 100 eV due to the properties of Mo/Si multilayer and single isolated pulses of 80 asec pulse duration have been achieved. For many applications, e.g. in the characterization of the photoemission dynamics from solid surfaces or the characterization of ultrafast surface plasmon dynamics in metallic nanostructures by attosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, higher photon energies are desirable to address deeper bound electronic core states or to increase the kinetic energy of the emitted photoelectrons. Here, we introduce new aperiodic broad bandwidth multilayer systems based on lanthanum (e.g. LaMo, LaB{sub 4}CMo, LaB{sub 4}C, MoB{sub 4}C),for the 100-190 eV photon energy range. Multilayer properties like interface roughness, interlayer formation and reflectivity are discussed. Finally, first applications for spectral filtering of the HHG comb above 100 eV are presented.

  2. Electron Interference in Molecular Circular Polarization Attosecond XUV Photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-center electron interference in molecular attosecond photoionization processes is investigated from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Both symmetric H\\(_2^+\\ and nonsymmetric HHe\\(^{2+}\\ one electron diatomic systems are ionized by intense attosecond circularly polarized XUV laser pulses. Photoionization of these molecular ions shows signature of interference with double peaks (minima in molecular attosecond photoelectron energy spectra (MAPES at critical angles \\(\\vartheta_c\\ between the molecular \\(\\textbf{R}\\ axis and the photoelectron momentum \\(\\textbf{p}\\. The interferences are shown to be a function of the symmetry of electronic states and the interference patterns are sensitive to the molecular orientation and pulse polarization. Such sensitivity offers possibility for imaging of molecular structure and orbitals.

  3. Giant half-cycle attosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, H -C

    2011-01-01

    Half-cycle picosecond pulses have been produced from thin photo-conductors, when applying an electric field across the surface and switching on conduction by a short laser pulse. Then the transverse current in the wafer plane emits half-cycle pulses in normal direction, and pulses of 500 fs duration and 1e6 V/m peak electric field have been observed. Here we show that single half-cycle pulses of 50 as duration and up to 1e13 V/m can be produced when irradiating a double foil target by intense few-cycle laser pulses. Focused onto an ultra-thin foil, all electrons are blown out, forming a uniform sheet of relativistic electrons. A second layer, placed at some distance behind, reflects the drive beam, but lets electrons pass straight. Under oblique incidence, beam reflection provides the transverse current, which emits intense half-cycle pulses. Such a pulse may completely ionize even heavier atoms. New types of attosecond pump-probe experiments will become possible.

  4. Transient absorption lineshapes in a dense, laser-dressed Helium target probed by attosecond pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Timmers, Henry; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2014-05-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is an emerging time-resolved spectroscopic technique to explore electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. In this experimental study, we used extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains (APTs) in energy range of 20-25 eV to probe the transient excited-state absorption of an optically thick Helium gas sample under the influence of moderately strong (1-3 TW/cm2) , infrared (IR), femtosecond pump pulse. We found that the resonant absorption lineshapes for Helium 1s2p, 1snp, and continuum states show rich dynamics, evolving between Lorenzian and Fano profiles with phases imposed by IR laser pulse and multi-channel quantum-path interference. Both AC Stark shifts and light-induced states were studied as a function of pump-probe delay and IR intensity. By changing the Helium gas density, we observed the lineshape modification due to the macroscopic propagation effects, which is usually not included in the single-atom response model. We found that the 13th and 15th high harmonics of XUV produce two coupled polarizations, and the relative coherence between these two polarizations changes the absorption even when the IR pulse arrives after a long time (about 500 fs) after the XUV. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-0955274.

  5. Isolated Attosecond Pulses using a Detuned Second-harmonic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merdji, Hamed; /Saclay /SLAC, PULSE; Auguste, Thierry; Boutu, Willem; Caumes, J.-Pascal; Carre, Bertrand; /Saclay; Pfeifer, Thomas; Jullien, Aurelie; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-11-07

    Calculations are presented for the generation of an isolated attosecond pulse in a multicycle two-color strong-field regime. We show that the recollision of the electron wave packet can be confined to half an optical cycle using pulses of up to 40 fs in duration. The scheme is proven to be efficient using two intense beams, one producing a strong field at {omega} and the other a strong field detuned from 2{omega}. The slight detuning {delta}{omega} of the second harmonic is used to break the symmetry of the electric field over many optical cycles and provides a coherent control for the formation of an isolated attosecond pulse.

  6. Bilayer graphene under pressure: Electron-hole symmetry breaking, valley Hall effect, and Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, F.; Collado, H. P. Ojeda; Usaj, Gonzalo; Sofo, Jorge O.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structure of bilayer graphene under pressure develops very interesting features with an enhancement of the trigonal warping and a splitting of the parabolic touching bands at the K point of the reciprocal space into four Dirac cones, one at K and three along the T symmetry lines. As pressure is increased, these cones separate in reciprocal space and in energy, breaking the electron-hole symmetry. Due to their energy separation, their opposite Berry curvature can be observed in valley Hall effect experiments and in the structure of the Landau levels. Based on the electronic structure obtained by density functional theory, we develop a low energy Hamiltonian that describes the effects of pressure on measurable quantities such as the Hall conductivity and the Landau levels of the system.

  7. Electron-hole doping asymmetry of Fermi surface reconstructed in a simple Mott insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasugi, Yoshitaka; Seki, Kazuhiro; Edagawa, Yusuke; Sato, Yoshiaki; Pu, Jiang; Takenobu, Taishi; Yunoki, Seiji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi M; Kato, Reizo

    2016-08-05

    It is widely recognized that the effect of doping into a Mott insulator is complicated and unpredictable, as can be seen by examining the Hall coefficient in high Tc cuprates. The doping effect, including the electron-hole doping asymmetry, may be more straightforward in doped organic Mott insulators owing to their simple electronic structures. Here we investigate the doping asymmetry of an organic Mott insulator by carrying out electric-double-layer transistor measurements and using cluster perturbation theory. The calculations predict that strongly anisotropic suppression of the spectral weight results in the Fermi arc state under hole doping, while a relatively uniform spectral weight results in the emergence of a non-interacting-like Fermi surface (FS) in the electron-doped state. In accordance with the calculations, the experimentally observed Hall coefficients and resistivity anisotropy correspond to the pocket formed by the Fermi arcs under hole doping and to the non-interacting FS under electron doping.

  8. The fate of electron-hole pairs in polymer:fullerene blends for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causa', Martina; De Jonghe-Risse, Jelissa; Scarongella, Mariateresa; Brauer, Jan C; Buchaca-Domingo, Ester; Moser, Jacques-E; Stingelin, Natalie; Banerji, Natalie

    2016-09-02

    There has been long-standing debate on how free charges are generated in donor:acceptor blends that are used in organic solar cells, and which are generally comprised of a complex phase morphology, where intermixed and neat phases of the donor and acceptor material co-exist. Here we resolve this question, basing our conclusions on Stark effect spectroscopy data obtained in the absence and presence of externally applied electric fields. Reconciling opposing views found in literature, we unambiguously demonstrate that the fate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs-whether they will dissociate to free charges or geminately recombine-is determined at ultrafast times, despite the fact that their actual spatial separation can be much slower. Our insights are important to further develop rational approaches towards material design and processing of organic solar cells, assisting to realize their purported promise as lead-free, third-generation energy technology that can reach efficiencies over 10%.

  9. The fate of electron-hole pairs in polymer:fullerene blends for organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causa', Martina; de Jonghe-Risse, Jelissa; Scarongella, Mariateresa; Brauer, Jan C.; Buchaca-Domingo, Ester; Moser, Jacques-E.; Stingelin, Natalie; Banerji, Natalie

    2016-09-01

    There has been long-standing debate on how free charges are generated in donor:acceptor blends that are used in organic solar cells, and which are generally comprised of a complex phase morphology, where intermixed and neat phases of the donor and acceptor material co-exist. Here we resolve this question, basing our conclusions on Stark effect spectroscopy data obtained in the absence and presence of externally applied electric fields. Reconciling opposing views found in literature, we unambiguously demonstrate that the fate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs--whether they will dissociate to free charges or geminately recombine--is determined at ultrafast times, despite the fact that their actual spatial separation can be much slower. Our insights are important to further develop rational approaches towards material design and processing of organic solar cells, assisting to realize their purported promise as lead-free, third-generation energy technology that can reach efficiencies over 10%.

  10. Reversible electron-hole separation in a hot carrier solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Heiner

    Hot-carrier solar cells are envisioned to utilize energy filtering to extract power from photogenerated electron-hole pairs before they thermalize with the lattice, and thus potentially offer higher power conversion efficiency compared to conventional, single absorber solar cells. The efficiency of hot-carrier solar cells can be expected to strongly depend on the details of the energy filtering process, a relationship which to date has not been satisfactorily explored. Here, we establish the conditions under which electron-hole separation in hot-carrier solar cells can occur reversibly, that is, at maximum energy conversion efficiency. We find that, under specific conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a hot-carrier solar cell can exceed the Carnot limit set by the intra-device temperature gradient alone, due to the additional contribution of the quasi-Fermi level splitting in the absorber. To achieve this, we consider a highly selective energy filter such as a quantum dot embedded into a one-dimensional conductor. We also establish that the open-circuit voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell is not limited by the band gap of the absorber, due to the additional thermoelectric contribution to the voltage. Additionally, we find that a hot-carrier solar cell can be operated in reverse as a thermally driven solid-state light emitter. In addition this theoretical analysis, I will also report on first experimental results in a nanowire-based energy filter device. Ref: S Limpert, S Bremner, and H Linke, New J. Phys 17, 095004 (2015)

  11. Electronic hole localization in rutile and anatase TiO2 - Self-interaction correction in Delta-SCF DFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We study electronic hole localization in rutile and anatase titanium dioxide by means of Δ-Self-Consistent Field Density Functional Theory. In order to compare stabilities of the localized and the delocalized hole states we introduce a simple correction to the wrong description of the localization...

  12. Secondary-electron cascade in attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    Attosecond spectroscopy is currently restricted to photon energies around 100 eV. We show that under these conditions, electron-electron scatterings, as the photoelectrons leave the metal, give rise to a tail of secondary electrons with lower energies and hence a significant background. We develop...

  13. Two-photon double ionization of neon using an intense attosecond pulse train

    CERN Document Server

    Manschwetus, B; Campi, F; Maclot, S; Coudert-Alteirac, H; Lahl, J; Wikmark, H; Rudawski, P; Heyl, C M; Farkas, B; Mohamed, T; L'Huillier, A; Johnsson, P

    2016-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of two-photon double ionization of neon using an intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse train (APT) in a photon energy regime where both direct and sequential mechanisms are allowed. For an APT generated through high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in argon we achieve a total pulse energy close to 1 $\\mu$J, a central energy of 35 eV and a total bandwidth of $\\sim30$ eV. The APT is focused by broadband optics in a neon gas target to an intensity of $3\\cdot10^{12} $W$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$. By tuning the photon energy across the threshold for the sequential process the double ionization signal can be turned on and off, indicating that the two-photon double ionization predominantly occurs through a sequential process. The demonstrated performance opens up possibilities for future XUV-XUV pump-probe experiments with attosecond temporal resolution in a photon energy range where it is possible to unravel the dynamics behind direct vs. sequential double ionization and the asso...

  14. Exceptionally strong correlation-driven charge migration and attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollstein, Maximilian; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically charge migration following prompt double ionization of a polyatomic molecule (C$_2$H$_4$BrI) and find that for double ionization, correlation-driven charge migration appears to be particularly prominent, i.e., we observe exceptionally rich dynamics solely driven by the electron-electron interaction even in the situation when the electrons are emitted from outer-valence orbitals. These strongly correlated electron dynamics are witnessed in the theoretically determined time-resolved transient absorption cross section. Strikingly, features in the cross section can be traced back to electron hole populations and time-dependent partial charges and hence, can be interpreted with surprising ease. Remarkably, by taking advantage of element specific core-to-valence transitions, the hole population dynamics can be followed both in time and space. With this, not only do we report the high relevance of correlation-driven charge migration following double ionization but our findings also highl...

  15. Attosecond gamma-ray pulses via nonlinear Compton scattering in the radiation dominated regime

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Xing; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counter-propagating tightly-focused laser beam is investigated for intensities when the dynamics is strongly affected by its own radiation. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma-radiation are evaluated employing a semiclassical description for the laser-driven electron dynamics and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emissions. We show for laser facilities under construction that gamma-ray bursts of few hundred attoseconds and dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies may be detected in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. Tight focussing of the laser beam and radiation reaction are demonstrated to be jointly responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts which are independent of both duration of electron bunch and laser pulse. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of the gamma-photon emission features signatures in the resulting gamma-ray comb in the case of the application of a multi-cycle laser pulse.

  16. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure.

  17. What Causes Electron Holes During Magnetic Reconnection and What Can We Learn From Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Martin V.; Newman, David L.; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andre; Califano, Francesco; Che, Haihong

    2009-11-01

    Weak bipolar electrostatic fields are commonly observed in association with magnetic reconnection. Recent attention has focused on their origin due to nonlinear evolution of electrostatic instabilities.footnotetextGoldman, M. V., D. L. Newman, and P. Pritchett, GRL, 35, doi:10.1029/2008GL035608 (2008).^,footnotetextNewman, D. L. and M. V. Goldman, SM31B-1735, AGU Fall Meeting (2008).^,footnotetextChe, H., J. F. Drake, M. Swisdak, and P. H. Yoon, PRL, 102, 145004 (2009). We present evidence from both older and new reconnection simulations for the SPATIAL dependence of electrostatically unstable electron distributions along the separatrix during guide-field magnetic reconection. Particle distributions further from the reconnection region tend to be Buneman (electron-ion) unstable, while distributions closer to the reconnection region tend to be two-stream (electron-electron) unstable. It may be possible to infer properties of the particle distributions from measurements of the speed, half-width, amplitude and aspect ratio of weak electron holes.

  18. Development of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray multilayer optics for scientific studies with femtosecond/attosecond sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, Andrew Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-21

    The development of multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation has led to advancements in many areas of science and technology, including materials studies, EUV lithography, water window microscopy, plasma imaging, and orbiting solar physics imaging. Recent developments in femtosecond and attosecond EUV pulse generation from sources such as high harmonic generation lasers, combined with the elemental and chemical specificity provided by EUV radiation, are opening new opportunities to study fundamental dynamic processes in materials. Critical to these efforts is the design and fabrication of multilayer optics to transport, focus, shape and image these ultra-fast pulses This thesis describes the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of multilayer optics for EUV femtosecond and attosecond scientific studies. Multilayer mirrors for bandwidth control, pulse shaping and compression, tri-material multilayers, and multilayers for polarization control are described. Characterization of multilayer optics, including measurement of material optical constants, reflectivity of multilayer mirrors, and metrology of reflected phases of the multilayer, which is critical to maintaining pulse size and shape, were performed. Two applications of these multilayer mirrors are detailed in the thesis. In the first application, broad bandwidth multilayers were used to characterize and measure sub-100 attosecond pulses from a high harmonic generation source and was performed in collaboration with the Max-Planck institute for Quantum Optics and Ludwig- Maximilians University in Garching, Germany, with Professors Krausz and Kleineberg. In the second application, multilayer mirrors with polarization control are useful to study femtosecond spin dynamics in an ongoing collaboration with the T-REX group of Professor Parmigiani at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. As new ultrafast x-ray sources become available, for example free electron lasers, the multilayer designs

  19. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kärtner, F.X., E-mail: franz.kaertner@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahr, F. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); Calendron, A.-L. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Çankaya, H. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Carbajo, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Chang, G.; Cirmi, G. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dörner, K. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dorda, U. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Fallahi, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hartin, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hemmer, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  20. Formation and transport of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer of MOS transistors after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky); Petr, I. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Jaderna a Fysikalne Inzenyrska)

    1985-04-01

    The formation of electron-hole pairs in the SiO/sub 2/ layer after irradiation with gamma rays and fast electrons is analyzed. The energy per electron-hole pair formed in the SiO/sub 2/ layer has been estimated, the value obtained is compared with the results of other authors. Moreover, the transport of the electrons and holes formed in the SiO/sub 2/ layer is discussed. The distribution of the accumulated space charge is determined along the thickness of the oxide layer. The experimental data verify that the space charge in the SiO/sub 2/ layer is distributed in low depths of the Si-SiO/sub 2/ junction.

  1. Attosecond Precision Multi-km Laser-Microwave Network

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, M; Peng, M Y; Kalaydzhyan, A; Wang, W; Muecke, O D; Kaertner, F X

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous laser-microwave networks consisting of many optical and microwave sources distributed over km-distances are crucial for scientific efforts requiring highest spatio-temporal resolution. However, present synchronization techniques limit these networks to 10-fs relative timing jitter between their sub-sources. Here, we present a novel 4.7 km laser-microwave network with attosecond precision for over tens of hours of continuous operation. It is achieved through new metrological devices and careful balancing of fiber nonlinearities and fundamental noise contributions. This work may enable next-generation attosecond photon-science facilities to revolutionize many research fields from structural biology to material science and chemistry to fundamental physics. It will also accelerate the development in other research areas requiring high spatio-temporal resolution such as geodesy, very-long-baseline interferometry, high-precision navigation and multi-telescope arrays.

  2. Modulation of attosecond beating in resonant two-photon ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro J; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating at the basis of RABBIT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating By Interference of Two-photon transitions) in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, its sidebands exhibit a peaked phase shift as well as a modulation of the beating frequency itself. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a sensitive non-holographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena quantitatively with a general finite-pulse analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes, at a negligible computational cost. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N=2 doubly excited states.

  3. Extremely Efficient Multiple Electron-hole Pair Generation in Carbon Nanotube Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Nathaniel

    2010-03-01

    The efficient generation of multiple electron-hole (e-h) pairs from a single photon could improve the efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells beyond standard thermodynamic limits [1] and has been the focus of much recent work in semiconductor nanomaterials [2,3]. In single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the small Fermi velocity and low dielectric constant suggests that electron-electron interactions are very strong and that high-energy carriers should efficiently generate e-h pairs. Here, I will discuss observations of highly efficient generation of e-h pairs due to impact excitation in SWNT p-n junction photodiodes [4]. To investigate optoelectronic transport properties of individual SWNT photodiodes, we focus a laser beam over the device while monitoring the electronic characteristics. Optical excitation into the second electronic subband E22 ˜ 2 EGAP leads to striking photocurrent steps in the device I-VSD characteristics that occur at voltage intervals of the band gap energy EGAP/ e. Spatially and spectrally resolved photocurrent combined with temperature-dependent studies suggest that these steps result from efficient generation of multiple e-h pairs from a single hot E22 carrier. We conclude that in the SWNT photodiode, a single photon with energy greater than 2EGAP is converted into multiple e-h pairs, leading to enhanced photocurrent and increased photo-conversion efficiency. [1] W. Shockley, and H. J. Queisser, Journal of Applied Physics 32, 510 (1961). [2] R. D. Schaller, and V. I. Klimov, Physical Review Letters 92 (18), 186601 (2004). [3] R. J. Ellingson, et al, Nano Letters, 5 (5), 865-871 (2005). [4] Nathaniel M. Gabor, Zhaohui Zhong, Ken Bosnick, Jiwoong Park, and Paul McEuen, Science, 325, 1367 (2009).

  4. Electron holes in the outer radiation belt: Characteristics and their role in electron energization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.; Drake, J. F.; Kuzichev, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Van Allen Probes have detected electron holes (EHs) around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. Presumably generated near equator, EHs propagate to higher latitudes potentially resulting in energization of electrons trapped within EHs. This process has been recently shown to provide electrons with energies up to several tens of keV and requires EH propagation up to rather high latitudes. We have analyzed more than 100 EHs observed around a particular injection to determine their kinetic structure and potential energy sources supporting the energization of trapped electrons. EHs propagate with velocities from 1000 to 20,000 km/s (a few times larger than the thermal velocity of the coldest background electron population). The parallel scale of observed EHs is from 0.3 to 3 km that is of the order of hundred Debye lengths. The perpendicular to parallel scale ratio is larger than one in a qualitative agreement with the theoretical scaling relation. The amplitudes of EH electrostatic potentials are generally below 100 V. We determine the properties of the electron population trapped within EHs by making use of the Bernstein-Green-Kruskal analysis and via analysis of EH magnetic field signatures. The density of the trapped electron population is on average 20% of the background electron density. The perpendicular temperature of the trapped population is on average 300 eV and is larger for faster EHs. We show that energy losses of untrapped electrons scattered by EHs in the inhomogeneous background magnetic field may balance the energization of trapped electrons.

  5. A Theoretical Strategy to Generate an Isolated 80-Attosecond Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Fu-Ming; YANG Yu-Jun; JIN Ming-Xing; DING Da-Jun; ZHU Qi-Ren

    2009-01-01

    Using a linearly polarized, phase-stabilized 2.66-femtcsecond driving pulse of 400 nm central wavelength orthogonally combined with another linearly polarized long pulse of 800nm central wavelength irradiating jointly on the helium atom, we demonstrate theoretically the generation of a clean isolated 80-attosecond pulse in the spectral region of 93-155 electron volts in a two-dimensional model.

  6. Attosecond delays in photoionization: time and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, Alfred; Caillat, Jérémie; Taïeb, Richard

    2014-10-01

    This article addresses topics regarding time measurements performed on quantum systems. The motivation is linked to the advent of ‘attophysics’ which makes feasible to follow the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules, with time resolution at the attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) level, i.e. at the natural scale for electronic processes in these systems. In this context, attosecond ‘time-delays’ have been recently measured in experiments on photoionization and the question arises if such advances could cast a new light on the still active discussion on the status of the time variable in quantum mechanics. One issue still debatable is how to decide whether one can define a quantum time operator with eigenvalues associated to measurable ‘time-delays’, or time is a parameter, as it is implicit in the Newtonian classical mechanics. One objective of this paper is to investigate if the recent attophysics-based measurements could shed light on this parameter-operator conundrum. To this end, we present here the main features of the theory background, followed by an analysis of the experimental schemes that have been used to evidence attosecond ‘time-delays’ in photoionization. Our conclusion is that these results reinforce the view that time is a parameter which cannot be defined without reference to classical mechanics.

  7. Comparison of RABITT and FROG measurements in the temporal characterization of attosecond pulse trains

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyung Taec; Park, Mi Na; Imran, Tayyab; Umesh, G; Nam, Chang Hee

    2007-01-01

    The attosecond high harmonic pulses obtained from a long Ar-filled gas cell were characterized by two techniques - the reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transition (RABITT) and frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) methods. The pulse durations obtained by RABITT and FROG methods agreed within 10 %.

  8. Single attosecond pulse from terahertz-assisted high-order harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balogh, Emeric [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Kovacs, Katalin [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dombi, Peter; Farkas, Gyozo [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Fulop, Jozsef A.; Hebling, Janos [Department of Experimental Physics, University of Pecs, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Tosa, Valer [National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Varju, Katalin [HAS Research Group on Laser Physics, University of Szeged, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2011-08-15

    High-order harmonic generation by few-cycle 800 nm laser pulses in neon gas in the presence of a strong terahertz (THz) field is investigated numerically with propagation effects taken into account. Our calculations show that the combination of THz fields with up to 12 fs laser pulses can be an effective gating technique to generate single attosecond pulses. We show that in the presence of the strong THz field only a single attosecond burst can be phase matched, whereas radiation emitted during other half cycles disappears during propagation. The cutoff is extended and a wide supercontinuum appears in the near-field spectra, extending the available spectral width for isolated attosecond pulse generation from 23 to 93 eV. We demonstrate that phase-matching effects are responsible for the generation of isolated attosecond pulses, even in conditions when single-atom response yields an attosecond pulse train.

  9. Generation, temporal characterization and applications of femtosecond-/ attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, Isabell

    The work of this thesis is arranged into three parts: (A) Generation and temporal characterization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) attosecond pulses. In this work I present the generation and first temporal characterization of sub-optical cycle EUV radiation generated in a noble-gas filled hollow-core waveguide. Two regimes of EUV radiation were characterized, ranging from 200 attoseconds to ˜ 1 femtosecond in duration. The first regime that was characterized distinguishes itself from EUV radiation generated by other methods by its narrow (˜ 1 eV) spectral width, its simple energy tunability and its temporal confinement to ˜ 1 femtosecond. In the second regime, single isolated pulses of 200 attoseconds duration (and accordingly larger bandwidth) were generated. In both regimes dynamic phase-matching effects create an extremely short time window within which efficient nonlinear conversion is possible, while it is suppressed outside this window. Temporal characterization of the generated EUV pulses was approached by two-color pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy. Therefore an efficient photoelectron spectrometer was set up, detecting electrons in a 2pi collection angle. For the interpretation of the experimental data, an analytical model as well as an iterative algorithm were developed, to allow extraction of complex EUV waveforms. The demonstrated radiation will allow for time-resolved studies of the fastest processes in molecules and condensed matter, while at the same time ensuring adequate energy resolution for addressing individual electronic states. (B) Application of a COLTRIMS reaction microscope in combination with femtosecond EUV pulses to questions in molecular physics. The combination of the sensitive detection capabilities of a COLTRIMS reaction microscope with the high time resolution of pump-probe experiments using femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses makes it possible to answer very fundamental open questions in molecular physics such as the

  10. Merge of high harmonic generation from gases and solids and its implications for attosecond science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vampa, G.; Brabec, T.

    2017-04-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) in atomic and molecular gases builds the foundation of attosecond science. In recent experiments HHG has been demonstrated in solids for the first time. A theoretical analysis has revealed that one of the mechanisms driving HHG in semiconductors is similar to the one in atomic and molecular gases. As a result, many of the processes developed for attosecond science in gases can be adapted and applied to the condensed matter phase. In this tutorial, the connection between atomic and solid HHG is summarized with covering both theoretical and experimental work, and some implications for attosecond science in solids are presented.

  11. Genetic optimization of attosecond pulse generation in light-field synthesizers

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, E; Tosa, V; Goulielmakis, E; Varjú, K; Dombi, P

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate control over attosecond pulse generation and shaping by numerically optimizing the synthesis of few-cycle to sub-cycle driver waveforms. The optical waveform synthesis takes place in an ultrabroad spectral band covering the ultraviolet-infrared domain. These optimized driver waves are used for ultrashort single and double attosecond pulse production (with tunable separation) revealing the potentials of the light wave synthesizer device demonstrated by Wirth et al. [Science 334, 195 (2011)]. The results are also analyzed with respect to attosecond pulse propagation phenomena.

  12. Two attosecond pulse transient absorption spectroscopy and extraction of the instantaneous AC Stark shift in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bækhøj, Jens E.; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    In two attosecond pulse absorption spectroscopy (TAPAS) the use of two attosecond XUV pulses allows the extraction of atomic and molecular quantum mechanical dipole phases from spectroscopic measurements. TAPAS relies on interference between processes that individually only include a single XUV photon, and therefore does not rely on high intensity attosecond pulses. To show the usefulness and limitations of the TAPAS method we investigate its capability of capturing the instantaneous AC Stark shift induced by a midinfrared 3200 nm pulse in the | 1{{s}}2{{p}}> state of helium.

  13. Phase Determination Method to Directly Measure Intensity and Frequency of Temporal Profiles of Attosecond EUV Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Yu-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ A new method of phase determination is presented to directly measure the intensity and frequency temporalprofiles of attosecond EUV pulses. The profiles can be reconstructed from the photoelectron energy spectra measured with two different laser intensities at 0° and 180° with respect to the linear laser polarization using a cross correlation between the femtosecond laser and the attosecond EUV. The method has a temporal measurement range from a quarter to about half of a laser oscillation period. The time resolution depends on the jitter and control precision of laser and EUV pulses. This method improves the time resolution in measuring attosecond EUV pulses.

  14. Nonradiative Electron--Hole Recombination Rate Is Greatly Reduced by Defects in Monolayer Black Phosphorus: Ab Initio Time Domain Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Fang, Weihai; Akimov, Alexey V

    2016-02-18

    We report ab initio time-domain simulations of nonradiative electron-hole recombination and electronic dephasing in ideal and defect-containing monolayer black phosphorus (MBP). Our calculations predict that the presence of phosphorus divacancy in MBP (MBP-DV) substantially reduces the nonradiative recombination rate, with time scales on the order of 1.57 ns. The luminescence line width in ideal MBP of 150 meV is 2.5 times larger than MBP-DV at room temperature, and is in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that the electron-hole recombination in ideal MBP is driven by the 450 cm(-1) vibrational mode, whereas the recombination in the MBP-DV system is driven by a broad range of vibrational modes. The reduced electron-phonon coupling and increased bandgap in MBP-DV rationalize slower recombination in this material, suggesting that electron-phonon energy losses in MBP can be minimized by creating suitable defects in semiconductor device material.

  15. A-periodic multilayer development for attosecond pulses in the 300-500 eV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael; Kleineberg, Ulf [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Rauhut, Roman [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The development of ultrafast X-ray pulses in the sub-femtosecond time regime is a cutting edge technology for studying electron dynamics in atoms, molecules or solid surfaces/nanostructures by means of pump/probe electron spectroscopy. XUV elements as multilayer mirrors and thin metal filters are used to filter and shape attosecond bursts from high harmonic radiation. One near future goal is to extend the current technology to higher photon energies, reaching the water window range around 300-500 eV, where the in-vitro investigation of bio-materials on ultra-short time scales becomes possible. Following the ideas of nowadays experimental setups, both the spectral and the temporal resolution can be determined and guided by means of periodic and a-periodic multilayer mirrors, allowing for spectral and temporal soft X-ray pulse shaping. We will present first investigations of periodic and a-periodic multilayer XUV optics in that energy range of 300-400 eV and discuss their applications for filtering single attosecond pulses from High Harmonic radiation. Simulations and optimizations of various binary and ternary multilayer material systems as well as first experimental results achieved by Ion Beam Deposition and in-situ ellipsometry of the deposited nanolayers are demonstrated.

  16. Sub-20-Attosecond Timing Jitter Mode-Locked Fiber Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyoji; Song, Youjian; Yang, Heewon; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Jung, Kwangyun; Wang, Chingyue; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate 14.3-attosecond timing jitter [integrated from 10 kHz to 94 MHz offset frequency] optical pulse trains from 188-MHz repetition-rate mode-locked Yb-fiber lasers. In order to minimize the timing jitter, we shorten the non-gain fiber length to shorten the pulsewidth and reduce excessive higher-order nonlinearity and nonlinear chirp in the fiber laser. The measured jitter spectrum is limited by the amplified spontaneous emission limited quantum noise in the 100 kHz - 1 MHz offset frequency range, while it was limited by the relative intensity noise-converted jitter in the lower offset frequency range. This intrinsically low timing jitter enables sub-100-attosecond synchronization between the two mode-locked Yb-fiber lasers over the full Nyquist frequency with a modest 10-kHz locking bandwidth. The demonstrated performance is the lowest timing jitter measured from any free-running mode-locked fiber lasers, comparable to the performance of the lowest-jitter Ti:sapphire solid-state lasers.

  17. Deconfinement of Quarks with TeV Attosecond Photon Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2010-02-01

    Recently, I have proposed a novel heuristic method for the deconfinement of quarks.footnotetextM. Gell-Mann. The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex (New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Co., 1994) [cf. M. Gell-Mann, The Garden of Live Flowers in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. Essays Honoring Victor Frederick Weisskopf (Springer, 1998), pp. 109-121]. It proceeds in two phases.footnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, On a Heuristic Point of View About Inertial Deconfinement of Quarks, American Physical Society, 2009 APS April Meeting, May 2-5, 2009, abstract #E1.038. Firstly, a frozen hydrogen pellet is inertially confined by the ultra-intense lasers up to a solid state density. Secondly, a solid state nano-pellet is ``punched'' by the photon beam created in the beat wave driven free electron laser (BW-FEL), leading to the ``rapture'' (in a ``karate chop'' model) of the ``MIT Bag''footnotetextJ. I. Friedman and H. Kendall, Viki, in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. (Springer, 1998), pp. 103-108]. before the asymptotically free quarks move apart. Hereby, I propose TeV, a few 100s attosecond, photon beams in interaction with the nano-pellet. The threshold ``rapture force'' of the TeV attosecond photon is 10^7 N. )

  18. Attochirp-corrected photo ionization time delays using coincidence attosecond streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbar, M; Boge, R; Lucchini, M; Gallmann, L; Cirelli, C; Keller, U

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated the possibility of probing single-photon ionization time delays of electrons originating from different initial states [1,2]. Here, we show for the first time the importance of the temporal structure of the ionizing single attosecond pulse (i.e. attochirp) in the extraction of time delays in attosecond streaking experiments. We have demonstrated this by measuring the time delay between valence electrons from different atomic species by combining attosecond streaking with a coincidence detection scheme. This novel technique allows for the simultaneous measurement of both species under identical conditions. We find that the attochirp introduces an artificial time delay that may exceed the atomic time delay and present a general procedure, which corrects for this contribution. Our analysis, exemplarily applied to argon (Ar) and neon (Ne), reveals an energy-dependent atomic time delay of a few tens of attoseconds in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  19. Applications of Ultrafast Terahertz Pulses for Intra-ExcitonicSpectroscopy of Quasi-2D Electron-Hole Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Carnahan, Marc A.; Hagele, Daniel; Chemla, D.S.

    2006-09-02

    Excitons are of fundamental interest and of importance foropto-electronic applications of bulk and nano-structured semiconductors.This paper discusses the utilization of ultrafast terahertz (THz) pulsesfor the study of characteristic low-energy excitations of photoexcitedquasi 2D electron-hole (e-h) gases. Optical-pump THz-probe spectroscopyat 250-kHz repetition rate is employed to detect characteristic THzsignatures of excitons and unbound e-h pairs in GaAs quantum wells.Exciton and free-carrier densities are extracted from the data using atwo-component model. We report the detailed THz response and pairdensities for different photoexcitation energies resonant to heavy-holeexcitons, light-hole excitons, or the continuum of unbound pairs. Suchexperiments can provide quantitative insights into wavelength, time, andtemperature dependence of the low-energy response and composition ofoptically excited e-h gases in low-dimensionalsemiconductors.

  20. g factors and diamagnetic coefficients of electrons, holes, and excitons in InAs/InP quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bree, J.; Silov, A. Yu.; Koenraad, P. M.; Flatté, M. E.; Pryor, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    The electron, hole, and exciton g factors and diamagnetic coefficients have been calculated using envelope-function theory for cylindrical InAs/InP quantum dots in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the dot symmetry axis. A clear connection is established between the electron g factor and the amplitude of those valence-state envelope functions that possess nonzero orbital momentum associated with the envelope function. The dependence of the exciton diamagnetic coefficients on the quantum dot height is found to correlate with the energy dependence of the effective mass. Calculated exciton g factor and diamagnetic coefficients, constructed from the values associated with the electron and hole constituents of the exciton, match experimental data well, however including the Coulomb interaction between the electron and hole states improves the agreement. Remote-band contributions to the valence-band electronic structure, included perturbatively, reduce the agreement between theory and experiment.

  1. Tuning of magnetic optical response in a dielectric nanoparticle by ultrafast photo-injection of dense electron-hole plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Sergey; Mukhin, Ivan; Mozharov, Alexey; Milichko, Valentin; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for efficient tuning of optical properties of a high refractive index subwavelength nanoparticle with a magnetic Mie-type resonance by means of femtosecond laser irradiation. This concept is based on ultrafast photo-injection of dense (>10^20 cm^-3) electron-hole plasma within such nanoparticle, drastically changing its transient dielectric permittivity. This allows to manipulate by both electric and magnetic nanoparticle responses, resulting in dramatic changes of its scattering diagram and scattering cross section. We experimentally demonstrate 20 % tuning of reflectance of a single silicon nanoparticle by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelength in the vicinity of the magnetic dipole resonance. Such single-particle nanodevice enables to design fast and ultracompact optical switchers and modulators.

  2. Generation of coherent ion acoustic solitary waves in inhomogeneous plasmas by an odd eigenmode of electron holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokgo, Kyunghwan; Woo, Minho; Choi, Cheong-Rim; Min, Kyoung-Wook; Hwang, Junga

    2016-09-01

    Generation of coherent ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in inhomogeneous plasmas by an odd eigenmode (OEM) of electron holes (EHs) is investigated using 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The OEM oscillates at a frequency comparable to the trapped electron bouncing frequency, as also demonstrated by Lewis' theoretical formalism about the linear eigenmode in Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) equilibrium. The density gradient in the inhomogeneous plasmas causes asymmetry in the EH potential structure associated with the OEM, whose amplitude grows rapidly as it propagates through the density gradient region. As the ions interact with this asymmetric potential, which oscillates slowly enough for the ions to respond, they are ejected to the lower density side with a larger potential amplitude, forming a chain of IASWs coherently with the oscillation of the OEM.

  3. Formation and Decay of Electron-Hole Plasma Clusters in a Direct-Gap Semiconductor CuCl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lei(姜磊); WU Ming-Wei(吴明卫); M. Nagai; M. Kuwata-Gonokami

    2003-01-01

    The master equation for the cluster-size distribution function is solved numerically to investigate the electronhole droplet formation claimed to be discovered in the direct-gap CuCl excited by picosecond laser pulses [Nagai et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001)5795; J. Lumin. 100 (2002)233]. Our result shows that for the excitation in the experiment, the average number of pairs per cluster (ANPC) is only around 5.2, much smaller than that (106 typically for Ge) of the well studied electron-hole droplet in indirect-gap semiconductors such as Ge and Si.These results indicate that what measured in CuCl by Nagai et al. may not come from the EHD formed from exciton gas, instead possibly come from some bubbles of excitons in metallic liquid.

  4. Electrons, holes, and excitons in superlattice of cylindrical quantum dots with weakest coupling of quasiparticles between quantum dots layers

    CERN Document Server

    Tkach, N V; Zegrya, G G

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical investigation of the spectrum of electrons, holes, and excitons in the superlattice of cylindrical quantum dots with weakest coupling of quasiparticles between vertical layers of quantum dots is carried out. The calculations are fulfilled by the example of cylindrical quantum dots of beta-HgS introduced into beta-CdS as the superlattice. It is shown that electron and hole in such system form quasi-two-dimensional energy minibands, but excitons are described by the Sugano-Shinada model. The dependence of quasiparticle spectra on geometric parameters of the superlattice with cylindrical quantum dots is studied. It is shown that the position of minibands of all quasiparticles is very sensitive to variation of the quantum dot height

  5. Observation of molecular dipole excitations by attosecond self-streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Georg; Sato, Shunsuke A; Pazourek, Renate; Wais, Michael; Lemell, Christoph; Tong, Xiao-Min; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We propose a protocol to probe the ultrafast evolution and dephasing of coherent electronic excitation in molecules in the time domain by the intrinsic streaking field generated by the molecule itself. Coherent electronic motion in the endohedral fullerene \\Necsixty~is initiated by a moderately intense femtosecond UV-VIS pulse leading to coherent oscillations of the molecular dipole moment that persist after the end of the laser pulse. The resulting time-dependent molecular near-field is probed through the momentum modulation of photoemission from the central neon atom by a time-delayed attosecond XUV pulse. Our ab-initio time-dependent density functional theory and classical trajectory simulations predict that this self-streaking signal accurately traces the molecular dipole oscillations in real time. We discuss the underlying processes and give an analytical model that captures the essence of our ab-initio simulations.

  6. A Novel Femtosecond Laser System for Attosecond Pulse Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel ultrabroadband high-energy femtosecond laser to be built in our laboratory. A 7-femtosecond pulse is firstly stretched by an eight-pass offner stretcher with a chirp rate 15 ps/nm, and then energy-amplified by a two-stage optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA. The first stage as preamplification with three pieces of BBO crystals provides the majority of the energy gain. At the second stage, a YCOB crystal with the aperture of ~50 mm is used instead of the KDP crystal as the gain medium to ensure the shortest pulse. After the completion, the laser will deliver about 8 J with pulse duration of about 10 femtoseconds, which should be beneficial to the attosecond pulse generation and other ultrafast experiments.

  7. Breaking time-inversion invariance through decoherence — Energetic consequences for attosecond neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; MacA Gray, E.; Blach, T. P.

    2012-08-01

    Nuclei and electrons in condensed matter and/or molecules are usually entangled, due to the prevailing (mainly electromagnetic) interactions. However, the "environment" of a microscopic scattering system (e.g. a proton) causes ultrafast decoherence, thus making atomic and/or nuclear entanglement effects not directly accessible to experiments. However, our neutron Compton scattering experiments from protons (H-atoms) in condensed systems and molecules have a characteristic collisional time about 100-1000 attoseconds. The quantum dynamics of an atom in this ultrashort, but finite, time window is governed by non-unitary time evolution due to the aforementioned decoherence. Unexpectedly, recent theoretical investigations have shown that decoherence can also have the following energetic consequences. Disentangling two subsystems A and B of a quantum system AB is tantamount to erasure of quantum phase relations between A and B. This erasure is widely believed to be an innocuous process, which e.g. does not affect the energies of A and B. However, two independent groups proved recently that disentangling two systems, within a sufficiently short time interval, causes increase of their energies. This is also derivable by the simplest Lindblad-type master equation of one particle being subject to pure decoherence. Our neutron-proton scattering experiments with H2 molecules provide for the first time experimental evidence of this effect. Our results reveal that the neutron-proton collision, leading to the cleavage of the H-H bond in the attosecond timescale, is accompanied by larger energy transfer (by about 2-3%) than conventional theory predicts. Preliminary results from current investigations show qualitatively the same effect in the neutron-deuteron Compton scattering from D2 molecules. We interpret the experimental findings by treating the neutron-proton (or neutron-deuteron) collisional system as an entangled open quantum system being subject to fast decoherence caused

  8. Simulation of attosecond-resolved imaging of the plasmon electric field in metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prell, James S.; Borja, Lauren J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1460 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1460 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1460 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1460 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Sub-cycle photoelectron streaking from silver plasmonic nanospheres is simulated using few-cycle laser pulses tuned both on and off the plasmon resonance (376 nm vs 800 nm, respectively) to initiate the plasmon. Phase-locked, isolated attosecond XUV pulses induce photoemission from the nanospheres, and two different types of streaking of the photoelectrons occur simultaneously due to the laser and plasmon electric fields. Streaking is simulated over a wide range of excitation pulse intensities, and final velocity distributions for the photoelectrons emitted at different times are calculated. The resulting velocity distributions exhibit several characteristics attributable to the plasmon electric field. The dipole moment amplitude can be reconstructed using velocity map imaging or time-of-flight photoelectron velocity measurements without separate measurement of the laser electric field or deconvolution using an assumed streaking trace shape. These results indicate that photoelectron experiments in table-top set-ups can provide unprecedented spatio-temporal information about sub-cycle plasmon dynamics in metallic nanostructures. (copyright 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Research Update: Relativistic origin of slow electron-hole recombination in hybrid halide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarhoosh, Pooya; McKechnie, Scott; Frost, Jarvist M.; Walsh, Aron; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPI) exhibits long minority-carrier lifetimes and diffusion lengths. We show that slow recombination originates from a spin-split indirect-gap. Large internal electric fields act on spin-orbit-coupled band extrema, shifting band-edges to inequivalent wavevectors, making the fundamental gap indirect. From a description of photoluminescence within the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation for MAPI, CdTe, and GaAs, we predict carrier lifetime as a function of light intensity and temperature. At operating conditions we find radiative recombination in MAPI is reduced by a factor of more than 350 compared to direct gap behavior. The indirect gap is retained with dynamic disorder.

  10. Research Update: Relativistic origin of slow electron-hole recombination in hybrid halide perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Azarhoosh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPI exhibits long minority-carrier lifetimes and diffusion lengths. We show that slow recombination originates from a spin-split indirect-gap. Large internal electric fields act on spin-orbit-coupled band extrema, shifting band-edges to inequivalent wavevectors, making the fundamental gap indirect. From a description of photoluminescence within the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation for MAPI, CdTe, and GaAs, we predict carrier lifetime as a function of light intensity and temperature. At operating conditions we find radiative recombination in MAPI is reduced by a factor of more than 350 compared to direct gap behavior. The indirect gap is retained with dynamic disorder.

  11. Generation of intense circularly polarized attosecond light bursts from relativistic laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Guangjin; Yu, M Y; Shen, Baifei; Veisz, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the polarization of attosecond light bursts generated by nanobunches of electrons from relativistic few-cycle laser pulse interaction with the surface of overdense plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the polarization state of the generated attosecond burst depends on the incident-pulse polarization, duration, carrier envelope phase, as well as the plasma scale length. Through laser and plasma parameter control, without compromise of generation efficiency, a linearly polarized laser pulse with azimuth $\\theta^i=10^\\circ$ can generate an elliptically polarized attosecond burst with azimuth $|\\theta^r_{\\rm atto}|\\approx61^\\circ$ and ellipticity $\\sigma^r_{\\rm atto}\\approx0.27$; while an elliptically polarized laser pulse with $\\sigma^i\\approx0.36$ can generate an almost circularly polarized attosecond burst with $\\sigma^r_{\\rm atto}\\approx0.95$. The results propose a new way to a table-top circularly polarized XUV source as a probe with attosecond scale time resolution for many a...

  12. Nonlinear Optical Properties and Subpicosecond Dynamics of Excitons and Electron-Hole Plasmas in Multiple Quantum Well Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    semiconductors GaAs, InP, and CdTe on time function of temperature (N + = 1.4 x 101s cm- 1) and scales from 250 psec to steady state.- 5 Herewereport from...wavelengths below -700 nm. Recently, the photorefractive responses of the compound III-V semiconductors GaAs and InP and the I-VI semiconductor CdTe to cw...rhodamine 6G niodclockine of di css dse laser in the ’ cllow spectral’ region.’ Opt 1111 systems in this laser cavity. This may arise from the Cmmut

  13. Magnetic Field Stabilized Electron-Hole Liquid in Indirect-Band-Gap AlxGa1-xAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kristin; Fluegel, Brian; Crooker, Scott A.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2016-02-15

    An electron-hole liquid (EHL), a condensed liquidlike phase of free electrons and holes in a semiconductor, presents a unique system for exploring quantum many-body phenomena. While the behavior of EHLs is generally understood, less attention has been devoted to systematically varying the onset of their formation and resulting properties. We report on an experimental approach to tune the conditions of formation and characteristics using a combination of low excitation densities and high magnetic fields up to 90 T. Demonstration of this approach was carried out in indirect-band-gap Al0.387Ga0.613As. EHL droplets can be nucleated from one of two multiexciton complex states depending on the applied excitation density. Furthermore, the excitation density influences the carrier density of the EHL at high magnetic fields, where filling of successive Landau levels can be controlled. The ability to manipulate the formation pathway, temperature, and carrier density of the EHL phase under otherwise fixed experimental conditions makes our approach a powerful tool for studying condensed carrier phases in further detail.

  14. Determination of the electron-hole pair creation energy for semiconductors from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Scholze, F; Kuschnerus, P; Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G

    2000-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be detected by the measurement of the charge carriers produced in a detector. The improved semiconductor technology now allows detectors operating near the physical limits of the detector materials to be designed. The mean energy required for producing an electron-hole pair, W, is a material property of the semiconductor. Here, the determination of W from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes is demonstrated. Using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation, different types of semiconductor photodiodes have been examined in the UV-, VUV-, and soft X-ray spectral range. Their spectral responsivity was determined with relative uncertainties between 0.4% and 1% using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer as primary detector standard. Results are presented for silicon n-on-p junction photodiodes and for GaAsP/Au Schottky diodes at room temperature. The investigations for silicon covered the complete spectral range from 3 to 1500 eV, yielding a constant value W=(3.66+-0.03) eV fo...

  15. The impact of long-range electron-hole interaction on the charge separation yield of molecular photocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati Aram, Tahereh; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Asgari, Asghar; Mayou, Didier

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the effects of charge carrier interaction and recombination on the operation of molecular photocells. Molecular photocells are devices where the energy conversion process takes place in a single molecular donor-acceptor complex attached to electrodes. Our investigation is based on the quantum scattering theory, in particular on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation; this minimizes the complexity of the problem while providing useful and non-trivial insight into the mechanism governing photocell operation. In this study, both exciton pair creation and dissociation are treated in the energy domain, and therefore there is access to detailed spectral information, which can be used as a framework to interpret the charge separation yield. We demonstrate that the charge carrier separation is a complex process that is affected by different parameters, such as the strength of the electron-hole interaction and the non-radiative recombination rate. Our analysis helps to optimize the charge separation process and the energy transfer in organic solar cells and in molecular photocells.

  16. Multipass relativistic high-order-harmonic generation for intense attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Mikhailova, Julia M.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the total reflected field produced by the interaction of a moderately relativistic laser with dense plasma is itself an efficient driver of high-order-harmonic generation. A system of two or more successive interactions of an incident laser beam on solid targets may therefore be an experimentally realizable method of optimizing conversion of laser energy to high-order harmonics. Particle-in-cell simulations suggest that attosecond pulse intensity may be increased by up to four orders of magnitude in a multipass system, with decreased duration of the attosecond pulse train. We discuss high-order-harmonic wave-form engineering for enhanced attosecond pulse generation with an electron trajectory model, present the behavior of multipass systems over a range of parameters, and offer possible routes towards experimental implementation of a two-pass system.

  17. Attosecond Control of Relativistic Electron Bunches using Two-Colour Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, M; Bierbach, J; Li, L; Eckner, E; Kuschel, S; Woldegeorgis, A; Rödel, C; Sävert, A; Paulus, G G; Coughlan, M; Dromey, B; Zepf, M

    2016-01-01

    Energy coupling during relativistically intense laser-matter interactions is encoded in the attosecond motion of strongly driven electrons at the pre-formed plasma-vacuum boundary. Studying and controlling this motion can reveal details about the microscopic processes that govern a vast array of light-matter interaction physics and applications. These include research areas right at the forefront of extreme laser-plasma science such as laser-driven ion acceleration1, bright attosecond pulse generation2,3 and efficient energy coupling for the generation and study of warm dense matter4. Here we demonstrate attosecond control over the trajectories of relativistic electron bunches formed during such interactions by studying the emission of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) harmonic radiation. We describe how the precise addition of a second laser beam operating at the second harmonic of the driving laser pulse can significantly transform the interaction by modifying the accelerating potential provided by the fundamental ...

  18. Attosecond pulse production using resonantly-enhanced high-order harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Strelkov, V V

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the effect of the giant resonance in Xe on the phase difference between the consecutive high order resonantly-enhanced harmonics and calculate the duration of the attosecond pulses produced by these harmonics. For certain conditions resonantly-induced dephasing compensates the phase difference which is intrinsic for the off-resonance harmonics. We find these conditions analytically and compare them with the numerical results. This harmonic synchronization allows attosecond pulse shortening in conjunction with the resonance-induced intensity increase by more than an order of magnitude; the latter enhancement relaxes the requirements for the UV filtering needed for the attosecond pulse production. Using a two-color driving field allows further increase of the intensity. In particular, a caustic-like feature in the harmonic spectrum leads to the generation efficiency growth up to two orders of magnitude, however accompanied by an elongation of the XUV pulse.

  19. Route to One Atomic Unit of Time: Development of a Broadband Attosecond Streak Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Qi; Chini, Michael; Chang, Zenghu

    A new attosecond streak camera based on a three-meter-long magnetic-bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer (MBES) is developed. The temporal resolution of the photoelectron detection system is measured to be better than 250 ps, which is sufficient to achieve an energy resolution of 0.5 eV at 150 eV photoelectron energy. In preliminary experiments, a 94-as isolated XUV pulse was generated and characterized. With a new algorithm to retrieve the amplitude and phase of XUV pulses (PROOF—phase retrieval by omega oscillation filtering), the attosecond streak camera will be able to characterize isolated attosecond pulses as short as one atomic unit of time (25 as).

  20. Attosecond Timing in Optical-to-Electrical Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Baynes, Fred N; Fortier, Tara; Zhou, Qiugui; Beling, Andreas; Campbell, Joe C; Diddames, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    The most frequency-stable sources of electromagnetic radiation are produced optically, and optical frequency combs provide the means for high fidelity frequency transfer across hundreds of terahertz and into the microwave domain. A critical step in this photonic-based synthesis of microwave signals is the optical-to-electrical conversion process. Here we show that attosecond (as) timing stability can be preserved across the opto-electronic interface of a photodiode, despite an intrinsic temporal response that is more than six orders of magnitude slower. The excess timing noise in the photodetection of a periodic train of ultrashort optical pulses behaves as flicker noise (1/f) with amplitude of 4 as/Sqrt(Hz) at 1 Hz offset. The corresponding fractional frequency fluctuations are 1.4x10-17 at 1 second and 5.5x10-20 at 1000 seconds. These results demonstrate that direct photodetection, as part of frequency-comb-based microwave synthesis, can support the timing performance of the best optical frequency standards...

  1. Noncollinear wave mixing of attosecond XUV and few-cycle optical laser pulses in gas-phase atoms: Toward multidimensional spectroscopy involving XUV excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Fidler, Ashley; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, which records transient wave-mixing signals in a medium, is a powerful tool to access microscopic information using light sources in the radio-frequency and optical regimes. The extension of this technique towards the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or even x-ray regimes holds the promise to uncover rich structural or dynamical information with even higher spatial or temporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate noncollinear wave mixing between weak XUV attosecond pulses and a strong near-infrared (NIR) few-cycle laser pulse in gas phase atoms (one photon of XUV and two photons of NIR). In the noncollinear geometry the attosecond and either one or two NIR pulses interact with argon atoms. Nonlinear XUV signals are generated in a spatially resolved fashion as required by phase matching. Different transition pathways can be identified from these background-free nonlinear signals according to the specific phase-matching conditions. Time-resolved measurements of the spatially gated XUV signals reveal electronic coherences of Rydberg wave packets prepared by a single XUV photon or XUV-NIR two-photon excitation, depending on the applied pulse sequences. These measurements open possible applications of tabletop multidimensional spectroscopy to the study of dynamics associated with valence or core excitation with XUV photons.

  2. Development of the Schrodinger equation for attosecond laser pulse interaction with Planck gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, M; Pilsudski, Josef

    2011-01-01

    The creation of the new particles by the interaction of the ultrarelativistic ions,from Large Hadron Collider(LHC), and attosecond laser pulse open new possibilities for laser physicists community .In this paper we propose the hyperbolic Schr\\"odinger equation (HSE) for gas of the "classical" particles "i.e. particles with mass= Planck mass We discuss the inclusion of the gravity to the HSE The solution of the HSE for a particle in a box is obtained. It is shown that for particles with m greater than Mp the energy spectrum is independent of the mass of particle. Key words: attosecond laser pulses, Schrodinger equation, Planck particles, thermal processes

  3. Control of the polarization of attosecond pulses using a two-color field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Camilo; Hoffmann, David J; Torres, Ricardo; Chipperfield, Luke E; Marangos, Jonathan P [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: camilo@usal.es

    2009-11-15

    Control over the polarization of an attosecond pulse train (APT) is demonstrated theoretically using orthogonally polarized two-color fields. The carrier envelope phase of the two pulses is used as a control parameter to generate both an APT with linear polarization in two nearly perpendicular planes or a train of elliptically polarized pulses of alternating helicity. By using few-cycle driving laser fields an isolated attosecond pulse with elliptical polarization is shown to be generated after selecting the cut-off region of the harmonic spectrum. The control mechanism is explained in terms of classical trajectories.

  4. Quantum-mechanical analysis of pulse reconstruction for a narrow bandwidth attosecond x-ray pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The photoelectron energy spectra(PESs)excited by narrow bandwidth attosecond x-ray pulses in the presence of a few-cycle laser are quantum-mechanically calculated.Transfer equations are used to reconstruct the detailed temporal structure of an attosecond x-ray pulse directly from a measured PES.Theoretical analysis shows that the temporal uncertainties of the pulse reconstruction depend on the x-ray bandwidth.The procedure of pulse reconstruction is direct and simple without making any previous pulse assumption,data fitting analysis and time-resolved measurement of PESs.The temporal measurement range is half of a laser optical cycle.

  5. Use of photoelectron laser phase determination method for attosecond measurements with quantum-mechanical calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper calculates quantum-mechanically the photoelectron energy spectra excited by attosecond x-rays in the presence of a few-cycle laser. A photoelectron laser phase determination method is used for precise measurements of the pulse natural properties of x-ray intensity and the instantaneous frequency profiles. As a direct procedure without any previous pulse profile assumptions and time-resolved measurements as well as data fitting analysis, this method can be used to improve the time resolutions of attosecond timing and measurements with metrological precision. The measurement range is half of a laser optical cycle.

  6. Efficient suppression of back electron/hole recombination in cobalt phosphate surface-modified undoped bismuth vanadate photoanodes† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD characterization and SEM images of CoPi-modified and unmodified BiVO4, continuous illumination J–V curves, transient absorption fit results, and transient absorption decays measured as a function of excitation intensities. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta05826k Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yimeng; Le Formal, Florian; Kafizas, Andreas; Pendlebury, Stephanie R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compared for the first time the dynamics of photogenerated holes in BiVO4 photoanodes with and without CoPi surface modification, employing transient absorption and photocurrent measurements on microsecond to second timescales. CoPi surface modification is known to cathodically shift the water oxidation onset potential; however, the reason for this improvement has not until now been fully understood. The transient absorption and photocurrent data were analyzed using a simple kinetic model, which allows quantification of the competition between electron/hole recombination and water oxidation. The results of this model are shown to be in excellent agreement with the measured photocurrent data. We demonstrate that the origin of the improvement of photocurrent onset resulting from CoPi treatment is primarily due to retardation of back electron/hole recombination across the space charge layer; no evidence of catalytic water oxidation via CoPi was observed. PMID:27358733

  7. Attosecond control of orbital parity mix interferences and the relative phase of even and odd harmonics in an attosecond pulse train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, G; Cao, W; Li, H; Wang, Z; Ben-Itzhak, I; Cocke, C L

    2012-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrate that atomic orbital parity mix interferences can be temporally controlled on an attosecond time scale. Electron wave packets are formed by ionizing argon gas with a comb of odd and even high-order harmonics, in the presence of a weak infrared field. Consequently, a mix of energy-degenerate even and odd parity states is fed in the continuum by one- and two-photon transitions. These interfere, leading to an asymmetric electron emission along the polarization vector. The direction of the emission can be controlled by varying the time delay between the comb and infrared field pulses. We show that such asymmetric emission provides information on the relative phase of consecutive odd and even order harmonics in the attosecond pulse train.

  8. Efficient generation of isolated attosecond pulses with high beam-quality by two-color Bessel-Gauss beams

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qingbin; Wang, Shaoyi; Lu, Peixiang

    2011-01-01

    The generation of isolated attosecond pulses with high efficiency and high beam quality is essential for attosec- ond spectroscopy. We numerically investigate the supercontinuum generation in a neutral rare-gas medium driven by a two-color Bessel-Gauss beam. The results show that an efficient smooth supercontinuum in the plateau is obtained after propagation, and the spatial profile of the generated attosecond pulse is Gaussian-like with the divergence angle of 0.1 degree in the far field. This bright source with high beam quality is beneficial for detecting and controlling the microscopic processes on attosecond time scale.

  9. Experimental observation of attosecond control over relativistic electron bunches with two-colour fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, M.; Rykovanov, S.; Bierbach, J.; Li, L.; Eckner, E.; Kuschel, S.; Woldegeorgis, A.; Rödel, C.; Sävert, A.; Paulus, G. G.; Coughlan, M.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.

    2017-01-01

    Energy coupling during relativistically intense laser-matter interactions is encoded in the attosecond motion of strongly driven electrons at the pre-formed plasma-vacuum boundary. Studying and controlling this motion can reveal details about the microscopic processes that govern a vast array of light-matter interaction phenomena, including those at the forefront of extreme laser-plasma science such as laser-driven ion acceleration, bright attosecond pulse generation and efficient energy coupling for the generation and study of warm dense matter. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by precisely adjusting the relative phase of an additional laser beam operating at the second harmonic of the driving laser it is possible to control the trajectories of relativistic electron bunches formed during the interaction with a solid target at the attosecond scale. We observe significant enhancements in the resulting high-harmonic yield, suggesting potential applications for sources of ultra-bright, extreme ultraviolet attosecond radiation to be used in atomic and molecular pump-probe experiments.

  10. Generation of stable ultra-relativistic attosecond electron bunches via the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; Goor, van F.A.; Boller, K.-J.

    2009-01-01

    In recent experiments ultra-relativistic femtosecond electron bunches were generated by a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in different regimes. Here we predict that even attosecond bunches can be generated by an LWFA due to the fast betatron phase mixing within a femtosecond electron bunch. The a

  11. Catching Conical Intersections in the Act; Monitoring Transient Electronic Coherences by Attosecond Stimulated X-Ray Raman Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Dorfman, Konstantin; Mukamel, Shaul

    Conical intersections (CIs) dominate the pathways and outcomes of virtually all photochemical molecular processes. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical effort, CIs have not been directly observed yet and the experimental evidence is inferred from fast reaction rates and vibrational signatures. We show that short X-ray pulses can directly detect the passage through a CI with the adequate temporal and spectral sensitivity. The non-adiabatic coupling that exists in the region of a CI redistributes electronic population but also generates electronic coherence. This coherent oscillation can then be detected via a coherent Raman process that employs a composite femtosecond/attosecond X-ray pulse. This technique, dubbed Transient Redistribution of Ultrafast Electronic Coherences (TRUECARS) is reminiscent of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) in that a coherent oscillation is set in motion and then monitored, but differs in that the dynamics is electronic (CARS generally observes nuclear dynamics) and the coherence is generated internally by passage through a region of non-adiabatic coupling rather than by an externally applied laser. Support provided by U.S. Department of Energy through Award No. DE-FG02-04ER15571, the National Science Foundation (Grant No CHE-1361516), and the Alexander von Humboldt foundation through the Feodor Lynen program.

  12. Electron-hole pair mechanism for the magnetic field effect in organic light emitting diodes based on poly(paraphenylene vinylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnich, S. A.; Niedermeier, U.; Melzer, C.; Sarfert, W.; von Seggern, H.

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the magnetic field effect (MFE) on current and electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes based on poly(paraphenylene vinylene). The MFE was strictly positive in the full range of device operation and showed nonmonotonic dependencies on applied voltage and temperature. Furthermore, the MFE on current obtained in bipolar devices was significantly larger than in hole-dominated devices. We discuss our results in the framework of an electron-hole pair model and show that the model can explain all functional dependencies observed in our devices.

  13. On the Attosecond charge migration in Cl.....N, Cl.....O, Br.....N and Br.....O Halogen-bonded clusters: Effect of donor, acceptor, vibration, rotation, and electron correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANKHABRATA CHANDRA; MOHAMMED MUSTHAFA IQBAL; ATANU BHATTACHARYA

    2016-08-01

    The electron-electron relaxation and correlation-driven charge migration process, which features pure electronic aspect of ultrafast charge migration phenomenon, occurs on a very short timescale in ionized molecules and molecular clusters, prior to the onset of nuclear motion. In this article, we have presented natureof ultrafast pure electronic charge migration dynamics through Cl.....N, Cl.....O, Br.....N, and Br.....O halogen bonds, explored using density functional theory. We have explored the role of donor, acceptor, electron correlation, vibration and rotation in charge migration dynamics through these halogen bonds. For this work, we have selected ClF, Cl₂, ClOH, ClCN, BrF, BrCl, BrOH, and BrCN molecules paired with either NH₃ or H₂O. We have found that the timescale for pure electron-electron relaxation and correlation-driven charge migration through the Cl.....N, Br.....N, Cl.....O, and Br.....O halogen bonds falls in the range of 300–600 attosecond. The primary driving force behind the attosecond charge migration through the Cl.....N, Br.....N, Cl.....O, and Br.....O halogen bonds is the energy difference (∆E) between two stationary cationic orbitals (LUMO-β and HOMO-β), which together represents the initial hole density immediately following vertical ionization. We have also predicted that the strength of electron correlation has significant effect on the charge migration timescale in Cl.....N, Br.....N, Cl.....O, and Br.....O halogen bonded clusters. Vibration and rotation are also found to exhibit profound effect on attosecond charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds.

  14. Generation of attosecond x-ray and gamma-ray via Compton backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Young; Yoon, Moohyun; Kim, Dong Eon

    2009-05-11

    The generation of an isolated attosecond gamma-ray pulse utilizing Compton backscattering of a relativistic electron bunch has been investigated. The energy of the electron bunch is modulated while the electron bunch interacts with a co-propagating few-cycle CEP (carrier envelope phase)-locked laser in a single-period wiggler. The energy-modulated electron bunch interacts with a counter-propagating driver laser, producing Compton back-scattered radiation. The energy modulation of the electron bunch is duplicated to the temporal modulation of the photon energy of Compton back-scattered radiation. The spectral filtering using a crystal spectrometer allows one to obtain an isolated attosecond gamma-ray.

  15. Attosecond delay of xenon $4d$ photoionization at the giant resonance and Cooper minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2016-01-01

    A Kohn-Sham time-dependent local-density-functional scheme is utilized to predict attosecond time delays of xenon 4d photoionization that involves the 4d giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. The fundamental effect of electron correlations to uniquely determine the delay at both regions is demonstrated. In particular, for the giant dipole resonance, the delay underpins strong collective effect, emulating the recent prediction at C60 giant plasmon resonance [T. Barillot et al, Phys. Rev. A 91, 033413 (2015)]. For the Cooper minimum, a qualitative similarity with a photorecombination experiment near argon 3p minimum [S. B. Schoun et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153001 (2014)] is found. The result should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe 4d photoemission.

  16. Investigation of the Newly Proposed Carrier-Envelope-Phase Stable Attosecond Pulse Source

    CERN Document Server

    Tibai, Z; Nagy-Csiha, Zs; Fülöp, J A; Almási, G; Hebling, J

    2016-01-01

    Practical aspects of the robust method we recently proposed for producing few-cycle attosecond pulses with arbitrary waveform in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range are studied numerically. It is based on the undulator radiation of relativistic ultrathin electron layers produced by inverse free-electron laser process. Optimal conditions for nanobunching are given; attosecond pulse energy and waveform, and their stability are studied. For K=0.8 undulator parameter, carrier-envelope-phase stable pulses with >45 nJ energy and 80 as duration at 20 nm, and >250 nJ energy and 240 as duration at 60 nm are predicted with 31 mrad and 13 mrad phase stability, respectively.

  17. Influence of generalized focusing of few-cycle Gaussian pulses in attosecond pulse generation

    CERN Document Server

    Karimi, Ebrahim; Tosa, Valer; Velotta, Raffaele; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the case of quasi-monochromatic waves, a focused optical pulse in the few-cycle limit may exhibit two independent curved wavefronts, associated with phase and group retardations, respectively. Focusing optical elements will generally affect these two wavefronts differently, thus leading to very different behavior of the pulse near focus. As limiting cases, we consider an ideal diffractive lens introducing only phase retardations and a perfect non-dispersive refractive lens (or a curved mirror) introducing equal phase and group retardations. We study the resulting diffraction effects on the pulse, finding both strong deformations of the pulse shape and shifts in the spectrum. We then show how important these effects can be in highly nonlinear optics, by studying their role in attosecond pulse generation. In particular, the focusing effects are found to affect substantially the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in gases from few-cycle fundamental optical fields.

  18. Nuclear-Motion Effects in Attosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bækhøj, Jens E; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the characteristic effects of nuclear motion on attosecond transient absorption spectra in molecules by calculating the spectrum for different model systems. Two models of the hydrogen molecular ion are considered: one where the internuclear separation is fixed, and one where the nuclei are free to vibrate. The spectra for the fixed nuclei model are similar to atomic spectra reported elsewhere, while the spectra obtained in the model including nuclear motion are very different and dominated by extremely broad absorption features. These broad absorption features are analyzed and their relation to molecular dissociation investigated. The study of the hydrogen molecular ion validates an approach based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a finite electronic basis. This latter approach is then used to study the three-dimensional hydrogen molecule including nuclear vibration. The spectrum obtained from H$_2$ is compared to the result of a fixed-nuclei calculation. In the attosecond transient ab...

  19. Tracing attosecond electron motion inside a molecule by interferences from photoelectron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Minghui; Peng Liangyou; Zhang Zheng; Gong Qihuang, E-mail: liangyou.peng@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-01-28

    We present a theoretical study of photoelectron emission of a homonuclear molecule by an attosecond xuv pulse, which can be regarded as a natural double-slit experiment. We show that attosecond electron motion inside the molecule opens one to two 'slits' for photoionization. Interference fringes in the angle-resolved photoelectron momentum distributions exhibit varying visibility (V), depending on the degree of which-path information (P). The complementarity relation, P{sup 2} + V{sup 2} {<=} 1, is verified in the time-dependent molecule double-slit experiment. Hence, the electron motion can be easily mapped out by measuring the interference visibility. This opens up the prospect of employing interferometric techniques to probe ultrafast intramolecular electronic motions. (fast track communication)

  20. High Harmonic Radiation Generation and Attosecond pulse generation from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Alexander Roy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Krushelnick, Karl [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-09-08

    We have studied ion motion effects in high harmonic generation, including shifts to the harmonics which result in degradation of the attosecond pulse train, and how to mitigate them. We have examined the scaling with intensity of harmonic emission. We have also switched the geometry of the interaction to measure, for the first time, harmonics from a normal incidence interaction. This was performed by using a special parabolic reflector with an on axis hole and is to allow measurements of the attosecond pulses using standard techniques. Here is a summary of the findings: First high harmonic generation in laser-solid interactions at 1021 Wcm-2, demonstration of harmonic focusing, study of ion motion effects in high harmonic generation in laser-solid interactions, and demonstration of harmonic amplification.

  1. Generation of attosecond soft X-ray pulses in a longitudinal space charge amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohlus, M.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    A longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA), operating in soft X-ray regime, was recently proposed. Such an amplifier consists of a few amplification cascades (focusing channel and chicane) and a short radiator undulator in the end. Broadband nature of LSCA supports generation of few-cycle pulses as well as wavelength compression. In this paper we consider an application of these properties of LSCA for generation of attosecond X-ray pulses. It is shown that a compact and cheap addition to the soft X-ray free electron laser facility FLASH would allow to generate 60 attosecond (FWHM) long X-ray pulses with the peak power at 100 MW level and a contrast above 98%. (orig.)

  2. Stably propagating trains of attosecond electron bunches generated along the target back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y.; Cao, L. H.; Liu, Z. J.; He, X. T.

    2016-09-01

    With the help of particle-in-cell simulations, we show a stably propagating train of attosecond ( 10 - 18 s) electron bunches which are generated along the target back surface via laser-solid interactions. The electron bunches are generated by the oscillating electric fields of the surface plasma wave. Because of the combinational effects of the electrostatic field and the static magnetic field on the target back surface, the electron bunches are stably propagating along the target back surface, which means they are totally separated from the laser pulse. The averaged energy of these electron bunches is over 20 MeV , the maximum averaged density is about 6 n c (where n c ≈ 1.1 × 10 21 cm - 3 is the critical density of the incident laser), and the averaged duration is less than 200 as. Such electron bunches are easily applied to the generation of attosecond x-rays via Compton backscattering. The energy conversion efficiency from the laser to the attosecond electron bunches is about 1.5%.

  3. Lanthanum-molybdenum multilayer mirrors for attosecond pulses between 80 and 130 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, M; Schultze, M; Guggenmos, A; Gagnon, J; Yakovlev, V S; Krausz, F; Kleineberg, U [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aquila, A; Yang, S; Gullikson, E [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2-400, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Huth, M; Nickel, B [Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Schellingstrasse 4, 80799 Munich (Germany); Goulielmakis, E, E-mail: michael.hofstetter@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    A novel multilayer material system consisting of lanthanum and molybdenum nano-layers for both broadband and highly reflecting multilayer mirrors in the energy range between 80 and 130 eV is presented. The simulation and design of these multilayers were based on an improved set of optical constants, which were recorded by extreme ultraviolet (XUV)/soft-x-ray absorption measurements on freestanding lanthanum nano-films between 30 eV and 1.3 keV. Lanthanum-molybdenum (La/Mo) multilayer mirrors were produced by ion-beam sputtering and characterized through both x-ray and XUV reflectivity measurements. We demonstrate the ability to precisely simulate and realize aperiodic stacks. Their stability against ambient air conditions is demonstrated. Finally, the La/Mo mirrors were used in the generation of single attosecond pulses from high-harmonic cut-off spectra above 100 eV. Isolated 200 attosecond-long pulses were measured by XUV-pump/IR-probe streaking experiments and characterized using frequency-resolved optical gating for complete reconstruction of attosecond bursts (FROG/CRAB) analyses.

  4. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro Jiménez; Argenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate \\emph{ab initio} calculations, or be extracted from few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N=2 threshold for the RABITT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference of Two-photon Transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association to a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate \\emph{ab initio} simulations. In particular, we show that: i) Use of finite pulses results in a homogene...

  5. Broadband multilayer mirror and diffractive optics for attosecond pulse shaping in the 280-500 eV photon energy range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chirped broadband multilayer mirrors are key components to shape attosecond pulses in the XUV range. Compressing high harmonic pulses to their Fourier limit is the major goal for attosecond physics utilizing short pulse pump-probe experiments. Here, we report about the first implementation of multilayers and diffractive optics fulfilling these requirements in the “water-window” spectral range.

  6. Generation of a single attosecond pulse from an overdense plasma surface driven by a laser pulse with time-dependent polarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Mu-Hua; Zhang Qiu-Ju

    2011-01-01

    The influence of time-dependent polarization on attosecond pulse generation from an overdense plasma surface driven by laser pulse is discussed analytically and numerically.The results show that the frequency of controlling pulse controls the number and interval of the generated attosecond pulse,that the generation moment of the attosecond pulse is dominated by the phase difference between the controlling and driving pulses,and that the amplitude of the controlling pulse affects the intensity of the attosecond pulse.Using the method of time-dependent polarization,a "single" ultra-strong attosecond pulse with duration τ≈8.6 as and intensity I≈3.08×1020 W·cm-2 can be generated.

  7. Purcell enhancement of fast-dephasing spontaneous emission from electron-hole droplets in high-Q silicon photonic crystal nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumikura, Hisashi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2016-11-01

    We have observed electron-hole droplet emission enhanced by silicon photonic crystal nanocavities with different Q values and simulated their Purcell effect using a semiclassical theory considering the temporal dephasing of the emission. When the photon loss rate of the nanocavities is smaller than the dephasing rate of the emission, the cavity-enhanced integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity is unchanged by the cavity Q value. This is because the Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate is saturated in a high-Q region. In contrast, the peak intensity of the cavity-enhanced PL is proportional to the cavity Q value without saturation. These results suggest that a high-Q nanocavity is suitable for fabricating bright narrowband light emitting devices that concentrate the broadband emission energy of fast-dephasing emitters in a narrowband cavity resonance.

  8. Localized surface plasmon induced enhancement of electron-hole generation with silver metal island at n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu{sub 2}O heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurpreet, E-mail: physgk@gmail.com; Yadav, K. L.; Mitra, Anirban [High Power Laser Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2015-08-03

    Localized surface plasmon induced generation of electron-hole pairs with inclusion of metal islands of noble metal like Ag can enhance the photocurrent. A heterostructure of n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu{sub 2}O with inclusion of Ag metalislands at the junction has been fabricated. I-V characteristic curve of these heterostructures shows a significant enhancement of photocurrent under the illumination (1.5 AMU). This enhancement of photocurrent is attributed to the supply of hot electrons generated in silver metal nanoislands. It has also been shown that inclusion of metal islands increases the absorption of solar spectrum in visible region at 500 nm. Enhancement of photocurrent may also be due to the direct resonance energy transfer from Localized Surface Plasmons of metal islands to Cu{sub 2}O.

  9. Improving attosecond pulse reflection by large angle incidence for a periodic multilayer mirror in the extreme ultraviolet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Cheng-You; Chen Shu-Jing; Liu Da-He

    2013-01-01

    The improvement of attosecond pulse reflection by large angle incidence for a periodic multilayer mirror in the extreme ultraviolet region has been discussed.Numerical simulations of both spectral and temporal reflection characteristics of periodic multilayer mirrors under various incident angles have been analyzed and compared.It was found that the periodic multilayer mirror under a larger incidence angle can provide not only higher integrated reflectivity but also a broader reflection band with negligible dispersion,making it possible to obtain better a reflected pulse that has a higher pulse reflection efficiency and shorter pulse duration for attosecond pulse reflection.In addition,by increasing the incident angle,the promotion of attosecond pulse reflection capability has been proven for periodic multilayer mirrors with arbitrary layers.

  10. The dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Eliasson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of recent analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma. The new results are based on the class of analytic solutions which were found by Schamel more than three decades ago, and which here work as initial conditions to numerical simulations of the dynamics of ion and electron holes and their interaction with radiation and the background plasma. Our analytic and numerical studies reveal that ion holes in an electron-ion plasma can trap Langmuir waves, due the local electron density depletion associated with the negative ion hole potential. Since the scale-length of the ion holes are on a relatively small Debye scale, the trapped Langmuir waves are Landau damped. We also find that colliding ion holes accelerate electron streams by the negative ion hole potentials, and that these streams of electrons excite Langmuir waves due to a streaming instability. In our Vlasov simulation of two colliding ion holes, the holes survive the collision and after the collision, the electron distribution becomes flat-topped between the two ion holes due to the ion hole potentials which work as potential barriers for low-energy electrons. Our study of the dynamics between electron holes and the ion background reveals that standing electron holes can be accelerated by the self-created ion cavity owing to the positive electron hole potential. Vlasov simulations show that electron holes are repelled by ion density minima and attracted by ion density maxima. We also present an extension of Schamel's theory to relativistically hot plasmas, where the relativistic mass increase of the accelerated electrons have a dramatic effect on the electron hole, with an increase in the electron hole potential and in the width of the electron hole. A study of the interaction between electromagnetic waves with relativistic electron holes shows that electromagnetic waves can be both linearly and nonlinearly

  11. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron-Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    optoelectronic devices that rely on long charge carrier lifetimes, such as nanostructured solar cells . Further studies of the effects of strain on the carrier...resolution and submicron spatial resolution to characterize charge–carrier recombination and transport dynamics in silicon nanowires (NWs) locally strained...release; distribution is unlimited. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron–Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump–Probe

  12. Coherence revival during the attosecond electronic and nuclear quantum photodynamics of the ozone molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Halász, Gábor J; Lasorne, Benjamin; Robb, Mike A; Gatti, Fabien; Vibók, Ágnes

    2013-01-01

    A coherent superposition of two electronic states of ozone (ground and Hartley B) is prepared with a UV pump pulse. Using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree approach, we calculate the subsequent time evolution of the two corresponding nuclear wave packets and the coherence between them. The resulting wave packet shows an oscillation between the two chemical bonds. Even more interesting, the coherence between the two electronics states reappears after the laser pulse is switched off, which could be observed experimentally with an attosecond probe pulse.

  13. Attosecond control of dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, W.; Kelkensberg, F.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Dowek, D. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR Universite Paris-Sud et CNRS, 8625), Batiment 351, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Lucchini, M.; Calegari, F. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Giovannini, U.; Rubio, A. [Nano-bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Avenida Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, Post Office Box 30012, College Station, Texas 77842-3012 (United States); Kono, H. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Lepine, F. [Universite Lyon 1/CNRS/LASIM, UMR 5579, 43 Boulevard Du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbane (France)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} can be controlled by the relative delay between an attosecond pulse train (APT) and a copropagating infrared (IR) field. Our experiments reveal a dependence of both the branching ratios between a range of electronic states and the fragment angular distributions on the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) to IR time delay. The observations go beyond adiabatic propagation of dissociative wave packets on IR-induced quasistatic potential energy curves and are understood in terms of an IR-induced coupling between electronic states in the molecular ion.

  14. Attosecond physics at a nanoscale metal tip: strong field physics meets near-field optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M.; Thomas, S.; Förster, M.; Maisenbacher, L.; Wachter, G.; Lemell, Chr.; Burgdörfer, J.; Hommelhoff, P.

    2013-03-01

    Attosecond physics, centering on the control of electronic matter waves within a single cycle of the optical laser's driving field, has led to tremendously successful experiments with atoms and molecules in the gas phase. We show that pivotal phenomena such as elastic electron rescattering at the parent matter, a strong carrier-evenlope phase sensitivity and electronic matter wave intereference also show up in few-cycle laser driven electron emission from nanometric sharp metal tips. Furthermore, we utilize spectral signatures to measure the enhanced near-field with a spatial resolution of 1nm.

  15. Fractional high-harmonic combs by attosecond-precision split-spectrum pulse control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laux Martin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Few-cycle laser fields enable pulse-shaping control of high-order harmonic generation by time delaying variable broadband spectral sections. We report the experimental generation of fractional (noninteger high-harmonic combs by the controlled interference of two attosecond pulse trains. Additionally the energy of the high harmonics is strongly tuned with the relative time delay. We quantify the tuning to directly result from the controlled variation of the instantaneous laser frequency at the shaped driver pulse intensity maximum.

  16. Attosecond time delay in valence photoionization and photorecombination of argon: a TDLDA study

    CERN Document Server

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Dixit, Gopal; Ivanov, Misha; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2015-01-01

    We determine and analyze the quantum phases and time delays in photoionization and photorecombination of valence 3p and 3s electrons of argon using the Kohn-Sham local density functional approach. The time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) is used to account for the electron correlation. Resulting attosecond Wigner-Smith time delays show excellent agreements with two recent independent experiments on argon that measured the relative 3s-3p time delay in photoionization [Physical Review Letters {\\bf 106}, 143002 (2011)] and the delay in 3p photorecombination [Physical Review Letters {\\bf 112}, 153002 (2014)

  17. Attosecond streaking of Cohen-Fano interferences in the photoionization of H$_2^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, Qi-Cheng; Song, Shu-Na; Jiang, Wei-Chao; Nagele, Stefan; Pazourek, Renate; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    We present the first numerical simulation of the time delay in the photoionization of the simplest diatomic molecule H$_2^+$ as observed by attosecond streaking. We show that the strong variation of the Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time delay as a function of energy and emission angle becomes observable in the streaking time shift provided laser field-induced components are accounted for. The strongly enhanced photoemission time shifts are traced to destructive Cohen-Fano (or two-center) interferences. Signatures of these interferences in the streaking trace are shown to be enhanced when the ionic fragments are detected in coincidence.

  18. Generation of Attosecond X-Ray Pulse through Coherent Relativistic Nonlinear Thomson Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K; Jeong, Y U; Lee, B C; Park, S H

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to some recent experimental results, which state that the Nonlinear Thomson Scattered (NTS) radiation is incoherent, a coherent condition under which the scattered radiation of an incident laser pulse by a bunch of electrons can be coherently superposed has been investigated. The Coherent Relativistic Nonlinear Thomson Scattered (C-RNTS) radiation makes it possible utilizing the ultra-short pulse nature of NTS radiation with a bunch of electrons, such as plasma or electron beams. A numerical simulation shows that a 25 attosecond X-ray pulse can be generated by irradiating an ultra-intense laser pulse of 4x10(19) W/cm2 on an ultra-thin solid target of 50 nm thickness, which is commercially available. The coherent condition can be easily extended to an electron beam from accelerators. Different from the solid target, much narrower electron beam is required for the generation of an attosecond pulse. Instead, this condition could be applied for the generation of intense Compton scattered X-rays with a...

  19. Binding of electrons, holes, and excitons in symmetric strained InP/ In0.49 Ga0.51 P triple quantum-dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2004-11-01

    The electron, hole, and exciton spectra in the strained quantum-dot molecule consisting of three vertically arranged type-II InP/ In0.49 Ga0.51 P self-assembled quantum dots are modeled by the k•p theory. For the sake of simplicity, we consider dots of cylindrical shape, but take into account the anisotropy of the strain through the continuum mechanical model. For thick spacers, the strain leads to an upward shift of the lowest energies in all explored electron shells, but for spacers thinner than, say, the coupling length, the quantum mechanical coupling prevails, and downward shifts are observed. The magnitudes of both the energy shift and the coupling length vary with the quantum-dot height. For the holes, the interplay of strain and mixing enables binding at larger distances than for the electrons. The overlap of the hole clouds is basically established by means of the light holes, which are confined by the strain in the spacer between the dots and may efficiently couple the heavy-hole states, which are localized inside the quantum dots. Similar to electrons, the exciton lowest-energy states of different angular momenta, as computed by an exact-diagonalization approach, exhibit overshoots on the single-quantum-dot levels. Good agreement is found with experiment on the spatial location of electrons and holes in the triple-quantum-dot molecules.

  20. Spatial separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs in BiOBr/BiOI bilayer to facilitate water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhen-Kun; Yin, Wen-Jin; Le Zhang; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Liu, Li-Min; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures and photocatalytic properties of bismuth oxyhalide bilayers (BiOX1/BiOX2, X1 and X2 are Cl, Br, I) are studied by density functional theory. Briefly, their compositionally tunable bandgaps range from 1.85 to 3.41 eV, suitable for sun-light absorption, and all bilayers have band-alignments good for photocatalytic water-splitting. Among them, heterogeneous BiOBr/BiOI bilayer is the best as it has the smallest bandgap. More importantly, photo-excitation of BiOBr/BiOI leads to electron supply to the conduction band minimum with localized states belonging mainly to bismuth of BiOBr where the H(+)/H2 half-reaction of water-splitting can be sustained. Meanwhile, holes generated by such photo-excitation are mainly derived from the iodine states of BiOI in the valence band maximum; thus, the O2/H2O half-reaction of water splitting is facilitated on BiOI. Detailed band-structure analysis also indicates that this intriguing spatial separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs and the two half-reactions of water splitting are good for a wide photo-excitation spectrum from 2-5 eV; as such, BiOBr/BiOI bilayer can be an efficient photocatalyst for water-splitting, particularly with further optimization of its optical absorptivity.

  1. Double carriers pulse DLTS for the characterization of electron-hole recombination process in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2011-03-01

    A nitrogen-related electron trap (E1), located approximately 0.33 eV from the conduction band minimum of GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy, was confirmed by investigating the dependence of its density with N concentration. This level exhibits a high capture cross section compared with that of native defects in GaAs. Its density increases significantly with N concentration, persists following post-thermal annealing, and was found to be quasi-uniformly distributed. These results indicate that E1 is a stable defect that is formed during growth to compensate for the tensile strain caused by N. Furthermore, E1 was confirmed to act as a recombination center by comparing its activation energy with that of the recombination current in the depletion region of the alloy. However, this technique cannot characterize the electron-hole (e-h) recombination process. For that, double carrier pulse deep level transient spectroscopy is used to confirm the non-radiative e -h recombination process through E1, to estimate the capture cross section of holes, and to evaluate the energy of multi-phonon emission. Furthermore, a configuration coordinate diagram is modeled based on the physical parameters of E1.

  2. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  3. Direct View of Hot Carrier Dynamics in Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Jens Christian; Ulstrup, Søren; Cilento, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of excited carriers in graphene is closely linked to the Dirac spectrum and plays a central role for many electronic and optoelectronic applications. Harvesting energy from excited electron-hole pairs, for instance, is only possible if these pairs can be separated before th...

  4. Attosecond Interference Induced by Coulomb-Field-Driven Transverse Backward-Scattering Electron Wave-Packets

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Yu, Xianhuan; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing; Xu, SongPo; Chen, YongJu; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-01-01

    A novel and universal interference structure is found in the photoelectron momentum distribution of atoms in intense infrared laser field. Theoretical analysis shows that this structure can be attributed to a new form of Coulomb-field-driven backward-scattering of photoelectrons in the direction perpendicular to the laser field, in contrast to the conventional rescattering along the laser polarization direction. This transverse backward-scattering process is closely related to a family of photoelectrons initially ionized within a time interval of less than 200 attosecond around the crest of the laser electric field. Those electrons, acquiring near-zero return energy in the laser field, will be pulled back solely by the ionic Coulomb field and backscattered in the transverse direction. Moreover, this rescattering process mainly occurs at the first or the second return times, giving rise to different phases of the photoelectrons. The interference between these photoelectrons leads to unique curved interference ...

  5. Attosecond-resolution timing jitter characterization of free-running mode-locked lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwon; Chen, Jeff; Cox, Jonathan; Kärtner, Franz X

    2007-12-15

    Timing jitter characterization of optical pulse trains from free-running mode-locked lasers with attosecond resolution is demonstrated using balanced optical cross correlation in the timing detector and the timing delay configurations. In the timing detector configuration, the balanced cross correlation between two mode-locked lasers synchronized by a low-bandwidth phase-locked loop is used to measure the timing jitter spectral density outside the locking bandwidth. In addition, the timing delay configuration using a 325 m long timing-stabilized fiber link enables the characterization of timing jitter faster than the delay time. The limitation set by shot noise in this configuration is 2.2 x 10(-8) fs(2)/Hz corresponding to 470 as in 10 MHz bandwidth.

  6. Production of intense attosecond vector beam pulse trains based on harmonics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩玉晶; 廖国前; 陈黎明; 李玉同; 王伟民; 张杰

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first report on the harmonics generated by an intense femtosecond vector beam that is normally incident on a solid target. By using 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, we observe the third and the fifth harmonic signals with the same vector structure as the driving beam, and obtain an attosecond vector beam pulse train. We also show that the conversion efficiencies of the third and the fifth harmonics reach their maxima for a plasma density of four times the critical density due to the plasma resonating with the driving force. This method provides a new means of generating intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) vector beams via ultra-intense laser-driven harmonics.

  7. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date.

  8. Generation of isolated attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses employing nanoplasmonic field enhancement: optimization of coupled ellipsoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbings, S L; Suessmann, F; Yang, Y-Y; Kling, M F [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strass e 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Scrinzi, A [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany); Durach, M; Rusina, A; Stockman, M I, E-mail: sarah.stebbings@mpq.mpg.de, E-mail: mstockman@gsu.edu, E-mail: matthias.kling@mpq.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 29 Peachtree Center Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The production of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation via nanoplasmonic field-enhanced high-harmonic generation (HHG) in gold nanostructures at MHz repetition rates is investigated theoretically in this paper. Analytical and numerical calculations are employed and compared in order to determine the plasmonic fields in gold ellipsoidal nanoparticles. The comparison indicates that numerical calculations can accurately predict the field enhancement and plasmonic decay, but may encounter difficulties when attempting to predict the oscillatory behavior of the plasmonic field. Numerical calculations for coupled symmetric and asymmetric ellipsoids for different carrier-envelope phases (CEPs) of the driving laser field are combined with time-dependent Schroedinger equation simulations to predict the resulting HHG spectra. The studies reveal that the plasmonic field oscillations, which are controlled by the CEP of the driving laser field, play a more important role than the nanostructure configuration in finding the optimal conditions for the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses via nanoplasmonic field enhancement.

  9. Generation of isolated attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses employing nanoplasmonic field enhancement: optimization of coupled ellipsoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, S. L.; Süßmann, F.; Yang, Y.-Y.; Scrinzi, A.; Durach, M.; Rusina, A.; Stockman, M. I.; Kling, M. F.

    2011-07-01

    The production of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation via nanoplasmonic field-enhanced high-harmonic generation (HHG) in gold nanostructures at MHz repetition rates is investigated theoretically in this paper. Analytical and numerical calculations are employed and compared in order to determine the plasmonic fields in gold ellipsoidal nanoparticles. The comparison indicates that numerical calculations can accurately predict the field enhancement and plasmonic decay, but may encounter difficulties when attempting to predict the oscillatory behavior of the plasmonic field. Numerical calculations for coupled symmetric and asymmetric ellipsoids for different carrier-envelope phases (CEPs) of the driving laser field are combined with time-dependent Schrödinger equation simulations to predict the resulting HHG spectra. The studies reveal that the plasmonic field oscillations, which are controlled by the CEP of the driving laser field, play a more important role than the nanostructure configuration in finding the optimal conditions for the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses via nanoplasmonic field enhancement.

  10. Attosecond nanotechnology: NEMS of energy storage and nanostructural transformations in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznosyuk, Sergey A.; Zhukovsky, Mark S.; Maslova, Olga A.

    2015-10-01

    The attosecond technology of the nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) energy storage as active center fast transformation of nanostructures in materials is considered. The self-organizing relaxation of the NEMS active center containing nanocube of 256-atoms limited by planes (100) in the FCC lattice matrix of 4d-transition metals (Ru, Rh, Pd) is described by the quantum NEMS-kinetics (NK) method. Typical for these metals change of the NEMS active center physicochemical characteristics during the time of relaxation is presented. There are three types of intermediate quasistationary states of the NEMS active center. Their forms are plainly distinguishable. The full relaxed NEMS active centers (Ru256, Rh256, Pd256) accumulate next storage energies: ERu = 2.27 eV/at, ERh = 1.67 eV/at, EPd = 3.02 eV/at.

  11. Double carriers pulse DLTS for the characterization of electron-hole recombination process in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzazi, Boussairi, E-mail: sd08503@toyota-ti.ac.j [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    A nitrogen-related electron trap (E1), located approximately 0.33 eV from the conduction band minimum of GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy, was confirmed by investigating the dependence of its density with N concentration. This level exhibits a high capture cross section compared with that of native defects in GaAs. Its density increases significantly with N concentration, persists following post-thermal annealing, and was found to be quasi-uniformly distributed. These results indicate that E1 is a stable defect that is formed during growth to compensate for the tensile strain caused by N. Furthermore, E1 was confirmed to act as a recombination center by comparing its activation energy with that of the recombination current in the depletion region of the alloy. However, this technique cannot characterize the electron-hole (e-h) recombination process. For that, double carrier pulse deep level transient spectroscopy is used to confirm the non-radiative e-h recombination process through E1, to estimate the capture cross section of holes, and to evaluate the energy of multi-phonon emission. Furthermore, a configuration coordinate diagram is modeled based on the physical parameters of E1. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Double carrier pulse DLTS method confirms the existence of SRH center. {yields} The recombination center in GaAsN depends on nitrogen concentration. {yields} Minority carrier lifetime in GaAsN is less than 1 ns. {yields} A non-radiative recombination center exits in GaAsN.

  12. Atomistic Tight-Binding Theory of Electron-Hole Exchange Interaction in Morphological Evolution of CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Nanodisk to CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Nanorod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worasak Sukkabot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the atomistic tight-binding theory (TB and a configuration interaction (CI description, the electron-hole exchange interaction in the morphological transformation of CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanodisk to CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanorod is described with the aim of understanding the impact of the structural shapes on the change of the electron-hole exchange interaction. Normally, the ground hole states confined in typical CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals are of heavy hole-like character. However, the atomistic tight-binding theory shows that a transition of the ground hole states from heavy hole-like to light hole-like contribution with the increasing aspect ratios of the CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanostructures is recognized. According to the change in the ground-state hole characters, the electron-hole exchange interaction is also significantly altered. To do so, optical band gaps, ground-state electron character, ground-state hole character, oscillation strengths, ground-state coulomb energies, ground-state exchange energies, and dark-bright (DB excitonic splitting (stoke shift are numerically demonstrated. These atomistic computations obviously show the sensitivity with the aspect ratios. Finally, the alteration in the hole character has a prominent effect on dark-bright (DB excitonic splitting.

  13. A new defect chemistry model for Nb-doped SrCoO2.5+δ: The role of oxygen interstitials and delocalized-to-localized electron holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Jin, Xinfang; Huang, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    A new defect chemistry model featuring oxygen interstitials (OI") and delocalized-to-localized d-electron holes (CoCo·) as point defects is demonstrated under a perfect Brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 reference framework to elucidate transport properties of Nb-doped SrCoO2.5+δ (SCN) system over a range of partial pressure of oxygen (Po2) and temperature (T). With this new defect chemistry model, the electronic conductivity behaviors with T and Po2 can be well interpreted by the change in concentration of d-electron holes migrating with a constant mobility. The important concentration contours of electron holes, excess electrons and oxygen interstitials are mapped out on the T-Po2 domain, from which hole-concentration and conductivity under iso-stoichiometry are reconstructed. The partial/integral molar thermodynamic properties and thermodynamic factor of the SCN solid solution are also determined. A transitional delocalized-to-localized hole-transport mechanism with decreasing oxygen stoichiometry is discussed based on p=p(T) obtained under constant oxygen stoichiometry.

  14. Quantum beats and fine structure in atto-second chronoscopy of strong-field photoionization of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazansky, A.K. [Sankt Petersburg State Univ., 1 Fock Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Donostia International Physics Center, San Sebastian/Donostia, Basque Country (Spain); Kabachnik, N.M. [Bielefeld Univ., Fakultat fur Physik (Germany); Kabachnik, N.M.; Sazhina, I.P. [Moscow State Univ., Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2008-04-15

    A theoretical model is presented which describes the time evolution of strong-field photoionization as studied in recent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump-IR probe atto-second tunneling (atto-second chronoscopy) experiments. The excitation of intermediate weakly bound states by an ultra-short XUV pulse (pump) is described within a sudden approximation. The photoionization of these states by a delayed strong IR pulse (probe) is described by solving the non-stationary Schroedinger equation. The results of the calculations show that the coherence of the excited states plays an important role resulting in quantum beats when the XUV pulse precedes the IR pulse. For a large overlap of the pulses a pronounced fine structure in the cross-section is revealed. The calculations for Ne agree qualitatively with the experiment. (authors)

  15. Flexible attosecond beamline for high harmonic spectroscopy and XUV/near-IR pump probe experiments requiring long acquisition times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. J., E-mail: sebastien.weber@cea.fr; Manschwetus, B.; Billon, M.; Bougeard, M.; Breger, P.; Géléoc, M.; Gruson, V.; Lin, N.; Ruchon, T.; Salières, P.; Carré, B. [Commissariat l’Energie Atomique, Laser, Interactions and Dynamics Laboratory (LIDyL), DSM/IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Böttcher, M.; Huetz, A.; Picard, Y. J. [ISMO, UMR 8214, Université Paris-Sud, Batiment 350, Orsay (France)

    2015-03-15

    We describe the versatile features of the attosecond beamline recently installed at CEA-Saclay on the PLFA kHz laser. It combines a fine and very complete set of diagnostics enabling high harmonic spectroscopy (HHS) through the advanced characterization of the amplitude, phase, and polarization of the harmonic emission. It also allows a variety of photo-ionization experiments using magnetic bottle and COLTRIMS (COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Microscopy) electron spectrometers that may be used simultaneously, thanks to a two-foci configuration. Using both passive and active stabilization, special care was paid to the long term stability of the system to allow, using both experimental approaches, time resolved studies with attosecond precision, typically over several hours of acquisition times. As an illustration, applications to multi-orbital HHS and electron-ion coincidence time resolved spectroscopy are presented.

  16. Quantum dynamic imaging theoretical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Misha

    2011-01-01

    Studying and using light or "photons" to image and then to control and transmit molecular information is among the most challenging and significant research fields to emerge in recent years. One of the fastest growing areas involves research in the temporal imaging of quantum phenomena, ranging from molecular dynamics in the femto (10-15s) time regime for atomic motion to the atto (10-18s) time scale of electron motion. In fact, the attosecond "revolution" is now recognized as one of the most important recent breakthroughs and innovations in the science of the 21st century. A major participant in the development of ultrafast femto and attosecond temporal imaging of molecular quantum phenomena has been theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear, non-perturbative response of atoms and molecules to ultrashort laser pulses. Therefore, imaging quantum dynamics is a new frontier of science requiring advanced mathematical approaches for analyzing and solving spatial and temporal multidimensional partial differ...

  17. Theory and experiments of electron-hole recombination at silicon/silicon dioxide interface traps and tunneling in thin oxide MOS transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jin

    2000-10-01

    Surface recombination and channel have dominated the electrical characteristics, performance and reliability of p/n junction diodes and transistors. This dissertation uses a sensitive direct-current current voltage (DCIV) method to measure base terminal currents (IB) modulated by the gate bias (VGB) and forward p/n junction bias (VPN) in a MOS transistor (MOST). Base terminal currents originate from electron-hole recombination at Si/SiO2 interface traps. Fundamental theories which relate DCIV characteristics to device and material parameters are presented. Three theory-based applications are demonstrated on both the unstressed as well as hot-carrier-stressed MOSTs: (1) determination of interface trap density and energy levels, (2) spatial profile of interface traps in the drain/base junction-space-charge region and in the channel region, and (3) determination of gate oxide thickness and impurity doping concentrations. The results show that interface trap energy levels are discrete, which is consistent with those from silicon dangling bonds; in unstressed MOS transistors interface trap density in the channel region rises sharply toward source and drain, and after channel-hot-carrier stress, interface trap density increases mostly in the junction space-charge region. As the gate oxide thins below 3 nm, the gate oxide leakage current via quantum mechanical tunneling becomes significant. A gate oxide tunneling theory which refined the traditional WKB tunneling probability is developed for modeling tunneling currents at low electric fields through a trapezoidal SiO2 barrier. Correlation with experimental data on thin oxide MOSTs reveals two new results: (1) hole tunneling dominates over electron tunneling in p+gate p-channel MOSTs, and (2) the small gate/drain overlap region passes higher tunneling currents than the channel region under depletion to flatband gate voltages. The good theory-experimental correlation enables the extraction of impurity doping concentrations

  18. Electron correlation in two-photon double ionization of helium from attosecond to FEL pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the role of electron correlation in the two-photon double ionization of helium for ultrashort pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) regime with durations ranging from a hundred attoseconds to a few femtoseconds. We perform time-dependent ab initio calculations for pulses with mean frequencies in the so-called 'sequential' regime ({Dirac_h}{omega} > 54.4 eV). Electron correlation induced by the time correlation between emission events manifests itself in the angular distribution of the ejected electrons, which strongly depends on the energy sharing between them. We show that for ultrashort pulses two-photon double ionization probabilities scale non-uniformly with pulse duration depending on the energy sharing between the electrons. Most interestingly we find evidence for an interference between direct ('nonsequential') and indirect ('sequential') double photoionization with intermediate shake-up states, the strength of which is controlled by the pulse duration. This observation may provide a route towards measuring the pulse duration of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses.

  19. Attosecond streaking measurement of extreme ultraviolet pulses using a long-wavelength electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nariyuki; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Kanai, Teruto; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Itatani, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Long-wavelength lasers have great potential to become a new-generation drive laser for tabletop coherent light sources in the soft X-ray region. Because of the significantly low conversion efficiency from a long-wavelength light field to high-order harmonics, their pulse characterization has been carried out by measuring the carrier-envelope phase and/or spatial dependences of high harmonic spectra. However, these photon detection schemes, in general, have difficulty in obtaining information on the spectral phases, which is crucial to determine the temporal structures of high-order harmonics. Here, we report the first attosecond streaking measurement of high harmonics generated by few-cycle optical pulses at 1.7 μm from a BiB3O6–based optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier. This is also the first demonstration of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using high harmonics from a long-wavelength drive laser other than Ti:sapphire lasers, which paves the way towards ultrafast soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. PMID:27752115

  20. Attosecond streaking measurement of extreme ultraviolet pulses using a long-wavelength electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nariyuki; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Kanai, Teruto; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Itatani, Jiro

    2016-10-01

    Long-wavelength lasers have great potential to become a new-generation drive laser for tabletop coherent light sources in the soft X-ray region. Because of the significantly low conversion efficiency from a long-wavelength light field to high-order harmonics, their pulse characterization has been carried out by measuring the carrier-envelope phase and/or spatial dependences of high harmonic spectra. However, these photon detection schemes, in general, have difficulty in obtaining information on the spectral phases, which is crucial to determine the temporal structures of high-order harmonics. Here, we report the first attosecond streaking measurement of high harmonics generated by few-cycle optical pulses at 1.7 μm from a BiB3O6-based optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier. This is also the first demonstration of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using high harmonics from a long-wavelength drive laser other than Ti:sapphire lasers, which paves the way towards ultrafast soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  2. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  3. Isolated sub-10 attosecond pulse generation by a 6-fs driving pulse and a 5-fs subharmonic controlling pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically study high-order harmonic generation by quantum path control in a special two-color laser field, which is synthesized by a 6 fs/800 nm fundamental pulse and a weaker 5 fs/1600 nm subharmonic controlling pulse. Single quantum path is selected without optimizing any carrier phase, which not only broadens the harmonic bandwidth to 400 eV, but also enhances the harmonic conversion efficiency in comparison with the short-plus-long scheme, which is based on 5 fs/800 nm driving pulse and 6 fs/1600 nm control pulse. An isolated 8-attosecond pulse is produced with currently available ultrafast laser sources.

  4. Attosecond timing jitter pulse trains from semiconductor saturable absorber mode-locked Cr:LiSAF lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Sennaroğlu, Alphan; Li, Duo; Demirbaş, Ümit; Benedick, Andrew; Fujimoto, James G.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2012-01-01

    The timing jitter of optical pulse trains from diode-pumped, semiconductor saturable absorber mode-locked femtosecond Cr:LiSAF lasers is characterized by a single-crystal balanced optical cross-correlator with an equivalent sensitivity in phase noise of -235 dBc/Hz. The RMS timing jitter is 30 attoseconds integrated from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, the Nyquist frequency of the 100 MHz repetition rate oscillator. The AM-to-PM conversion induced excess phase noise is calculated and compared with experime...

  5. Laser Polarization Effect on Molecular Harmonic and Elliptically Polarized Attosecond Pulse Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-Qiang; Li, Wen-Liang; Liu, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Molecular harmonic spectra of {{{H}}}2+ driven by the linearly polarized laser pulses with different polarized angles have been theoretically investigated through solving the two-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. (i) Below-threshold harmonic spectra show a visible enhanced peak around the 7th harmonic (H7), which produces a red-shift phenomenon as the internuclear distance increased. Theoretical analyses show the red-shift enhanced peak is caused by the laser-induced electron transfer between the ground state and the 1st excited state of {{{H}}}2+. (ii) Due to the two-centre interference phenomenon, the above-threshold harmonic spectra exhibit many maxima and minima. (iii) With the introduction of the polarized angle, the anomalous elliptically polarized harmonics can be found. But, with the introduction of the spatial inhomogeneous effect, not only the ellipticities of the harmonics are equal to a stable value of \\varepsilon ∼ 0.1–0.3, but also the harmonic cutoffs are extended. As a result, four super-bandwidths of 407 eV, 310 eV, 389 eV, and 581 eV can be obtained. Time profiles of the harmonic generations have been shown to explain the harmonic characteristics. Finally, a series of elliptically polarized (\\varepsilon ∼ 0.1–0.3) attosecond X-ray pulses with durations from 18as to 25as can be directly produced through Fourier transformation of the spectral continuum. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11504151, Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of Liaoning Province under Grant No. 201501123 and Scientific Research Fund of Liaoning Provincial Education Department under Grant No. L2014242

  6. Dynamics at Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces Volume 2 Fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bovensiepen, Uwe; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This two-volume work covers ultrafast structural and electronic dynamics of elementary processes at solid surfaces and interfaces, presenting the current status of photoinduced processes. Providing valuable introductory information for newcomers to this booming field of research, it investigates concepts and experiments, femtosecond and attosecond time-resolved methods, as well as frequency domain techniques.The whole is rounded off by a look at future developments.

  7. Tunable Ultrafast Photon Source and Imaging System for Studying Carrier Dynamics in Graphene Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Tunable ultrafast photon source and imaging system for studying carrier dynamics in graphene devices This project enabled the acquisition of a...and imaging system for studying carrier dynamics in graphene devices Report Title This project enabled the acquisition of a optical parametric...carrier dynamics in graphene devices As discussed below the focus of this DURIP project was on understanding the interaction between electrons, holes

  8. A new photon kinetic-measurement based on the kinetics of electron-hole pairs in photodegradation of textile wastewater using the Uv-H2O2FS-TiO2 process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIGWEDHA Nditange; HUA Zhao-zhe; CHEN Jian

    2007-01-01

    Actual textile wastewater and synthesized wastewater containing various textile dyes were photocatalytic degraded by the UVH2O2Fs-TiO2 process in an annular-flow photocatalytic reactor.In this process,a photon kinetic-measure was adopted to obtain constant rates of dyes decomposition.It was theorized that,by illumination at difierent UV frequencies.the electrons within the semiconductor were excited from the valence band to the conduction band,yielding the formation of electron-hole palrs which are the pre-requisites for photocatalysis.CPT(critical photonic time)exposure required to cause 90%of vibrations between the double and single bonds along the molecular chain of the dyes to be oxidized.was taken to measure the photocatalytic activities.The CPTs varied with the frequencies of the UV spectral areas.The derivatization of CPT from the first-order kinetic law was presented.

  9. Catching Conical Intersections in the Act; Monitoring Transient Electronic Coherences by Attosecond Stimulated X-Ray Raman Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalewski, Markus; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    Conical intersections (CoIn) dominate the pathways and outcomes of virtually all photophysical and photochemical molecular processes. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical effort, CoIns have not been directly observed yet and the experimental evidence is being inferred from fast reaction rates and some vibrational signatures. We show that short X-ray (rather than optical) pulses can directly detect the passage through a CoIn with the adequate temporal and spectral sensitivity. The technique is based on a coherent Raman process that employs a composite femtosecond/attosecond X-ray pulse to detect the electronic coherences (rather than populations) that are generated as the system passes through the CoIn.

  10. Laser Phase Determination and Transfer Function to Directly Measure the Temporal Structure of a Narrow Bandwidth Attosecond EUV Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Yu-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    A laser phase determination method and a transfer function that includes a proportional term of a measured photoelectron energy spectrum are presented to directly measure the detailed temporal structure of a narrow bandwidth attosecond extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) pulse. The method is based on the spectrum measurement of an electron generated by EUV photo-ionization interacting with a femtosecond laser field. The results of the study suggest that measurements should be taken at 0° or 180° with respect to the linear laser polarization. The method has a temporal measurement range of about half a laser oscillation period. The temporal resolution also depends on the jitter and control precision of the laser and EUV pulses.

  11. Dynamic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingshirn, C.

    The purpose of this chapter is to present the results of the dynamics of exciton (polariton)s or more generally of electron-hole pairs. For a recent review of this topic concentrating on quantum wells, see Davies and Jagadish (Laser Photon. Rev. 3(1), 1(2008)). We neither consider the dynamics of carriers, for example, their relaxation time entering in Hall mobility or electrical conductivity, nor the dynamics of phonons or spins, respectively. We give here only a very small selection of references to these topics (Baxter and Schmuttenmaer, J. Phys. Chem. B, 110:25229, 2006; Queiroz et al. Superlattice Microstruct. 42:270, 2007; Niehaus and Schwarz, Superlattice Microstruct. 42:299, 2007; Lee et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93:4939, 2003; A. K Azad, J. Han, W. Zhang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88:021103, 2006; Janssen et al., QELS 2008 IEEE 2; D. Lagarde et al., Phys. Stat. Sol. C 4:472, 2007; S. Gosh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86:232507, 2005; W. K. Liu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98:186804, 2007). The main characteristic time constants relevant to optical properties close to the fundamental absorption edge are the dephasing time T 2, (i.e. the time after which the polarization amplitude of the optically excited electron-hole pair loses the coherence with the driving light field), the intra band or inter sub band relaxation times T 3 (i.e. the time it takes for the electron-hole pairs to relax from their initial state of excitation to a certain other state e.g. to a thermal distribution with a temperature equal to or possibly still above lattice temperature) and finally the lifetime T 1 (i.e. the time until the electron-hole pairs recombine). The characteristic time constants T 2 and T 1 are also known as transverse and longitudinal relaxation times, respectively. Their inverses are the corresponding rate constants. T 2 is inversely proportional to the homogeneous width Γ, and T 1 includes both the radiative and the generally dominating non-radiative recombination (Hauser et al., Appl

  12. Generating Isolated Terawatt-Attosecond X-ray Pulses via a Chirped Laser Enhanced High-Gain Free-electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-01-01

    A feasible method is proposed to generate isolated attosecond terawatt x-ray radiation pulses in high-gain free-electron lasers. In the proposed scheme, a frequency chirped laser pulse is employed to generate a gradually-varied spacing current enhancement of the electron beam and a series of spatiotemporal shifters are applied between the undulator sections to amplify a chosen ultra-short radiation pulse from self-amplified spontaneous emission. Three-dimensional start-to-end simulations have been carried out and the calculation results demonstrated that 0.15 nm x-ray pulses with peak power over 1TW and duration of several tens of attoseconds could be achieved by using the proposed technique.

  13. Fifth-order attosecond polarization beats using twin color-locked noisy lights in cascade three-level system with Doppler-free approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Song; Xiangchen Zhang; Yanpeng Zhang; Keqing Lu; Yu Feng; Chenli Gan; Long Li; Yuanyuan Li; Xiaojun Yu; Hao Ge; Ruiqiong Ma; Chuangshe Li

    2005-01-01

    Fifth-order attosecond sum-frequency polarization beat (FASPB) is studied in a cascade three level system with the phase-conjugation fourth-order coherence function theory. An improved schematic diagram of geometry, which is different from that inducing fifth-order femtosecond different-frequency polarization beat(FFDPB), is used to obtain FASPB. By analyzing the cases that pump beams have either narrow or broad bandwidth, it is found that the temporal behavior of the sum-frequency polarization beat signal depends on the properties of the lasers and transverse relaxation rate of the atomic energy-level system. Finally,the cascaded four-wave mixing (FWM) processes and the difference between attosecond and femtosecond polarization beats have been discussed, it is found that cascaded or sequential lower processes can often obscure the direct fifth-order polarization beat processes.

  14. Helicity-Selective Phase-Matching and Quasi-Phase matching of Circularly Polarized High-Order Harmonics: Towards Chiral Attosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    1,2( ) With the same logic as in section 4, we wish to extract the symmetry propagator that links t  E , 0BC p ( ) and t  E z, .BC p ( ) We claim...We show that the propagation equation derived from the propagator of a bi-chromatic circularly polarized pump reveals a unique symmetry. It links ...Berlin: Springer ) [70] Chini M, Zhao K and Chang Z 2014 The generation, characterization and applications of broadband isolated attosecond pulses Nat

  15. Helicity-selective phase-matching and quasi-phase matching of circularly polarized high-order harmonics: towards chiral attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfir, Ofer; Grychtol, Patrik; Turgut, Emrah; Knut, Ronny; Zusin, Dmitriy; Fleischer, Avner; Bordo, Eliyahu; Fan, Tingting; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Popmintchev, Tenio; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Cohen, Oren

    2016-06-01

    Phase matching of circularly polarized high-order harmonics driven by counter-rotating bi-chromatic lasers was recently predicted theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. In that work, phase matching was analyzed by assuming that the total energy, spin angular momentum and linear momentum of the photons participating in the process are conserved. Here we propose a new perspective on phase matching of circularly polarized high harmonics. We derive an extended phase matching condition by requiring a new propagation matching condition between the classical vectorial bi-chromatic laser pump and harmonics fields. This allows us to include the influence of the laser pulse envelopes on phase matching. We find that the helicity dependent phase matching facilitates generation of high harmonics beams with a high degree of chirality. Indeed, we present an experimentally measured chiral spectrum that can support a train of attosecond pulses with a high degree of circular polarization. Moreover, while the degree of circularity of the most intense pulse approaches unity, all other pulses exhibit reduced circularity. This feature suggests the possibility of using a train of attosecond pulses as an isolated attosecond probe for chiral-sensitive experiments.

  16. Dynamics at Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces, Volume 1 Current Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Bovensiepen, Uwe; Wolf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This two-volume work covers ultrafast structural and electronic dynamics of elementary processes at solid surfaces and interfaces, presenting the current status of photoinduced processes. Providing valuable introductory information for newcomers to this booming field of research, it investigates concepts and experiments, femtosecond and attosecond time-resolved methods, as well as frequency domain techniques. The whole is rounded off by a look at future developments.

  17. Solvothermal syntheses of Bi and Zn co-doped TiO2 with enhanced electron-hole separation and efficient photodegradation of gaseous toluene under visible-light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan-Juan; Cai, Song-Cai; Xu, Zhen; Chen, Xi; Chen, Jin; Jia, Hong-Peng; Chen, Jing

    2017-03-05

    This study investigated the effects of Bi doped and Bi-Zn co-doped TiO2 on photodegradation of gaseous toluene. The doped TiO2 with various concentration of metal was prepared using the solvothermal route and characterized by SEM, XRD, Raman, BET, DRS, XPS, PL and EPR. Their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation were drastically influenced by the dopant content. The results showed that moderate metal doping levels were obviously beneficial for the toluene degradation, while high doping levels suppressed the photocatalytic activity. The photocatalytic degradation of toluene over TiBi1.9%O2 and TiBi1.9%Zn1%O2 can reach to 51% and 93%, respectively, which are much higher than 25% of TiO2. Bi doping into TiO2 lattice generates new intermediate energy level of Bi below the CB edge of TiO2. The electron excitation from the VB to Bi orbitals results in the decreased band gap, extended absorption of visible-light and thus enhances its photocatalytic efficiency. Zn doping not only further enhances the absorption in this visible-light region, but also Zn dopant exists as the form of ZnO crystallites located on the interfaces of TiO2 agglomerates and acts as a mediator of interfacial charge transfer to suppress the electron-hole recombination. These synergistic effects are responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  18. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  19. Generation of an isolated sub-30 attosecond pulse in a two-color laser field and a static electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Gang-Tai; Bai Ting-Ting; Zhang Mei-Guang

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation(HHG)from a helium ion model in a two-color laser field,which is synthesized by a fundamental pulse and its second harmonic pulse.It is shown that a supercontinuum spectrum can be generated in the two-color field.However,the spectral intensity is very low,limiting the application of the generated attosecond(as)pulse.By adding a static electric field to the synthesized two-color field,not only is the ionization yield of electrons contributing to the harmonic emission remarkably increased,but also the quantum paths of the HHG can be significantly modulated.As a result,the extension and enhancement of the supercontinuum spectrum are achieved,producing an intense isolated 26-as pulse with a bandwidth of about 170.5 eV.In particular,we also analyse the influence of the laser parameters on the ultrabroad supercontinuum spectrum and isolated sub-30-as pulse generation.

  20. 高能阿秒脉冲聚焦及光谱分析复合系统设计%Design of a combined system for focusing and spectrum-analyzing of high energy attosecond pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王超; 王兴; 田进寿; 卢裕; 曹希斌; 王俊锋; 徐向晏; 温文龙

    2014-01-01

    为了减小阿秒脉冲聚焦反射过程的能量损失、降低阿秒脉冲测量过程中由聚焦像差引起的测量误差以及提高阿秒光脉冲光谱分析监测的可操作性,采用各环节性能分别优化的方法,设计了一种高能阿秒光脉冲聚焦及光谱分析复合系统,聚焦及光谱分析元件分别采用镀金掠入射型超环面镜和掠入射型凹面聚焦光栅,并给出了其具体结构和特性参量。结果表明,此系统适用于以短脉宽、高能量阿秒脉冲为新型探针的阿秒光谱学研究。%For reducing attosecond pulses energy loss in the focusing reflection process and measurement error caused by attosecond pulse focusing aberration measurement , as well as improving the operability of attosecond pulse spectroscopy monitoring , a combined focusing and spectrum-analysis system for attosecond pulse was designed through step-by-step performance optimization .The structure and characteristic parameters were given in detail .The focusing and spectrum-analyzing components are gold-coated grazing incidence toroidal mirror and grazing incidence concave focusing grating , respectively.The proposed system can find application in research platform of attosecond spectroscopy using high energy short attosecond pulse as basic probe tool .

  1. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  2. New acceptor-bridge-donor strategy for enhancing NLO response with long-range excess electron transfer from the NH2...M/M3O donor (M = Li, Na, K) to inside the electron hole cage C20F19 acceptor through the unusual σ chain bridge (CH2)4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Li, Ying; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-04-01

    Using the strong electron hole cage C20F19 acceptor, the NH2...M/M3O (M = Li, Na, and K) complicated donors with excess electron, and the unusual σ chain (CH2)4 bridge, we construct a new kind of electride molecular salt e(-)@C20F19-(CH2)4-NH2...M(+)/M3O(+) (M = Li, Na, and K) with excess electron anion inside the hole cage (to be encapsulated excess electron-hole pair) serving as a new A-B-D strategy for enhancing nonlinear optical (NLO) response. An interesting push-pull mechanism of excess electron generation and its long-range transfer is exhibited. The excess electron is pushed out from the (super)alkali atom M/M3O by the lone pair of NH2 in the donor and further pulled inside the hole cage C20F19 acceptor through the efficient long σ chain (CH2)4 bridge. Owing to the long-range electron transfer, the new designed electride molecular salts with the excess electron-hole pair exhibit large NLO response. For the e(-)@C20F19-(CH2)4-NH2...Na(+), its large first hyperpolarizability (β0) reaches up to 9.5 × 10(6) au, which is about 2.4 × 10(4) times the 400 au for the relative e(-)@C20F20...Na(+) without the extended chain (CH2)4-NH2. It is shown that the new strategy is considerably efficient in enhancing the NLO response for the salts. In addition, the effects of different bridges and alkali atomic number on β0 are also exhibited. Further, three modulating factors are found for enhancing NLO response. They are the σ chain bridge, bridge-end group with lone pair, and (super)alkali atom. The new knowledge may be significant for designing new NLO materials and electronic devices with electrons inside the cages. They may also be the basis of establishing potential organic chemistry with electron-hole pair.

  3. Attosecond electronic and nuclear quantum photodynamics of ozone: time-dependent Dyson orbitals and dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Perveaux, A; Lasorne, B; Gatti, F; Robb, M A; Halász, G J; Vibók, Á

    2014-01-01

    A nonadiabatic scheme for the description of the coupled electron and nuclear motions in the ozone molecule was proposed recently. An initial coherent nonstationary state was prepared as a superposition of the ground state and the excited Hartley band. In this situation neither the electrons nor the nuclei are in a stationary state. The multiconfiguration time dependent Hartree method was used to solve the coupled nuclear quantum dynamics in the framework of the adiabatic separation of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. The resulting wave packet shows an oscillation of the electron density between the two chemical bonds. As a first step for probing the electronic motion we computed the time-dependent molecular dipole and the Dyson orbitals. The latter play an important role in the explanation of the photoelectron angular distribution. Calculations of the Dyson orbitals are presented both for the time-independent as well as the time-dependent situations. We limited our description of the electronic mot...

  4. Attosecond dissociation of the HT molecule from the He united-atom limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles W.; Thompson, Alan K.; Coplan, Michael A.; Cooper, John W.; Hughes, Patrick; Vest, Robert E.

    2008-05-01

    From an AMO perspective, the n + ^3He ->t + p + 764 keV nuclear reaction can be viewed as unimolecular dissociation of the HT molecule proceeding from the ^4He united-atom limit. The speeds of the electrons in the ground state of He are comparable to those of the triton and proton fragments, thus fulfilling the Massey criterion which is conducive to subsequent charge-transfer and excitation collisions between the heavy fragments and ambient ^3He. We have measured Lyman α radiation produced in a ^3He gas cell irradiated by a cold neutron beam at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. For atmospheric pressure and room temperature in the cell, we find yields of tens of Lyman α photons for every neutron reaction [arXiv:0801.2614]. These results suggest a method of cold neutron detection by optical means that is complementary to existing proportional counter technologies, and offers greater sensitivity, wider dynamic range, suppression of background, and simpler manufacturability.

  5. Photo-doped carrier dynamics in Mott insulatoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, Eiki; Ishihara, Sumio

    2013-03-01

    Electron/hole doping in Mott insulators, for example two-dimensional cuprates, has been well investigated in relation to high-Tc superconductivity. Especially related to photo-doping, many experiments on photo-induced phase transition in strongly correlated systems have been made. In the usual photo-doping setup, the system is excited with fs-laser pulse and generated electron-hole pairs affect properties of materials. Recently, another type of photo-doped experiment with heterostructure has been made, and hole or electron carriers are dynamically injected through the heterostructure. In this theoretical study, we examine photo-doped carrier dynamics in the t-J model with dynamically doped holes. We formulate dynamics of the carriers by non-equilibrium Green functions. We take an initial state of holes and decompose the non-equilibrium Green's function into a series of equilibrium Green's functions by using Wick's theorem. The effect of the initial distribution appears from the higher terms in the series. We treat magnons with the self-consistent Born approximation. The non-equilibrium Green function derived in this way shows double time dependence. We will present physical quantities in transient process, for example, one-particle excitation spectra for holes.

  6. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  7. Soliton dynamics in the multiphoton plasma regime

    CERN Document Server

    Husko, Chad A; Colman, Pierre; Zheng, Jiangjun; De Rossi, Alfredo; Wong, Chee Wei; 10.1038/srep01100

    2013-01-01

    Solitary waves have consistently captured the imagination of scientists, ranging from fundamental breakthroughs in spectroscopy and metrology enabled by supercontinuum light, to gap solitons for dispersionless slow-light, and discrete spatial solitons in lattices, amongst others. Recent progress in strong-field atomic physics include impressive demonstrations of attosecond pulses and high-harmonic generation via photoionization of free-electrons in gases at extreme intensities of 1014 Wcm2. Here we report the first phase-resolved observations of femtosecond optical solitons in a semiconductor microchip, with multiphoton ionization at picojoule energies and 1010 Wcm2 intensities. The dramatic nonlinearity leads to picojoule observations of free-electron-induced blue-shift at 1016 cm3 carrier densities and self-chirped femtosecond soliton acceleration. Furthermore, we evidence the time-gated dynamics of soliton splitting on-chip, and the suppression of soliton recurrence due to fast free-electron dynamics. Thes...

  8. Timing synchronization based on mo de-lo cked fib er lasers with attosecond timing jitter%基于阿秒抖动光纤锁模激光器的时钟同步∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦鹏; 宋有建; 胡明列; 柴路; 王清月

    2015-01-01

    Mode-locked fiber lasers output ultra-short pulse trains with extremely high temporal stability, showing great potential in systems that require precise timing synchronization, such as pump-probe experiments, high-speed analog-to-digital conversion, large-scale timing distribution and coherent combination. Fiber lasers are usually simpler, less costly, more efficient and more robust to the environment than solid state lasers, making them a better option for real-world applications. With the attosecond temporal resolution of the balanced optical cross-correlation (BOC) method, timing jitter of mode-locked fiber lasers has been carefully measured and optimized over the last decade. However, due to the inherently large amplified spontaneous emission noise in the long gain fiber and broad pulse width inside the laser cavity, the quantum-noise-limited timing jitter of mode-locked fiber lasers is still much higher than that of the solid state lasers. In order to further optimize the timing synchronization of mode-locked fiber lasers, larger locking bandwidth is required to suppress the low-frequency timing jitter, which contributes significantly to the total amount of residual timing jitter. In this work, tight timing synchronization between two mode-locked Yb-fiber lasers is achieved via a feedback loop built on an intra-cavity electro-optic phase modulator. Both lasers work in the stretched-pulse regime, which has been proven to support the lowest quantum-noise-limited timing jitter of mode-locked fiber laser. The output of the BOC system provides a timing error discriminator of 40 mV/fs, corresponding to 13 as resolution within the integration bandwidth. When the pulse trains from both lasers are successfully synchronized, the residual timing jitter can be measured with the same signal as that used for timing synchronization. Based on the residual timing jitter measurement, the intra-cavity dynamics of the laser and the locking parameters of the feedback loop can be

  9. Coherent spin dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amand, T.; Senes, M.; Marie, X.; Renucci, P. [Laboratoire de Nanophysique, Magnetisme et Optoelectronique-LPMC, INSA, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Urbaszek, B. [Laboratoire de Nanophysique, Magnetisme et Optoelectronique-LPMC, INSA, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Krebs, O.; Laurent, S.; Voisin, P. [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Warburton, R.J. [Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The anisotropic exchange interaction (AEI) between electrons and holes is shown to play a central role in quantum dots (QDs) spin dynamics. In neutral QDs, AEI is at the origin of spin quantum beats observed under resonant excitation between the lowest energy doublet of linearly dipole-active eigenstates. In negatively charged QDs, AEI is at the origin of QD emission with opposite helicity to the optic al excitation, under non-resonant excitation conditions. Finally, the possibility of leaving a spin information in the system after recombination of the photo-injected electron-hole pair is discussed with respect to the type and the level of the doping. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Conservation laws, bilinear forms and solitons for a fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the attosecond pulses in an optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jun; Tian, Bo, E-mail: tian_bupt@163.com; Zhen, Hui-Ling; Sun, Wen-Rong

    2015-08-15

    Under investigation in this paper is a fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the propagation of attosecond pulses in an optical fiber. Based on the Lax pair, infinitely-many conservation laws are derived. With the aid of auxiliary functions, bilinear forms, one-, two- and three-soliton solutions in analytic forms are generated via the Hirota method and symbolic computation. Soliton velocity varies linearly with the coefficients of the high-order terms. Head-on interaction between the bidirectional two solitons and overtaking interaction between the unidirectional two solitons as well as the bound state are depicted. For the interactions among the three solitons, two head-on and one overtaking interactions, three overtaking interactions, an interaction between a bound state and a single soliton and the bound state are displayed. Graphical analysis shows that the interactions between the two solitons are elastic, and interactions among the three solitons are pairwise elastic. Stability analysis yields the modulation instability condition for the soliton solutions.

  11. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in an ultracold Rydberg gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Sommer, Christian; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena such as the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences. Here we demonstrate an experimental approach towards this goal by utilizing an ultracold Rydberg gas generated with a broadband picosecond laser pulse. We follow the ultrafast evolution of its electronic coherence by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. The observed electronic coherence shows an ultrafast oscillation with a period of 1 femtosecond, whose phase shift on the attosecond timescale is consistent with many-body correlations among Rydberg atoms beyond mean-field approximations. This coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics is actively controlled by tuning the orbital size and population of the Rydberg state, as well as the mean atomic distance. Our approach will offer a versatile platform to observe and manipulate non-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale.

  12. Cluster dynamics transcending chemical dynamics toward nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2006-07-11

    Ultrafast cluster dynamics encompasses femtosecond nuclear dynamics, attosecond electron dynamics, and electron-nuclear dynamics in ultraintense laser fields (peak intensities 10(15)-10(20) W.cm(-2)). Extreme cluster multielectron ionization produces highly charged cluster ions, e.g., (C(4+)(D(+))(4))(n) and (D(+)I(22+))(n) at I(M) = 10(18) W.cm(-2), that undergo Coulomb explosion (CE) with the production of high-energy (5 keV to 1 MeV) ions, which can trigger nuclear reactions in an assembly of exploding clusters. The laser intensity and the cluster size dependence of the dynamics and energetics of CE of (D(2))(n), (HT)(n), (CD(4))(n), (DI)(n), (CD(3)I)(n), and (CH(3)I)(n) clusters were explored by electrostatic models and molecular dynamics simulations, quantifying energetic driving effects, and kinematic run-over effects. The optimization of table-top dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of deuterium containing heteroclusters is realized for light-heavy heteroclusters of the largest size, which allows for the prevalence of cluster vertical ionization at the highest intensity of the laser field. We demonstrate a 7-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the yield of dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of light-heavy heteroclusters as compared with (D(2))(n) clusters of the same size. Prospective applications for the attainment of table-top nucleosynthesis reactions, e.g., (12)C(P,gamma)(13)N driven by CE of (CH(3)I)(n) clusters, were explored.

  13. Tracing molecular dynamics at the femto-/atto-second boundary through extreme-ultraviolet pump-probe spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Carpeggiani, P A; Palacios, A; Gray, D; Martín, F; Charalambidis, D

    2013-01-01

    Coherent light pulses of few to hundreds of femtoseconds (fs) duration have prolifically served the field of ultrafast phenomena. While fs pulses address mainly dynamics of nuclear motion in molecules or lattices in the gas, liquid or condensed matter phase, the advent of attosecond pulses has in recent years provided direct experimental access to ultrafast electron dynamics. However, there are processes involving nuclear motion in molecules and in particular coupled electronic and nuclear motion that possess few fs or even sub-fs dynamics. In the present work we have succeeded in addressing simultaneously vibrational and electronic dynamics in molecular Hydrogen. Utilizing a broadband extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) continuum the entire, Frank-Condon allowed spectrum of H2 is coherently excited. Vibrational, electronic and ionization 1fs scale dynamics are subsequently tracked by means of XUV-pump-XUV-probe measurements. These reflect the intrinsic molecular behavior as the XUV probe pulse hardly distorts the mole...

  14. Dynamical chaos in chip-scale optomechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiagui; Huang, Yongjun; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Jinghui; Liu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Xia, Guangqiong; Wong, Chee Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chaos has revolutionized the field of nonlinear science and stimulated foundational studies from neural networks, extreme event statistics, to physics of electron transport. Recent studies in cavity optomechanics provide a new platform to uncover quintessential architectures of chaos generation and the underlying physics. Here we report the first generation of dynamical chaos in silicon optomechanical oscillators, enabled by the strong and coupled nonlinearities of Drude electron-hole plasma. Deterministic chaotic oscillation is achieved, and statistical and entropic characterization quantifies the complexity of chaos. The correlation dimension D2 is determined at ~ 1.67 for the chaotic attractor, along with a maximal Lyapunov exponent rate about 2.94*the fundamental optomechanical oscillation. The corresponding nonlinear dynamical maps demonstrate the plethora of subharmonics, bifurcations, and stable regimes, along with distinct transitional routes into chaotic states. The chaos generation in our mesoscopic...

  15. A Model of Charge Transfer Excitons: Diffusion, Spin Dynamics, and Magnetic Field Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chee Kong; Willard, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we explore how the microscopic dynamics of charge transfer (CT) excitons are influenced by the presence of an external magnetic field in disordered molecular semiconductors. This influence is driven by the dynamic interplay between the spin and spatial degrees of freedom of the electron-hole pair. To account for this interplay we have developed a numerical framework that combines a traditional model of quantum spin dynamics with a coarse-grained model of stochastic charge transport. This combination provides a general and efficient methodology for simulating the effects of magnetic field on CT state dynamics, therefore providing a basis for revealing the microscopic origin of experimentally observed magnetic field effects. We demonstrate that simulations carried out on our model are capable of reproducing experimental results as well as generating theoretical predictions related to the efficiency of organic electronic materials.

  16. Dynamic screening of a localized hole during photoemission from a metal cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Koval, N E; Borisov, A G; Muiño, R Díez

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy techniques have fueled the interest in the theoretical description of electronic processes taking place in the subfemtosecond time scale. We here study the coupled dynamic screening of a localized hole and a photoelectron emitted from a metal cluster using a semi-classical model. Electron density dynamics in the cluster is calculated with Time Dependent Density Functional Theory and the motion of the photoemitted electron is described classically. We show that the dynamic screening of the hole by the cluster electrons affects the motion of the photoemitted electron. At the very beginning of the photoemission process, the emitted electron is accelerated by the cluster electrons that pile up to screen the hole. This is a velocity dependent effect that needs to be accounted for when calculating the energy lost by the electron due to inelastic processes.

  17. Combining Molecular Dynamics and Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of a system consisting of electrons and ions is often treated in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, with electrons in their instantaneous ground state. This approach cannot capture many interesting processes that involved excitation of electrons and its effects on the coupled electron-ion dynamics. The time scale needed to accurately resolve the evolution of electron dynamics is atto-seconds. This poses a challenge to the simulation of important chemical processes that typically take place on time scales of pico-seconds and beyond, such as reactions at surfaces and charge transport in macromolecules. We will present a methodology based on time-dependent density functional theory for electrons, and classical (Ehrenfest) dynamics for the ions, that successfully captures such processes. We will give a review of key features of the method and several applications. These illustrate how the atomic and electronic structure evolution unravels the elementary steps that constitute a chemical reaction. In collaboration with: G. Kolesov, D. Vinichenko, G. Tritsaris, C.M. Friend, Departments of Physics and of Chemistry and Chemical Biology.

  18. Molecular internal dynamics studied by quantum path interferences in high order harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaïr, Amelle, E-mail: azair@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Siegel, Thomas; Sukiasyan, Suren; Risoud, Francois; Brugnera, Leonardo; Hutchison, Christopher [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Diveki, Zsolt; Auguste, Thierry [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molécules, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tisch, John W.G. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Salières, Pascal [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molécules, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ivanov, Misha Y.; Marangos, Jonathan P. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-12

    Highlights: ► Electronic trajectories in high order harmonic generation encodes attosecond and femtosecond molecular dynamical information. ► The observation of these quantum paths allows us to follow nuclear motion after ionization. ► Quantum paths interference encodes a signature of superposition of ionization channels. ► Quantum paths interference encodes a signature of transfer of population between channels due to laser coupling. ► Quantum paths interference is a promising technique to resolve ultra-fast dynamical processes after ionization. - Abstract: We investigate how short and long electron trajectory contributions to high harmonic emission and their interferences give access to information about intra-molecular dynamics. In the case of unaligned molecules, we show experimental evidence that the long trajectory contribution is more dependent upon the molecular species than the short one, providing a high sensitivity to cation nuclear dynamics from 100’s of as to a few fs after ionisation. Using theoretical approaches based on the strong field approximation and numerical integration of the time dependent Schrödinger equation, we examine how quantum path interferences encode electronic motion when the molecules are aligned. We show that the interferences are dependent upon which ionisation channels are involved and any superposition between them. In particular, quantum path interferences can encode signatures of electron dynamics if the laser field drives a coupling between the channels. Hence, molecular quantum path interferences are a promising method for attosecond spectroscopy, allowing the resolution of ultra-fast charge migration in molecules after ionisation in a self-referenced manner.

  19. Correlated dynamics of the motion of proton-hole wave packets in a photoionized water cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-18

    We explore the correlated dynamics of an electron hole and a proton after ionization of a protonated water cluster by extreme ultraviolet light. An ultrafast decay mechanism is found in which the proton-hole dynamics after the ionization are driven by electrostatic repulsion and involve a strong coupling between the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom. We describe the system by a quantum-dynamical approach and show that nonadiabatic effects are a key element of the mechanism by which electron and proton repel each other and become localized at opposite sides of the cluster. Based on the generality of the decay mechanism, similar effects may be expected for other ionized systems featuring hydrogen bonds.

  20. Carrier density driven lasing dynamics in ZnO nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Wille, Marcel; Michalsky, Tom; Röder, Robert; Ronning, Carsten; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temporal lasing dynamics of high quality ZnO nanowires using time-resolved micro-photoluminescence technique. The temperature dependence of the lasing characteristics and of the corresponding decay constants demonstrate the formation of an electron-hole plasma to be the underlying gain mechanism in the considered temperature range from 10 K to 300 K. We found that the temperature dependent emission onset-time ($t_{\\text{on}}$) strongly depends on the excitation power and becomes smallest in the lasing regime, with values below 5 ps. Furthermore, the observed red shift of the dominating lasing modes in time is qualitatively discussed in terms of the carrier density induced change of the refractive index dispersion after the excitation laser pulse. This theory is supported by extending an existing model for the calculation of the carrier density dependent complex refractive index for different temperatures. This model coincides with the experimental observations and reliably describes the evolu...

  1. Electron-hole quantum physics in ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation describes several new aspects of the quantum physics of electrons and holes in zinc oxide (ZnO), including a few possible applications. Zinc oxide is a II-VI semiconductor with a direct band gap in the ultraviolet. Experimental and theoretical studies have been performed, both on b

  2. Electron-hole pairing in graphene-GaAs heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Gamucci, A.; Spirito, D.; Carrega, M.; Karmakar, B.; Lombardo, A.; Bruna, M; Ferrari, A. C.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K. W.; Polini, M.; V. Pellegrini

    2014-01-01

    Vertical heterostructures combining different layered materials offer novel opportunities for applications and fundamental studies of collective behavior driven by inter-layer Coulomb coupling. Here we report heterostructures comprising a single-layer (or bilayer) graphene carrying a fluid of massless (massive) chiral carriers, and a quantum well created in GaAs 31.5 nm below the surface, supporting a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas. These are a new class of double-layer devices co...

  3. Parallel Electron-Hole Bilayer Conductivity from Electronic Interface Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pentcheva, R.; Huijben, M.; Otte, K.; Pickett, W.E.; Kleibeuker, J.E.; Huijben, J.; Boschker, H.; Kockmann, D.; Siemons, W.; Koster, G.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D.H.A.; Hilgenkamp, H.; Brinkman, A.

    2010-01-01

    The perovskite SrTiO3-LaAlO3 structure has advanced to a model system to investigate the rich electronic phenomena arising at polar oxide interfaces. Using first principles calculations and transport measurements we demonstrate that an additional SrTiO3 capping layer prevents atomic reconstruction a

  4. Electron holes appear to trigger cancer-implicated mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Villagran, Martha

    Malignant tumors are caused by mutations, which also affect their subsequent growth and evolution. We use a novel approach, computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)], to compute spectra of enhanced hole probability based on actual sequence data. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of reveal a correlation between hole spectrum peaks and spikes in human mutation frequencies. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with cancer-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential cancer `driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could also prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions, and sites of driver mutations, in the vast non-protein-coding genome. Supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Ctr. for Superconductivity.

  5. Correlation dynamics between electrons and ions in the fragmentation of D$_2$ molecules by short laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, X M; Lin, C D

    2003-01-01

    We studied the recollision dynamics between the electrons and D$_2^+$ ions following the tunneling ionization of D$_2$ molecules in an intense short pulse laser field. The returning electron collisionally excites the D$_2^+$ ion to excited electronic states from there D$_2^+$ can dissociate or be further ionized by the laser field, resulting in D$^+$ + D or D$^+$ + D$^+$, respectively. We modeled the fragmentation dynamics and calculated the resulting kinetic energy spectrum of D$^+$ to compare with recent experiments. Since the recollision time is locked to the tunneling ionization time which occurs only within fraction of an optical cycle, the peaks in the D$^+$ kinetic energy spectra provides a measure of the time when the recollision occurs. This collision dynamics forms the basis of the molecular clock where the clock can be read with attosecond precision, as first proposed by Corkum and coworkers. By analyzing each of the elementary processes leading to the fragmentation quantitatively, we identified ho...

  6. Energy-resolved hot carrier relaxation dynamics in monocrystalline plasmonic nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    Méjard, Régis; Petit, Marlène; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Cluzel, Benoît; Demichel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hot carriers are energetic photo-excited carriers driving a large range of chemico-physical mechanisms. At the nanoscale, an efficient generation of these carriers is facilitated by illuminating plasmonic antennas. However, the ultrafast relaxation rate severally impedes their deployment in future hot-carrier based devices. In this paper, we report on the picosecond relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in plasmonic monocrystalline gold nanoantennas. The temporal dynamics of the hot carriers is experimentally investigated by interrogating the nonlinear photoluminescence response of the antenna with a spectrally-resolved two-pulse correlation configuration. We measure time-dependent nonlinearity orders varying from 1 to 8, which challenge the common interpretation of multi-photon gold luminescence. We demonstrate that the relaxation of the photo-excited carriers depends of their energies relative to the Fermi level. We find a 60 % variation in the relaxation rate for electron-hole pair energies ranging from c.a....

  7. Correlated dynamics of the motion of proton-hole wave-packets in a photoionized water cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We explore the correlated dynamics of an electron-hole and a proton after ionization of a protonated water cluster by extreme ultra-violet (XUV) light. An ultrafast decay mechanism is found in which the proton--hole dynamics after the ionization are driven by electrostatic repulsion and involve a strong coupling between the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom. We describe the system by a quantum-dynamical approach and show that non-adiabatic effects are a key element of the mechanism by which electron and proton repel each other and become localized at opposite sides of the cluster. Based on the generality of the decay mechanism, similar effects may be expected for other ionized systems featuring hydrogen bonds.

  8. Laser Instrumentation for Attosecond Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-15

    matter lab. (b) CCD image and spectrum of XUV high- harmonic pulses generated in Ne gas (black line), and reflectivity of MoSi mirror (blue). The...XUV pulses were optimized in the region around 95 eV to coincide with the high reflectivity region of the multi-layer MoSi mirror used for focusing of...piezo- controlled split mirror separately reflects XUV and near-IR pulses for precise timing delay. The MoSi mirror reflectivity cuts out a ~4-eV

  9. GENERATION OF ATTOSECOND PULSES FROM THE INTERACTION OF OBLIQUE INCIDENT LASER PULSE WITH OVERDENSE PLASMA p%斜入射激光脉冲与稠密等离子体相互作用产生的阿秒脉冲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗牧华; 张秋菊

    2011-01-01

    Using one - dimensional particle - in - cell simulations, the generation of attosecond pulses is studied, which is obtained through the interaction of a short oblique incident laser pulse with overdense plasma. It is observed that the intensity and conversion efficiency of attosecond pulses at oblique incidence is always higher than the normal incidence at the same parameters. And the number of attosecond pulses for the oblique incident laser pulse is only one half of the normal incidence. According to the oscillating mirror model and the equation of the mirror motion, we analyze the reason of these questions. Furthermore, when the density of plasma is invariable and the intensity of the laser pulse is raised, with the increase the times of filtering, the conversion ratio of attosecond pulses for the oblique and normal incidence shows an approaching tendency. After selecting harmonics above the order of 300, then we can get the attosecond pulses that have reached the X - ray region.%利用一维粒子模拟程序研究和比较了斜入射和垂直入射激光脉冲与稠密等离子体相互作用得到的阿秒脉冲以及激光强度对阿秒脉冲转换比率的影响.同样参数下,斜入射的阿秒脉冲转换比率明显高于垂直入射的情况,滤波后得到的阿秒脉冲振幅比较大,而脉冲串中阿秒脉冲的个数则是垂直入射时的一半.根据振荡镜面模型对两种情况进行了分析,由镜面振荡方程可以对结果给出解释.保持等离子体密度不变,增大入射激光强度时,随着滤波次数的增加,斜入射与垂直入射的阿秒脉冲的转换比率逐渐趋于相同.300次以上高通滤波后我们得到了处于X射线范围的阿秒脉冲.

  10. Laser assisted electron dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, Alexander William

    2016-01-01

    We apply the convergent close-coupling (CCC) formalism to analyse the processes of laser assisted electron impact ionisation of He, and the attosecond time delay in the photodetachment of the H^{-} ion and the photoionisation of He. Such time dependent atomic collision processes are of considerable interest as experimental measurements on the relevant timescale (attoseconds 10^{-18} s) are now possible utilising ultrafast and intense laser pulses. These processes in particular are furthermore of interest as they are strongly influenced by many-electron correlations. In such cases their theoretical description requires a more comprehensive treatment than that offered by first order perturbation theory. We apply such a treatment through the use of the CCC formalism which involves the complete numeric solution of the integral Lippmann-Schwinger equations pertaining to a particular scattering event. For laser assisted electron impact ionisation of He such a treatment is of a considerably greater accuracy than the...

  11. Electron dynamics and its control in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2014-03-01

    The accessibility of few femtosecond or even attoseconds pulses opens the door to direct observation of electron dynamics. The idea to steer chemical reactions by localization of electronic wavepackets is intriguing, since electrons are directly involved in bond breaking and formation. The formation of a localized electronic wavepacket requires the superposition of two or more appropriate electronic states. Its guidance is only possible within the coherence time of the system and has to be synchronized with the vibrational molecular motions. In theoretical studies we elucidate the role of electron wavepacket motion for the control of molecular processes. We give three examples with direct connection to experiments. From our analysis, we extract the systems requirements defining the time window for intramolecular electronic coherence, the basis for efficient control. Based on these findings we map out a photoreaction that allows direct control by guiding electronic wavepackets. The carrier envelope of a femtosecond few cycle IR pulse is the control parameter that steers the photoreaction through a conical intersection.

  12. Measurement of the dynamics of plasmons inside individual gold nanoparticles using a femtosecond phase-resolved microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Francesco; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a phase-sensitive four-wave mixing microscopy in heterodyne detection to resolve the ultrafast changes of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function of single small (gold nanoparticles at the surface plasmon resonance. The results are quantitatively described via the transient electron temperature and density in gold considering both intraband and interband transitions. We find that the effect of interband transitions in the excitation is important to explain not only the magnitude of the measured four-wave mixing, but also its initial dynamics, which is dominated by the formation of hot electrons via Auger electron-hole recombination with 70-fs time constant, much faster than the well-characterized 500-fs electron thermalization dynamics for intraband excitation. This microscopy technique enables background-free detection of the complex susceptibility change even in highly scattering environments and can be readily applied to any metal nanostructure.

  13. Photocarrier recombination dynamics in perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 for solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Toru; Endo, Masaru; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-20

    Using time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption measurements at room temperature, we report excitation-intensity-dependent photocarrier recombination processes in thin films made from the organo-metal halide perovskite semiconductor CH3NH3PbI3 for solar-cell applications. The photocarrier dynamics are well described by a simple rate equation including single-carrier trapping and electron-hole radiative recombination. This result provides clear evidence that the free-carrier model is better than the exciton model for interpreting the optical properties of CH3NH3PbI3. The observed large two-carrier recombination rate suggests the promising potential of perovskite semiconductors for optoelectronic device applications. Our findings provide the information about the dynamical behaviors of photoexcited carriers that is needed for developing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  14. Carrier dynamics of terahertz emission from low-temperature-grown gaas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfeng; Qin, Jiayin

    2003-06-20

    Through theoretical modeling, we find that the dynamics of photogenerated carriers play a very important role in shaping the temporal waveform of terahertz (THz) radiation pulses emitted from biased low-temperature (LT-grown GaAs antenna. Our modeling gives successful analyses for the sharp and short, slow and long negative parts of temporal THz waveforms. By including intraband, carrier relaxation effect in the modeled mobility, we find an obvious dependence of the THz conversion efficiency on the material of THz emitter and experimental parameters such as the optical duration, the center wavelength, and the fluence of the laser pulses. Our research also shows that electron-hole and electron-electron collisions in LT-GaAs contribute to the saturation phenomenon with an increase of laser fluence.

  15. On quantitative analysis of interband recombination dynamics: Theory and application to bulk ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettieri, S. [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Capello, V.; Santamaria, L. [Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Maddalena, P. [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-12-09

    The issue of the quantitative analysis of time-resolved photoluminescence experiments is addressed by developing and describing two approaches for determination of unimolecular lifetime, bimolecular recombination coefficient, and equilibrium free-carrier concentration, based on a quite general second-order expression of the electron-hole recombination rate. Application to the case of band-edge emission of ZnO single crystals is reported, evidencing the signature of sub-nanosecond second-order recombination dynamics for optical transitions close to the interband excitation edge. The resulting findings are in good agreement with the model prediction and further confirm the presence, formerly evidenced in literature by non-optical methods, of near-surface conductive layers in ZnO crystals with sheet charge densities of about 3–5×10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}.

  16. Subfemtosecond electron dynamics of H{sub 2} in strong fields or the quest for the molecular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudte, A.

    2005-07-01

    In this work we have studied experimentally and theoretically hydrogen and deuterium molecules in strong laser fields. We wanted to demonstrate that control of dynamical processes on the time scale below a single laser cycle (2.7 fs) can be achieved even without using attosecond pulses just by employing the advanced experimental technique COLTRIMS. In order to do this, we have pursued two goals: 1. To examine, whether laser steered electron wavepackets can be used for laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) on molecules. 2. To demonstrate, that the double ionization of H{sub 2} can be followed with sub laser cycle temporal resolution (the molecular clock). Laser induced electron diffraction needs linearly polarized light since its mechanism relies on rescattering of the ionized electron in the molecular potential. With rescattering occurring within a few hundred attoseconds, LIED is really a process of attosecond physics. In principle, two extreme scattering geometries are possible for a homonuclear diatomic molecule like H{sub 2}: the perpendicular geometry, which corresponds to the classical double slit experiment where the electron microbunch is steered transversely to the molecular axis, and the tangential geometry with the electron moving parallel to the molecular axis. Experimental restrictions prevented us to investigate the perpendicular geometry. The molecular clock, on the other hand, employs circularly polarized light to map the absolute phase of the laser electric field onto the spatial direction of the electron momentum. Thereby, a full laser cycle is mapped onto 360 in momentum space. Thus, different electron ejection angles in the laboratory frame correspond to different ejection times. Together with the correlated kinetic energy release of the Coulomb exploding molecules an unambiguous clock running from 0-8 fs with a few 100 as resolution can be envisioned. In direct relation to this experiment, we studied the influence of the long range

  17. Dynamical co-existence of excitons and free carriers in perovskite probed by density-resolved fluorescent spectroscopic method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiangyuan; Lv, Yanping; Wang, Shufeng; Wang, Kai; Shi, Yantao; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Using transient fluorescent spectra at time-zero, we develop a density-resolved fluorescent spectroscopic method for investigating photoproducts in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite and related photophysics. The density dependent dynamical co-existence of excitons and free carriers over a wide density range is experimentally observed for the first time. The exciton binding energy (EB) and the effective mass of electron-hole pair can be estimated based on such co-existence. No ionic polarization is found contributing to photophysical behavior. It also solves the conflict between the large experimentally measured EB and the small predicted values. The spectroscopic method also helps to detect the true free carrier density under continuous illumination without the interference of ionic conductivity. Our methods and results profoundly enrich the study and understanding of the photophysics in perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications.

  18. Femtosecond-laser induced dynamics of CO on Ru(0001): Deep insights from a hot-electron friction model including surface motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Robert; Floß, Gereon; Saalfrank, Peter; Füchsel, Gernot; Lončarić, Ivor; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin model accounting for all six molecular degrees of freedom is applied to femtosecond-laser induced, hot-electron driven dynamics of Ru(0001)(2 ×2 ):CO. In our molecular dynamics with electronic friction approach, a recently developed potential energy surface based on gradient-corrected density functional theory accounting for van der Waals interactions is adopted. Electronic friction due to the coupling of molecular degrees of freedom to electron-hole pairs in the metal are included via a local density friction approximation, and surface phonons by a generalized Langevin oscillator model. The action of ultrashort laser pulses enters through a substrate-mediated, hot-electron mechanism via a time-dependent electronic temperature (derived from a two-temperature model), causing random forces acting on the molecule. The model is applied to laser induced lateral diffusion of CO on the surface, "hot adsorbate" formation, and laser induced desorption. Reaction probabilities are strongly enhanced compared to purely thermal processes, both for diffusion and desorption. Reaction yields depend in a characteristic (nonlinear) fashion on the applied laser fluence, as well as branching ratios for various reaction channels. Computed two-pulse correlation traces for desorption and other indicators suggest that aside from electron-hole pairs, phonons play a non-negligible role for laser induced dynamics in this system, acting on a surprisingly short time scale. Our simulations on precomputed potentials allow for good statistics and the treatment of long-time dynamics (300 ps), giving insight into this system which hitherto has not been reached. We find generally good agreement with experimental data where available and make predictions in addition. A recently proposed laser induced population of physisorbed precursor states could not be observed with the present low-coverage model.

  19. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  20. Dynamics of Below-Band-Gap Carrier in Highly Excited GaN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭冰; 黄锦圣; 叶志镇; 江红星; 林景瑜

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity was used to investigate below-band-gap (3.1 eV) carrier dynamics in a nominally undoped GaN epilayer under high excitation. A 2.5-ps rising process can be observed in the transient trace. This shot rising time results from the hot phonon effects which can cause a delayed energy relaxation of the initial photocarriers toward the band edge. From the density dependence of the carrier dynamics, the Mott density was estimated to be 1.51-1.56 × 1019 cm-3. Below the Mott density, the initial probed carrier dynamics was explained to the effect of acoustic phonon-assisted tunnelling for localized states, where a significant excitation density dependence of the tunnelling probability was observed due to the optically induced bandtail extension to lower energies. Above the Mott density, the measured carrier dynamics reflected the relaxation of an electron-hole plasma, in which a distinct fast decay component of 2.3 ps was observed due to the onset of nonlinear relaxation processes such Auger recombination.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of free carriers induced by two-photon excitation in bulk ZnSe crystal%双光子激发ZnSe自由载流子超快动力学研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    new effect and causes a transmittance change of the probe light. The presumable reasons are as follows: intense irradiances will result in the increase of carrier concentration and the rise of the lattice temperature as well as the narrowing of the band gap in the ZnSe crystal, which accelerates the electron-hole interband recombination process. Accordingly, the electron-hole recombination time decreases. Furthermore, when the carrier concentration is larger than 1018 cm−3, the occurrence of the electron-hole plasma is significant. At the same time, the enhancement of the scattering among the carriers results in the reduction of the free carrier absorption cross section. In summary, it is found that the free-carrier absorption cross section decreases whereas the electron-hole recombination time becomes shorter in ZnSe crystal as the excitation intensity increases, owing to both the narrowing of band gap and the occurrence of electron-hole plasma.

  2. Exploration of laser-driven electron-multirescattering dynamics in high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Jooya, Hossein Z.; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple rescattering processes play an important role in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in an intense laser field. However, the underlying multi-rescattering dynamics are still largely unexplored. Here we investigate the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG associated with the odd and even number of returning times of the electron to the parent ion. We perform fully ab initio quantum calculations and extend the empirical mode decomposition method to extract the individual multiple scattering contributions in HHG. We find that the tunneling ionization regime is responsible for the odd number times of rescattering and the corresponding short trajectories are dominant. On the other hand, the multiphoton ionization regime is responsible for the even number times of rescattering and the corresponding long trajectories are dominant. Moreover, we discover that the multiphoton- and tunneling-ionization regimes in multiple rescattering processes occur alternatively. Our results uncover the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG for the first time. It also provides new insight regarding the control of the multiple rescattering processes for the optimal generation of ultrabroad band supercontinuum spectra and the production of single ultrashort attosecond laser pulse.

  3. Carrier density driven lasing dynamics in ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marcel; Sturm, Chris; Michalsky, Tom; Röder, Robert; Ronning, Carsten; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-06-01

    We report on the temporal lasing dynamics of high quality ZnO nanowires using the time-resolved micro-photoluminescence technique. The temperature dependence of the lasing characteristics and of the corresponding decay constants demonstrate the formation of an electron-hole plasma to be the underlying gain mechanism in the considered temperature range from 10 K to 300 K. We found that the temperature-dependent emission onset-time ([Formula: see text]) strongly depends on the excitation power and becomes smallest in the lasing regime, with values below 5 ps. Furthermore, the observed red shift of the dominating lasing modes in time is qualitatively discussed in terms of the carrier density induced change of the refractive index dispersion after the excitation laser pulse. This theory is supported by extending an existing model for the calculation of the carrier density dependent complex refractive index for different temperatures. This model coincides with the experimental observations and reliably describes the evolution of the refractive index after the excitation laser pulse.

  4. Nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in ultrathin Si-on-glass films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, J.; Akbas, Y.; Crandall, L.; Bellman, R.; Kosik Williams, C.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2015-10-01

    We present a femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy approach for characterization of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films grown on glass substrates. Such films are presently being considered as absorbers in tandem-type, Si-based photovoltaic cells. Our experiments consisted of time-resolved, two-colour femtosecond optical measurements, performed in the transmission mode in a wide range of delay times. Depending on the sample growth process, collected normalized transmissivity change (ΔT/T) waveforms exhibited a bi-exponential relaxation dynamics with the characteristic times varying from picoseconds to nanoseconds. Experimental data were interpreted using a three-rate-equation models, and the relaxation was identified as, depending on the Si film type, being dominated by either carrier trapping or electron-phonon cooling and followed by electron-hole recombination. An excellent fit between the model and the ΔT/T transients was obtained and a correlation between the Si film growth process, its hydrogen content, and the associated trap concentration was demonstrated.

  5. Multi-purpose two- and three-dimensional momentum imaging of charged particles for attosecond experiments at 1 kHz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, Erik P; Sorensen, Stacey L; Arnold, Cord L; Kroon, David; Guénot, Diego; Fordell, Thomas; Lépine, Franck; Johnsson, Per; L'Huillier, Anne; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu

    2014-12-01

    We report on the versatile design and operation of a two-sided spectrometer for the imaging of charged-particle momenta in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). The benefits of 3D detection are to discern particles of different mass and to study correlations between fragments from multi-ionization processes, while 2D detectors are more efficient for single-ionization applications. Combining these detector types in one instrument allows us to detect positive and negative particles simultaneously and to reduce acquisition times by using the 2D detector at a higher ionization rate when the third dimension is not required. The combined access to electronic and nuclear dynamics available when both sides are used together is important for studying photoreactions in samples of increasing complexity. The possibilities and limitations of 3D momentum imaging of electrons or ions in the same spectrometer geometry are investigated analytically and three different modes of operation demonstrated experimentally, with infrared or extreme ultraviolet light and an atomic/molecular beam.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamic photonic crystal creation by four laser beams interference in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Ezhova, K. V.; Tikhonov, I. V.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a simple way to create dynamic photonic crystals with different lattice symmetry by interference of four non-coplanar laser beams in colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The formation of dynamic photonic crystal was confirmed by the observed diffraction of the beams that have excited photonic crystal at the angles equal to that calculated for the corresponding three-dimensional lattice (self-diffraction regime). Self-diffraction from an induced 3D transient photonic crystal has been discovered in the case of resonant excitation of the excitons (electron - hole transitions) in CdSe/ZnS QDs (highly absorbing colloidal solution) by powerful beams of mode-locked laser with picosecond pulse duration. Self-diffraction arises for four laser beams intersecting in the cell with colloidal CdSe/ZnS QDs due to the induced 3D dynamic photonic crystal. The physical processes that arise in CdSe/ZnS QDs and are responsible for the observed self-action effects are discussed.

  7. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  8. Towards a theory of attosecond transient recorder

    CERN Document Server

    Krasovskii, E E

    2009-01-01

    Laser assisted photoemission by a chirped subfemtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse is considered within an exactly solvable quantum-mechanical model. Special emphasis is given to the energy dependence of photoexcitation cross-section. The streaked spectra are analyzed within the classical picture of initial time-momentum distribution r_ini(p,t) of photoelectrons mapped to the final energy scale. The actual time-momentum distribution in the absence of the probe laser field is shown to be a poor choice for r_ini, and a more adequate ansatz is suggested. The semiclassical theory offers a simple practically useful approximation for streaked spectra. Its limitations for sufficiently long chirped XUV pulses are established.

  9. Polarization Effects in Attosecond Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    following the field instead. We show that polarization effects may lead to an apparent temporal shift that needs to be properly accounted for in the analysis. The effect may be isolated and studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from oriented polar molecules. We also show that polarization...

  10. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrogen on lead films: An ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saalfrank, Peter [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Juaristi, J. I. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Alducin, M.; Muiño, R. Díez [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Blanco-Rey, M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-12-21

    Using density functional theory and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Electronic Friction (AIMDEF), we study the adsorption and dissipative vibrational dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on free-standing lead films of increasing thickness. Lead films are known for their oscillatory behaviour of certain properties with increasing thickness, e.g., energy and electron spillout change in discontinuous manner, due to quantum size effects [G. Materzanini, P. Saalfrank, and P. J. D. Lindan, Phys. Rev. B 63, 235405 (2001)]. Here, we demonstrate that oscillatory features arise also for hydrogen when chemisorbed on lead films. Besides stationary properties of the adsorbate, we concentrate on finite vibrational lifetimes of H-surface vibrations. As shown by AIMDEF, the damping via vibration-electron hole pair coupling dominates clearly over the vibration-phonon channel, in particular for high-frequency modes. Vibrational relaxation times are a characteristic function of layer thickness due to the oscillating behaviour of the embedding surface electronic density. Implications derived from AIMDEF for frictional many-atom dynamics, and physisorbed species will also be given.

  11. Density matrix based time-dependent configuration interaction approach to ultrafast spin-flip dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, H; Kühn, O

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in attosecond spectroscopy yield access to the correlated motion of electrons on their intrinsic time scales. Spin-flip dynamics is usually considered in the context of valence electronic states, where spin-orbit coupling is weak and processes related to the electron spin are usually driven by nuclear motion. However, for core-excited states, where the core hole has a nonzero angular momentum, spin-orbit coupling is strong enough to drive spin-flips on a much shorter time scale. Using density matrix based time-dependent restricted active space configuration interaction including spin-orbit coupling, we address an unprecedentedly short spin-crossover for the example of L-edge (2p$\\rightarrow$3d) excited states of a prototypical Fe(II) complex. This process occurs on a time scale, which is faster than that of Auger decay ($\\sim$4\\,fs) treated here explicitly. Modest variations of carrier frequency and pulse duration can lead to substantial changes in the spin-state yield, suggesting its cont...

  12. An electrodynamics-Langevin dynamics (ED-LD) approach to simulate metal nanoparticle interactions and motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, N; Rice, S A; Gray, S K; Scherer, N F

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the formation of electrodynamically interacting assemblies of metal nanoparticles requires accurate computational methods for determining the forces and propagating trajectories. However, since computation of electromagnetic forces occurs on attosecond to femtosecond timescales, simulating the motion of colloidal nanoparticles on milliseconds to seconds timescales is a challenging multi-scale computational problem. Here, we present a computational technique for performing accurate simulations of laser-illuminated metal nanoparticles. In the simulation, we self-consistently combine the finite-difference time-domain method for electrodynamics (ED) with Langevin dynamics (LD) for the particle motions. We demonstrate the ED-LD method by calculating the 3D trajectories of a single 100-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticle and optical trapping and optical binding of two and three 150-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticles in simulated optical tweezers. We show that surface charge on the colloidal metal nanoparticles plays an important role in their optically driven self-organization. In fact, these simulations provide a more complete understanding of the assembly of different structures of two and three Ag nanoparticles that have been observed experimentally, demonstrating that the ED-LD method will be a very useful tool for understanding the self-organization of optical matter.

  13. Dynamic Logics of Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Platzer, André

    2012-01-01

    We survey dynamic logics for specifying and verifying properties of dynamical systems, including hybrid systems, distributed hybrid systems, and stochastic hybrid systems. A dynamic logic is a first-order modal logic with a pair of parametrized modal operators for each dynamical system to express necessary or possible properties of their transition behavior. Due to their full basis of first-order modal logic operators, dynamic logics can express a rich variety of system properties, including safety, controllability, reactivity, liveness, and quantified parametrized properties, even about relations between multiple dynamical systems. In this survey, we focus on some of the representatives of the family of differential dynamic logics, which share the ability to express properties of dynamical systems having continuous dynamics described by various forms of differential equations. We explain the dynamical system models, dynamic logics of dynamical systems, their semantics, their axiomatizations, and proof calcul...

  14. Study of recombination processes for 'electron-hole' pairs in germanium irradiated by {gamma} rays from {sup 60}Co using the photovoltaic effect in P-N junctions; Etude du processus de recombinaison des paires ''electron-trou'' dans le germanium irradie par les rayons {gamma} du cobalt 60 a l'aide de l'effet photovoltaique dans les jonctions P-N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahedi-Mochadam, A.A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-01

    Using the photo-voltaic effect in p-n junctions, we have studied, during bombardment, the mechanism of the recombination of 'electron-hole' pairs in the presence of structure defects produced in germanium of the N and P types by {gamma} rays from a Co{sup 60} source. At 310 K the level of the recombination centres is situated 0.25 eV above the conduction band and the capture cross-sections of the holes and of the electrons have the respective values of: {sigma}{sub p} = 4 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2} and {sigma}{sub n} = 3 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}. The value of {sigma}{sub n} appears to be under-estimated because the number of defects in P-type samples appears to be lower than that in N-type samples. These results lead to the conclusion that the interstitials are responsible for the recombination. At 80 K it has been found that in N-type samples, a shallow level exists at O.05 eV below the conduction band with a capture cross-section for the holes of {sigma}{sub p} {>=} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. We believe that in this case the recombination of charge carriers is controlled by the neighbouring 'defect-interstitial' pairs. In P-type samples at low temperature, the life-time is practically constant during irradiation. This fact is attributed to a spontaneous annealing of defects ol purely electrical origin. In the last part of the work the study of the photo-voltaic effect applied to the problem of gamma radiation dosimetry is considered. It is shown that such dosimeters, based on this principle, make it possible to measure the intensity of gamma rays over a very wide range. (author) [French] En utilisant l'effet photovoltaique dans les jonctions p-n, nous avons etudie au cours du bombardement le mecanisme de recombinaison des paires 'electron-trou' en presence des defauts de structure introduits dans le germanium de type N et de type P par les rayons gamma d'une source de Co{sup 60}. A 310 K, le niveau des centres de recombinaison se

  15. Quantum and classical dynamics of reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Díaz, Cristina

    2016-06-27

    We review the state-of-the art in dynamics calculations on the reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces, which is an important model system of an elementary reaction that is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis. In many applications, quantum dynamics and classical trajectory calculations are performed within the Born-Oppenheimer static surface model. However, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is finding increased use in applications aimed at modeling the effect of surface phonons on the dynamics. Molecular dynamics with electronic friction has been used to model the effect of electron-hole pair excitation. Most applications are still based on potential energy surfaces (PESs) or forces computed with density functional theory (DFT), using a density functional within the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation energy. A new development is the use of a semi-empirical version of DFT (the specific reaction parameter (SRP) approach to DFT). We also discuss the accurate methods that have become available to represent electronic structure data for the molecule-surface interaction in global PESs. It has now become possible to describe highly activated H2 + metal surface reactions with chemical accuracy using the SRP-DFT approach, as has been shown for H2 + Cu(111) and Cu(100). However, chemical accuracy with SRP-DFT has yet to be demonstrated for weakly activated systems like H2 + Ru(0001) and non-activated systems like H2 + Pd(111), for which SRP DFs are not yet available. There is now considerable evidence that electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation does not need to be modeled to achieve the (chemically) accurate calculation of dissociative chemisorption and scattering probabilities. Dynamics calculations show that phonons can be safely neglected in the chemically accurate calculation of sticking probabilities on cold metal surfaces for activated systems, and in the calculation of a number of other observables. However, there is now sufficient

  16. Space- and time-dependent quantum dynamics of spatially indirect excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasselli, Federico, E-mail: federico.grasselli@unimore.it; Goldoni, Guido, E-mail: guido.goldoni@unimore.it [Department of Physics, Informatics and Mathematics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy); CNR-NANO S3, Institute for Nanoscience, Via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Bertoni, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bertoni@nano.cnr.it [CNR-NANO S3, Institute for Nanoscience, Via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2015-01-21

    We study the unitary propagation of a two-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation by means of the Split-Step Fourier method, to study the coherent evolution of a spatially indirect exciton (IX) in semiconductor heterostructures. The mutual Coulomb interaction of the electron-hole pair and the electrostatic potentials generated by external gates and acting on the two particles separately are taken into account exactly in the two-particle dynamics. As relevant examples, step/downhill and barrier/well potential profiles are considered. The space- and time-dependent evolutions during the scattering event as well as the asymptotic time behavior are analyzed. For typical parameters of GaAs-based devices, the transmission or reflection of the pair turns out to be a complex two-particle process, due to comparable and competing Coulomb, electrostatic, and kinetic energy scales. Depending on the intensity and anisotropy of the scattering potentials, the quantum evolution may result in excitation of the IX internal degrees of freedom, dissociation of the pair, or transmission in small periodic IX wavepackets due to dwelling of one particle in the barrier region. We discuss the occurrence of each process in the full parameter space of the scattering potentials and the relevance of our results for current excitronic technologies.

  17. A dynamic Monte Carlo study of anomalous current voltage behaviour in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feron, K., E-mail: Krishna.Feron@csiro.au; Fell, C. J. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); CSIRO Energy Flagship, Newcastle, NSW 2300 (Australia); Zhou, X.; Belcher, W. J.; Dastoor, P. C. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2014-12-07

    We present a dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) study of s-shaped current-voltage (I-V) behaviour in organic solar cells. This anomalous behaviour causes a substantial decrease in fill factor and thus power conversion efficiency. We show that this s-shaped behaviour is induced by charge traps that are located at the electrode interface rather than in the bulk of the active layer, and that the anomaly becomes more pronounced with increasing trap depth or density. Furthermore, the s-shape anomaly is correlated with interface recombination, but not bulk recombination, thus highlighting the importance of controlling the electrode interface. While thermal annealing is known to remove the s-shape anomaly, the reason has been not clear, since these treatments induce multiple simultaneous changes to the organic solar cell structure. The DMC modelling indicates that it is the removal of aluminium clusters at the electrode, which act as charge traps, that removes the anomalous I-V behaviour. Finally, this work shows that the s-shape becomes less pronounced with increasing electron-hole recombination rate; suggesting that efficient organic photovoltaic material systems are more susceptible to these electrode interface effects.

  18. Impact of Hole Dynamics on InAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Hussein H. Warid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the internal mechanism of the QD has been studied, based on the separate electron-hole dynamics. For the first time, we have established the numerical model of InAs/GaAs QD laser by using four-levels rate equations model (4LREM include different processes ,recombination, capture, escape, for holes and electrons. Then, the (4LREM is solved numerically using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Gain characteristic and the output power of the QD laser have been studied respectively. The results show that the QD laser has small threshold current for ground state (GS, excited state (ES and continues state (CS. The simulation results are in accordance with the experimental results, which prove that the rate equation model can simulate various properties of QD laser perfectly. The work is beneficial to QD laser research. As a simplified model of QD laser, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects are ignored, and the model can be further improved

  19. Ultrafast charge generation and relaxation dynamics in methylammonium lead bromide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaofan; Wen, Xiaoming; Sheng, Rui; Huang, Shujuan; Harada, Takaaki; Kee, Tak W.; Green, Martin A.; Ho-Baillie, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Methylammonium Lead Bromide (CH3NH3PbBr3) is a promising material for tandem solar cell due to its high band gap. Ultrafast optical techniques on a time scale of femto- and picosecond are used to investigate the carrier dynamics in CH3NH3PbBr3. An ultrafast cooling of hot carriers occurs in sub-picoseconds in CH3NH3PbBr3 by phonon scattering. Two ultrafast relaxation processes are attributed to optical phonon scattering and acoustic phonon scattering. The relaxation processes are evidently slower when CH3NH3PbBr3 is in contact with compact TiO2 (c-TiO2) layer, suggesting better quality CH3NH3PbBr3. when deposited on c-TiO2. The nanosecond decay in CH3NH3PbBr3 film is ascribed to electron-hole recombination. With the presence of c-TiO2 layer, this process is accelerated due to electron transport across the CH3NH3PbBr3/ c-TiO2 interface.

  20. Novel detection methods for radiation-induced electron-hole pairs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Derzon, Mark Steven; Martinez, Marino John

    2010-09-01

    Most common ionizing radiation detectors typically rely on one of two general methods: collection of charge generated by the radiation, or collection of light produced by recombination of excited species. Substantial efforts have been made to improve the performance of materials used in these types of detectors, e.g. to raise the operating temperature, to improve the energy resolution, timing or tracking ability. However, regardless of the material used, all these detectors are limited in performance by statistical variation in the collection efficiency, for charge or photons. We examine three alternative schemes for detecting ionizing radiation that do not rely on traditional direct collection of the carriers or photons produced by the radiation. The first method detects refractive index changes in a resonator structure. The second looks at alternative means to sense the chemical changes caused by radiation on a scintillator-type material. The final method examines the possibilities of sensing the perturbation caused by radiation on the transmission of a RF transmission line structure. Aspects of the feasibility of each approach are examined and recommendations made for further work.

  1. Electron/hole transport-based NEMS gyro and devices using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, Panos [Knoxville, TN

    2009-06-30

    A nanomechanical (NEMS) gyroscope includes an integrated circuit substrate, a pair of spaced apart contact pads disposed on the substrate, and a movable nanoscale element forming at least a portion of a first electrically conductive path electrically coupling the contact pads. The movable element experiences movement comprising rotation, changes in rotation, or oscillation upon the gyroscope experiencing angular velocity or angular acceleration. Movement of the gyro introduces geometrically induced phase changes which results in phase and/or frequency changes in ac current flowing through the movable element. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) can include an integrated circuit substrate having a three axis gyroscope formed on the substrate and a three axis accelerometer, which is preferably formed on the same substrate.

  2. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The 'effective one-band' approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott's atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  3. Two-dimensional coupled electron-hole layers in high magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parlangeli, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    In solids, it is nowadays possible to create structures in which electrons are confined into a two-dimensional (2D) plane. The physics of a 2D electron gas (2DEG) has proved to be very rich, in particular in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The Quantum Hall Effect, i.e. the quantization

  4. Dynamical Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin

    The following sections are included: * Definition of Dynamical Languages * Distinct Excluded Blocks * Definition and Properties * L and L″ in Chomsky Hierarchy * A Natural Equivalence Relation * Symbolic Flows * Symbolic Flows and Dynamical Languages * Subshifts of Finite Type * Sofic Systems * Graphs and Dynamical Languages * Graphs and Shannon-Graphs * Transitive Languages * Topological Entropy

  5. Lightwave-driven quasiparticle collisions on a subcycle timescale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, F; Hohenleutner, M; Schmid, C P; Poellmann, C; Nagler, P; Korn, T; Schüller, C; Sherwin, M S; Huttner, U; Steiner, J T; Koch, S W; Kira, M; Huber, R

    2016-05-12

    Ever since Ernest Rutherford scattered α-particles from gold foils, collision experiments have revealed insights into atoms, nuclei and elementary particles. In solids, many-body correlations lead to characteristic resonances--called quasiparticles--such as excitons, dropletons, polarons and Cooper pairs. The structure and dynamics of quasiparticles are important because they define macroscopic phenomena such as Mott insulating states, spontaneous spin- and charge-order, and high-temperature superconductivity. However, the extremely short lifetimes of these entities make practical implementations of a suitable collider challenging. Here we exploit lightwave-driven charge transport, the foundation of attosecond science, to explore ultrafast quasiparticle collisions directly in the time domain: a femtosecond optical pulse creates excitonic electron-hole pairs in the layered dichalcogenide tungsten diselenide while a strong terahertz field accelerates and collides the electrons with the holes. The underlying dynamics of the wave packets, including collision, pair annihilation, quantum interference and dephasing, are detected as light emission in high-order spectral sidebands of the optical excitation. A full quantum theory explains our observations microscopically. This approach enables collision experiments with various complex quasiparticles and suggests a promising new way of generating sub-femtosecond pulses.

  6. Lightwave-driven quasiparticle collisions on a subcycle timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, F.; Hohenleutner, M.; Schmid, C. P.; Poellmann, C.; Nagler, P.; Korn, T.; Schüller, C.; Sherwin, M. S.; Huttner, U.; Steiner, J. T.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.; Huber, R.

    2016-05-01

    Ever since Ernest Rutherford scattered α-particles from gold foils, collision experiments have revealed insights into atoms, nuclei and elementary particles. In solids, many-body correlations lead to characteristic resonances—called quasiparticles—such as excitons, dropletons, polarons and Cooper pairs. The structure and dynamics of quasiparticles are important because they define macroscopic phenomena such as Mott insulating states, spontaneous spin- and charge-order, and high-temperature superconductivity. However, the extremely short lifetimes of these entities make practical implementations of a suitable collider challenging. Here we exploit lightwave-driven charge transport, the foundation of attosecond science, to explore ultrafast quasiparticle collisions directly in the time domain: a femtosecond optical pulse creates excitonic electron-hole pairs in the layered dichalcogenide tungsten diselenide while a strong terahertz field accelerates and collides the electrons with the holes. The underlying dynamics of the wave packets, including collision, pair annihilation, quantum interference and dephasing, are detected as light emission in high-order spectral sidebands of the optical excitation. A full quantum theory explains our observations microscopically. This approach enables collision experiments with various complex quasiparticles and suggests a promising new way of generating sub-femtosecond pulses.

  7. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  8. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, A. R.; Barlow Myers, C. W.; Bryan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM) in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs) combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics. PMID:27158637

  9. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  10. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  11. Molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Bethke, I.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is a model for the structure and meaning of object based programming systems. In molecular dynamics the memory state of a system is modeled as a fluid consisting of a collection of molecules. Each molecule is a collection of atoms with bindings between them. A computation is model

  12. Dynamic Squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Venema, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines various propositional logics in which the dynamic implication connective (discussed in Groenendijk and Stokhof's (1992) Dynamic Predicate Logic and Kamp's (1981) Discourse Representation Theory) plays the central role. Our approach is modal: the basic idea is to view as a binary

  13. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  14. Persuasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, Gérard; Deffuant, Guillaume; Amblard, Frédéric

    2005-08-01

    We here discuss a model of continuous opinion dynamics in which agents adjust continuous opinions as a result of random binary encounters whenever their difference in opinion is below a given threshold. We concentrate on the version of the model in the presence of few extremists which might drive the dynamics to generalized extremism. A network version of the dynamics is presented here, and its results are compared to those previously obtained for the full-mixing case. The same dynamical regimes are observed, but in rather different parameter regions. We here show that the combination of meso-scale features resulting from the first interaction steps determines the asymptotic state of the dynamics.

  15. Dynamic Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We distinguish static and dynamic optimization of programs: whereas static optimization modifies a program before runtime and is based only on its syntactical structure, dynamic optimization is based on the statistical properties of the input source and examples of program execution. Explanation-based generalization is a commonly used dynamic optimization method, but its effectiveness as a speedup-learning method is limited, in part because it fails to separate the learning process from the program transformation process. This paper describes a dynamic optimization technique called a learn-optimize cycle that first uses a learning element to uncover predictable patterns in the program execution and then uses an optimization algorithm to map these patterns into beneficial transformations. The technique has been used successfully for dynamic optimization of pure Prolog.

  16. Hybrid magnetic – Semiconductor nanocomposites: optical, magnetic and nanosecond dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emam, A.N.; Girgis, E.; Mostafa, A.A. [National Research Center, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Guirguis, O.W. [Biophysics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Mohamed, M.B., E-mail: monabmohamed@gmail.com [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); NanoTech Egypt for Photoelectronics, Dreamland, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    A series of colloidal CdSe quantum dots doped with different concentration of cobalt ions has been prepared via organometallic pyrolysis of a mixture of cadmium stearate and cobalt dithiocarbazate. The conditions required for successful doping depend on the source of cobalt ions and the dopant concentration. The structure and morphology of the prepared nanocrystals have been characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Slight shift in the interplaner space was observed in the XRD pattern of the doped nanocrystals. Formation of separate cobalt nanoclusters has been observed in the TEM images upon increasing the cobalt concentration more than 2% of the original cadmium concentration. This was confirmed by magnetic measurements of the prepared samples. Room-temperature ferromagnetism has been observed, in which the switching field increases as the cobalt ratio increases. Increasing the cobalt ratio more than 5% increases the coercivity due to formation of Co{sup 0} nanoclusters. Moreover, the presence of localized magnetic ions in semiconductor QDs leads to strong exchange interactions between sp band electrons and the magnetic ions d electrons. This would influence the optical properties such as absorption, emission, as well as nanosecond relaxation dynamics. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Hybrid semiconductor-magnetic nanostructure was prepared via chemical method. • Room-temperature ferromagnetism for hybrid CdSe–Co quantum dots has been observed. • Co{sup +2} ions induces slight shift in the interplaner space distance of the doped QDs. • Hybrid CdSe–Co QDs have better quantum yield than pure CdSe QDs. • Hybrid CdSe–Co nanocrystals have faster electron-hole dynamics than pure CdSe QDs.

  17. Immense Magnetic Response of Exciplex Light Emission due to Correlated Spin-Charge Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Sahin-Tiras, Kevser; Harmon, Nicholas J.; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Flatté, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    As carriers slowly move through a disordered energy landscape in organic semiconductors, tiny spatial variations in spin dynamics relieve spin blocking at transport bottlenecks or in the electron-hole recombination process that produces light. Large room-temperature magnetic-field effects (MFEs) ensue in the conductivity and luminescence. Sources of variable spin dynamics generate much larger MFEs if their spatial structure is correlated on the nanoscale with the energetic sites governing conductivity or luminescence such as in coevaporated organic blends within which the electron resides on one molecule and the hole on the other (an exciplex). Here, we show that exciplex recombination in blends exhibiting thermally activated delayed fluorescence produces MFEs in excess of 60% at room temperature. In addition, effects greater than 4000% can be achieved by tuning the device's current-voltage response curve by device conditioning. Both of these immense MFEs are the largest reported values for their device type at room temperature. Our theory traces this MFE and its unusual temperature dependence to changes in spin mixing between triplet exciplexes and light-emitting singlet exciplexes. In contrast, spin mixing of excitons is energetically suppressed, and thus spin mixing produces comparatively weaker MFEs in materials emitting light from excitons by affecting the precursor pairs. Demonstration of immense MFEs in common organic blends provides a flexible and inexpensive pathway towards magnetic functionality and field sensitivity in current organic devices without patterning the constituent materials on the nanoscale. Magnetic fields increase the power efficiency of unconditioned devices by 30% at room temperature, also showing that magnetic fields may increase the efficiency of the thermally activated delayed fluorescence process.

  18. Dynamically coupled plasmon-phonon modes in GaP: An indirect-gap polar semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Kunie; Brixius, Kristina; Höfer, Ulrich; Rustagi, Avinash; Thatcher, Evan M.; Stanton, Christopher J.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2015-11-01

    The ultrafast coupling dynamics of coherent optical phonons and the photoexcited electron-hole plasma in the indirect gap semiconductor GaP are investigated by experiment and theory. For below-gap excitation and probing by 800-nm light, only the bare longitudinal optical (LO) phonons are observed. For above-gap excitation with 400-nm light, the photoexcitation creates a high density, nonequilibrium e -h plasma, which introduces an additional, faster decaying oscillation due to an LO phonon-plasmon coupled (LOPC) mode. The LOPC mode frequency exhibits very similar behavior for both n - and p -doped GaP, downshifting from the LO to the transverse optical (TO) phonon frequency limits with increasing photoexcited carrier density. We assign the LOPC mode to the LO phonons coupled with the photoexcited multicomponent plasma. For the 400-nm excitation, the majority of the photoexcited electrons are scattered from the Γ valley into the satellite X valley, while the light and spin-split holes are scattered into the heavy hole band, within 30 fs. The resulting mixed plasma is strongly damped, leading to the LOPC frequency appearing in the reststrahlen gap. Due to the large effective masses of the X electrons and heavy holes, the coupled mode appears most distinctly at carrier densities ≳5 ×1018cm-3 . We perform theoretical calculations of the nuclear motions and the electronic polarizations following an excitation with an ultrashort optical pulse to obtain the transient reflectivity responses of the coupled modes. We find that, while the longitudinal diffusion of photoexcited carriers is insignificant, the lateral inhomogeneity of the photoexcited carriers due to the laser intensity profile should be taken into account to reproduce the major features of the observed coupled mode dynamics.

  19. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  20. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability.......The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities and innovation management. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance...... and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...

  1. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We propose an alternative paradigm to the conjectured Miransky scaling potentially underlying the physics describing the transition from the conformally broken to the conformally restored phase when tuning certain parameters such as the number of flavors in gauge theories. According to the new...... paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  2. Dynamic Bifurcations

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical Bifurcation Theory is concerned with the phenomena that occur in one parameter families of dynamical systems (usually ordinary differential equations), when the parameter is a slowly varying function of time. During the last decade these phenomena were observed and studied by many mathematicians, both pure and applied, from eastern and western countries, using classical and nonstandard analysis. It is the purpose of this book to give an account of these developments. The first paper, by C. Lobry, is an introduction: the reader will find here an explanation of the problems and some easy examples; this paper also explains the role of each of the other paper within the volume and their relationship to one another. CONTENTS: C. Lobry: Dynamic Bifurcations.- T. Erneux, E.L. Reiss, L.J. Holden, M. Georgiou: Slow Passage through Bifurcation and Limit Points. Asymptotic Theory and Applications.- M. Canalis-Durand: Formal Expansion of van der Pol Equation Canard Solutions are Gevrey.- V. Gautheron, E. Isambe...

  3. Forest dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  4. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  5. Dynamic LIMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díez, F.J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of artificial intelligence is to build decision-support models for systems that evolve over time and include several types of uncertainty. Dynamic limited-memory influence diagrams (DLIMIDs) are a new type of model proposed recently for this kind of problems. DLIMIDs are simila

  6. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    -facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  7. Internetwork dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This review places current research in quiet-Sun chromospheric dynamics in the context of past and future work, concentrating on observational aspects of three-minute oscillations and Ca II K2V grains. The subject is of interest at present because observations and simulations come together to permit

  8. Glassy Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The term glassy dynamics is often used to refer to the extremely slow relaxation observed in several types of many component systems. The time span needed to reach a steady, time independent, state will typically be far beyond experimentally accessible time scales. When melted alloys are cooled d...

  9. Mitotic dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1996-01-01

    A new model for mitotic dynamics of eukaryotic cells is proposed. In the kinetochore mo-tor-midzone motor model two kinds of motors, the kinetochore motors and the midzone motors, play important roles in chromosome movement. Using this model the chromosome congression during prometaphase, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase and the chromatid segregation during anaphase are described in a unified way.

  10. Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Donald T

    1997-01-01

    Graduate-level text for science and technology students provides strong background in the more abstract and intellectually satisfying areas of dynamical theory. Topics include d'Alembert's principle and the idea of virtual work, Hamilton's equations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, canonical transformations, more. Problems and references at chapter ends.

  11. Structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strømmen, Einar N

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces to the theory of structural dynamics, with focus on civil engineering structures that may be described by line-like beam or beam-column type of systems, or by a system of rectangular plates. Throughout this book the mathematical presentation contains a classical analytical description as well as a description in a discrete finite element format, covering the mathematical development from basic assumptions to the final equations ready for practical dynamic response predictions. Solutions are presented in time domain as well as in frequency domain. Structural Dynamics starts off at a basic level and step by step brings the reader up to a level where the necessary safety considerations to wind or horizontal ground motion induced dynamic design problems can be performed. The special theory of the tuned mass damper has been given a comprehensive treatment, as this is a theory not fully covered elsewhere. For the same reason a chapter on the problem of moving loads on beams has been included.

  12. System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  13. Dynamics of charge at water-to-semiconductor interface: Case study of wet [0 0 1] anatase TiO2 nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuping; Balasanthiran, Choumini; Tretiak, Sergei; Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Kilina, Svetlana V.; Kilin, Dmitri S.

    2016-12-01

    The behavior of water molecules on the surfaces of the TiO2 nanowire grown in [0 0 1] direction has been investigated by combining theoretical calculations and experiments. Calculated UV-visible absorption spectra reproduce the main features of the experimental spectra. Computations predict that a photoexcitation followed by a sequence of relaxation events results in photoluminescence across the gap. TiO2 nanowires in vacuum and aqueous environment exhibit different dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers. In water, computed relaxation of electrons (holes) is approximately 2 (4) times faster compared with vacuum environment. Faster relaxation of holes vs. electrons and specific spatial localization of holes result to formation of long lived charge transfer excitation with positive charge at the surface of the nanowire. Comparison of relaxation process in TiO2/water interfaces focusing on different surfaces and nanostructures has potential in identifying structural characteristics of TiO2 materials important for efficient photo-electrochemical water splitting.

  14. Influence of Indium-Percentage Variation on Dynamical Characteristics of InxGa1-xAs/GaAs(001) Quantum Dot Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Borji, Mahdi Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    The influence of indium percentage on dynamical characteristics of InxGa1-xAs/GaAs(001) quantum dot lasers (QDLs) is investigated. Energy levels of self-organized truncated-cone-shape QDs are calculated by means of the eight-band k.p model, and their dependence to indium percentage is surveyed. Then, by presenting a three-level model and numerical solution of the resulting rate equations, laser properties are determined. Our results show that inclusion of more indium gives rise in the reduced energy gap and electron-hole recombination energy. Moreover, lasing process for both Ground State (GS) and Excited States (ES) sound to be sensitive to indium percentage. It is shown that rise of indium percentage at fixed injected current results in the increased ES turn-on delay and GS photon number and 3dB modulation bandwidth, and decreased ES photon number, GS turn on delay, amplitude of relaxation oscillations, output power, and ES 3dB modulation bandwidth; but has no effect on threshold current and laser gain. At ...

  15. Excited state carrier dynamics in CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} semisconductor alloys as studied by ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadd, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    This dissertation discusses studies of the electron-hole pair dynamics of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} semiconductor alloys for the entire compositional range from x = 1 to x = 0 as examined by the ultrafast fluorescence techniques of time correlated single photon counting and fluorescence upconversion. Specifically, samples with x = 1, .75, .5, .25, and 0 were studied each at a spread of wavelengths about its respective emission maximum which varies according to {lambda} = 718nm - 210x nm. The decays of these samples were found to obey a Kohlrausch distribution, exp [(t/{tau}){sup {beta}}], with the exponent 3 in the range .5-.7 for the alloys. These results are in agreement with those expected for localization due to local potential variations resulting from the random distribution of sulfur and selenium atoms on the element VI A sub-lattice. This localization can be understood in terms of Anderson localization of the holes in states whose energy distribution tails into the forbidden energy band-gap. Because these states have energy dependent lifetimes, the carriers can decay via many parallel channels. This distribution of channels is the ultimate source of the Kohlrausch form of the fluorescence decays.

  16. Discrete dynamics versus analytic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2014-01-01

    For discrete classical Molecular dynamics obtained by the “Verlet” algorithm (VA) with the time increment h there exists a shadow Hamiltonian H˜ with energy E˜(h) , for which the discrete particle positions lie on the analytic trajectories for H˜ . Here, we proof that there, independent...

  17. Dynamics of H2 dissociation on the close-packed (111) surface of the noblest metal: H2 + Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijzenbroek, Mark; Helstone, Darcey; Meyer, Jörg; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2016-10-01

    We have performed calculations on the dissociative chemisorption of H2 on un-reconstructed and reconstructed Au(111) with density functional theory, and dynamics calculations on this process on un-reconstructed Au(111). Due to a very late barrier for dissociation, H2 + Au(111) is a candidate H2-metal system for which the dissociative chemisorption could be considerably affected by the energy transfer to electron-hole pairs. Minimum barrier geometries and potential energy surfaces were computed for six density functionals. The functionals tested yield minimum barrier heights in the range of 1.15-1.6 eV, and barriers that are even later than found for the similar H2 + Cu(111) system. The potential energy surfaces have been used in quasi-classical trajectory calculations of the initial (v,J) state resolved reaction probability for several vibrational states v and rotational states J of H2 and D2. Our calculations may serve as predictions for state-resolved associative desorption experiments, from which initial state-resolved dissociative chemisorption probabilities can be extracted by invoking detailed balance. The vibrational efficacy ηv=0→1 reported for D2 dissociating on un-reconstructed Au(111) (about 0.9) is similar to that found in earlier quantum dynamics calculations on H2 + Ag(111), but larger than found for D2 + Cu(111). With the two functionals tested most extensively, the reactivity of H2 and D2 exhibits an almost monotonic increase with increasing rotational quantum number J. Test calculations suggest that, for chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mol), the herringbone reconstruction of Au(111) should be modeled.

  18. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  19. Applied dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schiehlen, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Applied Dynamics is an important branch of engineering mechanics widely applied to mechanical and automotive engineering, aerospace and biomechanics as well as control engineering and mechatronics. The computational methods presented are based on common fundamentals. For this purpose analytical mechanics turns out to be very useful where D’Alembert’s principle in the Lagrangian formulation proves to be most efficient. The method of multibody systems, finite element systems and continuous systems are treated consistently. Thus, students get a much better understanding of dynamical phenomena, and engineers in design and development departments using computer codes may check the results more easily by choosing models of different complexity for vibration and stress analysis.

  20. Exciton dynamics in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litvinenko, K.; Birkedal, Dan; Lyssenko, V. G.

    1999-01-01

    The changes induced in the optical absorption spectrum of a GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum well due to a photoexcited carrier distribution are reexamined. We use a femtosecond pump-probe technique to excite excitons and free electron-hole pairs. We find that for densities up to 10(11) cm(-2...

  1. Dissociative photoionization of molecular hydrogen. A joint experimental and theoretical study of the electron-electron correlations induced by XUV photoionization and nuclear dynamics on IR-laser dressed transition states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2015-01-13

    In this thesis, the dissociative single-ionization of molecular hydrogen is investigated in a kinematically complete experiment by employing extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains and infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Induced by the absorption of a single XUV photon, a pronounced energy-dependent asymmetry of the relative emission direction of the photoelectron and the ion is observed. The asymmetry pattern is explained in terms of an interference of two ionization pathways involving a doubly-excited state. This interpretation is validated by a semi-classical model which only takes the nuclear motion into account. Using this model and the observed asymmetry, it is furthermore possible to disentangle the two dissociation pathways which allows for the determination of the autoionization lifetime of the contributing doubly-excited state as a function of the internuclear distance. Moreover, using a pump-probe experiment the dissociation dynamics of molecular hydrogen is investigated. A time-delay dependent momentum distribution of the fragments is observed. With a combined quantum mechanical and semi-classical approach the mechanism giving rise to the observed time-dependence is identified in terms of an intuitive elevator mechanism.

  2. Tunable Optical Phenomena and Carrier Recombination Dynamics in III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Thota, Venkata Ramana

    Semiconductor nanostructures such as quantum dots, quantum wires and quantum wells have gained significant attention in the scientific community due to their peculiar properties, which arise from the quantum confinement of charge carriers. In such systems, confinement plays key role and governs the emission spectra. With the advancements in growth techniques, which enable the fabrication of these nanostructured devices with great precision down to the atomic scale, it is intriguing to study and observe quantum mechanical effects through light-matter interactions and new physics governed by the confinement, size, shape and alloy composition. The goal is to reduce the size of semiconductor bulk material to few nanometers, which in turn localizes the charge carriers inside these structures such that the spin associated with them is used to carry and process information within ultra-short time scales. The main focus of this dissertation is the optical studies of quantum dot molecule (QDM) systems. A system where the electrons can tunnel between the two dots leading to observable tunneling effects. The emission spectra of such system has been demonstrated to have both intradot transitions (electron-hole pair residing in the same dot) and interdot transitions (electron-hole pair participating in the recombination origin from different dots). In such a system, it is possible to apply electric field such that the wavefunction associated with the charge carriers can be tuned to an extent of delocalizing between the two dots. This forms the first project of this dissertation, which addresses the origin of the fine structure splitting in the exciton-biexciton cascade. Moreover, we also show how this fine structure can be tuned in the quantum dot molecule system with the application of electric field along the growth direction. This is demonstrated through high resolution polarization dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy on a single QDM, which was described in great detail

  3. Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vilasi, Gaetano

    2001-01-01

    This is both a textbook and a monograph. It is partially based on a two-semester course, held by the author for third-year students in physics and mathematics at the University of Salerno, on analytical mechanics, differential geometry, symplectic manifolds and integrable systems. As a textbook, it provides a systematic and self-consistent formulation of Hamiltonian dynamics both in a rigorous coordinate language and in the modern language of differential geometry. It also presents powerful mathematical methods of theoretical physics, especially in gauge theories and general relativity. As a m

  4. Dynamic cholescintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftdahl, D B; Højgaard, L; Winkler, K

    1996-01-01

    was measured by dynamic cholescintigraphy. Twelve healthy subjects and six patients with gallstones were examined twice with CCK-8 infusion cholescintigraphy, 0.3 ng CCK-8 kg per min for 60 min under identical circumstances. Another six healthy subjects randomly received bolus injection (0.04 microgram...... emptying with a mean EF value of 16% (s.d. 9%; range 7%-32%) compared to 49% (s.d. 7%; range 37%-57%) following CCK-8 infusion (p = 0.004). Abdominal discomfort was observed in all subjects after administration of the bolus injection, whereas no complaints were reported during infusion. CONCLUSION: Mean EF...

  5. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  6. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  7. Spin dynamics in GaAs and (110)-GaAs heterostructures; Spindynamik in GaAs und (110)-GaAs-Heterostrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    specially designed (110)-GaAs heterostructure consisting of a 9 nm thick quantum well separated by 3 nm thin AlGaAs barriers from two adjacent 4 nm quantum wells is characterized: The electron spin polarization in the 9 nm drain quantum well is measured in dependence on the energy of the circular optical injection. At the indirect optical injection via the heavy hole resonance of the thin quantum wells an electron spin polarization of 75% in the drain quantum well is reached. By means of the structure the impact of interface roughnesses in the 9 nm quantum well on the carrier dynamics is additionally investigated. The (110)-GaAs heterostructure is used to determine the spin relaxation time in (110)-GaAs quantum wells experimentally over a wide range of densities and temperatures. The special growth direction of the structure provides access to spin relaxation mechanisms that are usually concealed by the dominating Dyakonov-Perel mechanism. The measured elect ron spin relaxation times are interpreted as an exciton marker within the electron-hole plasma and are in good agreement with a simple model based upon the exciton fraction within the electron-hole plasma.

  8. Population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooch, E. G.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases or decreases in the size of populations over space and time are, arguably, the motivation for much of pure and applied ecological research. The fundamental model for the dynamics of any population is straightforward: the net change over time in the abundance of some population is the simple difference between the number of additions (individuals entering the population minus the number of subtractions (individuals leaving the population. Of course, the precise nature of the pattern and process of these additions and subtractions is often complex, and population biology is often replete with fairly dense mathematical representations of both processes. While there is no doubt that analysis of such abstract descriptions of populations has been of considerable value in advancing our, there has often existed a palpable discomfort when the ‘beautiful math’ is faced with the often ‘ugly realities’ of empirical data. In some cases, this attempted merger is abandoned altogether, because of the paucity of ‘good empirical data’ with which the theoretician can modify and evaluate more conceptually–based models. In some cases, the lack of ‘data’ is more accurately represented as a lack of robust estimates of one or more parameters. It is in this arena that methods developed to analyze multiple encounter data from individually marked organisms has seen perhaps the greatest advances. These methods have rapidly evolved to facilitate not only estimation of one or more vital rates, critical to population modeling and analysis, but also to allow for direct estimation of both the dynamics of populations (e.g., Pradel, 1996, and factors influencing those dynamics (e.g., Nichols et al., 2000. The interconnections between the various vital rates, their estimation, and incorporation into models, was the general subject of our plenary presentation by Hal Caswell (Caswell & Fujiwara, 2004. Caswell notes that although interest has traditionally

  9. Superconductor Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gömöry, F

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors used in magnet technology could carry extreme currents because of their ability to keep the magnetic flux motionless. The dynamics of the magnetic flux interaction with superconductors is controlled by this property. The cases of electrical transport in a round wire and the magnetization of wires of various shapes (circular, elliptical, plate) in an external magnetic field are analysed. Resistance to the magnetic field penetration means that the field produced by the superconducting magnet is no longer proportional to the supplied current. It also leads to a dissipation of electromagnetic energy. In conductors with unequal transverse dimensions, such as flat cables, the orientation with respect to the magnetic field plays an essential role. A reduction of magnetization currents can be achieved by splitting the core of a superconducting wire into fine filaments; however, new kinds of electrical currents that couple the filaments consequently appear. Basic formulas allowing qualitative analyses ...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, G. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-01-01

    Research in nonlinear dynamics is rapidly expanding and its range of applications is extending beyond the traditional areas of science where it was first developed. Indeed while linear analysis and modelling, which has been very successful in mathematical physics and engineering, has become a mature science, many elementary phenomena of intrinsic nonlinear nature were recently experimentally detected and investigated, suggesting new theoretical work. Complex systems, as turbulent fluids, were known to be governed by intrinsically nonlinear laws since a long time ago, but received purely phenomenological descriptions. The pioneering works of Boltzmann and Poincare, probably because of their intrinsic difficulty, did not have a revolutionary impact at their time; it is only very recently that their message is reaching a significant number of mathematicians and physicists. Certainly the development of computers and computer graphics played an important role in developing geometric intuition of complex phenomena through simple numerical experiments, while a new mathematical framework to understand them was being developed.

  11. Electronic couplings and on-site energies for hole transfer in DNA: Systematic quantum mechanical/molecular dynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2008-03-01

    The electron hole transfer (HT) properties of DNA are substantially affected by thermal fluctuations of the π stack structure. Depending on the mutual position of neighboring nucleobases, electronic coupling V may change by several orders of magnitude. In the present paper, we report the results of systematic QM/molecular dynamic (MD) calculations of the electronic couplings and on-site energies for the hole transfer. Based on 15ns MD trajectories for several DNA oligomers, we calculate the average coupling squares ⟨V2⟩ and the energies of basepair triplets XG +Y and XA +Y, where X, Y =G, A, T, and C. For each of the 32 systems, 15 000 conformations separated by 1ps are considered. The three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush method is used to derive electronic couplings for HT between neighboring basepairs. The adiabatic energies and dipole moment matrix elements are computed within the INDO/S method. We compare the rms values of V with the couplings estimated for the idealized B-DNA structure and show that in several important cases the couplings calculated for the idealized B-DNA structure are considerably underestimated. The rms values for intrastrand couplings G-G, A-A, G-A, and A-G are found to be similar, ˜0.07eV, while the interstrand couplings are quite different. The energies of hole states G+ and A+ in the stack depend on the nature of the neighboring pairs. The XG +Y are by 0.5eV more stable than XA +Y. The thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure facilitate the HT process from guanine to adenine. The tabulated couplings and on-site energies can be used as reference parameters in theoretical and computational studies of HT processes in DNA.

  12. Electronic couplings and on-site energies for hole transfer in DNA: systematic quantum mechanical/molecular dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2008-03-21

    The electron hole transfer (HT) properties of DNA are substantially affected by thermal fluctuations of the pi stack structure. Depending on the mutual position of neighboring nucleobases, electronic coupling V may change by several orders of magnitude. In the present paper, we report the results of systematic QM/molecular dynamic (MD) calculations of the electronic couplings and on-site energies for the hole transfer. Based on 15 ns MD trajectories for several DNA oligomers, we calculate the average coupling squares V(2) and the energies of basepair triplets XG(+)Y and XA(+)Y, where X, Y=G, A, T, and C. For each of the 32 systems, 15,000 conformations separated by 1 ps are considered. The three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush method is used to derive electronic couplings for HT between neighboring basepairs. The adiabatic energies and dipole moment matrix elements are computed within the INDO/S method. We compare the rms values of V with the couplings estimated for the idealized B-DNA structure and show that in several important cases the couplings calculated for the idealized B-DNA structure are considerably underestimated. The rms values for intrastrand couplings G-G, A-A, G-A, and A-G are found to be similar, approximately 0.07 eV, while the interstrand couplings are quite different. The energies of hole states G(+) and A(+) in the stack depend on the nature of the neighboring pairs. The XG(+)Y are by 0.5 eV more stable than XA(+)Y. The thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure facilitate the HT process from guanine to adenine. The tabulated couplings and on-site energies can be used as reference parameters in theoretical and computational studies of HT processes in DNA.

  13. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    With the development of techniques for high-resolution inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS), electron scattering (EELS) and neutron spin echo spectroscopy, it has become possible, within approximately the last thirty years, to measure the dispersion curves of surface phonons in insulators, semiconductors and metals. In recent years, the advent of new experimental techniques such as 3He spin-echo spectroscopy, scanning inelastic electron tunnel spectroscopy, inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy and inelastic photoemission have extended surface phonon spectroscopy to a variety of systems. These include ultra-thin metal films, adsorbates at surface and elementary processes where surface phonons play an important role. Other important directions have been actively pursued in the past decade: the dynamics of stepped surfaces and clusters grown on metal surfaces, due to their relevance in many dynamical and chemical processes at surfaces, including heterogeneous catalysis; clusters; diffusion etc. The role of surface effects in these processes has been conjectured since the early days of surface dynamics, although only now is the availability of ab initio approaches providing those conjectures with a microscopic basis. Last but not least, the investigation of non-adiabatic effects, originating for instance from the hybridization (avoided crossing) of the surface phonons branches with the quasi 1D electron-hole excitation branch, is also a challenging new direction. Furthermore, other elementary oscillations such as surface plasmons are being actively investigated. The aforementioned experimental breakthroughs have been accompanied by advances in the theoretical study of atom-surface interaction. In particular, in the past decade first principles calculations based on density functional perturbation theory have boosted the theoretical study of the dynamics of low-dimensional systems. Phonon dispersion relations of clean surfaces, the dynamics of adsorbates, and the

  14. k - dependent Jeff=1/2 band splitting and the electron-hole asymmetry in SrIrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijeta; Pulikkotil, J. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Ir ion in Srn+1 IrnO 3 n + 1 series of compounds is octahedrally coordinated. However, unlike Sr2IrO4 (n=1) and Sr3Ir2O7 (n=2) which are insulating due to spin-orbit induced Jeff splitting of the t2g bands, SrIrO3 (n= ∞) is conducting. To explore whether such a splitting is relevant in SrIrO3, and if so to what extent, we investigate the electronic structure of orthorhombic SrIrO3 using density functional theory. Calculations reveal that the crystal field split Ir t2 g bands in SrIrO3 are indeed split into Jeff=3/2 and and Jeff=1/2 states. However, the splitting is found to be strongly k - dependent with its magnitude determined by the Ir - O orbital hybridization. Besides, we find that the spin-orbit induced pseudo-gap, into which the Fermi energy is positioned, is composed of both light electron-like and heavy hole-like bands. These features in the band structure of SrIrO3 suggest that variations in the carrier concentration control the electronic transport properties in SrIrO3, which is consistent with the experiments.

  15. Tuning a Schottky Barrier in a Photoexcited Topological Insulator with Transient Dirac Cone Electron-Hole Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-06

    reserved. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1...thank support from the DOE (DE-FG02-07ER46451). T.D. was funded by LDRD and BES programs at LANL , under the auspices of the DOE for Los Alamos National

  16. First-principles calculation of optical absorption spectra in conjugated polymers: Role of electron-hole interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, Michael; Tiago, M.L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-03-20

    Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that excitonic effects play an important role in the optical properties of conjugated polymers. The optical absorption spectrum of trans-polyacetylene, for example, can be understood as completely dominated by the formation of exciton bound states. We review a recently developed first-principles method for computing the excitonic effects and optical spectrum, with no adjustable parameters. This theory is used to study the absorption spectrum of two conjugated polymers: trans-polyacetylene and poly-phenylene-vinylene(PPV).

  17. Proposed Quenching of Phonon-Induced Processes in Photoexcited Quantum Dots due to Electron-Hole Asymmetries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; Nielsen, Per Kær; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy of a single quantum dot. We also investigate the implications for cavity QED, i.e., a coupled quantum dot-cavity system, and demonstrate that the phonon scattering may be strongly quenched. The quenching is explained by a balancing between the deformation potential...

  18. Subpicosecond electron-hole recombination time and terahertz-bandwidth photoresponse in freestanding GaAs epitaxial mesoscopic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulics, Martin; Zhang, Jie; Serafini, John; Adam, Roman; Grützmacher, Detlev; Sobolewski, Roman

    2012-07-01

    We present the ultrafast (THz-bandwidth) photoresponse from GaAs single-crystal mesoscopic structures, such as freestanding whiskers and platelets fabricated by the top-down technique, transferred onto a substrate of choice, and incorporated into a coplanar strip line. We recorded electrical transients as short as ˜600 fs from an individual whisker photodetector. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of the photoresponse electrical signal showed that, intrinsically, our device was characterized by an ˜150-fs carrier lifetime and an overall 320-fs response. The corresponding 3-dB frequency bandwidth was 1.3 THz—the highest bandwidth ever reported for a GaAs-based photodetector. Simultaneously, as high-quality, epitaxially grown crystals, our GaAs structures exhibited mobility values as high as ˜7300 cm2/V.s, extremely low dark currents, and ˜7% intrinsic detection efficiency, which, together with their experimentally measured photoresponse repetition time of ˜1 ps, makes them uniquely suitable for terahertz-frequency optoelectronic applications, ranging from ultrafast photon detectors and counters to THz-bandwidth optical-to-electrical transducers and photomixers.

  19. Electron/hole and ion transport in La 1- xSr xFeO 3- δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrakeev, M. V.; Bahteeva, J. A.; Mitberg, E. B.; Leonidov, I. A.; Kozhevnikov, V. L.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.

    2003-04-01

    The conductivity of the entire solid solution La 1- xSr xFeO 3- δ, where x=0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9, in the oxygen partial pressure range 10 -19-0.5 atm and temperatures between 750°C and 950°C is reported. The partial contributions from different charge carriers and the energetic parameters governing transport of charged species reveal that the lanthanum-strontium ferrites can be characterized as mixed, ion-electron conductors in the low oxygen pressure/high oxygen deficiency limit. The partial contributions to conductivity from oxygen ions, electrons and holes increase with strontium content and attain maximal values at x=0.5. Further increase in doping results in development of oxygen vacancy ordering phenomena and deterioration of conducting properties.

  20. Photothermal Transformation In Heterogeneous Semiconductors Structures Under Its Pulse Laser Irradiation: Role Of Electron-Hole Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaiev M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available W pracy zaprezentowano wyniki badań konwersji fototermicznej w półprzewodnikowych strukturach ze zmodyfikowanymi własnościami warstwy wierzchniej, pod wpływem impulsów laserowych o długości 10 ns. Obecność takiej zmodyfikowanej warstwy prowadzi do zwiększenia powierzchniowej temperatury w porównaniu do temperatury jednorodnej struktury. W pracy pokazano, że wzrost temperatury może kompensować spadek temperatur' indukowanej przez przepływ związany dyfuzją nośników ładunku.

  1. The Electron-Hole Pair in a Single Quantum Dot and That in a Vertically Coupled Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang; ZHU Wu

    2003-01-01

    The energy spectra of low-lying states of an exciton in a single and a vertically coupled quantum dots arestudied under the influence of a perpendicularly applied magnetic field. Calculations are made by using the method ofnumerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. We also calculated the bindingenergy of the ground and the excited states of an exciton in a single quantum dot and that in a vertically coupledquantum dot as a function of the dot radius for different values of the distance and the magnetic field strength.

  2. Hole Scavenging and Photo-Stimulated Recombination of Electron-Hole Pairs in Aqueous TiO2 Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that 532 nm and 1064 nm laser photoexcitation of trapped electrons generated by 355 nm photolysis of aqueous titania (TiO2) nanoparticles causes rapid photobleaching of their absorbance band in the visible and near IR. This photobleaching occurs within the duration of the laser pulse (3 ns FWHM); it is caused by photoinduced electron detrapping followed by rapid recombination of the resulting free electron and a trapped hole. The quantum yield for the electron photobleaching is ca. 0.28 for 532 nm and ca. 0.024 for 1064 nm photoexcitation. Complete separation of the spectral contributions from trapped electron and hole is demonstrated using glycerol as a selective hole scavenger. When glycerol is added to the solution, some light-absorbing holes are scavenged promptly within the duration of the 355 nm photoexcitation pulse, some are scavenged at a slower rate over the first 200 ns after the 355 nm pulse, and the rest are not scavenged, even at high concentration of the scavenger (> 10 vol %). A re...

  3. Internet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  4. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  5. Void Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Paz, Dante; Lares, Marcelo; Ceccarelli, Laura; Lambas, Diego Garcí A.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are becoming key players in testing the physics of our Universe.Here we concentrate on the abundances and the dynamics of voids as these are among the best candidatesto provide information on cosmological parameters. Cai, Padilla & Li (2014)use the abundance of voids to tell apart Hu & Sawicki f(R) models from General Relativity. An interestingresult is that even though, as expected, voids in the dark matter field are emptier in f(R) gravity due to the fifth force expellingaway from the void centres, this result is reversed when haloes are used to find voids. The abundance of voids in this casebecomes even lower in f(R) compared to GR for large voids. Still, the differences are significant and thisprovides a way to tell apart these models. The velocity field differences between f(R) and GR, on the other hand, arethe same for halo voids and for dark matter voids.Paz et al. (2013), concentrate on the velocity profiles around voids. First they show the necessityof four parameters to describe the density profiles around voids given two distinct voidpopulations, voids-in-voids and voids-in-clouds. This profile is used to predict peculiar velocities around voids,and the combination of the latter with void density profiles allows the construction of modelvoid-galaxy cross-correlation functions with redshift space distortions. When these modelsare tuned to fit the measured correlation functions for voids and galaxies in the SloanDigital Sky Survey, small voids are found to be of the void-in-cloud type, whereas largerones are consistent with being void-in-void. This is a novel result that is obtaineddirectly from redshift space data around voids. These profiles can be used toremove systematics on void-galaxy Alcock-Pacinsky tests coming from redshift-space distortions.

  6. Effect of Internal Electric Fields on Charge Carrier Dynamics in a Ferroelectric Material for Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Madeleine R; Pendlebury, Stephanie R; Hong, Jongin; Dunn, Steve; Durrant, James R

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous polarization is shown to enhance the lifetimes of photogenerated species in BaTiO3 . This is attributed to polarization-induced surface band bending acting as a thermal barrier to electron/hole recombination. The study indicates that the efficiencies of solar cells and solar fuels devices can be enhanced by the use of ferroelectric materials.

  7. Attosecond-recollision-controlled selective fragmentation of polyatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinhua; Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S; Kartashov, Daniil; Xu, Huailiang; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2012-12-14

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wave packets, whose recollision energy in few-cycle ionizing laser pulses strongly depends on the optical waveform. Our work demonstrates an efficient and selective way of predetermining fragmentation and isomerization reactions in polyatomic molecules on subfemtosecond time scales.

  8. Single-cycle Optical Pulses and Isolated Attosecond Pulse Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    picosecond green light from a frequency-doubled hybrid cryogenic Yb:YAG laser system,” 36 UFO /HFSW 2009 (Arcachon, France, Aug. 31-Sept. 4, 2009...High Fields Short Wavelength,” ( UFO VII – HFSW XIII), Arcachon, France, August 31 – September 4, 2009 (invited). 25) Kyung-Han Hong, Juliet Gopinath

  9. Fullerene photoemission time delay explores molecular cavity in attoseconds

    CERN Document Server

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Dixit, Gopal; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy can probe interference oscillations in C60 valence emissions that produce series of minima whose energy separation depends on the molecular size. We show that the quantum phase associated with these minima exhibits rapid variations due to electron correlations, causing rich structures in the photoemission time delay. These findings provide a way to utilize temporal information to access the fullerene cavity size, that is making the time to "see" the space, and can be generalized to photoemissions from clusters and nanostructures.

  10. Attosecond-recollision-controlled selective fragmentation of polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xinhua; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S; Kartashov, Daniil; Xu, Huailiang; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wavepackets, whose recollision energy in few-cycle ionizing laser pulses strongly depends on the optical waveform. Our work demonstrates an efficient and selective way of pre-determining fragmentation and isomerization reactions in polyatomic molecules on sub-femtosecond time-scales.

  11. Modulation of attosecond beating by resonant two-photon transition

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro Jiménez; Martín, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the $\\pi$ jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  12. Dynamical system synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical System Synchronization (DSS) meticulously presents for the first time the theory of dynamical systems synchronization based on the local singularity theory of discontinuous dynamical systems. The book details the sufficient and necessary conditions for dynamical systems synchronizations, through extensive mathematical expression. Techniques for engineering implementation of DSS are clearly presented compared with the existing techniques.  This book also:  Presents novel concepts and methods for dynamical system synchronization Extends beyond the Lyapunov theory for dynamical system synchronization Introduces companion and synchronization of discrete dynamical systems Includes local singularity theory for discontinuous dynamical systems Covers the invariant domains of synchronization Features more than 75 illustrations Dynamical System Synchronization is an ideal book for those interested in better understanding new concepts and methodology for dynamical system synchronization, local singularity...

  13. OTTO MOTOR DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrescu, Florian Ion Tiberiu; Polytechnic University of Bucharest; Petrescu, Relly Victoria Virgil; Polytechnic University of Bucharest

    2016-01-01

    Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. It uses then the Lagrange equation. The dynamic equation of motion of the piston, obtained by integrating the Lagrange equation, takes a new form. It presents a new r...

  14. Fundamentals of structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Roy R

    2006-01-01

    From theory and fundamentals to the latest advances in computational and experimental modal analysis, this is the definitive, updated reference on structural dynamics.This edition updates Professor Craig's classic introduction to structural dynamics, which has been an invaluable resource for practicing engineers and a textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in vibrations and/or structural dynamics. Along with comprehensive coverage of structural dynamics fundamentals, finite-element-based computational methods, and dynamic testing methods, this Second Edition includes new and e

  15. Numerical Computation of Dynamical Schwingerlike Pair Production in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, F.; Blain, P.; Gagnon, D.; Lefebvre, C.; Maclean, S.

    2017-03-01

    The density of electron-hole pairs produced in a graphene sample immersed in a homogeneous time-dependent electric field is evaluated. Because low energy charge carriers in graphene are described by relativistic quantum mechanics, the calculation is performed within the strong field quantum electrodynamics formalism, requiring a solution of the Dirac equation in momentum space. The equation is solved using a split-operator numerical scheme on parallel computers, allowing for the investigation of several field configurations. The strength of the method is illustrated by computing the electron momentum density generated from a realistic laser pulse model. We observe quantum interference patterns reminiscent of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry.

  16. Dynamical systems theory for music dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Boon, J P

    1994-01-01

    Abstract:We show that, when music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, the concepts and tools of dynamical systems theory can be applied to the analysis of {\\it temporal dynamics} in music. (i) Phase space portraits are constructed from the time series wherefrom the dimensionality is evaluated as a measure of the {\\pit global} dynamics of each piece. (ii) Spectral analysis of the time series yields power spectra (\\sim f^{-\

  17. for hybrid dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a unified dynamical systems framework for a general class of systems possessing left-continuous flows; that is, left-continuous dynamical systems. These systems are shown to generalize virtually all existing notions of dynamical systems and include hybrid, impulsive, and switching dynamical systems as special cases. Furthermore, we generalize dissipativity, passivity, and nonexpansivity theory to left-continuous dynamical systems. Specifically, the classical concepts of system storage functions and supply rates are extended to left-continuous dynamical systems providing a generalized hybrid system energy interpretation in terms of stored energy, dissipated energy over the continuous-time dynamics, and dissipated energy over the resetting events. Finally, the generalized dissipativity notions are used to develop general stability criteria for feedback interconnections of left-continuous dynamical systems. These results generalize the positivity and small gain theorems to the case of left-continuous, hybrid, and impulsive dynamical systems.

  18. Microseconds, milliseconds and seconds: deconvoluting the dynamic behaviour of planar perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pockett, Adam; Eperon, Giles; Sakai, Nobuya; Snaith, Henry; Peter, Laurence M.; Cameron, Petra J

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSC) are shown to behave as coupled ionic-electronic conductors with strong evidence that the ionic environment moderates both the rate of electron-hole recombination and the band offsets in planar PSC. Numerous models have been presented to explain the behavior of perovskite solar cells, but to date no single model has emerged that can explain both the frequency and time dependent response of the devices. Here we present a straightforward coupled ionic-electronic mode...

  19. Vibro-impact dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2012-01-01

    Presents a systematic view of vibro-impact dynamics based on the nonlinear dynamics analysis Comprehensive understanding of any vibro-impact system is critically impeded by the lack of analytical tools viable for properly characterizing grazing bifurcation. The authors establish vibro-impact dynamics as a subset of the theory of discontinuous systems, thus enabling all vibro-impact systems to be explored and characterized for applications.  Vibro-impact Dynamics presents an original theoretical way of analyzing the behavior of vibro-impact dynamics that can be extended to discontinuous dynamic

  20. Spectral Features and Charge Dynamics of Lead Halide Perovskites: Origins and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Xing, Guichuan; Lim, Swee Sien; Chong, Wee Kiang; Giovanni, David; Dewi, Herlina Arianita

    2016-02-16

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells are presently the forerunner among the third generation solution-processed photovoltaic technologies. With efficiencies exceeding 20% and low production costs, they are prime candidates for commercialization. Critical insights into their light harvesting, charge transport, and loss mechanisms have been gained through time-resolved optical probes such as femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (fs-TAS), transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Specifically, the discoveries of long balanced electron-hole diffusion lengths and gain properties in halide perovskites underpin their significant roles in uncovering structure-function relations and providing essential feedback for materials development and device optimization. In particular, fs-TAS is becoming increasingly popular in perovskite characterization studies, with commercial one-box pump-probe systems readily available as part of a researcher's toolkit. Although TAS is a powerful probe in the study of charge dynamics and recombination mechanisms, its instrumentation and data interpretation can be daunting even for experienced researchers. This issue is exacerbated by the sensitive nature of halide perovskites where the kinetics are especially susceptible to pump fluence, sample preparation and handling and even degradation effects that could lead to disparate conclusions. Nonetheless, with end-users having a clear understanding of TAS's capabilities, subtleties, and limitations, cutting-edge work with deep insights can still be performed using commercial setups as has been the trend for ubiquitous spectroscopy instruments like absorption, fluorescence, and transient photoluminescence spectrometers. Herein, we will first briefly examine the photophysical processes in lead halide perovskites, highlighting their novel properties. Next, we proceed to give a succinct overview of the fundamentals of pump-probe spectroscopy in relation

  1. Dynamic statistical information theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years we extended Shannon static statistical information theory to dynamic processes and established a Shannon dynamic statistical information theory, whose core is the evolution law of dynamic entropy and dynamic information. We also proposed a corresponding Boltzmman dynamic statistical information theory. Based on the fact that the state variable evolution equation of respective dynamic systems, i.e. Fokker-Planck equation and Liouville diffusion equation can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equation, we derived the nonlinear evolution equations of Shannon dynamic entropy density and dynamic information density and the nonlinear evolution equations of Boltzmann dynamic entropy density and dynamic information density, that describe respectively the evolution law of dynamic entropy and dynamic information. The evolution equations of these two kinds of dynamic entropies and dynamic informations show in unison that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes; and that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. Entropy and information have been combined with the state and its law of motion of the systems. Furthermore we presented the formulas of two kinds of entropy production rates and information dissipation rates, the expressions of two kinds of drift information flows and diffusion information flows. We proved that two kinds of information dissipation rates (or the decrease rates of the total information) were equal to their corresponding entropy production rates (or the increase rates of the total entropy) in the same dynamic system. We obtained the formulas of two kinds of dynamic mutual informations and dynamic channel

  2. Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A searchable database of all Solar Dynamics Observatory data including EUV, magnetograms, visible light and X-ray. SDO: The Solar Dynamics Observatory is the first...

  3. The dynamics of scaffolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geert, P. L. C.; Steenbeek, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we have reinterpreted a relatively standard definition of scaffolding in the context of dynamic systems theory. Our main point is that scaffolding cannot be understood outside the context of a dynamic approach of learning and (formal or informal) teaching. We provide a dynamic system

  4. Dynamics of Carroll particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate particles whose dynamics are invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single, free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (the Carroll particle does not move), we show that non-trivial dynamics exists for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge th

  5. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  6. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  7. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  8. Dynamics at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  9. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  10. Dynamic Boiler Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim

    Traditionally, boilers have been designed mainly focussing on the static operation of the plant. The dynamic capability has been given lower priority and the analysis has typically been limited to assuring that the plant was not over-stressed due to large temperature gradients. New possibilities...... for buying and selling energy has increased the focus on the dynamic operation capability, efciency, emissions etc. For optimizing the design of boilers for dynamic operation a quantication of the dynamic capability is needed. A framework for optimizing design of boilers for dynamic operation has been...... developed. Analyzing boilers for dynamic operation gives rise to a number of opposing aims: shrinking and swelling, steam quality, stress levels, control system/philosophy, pressurization etc. Common for these opposing aims is that an optimum can be found for selected operation conditions. The framework has...

  11. Multiscale Gentlest Ascent Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The gentlest ascent dynamics (E and Zhou in {\\it Nonlinearity} vol 24, p1831, 2011) locally converges to a nearby saddle point with one dimensional unstable manifold. Here we present a multiscale gentlest ascent dynamics for stochastic slow-fast systems in order to compute saddle point associated with the effective dynamics of the slow variable. Such saddle points, as the candidates of transition states, are important in non-equilibrium transitions for the coarse-grained slow variables; they are also helpful to explore free energy surface. We derive the expressions of the gentlest ascent dynamics for the averaged system, and propose the multiscale numerical methods to efficiently solve the multiscale gentlest ascent dynamics for search of saddle point. The examples of stochastic ordinary and partial differential equations are presented to illustrate the performance of this multiscale gentlest ascent dynamics.

  12. Dynamics of Media Attention

    CERN Document Server

    Traag, V A; Hicks, J; van Klinken, G

    2014-01-01

    Studies of human attention dynamics analyses how attention is focused on specific topics, issues or people. In online social media, there are clear signs of exogenous shocks, bursty dynamics, and an exponential or powerlaw lifetime distribution. We here analyse the attention dynamics of traditional media, focussing on co-occurrence of people in newspaper articles. The results are quite different from online social networks and attention. Different regimes seem to be operating at two different time scales. At short time scales we see evidence of bursty dynamics and fast decaying edge lifetimes and attention. This behaviour disappears for longer time scales, and in that regime we find Poissonian dynamics and slower decaying lifetimes. We propose that a cascading Poisson process may take place, with issues arising at a constant rate over a long time scale, and faster dynamics at a shorter time scale.

  13. ON NONDETERMINISTIC DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    R. Bellman left a lot of research problems in his work “Dynamic Programming" (1957). Having received ideas from Bellman, S. Iwamoto has extracted, out of his problems, a problem on nondeterministic dynamic programming (NDP). Instead of stochastic dynamic programming which has been well studied, Iwamoto has opened a gate to NDP. This report presents speci_c optimal solutions for NDPs on continuous state and decision spaces.

  14. Dynamical Constraints on Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonti; Tinney, Chris; Hinse, Tobias C; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical studies of new exoplanet systems are a critical component of the discovery and characterisation process. Such studies can provide firmer constraints on the parameters of the newly discovered planets, and may even reveal that the proposed planets do not stand up to dynamical scrutiny. Here, we demonstrate how dynamical studies can assist the characterisation of such systems through two examples: QS Virginis and HD 73526.

  15. Symplectic algebraic dynamics algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the algebraic dynamics solution of ordinary differential equations andintegration of  ,the symplectic algebraic dynamics algorithm sn is designed,which preserves the local symplectic geometric structure of a Hamiltonian systemand possesses the same precision of the na ve algebraic dynamics algorithm n.Computer experiments for the 4th order algorithms are made for five test modelsand the numerical results are compared with the conventional symplectic geometric algorithm,indicating that sn has higher precision,the algorithm-inducedphase shift of the conventional symplectic geometric algorithm can be reduced,and the dynamical fidelity can be improved by one order of magnitude.

  16. Essential dynamics and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donnell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Essential Dynamics & Relativity provides students with an introduction to the core aspects of dynamics and special relativity. The author reiterates important ideas and terms throughout and covers concepts that are often missing from other textbooks at this level. He also places each topic within the wider constructs of the theory, without jumping from topic to topic to illustrate a point.The first section of the book focuses on dynamics, discussing the basic aspects of single particle motion and analyzing the motion of multi-particle systems. The book also explains the dynamical behavior of b

  17. Dynamical Systems Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gils, S; Hoveijn, I; Takens, F; Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Chaos

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries in dynamical systems, "KAM theory and other perturbation theories", "Infinite dimensional systems", "Time series analysis" and "Numerical continuation and bifurcation analysis" were the main topics of the December 1995 Dynamical Systems Conference held in Groningen in honour of Johann Bernoulli. They now form the core of this work which seeks to present the state of the art in various branches of the theory of dynamical systems. A number of articles have a survey character whereas others deal with recent results in current research. It contains interesting material for all members of the dynamical systems community, ranging from geometric and analytic aspects from a mathematical point of view to applications in various sciences.

  18. Introduction to dynamic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Leon; Rodin, E Y

    1981-01-01

    Introduction to Dynamic Programming provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of dynamic programming. This book considers problems that can be quantitatively formulated and deals with mathematical models of situations or phenomena that exists in the real world.Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the fundamental components of any mathematical optimization model. This text then presents the details of the application of dynamic programming to variational problems. Other chapters consider the application of dynamic programming to inventory theory, Mark

  19. Nonlinear dynamics and complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert; Fu, Xilin

    2014-01-01

    This important collection presents recent advances in nonlinear dynamics including analytical solutions, chaos in Hamiltonian systems, time-delay, uncertainty, and bio-network dynamics. Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity equips readers to appreciate this increasingly main-stream approach to understanding complex phenomena in nonlinear systems as they are examined in a broad array of disciplines. The book facilitates a better understanding of the mechanisms and phenomena in nonlinear dynamics and develops the corresponding mathematical theory to apply nonlinear design to practical engineering.

  20. Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural dynamic testing is performed to verify the survivability of a component or assembly when exposed to vibration stress screening, or a controlled simulation...

  1. Dynamics of machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Dresig, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic loads and disturbing oscillations increase with higher speed of the machines and more lightweight constructions. Industrial safety standards require better oscillation reduction and noise control. The book by Dresig/Holzweissig deals with these topics. It presents the classical areas of modeling, dynamics of rigid bodies, balancing, torsional and bending vibrations, problems of vibration isolation and the dynamic behavior of complex vibrating systems. Typical dynamic effects, i.e., the gyroscopic effect, the damping of oscillations, resonances of k-th order, subharmonic and nonlinear f

  2. Dynamic power flow controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Prasai, Anish

    2017-03-07

    Dynamic power flow controllers are provided. A dynamic power flow controller may comprise a transformer and a power converter. The power converter is subject to low voltage stresses and not floated at line voltage. In addition, the power converter is rated at a fraction of the total power controlled. A dynamic power flow controller controls both the real and the reactive power flow between two AC sources having the same frequency. A dynamic power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between two AC sources.

  3. Partial Dynamical Symmetry and Mixed Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    1996-01-01

    Partial dynamical symmetry describes a situation in which some eigenstates have a symmetry which the quantum Hamiltonian does not share. This property is shown to have a classical analogue in which some tori in phase space are associated with a symmetry which the classical Hamiltonian does not share. A local analysis in the vicinity of these special tori reveals a neighbourhood of phase space foliated by tori. This clarifies the suppression of classical chaos associated with partial dynamical symmetry. The results are used to divide the states of a mixed system into ``chaotic'' and ``regular'' classes.

  4. Dynamic normal forms and dynamic characteristic polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Sankowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    with relative error 2−b in additional O(nlog2nlogb) time. Furthermore, it can be used to dynamically maintain the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a generic matrix. Together with the algorithm, the hardness of the problem is studied. For the symmetric case, we present an Ω(n2) lower bound for rank...

  5. Dynamical Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ciccotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss the Dynamical approach to Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (D-NEMD, which extends stationary NEMD to time-dependent situations, be they responses or relaxations. Based on the original Onsager regression hypothesis, implemented in the nineteen-seventies by Ciccotti, Jacucci and MacDonald, the approach permits one to separate the problem of dynamical evolution from the problem of sampling the initial condition. D-NEMD provides the theoretical framework to compute time-dependent macroscopic dynamical behaviors by averaging on a large sample of non-equilibrium trajectories starting from an ensemble of initial conditions generated from a suitable (equilibrium or non-equilibrium distribution at time zero. We also discuss how to generate a large class of initial distributions. The same approach applies also to the calculation of the rate constants of activated processes. The range of problems treatable by this method is illustrated by discussing applications to a few key hydrodynamic processes (the “classical” flow under shear, the formation of convective cells and the relaxation of an interface between two immiscible liquids.

  6. Visualizing Dynamic Memory Allocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreta, Sergio; Telea, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    We present a visualization tool for dynamic memory allocation information obtained from instrumenting the runtime allocator used by C programs. The goal of the presented visualization techniques is to convey insight in the dynamic behavior of the allocator. The purpose is to help the allocator desig

  7. Probabilistic Dynamic Epistemic Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.P.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I combine the dynamic epistemic logic of Gerbrandy (1999) with the probabilistic logic of Fagin and Halpern (1999). The result is a new probabilistic dynamic epistemic logic, a logic for reasoning about probability, information, and information change that takes higher order informatio

  8. Dynamic public service mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, W.; Staalduinen, M. van

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to dynamic public service mediation. It is based on a conceptual model and the use of search and ranking algorithms. The conceptual model is based on Abstract State Machine theory. Requirements for dynamic service mediation were derived from a real-world case. The con

  9. EU Budgetary Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citi, Manuele

    2013-01-01

    and change in the EU in light of the two models of policy dynamics currently existing in the literature: the incrementalist model and the punctuated equilibrium model. The analysis of long series of original data extracted from the EU budget shows that EU policies do not evolve following an incrementalist...... pattern, but by a punctuated equilibrium dynamic....

  10. Applications of fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, G.R.; Garg, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes flexible and practical approach to learning the basics of fluid dynamics. Each chapter is a self-contained work session and includes a fluid dynamics concept, an explanation of the principles involved, an illustration of their application and references on where more detailed discussions can be found.

  11. Transformations, Dynamics and Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Glazunov, Nikolaj

    2011-01-01

    We review and investigate some new problems and results in the field of dynamical systems generated by iteration of maps, {\\beta}-transformations, partitions, group actions, bundle dynamical systems, Hasse-Kloosterman maps, and some aspects of complexity of the systems.

  12. Team coordination dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  13. Space Manifold dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Gerard; Barrabés Vera, Esther

    2011-01-01

    The term Space Manifold Dynamics (SMD) has been proposed for encompassing the various applications of Dynamical Systems methods to spacecraft mission analysis and design, ranging from the exploitation of libration orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points to the design of optimal station-keeping and eclipse avoidance manoeuvres or the determination of low energy lunar and interplanetary transfers

  14. Dynamic Calorimetry for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A student experiment on dynamic calorimetry is described. Dynamic calorimetry is a powerful technique for calorimetric studies, especially at high temperatures and pressures. A low-power incandescent lamp serves as the sample. The ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with DataStudio software from PASCO Scientific displays the results of the…

  15. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...... in the process as well as modeling dependences between attributes....

  16. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  17. Dynamic defense workshop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  18. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady s

  19. Vehicle Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Rajamani, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system applications covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire-road friction coefficient estimation, rollover prevention, and hybrid electric vehicle. In developing the dynamic model for each application, an effort is made to both keep the model simple enough for control system design but at the same time rich enough to capture the essential features of the dynamics. A special effort has been made to explain the several different tire models commonly used in literature and to interpret them physically. In the second edition of the book, chapters on roll dynamics, rollover prevention and hybrid electric vehicles have been added, and the chapter on electronic stability co...

  20. Financial market dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Fredrick; Johnson, M. D.

    2003-03-01

    A necessary precondition for modeling financial markets is a complete understanding of their statistics, including dynamics. Distributions derived from nonextensive Tsallis statistics are closely connected with dynamics described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation. The combination shows promise in describing stochastic processes with power-law distributions and superdiffusive dynamics. We investigate intra-day price changes in the S& P500 stock index within this framework. We find that the power-law tails of the distributions, and the index's anomalously diffusing dynamics, are very accurately described by this approach. Our results show good agreement between market data and Fokker-Planck dynamics. This approach may be applicable in any anomalously diffusing system in which the correlations in time can be accounted for by an Ito-Langevin process with a simple time-dependent diffusion coefficient.

  1. Dynamic fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic fracture and crack propagation concepts for ductile materials are reviewed. The equations for calculating dynamic stress integrity and the dynamic energy release rate in order to study dynamic crack propagation are provided. The stress intensity factor versus crack velocity relation is investigated. The uses of optical experimental techniques and finite element methods for fracture analyses are described. The fracture criteria for a rapidly propagating crack under mixed mode conditions are discussed; crack extension and fracture criteria under combined tension and shear loading are based on maximum circumferential stress or energy criteria such as strain energy density. The development and use of a Dugdale model and finite element models to represent crack and fracture dynamics are examined.

  2. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic capabilities are widely considered to incorporate those processes that enable organizations to sustain superior performance over time. In this paper, we argue theoretically and demonstrate empirically that these effects are contingent on organizational structure and the competitive...... intensity in the market. Results from partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) analyses indicate that organic organizational structures facilitate the impact of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance. Furthermore, we find that the performance effects of dynamic capabilities...... are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This book lays the foundation of knowledge that will allow a better understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in structural dynamics.   This work is intended for graduate engineering students who want to expand their knowledge on the dynamic behavior of structures, specifically in the nonlinear field, by presenting the basis of dynamic balance in non‐linear behavior structures due to the material and kinematics mechanical effects.   Particularly, this publication shows the solution of the equation of dynamic equilibrium for structure with nonlinear time‐independent materials (plasticity, damage and frequencies evolution), as well as those time dependent non‐linear behavior materials (viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity). The convergence conditions for the non‐linear dynamic structure solution  are studied, and the theoretical concepts and its programming algorithms are presented.  

  4. Probing Transient Electron Dynamics Using Ultrafast X Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Linear x-ray absorption in atoms or molecules creates highly excited multi-electron quantum systems, which relax rapidly by fluorescence or Auger emission. These relaxation rates are usually less than a few femtoseconds in duration, and so they can reveal transient elecronic states in molecules as they undergo photo-induced transformations. I will show recent results from femtosecond x-ray experiments that display this phenomenon. There are efforts underway to push the temporal resolving power of ultrafast x-ray pulses into the attosecond regime, using stronger fields to initiate nonlinear absorption processes such as transient stimulated electronic Raman scattering. I will discuss current progress and future prospects for research in this area. This research is supported through Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Lab by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Science Program.

  5. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  6. From Molecular Dynamics to Brownian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) models are investigated with the aim of developing and analyzing multiscale methods which use MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in the remainder of the domain. The first MD model is formulated in one spatial dimension. It is based on elastic collisions of heavy molecules (e.g. proteins) with light point particles (e.g. water molecules). Two three-dimensional MD models are then investigated. The obtained results are applied to a simplified model of protein binding to receptors on the cellular membrane. It is shown that modern BD simulators of intracellular processes can be used in the bulk and accurately coupled with a (more detailed) MD model of protein binding which is used close to the membrane.

  7. Fundamentals of gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, V

    2014-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition isa comprehensively updated new edition and now includes a chapter on the gas dynamics of steam. It covers the fundamental concepts and governing equations of different flows, and includes end of chapter exercises based on the practical applications. A number of useful tables on the thermodynamic properties of steam are also included.Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition begins with an introduction to compressible and incompressible flows before covering the fundamentals of one dimensional flows and normal shock wav

  8. High enthalpy gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2014-01-01

    This is an introductory level textbook which explains the elements of high temperature and high-speed gas dynamics. written in a clear and easy to follow style, the author covers all the latest developments in the field including basic thermodynamic principles, compressible flow regimes and waves propagation in one volume covers theoretical modeling of High Enthalpy Flows, with particular focus on problems in internal and external gas-dynamic flows, of interest in the fields of rockets propulsion and hypersonic aerodynamics High enthalpy gas dynamics is a compulsory course for aerospace engine

  9. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  10. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  11. Real estate investment dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is motivated by the steadily increasing interest in the dynamic relationship between the macro-economy and the real estate sector. One of the main issues in this respect is to study the investment dynamics. Since the bursting of the U.S. housing bubble in 2006 is identified as the point of origin of the so called subprime crises, which led to the collapse of the U.S. financial system, the dynamics of real estate investments is of particular interest. In the first part of my the...

  12. Thermofield dynamics and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, V P

    2015-01-01

    Thermofield dynamics is presented in terms of a path-integral using coherent states, equivalently, using a coadjoint orbit action. A field theoretic formulation in terms of fields on a manifold ${\\mathcal M} \\times {\\tilde{\\mathcal M}}$ where the two components have opposite orientation is also presented. We propose formulating gravitational dynamics for noncommutative geometry using thermofield dynamics, doubling the Hilbert space modeling the noncommutative space. We consider 2+1 dimensions in some detail and since ${\\mathcal M}$ and ${\\tilde{\\mathcal M}}$ have opposite orientation, the commutative limit leads to the Einstein-Hilbert action as the difference of two Chern-Simons actions.

  13. Elements of analytical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolph; Stark, M

    1976-01-01

    Elements of Analytical Dynamics deals with dynamics, which studies the relationship between motion of material bodies and the forces acting on them. This book is a compilation of lectures given by the author at the Georgia and Institute of Technology and formed a part of a course in Topological Dynamics. The book begins by discussing the notions of space and time and their basic properties. It then discusses the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and Hamilton's principle and first integrals. The text concludes with a discussion on Jacobi's geometric interpretation of conservative systems. This book will

  14. Dynamics of Tectonic Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Pechersky, E; Sadowski, G; Yambartsev, A

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a model that describes a mutual dynamic of tectonic plates. The dynamic is a sort of stick-slip one which is modeled by a Markov random process. The process defines a microlevel of the dynamic. A macrolevel is obtained by a scaling limit which leads to a system of integro-differential equations which determines a kind of mean field systems. Conditions when Gutenberg-Richter empirical law are presented on the mean field level. These conditions are rather universal and do not depend on features of resistant forces.

  15. Dynamics of Tectonic Plates

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a model that describes a mutual dynamic of tectonic plates. The dynamic is a sort of stick-slip one which is modeled by a Markov random process. The process defines a microlevel of the dynamic. A macrolevel is obtained by a scaling limit which leads to a system of integro-differential equations which determines a kind of mean field systems. Conditions when Gutenberg-Richter empirical law are presented on the mean field level. These conditions are rather universal and do not depend ...

  16. Recovery of dynamic interference

    CERN Document Server

    Baghery, Mehrdad; Rost, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    We develop general quantitative criteria for dynamic interference, a manifestation of double-slit interference in time which should be realizable with brilliant state-of-the-art high-frequency laser sources. Our analysis reveals that the observation of dynamic interference hinges upon maximizing the difference between the dynamic polarization of the initial bound and the final continuum state of the electron during the light pulse, while keeping depletion of the initial state small. Confirmed by numerical results, we predict that this is impossible for the hydrogen ground-state but feasible with excited states explicitly exemplified with the hydrogen 2p-state.

  17. Stability of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Xiaoxin; Yu, P 0

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of developing stability theory is to examine dynamic responses of a system to disturbances as the time approaches infinity. It has been and still is the object of intense investigations due to its intrinsic interest and its relevance to all practical systems in engineering, finance, natural science and social science. This monograph provides some state-of-the-art expositions of major advances in fundamental stability theories and methods for dynamic systems of ODE and DDE types and in limit cycle, normal form and Hopf bifurcation control of nonlinear dynamic systems.ʺ Presents

  18. Basic structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James C

    2012-01-01

    A concise introduction to structural dynamics and earthquake engineering Basic Structural Dynamics serves as a fundamental introduction to the topic of structural dynamics. Covering single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems while providing an introduction to earthquake engineering, the book keeps the coverage succinct and on topic at a level that is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students. Through dozens of worked examples based on actual structures, it also introduces readers to MATLAB, a powerful software for solving both simple and complex structural d

  19. Shadowing in dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pilyugin, Sergei Yu

    1999-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of shadowing of approximate trajectories in dynamical systems by exact ones. This is the first book completely devoted to the theory of shadowing. It shows the importance of shadowing theory for both the qualitative theory of dynamical systems and the theory of numerical methods. Shadowing Methods allow us to estimate differences between exact and approximate solutions on infinite time intervals and to understand the influence of error terms. The book is intended for specialists in dynamical systems, for researchers and graduate students in the theory of numerical methods.

  20. The dynamics of leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. A. Vos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of leadership This article reflects on the need for dynamic leadership. An organisation'sfunctionality is dependent on the intellectual, emotional andphysical energy which the people involved in the organisation arewilling to contribute. The process of energy release is determined mainlyby two concepts: vision and mission. A vision is inextricably linked to astrategy. Leadership plays an essential part in the realisation of anorganisation's vision and mission. In this article different leadershipmodels are discussed. Autocratic leadership is critically analysed.Dynamic leadership, which encompasses inspirational and imaginativeleadership is discussed. The community of faith and society both have alife-long need for inspirational leadership.

  1. Fluid dynamics transactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  2. Chiral Gauge Dynamics and Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2009-05-07

    We study the dynamics of a chiral SU(2) gauge theory with a Weyl fermion in the I = 3/2 representation and of its supersymmetric generalization. In the former, we find a new and exotic mechanism of confinement, induced by topological excitations that we refer to as magnetic quintets. The supersymmetric version was examined earlier in the context of dynamical supersymmetry breaking by Intriligator, Seiberg, and Shenker, who showed that if this gauge theory confines at the origin of moduli space, one may break supersymmetry by adding a tree level superpotential. We examine the dynamics by deforming the theory on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}, and show that the infrared behavior of this theory is an interacting CFT at small S{sup 1}. We argue that this continues to hold at large S{sup 1}, and if so, that supersymmetry must remain unbroken. Our methods also provide the microscopic origin of various superpotentials in SQCD on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}--which were previously obtained by using symmetry and holomorphy--and resolve a long standing interpretational puzzle concerning a flux operator discovered by Affleck, Harvey, and Witten. It is generated by a topological excitation, a 'magnetic bion', whose stability is due to fermion pair exchange between its constituents. We also briefly comment on composite monopole operators as leading effects in two dimensional antiferromagnets.

  3. Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) is a dynamic inter-processor communication network that spans heterogeneous processor architectures, unifying components,...

  4. Advances in soil dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Advances in Soil Dynamics, Volume 3, represents the culmination of the work undertaken by the Advances in Soil Dynamics Monograph Committee, PM-45-01, about 15 years ago to summarize important developments in this field over the last 35 years. When this project was initiated, the main goal...... was to abridge major strides made in the general area of soil dynamics during the sixties, seventies, and eighties. However, by about the mid-nineties soil dynamics research in the US and much of the developed world had come to a virtual standstill. Although significant progress was made prior to the mid......-nineties, we still do not have a sound fundamental knowledge of soil-machine and soil-plant interactions. It is the hope of the editors that these three volumes will provide a ready reference for much needed future research in this area....

  5. Discrete dynamical models

    CERN Document Server

    Salinelli, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the analysis of discrete dynamical systems. The content is presented by an unitary approach that blends the perspective of mathematical modeling together with the ones of several discipline as Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Systems Theory and Probability. After a preliminary discussion of several models, the main tools for the study of linear and non-linear scalar dynamical systems are presented, paying particular attention to the stability analysis. Linear difference equations are studied in detail and an elementary introduction of Z and Discrete Fourier Transform is presented. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of bifurcations and chaotic dynamics. One-step vector-valued dynamical systems are the subject of three chapters, where the reader can find the applications to positive systems, Markov chains, networks and search engines. The book is addressed mainly to students in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economic...

  6. Fractional Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Edelman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the results of the preliminary investigation of fractional dynamical systems based on the results of numerical simulations of fractional maps. Fractional maps are equivalent to fractional differential equations describing systems experiencing periodic kicks. Their properties depend on the value of two parameters: the non-linearity parameter, which arises from the corresponding regular dynamical systems; and the memory parameter which is the order of the fractional derivative in the corresponding non-linear fractional differential equations. The examples of the fractional Standard and Logistic maps demonstrate that phase space of non-linear fractional dynamical systems may contain periodic sinks, attracting slow diverging trajectories, attracting accelerator mode trajectories, chaotic attractors, and cascade of bifurcations type trajectories whose properties are different from properties of attractors in regular dynamical systems. The author argues that discovered properties s...

  7. Network-behavior dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, René; Dijkstra, Jan; Steglich, Christian; Van Zalk, Maarten H. W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in disentangling selection and influence processes. This literature review provides context for the special issue on network-behavior dynamics. It brings together important conceptual, methodological, and empirical contributions focusing on longitudina

  8. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  9. Causal graph dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these `causal graph dynamics' is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. Keywords: Dynamical networks, Boolean network...

  10. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  11. Stochastic dynamics and irreversibility

    CERN Document Server

    Tomé, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    This textbook presents an exposition of stochastic dynamics and irreversibility. It comprises the principles of probability theory and the stochastic dynamics in continuous spaces, described by Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, and in discrete spaces, described by Markov chains and master equations. Special concern is given to the study of irreversibility, both in systems that evolve to equilibrium and in nonequilibrium stationary states. Attention is also given to the study of models displaying phase transitions and critical phenomema both in thermodynamic equilibrium and out of equilibrium. These models include the linear Glauber model, the Glauber-Ising model, lattice models with absorbing states such as the contact process and those used in population dynamic and spreading of epidemic, probabilistic cellular automata, reaction-diffusion processes, random sequential adsorption and dynamic percolation. A stochastic approach to chemical reaction is also presented.The textbook is intended for students of ...

  12. ON PERIODIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU WENLIAN; CHEN TIANPING

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigate the existence and the global stability of periodic solution for dynamical systems with periodic interconnections, inputs and self-inhibitions. The model is very general, the conditions are quite weak and the results obtained are universal.

  13. The Dynamics of Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsson, Nils; Rasche, Andreas; Seidl, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests that when the phenomenon of standards and standardization is examined from the perspective of organization studies, three aspects stand out: the standardization of organizations, standardization by organizations and standardization as (a form of) organization. Following...... a comprehensive overview of existing research in these three areas, we argue that the dynamic aspects of standardization are under-represented in the scholarly discourse. Furthermore, we identify the main types of tension associated with standardization and the dynamics they generate in each of those three areas......, and show that, while standards and standardization are typically associated with stability and sameness, they are essentially a dynamic phenomenon. The paper highlights the contributions of this special issue to the topic of standards as a dynamic phenomenon in organization studies and makes suggestions...

  14. Dynamic Boolean Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mathematical environments allow users to reify mathematical concepts through multiple representations, transform mathematical relations and organically explore mathematical properties, investigate integrated mathematics, and develop conceptual understanding. Herein, we integrate Boolean algebra, the functionalities of a dynamic…

  15. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  16. Market Squid Population Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains population dynamics data on paralarvae, juvenile and adult market squid collected off California and the US Pacific Northwest. These data were...

  17. Dynamic Stage Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian von Hofen[GER

    2013-01-01

    Concepts and methods for dynamic stage designs were introduced ranging from different ifelds of TV live shows, exhibitions and theatre performances, and a special emphasis was put on solution to the theatre stage design.

  18. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

    as well as at Aalborg University. The first visible result has been participating supervisors telling us that the course has inspired them to try supervising group dynamics in the future. This paper will explore some aspects of supervising group dynamics as well as, how to develop the Aalborg model...... An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...

  19. Dynamically Generated $\\Xi (1690)$

    CERN Document Server

    Sekihara, Takayasu

    2016-01-01

    We show that the $\\Xi (1690)$ resonance can be dynamically generated in the $s$-wave $\\bar{K} \\Sigma$-$\\bar{K} \\Lambda$-$\\pi \\Xi$-$\\eta \\Xi$ coupled-channels chiral unitary approach. In our model, the $\\Xi (1690)$ resonance appears near the $\\bar{K} \\Sigma$ threshold as a $\\bar{K} \\Sigma$ molecular state and the experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss properties of the dynamically generated $\\Xi (1690)$.

  20. Ocean Dynamics: Vietnam DRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Dynamics: Vietnam DRI Robert Pinkel Marine Physical Laboratory Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla California 92093-0213 Phone: (858) 534...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Vietnam DRI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...cycle.. The Thorpe-scale estimates are local to Site III. South China Sea Process Cruise 2014 Under Vietnam DRI funding, Researcher Drew Lucas

  1. Nonuniversality in level dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kunstman, P; Zakrzewski, J A; Kunstman, Pawe{\\l}; Zyczkowski, Karol \\.; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    1997-01-01

    Statistical properties of parametric motion in ensembles of Hermitian banded random matrices are studied. We analyze the distribution of level velocities and level curvatures as well as their correlation functions in the crossover regime between three universality classes. It is shown that the statistical properties of level dynamics are in general non-universal and strongly depend on the way in which the parametric dynamics is introduced.

  2. Nonuniversality in level dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunstman, P.; Zyczkowski, K.; Zakrzewski, J. [Instytut Fizyki Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    1997-03-01

    Statistical properties of parametric motion in ensembles of Hermitian banded random matrices are studied. We analyze the distribution of level velocities and level curvatures as well as their correlation functions in the crossover regime between three universality classes. It is shown that the statistical properties of level dynamics are in general {ital nonuniversal} and strongly depend on the way in which the parametric dynamics is introduced. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo Robert Pinkel Marine Physical...execution of the Dynamo Leg IV Experiment in December 2011. Our objective was to document the development of the diurnal surface layer and its...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Dynamics of curved fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Pelce, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in the understanding of interface dynamics of various systems: hydrodynamics, crystal growth, chemical reactions, and combustion. Dynamics of Curved Fronts is an important contribution to this field and will be an indispensable reference work for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics, and chemical engineering. The book consist of a 100 page introduction by the editor and 33 seminal articles from various disciplines.

  5. Chaotic dynamics with Maxima

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present an introduction to the study of chaos in discrete and continuous dynamical systems using the CAS Maxima. These notes are intended to cover the standard topics and techniques: discrete and continuous logistic equation to model growth population, staircase plots, bifurcation diagrams and chaos transition, nonlinear continuous dynamics (Lorentz system and Duffing oscillator), Lyapunov exponents, Poincar\\'e sections, fractal dimension and strange attractors. The distinctive feature her...

  6. Dynamics of Soft Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García Sakai, Victoria; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of Soft Matter: Neutron Applications provides an overview of neutron scattering techniques that measure temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously, at the microscopic and/or mesoscopic scale. These techniques offer answers to new questions arising at the interface of physics, chemistry, and biology. Knowledge of the dynamics at these levels is crucial to understanding the soft matter field, which includes colloids, polymers, membranes, biological macromolecules, foams, emulsions towards biological & biomimetic systems, and phenomena involving wetting, friction, adhesion, or micr

  7. Dynamic performance management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An integrated, efficient and effective performance management system, "dynamic performance management system", is presented, which covers the entire performance management process including measures design, analysis, and dynamic update. The analysis of performance measures using causal loop diagrams, qualitative inference and analytic network process is mainly discussed. A real world case study is carried out throughout the paper to explain how the framework works. A software tool for DPMS, Performance Analyzer, is also introduced.

  8. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  9. Dynamical quantum teleportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muschik, Christine [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Spain); Polzik, Eugene [Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Cirac, Ignacio [Max-Planck-Institute (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We introduce two protocols for inducing non-local dynamics between two separate parties. The first scheme allows for the engineering of an interaction between the two remote systems, while the second protocol induces a dynamics in one of the parties, which is controlled by the other one. Both schemes apply to continuous variable systems, run continuously in time and are based on instantaneous feedback.

  10. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  11. Dynamic hardness of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  12. Exciton Dynamics and Many Body Interactions in Layered Semiconducting Materials Revealed with Non-linear Coherent Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prasenjit

    Atomically thin, semiconducting transition metal dichalogenides (TMDs), a special class of layered semiconductors, that can be shaped as a perfect two dimensional material, have garnered a lot of attention owing to their fascinating electronic properties which are achievable at the extreme nanoscale. In contrast to graphene, the most celebrated two-dimensional (2D) material thus far; TMDs exhibit a direct band gap in the monolayer regime. The presence of a non-zero bandgap along with the broken inversion symmetry in the monolayer limit brands semiconducting TMDs as the perfect candidate for future optoelectronic and valleytronics-based device application. These remarkable discoveries demand exploration of different materials that possess similar properties alike TMDs. Recently, III-VI layered semiconducting materials (example: InSe, GaSe etc.) have also emerged as potential materials for optical device based applications as, similar to TMDs, they can be shaped into a perfect two-dimensional form as well as possess a sizable band gap in their nano-regime. The perfect 2D character in layered materials cause enhancement of strong Coulomb interaction. As a result, excitons, a coulomb bound quasiparticle made of electron-hole pair, dominate the optical properties near the bandgap. The basis of development for future optoelectronic-based devices requires accurate characterization of the essential properties of excitons. Two fundamental parameters that characterize the quantum dynamics of excitons are: a) the dephasing rate, gamma, which represents the coherence loss due to the interaction of the excitons with their environment (for example- phonons, impurities, other excitons, etc.) and b) excited state population decay rate arising from radiative and non-radiative relaxation processes. The dephasing rate is representative of the time scale over which excitons can be coherently manipulated, therefore accurately probing the source of exciton decoherence is crucial for

  13. A HYBRID DYNAMIC PROGRAM SLICING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tong; Wu Fangjun

    2005-01-01

    This letter proposes a hybrid method for computing dynamic program slicing. The key element is to construct a Coverage-Testing-based Dynamic Dependence Graph (CTDDG),which makes use of both dynamic and static information to get execution status. The approach overcomes the limitations of previous dynamic slicing methods, which have to redo slicing if slice criterion changes.

  14. Dynamics in Epistasis Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awdeh, Aseel; Phenix, Hilary; Kaern, Mads; Perkins, Theodore

    2017-01-16

    Finding regulatory relationships between genes, including the direction and nature of influence between them, is a fundamental challenge in the field of molecular genetics. One classical approach to this problem is epistasis analysis. Broadly speaking, epistasis analysis infers the regulatory relationships between a pair of genes in a genetic pathway by considering the patterns of change in an observable trait resulting from single and double deletion of genes. While classical epistasis analysis has yielded deep insights on numerous genetic pathways, it is not without limitations. Here, we explore the possibility of dynamic epistasis analysis, in which, in addition to performing genetic perturbations of a pathway, we drive the pathway by a time-varying upstream signal. We explore the theoretical power of dynamical epistasis analysis by conducting an identifiability analysis of Boolean models of genetic pathways, comparing static and dynamic approaches. We find that even relatively simple input dynamics greatly increases the power of epistasis analysis to discriminate alternative network structures. Further, we explore the question of experiment design, and show that a subset of short time-varying signals, which we call dynamic primitives, allow maximum discriminative power with a reduced number of experiments.

  15. Modeling dynamic swarms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the problem of modeling video sequences of dynamic swarms (DSs). We define a DS as a large layout of stochastically repetitive spatial configurations of dynamic objects (swarm elements) whose motions exhibit local spatiotemporal interdependency and stationarity, i.e., the motions are similar in any small spatiotemporal neighborhood. Examples of DS abound in nature, e.g., herds of animals and flocks of birds. To capture the local spatiotemporal properties of the DS, we present a probabilistic model that learns both the spatial layout of swarm elements (based on low-level image segmentation) and their joint dynamics that are modeled as linear transformations. To this end, a spatiotemporal neighborhood is associated with each swarm element, in which local stationarity is enforced both spatially and temporally. We assume that the prior on the swarm dynamics is distributed according to an MRF in both space and time. Embedding this model in a MAP framework, we iterate between learning the spatial layout of the swarm and its dynamics. We learn the swarm transformations using ICM, which iterates between estimating these transformations and updating their distribution in the spatiotemporal neighborhoods. We demonstrate the validity of our method by conducting experiments on real and synthetic video sequences. Real sequences of birds, geese, robot swarms, and pedestrians evaluate the applicability of our model to real world data. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  17. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  18. System dynamics with interaction discontinuity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This book describes system dynamics with discontinuity caused by system interactions and presents the theory of flow singularity and switchability at the boundary in discontinuous dynamical systems. Based on such a theory, the authors address dynamics and motion mechanism of engineering discontinuous systems due to interaction. Stability and bifurcations of fixed points in nonlinear discrete dynamical systems are presented, and mapping dynamics are developed for analytical predictions of periodic motions in engineering discontinuous dynamical systems. Ultimately, the book provides an alternative way to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  19. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten; Andersen, Lars

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear...... of the skirt length, Poisson's ratio and the ratio between soil stiffness and skirt stiffness. Finally the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies is investigated....... viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three...

  20. Microseconds, milliseconds and seconds: deconvoluting the dynamic behaviour of planar perovskite solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Pockett, Adam; Sakai, Nobuya; Snaith, Henry; Peter, Laurence M; Cameron, Petra J

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSC) are shown to behave as coupled ionic-electronic conductors with strong evidence that the ionic environment moderates both the rate of electron-hole recombination and the band offsets in planar PSC. Numerous models have been presented to explain the behavior of perovskite solar cells, but to date no single model has emerged that can explain both the frequency and time dependent response of the devices. Here we present a straightforward coupled ionic-electronic model that can be used to explain the large amplitude transient behavior and the impedance response of PSC.