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Sample records for attenuate insulin action

  1. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guoxun

    2007-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver

  2. Insulin action in the human brain: evidence from neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, S; Heni, M; Fritsche, A; Preissl, H

    2015-06-01

    Thus far, little is known about the action of insulin in the human brain. Nonetheless, recent advances in modern neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG), have made it possible to investigate the action of insulin in the brain in humans, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of brain insulin resistance and obesity. Using MEG, the clinical relevance of the action of insulin in the brain was first identified, linking cerebral insulin resistance with peripheral insulin resistance, genetic predisposition and weight loss success in obese adults. Although MEG is a suitable tool for measuring brain activity mainly in cortical areas, fMRI provides high spatial resolution for cortical as well as subcortical regions. Thus, the action of insulin can be detected within all eating behaviour relevant regions, which include regions deeply located within the brain, such as the hypothalamus, midbrain and brainstem, as well as regions within the striatum. In this review, we outline recent advances in the field of neuroimaging aiming to investigate the action of insulin in the human brain using different routes of insulin administration. fMRI studies have shown a significant insulin-induced attenuation predominantly in the occipital and prefrontal cortical regions and the hypothalamus, successfully localising insulin-sensitive brain regions in healthy, mostly normal-weight individuals. However, further studies are needed to localise brain areas affected by insulin resistance in obese individuals, which is an important prerequisite for selectively targeting brain insulin resistance in obesity. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  3. Histidine augments the suppression of hepatic glucose production by central insulin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Inaba, Yuka; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Asahara, Shun-Ichiro; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Akifumi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Mukai, Chisato; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Ota, Tsuguhito; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    Glucose intolerance in type 2 diabetes is related to enhanced hepatic glucose production (HGP) due to the increased expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. Previously, we revealed that hepatic STAT3 decreases the expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and suppresses HGP. Here, we show that increased plasma histidine results in hepatic STAT3 activation. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histidine-activated hepatic STAT3 reduced G6Pase protein and mRNA levels and augmented HGP suppression by insulin. This suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis by histidine was abolished by hepatic STAT3 deficiency or hepatic Kupffer cell depletion. Inhibition of HGP by histidine was also blocked by ICV administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist. Therefore, histidine activates hepatic STAT3 and suppresses HGP via central histamine action. Hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after histidine ICV administration was attenuated in histamine H1 receptor knockout (Hrh1KO) mice but not in neuron-specific insulin receptor knockout (NIRKO) mice. Conversely, hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after insulin ICV administration was attenuated in NIRKO but not in Hrh1KO mice. These findings suggest that central histidine action is independent of central insulin action, while both have additive effects on HGP suppression. Our results indicate that central histidine/histamine-mediated suppression of HGP is a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  4. Is Insulin Action in the Brain Relevant in Regulating Blood Glucose in Humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Satya; Xiao, Changting; Morgantini, Cecilia; Koulajian, Khajag; Lewis, Gary F

    2015-07-01

    In addition to its direct action on the liver to lower hepatic glucose production, insulin action in the central nervous system (CNS) also lowers hepatic glucose production in rodents after 4 hours. Although CNS insulin action (CNSIA) modulates hepatic glycogen synthesis in dogs, it has no net effect on hepatic glucose output over a 4-hour period. The role of CNSIA in regulating plasma glucose has recently been examined in humans and is the focus of this review. Intransal insulin (INI) administration increases CNS insulin concentration. Hence, INI can address whether CNSIA regulates plasma glucose concentration in humans. We and three other groups have sought to answer this question, with differing conclusions. Here we will review the critical aspects of each study, including its design, which may explain these discordant conclusions. The early glucose-lowering effect of INI is likely due to spillover of insulin into the systemic circulation. In the presence of simultaneous portal and CNS hyperinsulinemia, portal insulin action is dominant. INI administration does lower plasma glucose independent of peripheral insulin concentration (between ∼3 and 6 h after administration), suggesting that CNSIA may play a role in glucose homeostasis in the late postprandial period when its action is likely greatest and portal insulin concentration is at baseline. The potential physiological role and purpose of this pathway are discussed in this review. Because the effects of INI are attenuated in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity, this is unlikely to be of therapeutic utility.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  6. Amino Acids Attenuate Insulin Action on Gluconeogenesis and Promote Fatty Acid Biosynthesis via mTORC1 Signaling Pathway in trout Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Dai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carnivores exhibit poor utilization of dietary carbohydrates and glucose intolerant phenotypes, yet it remains unclear what are the causal factors and underlying mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate excessive amino acids (AAs-induced effects on insulin signaling, fatty acid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism in rainbow trout and determine the potential involvement of mTORC1 and p38 MAPK pathway. Methods: We stimulated trout primary hepatocytes with different AA levels and employed acute administration of rapamycin to inhibit mTORC1 activation. Results: Increased AA levels enhanced the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1, S6, and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1 on Ser302 but suppressed Akt and p38 phosphorylation; up-regulated the expression of genes related to gluconeogenesis and fatty acid biosynthesis. mTORC1 inhibition not only inhibited the phosphorylation of mTORC1 downstream targets, but also blunted IRS-1 Ser302 phosphorylation and restored excessive AAs-suppressed Akt phosphorylation. Rapamycin also inhibited fatty acid biosynthetic and gluconeogenic gene expression. Conclusion: High levels of AAs up-regulate hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression through an mTORC1-dependent manner, while attenuate insulin-mediated repression of gluconeogenesis through elevating IRS-1 Ser302 phosphorylation, which in turn impairs Akt activation and thereby weakening insulin action. We propose that p38 MAPK probably also involves in these AAs-induced metabolic changes.

  7. AMPK and insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is considered "a metabolic master-switch" in skeletal muscle reducing ATP- consuming processes whilst stimulating ATP regeneration. Within recent years, AMPK has also been proposed as a potential target to attenuate insulin resistance, although the exact...... role of AMPK is not well understood. Here we hypothesized that mice lacking a2AMPK activity in muscle would be more susceptible to develop insulin resistance associated with ageing alone or in combination with high fat diet. Young (~4 month) or old (~18 month) wild type and muscle specific a2AMPK...... kinase-dead mice on chow diet as well as old mice on 17 weeks of high fat diet were studied for whole body glucose homeostasis (OGTT, ITT and HOMA-IR), insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle. We demonstrate that high fat diet in old mice results in impaired glucose homeostasis...

  8. Insulin secretion and insulin action in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: which defect is primary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaven, G M

    1984-01-01

    Defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action exist in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The loss of the acute plasma insulin response to intravenous glucose is seen in patients with relatively mild degrees of fasting hyperglycemia, but patients with severe fasting hyperglycemia also demonstrate absolute hypoinsulinemia in response to an oral glucose challenge. In contrast, day-long circulating insulin levels are within normal limits even in severely hyperglycemic patients with NIDDM. The relationship between NIDDM and insulin action in NIDDM is less complex, and is a characteristic feature of the syndrome. This metabolic defect is independent of obesity, and the severity of the resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake increases with magnitude of hyperglycemia. Control of hyperglycemia with exogenous insulin ameliorates the degree of insulin resistance, and reduction of insulin resistance with weight loss in obese patients with NIDDM leads to an enhanced insulin response. Since neither therapeutic intervention is capable of restoring all metabolic abnormalities to normal, these observations do not tell us which of these two defects is primarily responsible for the development of NIDDM. Similarly, the observation that most patients with impaired glucose tolerance are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant does not prove that insulin resistance is the primary defect in NIDDM. In conclusion, reduction in both insulin secretion and action is seen in patients with NIDDM, and the relationship between these two metabolic abnormalities is very complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Role of sialic acid in insulin action and the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salhanick, A.I.; Amatruda, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Adipocytes treated with neuraminidase show markedly reduced responsiveness to insulin without any alteration in insulin binding. In addition, several studies have separately demonstrated both insulin resistance and decreases in membrane sialic acid content and associated biosynthetic enzymes in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the authors investigated the role that sialic acid residues may play in insulin action and in the hepatic insulin resistance associated with nonketotic diabetes. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats treated with neuraminidase demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in insulin-stimulated lipogenesis. At a concentration of neuraminidase that decreases insulin action by 50%, 23% of total cellular sialic acid content was released. Neuraminidase-releasable sialic acid was significantly decreased in hepatocytes from diabetic rats and this was associated with significant insulin resistance. Treatment of hepatocytes from diabetic rats with cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) enhanced insulin responsiveness 39%. The enhanced insulin responsiveness induced by CMP-NANA was blocked by cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) suggesting that the CMP-NANA effect was catalyzed by a cell surface sialyl-transferase. CMP reduced neuraminidase-releasable [ 14 C]sialic acid incorporation into hepatocytes by 43%. The data demonstrate a role for cell surface sialic acid residues in hepatic insulin action and support a role for decreased cell surface sialic acid residues in the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

  10. Insulin detemir attenuates food intake, body weight gain and fat mass gain in diet-induced obese Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J M; Printz, R L; Niswender, K D

    2011-07-04

    Initiation and intensification of insulin therapy commonly causes weight gain, a barrier to therapy. A contrasting body of evidence indicates that insulin functions as an adiposity negative feedback signal and reduces food intake, weight gain and adiposity via action in the central nervous system. Basal insulin analogs, detemir (Det) and glargine (Glar), have been associated with less hypoglycemia compared with neutral protamine hagedorn insulin, and Det with less weight gain, especially in patients with higher body mass index (BMI). We sought to determine whether insulin therapy per se causes body weight and fat mass gain when delivered via a clinically relevant subcutaneous (SC) route in the absence of hypoglycemia and glycosuria in non-diabetic lean and diet-induced obese rats. Rats were exposed to either a low-fat diet (LFD; 13.5% fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% fat), and received Det (0.5 U kg(-1)), Glar (0.2 U kg(-1)) or vehicle (Veh) SC once daily for 4 weeks. These dosages of insulin were equipotent in rats with respect to blood-glucose concentration and did not induce hypoglycemia. As predicted by current models of energy homeostasis, neither insulin Det nor Glar therapy affected food intake and weight gain in LFD rats. Det treatment significantly attenuated food intake, body weight gain and fat mass gain relative to the Glar and Veh in high-fat fed animals, mirroring observations in humans. That neither insulin group gained excess weight, suggests weight gain with SC basal insulin therapy may not be inevitable. Our data further suggest that Det possesses a unique property to attenuate the development of obesity associated with a HFD.

  11. Meju, unsalted soybeans fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergilus oryzae, potentiates insulinotropic actions and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Park, Sunmin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although soybeans have the ability to attenuate insulin resistance, it is insufficient to alleviate type 2 diabetic symptoms and different types of fermented soybeans may have even better anti-diabetic effects. Meju, unsalted fermented soybeans exhibited better insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic actions than unfermented cooked soybeans (CSB). We investigated whether meju fermented in the traditional (TMS) manner for 60 days and meju fermented in the standardized (MMS) ...

  12. [Mechanism of action of insulin sensitizer agents in the treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo García, Carlos G; Vega Arias, Maria de Jesús; Hernández Marín, Imelda; Ayala, Aquiles R

    2007-03-01

    Polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) is the most important endocrine abnormality that affects women in reproductive age. It is characterized by chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenemia probably secondary to insulin resistance. Hence insulin sensitizers agents had been used in PCOD. Metformin is a biguanide used in the treatment of PCOD via decrease of hepatic gluconeogenesis and insulinemia; improvement peripheral glucose utilization, oxidative glucose metabolism, nonoxidative glucose metabolism and intracellular glucose transport. Such effects, when this drug is administered alone during 3 to 6 months, increase sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), reduce free androgens index and hirsutism, decrease insulin resistance, and regulate menses in 60 to 70% of cases. Thiazolidinodiones are drugs that decrease insulin resistance in the liver with hepatic glucose production. Their mechanism of action is through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPAR-gamma), that help to decrease plasmatic concentrations of free fatty acids, pre and postprandial glucose, insulin, triglycerides, increased HDL cholesterol and decreased LDL, menses return to normality, with improvement of ovulation and decreased hirsutism. It seems that by modulation and attenuation of insulin resistance, hypoglucemic agents such as metfomin and thiazolidinodiones can be used effectively to treat anovulation, infertility and hyperandrogenemia.

  13. Fluoxetine increases insulin action in obese type II (non-insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potter van Loon, B. J.; Radder, J. K.; Froelich, M.; Krans, H. Michiel J.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Meinders, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the metabolic defects in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Anorectic agents have been shown to improve insulin action in NIDDM, irrespective of weight reduction. In a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, we examined hepatic and peripheral

  14. Insulin sensitizing and alpha-glucoamylase inhibitory action of sennosides, rheins and rhaponticin in Rhei Rhizoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Bong; Ko, Byoung Seob; Park, Seong Kyu; Jang, Jin Sun; Park, Sunmin

    2006-01-25

    Extracts from Rhei Rhizoma extracts (RR) have been reported to attenuate metabolic disorders such as diabetic nephropathy, hypercholesterolemia and platelet aggregation. With this study we investigated the anti-diabetic action of 70% ethanol RR extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and determined the action mechanism of active compounds of RR in vitro. In the diabetic mice, serum glucose levels at fasting and post-prandial states and glucose area under the curve at modified oral glucose tolerance tests were lowered without altering serum insulin levels, indicating that RR contained potential anti-diabetic agents. The fractions fractionated from RR extracts by XAD-4 column revealed that 60%, 80% and 100% methanol fractions enhanced insulin sensitivity and inhibited alpha-glucoamylase activity. The major compounds of these fractions were sennosides, rhein and rhaponticin. Rhaponticin and rhein enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Rhaponticin increased adipocytes with a differentiating effect similar to pioglitazone, but rhein and sennoside B decreased triglyceride accumulation. Sennoside A and B inhibited alpha-glucoamylase activity as much as acarbose. In conclusion, a crude extract of RR improves glucose intolerance by enhancing insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and decreasing carbohydrate digestion via inhibiting alpha-glucoamylase activity. Rhein and rhaponticin are potential candidates for hypoglycemic agents.

  15. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Jianwei, E-mail: wangjianwei1968@gmail.com [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Gu, Tieguang [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia); Yamahara, Johji [Pharmafood Institute, Kyoto 602-8136 (Japan); Li, Yuhao, E-mail: yuhao@sitcm.edu.au [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  16. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Jianwei; Gu, Tieguang; Yamahara, Johji; Li, Yuhao

    2014-01-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  17. Humanin: a novel central regulator of peripheral insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika H Muzumdar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Decline in insulin action is a metabolic feature of aging and is involved in the development of age-related diseases including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and Alzheimer's disease (AD. A novel mitochondria-associated peptide, Humanin (HN, has a neuroprotective role against AD-related neurotoxicity. Considering the association between insulin resistance and AD, we investigated if HN influences insulin sensitivity.Using state of the art clamp technology, we examined the role of central and peripheral HN on insulin action. Continuous infusion of HN intra-cerebro-ventricularly significantly improved overall insulin sensitivity. The central effects of HN on insulin action were associated with activation of hypothalamic STAT-3 signaling; effects that were negated by co-inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3. Peripheral intravenous infusions of novel and potent HN derivatives reproduced the insulin-sensitizing effects of central HN. Inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3 completely negated the effects of IV HN analog on liver, suggesting that the hepatic actions of HN are centrally mediated. This is consistent with the lack of a direct effect of HN on primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, single treatment with a highly-potent HN analog significantly lowered blood glucose in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Based upon the link of HN with two age-related diseases, we examined if there were age associated changes in HN levels. Indeed, the amount of detectable HN in hypothalamus, skeletal muscle, and cortex was decreased with age in rodents, and circulating levels of HN were decreased with age in humans and mice.We conclude that the decline in HN with age could play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases including AD and T2DM. HN represents a novel link between T2DM and neurodegeneration and along with its analogues offers a potential therapeutic tool to improve insulin action and treat T2DM.

  18. Insulin action in vivo: studies in control and exercise trained rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis is primarily concerned with in vivo insulin action and how this is modified by exercise training. The aims are; to define differential insulin action within the major insulin sensitive tissues; to characterize the relationship between these individual responses and whole body insulin action; and to examine the effect of exercise training on whole body and differential tissue insulin action. A technique, based on the euglycaemic clamp, is described for examining in vivo insulin action on glucose utilization and storage in individual tissues in the conscious, unrestrained rat. Tissue glucose metabolic rate (Rg') was estimated using (/sup 3/H)-2-deoxyglucose and glucose disposal was examined by measuring glycogen content and /sup 14/C-glucose incorporation into tissue glycogen or lipids. Elevating plasma insulin to 150 mU/l resulted in significant increases of glucose utilization in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Oxidative skeletal muscle could account for up to 70% of total glucose disposal whereas adipose tissue and liver could account for less than 3%. The following conclusions have been drawn from these studies. The whole body insulin response curve for glucose utilization closely reflects muscle glucose metabolism; mild elevations in plasma insulin will markedly elevate the glucose utilization rate in oxidative but not glycolytic skeletal muscle fibers; the increased whole body insulin sensitivity which is observed following exercise training is due to increased insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that exercise training will undoubtedly result in improved glucose disposal in the prandial state. This emphasises the potential benefit of exercise in obesity and Type II diabetes.

  19. FLUOXETINE INCREASES INSULIN ACTION IN OBESE NONDIABETIC AND IN OBESE NON-INSULIN-DEPENDENT DIABETIC INDIVIDUALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potter van Loon, B. J.; Radder, J. K.; Froelich, M.; Krans, H. M.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Meinders, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the metabolic defects in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Anorectic agents have been shown to improve insulin action in NIDDM, irrespective of weight reduction. The serotonin-reuptake inhibiting agent fluoxetine has recently been recognized as an

  20. Insulin secretion and action in North Indian women during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, G P; Almgren, P; Thaman, R G; Pal, A; Groop, L; Vaag, A; Prasad, R B; Brøns, C

    2017-10-01

    The relative roles(s) of impaired insulin secretion vs. insulin resistance in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus depend upon multiple risk factors and diagnostic criteria. Here, we explored their relative contribution to gestational diabetes as defined by the WHO 1999 (GDM1999) and adapted WHO 2013 (GDM2013) criteria, excluding the 1-h glucose value, in a high-risk Indian population from Punjab. Insulin secretion (HOMA2-B) and insulin action (HOMA2-IR) were assessed in 4665 Indian women with or without gestational diabetes defined by the GDM1999 or adapted GDM2013 criteria. Gestational diabetes defined using both criteria was associated with decreased insulin secretion compared with pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance. Women with gestational diabetes defined by the adapted GDM2013, but not GDM1999 criteria, were more insulin resistant than pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance, and furthermore displayed lower insulin secretion than GDM1999 women. Urban habitat, illiteracy, high age and low BMI were independently associated with reduced insulin secretion, whereas Sikh religion, increasing age and BMI, as well as a family history of diabetes were independently associated with increased insulin resistance. Gestational diabetes risk factors influence insulin secretion and action in North Indian women in a differential manner. Gestational diabetes classified using the adapted GDM2013 compared with GDM1999 criteria is associated with more severe impairments of insulin secretion and action. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  1. Insulin action in brain regulates systemic metabolism and brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A; Cai, Weikang; Kahn, C Ronald

    2014-07-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Central insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) restores whole-body insulin action in a model of age-related insulin resistance and IGF-1 decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Derek M; Farias Quipildor, Gabriela; Mao, Kai; Zhang, Xueying; Wan, Junxiang; Apontes, Pasha; Cohen, Pinchas; Barzilai, Nir

    2016-02-01

    Low insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is associated with improved longevity, but is paradoxically linked with several age-related diseases in humans. Insulin-like growth factor-1 has proven to be particularly beneficial to the brain, where it confers protection against features of neuronal and cognitive decline. While aging is characterized by central insulin resistance in the face of hyperinsulinemia, the somatotropic axis markedly declines in older humans. Thus, we hypothesized that increasing IGF-1 in the brain may prove to be a novel therapeutic alternative to overcome central insulin resistance and restore whole-body insulin action in aging. Utilizing hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, we show that old insulin-resistant rats with age-related declines in IGF-1 level demonstrate markedly improved whole-body insulin action, when treated with central IGF-1, as compared to central vehicle or insulin (P IGF-1, but not insulin, suppressed hepatic glucose production and increased glucose disposal rates in aging rats (P IGF-1 action in the brain and periphery provides a 'balance' between its beneficial and detrimental actions. Therefore, we propose that strategies aimed at 'tipping the balance' of IGF-1 action centrally are the optimal approach to achieve healthy aging and longevity in humans. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Insulin action in human thighs after one-legged immobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Mizuno, M.

    1989-01-01

    Insulin action was assessed in thighs of five healthy young males who had one knee immobilized for 7 days by a splint. The splint was not worn in bed. Subjects also used crutches to prevent weight bearing of the immobilized leg. Immobilization decreased the activity of citrate synthase and 3-OH......-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase in the vastus lateralis muscle by 9 and 14%, respectively, and thigh volume by 5%. After 7 days of immobilization, a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp procedure combined with arterial and bilateral femoral venous catheterization was performed. Insulin action on glucose uptake and tyrosine release...... of the thighs at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 67 (clamp step I) and 447 microU/ml (clamp step II) was decreased by immobilization, whereas immobilization did not affect insulin action on thigh exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, O2, or potassium. Before and during the clamp step I, lactate release...

  4. Alternative translation initiation of Caveolin-2 desensitizes insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor by PTP1B and causes insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hayeong; Jang, Donghwan; Choi, Moonjeong; Lee, Jaewoong; Jeong, Kyuho; Pak, Yunbae

    2018-06-01

    Insulin resistance, defined as attenuated sensitivity responding to insulin, impairs insulin action. Direct causes and molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance have thus far remained elusive. Here we show that alternative translation initiation (ATI) of Caveolin-2 (Cav-2) regulates insulin sensitivity. Cav-2β isoform yielded by ATI desensitizes insulin receptor (IR) via dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and subsequent endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of IR, causing insulin resistance. Blockage of Cav-2 ATI protects against insulin resistance by preventing Cav-2β-PTP1B-directed IR desensitization, thereby normalizing insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake. Our findings show that Cav-2β is a negative regulator of IR signaling, and identify a mechanism causing insulin resistance through control of insulin sensitivity via Cav-2 ATI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization...... was performed. Increased insulin action on glucose uptake was found in the exercised compared with the rested thigh at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 23, 40, and 410 microU/ml. Furthermore, prior contractions directed glucose uptake toward glycogen synthesis and increased insulin effects on thigh O2...... consumption and at some insulin concentrations on potassium exchange. In contrast, no change in insulin effects on limb exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine or tyrosine were found after exercise. Glycogen concentration in rested vastus lateralis muscle did not increase measurably during the clamp...

  6. An aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes stimulates insulin release and mimics insulin action on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohankumar, Sureshkumar; McFarlane, James R

    2011-03-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has been used widely as a spice, particularly in Asian countries. It is also used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine as an antiinflammatory and antimicrobial agent and for numerous other curative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (AEC) on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis. The extract was prepared by soaking 100 g of ground turmeric in 1 L of water, which was filtered and stored at -20°C prior to use. Pancreas and muscle tissues of adult mice were cultured in DMEM with 5 or 12 mmol/L glucose and varying doses of extract. The AEC stimulated insulin secretion from mouse pancreatic tissues under both basal and hyperglycaemic conditions, although the maximum effect was only 68% of that of tolbutamide. The AEC induced stepwise stimulation of glucose uptake from abdominal muscle tissues in the presence and absence of insulin, and the combination of AEC and insulin significantly potentiated the glucose uptake into abdominal muscle tissue. However, this effect was attenuated by wortmannin, suggesting that AEC possibly acts via the insulin-mediated glucose uptake pathway. In summary, water soluble compounds of turmeric exhibit insulin releasing and mimicking actions within in vitro tissue culture conditions. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Pertussis toxin treatment attenuates some effects of insulin in BC3H-1 murine myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luttrell, L.M.; Hewlett, E.L.; Romero, G.; Rogol, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin (PT) treatment on insulin-stimulated myristoyl-diacylglycerol (DAG) generation, hexose transport, and thymidine incorporation were studied in differentiated BC3H-1 mycocytes. Insulin treatment caused a biphasic increase in myristoyl-DAG production which was abolished in myocytes treated with PT. There was no effect of PT treatment on basal (nonstimulated) myristoyl-DAG production. Insulin-stimulated hydrolysis of a membrane phosphatidylinositol glycan was blocked by PT treatment. ADP-ribosylation of BC3H-1 plasma membranes with [ 32 P]NAD revealed a 40-kDa protein as the major PT substrate in vivo and in vitro. The time course and dose dependence of the effects of PT on diacylglycerol generation correlated with the in vivo ADP-ribosylation of the 40-kDa substrate. Pertussis toxin treatment resulted in a 71% attenuation of insulin-stimulated hexose uptake without effect on either basal or phorbol ester-stimulated uptake. The stimulatory effects of insulin and fetal calf serum on [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent myocytes were attenuated by 61 and 59%, respectively, when PT was added coincidently with the growth factors. Nonstimulated and EGF-stimulated [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation was unaffected by PT treatment. These data suggest that a PT-sensitive G protein is involved in the cellular signaling mechanisms of insulin

  8. Insulin Action in Brain Regulates Systemic Metabolism and Brain Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinridders, Andr?; Ferris, Heather A.; Cai, Weikang; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in t...

  9. Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein Interacts with Thioesterase Superfamily Member 2 to Attenuate Insulin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Baran A.; Tarun, Akansha; D’Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J.; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F.; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D.; Cohen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenc...

  10. Rebelling against the (Insulin Resistance: A Review of the Proposed Insulin-Sensitizing Actions of Soybeans, Chickpeas, and Their Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime L. Clark

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Current methods for management of insulin resistance include pharmacological therapies and lifestyle modifications. Several clinical studies have shown that leguminous plants such as soybeans and pulses (dried beans, dried peas, chickpeas, lentils are able to reduce insulin resistance and related type 2 diabetes parameters. However, to date, no one has summarized the evidence supporting a mechanism of action for soybeans and pulses that explains their ability to lower insulin resistance. While it is commonly assumed that the biological activities of soybeans and pulses are due to their antioxidant activities, these bioactive compounds may operate independent of their antioxidant properties and, thus, their ability to potentially improve insulin sensitivity via alternative mechanisms needs to be acknowledged. Based on published studies using in vivo and in vitro models representing insulin resistant states, the proposed mechanisms of action for insulin-sensitizing actions of soybeans, chickpeas, and their bioactive compounds include increasing glucose transporter-4 levels, inhibiting adipogenesis by down-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, reducing adiposity, positively affecting adipokines, and increasing short-chain fatty acid-producing bacteria in the gut. Therefore, this review will discuss the current evidence surrounding the proposed mechanisms of action for soybeans and certain pulses, and their bioactive compounds, to effectively reduce insulin resistance.

  11. PPARgamma activation attenuates T-lymphocyte-dependent inflammation of adipose tissue and development of insulin resistance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation of adipose tissue (AT has been recently accepted as a first step towards obesity-mediated insulin resistance. We could previously show that mice fed with high fat diet (HFD develop systemic insulin resistance (IR and glucose intolerance (GI associated with CD4-positive T-lymphocyte infiltration into visceral AT. These T-lymphocytes, when enriched in AT, participate in the development of fat tissue inflammation and subsequent recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages. The aim of this work was to elucidate the action of the insulin sensitizing PPARgamma on T-lymphocyte infiltration during development of IR, and comparison of the PPARgamma-mediated anti-inflammatory effects of rosiglitazone and telmisartan in diet-induced obesity model (DIO-model in mice. Methods In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying early development of systemic insulin resistance and glucose intolerance male C57BL/6J mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD for 10-weeks in parallel to the pharmacological intervention with rosiglitazone, telmisartan, or vehicle. Results Both rosiglitazone and telmisartan were able to reduce T-lymphocyte infiltration into AT analyzed by quantitative analysis of the T-cell marker CD3gamma and the chemokine SDF1alpha. Subsequently, both PPARgamma agonists were able to attenuate macrophage infiltration into AT, measured by the reduction of MCP1 and F4/80 expression. In parallel to the reduction of AT-inflammation, ligand-activated PPARgamma improved diet-induced IR and GI. Conclusion Together the present study demonstrates a close connection between PPARgamma-mediated anti-inflammation in AT and systemic improvement of glucose metabolism identifying T-lymphocytes as one cellular mediator of PPARgamma´s action.

  12. Chelation of intracellular calcium blocks insulin action in the adipocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershadsingh, H.A.; Shade, D.L.; Delfert, D.M.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that intracellular Ca 2+ is an essential component of the intracellular mechanism of insulin action in the adipocyte was evaluated. Cells were loaded with the Ca 2+ chelator quin-2, by preincubating them with quin-2 AM, the tetrakis(acetoxymethyl) ester of quin-2. Quin-2 loading inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport without affecting basal activity. The ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake in quin-2-loaded cells could be partially restored by preincubating cells with buffer supplemented with 1.2 mM CaCl 2 and the Ca 2+ ionophore A23187. These conditions had no effect on basal activity and omission of CaCl 2 from the buffer prevented the restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by A23187. Quin-2 loading also inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and the ability of insulin to inhibit cAMP-stimulated lipolysis without affecting their basal activities. Incubation of cells with 100 μM quin-2 or quin-2 AM had no effect on intracellular ATP concentration or the specific binding of 125 I=labeled insulin to adipocytes. These findings suggest that intracellular Ca 2+ is an essential component in the coupling of the insulin-activated receptor complex to cellular physiological/metabolic machinery. Furthermore, differing quin-2 AM dose-response profiles suggest the presence of dual Ca 2+ -dependent pathways in the adipocyte. One involves insulin stimulation of glucose transport and oxidation, whereas the other involves the antilipolytic action of insulin

  13. Glucoregulation after canine islet transplantation : Contribution of insulin secretory capacity, insulin action, and the entero-insular axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderBurg, MPM; van Suylichem, PTR; Guicherit, OR; Frolich, M; Lemkes, HHPJ; Gooszen, HG

    1997-01-01

    The physiological glucoregulatory mechanisms after islet transplantation have been incompletely investigated, We studied the insulin secretory capacity (ISC) by intravenous arginine stimulation during 35-mM glucose clamps, insulin action during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, and mixed-meal

  14. Meju, unsalted soybeans fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergilus oryzae, potentiates insulinotropic actions and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hye

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although soybeans have the ability to attenuate insulin resistance, it is insufficient to alleviate type 2 diabetic symptoms and different types of fermented soybeans may have even better anti-diabetic effects. Meju, unsalted fermented soybeans exhibited better insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic actions than unfermented cooked soybeans (CSB. We investigated whether meju fermented in the traditional (TMS manner for 60 days and meju fermented in the standardized (MMS method inoculating Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae for 6 days modulated insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and pancreatic β-cell growth and survival in 90% pancreatectomized (Px diabetic rats, a moderate and non-obese type 2 diabetic animal model. Methods Diabetic rats were divided into 3 groups: 1 TMS (n = 20, 2 MMS (n = 20 or 3 casein (control; n = 20. Rats were provided with a high fat diet (40 energy % fat containing assigned 10% meju for 8 weeks. At the end of experiment insulin resistance and insulin secretion capacity were measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp and by hyperglycemic clamp, respectively. Additionally, β-cell mass and islet morphohometry were determined by immunohistochemistry and insulin signaling in the liver was measured by western blot. Results TMS and MMS increased isoflavonoid aglycones much more than CSB. CSB and TMS/MMS improved glucose tolerance in diabetic rats but the mechanism was different between treatments (P Conclusions The anti-diabetic action of MMS, especially when fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae, was superior to CSB by increasing isoflavonoid aglycones and small peptides with regard to type 2 diabetic rats.

  15. Meju, unsalted soybeans fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergilus oryzae, potentiates insulinotropic actions and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Park, Sunmin

    2012-05-02

    Although soybeans have the ability to attenuate insulin resistance, it is insufficient to alleviate type 2 diabetic symptoms and different types of fermented soybeans may have even better anti-diabetic effects. Meju, unsalted fermented soybeans exhibited better insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic actions than unfermented cooked soybeans (CSB). We investigated whether meju fermented in the traditional (TMS) manner for 60 days and meju fermented in the standardized (MMS) method inoculating Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae for 6 days modulated insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and pancreatic β-cell growth and survival in 90% pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, a moderate and non-obese type 2 diabetic animal model. Diabetic rats were divided into 3 groups: 1) TMS (n = 20), 2) MMS (n = 20) or 3) casein (control; n = 20). Rats were provided with a high fat diet (40 energy % fat) containing assigned 10% meju for 8 weeks. At the end of experiment insulin resistance and insulin secretion capacity were measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp and by hyperglycemic clamp, respectively. Additionally, β-cell mass and islet morphohometry were determined by immunohistochemistry and insulin signaling in the liver was measured by western blot. TMS and MMS increased isoflavonoid aglycones much more than CSB. CSB and TMS/MMS improved glucose tolerance in diabetic rats but the mechanism was different between treatments (P MMS enhanced only hepatic insulin sensitivity through activating insulin signaling in diabetic rats (P MMS, but not CSB, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and β-cell mass (P MMS had better insulinotropic actions than the control (P MMS, especially when fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae, was superior to CSB by increasing isoflavonoid aglycones and small peptides with regard to type 2 diabetic rats.

  16. Effects of acute and chronic attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia on postglucose-load endothelial function in insulin resistant individuals: is stimulation of first phase insulin secretion beneficial for the endothelial function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Major-Pedersen, A; Ihlemann, N; Hermann, T S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine if attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia, by acutely and chronically enhancing postprandial insulin secretion in insulin-resistant individuals, improves the endothelial dysfunction. We assessed postoral glucose-load endothelial function in 56 insulin....... We found no relationship between postprandial hyperglycemia and post-OGL FMD....

  17. Mechanisms of action of brain insulin against neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Insulin, a pancreatic hormone, is best known for its peripheral effects on the metabolism of glucose, fats and proteins. There is a growing body of evidence linking insulin action in the brain to neurodegenerative diseases. Insulin present in central nervous system is a regulator of central glucose metabolism nevertheless this glucoregulation is not the main function of insulin in the brain. Brain is known to be specifically vulnerable to oxidative products relative to other organs and altered brain insulin signaling may cause or promote neurodegenerative diseases which invalidates and reduces the quality of life. Insulin located within the brain is mostly of pancreatic origin or is produced in the brain itself crosses the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain via a receptor-mediated active transport system. Brain Insulin, insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the regulation of peripheral metabolism, feeding behavior, memory and maintenance of neural functions such as neuronal growth and differentiation, neuromodulation and neuroprotection. In the present review, we would like to summarize the novel biological and pathophysiological roles of neuronal insulin in neurodegenerative diseases and describe the main signaling pathways in use for therapeutic strategies in the use of insulin to the cerebral tissues and their biological applications to neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Therapeutic actions of an insulin receptor activator and a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist in the spontaneously hypertensive obese rat model of metabolic syndrome X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliquette, Rodney A; Friedman, Jacob E; Shao, J; Zhang, Bei B; Ernsberger, Paul

    2005-07-01

    Insulin resistance clusters with hyperlipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypertension as metabolic syndrome X. We tested a low molecular weight insulin receptor activator, demethylasterriquinone B-1 (DMAQ-B1), and a novel indole peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, 2-(2-(4-phenoxy-2-propylphenoxy)ethyl)indole-5-acetic acid (PPEIA), in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB), a genetic model of syndrome X. Agents were given orally for 19 days. SHROB showed fasting normoglycemia but impaired glucose tolerance after an oral load, as shown by increased glucose area under the curve (AUC) [20,700 mg x min/ml versus 8100 in lean spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)]. Insulin resistance was indicated by 20-fold excess fasting insulin and increased insulin AUC (6300 ng x min/ml versus 990 in SHR). DMAQ-B1 did not affect glucose tolerance (glucose AUC = 21,300) but reduced fasting insulin 2-fold and insulin AUC (insulin AUC = 4300). PPEIA normalized glucose tolerance (glucose AUC = 9100) and reduced insulin AUC (to 3180) without affecting fasting insulin. PPEIA also increased food intake, fat mass, and body weight gain (81 +/- 12 versus 45 +/- 8 g in untreated controls), whereas DMAQ-B1 had no effect on body weight but reduced subscapular fat mass. PPEIA but not DMAQ-B1 reduced blood pressure. In skeletal muscle, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate protein 1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity were decreased by 40 to 55% in SHROB relative to lean SHR. PPEIA, but not DMAQ-B1, enhanced both insulin actions. SHROB also showed severe hypertriglyceridemia (355 +/- 42 mg/dl versus 65 +/- 3 in SHR) attenuated by both agents (DMAQ-B1, 228 +/- 18; PPEIA, 79 +/- 3). Both these novel antidiabetic agents attenuate insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia associated with metabolic syndrome but via distinct mechanisms.

  19. Insulin secretion and action in North Indian women during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arora, G P; Almgren, P; Thaman, R G

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: Gestational diabetes defined using both criteria was associated with decreased insulin secretion compared with pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance. Women with gestational diabetes defined by the adapted GDM2013, but not GDM1999 criteria, were more insulin resistant than pregnant women......AIM: The relative roles(s) of impaired insulin secretion vs. insulin resistance in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus depend upon multiple risk factors and diagnostic criteria. Here, we explored their relative contribution to gestational diabetes as defined by the WHO 1999 (GDM1999...... independently associated with increased insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS: Gestational diabetes risk factors influence insulin secretion and action in North Indian women in a differential manner. Gestational diabetes classified using the adapted GDM2013 compared with GDM1999 criteria is associated with more...

  20. FNDC5 attenuates adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated macrophage polarization in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Geng, Zhi; Zhou, Bing; Zhang, Feng; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2018-06-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, and the recruitment and proinflammatory activation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) is important for the development of this process. Here, we examined the effects of fibronectin type III domain-containing 5 (FNDC5) on inflammation and insulin resistance in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Male wild-type (WT) and FNDC5 -/- mice were fed with standard chow (Ctrl) or high fat diet (HFD) for 20 weeks to induce obesity and insulin resistance. Firstly, effects of FNDC5 gene deletion on obesity, insulin resistance, macrophage accumulation and polarization and adipose tissue inflammation were determined in mice. Secondly, the macrophage polarity shift was further examined with flow cytometry in isolated stromal vascular fraction (SVF). Thirdly, the effects of exogenous FNDC5 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage polarization, inflammation and the underlying signaling mechanism were investigated in RAW264.7 macrophages and primary mouse peritoneal cavity macrophages (PMs). Finally, the therapeutic effects of FNDC5 overexpression were examined in HFD-induced obese WT and FNDC5 -/- mice. FNDC5 gene deletion aggravated obesity, insulin resistance, fat accumulation and inflammation accompanied with enhanced AMPK inhibition, macrophages recruitment and M1 polarization in mice fed with HFD. Exogenous FNDC5 inhibited LPS-induced M1 macrophage polarization and inflammatory cytokine production via AMPK phosphorylation in both RAW264.7 macrophages and PMs. FNDC5 overexpression attenuated insulin resistance, AMPK inhibition, M1 macrophage polarization and inflammatory cytokine production in adipose tissue of obese WT and FNDC5 -/- mice. FNDC5 attenuates adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated macrophage polarization in HFD-induced obesity. FNDC5 plays several beneficial roles in obesity and may be used as a therapeutic regimen for preventing

  1. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  2. Insulin action in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and its relation to gestational diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wilde, Marlieke A.; Goverde, Angelique J.; Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M.; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Franx, Arie; Fauser, Bart C J M; Koster, Maria P H

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: How does insulin action change during pregnancy in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) who develop gestational diabetes (GDM) compared with women with PCOS who do not? SUMMARY ANSWER: Women with PCOS who develop GDM already show disturbed insulin action early in pregnancy.

  3. Insulin action in adipose tissue and muscle in hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, George; Mitrou, Panayota; Lambadiari, Vaia; Boutati, Eleni; Maratou, Eirini; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Koukkou, Efi; Tzanela, Marinela; Thalassinos, Nikos; Raptis, Sotirios A

    2006-12-01

    Although insulin resistance in thyroid hormone excess is well documented, information on insulin action in hypothyroidism is limited. To investigate this, a meal was given to 11 hypothyroid (HO; aged 45 +/- 3 yr) and 10 euthyroid subjects (EU; aged 42 +/- 4 yr). Blood was withdrawn for 360 min from veins (V) draining the anterior abdominal sc adipose tissue and the forearm and from the radial artery (A). Blood flow (BF) in adipose tissue was measured with 133Xe and in forearm with strain-gauge plethysmography. Tissue glucose uptake was calculated as (A-V)glucose(BF), lipoprotein lipase as (A-V)Triglycerides(BF), and lipolysis as [(V-A)glycerol(BF)]-lipoprotein lipase. The HO group had higher glucose and insulin levels than the EU group (P hypothyroidism: 1) glucose uptake in muscle and adipose tissue is resistant to insulin; 2) suppression of lipolysis by insulin is not impaired; and 3) hypertriglyceridemia is due to decreased clearance by the adipose tissue.

  4. Evaluation of fasting plasma insulin concentration as an estimate of insulin action in nondiabetic individuals: comparison with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Fahim; Okeke, QueenDenise; Reaven, Gerald M

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-mediated glucose disposal varies severalfold in apparently healthy individuals, and approximately one-third of the most insulin resistant of these individuals is at increased risk to develop various adverse clinical syndromes. Since direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are not practical in a clinical setting, several surrogate estimates of insulin action have been proposed, including fasting plasma insulin (FPI) concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) calculated by a formula employing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and FPI concentrations. The objective of this study was to compare FPI as an estimate of insulin-mediated glucose disposal with values generated by HOMA-IR in 758 apparently healthy nondiabetic individuals. Measurements were made of FPG, FPI, triglyceride (TG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations, and insulin-mediated glucose uptake was quantified by determining steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentration during the insulin suppression test. FPI and HOMA-IR were highly correlated (r = 0.98, P HOMA-IR (r = 0.64). Furthermore, the relationship between FPI and TG (r = 0.35) and HDL-C (r = -0.40) was comparable to that between HOMA-IR and TG (r = 0.39) and HDL-C (r = -0.41). In conclusion, FPI and HOMA-IR are highly correlated in nondiabetic individuals, with each estimate accounting for ~40% of the variability (variance) in a direct measure of insulin-mediated glucose disposal. Calculation of HOMA-IR does not provide a better surrogate estimate of insulin action, or of its associated dyslipidemia, than measurement of FPI.

  5. Attenuation of insulin-evoked responses in brain networks controlling appetite and reward in insulin resistance: the cerebral basis for impaired control of food intake in metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Karen; Reed, Laurence J; Dunn, Joel T; Bingham, Emma; Hopkins, David; Marsden, Paul K; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2006-11-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes is a global challenge. A possible mechanism linking insulin resistance and weight gain would be attenuation of insulin-evoked responses in brain areas relevant to eating in systemic insulin resistance. We measured brain glucose metabolism, using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, in seven insulin-sensitive (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR] = 1.3) and seven insulin-resistant (HOMA-IR = 6.3) men, during suppression of endogenous insulin by somatostatin, with and without an insulin infusion that elevated insulin to 24.6 +/- 5.2 and 23.2 +/- 5.8 mU/l (P = 0.76), concentrations similar to fasting levels of the resistant subjects and approximately threefold above those of the insulin-sensitive subjects. Insulin-evoked change in global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was reduced in insulin resistance (+7 vs. +17.4%, P = 0.033). Insulin was associated with increased metabolism in ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex and with decreased metabolism in right amygdala/hippocampus and cerebellar vermis (P reward. Diminishing the link be-tween control of food intake and energy balance may contribute to development of obesity in insulin resistance.

  6. Distinct signalling properties of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 in mediating insulin/IGF-1 action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Krüger, Marcus; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    Insulin/IGF-1 action is driven by a complex and highly integrated signalling network. Loss-of-function studies indicate that the major insulin/IGF-1 receptor substrate (IRS) proteins, IRS-1 and IRS-2, mediate different biological functions in vitro and in vivo, suggesting specific signalling...... properties despite their high degree of homology. To identify mechanisms contributing to the differential signalling properties of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in the mediation of insulin/IGF-1 action, we performed comprehensive mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomic profiling of brown preadipocytes from wild type......, IRS-1-/-and IRS-2-/-mice in the basal and IGF-1-stimulated states. We applied stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for the accurate quantitation of changes in protein phosphorylation. We found ~10% of the 6262 unique phosphorylation sites detected to be regulated by IGF-1...

  7. Interplay between FGF21 and insulin action in the liver regulates metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Vienberg, Sara G; Smyth, Graham

    2014-01-01

    gluconeogenesis in these animals. Improvements in blood sugar were due in part to increased glucose uptake in brown fat, browning of white fat, and overall increased energy expenditure. These effects were preserved even after removal of the main interscapular brown fat pad. In contrast to its retained effects...... of insulin action in the liver by increasing energy metabolism via activation of brown fat and browning of white fat, but intact liver insulin action is required for FGF21 to control hepatic lipid metabolism....

  8. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on inflammation and insulin action in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hanyu; Hussey, Sophie E; Sanchez-Avila, Alicia; Tantiwong, Puntip; Musi, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from animal studies suggest that chronic elevation of circulating intestinal-generated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (i.e., metabolic endotoxemia) could play a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, the effect of LPS in human muscle is unclear. Moreover, it is unknown whether blockade/down regulation of toll-like receptor (TLR)4 can prevent the effect of LPS on insulin action and glucose metabolism in human muscle cells. In the present study we compared plasma LPS concentration in insulin resistant [obese non-diabetic and obese type 2 diabetic (T2DM)] subjects versus lean individuals. In addition, we employed a primary human skeletal muscle cell culture system to investigate the effect of LPS on glucose metabolism and whether these effects are mediated via TLR4. Obese non-diabetic and T2DM subjects had significantly elevated plasma LPS and LPS binding protein (LBP) concentrations. Plasma LPS (r = -0.46, P = 0.005) and LBP (r = -0.49, P = 0.005) concentrations negatively correlated with muscle insulin sensitivity (M). In human myotubes, LPS increased JNK phosphorylation and MCP-1 and IL-6 gene expression. This inflammatory response led to reduced insulin-stimulated IRS-1, Akt and AS160 phosphorylation and impaired glucose transport. Both pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 with TAK-242, and TLR4 gene silencing, suppressed the inflammatory response and insulin resistance caused by LPS in human muscle cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that elevations in plasma LPS concentration found in obese and T2DM subjects could play a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and that antagonists of TLR4 may improve insulin action in these individuals.

  9. Antidiabetic activity of Kalanchoe pinnata in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by glucose independent insulin secretagogue action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Swapnil B; Dongare, Vandana R; Kulkarni, Chaitanya R; Joglekar, Madhav M; Arvindekar, Akalpita U

    2013-11-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata Lam. (Crassulaceae) is used as a traditional medicine worldwide to treat several ailments, including diabetes. However, the mechanism for the antihyperglycemic action is unknown. The present study evaluates the antihyperglycemic and insulin secretagogue potential of Kalanchoe pinnata and assessment of the probable mechanism of action. Steam distillate of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves was subjected to solvent fractionation and antidiabetic activity was detected in dichloromethane (DCM) fraction. In the in vivo studies, rats were treated with 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight of DCM fraction for 45 days orally. Lipid profile and other biochemical parameters were estimated. The probable mechanism for insulin secretagogue action was evaluated through studies using diazoxide and nifedipine. The bioactive component from DCM fraction was studied using HPTLC, GCMS and IR. Fasting blood glucose values were reduced to 116 mg/dl from 228 mg/dl on treatment with 10 mg/kg body weight of DCM fraction, while glycated hemoglobin improved to 8.4% compared with 12.9% in diabetic controls. The insulin level and lipid profile values were close to normal values. In vitro studies demonstrated a dose-dependent insulin secretagogue action. Insulin secretion was 3.29-fold higher at 10 µg/ml as compared to the positive control. The insulin secretagogue activity was glucose independent and K(+)-ATP channel dependent. The bioactive component of the DCM fraction was identified to be a phenyl alkyl ether derivative. The DCM fraction of Kalanchoe pinnata demonstrates excellent insulin secretagogue action and can be useful in treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  10. Sex and muscle structural lipids in obese subjects - an impact on insulin action?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, SB; Vaag, A.; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) especially the n-3-FA of skeletal muscle phospholipids may facilitate insulin action, whereas saturated and trans-FA act oppositely. Community studies show that non-diabetic weight matched obese men and women display similar insulin resis...

  11. Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 to attenuate insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Baran A; Tarun, Akansha; D'Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D; Cohen, David E

    2013-07-30

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenced by insulin-independent IRS2 activation after knockdown, genetic ablation, or chemical inhibition of PC-TP. In addition, IRS2 was activated after knockdown of THEM2, providing support for a role for the interaction of PC-TP with THEM2 in suppressing insulin signaling. Additionally, we showed that PC-TP bound to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and stabilized the components of the TSC1-TSC2 complex, which functions to inhibit mTORC1. Preventing phosphatidylcholine from binding to PC-TP disrupted interactions of PC-TP with THEM2 and TSC2, and disruption of the PC-TP-THEM2 complex was associated with increased activation of both IRS2 and mTORC1. In livers of mice with genetic ablation of PC-TP or that had been treated with a PC-TP inhibitor, steady-state amounts of IRS2 were increased, whereas those of TSC2 were decreased. These findings reveal a phospholipid-dependent mechanism that suppresses insulin signaling downstream of its receptor.

  12. The effects of short-term overfeeding on insulin action in lean and reduced-obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornier, Marc-Andre; Bergman, Bryan C; Bessesen, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Insulin resistance is clearly associated with obesity. However, the role of excess energy intake per se as opposed to increased fat mass in the development of insulin resistance has not been clearly defined. It may be that the nutrient load provided by short-term overfeeding is sufficient to induce measurable changes in insulin action in skeletal muscle and the liver. We examined the effects of 3 days of overfeeding on insulin action and glucose kinetics in 13 lean (body mass index, 20.9 +/- 2.4 kg/m(2); 6 men, 7 women) and 9 reduced-obese (RO) (body mass index, 29.1 +/- 2.2 kg/m(2); 4 men, 5 women) individuals. A two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study (5 and 40 mU m(-2) min(-1)) with a primed, constant infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose was performed after 3 days of a weight-maintenance diet and again after 3 days of overfeeding by 50% (50% carbohydrate, 30% fat, 20% protein). At baseline, lean individuals were more insulin sensitive, as measured by glucose infusion rate, than RO individuals (12.08 +/- 0.8 vs 7.62 +/- 1.0 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P lean women being more insulin sensitive than lean men (P lean women (13.37 +/- 1.3 to 11.42 +/- 1.0 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P lean men or RO individuals. Basal and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal remained unchanged with overfeeding in all groups. Low-dose insulin suppression of endogenous glucose production was impaired after overfeeding in lean women (euenergetic, 1.92 +/- 0.36 to 0.36 +/- 0.16 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1); overfeeding: 2.13 +/- 0.17 to 0.86 +/- 0.12 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1); P = .04) but remained unchanged in the other groups. These findings demonstrate that insulin action is reduced in lean, obese-resistant women after short-term overfeeding primarily because of an inhibition of insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, whereas short-term overfeeding does not appear to effect insulin action in lean men and RO individuals. This response may be indirectly involved in the ability of

  13. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    muscle in vivo by activation of the insulin signaling cascade to glucose transport through the enzymes IRS1, PI3K, Akt2, AS160/TBC1D4 and RAC1, and to glycogen synthesis through Akt2, inhibition of GSK3 and activation of glycogen synthase (GS) via dephosphorylation of serine residues in both the NH2-terminal (site 2+2a) and the COOH-terminal end (site 3a+3b). In type 2 diabetes, obesity and PCOS, there is, although with some variation from study to study, defects in insulin signaling through IRS1, PI3K, Akt2 and AS160/TBC1D4, which can explain reduced insulin action on glucose transport. In type 2 diabetes an altered intracellular distribution of SNAP23 and impaired activation of RAC1 also seem to play a role for reduced insulin action on glucose transport. In all common metabolic disorders, we observed an impaired insulin activation of GS, which seems to be caused by attenuated dephosphorylation of GS at site 2+2a, whereas as the inhibition of GSK3 and the dephosphorylation of GS at its target sites, site 3a+3a, appeared to be completely normal. In individuals with inherited insulin resistance, we observed largely the same defects in insulin action on IRS1, PI3K, Akt2 and GS, as well as a normal inhibition of GSK3 and dephosphorylation of GS at site 3a+3b. In these individuals, however, a markedly reduced insulin clearance seems to partially rescue insulin signaling to glucose transport and GS. Adiponectin is thought to improve insulin sensitivity primarily by increasing lipid oxidation through activation of the enzyme AMPK, and possibly via cross-talking of adiponectin with insulin signaling, and hence glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. We demonstrated a strong correlation between plasma adiponectin and insulin action on glucose disposal and glycogen synthesis in obesity, type 2 diabetes and PCOS. In individuals with inherited insulin resistance, plasma adiponectin was normal, but the correlation of adiponectin with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen

  14. Brain insulin signaling and Alzheimer's disease: current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Craft, Suzanne; Brooks, Samantha J; Frey, William H; Benedict, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Insulin receptors in the brain are found in high densities in the hippocampus, a region that is fundamentally involved in the acquisition, consolidation, and recollection of new information. Using the intranasal method, which effectively bypasses the blood-brain barrier to deliver and target insulin directly from the nose to the brain, a series of experiments involving healthy humans has shown that increased central nervous system (CNS) insulin action enhances learning and memory processes associated with the hippocampus. Since Alzheimer's disease (AD) is linked to CNS insulin resistance, decreased expression of insulin and insulin receptor genes and attenuated permeation of blood-borne insulin across the blood-brain barrier, impaired brain insulin signaling could partially account for the cognitive deficits associated with this disease. Considering that insulin mitigates hippocampal synapse vulnerability to amyloid beta and inhibits the phosphorylation of tau, pharmacological strategies bolstering brain insulin signaling, such as intranasal insulin, could have significant therapeutic potential to deter AD pathogenesis.

  15. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 restores insulin action in leucine-treated skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A; Salehzadeh, F; Metayer-Coustard, S

    2009-01-01

    Excessive nutrients, especially amino acids, impair insulin action on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that the branched-chain amino acid leucine reduces acute insulin action in primary myotubes via a negative feedback mechanism involving ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1...... to excessive leucine. In conclusion, S6K1 plays an important role in the regulation of insulin action on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle....

  16. High-Intensity Interval Training Attenuates Insulin Resistance Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. T. de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sleep deprivation can impair several physiological systems and recently, new evidence has pointed to the relationship between a lack of sleep and carbohydrate metabolism, consequently resulting in insulin resistance. To minimize this effect, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT is emerging as a potential strategy.Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HIIT on insulin resistance induced by sleep deprivation.Method: Eleven healthy male volunteers were recruited, aged 18–35 years, who declared taking 7–8 h sleep per night. All volunteers were submitted to four different conditions: a single night of regular sleep (RS condition, 24 h of total sleep deprivation (SD condition, HIIT training followed by regular sleep (HIIT+RS condition, and HIIT training followed by 24 h of total sleep deprivation (HIIT+SD condition. They performed six training sessions over 2 weeks and each session consisted of 8–12 × 60 s intervals at 100% of peak power output. In each experimental condition, tests for glucose, insulin, cortisol, free fatty acids, and insulin sensitivity, measured by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, were performed.Results: Sleep deprivation increased glycaemia and insulin levels, as well as the area under the curve. Furthermore, an increase in free fatty acids concentrations and basal metabolism was observed. There were no differences in the concentrations of cortisol. However, HIIT before 24 h of sleep deprivation attenuated the increase of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids.Conclusion: Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation resulted in acute insulin resistance. However, HIIT is an effective strategy to minimize the deleterious effects promoted by this condition.

  17. High-Intensity Interval Training Attenuates Insulin Resistance Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jorge F T; Dáttilo, Murilo; de Mello, Marco T; Tufik, Sergio; Antunes, Hanna K M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep deprivation can impair several physiological systems and recently, new evidence has pointed to the relationship between a lack of sleep and carbohydrate metabolism, consequently resulting in insulin resistance. To minimize this effect, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is emerging as a potential strategy. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HIIT on insulin resistance induced by sleep deprivation. Method: Eleven healthy male volunteers were recruited, aged 18-35 years, who declared taking 7-8 h sleep per night. All volunteers were submitted to four different conditions: a single night of regular sleep (RS condition), 24 h of total sleep deprivation ( SD condition), HIIT training followed by regular sleep (HIIT+RS condition), and HIIT training followed by 24 h of total sleep deprivation (HIIT+ SD condition). They performed six training sessions over 2 weeks and each session consisted of 8-12 × 60 s intervals at 100% of peak power output. In each experimental condition, tests for glucose, insulin, cortisol, free fatty acids, and insulin sensitivity, measured by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), were performed. Results: Sleep deprivation increased glycaemia and insulin levels, as well as the area under the curve. Furthermore, an increase in free fatty acids concentrations and basal metabolism was observed. There were no differences in the concentrations of cortisol. However, HIIT before 24 h of sleep deprivation attenuated the increase of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids. Conclusion: Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation resulted in acute insulin resistance. However, HIIT is an effective strategy to minimize the deleterious effects promoted by this condition.

  18. High-Intensity Interval Training Attenuates Insulin Resistance Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jorge F. T.; Dáttilo, Murilo; de Mello, Marco T.; Tufik, Sergio; Antunes, Hanna K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep deprivation can impair several physiological systems and recently, new evidence has pointed to the relationship between a lack of sleep and carbohydrate metabolism, consequently resulting in insulin resistance. To minimize this effect, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is emerging as a potential strategy. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HIIT on insulin resistance induced by sleep deprivation. Method: Eleven healthy male volunteers were recruited, aged 18–35 years, who declared taking 7–8 h sleep per night. All volunteers were submitted to four different conditions: a single night of regular sleep (RS condition), 24 h of total sleep deprivation (SD condition), HIIT training followed by regular sleep (HIIT+RS condition), and HIIT training followed by 24 h of total sleep deprivation (HIIT+SD condition). They performed six training sessions over 2 weeks and each session consisted of 8–12 × 60 s intervals at 100% of peak power output. In each experimental condition, tests for glucose, insulin, cortisol, free fatty acids, and insulin sensitivity, measured by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), were performed. Results: Sleep deprivation increased glycaemia and insulin levels, as well as the area under the curve. Furthermore, an increase in free fatty acids concentrations and basal metabolism was observed. There were no differences in the concentrations of cortisol. However, HIIT before 24 h of sleep deprivation attenuated the increase of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids. Conclusion: Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation resulted in acute insulin resistance. However, HIIT is an effective strategy to minimize the deleterious effects promoted by this condition. PMID:29270126

  19. Insulin Detemir Is Transported From Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid and Has Prolonged Central Anorectic Action Relative to NPH Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P.; May, Aaron A.; Mul, Joram D.; Liu, Min; D’Alessio, David A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin detemir (DET) reduces glycemia comparably to other long-acting insulin formulations but causes less weight gain. Insulin signaling in the brain is catabolic, reducing food intake. We hypothesized that DET reduces weight gain, relative to other insulins, owing to increased transport into the central nervous system and/or increased catabolic action within the brain. Transport of DET and NPH insulin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was compared over several hours and after the administration of different doses peripherally in rats. DET and NPH had comparable saturable, receptor-mediated transport into the CSF. CSF insulin remained elevated significantly longer after intraperitoneal DET than after NPH. When administered acutely into the 3rd cerebral ventricle, both DET and NPH insulin reduced food intake and body weight at 24 h, and both food intake and body weight remained lower after DET than after NPH after 48 h. In direct comparison with another long-acting insulin, insulin glargine (GLAR), DET led to more prolonged increases in CSF insulin despite a shorter plasma half-life in both rats and mice. Additionally, peripheral DET administration reduced weight gain and increased CSF insulin compared with saline or GLAR in mice. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that DET has distinct effects on energy balance through enhanced and prolonged centrally mediated reduction of food intake. PMID:25667307

  20. Acute insulin resistance stimulates and insulin sensitization attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Eugenio; Xu, Xiaojing; Upala, Sikarin; Triplitt, Curtis; Musi, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Differential activation/deactivation of insulin signaling, PI-3K and MAP-K pathways by high glucose and palmitate, with/out the insulin sensitizer pioglitazone (PIO), have been previously shown in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). To determine the biological impact of these molecular changes, we examined VSMC migration and proliferation ("M"&"P") patterns in similar conditions. VSMCs from healthy human coronary arteries were incubated in growth medium and "M"&"P" were analyzed after exposure to high glucose (25 mmol/L) ± palmitate (200 μmol/L) and ± PIO (8 μmol/L) for 5 h. "M"&"P" were assessed by: (1) polycarbonate membrane barrier with chemo-attractants and extended cell protrusions quantified by optical density (OD595 nm); (2) % change in radius area (2D Assay) using inverted microscopy images; and (3) cell viability assay expressed as cell absorbance (ABS) in media. "M" in 25 mmol/L glucose media increased by ~25% from baseline and % change in radius area rose from ~20% to ~30%. The addition of PIO was accompanied by a significant decrease in "M" from 0.25 ± 0.02 to 0.19 ± 0.02; a comparable decline from 0.25 ± 0.02 to 0.18 ± 0.02 was also seen with 25 mmol/L of glucose +200 μmol/L of palmitate. When PIO was coincubated with high glucose plus palmitate there was a 50% reduction in % change in radius. A ~10% increase in ABS, reflecting augmented "P" in media with 25 mmol/L glucose versus control was documented. The addition of PIO reduced ABS from 0.208 ± 0.03 to 0.183 ± 0.06. Both high glucose and palmitate showed ABS of ~0.140 ± 0.02, which decreased with PIO to ~0.120 ± 0.02, indicating "P" was reduced. These results confirm that high glucose and palmitate stimulate VSMCs migration and proliferation in vitro, which is attenuated by coincubation with the insulin sensitizer PIO. Although, we cannot ascertain whether these functional changes are coincident with the activation/deactivation of signal molecules, our findings are consistent with the

  1. Dietary Tributyrin Supplementation Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Abnormal Lipid Metabolism in Suckling Piglets with Intrauterine Growth Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jintian; Dong, Li; Xu, Wen; Bai, Kaiwen; Lu, Changhui; Wu, Yanan; Huang, Qiang; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is associated with insulin resistance and lipid disorder. Tributyrin (TB), a pro-drug of butyrate, can attenuate dysfunctions in body metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of TB supplementation on insulin resistance and lipid metabolism in neonatal piglets with IUGR. Eight neonatal piglets with normal birth weight (NBW) and 16 neonatal piglets with IUGR were selected, weaned on the 7th day, and fed basic milk diets (NBW and IUGR groups) or basic milk diets supplemented with 0.1% tributyrin (IT group, IUGR piglets) until day 21 (n = 8). Relative parameters for lipid metabolism and mRNA expression were measured. Piglets with IUGR showed higher (P insulin in the serum, higher (P insulin, HOMA-IR, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the serum, and the concentrations of TG and NEFA in the liver, and increased (P insulin signal transduction pathway and hepatic lipogenic pathway (including transcription factors and nuclear factors) was significantly (P insulin resistance and abnormal lipid metabolism in IUGR piglets by increasing enzyme activities and upregulating mRNA expression, leading to an early improvement in the metabolic efficiency of IUGR piglets. PMID:26317832

  2. Cinnamon extract improves insulin sensitivity in the brain and lowers liver fat in mouse models of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Peter, Andreas; Schulz, Nadja; Drescher, Andrea; Bergheim, Ina; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Siegel-Axel, Dorothea; Schürmann, Annette; Weigert, Cora; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of diabetic subjects with cinnamon demonstrated an improvement in blood glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity but the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. This work intends to elucidate the impact of cinnamon effects on the brain by using isolated astrocytes, and an obese and diabetic mouse model. Cinnamon components (eugenol, cinnamaldehyde) were added to astrocytes and liver cells to measure insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis. Ob/ob mice were supplemented with extract from cinnamomum zeylanicum for 6 weeks and cortical brain activity, locomotion and energy expenditure were evaluated. Insulin action was determined in brain and liver tissues. Treatment of primary astrocytes with eugenol promoted glycogen synthesis, whereas the effect of cinnamaldehyde was attenuated. In terms of brain function in vivo, cinnamon extract improved insulin sensitivity and brain activity in ob/ob mice, and the insulin-stimulated locomotor activity was improved. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance were greatly improved in ob/ob mice due to cinnamon extracts, while insulin secretion was unaltered. This corresponded with lower triglyceride and increased liver glycogen content and improved insulin action in liver tissues. In vitro, Fao cells exposed to cinnamon exhibited no change in insulin action. Together, cinnamon extract improved insulin action in the brain as well as brain activity and locomotion. This specific effect may represent an important central feature of cinnamon in improving insulin action in the brain, and mediates metabolic alterations in the periphery to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis.

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyls exposure-induced insulin resistance is mediated by lipid droplet enlargement through Fsp27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Kwon, Woo Young; Kim, Yeon A; Oh, Yoo Jin; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, Mi Hwa; Bae, Ju Yong; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Although epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) lead to insulin resistance, the mechanism underlying PCBs-induced insulin resistance has remained unsolved. In this study, we examined in vitro and in vivo effects of PCB-118 (dioxin-like PCB) and PCB-138 (non-dioxin-like PCB) on adipocyte differentiation, lipid droplet growth, and insulin action. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated with PCB-118 or PCB-138 during adipocyte differentiation. For in vivo studies, C57BL/6 mice were administered PCB-118 or PCB-138 (37.5 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection and we examined adiposity and whole-body insulin action. PCB-118 and PCB-138 significantly promoted adipocyte differentiation and increased the lipid droplet (LD) size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In mice, both PCBs increased adipose mass and adipocyte size. Furthermore, both PCBs induced insulin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Expression of fat-specific protein 27 (Fsp27), which is localized to LD contact sites, was increased in PCB-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and mice. Depletion of Fsp27 by siRNA resulted in the inhibition of LD enlargement and attenuation of insulin resistance in PCB-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. An anti-diabetic drug, metformin, attenuated insulin resistance in PCB-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes through the reduced expression of Fsp27 protein and LD size. This study suggests that PCB exposure-induced insulin resistance is mediated by LD enlargement through Fsp27.

  4. Spirulina vesicolor Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Attenuates Hyperglycemia-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Hozayen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study aimed to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic and insulin sensitizing effects of the cyanobacterium Spirulina vesicolor extract in fructose-fed rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed 30% fructose solution in drinking water for 4 weeks. Animals exhibited hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were selected for further investigations. Diabetic and control rats were orally supplemented with 50 mg/kg body weight S. vesicolor extract for 4 weeks. Results: At the end of 8 weeks, fructose-fed rats showed significant increase in serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, cardiovascular risk indices and insulin resistance. Treatment of the fructose-fed rats with S. vesicolor extract improved this metabolic profile. Fructose feeding produced a significant increase in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and a decrease in adiponectin levels. In addition, fructose-fed rats exhibited a significant increase in liver, kidney and heart lipid peroxidation levels, and declined antioxidant defenses. Supplementation of the fructose-fed rats with S. vesicolor extract reversed these alterations. Conclusion: S. vesicolor attenuates hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and inflammation, and is thus effective in improving insulin sensitivity in fructose-fed rats. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(1.000: 57-64

  5. In vivo and in vitro attenuation of naloxone-precipitated experimental opioid withdrawal syndrome by insulin and selective KATP channel modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh; Gupta, Surbhi; Sharma, B M

    2015-01-01

    Opiate exposure for longer duration develops state of dependence in humans and animals, which is revealed by signs and symptoms of withdrawal precipitated by opioid receptor antagonists. The sudden withdrawal of opioids produces a withdrawal syndrome in opioid-dependent subjects. Insulin and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel-mediated glucose homeostasis have been shown to modulate morphine withdrawal. Present study has been structured to investigate the role of insulin and pharmacological modulator of KATP channel (gliclazide) in experimental morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. In this study, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome in mice (invivo) as well as in rat ileum (invitro) were utilized to assess opioid withdrawal phenomenon. Morphine withdrawal syndromes like jumping and rearing frequency, forepaw licking, circling, fore paw tremor, wet dog shake, sneezing, overall morphine withdrawal severity (OMWS), serum glucose, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), nitrite/nitrate, and calcium (Ca(+2)) were assessed. Naloxone has significantly increased morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. Insulin and gliclazide have significantly attenuated, naloxone induced behavioral changes like jumping and rearing frequency, forepaw licking, wet dog shake, sneezing, straightening, circling, OMWS, and various biochemical impairments such as serum glucose, brain MDA, GSH, nitrite/nitrate, and Ca(+2) in morphine-dependent animals (invivo). In vitro, insulin and gliclazide have significantly reduced naloxone-induced contraction in morphine-withdrawn rat ileum preparation. Insulin and gliclazide (KATP channel blocker) have attenuated naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. Thus, insulin and KATP channel modulation may provide new avenues for research in morphine withdrawal.

  6. Delivery of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Attenuates Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Obese Mice Through Remodeling Macrophage Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Qianwen; Bai, Yang; Wang, Guannan; Song, Qiang; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Wang, Qun

    2015-09-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been used to control several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases due to immunosuppressive properties, but their role in obesity-associated inflammation remains unestablished. This study aims to evaluate the effects of ADSCs on obesity-induced white adipose tissue (WAT) inflammation and insulin resistance. We found that diet-induced obesity caused a remarkable reduction of ADSC fraction in mouse WAT. Delivery of lean mouse-derived ADSCs, which could successfully locate into WAT of obese mice, substantially improved insulin action and metabolic homeostasis of obese mice. ADSC treatment not only reduced adipocyte hypertrophy but also attenuated WAT inflammation by reducing crown-like structures of macrophages and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion. Importantly, ADSC treatment remodeled the phenotypes of adipose-resident macrophages from proinflammatory M1 toward anti-inflammatory M2-like subtypes, as characterized by decreased MHC class II-expressing but increased interleukin (IL)-10-producing macrophages together with low expression of TNF-α and IL-12. Coculture of ADSCs through the transwell or conditional medium with induced M1 macrophages also reproduced the phenotypic switch toward M2-like macrophages, which was substantiated by elevated arginase 1, declined inducible nitric oxide synthase, inhibition of NF-κB activity, and activation of STAT3/STAT6. Taken together, our data support that ADSC supplement in obese mice could sustain IL-10-producing M2-like macrophages in WAT through paracrine action, thereby suggesting the crucial role of ADSCs in resolving WAT inflammation, maintaining adipose homeostasis, and proposing a potential ADSC-based approach for the treatment of obesity-related diseases.

  7. Action of Phytochemicals on Insulin Signaling Pathways Accelerating Glucose Transporter (GLUT4 Protein Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Sadat Md Sayem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with obesity, generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress and redox imbalances which are implicated in the progression of micro- and macro-complications like heart disease, stroke, dementia, cancer, kidney failure and blindness. All these complications rise primarily due to consistent high blood glucose levels. Insulin and glucagon help to maintain the homeostasis of glucose and lipids through signaling cascades. Pancreatic hormones stimulate translocation of the glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4 from an intracellular location to the cell surface and facilitate the rapid insulin-dependent storage of glucose in muscle and fat cells. Malfunction in glucose uptake mechanisms, primarily contribute to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Plant secondary metabolites, commonly known as phytochemicals, are reported to have great benefits in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of phytochemicals and their action on insulin signaling pathways through stimulation of GLUT4 translocation is crucial to understand the pathogenesis of this disease in the management process. This review will summarize the effects of phytochemicals and their action on insulin signaling pathways accelerating GLUT4 translocation based on the current literature.

  8. Fructose downregulates miR-330 to induce renal inflammatory response and insulin signaling impairment: Attenuation by morin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ting-Ting; Song, Lin; Chen, Tian-Yu; Wang, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Juan; Ding, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Yan-Zi; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2017-08-01

    Fructose induces insulin resistance with kidney inflammation and injury. MicroRNAs are emerged as key regulators of insulin signaling. Morin has insulin-mimetic effect with the improvement of insulin resistance and kidney injury. This study investigated the protective mechanisms of morin against fructose-induced kidney injury, with particular focus on miR-330 expression change, inflammatory response, and insulin signaling impairment. miR-330, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor (S1PR)1/3 signaling, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and insulin signaling were detected in kidney cortex of fructose-fed rats and fructose-exposed HK-2 cells, respectively. Whether miR-330 mediated inflammatory response to affect insulin signaling was examined using SphK1 inhibitor, S1PR1/3 short interfering RNA, or miR-330 mimic/inhibitor, respectively. Fructose was found to downregulate miR-330 expression to increase SphK1/S1P/S1PR1/3 signaling, and then activate NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome to produce IL-1β, causing insulin signaling impairment. Moreover, morin upregulated miR-330 and partly attenuated inflammatory response and insulin signaling impairment to alleviate kidney injury. These findings suggest that morin protects against fructose-induced kidney insulin signaling impairment by upregulating miR-330 to reduce inflammatory response. Morin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of kidney injury associated with fructose-induced inflammation and insulin signaling impairment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Over-expression of Follistatin-like 3 attenuates fat accumulation and improves insulin sensitivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Hansen, Jakob Bondo

    2015-01-01

    -fat feeding. Body weight, food intake, fat accumulation by MR scanning, and glucose, insulin and glucagon tolerance were evaluated, as was the response in body weight and metabolic parameters to 24h fasting. Effects of fstl3 on pancreatic insulin and glucagon content, and pancreatic islet morphology were......OBJECTIVE: Follistatin-like 3 (fstl3), a natural inhibitor of members of the TGF-β family, increases during resistance training in human plasma. Fstl3 primarily binds myostatin and activin A, and thereby inhibits their functions. We hypothesize that blocking myostatin and activin A signalling....../glucagon ratio. Accordingly, fstl3 transfection improved counter-regulation to 24h fasting. CONCLUSION: Fstl3 over-expression regulates insulin and glucagon sensitivities through increased muscular insulin action, as well as increased hepatic glucagon sensitivity and pancreatic glucagon content....

  10. Metformin attenuates olanzapine-induced hepatic, but not peripheral insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Gary J; Teo, Celine; Wilson, Virginia; Chintoh, Araba; Guenette, Melanie; Ahsan, Zohra; Giacca, Adria; Hahn, Margaret K

    2015-11-01

    Antipsychotics (APs) are linked to diabetes, even without weight gain. Whether anti-diabetic drugs are efficacious in reversing the direct effects of APs on glucose pathways is largely undetermined. We tested two metformin (Met) doses to prevent impairments seen following a dose of olanzapine (Ola) (3 mg/kg); glucokinetics were measured using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HIEC). Met (150 mg/kg; n=13, or 400 mg/kg; n=11) or vehicle (Veh) (n=11) was administered through gavage preceding an overnight fast, followed by a second dose prior to the HIEC. Eleven additional animals were gavaged with Veh and received a Veh injection during the HIEC (Veh/Veh); all others received Ola. Basal glucose was similar across treatment groups. The Met 400 group had significantly greater glucose appearance (Ra) in the basal period (i.e., before Ola, or hyperinsulinemia) vs other groups. During hyperinsulinemia, glucose infusion rate (GINF) to maintain euglycemia (reflective of whole-body insulin sensitivity) was higher in Veh/Veh vs other groups. Met 150/Ola animals demonstrated increased GINF relative to Veh/Ola during early time points of the HIEC. Glucose utilization during hyperinsulinemia, relative to basal conditions, was significantly higher in Veh/Veh vs other groups. The change in hepatic glucose production (HGP) from basal to hyperinsulinemia demonstrated significantly greater decreases in Veh/Veh and Met 150/Ola groups vs Veh/Ola. Given the increase in basal Ra with Met 400, we measured serum lactate (substrate for HGP), finding increased levels in Met 400 vs Veh and Met 150. In conclusion, Met attenuates hepatic insulin resistance observed with acute Ola administration, but fails to improve peripheral insulin resistance. Use of supra-therapeutic doses of Met may mask metabolic benefits by increasing lactate. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. Distinct signalling properties of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 in mediating insulin/IGF-1 action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Krüger, Marcus; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jacob; Kahn, C Ronald; Emanuelli, Brice

    2018-07-01

    Insulin/IGF-1 action is driven by a complex and highly integrated signalling network. Loss-of-function studies indicate that the major insulin/IGF-1 receptor substrate (IRS) proteins, IRS-1 and IRS-2, mediate different biological functions in vitro and in vivo, suggesting specific signalling properties despite their high degree of homology. To identify mechanisms contributing to the differential signalling properties of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in the mediation of insulin/IGF-1 action, we performed comprehensive mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomic profiling of brown preadipocytes from wild type, IRS-1 -/- and IRS-2 -/- mice in the basal and IGF-1-stimulated states. We applied stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for the accurate quantitation of changes in protein phosphorylation. We found ~10% of the 6262 unique phosphorylation sites detected to be regulated by IGF-1. These regulated sites included previously reported substrates of the insulin/IGF-1 signalling pathway, as well as novel substrates including Nuclear Factor I X and Semaphorin-4B. In silico prediction suggests the protein kinase B (PKB), protein kinase C (PKC), and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) as the main mediators of these phosphorylation events. Importantly, we found preferential phosphorylation patterns depending on the presence of either IRS-1 or IRS-2, which was associated with specific sets of kinases involved in signal transduction downstream of these substrates such as PDHK1, MAPK3, and PKD1 for IRS-1, and PIN1 and PKC beta for IRS-2. Overall, by generating a comprehensive phosphoproteomic profile from brown preadipocyte cells in response to IGF-1 stimulation, we reveal both common and distinct insulin/IGF-1 signalling events mediated by specific IRS proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiovascular action of insulin in health and disease: focus in endothelial L-arginine transport and cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels.

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    Sebastián eDubó

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1 is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. Insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involved increases of hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contributes to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, the electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus, generating a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown a prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval. The long QT generated is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. The impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5 or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that the lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular

  13. The ergogenic supplement β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) attenuates insulin resistance through suppressing GLUT-2 in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharawy, Maha H; El-Awady, Mohammed S; Megahed, Nirmeen; Gameil, Nariman M

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of the ergogenic supplement β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) on insulin resistance induced by high-fructose diet (HFD) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed 60% HFD for 12 weeks and HMB (320 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), orally) for 4 weeks. HFD significantly increased fasting insulin, fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1C), liver glycogen content, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, while it decreased glucose and insulin tolerance. Furthermore, HFD significantly increased serum triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) levels, while it significantly decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Moreover, HFD significantly increased mRNA expression of glucose transporter type-2 (GLUT-2), the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) but decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) in liver. Aortic relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired and histopathology showed severe hepatic steatosis. HMB significantly increased insulin tolerance and decreased fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HBA1C, hepatic glycogen content, serum TG, LDL-C, and VLDL-C. Additionally, HMB enhanced ACh-induced relaxation, ameliorated hepatic steatosis, and decreased mRNA expression of GLUT-2. In conclusion, HMB may attenuate insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis through inhibiting GLUT-2 in liver.

  14. Insulin-releasing action of the novel antidiabetic agent BTS 67 582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, N H; Flatt, P R; Bailey, C J

    1998-02-01

    1. BTS 67582 (1,1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate) is a novel antidiabetic agent with a short-acting insulin-releasing effect. This study examined its mode of action in the clonal B-cell line BRIN-BD11. 2. BTS 67582 increased insulin release from BRIN-BD11 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (10[-8] to 10[-4] M) at both non-stimulating (1.1 mM) and stimulating (16.7 mM) concentrations of glucose. 3. BTS 67582 (10[-4] M) potentiated the insulin-releasing effect of a depolarizing concentration of K+ (30 mM), whereas the K+ channel openers pinacidil (400 microM) and diazoxide (300 microM) inhibited BTS 67582-induced release. 4. Suppression of Ca+ channel activity with verapamil (20 microM) reduced the insulin-releasing effect of BTS 67582 (10[-4] M). 5. BTS 67582 (10[-4] M) potentiated insulin release induced by amino acids (10 mM), and enhanced the combined stimulant effects of glucose plus either the fatty acid palmitate (10 mM), or agents which raise intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations (25 microM forskolin and 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine), or the cholinoceptor agonist carbachol (100 microM). 6. Inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release by adrenaline or noradrenaline (10 microM) was partially reversed by BTS 67582 (10[-4] M). 7. These data suggest that the insulin-releasing effect of BTS 67582 involves regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channel activity and Ca2+ influx, and that the drug augments the stimulant effects of nutrient insulin secretagogues and agents which enhance adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C. BTS 67582 may also exert insulin-releasing effects independently of ATP-sensitive K+ channel activity.

  15. Insulin action in denervated skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanisms responsible for reduced insulin response in denervated muscle. Denervation for 3 days of rat muscles consisting of very different compositions of fiber types decreased insulin stimulated [U- 14 C]glucose incorporation into glycogen by 80%. Associated with the reduction in glycogen synthesis was a decreased activation of glycogen synthase. Denervation of hemidiaphragms for 1 day decreased both the basal and insulin stimulated activity ratios of glycogen synthase and the rate of insulin stimulated [U- 14 C[glucose incorporation into glycogen by 50%. Insulin stimulation of 2-deoxy[ 3 H]glucose uptake was not decreased until 3 days after denervation. Consistent with the effects on glucose transport,insulin did not increase the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-P in muscles 3 days after denervation. Furthermore, since the Ka for glucose-6-P activation of glycogen synthase was not decreased by insulin in denervated hemidiaphragms, the effects of denervation on glycogen synthase and glucose transport were synergistic resulting in the 80% decrease in glycogen synthesis rates

  16. Ebselen pretreatment attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury and prevents hyperglycemia by improving hepatic insulin signaling and β-cell survival in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S; Kang, S; Kim, D S; Shin, B K; Moon, N R; Daily, J W

    2014-08-01

    Transient carotid artery occlusion causes ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury resulting in neuron and pancreatic β-cell death with consequential post-stroke hyperglycemia, which can lead to diabetes and may accelerate the development of Alzheimer's disease. Antioxidants have been shown to protect against the I/R injury and destruction of neurons. However, it is unknown whether the protection against I/R injury extends to the pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, we investigated whether treatment with ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic, prevents neuronal and β-cell death following I/R in gerbils susceptible to stroke. After 28 days post artery occlusion, there was widespread neuronal cell death in the CA1 of the hippocampus and elevated IL-1β and TNF-α levels. Pretreatment with ebselen prevented the death by 56% and attenuated neurological damage (abnormal eyelid drooping, hair bristling, muscle tone, flexor reflex, posture, and walking patterns). Ischemic gerbils also exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity which induced post-stroke hyperglycemia associated with decreased β-cell mass due to increased β-cell apoptosis. Ebselen prevented the increased β-cell apoptosis, possibly by decreasing IL-1β and TNF-α in islets. Ischemia also attenuated hepatic insulin signaling, and expression of GLUT2 and glucokinase, whereas ebselen prevented the attenuation and suppressed gluconeogenesis by decreasing PEPCK expression. In conclusion, antioxidant protection by ebselen attenuated I/R injury of neurons and pancreatic β-cells and prevented subsequent impairment of glucose regulation that could lead to diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. SGLT2 Inhibition by Empagliflozin Promotes Fat Utilization and Browning and Attenuates Inflammation and Insulin Resistance by Polarizing M2 Macrophages in Diet-induced Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT 2 inhibitors increase urinary glucose excretion (UGE, leading to blood glucose reductions and weight loss. However, the impacts of SGLT2 inhibition on energy homeostasis and obesity-induced insulin resistance are less well known. Here, we show that empagliflozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor, enhanced energy expenditure and attenuated inflammation and insulin resistance in high-fat-diet-induced obese (DIO mice. C57BL/6J mice were pair-fed a high-fat diet (HFD or a HFD with empagliflozin for 16 weeks. Empagliflozin administration increased UGE in the DIO mice, whereas it suppressed HFD-induced weight gain, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. Moreover, empagliflozin shifted energy metabolism towards fat utilization, elevated AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl-CoA carbolxylase phosphorylation in skeletal muscle, and increased hepatic and plasma fibroblast growth factor 21 levels. Importantly, empagliflozin increased energy expenditure, heat production, and the expression of uncoupling protein 1 in brown fat and in inguinal and epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT. Furthermore, empagliflozin reduced M1-polarized macrophage accumulation while inducing the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype of macrophages within WAT and liver, lowering plasma TNFα levels and attenuating obesity-related chronic inflammation. Thus, empagliflozin suppressed weight gain by enhancing fat utilization and browning and attenuated obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance by polarizing M2 macrophages in WAT and liver.

  18. Loss of ABHD15 Impairs the Anti-lipolytic Action of Insulin by Altering PDE3B Stability and Contributes to Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenmin; Pessentheiner, Ariane R; Hofer, Dina C; Amor, Melina; Schreiber, Renate; Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Eichmann, Thomas O; Walenta, Evelyn; Itariu, Bianca; Prager, Gerhard; Hackl, Hubert; Stulnig, Thomas; Kratky, Dagmar; Rülicke, Thomas; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G

    2018-05-15

    Elevated circulating fatty acids (FAs) contribute to obesity-associated metabolic complications, but the mechanisms by which insulin suppresses lipolysis are poorly understood. We show that α/β-hydrolase domain-containing 15 (ABHD15) is required for the anti-lipolytic action of insulin in white adipose tissue (WAT). Neither insulin nor glucose treatments can suppress FA mobilization in global and conditional Abhd15-knockout (KO) mice. Accordingly, insulin signaling is impaired in Abhd15-KO adipocytes, as indicated by reduced AKT phosphorylation, glucose uptake, and de novo lipogenesis. In vitro data reveal that ABHD15 associates with and stabilizes phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B). Accordingly, PDE3B expression is decreased in the WAT of Abhd15-KO mice, mechanistically explaining increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) phosphorylation, and undiminished FA release upon insulin signaling. Ultimately, Abhd15-KO mice develop insulin resistance. Notably, ABHD15 expression is decreased in humans with obesity and diabetes compared to humans with obesity and normal glucose tolerance, identifying ABHD15 as a potential therapeutic target to mitigate insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by ∼60%. However, supplementing gAd fully rescued insulin’s microvascular action and significantly improved the metabolic responses to insulin in HFD male rats and these actions were abolished by inhibition of either AMPK or nitric oxide production. We conclude that HFD induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but gAd administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin’s metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism in male rats. Key points Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle

  20. Role of myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK in glucose homeostasis and muscle insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Llagostera

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1 is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-unstranslated region of the DMPK gene, which encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. One of the common clinical features of DM1 patients is insulin resistance, which has been associated with a pathogenic effect of the repeat expansions. Here we show that DMPK itself is a positive modulator of insulin action. DMPK-deficient (dmpk-/- mice exhibit impaired insulin signaling in muscle tissues but not in adipocytes and liver, tissues in which DMPK is not expressed. Dmpk-/- mice display metabolic derangements such as abnormal glucose tolerance, reduced glucose uptake and impaired insulin-dependent GLUT4 trafficking in muscle. Using DMPK mutants, we show that DMPK is required for a correct intracellular trafficking of insulin and IGF-1 receptors, providing a mechanism to explain the molecular and metabolic phenotype of dmpk-/- mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that reduced DMPK expression may directly influence the onset of insulin-resistance in DM1 patients and point to dmpk as a new candidate gene for susceptibility to type 2-diabetes.

  1. Effects of androgens on insulin action in women: is androgen excess a component of female metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbould, A

    2008-10-01

    Hyperinsulinemia as a consequence of insulin resistance causes hyperandrogenemia in women. The objective was to review evidence for the converse situation, i.e. whether androgens adversely influence insulin action. Androgen excess could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes, and in obese peripubertal girls. An Entrez-PubMed search was conducted to identify studies addressing the relationship of androgens with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in women. Studies reporting outcomes of androgen administration, interventions to reduce androgen effects in hyperandrogenemic women, and basic studies investigating androgen effects on insulin target tissues were reviewed. Multiple studies showed associations between serum testosterone and insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes risk in women, but their cross-sectional nature did not allow conclusions about causality. Androgen administration to healthy women was associated with development of insulin resistance. Intervention studies in women with hyperandrogenism were limited by small subject numbers and use of indirect methods for assessing insulin sensitivity. However, in three of the seven studies using euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps, reduction of androgen levels or blockade of androgen action improved insulin sensitivity. Testosterone administration to female rats caused skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Testosterone induced insulin resistance in adipocytes of women in vitro. In conclusion, the metabolic consequences of androgen excess in women have been under-researched. Studies of long-term interventions that lower androgen levels or block androgen effects in young women with hyperandrogenism are needed to determine whether these might protect against metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in later life. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Multiple low-dose radiation prevents type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage through attenuation of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance and subsequent renal inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Shao

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms.Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured.HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2 expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks.These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.

  3. Action of insulin on the surface morphology of hepatocytes: role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in insulin-induced shape change of microvilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, K; Brandt, U; Gartzke, J; Bergmann, J

    1998-02-25

    In previous studies we have shown that the insulin-responding glucose transporter isoform of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, GluT4, is almost completely located on microvilli. Furthermore, insulin caused the integration of these microvilli into the plasma membrane, suggesting that insulin-induced stimulation of glucose uptake may be due to the destruction of the cytoskeletal diffusion barrier formed by the actin filament bundle of the microvillar shaft regions [Lange et al. (1990) FEBS Lett. 261, 459-463; Lange et al. (1990) FEBS Lett. 276, 39-41]. Similar shape changes in microvilli were observed when the transport rates of adipocytes were modulated by glucose feeding or starvation. Here we demonstrate that the action of insulin on the surface morphology of hepatocytes is identical to that on 3T3L1 adipocytes; small and narrow microvilli on the surface of unstimulated hepatocytes were rapidly shortened and dilated on top of large domed surface areas. The aspect and mechanism of this effect are closely related to "membrane ruffling" induced by insulin and other growth factors. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin (100 nM), which completely prevents transport stimulation by insulin in adipocytes and other cell types, also inhibited insulin-induced shape changes in microvilli on the hepatocyte surface. In contrast, vasopressin-induced microvillar shape changes in hepatocytes [Lange et al. (1997) Exp. Cell Res. 234, 486-497] were insensitive to wortmannin pretreatment. These findings indicate that PI 3-kinase products are necessary for stimulation of submembrane microfilament dynamics and that cytoskeletal reorganization is critically involved in insulin stimulation of transport processes. The mechanism of the insulin-induced cytoskeletal reorganization can be explained on the basis of the recent finding of Lu et al. [Biochemistry 35(1996) 14027-14034] that PI 3-kinase products exhibit much higher affinity for the profilin-actin complex than the

  4. Insulin receptor internalization defect in an insulin-resistant mouse melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androlewicz, M.J.; Straus, D.S.; Brandenburg, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated that the PG19 mouse melanoma cell line does not exhibit a biological response to insulin, whereas melanoma x mouse embryo fibroblast hybrids do respond to insulin. To investigate the molecular basis of the insulin resistance of the PG19 melanoma cells, insulin receptors from the insulin-resistant melanoma cells and insulin-sensitive fibroblast x melanoma hybrid cells were analyzed by the technique of photoaffinity labeling using the photoprobe 125 I-NAPA-DP-insulin. Photolabeled insulin receptors from the two cell types have identical molecular weights as determined by SDS gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions, indicating that the receptors on the two cell lines are structurally similar. Insulin receptor internalization studies revealed that the hybrid cells internalize receptors to a high degree at 37 degree C, whereas the melanoma cells internalize receptors to a very low degree or not at all. The correlation between ability to internalize insulin receptors and sensitivity to insulin action in this system suggests that uptake of the insulin-receptor complex may be required for insulin action in these cells. Insulin receptors from the two cell lines autophosphorylate in a similar insulin-dependent manner both in vitro and in intact cells, indicating that insulin receptors on the melanoma and hybrid cells have functional tyrosine protein kinase activity. Therefore, the block in insulin action in the PG19 melanoma cells appears to reside at a step beyond insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation

  5. Resveratrol attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced macrophage migration to visceral white adipose tissue and insulin resistance in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X L; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gozal, David

    2015-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea.

  6. 1-Hour OGTT Plasma Glucose as a Marker of Progressive Deterioration of Insulin Secretion and Action in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering old GDM diagnostic criteria, alterations in insulin secretion and action are present in women with GDM as well as in women with one abnormal value (OAV during OGTT. Our aim is to assess if changes in insulin action and secretion during pregnancy are related to 1-hour plasma glucose concentration during OGTT. We evaluated 3 h/100 g OGTT in 4,053 pregnant women, dividing our population on the basis of 20 mg/dL increment of plasma glucose concentration at 1 h OGTT generating 5 groups (<120 mg/dL, =661; 120–139 mg/dL, =710; 140–159 mg/dL, =912; 160–179 mg/dL, =885; and ≥180 mg/dL, =996. We calculated incremental area under glucose (AUCgluc and insulin curves (AUCins, indexes of insulin secretion (HOMA-B, and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-R, AUCins/AUCgluc. AUCgluc and AUCins progressively increased according to 1-hour plasma glucose concentrations (both <0.0001 for trend. HOMA-B progressively declined (<0.001, and HOMA-R progressively increased across the five groups. AUCins/AUCgluc decreased in a linear manner across the 5 groups (<0.001. Analysing the groups with 1-hour value <180 mg/dL, defects in insulin secretion (HOMA-B: −29.7% and sensitivity (HOMA-R: +15% indexes were still apparent (all <0.001. Progressive increase in 1-hour OGTT is associated with deterioration of glucose tolerance and alterations in indexes of insulin action and secretion.

  7. Evidence for altered transport of insulin across the blood-brain barrier in insulin-resistant humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Schöpfer, Patricia; Peter, Andreas; Sartorius, Tina; Fritsche, Andreas; Synofzik, Matthis; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Maetzler, Walter; Hennige, Anita M

    2014-08-01

    Eating behavior, body weight regulation, peripheral glucose metabolism, and cognitive function depend on adequate insulin action in the brain, and recent studies in humans suggested that impaired insulin action in the brain emerges upon fat intake, obesity, and genetic variants. As insulin enters into the brain in a receptor-mediated fashion, we hypothesized that whole-body insulin sensitivity might affect the transport of insulin into the brain and contribute to the aversive effect of insulin resistance in the central nervous system. In this study, we aimed to determine the ratio of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum to whole-body insulin sensitivity. Healthy human subjects participated in an oral glucose tolerance test to determine whole-body insulin sensitivity and underwent lumbar puncture. Blood and CSF concentrations of insulin were significantly correlated. The CSF/serum ratio for insulin was significantly associated with whole body insulin sensitivity with reduced insulin transported into the CSF in insulin-resistant subjects. Together, our data suggest that transport of insulin into the CSF relates to peripheral insulin sensitivity and impairs insulin action in the brain. This underlines the need for sensitizing measures in insulin-resistant subjects.

  8. Plerocercoid growth factor (PGF), a human growth hormone (hGH) analogue produced by the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides, has direct insulin-like action in adipose tissue of normal rats in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, M.A.M.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic actions of GH can be divided into acute (insulin-like) and chronic (lipolytic/anti-insulin). The insulin-like actions of GH are most readily elicited in GH-deficient animals as GH induces resistance to its own insulin-like action. Like GH, PGF stimulates growth and cross-reacts with anti-hGH antibodies. Independent experiments were conducted comparing the direct actions of PGF to insulin or hGH in vitro. Insulin-like effects were determined by the ability of PGF, insulin or hGH to stimulate [U- 14 C]glucose metabolism in epidydimal fat pads from normal rats and by inhibition of epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. Direct stimulation of lipolysis was used as anti-insulin activity. To determine if PGF competes for insulin or GH receptors, adipocytes (3 x 10 5 cells/ml) were incubated with either [ 125 I]insulin or [ 125 I]hGH +/- PGF, +/- insulin or +/- hGH. PGF stimulated glucose oxidation and 14 C-incorporation into lipids. Insulin, hGH and PGF inhibited lipolysis (33%, 29% and 34%, respectively). Adipose tissue was very sensitive to the lipolytic effect of hGH but PGF was neither lipolytic nor did it confer refractoriness to its insulin-like action. PGF bound to GH but not to insulin receptors. Therefore, PGF had direct insulin-like effects but did not stimulate lipolysis in tissue from normal rats in vitro

  9. Attenuation of insulin resistance in rats by agmatine: role of SREBP-1c, mTOR and GLUT-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharawy, Maha H; El-Awady, Mohammed S; Megahed, Nirmeen; Gameil, Nariman M

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a serious health condition worldwide; however, its exact mechanisms are still unclear. This study investigates agmatine (AGM; an endogenous metabolite of L-arginine) effects on insulin resistance induced by high fructose diet (HFD) in rats and the possible involved mechanisms. Sprague Dawley rats were fed 60% HFD for 12 weeks, and AGM (10 mg/kg/day, orally) was given from week 9 to 12. AGM significantly reduced HFD-induced elevation in fasting insulin level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and liver glycogen content from 3.44-, 3.62- and 2.07- to 2.59-, 2.78- and 1.3-fold, respectively, compared to the control group, while it increased HFD-induced reduction in glucose tolerance. Additionally, AGM significantly decreased HFD-induced elevation in serum triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels from 3.18-, 2.97- and 4.75- to 1.25-, 1.25- and 1.07-fold, respectively, compared to control group. Conversely, AGM had no significant effect on HFD-induced changes in fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin tolerance and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Furthermore, AGM significantly reduced HFD-induced elevation in mRNA expression of glucose transporter type-2 (GLUT-2), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) without affecting that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) in the liver. Additionally, AGM enhanced ACh-induced aortic relaxation and attenuated liver steatosis induced by HFD. In conclusion, AGM may have a therapeutic potential in insulin resistance through suppressing SREBP-1c, mTOR and GLUT-2 in liver.

  10. Insulin analogues: have they changed insulin treatment and improved glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2002-01-01

    To improve insulin therapy, new insulin analogues have been developed. Two fast-acting analogues with a more rapid onset of effect and a shorter duration of action combined with a low day-to-day variation in absorption rate are now available. Despite this favourable time-action profile most studies....... This is probably the main explanation for the absence of improvement in overall glycaemic control when compared with regular human insulin. A tendency to a reduction in hypoglycaemic events during treatment with fast-acting analogues has been observed in most studies. Recent studies have indicated that NPH insulin...... administered several times daily at mealtimes can improve glycaemic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia. The fast-acting analogues are now also available as insulin mixed with NPH. Insulin glargine is a new long-acting insulin which is soluble and precipitates after injection, resulting...

  11. Higher intramuscular triacylglycerol in women does not impair insulin sensitivity and proximal insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Louise; Roepstorff, Carsten; Thiele, Maja

    2009-01-01

    that despite 47% higher IMTG levels in women in the follicular phase whole body as well as leg insulin sensitivity are higher than in matched men. This was not explained by sex differences in proximal insulin signalling in women. In women it seems that a high capillary density and type 1 muscle fiber...... expression may be important for insulin action. Key words: Muscle Triglycerides, gender, insulin action, sex paradox....

  12. Short-term weight loss attenuates local tissue inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity without affecting adipose inflammation in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Lichtman, Eben I; Lee, Eunjung; Lawton, Elizabeth; Ong, Helena; Yu, Kristine; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Friedline, Randall H; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is a major cause of insulin resistance, and weight loss is shown to improve glucose homeostasis. But the underlying mechanism and the role of inflammation remain unclear. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk. After HFD, weight loss was induced by changing to a low-fat diet (LFD) or exercise with continuous HFD. The weight loss effects on energy balance and insulin sensitivity were determined using metabolic cages and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps in awake mice. Diet and exercise intervention for 3 wk caused a modest weight loss and improved glucose homeostasis. Weight loss dramatically reduced local inflammation in skeletal muscle, liver, and heart but not in adipose tissue. Exercise-mediated weight loss increased muscle glucose metabolism without affecting Akt phosphorylation or lipid levels. LFD-mediated weight loss reduced lipid levels and improved insulin sensitivity selectively in liver. Both weight loss interventions improved cardiac glucose metabolism. These results demonstrate that a short-term weight loss with exercise or diet intervention attenuates obesity-induced local inflammation and selectively improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver. Our findings suggest that local factors, not adipose tissue inflammation, are involved in the beneficial effects of weight loss on glucose homeostasis.

  13. Insulin resistance: definition and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovitz, H E

    2001-01-01

    Insulin resistance is defined clinically as the inability of a known quantity of exogenous or endogenous insulin to increase glucose uptake and utilization in an individual as much as it does in a normal population. Insulin action is the consequence of insulin binding to its plasma membrane receptor and is transmitted through the cell by a series of protein-protein interactions. Two major cascades of protein-protein interactions mediate intracellular insulin action: one pathway is involved in regulating intermediary metabolism and the other plays a role in controlling growth processes and mitoses. The regulation of these two distinct pathways can be dissociated. Indeed, some data suggest that the pathway regulating intermediary metabolism is diminished in type 2 diabetes while that regulating growth processes and mitoses is normal.--Several mechanisms have been proposed as possible causes underlying the development of insulin resistance and the insulin resistance syndrome. These include: (1) genetic abnormalities of one or more proteins of the insulin action cascade (2) fetal malnutrition (3) increases in visceral adiposity. Insulin resistance occurs as part of a cluster of cardiovascular-metabolic abnormalities commonly referred to as "The Insulin Resistance Syndrome" or "The Metabolic Syndrome". This cluster of abnormalities may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, accelerated atherosclerosis, hypertension or polycystic ovarian syndrome depending on the genetic background of the individual developing the insulin resistance.--In this context, we need to consider whether insulin resistance should be defined as a disease entity which needs to be diagnosed and treated with specific drugs to improve insulin action.

  14. Treatment of spontaneously hypertensive rats with rosiglitazone and/or enalapril restores balance between vasodilator and vasoconstrictor actions of insulin with simultaneous improvement in hypertension and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Maria A; Marasciulo, Flora L; Tarquinio, Mariela; Quon, Michael J; Montagnani, Monica

    2006-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Reciprocal relationships between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance may contribute to hypertension by causing imbalanced regulation of endothelial-derived vasodilators (e.g., nitric oxide) and vasoconstrictors (e.g., endothelin-1 [ET-1]). Treatment of SHRs with rosiglitazone (insulin sensitizer) and/or enalapril (ACE inhibitor) may simultaneously improve hypertension, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction by rebalancing insulin-stimulated production of vasoactive mediators. When compared with WKY control rats, 12-week-old vehicle-treated SHRs were hypertensive, overweight, and insulin resistant, with elevated fasting levels of insulin and ET-1 and reduced serum adiponectin levels. In mesenteric vascular beds (MVBs) isolated from vehicle-treated SHRs and preconstricted with norepinephrine (NE) ex vivo, vasodilator responses to insulin were significantly impaired, whereas the ability of insulin to oppose vasoconstrictor actions of NE was absent (versus WKY controls). Three-week treatment of SHRs with rosiglitazone and/or enalapril significantly reduced blood pressure, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, and ET-1 levels and increased adiponectin levels to values comparable with those observed in vehicle-treated WKY controls. By restoring phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent effects, rosiglitazone and/or enalapril therapy of SHRs also significantly improved vasodilator responses to insulin in MVB preconstricted with NE ex vivo. Taken together, our data provide strong support for the existence of reciprocal relationships between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance that may be relevant for developing novel therapeutic strategies for the metabolic syndrome.

  15. Central insulin action in energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Leona; Belgardt, Bengt F; Brüning, Jens C

    2006-07-01

    Insulin has pleiotropic biological effects in virtually all tissues. However, the relevance of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues has been studied far more extensively than its role in the brain. An evolving body of evidence indicates that in the brain, insulin is involved in multiple regulatory mechanisms including neuronal survival, learning, and memory, as well as in regulation of energy homeostasis and reproductive endocrinology. Here we review insulin's role as a central homeostatic signal with regard to energy and glucose homeostasis and discuss the mechanisms by which insulin communicates information about the body's energy status to the brain. Particular emphasis is placed on the controversial current debate about the similarities and differences between hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling at the molecular level.

  16. Capillary recruitment is impaired in essential hypertension and relates to insulin's metabolic and vascular actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serne, EH; Gans, ROB; ter Maaten, JC; ter Wee, PM; Donker, AM; Stehouwer, CDA

    Objective: In patients with essential hypertension, defects in both the metabolic and vascular actions of insulin have been described. Impaired microvascular function, a well-established abnormality in essential hypertension, may explain part of these defects. In the present study we investigated

  17. Fructose-rich diet and insulin action in female rat heart: Estradiol friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundalo, Maja; Romic, Snjezana; Tepavcevic, Snezana; Stojiljkovic, Mojca; Stankovic, Aleksandra; Zivkovic, Maja; Koricanac, Goran

    2017-09-15

    Increased intake of fructose in humans and laboratory animals is demonstrated to be a risk factor for development of metabolic disorders (insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, estradiol is emphasized as a cardioprotective agent. The main goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on damaging cardiac effects of fructose-rich diet in females, mostly experimental animals, and to evaluate protective capacity of estradiol. Published results of our and other research groups indicate mostly detrimental effects of fructose-rich diet on cardiac insulin signaling molecules, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, nitric oxide production and ion transport, as well as renin-angiotensin system and inflammation. Some of these processes are involved in cardiac insulin signal transmission, others are regulated by insulin or have an influence on insulin action. Administration of estradiol to ovariectomized female rats, exposed to increased intake of fructose, was mostly beneficial to the heart, but sometimes it was ineffective or even detrimental, depending on the particular processes. We believe that these data, carefully translated to human population, could be useful for clinicians dealing with postmenopausal women susceptible to metabolic diseases and hormone replacement therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effect of physical training on insulin secretion and action in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Stallknecht, Bente Merete

    2010-01-01

    in CON but not in FDR, whereas glucose-mediated GU increased (P groups. Adipose tissue GU was not affected by training, but it was higher (abdominal, P Training increased skeletal muscle lipolysis (P ...- to sevenfold. We conclude that insulin-secretory capacity is lower in FDR than in CON and that there is dissociation between training-induced changes in insulin secretion and insulin-mediated GU. Maximal GU rates are similar between groups and increases with physical training.......Physical training affects insulin secretion and action, but there is a paucity of data on the direct effects in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and on the effect of training in first-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied insulin action at the whole body level...

  19. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  20. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, C

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, /sup 125/I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and /sup 125/I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture.

  1. Long term rebaudioside A treatment does not alter circadian activity rhythms, adiposity, or insulin action in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Reynolds

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health problem that is highly associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, two conditions associated with circadian disruption. To date, dieting is one of the only interventions that result in substantial weight loss, but restricting caloric intake is difficult to maintain long-term. The use of artificial sweeteners, particularly in individuals that consume sugar sweetened beverages (energy drinks, soda, can reduce caloric intake and possibly facilitate weight loss. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of the artificial sweetener, rebaudioside A (Reb-A, on circadian rhythms, in vivo insulin action, and the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. Six month old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to a control or Reb-A (0.1% Reb-A supplemented drinking water group for six months. Circadian wheel running rhythms, body weight, caloric intake, insulin action, and susceptibility to diet-induced obesity were assessed. Time of peak physical activity under a 12:12 light-dark (LD cycle, mean activity levels, and circadian period in constant dark were not significantly different in mice that consumed Reb-A supplemented water compared to normal drinking water, indicating that circadian rhythms and biological clock function were unaltered. Although wheel running significantly reduced body weight in both Reb-A and control mice (P = 0.0001, consuming Reb-A supplemented water did not alter the changes in body weight following wheel running (P = 0.916. In vivo insulin action, as assessed by glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests, was not different between mice that consumed Reb-A treated water compared to normal drinking water. Finally, Reb-A does not appear to change the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity as both groups of mice gained similar amounts of body weight when placed on a high fat diet. Our results indicate that consuming Reb-A supplemented water does not promote circadian disruption

  2. PTP1B deficiency improves hypothalamic insulin sensitivity resulting in the attenuation of AgRP mRNA expression under high-fat diet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Mariko; Banno, Ryoichi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Tominaga, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Taku; Onoue, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Ito, Yoshihiro; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Iwama, Shintaro; Goto, Motomitsu; Suga, Hidetaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2017-06-17

    Hypothalamic insulin receptor signaling regulates energy balance and glucose homeostasis via agouti-related protein (AgRP). While protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is classically known to be a negative regulator of peripheral insulin signaling by dephosphorylating both insulin receptor β (IRβ) and insulin receptor substrate, the role of PTP1B in hypothalamic insulin signaling remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of PTP1B in hypothalamic insulin signaling using PTP1B deficient (KO) mice in vivo and ex vivo. For the in vivo study, hypothalamic insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) improved in KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Hypothalamic AgRP mRNA expression levels were also significantly decreased in KO mice independent of body weight changes. In an ex vivo study using hypothalamic organotypic cultures, insulin treatment significantly increased the phosphorylation of both IRβ and Akt in the hypothalamus of KO mice compared to WT mice, and also significantly decreased AgRP mRNA expression levels in KO mice. While incubation with inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) had no effect on basal levels of Akt phosphorylation, these suppressed insulin induction of Akt phosphorylation to almost basal levels in WT and KO mice. The inhibition of the PI3K-Akt pathway blocked the downregulation of AgRP mRNA expression in KO mice treated with insulin. These data suggest that PTP1B acts on the hypothalamic insulin signaling via the PI3K-Akt pathway. Together, our results suggest a deficiency of PTP1B improves hypothalamic insulin sensitivity resulting in the attenuation of AgRP mRNA expression under HFD conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Recruits Muscle Microvasculature and Improves Insulin’s Metabolic Action in the Presence of Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Weidong; Zhang, Xingxing; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) acutely recruits muscle microvasculature, increases muscle delivery of insulin, and enhances muscle use of glucose, independent of its effect on insulin secretion. To examine whether GLP-1 modulates muscle microvascular and metabolic insulin responses in the setting of insulin resistance, we assessed muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity, and blood flow in control insulin-sensitive rats and rats made insulin-resistant acutely (systemic lipid infusion) or chronically (high-fat diet [HFD]) before and after a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (3 mU/kg/min) with or without superimposed systemic GLP-1 infusion. Insulin significantly recruited muscle microvasculature and addition of GLP-1 further expanded muscle MBV and increased insulin-mediated glucose disposal. GLP-1 infusion potently recruited muscle microvasculature in the presence of either acute or chronic insulin resistance by increasing muscle MBV. This was associated with an increased muscle delivery of insulin and muscle interstitial oxygen saturation. Muscle insulin sensitivity was completely restored in the presence of systemic lipid infusion and significantly improved in rats fed an HFD. We conclude that GLP-1 infusion potently expands muscle microvascular surface area and improves insulin’s metabolic action in the insulin-resistant states. This may contribute to improved glycemic control seen in diabetic patients receiving incretin-based therapy. PMID:24658303

  4. Attenuation of Ca2+ homeostasis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunctions in diabetic rat heart: insulin therapy or aerobic exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Márcia F; Natali, Antônio J; da Silva, Edson; Gomes, Gilton J; Teodoro, Bruno G; Cunha, Daise N Q; Drummond, Lucas R; Drummond, Filipe R; Moura, Anselmo G; Belfort, Felipe G; de Oliveira, Alessandro; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Alberici, Luciane C

    2015-07-15

    We tested the effects of swimming training and insulin therapy, either alone or in combination, on the intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) homeostasis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial functions in diabetic rat hearts. Male Wistar rats were separated into control, diabetic, or diabetic plus insulin groups. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Insulin-treated groups received 1 to 4 UI of insulin daily for 8 wk. Each group was divided into sedentary or exercised rats. Trained groups were submitted to swimming (90 min/day, 5 days/wk, 8 wk). [Ca(2+)]i transient in left ventricular myocytes (LVM), oxidative stress in LV tissue, and mitochondrial functions in the heart were assessed. Diabetes reduced the amplitude and prolonged the times to peak and to half decay of the [Ca(2+)]i transient in LVM, increased NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox-4) expression, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased carbonyl protein contents in LV tissue. In isolated mitochondria, diabetes increased Ca(2+) uptake, susceptibility to permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) expression, and oxygen consumption but reduced H2O2 release. Swimming training corrected the time course of the [Ca(2+)]i transient, UCP-2 expression, and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Insulin replacement further normalized [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitude, Nox-4 expression, and carbonyl content. Alongside these benefits, the combination of both therapies restored the LV tissue SOD and mitochondrial O2 consumption, H2O2 release, and MPTP opening. In conclusion, the combination of swimming training with insulin replacement was more effective in attenuating intracellular Ca(2+) disruptions, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunctions in STZ-induced diabetic rat hearts. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Paresh; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Mohanty, Priya; Ghanim, Husam

    2007-07-01

    This review deals with the recent observations on the pro-inflammatory effects of glucose and the anti-inflammatory actions of insulin. Apart from being novel, they are central to our understanding of why hyperglycemia is a prognosticator of bad clinical outcomes including patients with acute coronary syndromes, stroke and in patients in the intensive care unit. The pro-inflammatory effect of glucose as well as that of other macronutrients including fast food meals provides the basis of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation in the obese and their propensity to atherosclerotic disease. The anti-inflammatory action of insulin provides a neutralizing effect to balance macronutrient induced inflammation on the one hand and the possibility of using insulin as an anti-inflammatory drug on the other. The actions of macronutrients and insulin described above explain why insulin resistant states like obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and atherosclerosis. They also suggest that insulin may be antiatherogenic.

  6. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Alzheimer's disease (CBS 2012), dementia (Health news 2012) and ... the effects of coffee on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance as ..... mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes. ... transporter family: Structure, function and tissue-.

  7. Diet-induced increases in chemerin are attenuated by exercise and mediate the effect of diet on insulin and HOMA-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jesse W.; Zerfass, Kristy M.; Heckstall, Ebony M.; Evans, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Chemerin concentrations are elevated in obesity and associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. Exercise improves insulin sensitivity, which may be facilitated by changes in chemerin. We explored the effects of chronic exercise on chemerin levels in diet-induced obese mice. Methods: We divided 40 mice into 4 groups: high-fat diet/exercise, high-fat diet/sedentary, normal diet/exercise, and normal diet/sedentary. A 9-week dietary intervention was followed by a 12-week exercise intervention (treadmill run: 11 m/min for 30 min, 3×/week). We analyzed blood samples before and after the exercise intervention. We used t-tests and linear regression to examine changes in chemerin, insulin resistance, and inflammatory markers, and associations between changes in chemerin and all other biomarkers. Results: Chemerin increased significantly across all mice over the 12-week intervention (mean ± SD = 40.7 ± 77.8%, p = 0.01), and this increase was smaller in the exercise versus sedentary mice (27.2 ± 83.9% versus 54.9 ± 70.5%, p = 0.29). The increase among the high-fat diet/exercise mice was ~44% lower than the increase among the high-fat diet/sedentary mice (55.7 ± 54.9% versus 99.8 ± 57.7%, p = 0.12). The high-fat diet mice showed significant increases in insulin (773.5 ± 1286.6%, p diet-induced increases in insulin and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: Chronic exercise may attenuate diet-driven increases in circulating chemerin, and the insulin resistance associated with a high-fat diet may be mediated by diet-induced increases in chemerin. PMID:26445641

  8. Brain insulin action augments hepatic glycogen synthesis without suppressing glucose production or gluconeogenesis in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Smith, Marta S.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Williams, Philip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Mari, Andrea; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, acute brain insulin action reduces blood glucose levels by suppressing the expression of enzymes in the hepatic gluconeogenic pathway, thereby reducing gluconeogenesis and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Whether a similar mechanism is functional in large animals, including humans, is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that in canines, physiologic brain hyperinsulinemia brought about by infusion of insulin into the head arteries (during a pancreatic clamp to maintain basal hepatic insulin and glucagon levels) activated hypothalamic Akt, altered STAT3 signaling in the liver, and suppressed hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression without altering EGP or gluconeogenesis. Rather, brain hyperinsulinemia slowly caused a modest reduction in net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) that was attributable to increased net hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. This was associated with decreased levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) protein and mRNA and with decreased glycogen synthase phosphorylation, changes that were blocked by hypothalamic PI3K inhibition. Therefore, we conclude that the canine brain senses physiologic elevations in plasma insulin, and that this in turn regulates genetic events in the liver. In the context of basal insulin and glucagon levels at the liver, this input augments hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, reducing NHGO without altering EGP. PMID:21865644

  9. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-08

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Diet-induced increases in chemerin are attenuated by exercise and mediate the effect of diet on insulin and HOMA-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jesse W; Zerfass, Kristy M; Heckstall, Ebony M; Evans, Kristin A

    2015-10-01

    Chemerin concentrations are elevated in obesity and associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. Exercise improves insulin sensitivity, which may be facilitated by changes in chemerin. We explored the effects of chronic exercise on chemerin levels in diet-induced obese mice. We divided 40 mice into 4 groups: high-fat diet/exercise, high-fat diet/sedentary, normal diet/exercise, and normal diet/sedentary. A 9-week dietary intervention was followed by a 12-week exercise intervention (treadmill run: 11 m/min for 30 min, 3×/week). We analyzed blood samples before and after the exercise intervention. We used t-tests and linear regression to examine changes in chemerin, insulin resistance, and inflammatory markers, and associations between changes in chemerin and all other biomarkers. Chemerin increased significantly across all mice over the 12-week intervention (mean ± SD = 40.7 ± 77.8%, p = 0.01), and this increase was smaller in the exercise versus sedentary mice (27.2 ± 83.9% versus 54.9 ± 70.5%, p = 0.29). The increase among the high-fat diet/exercise mice was ~44% lower than the increase among the high-fat diet/sedentary mice (55.7 ± 54.9% versus 99.8 ± 57.7%, p = 0.12). The high-fat diet mice showed significant increases in insulin (773.5 ± 1286.6%, p HOMA-IR; 846.5 ± 1723.3%, p HOMA-IR. Chronic exercise may attenuate diet-driven increases in circulating chemerin, and the insulin resistance associated with a high-fat diet may be mediated by diet-induced increases in chemerin.

  11. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  12. Nasal insulin changes peripheral insulin sensitivity simultaneously with altered activity in homeostatic and reward-related human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, M; Kullmann, S; Ketterer, C; Guthoff, M; Linder, K; Wagner, R; Stingl, K T; Veit, R; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2012-06-01

    Impaired insulin sensitivity is a major factor leading to type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that the brain is involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether insulin action in the human brain regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity and examined which brain areas are involved. Insulin and placebo were given intranasally. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured in 103 participants at 0, 30 and 60 min. A subgroup (n = 12) was also studied with functional MRI, and blood sampling at 0, 30 and 120 min. For each time-point, the HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as an inverse estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin increased and subsequently decreased. This excursion was accompanied by slightly decreased plasma glucose, resulting in an initially increased HOMA-IR. At 1 h after insulin spray, the HOMA-IR subsequently decreased and remained lower up to 120 min. An increase in hypothalamic activity was observed, which correlated with the increased HOMA-IR at 30 min post-spray. Activity in the putamen, right insula and orbitofrontal cortex correlated with the decreased HOMA-IR at 120 min post-spray. Central insulin action in specific brain areas, including the hypothalamus, may time-dependently regulate peripheral insulin sensitivity. This introduces a potential novel mechanism for the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity and underlines the importance of cerebral insulin action for the whole organism.

  13. Growth Hormone-Releaser Diet Attenuates Cognitive Dysfunction in Klotho Mutant Mice via Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Activation in a Genetic Aging Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Joo Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt has been recognized that a defect in klotho gene expression accelerates the degeneration of multiple age-sensitive traits. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging is associated with declines in cognitive function and the activity of growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1.MethodsIn this study, we examined whether a GH-releaser diet could be effective in protecting against cognitive impairment in klotho mutant mice.ResultsThe GH-releaser diet significantly induced the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptors in the hippocampus of klotho mutant mice. Klotho mutant mice showed significant memory impairments as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the klotho mutation significantly decreased the expression of cell survival/antiapoptotic factors, including phospho-Akt (p-Akt/phospho-glycogen synthase kinase3β (p-GSK3β, phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK, and Bcl-2, but significantly increased those of cell death/proapoptotic factors, such as phospho-c-jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 in the hippocampus. Treatment with GH-releaser diet significantly attenuated both decreases in the expression of cell survival/antiapoptotic factors and increases in the expression of cell death/proapoptotic factors in the hippocampus of klotho mutant mice. In addition, klotho mutation-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by the GH-releaser diet. Consequently, a GH-releaser diet significantly improved memory function in the klotho mutant mice. GH-releaser diet-mediated actions were significantly reversed by JB-1, an IGF-1 receptor antagonist.ConclusionThe results suggest that a GH-releaser diet attenuates oxidative stress, proapoptotic changes and consequent dysfunction in klotho mutant mice by promoting IGF-1 expression and IGF-1 receptor activation.

  14. Autophagy downregulation contributes to insulin resistance mediated injury in insulin receptor knockout podocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is unknown whether autophagy activity is altered in insulin resistant podocytes and whether autophagy could be a therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy (DN. Here we used shRNA transfection to knockdown the insulin receptor (IR gene in cultured human immortalized podocytes as an in vitro insulin resistant model. Autophagy related proteins LC3, Beclin, and p62 as well as nephrin, a podocyte injury marker, were assessed using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Our results show that autophagy is suppressed when podocytes lose insulin sensitivity and that treatment of rapamycin, an mTOR specific inhibitor, could attenuate insulin resistance induced podocytes injury via autophagy activation. The present study deepens our understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of DN.

  15. Maternal Moderate Physical Training during Pregnancy Attenuates the Effects of a Low-Protein Diet on the Impaired Secretion of Insulin in Rats: Potential Role for Compensation of Insulin Resistance and Preventing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Góis Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pregestational and gestational low-to-moderate physical training on insulin secretion in undernourished mothers were evaluated. Virgin female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: control (C, n=5; trained (T, n=5; low-protein diet (LP, n=5; trained with a low-protein diet (T + LP, n=5. Trained rats ran on a treadmill over a period of 4 weeks before mate (5 days week−1 and 60 min day−1, at 65% of VO2max. At pregnancy, the intensity and duration of the exercise were reduced. Low-protein groups were provided with an 8% casein diet, and controls were provided with a 17% casein diet. At third day after delivery, mothers and pups were killed and islets were isolated by collagenase digestion of pancreas and incubated for a further 1 h with medium containing 5.6 or 16.7 mM glucose. T mothers showed increased insulin secretion by isolated islets incubated with 16.7 mM glucose, whereas LP group showed reduced secretion of insulin by isolated islets when compared with both C and LP + T groups. Physical training before and during pregnancy attenuated the effects of a low-protein diet on the secretion of insulin, suggesting a potential role for compensation of insulin resistance and preventing gestational diabetes mellitus.

  16. Insulin degludec in type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of a new-generation ultra-long-acting insulin compared with insulin glargine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkeland, Kåre I.; Home, Philip D.; Wendisch, Ulrich; Ratner, Robert E.; Johansen, Thue; Endahl, Lars A.; Lyby, Karsten; Jendle, Johan H.; Roberts, Anthony P.; DeVries, J. Hans; Meneghini, Luigi F.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a basal insulin that forms soluble multihexamers after subcutaneous injection, resulting in an ultra-long action profile. We assessed the efficacy and safety of IDeg formulations administered once daily in combination with mealtime insulin aspart in people with type 1

  17. A two-week reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2009-01-01

    after step reduction, with a post hoc analysis revealing the most pronounced effect after 4 h of insulin infusion. In addition, the two-week period induced a 7% decline in VO2max (ml/min; cardiovascular fitness). Lean mass of legs, but not arms and truck, decreased concurrently. Taken together, one...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for two weeks in healthy, non-exercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass. Key words: Inactivity, Insulin...... number of daily steps induced a significant reduction of 17% in the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the clamp. This reduction was due to a decline in peripheral insulin sensitivity with no effect on hepatic endogenous glucose production. The insulin-stimulated ratio of pAkt(thr308)/total Akt decreased...

  18. The amine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine limits lipogenesis in adipocytes without inhibiting insulin action on glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpéné, Christian; Grès, Sandra; Rascalou, Simon

    2013-06-01

    The antidepressant phenelzine is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor known to inhibit various other enzymes, among them semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (currently named primary amine oxidase: SSAO/PrAO), absent from neurones but abundant in adipocytes. It has been reported that phenelzine inhibits adipocyte differentiation of cultured preadipocytes. To further explore the involved mechanisms, our aim was to study in vitro the acute effects of phenelzine on de novo lipogenesis in mature fat cells. Therefore, glucose uptake and incorporation into lipid were measured in mouse adipocytes in response to phenelzine, other hydrazine-based SSAO/PrAO-inhibitors, and reference agents. None of the inhibitors was able to impair the sevenfold activation of 2-deoxyglucose uptake induced by insulin. Phenelzine did not hamper the effect of lower doses of insulin. However, insulin-stimulated glucose incorporation into lipids was dose-dependently inhibited by phenelzine and pentamidine, but not by semicarbazide or BTT2052. In contrast, all these SSAO/PrAO inhibitors abolished the transport and lipogenesis stimulation induced by benzylamine. These data indicate that phenelzine does not inhibit glucose transport, the first step of lipogenesis, but inhibits at 100 μM the intracellular triacylglycerol assembly, consistently with its long-term anti-adipogenic effect and such rapid action was not found with all the hydrazine derivatives tested. Therefore, the alterations of body weight control consecutive to the use of this antidepressant drug might be not only related to central effects on food intake/energy expenditure, but could also depend on its direct action in adipocytes. Nonetheless, phenelzine antilipogenic action is not merely dependent on SSAO/PrAO inhibition.

  19. Insulin in the brain: there and back again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A; Owen, Joshua B; Erickson, Michelle A

    2012-10-01

    Insulin performs unique functions within the CNS. Produced nearly exclusively by the pancreas, insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) using a saturable transporter, affecting feeding and cognition through CNS mechanisms largely independent of glucose utilization. Whereas peripheral insulin acts primarily as a metabolic regulatory hormone, CNS insulin has an array of effects on brain that may more closely resemble the actions of the ancestral insulin molecule. Brain endothelial cells (BECs), the cells that form the vascular BBB and contain the transporter that translocates insulin from blood to brain, are themselves regulated by insulin. The insulin transporter is altered by physiological and pathological factors including hyperglycemia and the diabetic state. The latter can lead to BBB disruption. Pericytes, pluripotent cells in intimate contact with the BECs, protect the integrity of the BBB and its ability to transport insulin. Most of insulin's known actions within the CNS are mediated through two canonical pathways, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3)/Akt and Ras/mitogen activated kinase (MAPK) cascades. Resistance to insulin action within the CNS, sometimes referred to as diabetes mellitus type III, is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, but it is possible that variable hormonal resistance syndromes exist so that resistance at one tissue bed may be independent of that at others. CNS insulin resistance is associated with Alzheimer's disease, depression, and impaired baroreceptor gain in pregnancy. These aspects of CNS insulin action and the control of its entry by the BBB are likely only a small part of the story of insulin within the brain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Quantum system under the actions of two counteracting baths: A model for the attenuation-amplification interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, F.; Moussa, M. H. Y.; Ponte, M. A. de; Almeida, N. G. de

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the dynamical behavior of a quantum system under the actions of two counteracting baths: the inevitable energy draining reservoir and, in opposition, exciting the system, an engineered Glauber's amplifier. We follow the system dynamics towards equilibrium to map its distinctive behavior arising from the interplay of attenuation and amplification. Such a mapping, with the corresponding parameter regimes, is achieved by calculating the evolution of both the excitation and the Glauber-Sudarshan P function. Techniques to compute the decoherence and the fidelity of quantum states under the action of both counteracting baths, based on the Wigner function rather than the density matrix, are also presented. They enable us to analyze the similarity of the evolved state vector of the system with respect to the original one, for all regimes of parameters. Applications of this attenuation-amplification interplay are discussed.

  1. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  2. Does DNA Methylation of PPARGC1A Influence Insulin Action in First Degree Relatives of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillberg, Linn; Jacobsen, Stine; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    and in muscle from individuals at risk of T2D. This study aimed to investigate DNA promoter methylation and gene expression of PPARGC1A in skeletal muscle from first degree relatives (FDR) of T2D patients, and to determine the association with insulin action as well as the influence of family relation. We...... genetic regulation to play a role. No significant effect of familiality on DNA methylation was found. Taken together, increased DNA methylation of the PPARGC1A promoter is unlikely to play a major causal role for the development of insulin resistance in FDR of patients with T2D....... included 124 Danish FDR of T2D patients from 46 different families. Skeletal muscle biopsies were excised from vastus lateralis and insulin action was assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests. DNA methylation and mRNA expression levels were measured using bisulfite sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR...

  3. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V; Li, Ji; Musi, Nicolas; Hussey, Sophie E

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo.

  4. Circulating interleukin-6 in relation to adiposity, insulin action, and insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, B; Weyer, C; Hanson, K

    2001-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine produced and released in part by adipose tissue, are elevated in people with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because recent studies suggest that markers of inflammation predict the development of type 2 diabetes, we examined w...... whether circulating plasma IL-6 concentrations were related to direct measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction in Pima Indians, a population with high rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes....

  5. Evaluation of insulin secretion and action in New World camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firshman, Anna M; Cebra, Christopher K; Schanbacher, Barbara J; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2013-01-01

    To measure and compare insulin secretion and sensitivity in healthy alpacas and llamas via glucose clamping techniques. 8 llamas and 8 alpacas. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping (HEC) and hyperglycemic clamping (HGC) were performed on each camelid in a crossover design with a minimum 48-hour washout period between clamping procedures. The HEC technique was performed to measure insulin sensitivity. Insulin was infused IV at 6 mU/min/kg for 4 hours, and an IV infusion of glucose was adjusted to maintain blood glucose concentration at 150 mg/dL. Concentrations of blood glucose and plasma insulin were determined throughout. The HGC technique was performed to assess insulin secretion in response to exogenous glucose infusion. An IV infusion of glucose was administered to maintain blood glucose concentration at 320 mg/dL for 3 hours, and concentrations of blood glucose and plasma insulin were determined throughout. Alpacas and llamas were not significantly different with respect to whole-body insulin sensitivity during HEC or in pancreatic β-cell response during HGC. Alpacas and llamas had markedly lower insulin sensitivity during HEC and markedly lower pancreatic β-cell response during HGC, in comparison with many other species. New World camelids had lower glucose-induced insulin secretion and marked insulin resistance in comparison with other species. This likely contributes to the disorders of fat and glucose metabolism that are common to camelids.

  6. A role for polyamines in glucose-stimulated insulin-gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, N

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible role for polyamines in the glucose regulation of the metabolism of insulin mRNA of pancreatic islet cells. For this purpose islets were prepared from adult mice and cultured for 2 days in culture medium RPMI 1640 containing 3.3 mM- or 16.7 mM-glucose with or without the addition of the inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and ethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (EGBG). Culture at the high glucose concentration increased the islet contents of both insulin mRNA and polyamines. The synthesis of total RNA, total islet polyamines and polyamines associated with islet nuclei was also increased. When the combination of DFMO and EGBG was added in the presence of 16.7 mM-glucose, low contents of insulin mRNA, spermine and spermidine were observed. Total islet polyamine synthesis was also depressed by DFMO + EGBG, unlike islet biosynthesis of polyamines associated with nuclei, which was not equally decreased by the polyamine-synthesis inhibitors. Total RNA synthesis and turnover was not affected by DFMO + EGBG. Finally, actinomycin D attenuated the glucose-induced enhancement of insulin mRNA, and cycloheximide counteracted the insulin-mRNA attenuation induced by inhibition of polyamine synthesis. It is concluded that the glucose-induced increase in insulin mRNA is paralleled by increased contents and rates of polyamine biosynthesis and that an attenuation of the increase in polyamines prevents the increase in insulin mRNA. In addition, the results are compatible with the view that polyamines exert their effects on insulin mRNA mainly by increasing the stability of this messenger. PMID:2241922

  7. The Role of the Immune System in Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal S. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system provides organisms with rapid and well-coordinated protection from foreign pathogens. However, under certain conditions of metabolic dysfunction, components of the innate immune system may be activated in the absence of external pathogens, leading to pathologic consequences. Indeed, there appears to be an intimate relationship between metabolic diseases and immune dysfunction; for example, macrophages are prime players in the initiation of a chronic inflammatory state in obesity which leads to insulin resistance. In response to increases in free fatty acid release from obese adipose depots, M1-polarized macrophages infiltrate adipose tissues. These M1 macrophages trigger inflammatory signaling and stress responses within cells that signal through JNK or IKKβ pathways, leading to insulin resistance. If overnutrition persists, mechanisms that counteract inflammation (such as M2 macrophages and PPAR signaling are suppressed, and the inflammation becomes chronic. Although macrophages are a principal constituent of obese adipose tissue inflammation, other components of the immune system such as lymphocytes and mast cells also contribute to the inflammatory cascade. Thus it is not merely an increased mass of adipose tissue that directly leads to attenuation of insulin action, but rather adipose tissue inflammation activated by the immune system in obese individuals that leads to insulin resistance.

  8. The effect of salsalate on insulin action and glucose tolerance in obese non-diabetic patients: results of a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koska, J; Ortega, E; Bunt, J C

    2009-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation may contribute to obesity-related insulin resistance and has been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study evaluated whether treatment with salsalate, a traditional anti-inflammatory medication, would improve insulin action in obese non-...

  9. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  10. High-Fat Diet Augments VPAC1 Receptor-Mediated PACAP Action on the Liver, Inducing LAR Expression and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Nakata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP acts on multiple processes of glucose and energy metabolism. PACAP potentiates insulin action in adipocytes and insulin release from pancreatic β-cells, thereby enhancing glucose tolerance. Contrary to these effects at organ levels, PACAP null mice exhibit hypersensitivity to insulin. However, this apparent discrepancy remains to be solved. We aimed to clarify the mechanism underlying the antidiabetic phenotype of PACAP null mice. Feeding with high-fat diet (HFD impaired insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in wild type mice, whereas these changes were prevented in PACAP null mice. HFD also impaired insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation in the liver in wild type mice, but not in PACAP null mice. Using GeneFishing method, HFD increased the leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR protein tyrosine phosphatase in the liver in wild type mice. Silencing of LAR restored the insulin signaling in the liver of HFD mice. Moreover, the increased LAR expression by HFD was prevented in PACAP null mice. HFD increased the expression of VPAC1 receptor (VPAC1-R, one of three PACAP receptors, in the liver of wild type mice. These data indicate that PACAP-VPAC1-R signaling induces LAR expression and insulin resistance in the liver of HFD mice. Antagonism of VPAC1-R may prevent progression of HFD-induced insulin resistance in the liver, providing a novel antidiabetic strategy.

  11. A 2-wk reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2010-01-01

    decreased after step reduction, with a post hoc analysis revealing the most pronounced effect after 4 h of insulin infusion. In addition, the 2-wk period induced a 7% decline in VO2 max (ml/min; cardiovascular fitness). Lean mass of legs, but not arms and trunk, decreased concurrently. Taken together, one...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of Type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for 2 wk in healthy, nonexercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass........ A reduced number of daily steps induced a significant reduction of 17% in the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the clamp. This reduction was due to a decline in peripheral insulin sensitivity with no effect on hepatic endogenous glucose production. The insulin-stimulated ratio of pAktthr308/total Akt...

  12. Insulin resistance in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes: dissimilarities for glucose and intermediary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, H. G.; Radder, J. K.; Poorthuis, B. J.; Krans, H. M.

    1990-01-01

    To study insulin action on intermediary metabolism in relation to glucose disposal in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, 29 patients and 15 control subjects underwent sequential euglycemic clamps (insulin infusion rates 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 mU.kg-1.min-1 in 2 hour periods). Dose-response curves

  13. Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babraj, John A; Vollaard, Niels B J; Keast, Cameron

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional high volume aerobic exercise training reduces cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk but involves a substantial time commitment. Extremely low volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) has recently been demonstrated to produce improvements to aerobic function...... cycle sprints per session). Aerobic performance (250-kJ self-paced cycling time trial), and glucose, insulin and NEFA responses to a 75-g oral glucose load (oral glucose tolerance test; OGTT) were determined before and after training. RESULTS: Following 2 weeks of HIT, the area under the plasma glucose......, to substantially improve insulin action in young sedentary subjects is remarkable. This novel time-efficient training paradigm can be used as a strategy to reduce metabolic risk factors in young and middle aged sedentary populations who otherwise would not adhere to time consuming traditional aerobic exercise...

  14. Insulin resistance and improvements in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musi, Nicolas; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2006-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes and obesity are common metabolic disorders characterized by resistance to the actions of insulin to stimulate skeletal muscle glucose disposal. Insulin-resistant muscle has defects at several steps of the insulin-signaling pathway, including decreases in insulin-stimulated insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activation. One approach to increase muscle glucose disposal is to reverse/improve these insulin-signaling defects. Weight loss and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) improve glucose disposal, in part, by increasing insulin-stimulated insulin receptor and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and PI 3-kinase activity. In contrast, physical training and metformin improve whole-body glucose disposal but have minimal effects on proximal insulin-signaling steps. A novel approach to reverse insulin resistance involves inhibition of the stress-activated protein kinase Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A different strategy to increase muscle glucose disposal is by stimulating insulin-independent glucose transport. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an enzyme that works as a fuel gauge and becomes activated in situations of energy consumption, such as muscle contraction. Several studies have shown that pharmacologic activation of AMPK increases glucose transport in muscle, independent of the actions of insulin. AMPK activation is also involved in the mechanism of action of metformin and adiponectin. Moreover, in the hypothalamus, AMPK regulates appetite and body weight. The effect of AMPK to stimulate muscle glucose disposal and to control appetite makes it an important pharmacologic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  15. Comparison of Subcutaneous Regular Insulin and Lispro Insulin in Diabetics Receiving Continuous Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Mamie C.; Strilka, Richard J.; Clemens, Michael S.; Armen, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimal management of non–critically ill patients with diabetes maintained on continuous enteral feeding (CEN) is poorly defined. Subcutaneous (SQ) lispro and SQ regular insulin were compared in a simulated type 1 and type 2 diabetic patient receiving CEN. Method: A glucose-insulin feedback mathematical model was employed to simulate type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients on CEN. Each patient received 25 SQ injections of regular insulin or insulin lispro, ranging from 0-6 U. Primary endpoints were the change in mean glucose concentration (MGC) and change in glucose variability (GV); hypoglycemic episodes were also reported. The model was first validated against patient data. Results: Both SQ insulin preparations linearly decreased MGC, however, SQ regular insulin decreased GV whereas SQ lispro tended to increase GV. Hourly glucose concentration measurements were needed to capture the increase in GV. In the type 2 diabetic patient, “rebound hyperglycemia” occurred after SQ lispro was rapidly metabolized. Although neither SQ insulin preparation caused hypoglycemia, SQ lispro significantly lowered MGC compared to SQ regular insulin. Thus, it may be more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Analyses of the detailed glucose concentration versus time data suggest that the inferior performance of lispro resulted from its shorter duration of action. Finally, the effects of both insulin preparations persisted beyond their duration of actions in the type 2 diabetic patient. Conclusions: Subcutaneous regular insulin may be the short-acting insulin preparation of choice for this subset of diabetic patients. Clinical trial is required before a definitive recommendation can be made. PMID:26134836

  16. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present...

  17. Voluntary wheel running selectively augments insulin-stimulated vasodilation in arterioles from white skeletal muscle of insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikus, Catherine R; Roseguini, Bruno T; Uptergrove, Grace M; Morris, E Matthew; Rector, Randy Scott; Libla, Jessica L; Oberlin, Douglas J; Borengasser, Sarah J; Taylor, Angelina M; Ibdah, Jamal A; Laughlin, Maurice Harold; Thyfault, John P

    2012-11-01

    Exercise (RUN) prevents declines in insulin-mediated vasodilation, an important component of insulin-mediated glucose disposal, in rats prone to obesity and insulin resistance. Determine whether RUN (1) improves insulin-stimulated vasodilation after insulin resistance has been established, and (2) differentially affects arterioles from red and white muscle. Insulin signaling and vasoreactivity to insulin (1-1000 μIU/mL) were assessed in 2A from the Gw and Gr of SED OLETF rats at 12 and 20 weeks of age (SED12, SED20) and those undergoing RUN (RUN20) or caloric restriction (CR20; to match body weight of RUN) from 12 to 20 weeks. Glucose and insulin responses to i.p. glucose were reduced in RUN20, elevated in SED20 (p RUN20 (p RUN selectively improved insulin-mediated vasodilation in Gw 2As, in part through attenuated ET-1 sensitivity/production, an adaptation that was independent of changes in adiposity and may contribute to enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impaired insulin action in the human brain: causes and metabolic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Kullmann, Stephanie; Preissl, Hubert; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated that the human brain is an insulin-sensitive organ. Insulin regulates activity in a limited number of specific brain areas that are important for memory, reward, eating behaviour and the regulation of whole-body metabolism. Accordingly, insulin in the brain modulates cognition, food intake and body weight as well as whole-body glucose, energy and lipid metabolism. However, brain imaging studies have revealed that not everybody responds equally to insulin and that a substantial number of people are brain insulin resistant. In this Review, we provide an overview of the effects of insulin in the brain in humans and the relevance of the effects for physiology. We present emerging evidence for insulin resistance of the human brain. Factors associated with brain insulin resistance such as obesity and increasing age, as well as possible pathogenic factors such as visceral fat, saturated fatty acids, alterations at the blood-brain barrier and certain genetic polymorphisms, are reviewed. In particular, the metabolic consequences of brain insulin resistance are discussed and possible future approaches to overcome brain insulin resistance and thereby prevent or treat obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are outlined.

  19. Insulin analogues in type 1 diabetes mellitus: getting better all the time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Chantal; Gillard, Pieter; Benhalima, Katrien

    2017-07-01

    The treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus consists of external replacement of the functions of β cells in an attempt to achieve blood levels of glucose as close to the normal range as possible. This approach means that glucose sensing needs to be replaced and levels of insulin need to mimic physiological insulin-action profiles, including basal coverage and changes around meals. Training and educating patients are crucial for the achievement of good glycaemic control, but having insulin preparations with action profiles that provide stable basal insulin coverage and appropriate mealtime insulin peaks helps people with type 1 diabetes mellitus to live active lives without sacrificing tight glycaemic control. Insulin analogues enable patients to achieve this goal, as some have fast action profiles, and some have very slow action profiles, which gives people with type 1 diabetes mellitus the tools to achieve dynamic insulin-action profiles that enable tight glycaemic control with a risk of hypoglycaemia that is lower than that with human short-acting and long-acting insulins. This Review discusses the established and novel insulin analogues that are used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and provides insights into the future development of insulin analogues.

  20. Hypothalamic and Striatal Insulin Action Suppresses Endogenous Glucose Production and May Stimulate Glucose Uptake During Hyperinsulinemia in Lean but Not in Overweight Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Kullmann, Stephanie; Gancheva, Sofiya; Roden, Michael; Peter, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Intranasal spray application facilitates insulin delivery to the human brain. Although brain insulin modulates peripheral metabolism, the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Twenty-one men underwent two hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with d-[6,6- 2 H 2 ]glucose infusion to measure endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance. On two separate days, participants received intranasal insulin or placebo. Insulin spillover into circulation after intranasal insulin application was mimicked by an intravenous insulin bolus on placebo day. On a different day, brain insulin sensitivity was assessed by functional MRI. Glucose infusion rates (GIRs) had to be increased more after nasal insulin than after placebo to maintain euglycemia in lean but not in overweight people. The increase in GIRs was associated with regional brain insulin action in hypothalamus and striatum. Suppression of endogenous glucose production by circulating insulin was more pronounced after administration of nasal insulin than after placebo. Furthermore, glucose uptake into tissue tended to be higher after nasal insulin application. No such effects were detected in overweight participants. By increasing insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, brain insulin may improve glucose metabolism during systemic hyperinsulinemia. Obese people appear to lack these mechanisms. Therefore, brain insulin resistance in obesity may have unfavorable consequences for whole-body glucose homeostasis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Genetic and nongenetic determinants of skeletal muscle glucose transporter 4 messenger ribonucleic acid levels and insulin action in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Heidi; Poulsen, Pernille; Ling, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    -stimulated expressions of GLUT4 were independently and significantly related to whole-body in vivo insulin action, nonoxidative glucose metabolism, and glucose oxidation. CONCLUSION: We show that skeletal muscle GLUT4 gene expression in twins is significantly and independently related to glucose metabolism...

  2. Early differential defects of insulin secretion and action in 19-year-old caucasian men who had low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Dela, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Several studies have linked low birth weight (LBW) and type 2 diabetes. We investigated hepatic and peripheral insulin action including intracellular glucose metabolism in 40 19-year-old men (20 LBW, 20 matched control subjects), using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique at two...

  3. Selective Insulin Resistance in the Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been characterized as attenuation of insulin sensitivity at target organs and tissues, such as muscle and fat tissues and the liver. The insulin signaling cascade is divided into major pathways such as the PI3K/Akt pathway and the MAPK/MEK pathway. In insulin resistance, however, these pathways are not equally impaired. For example, in the liver, inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 2 pathway is impaired, while lipogenesis by the IRS1 pathway is preserved, thus causing hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It has been recently suggested that selective impairment of insulin signaling cascades in insulin resistance also occurs in the kidney. In the renal proximal tubule, insulin signaling via IRS1 is inhibited, while insulin signaling via IRS2 is preserved. Insulin signaling via IRS2 continues to stimulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule and causes sodium retention, edema, and hypertension. IRS1 signaling deficiency in the proximal tubule may impair IRS1-mediated inhibition of gluconeogenesis, which could induce hyperglycemia by preserving glucose production. In the glomerulus, the impairment of IRS1 signaling deteriorates the structure and function of podocyte and endothelial cells, possibly causing diabetic nephropathy. This paper mainly describes selective insulin resistance in the kidney, focusing on the proximal tubule. PMID:27247938

  4. Vitamin C and E chronic supplementation differentially affect hepatic insulin signaling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mennatallah A; Eid, Rania M H M; Hanafi, Mervat Y

    2018-02-01

    Vitamin C and vitamin E supplementations and their beneficial effects on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been subjected to countless controversial data. Hence, our aim is to investigate the hepatic molecular mechanisms of any diabetic predisposing risk of the chronic administration of different doses of vitamin E or vitamin C in rats. The rats were supplemented with different doses of vitamin C or vitamin E for eight months. Vitamin C and vitamin E increased fasting blood glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA). Vitamin C disrupted glucose tolerance by attenuating upstream hepatic insulin action through impairing the phosphorylation and activation of insulin receptor and its subsequent substrates; however, vitamin E showed its effect downstream insulin receptor in the insulin signaling pathway, reducing hepatic glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and phosphorylated protein kinase (p-Akt). Moreover, both vitamins showed their antioxidant capabilities [nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), total and reduced glutathione] and their negative effect on Wnt pathway [phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β)], by altering the previously mentioned parameters, inevitably leading to severe reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) below the physiological levels. In conclusion, a detrimental effect of chronic antioxidant vitamins supplementation was detected; leading to insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance obviously through different mechanisms. Overall, these findings indicate that the conventional view that vitamins promote health benefits and delay chronic illnesses and aging should be modified or applied with caution. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. IGF-1 and insulin exert opposite actions on ClC-K2 activity in the cortical collecting ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    Despite similar stimulatory actions on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule, insulin promotes kaliuresis, whereas insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) causes a reduction in urinary potassium levels. The factors contributing to this phenomenon remain elusive. Electrogenic distal nephron ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport establishes driving force for Cl(-) reabsorption and K(+) secretion. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we document that a Cl(-) channel is highly abundant on the basolateral plasma membrane of intercalated cells in freshly isolated mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. The channel has characteristics attributable to the ClC-K2: slow gating kinetics, conductance ∼10 pS, voltage independence, Cl(-)>NO3 (-) anion selectivity, and inhibition/activation by low/high pH, respectively. IGF-1 (100 and 500 nM) acutely stimulates ClC-K2 activity in a reversible manner. Inhibition of PI3-kinase (PI3-K) with LY294002 (20 μM) abrogates activation of ClC-K2 by IGF-1. Interestingly, insulin (100 nM) reversibly decreases ClC-K2 activity in CCD cells. This inhibitory action is independent of PI3-K and is mediated by stimulation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent cascade. We propose that IGF-1, by stimulating ClC-K2 channels, promotes net Na(+) and Cl(-) reabsorption, thus reducing driving force for potassium secretion by the CCD. In contrast, inhibition of ClC-K2 by insulin favors coupling of Na(+) reabsorption with K(+) secretion at the apical membrane contributing to kaliuresis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance | Pillay | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review discusses recent advances in understanding of the structure and function of the insulin receptor and insulin action, and how these relate to the clinical aspects of insulin resistance associated with non-insulin-dependent diabetes and other disorders. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of insulin ...

  7. High-Protein Intake during Weight Loss Therapy Eliminates the Weight-Loss-Induced Improvement in Insulin Action in Obese Postmenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon I. Smith; Jun Yoshino; Shannon C. Kelly; Dominic N. Reeds; Adewole Okunade; Bruce W. Patterson; Samuel Klein; Bettina Mittendorfer

    2016-01-01

    High-protein (HP) intake during weight loss (WL) therapy is often recommended because it reduces the loss of lean tissue mass. However, HP intake could have adverse effects on metabolic function, because protein ingestion reduces postprandial insulin sensitivity. In this study, we compared the effects of ∼10% WL with a hypocaloric diet containing 0.8 g protein/kg/day and a hypocaloric diet containing 1.2 g protein/kg/day on muscle insulin action in postmenopausal women with obesity. We found ...

  8. Effects of meals rich in either monounsaturated or saturated fat on lipid concentrations and on insulin secretion and action in subjects with high fasting triglyceride concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Sergio; Bermudez, Beatriz; Ortega, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes M; Pacheco, Yolanda M; Villar, Jose; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2011-03-01

    The nature of dietary fats and fasting concentrations of triglycerides affect postprandial hypertriglyceridemia and glucose homeostasis. The objectives were to examine the effects of meals enriched in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or saturated fatty acids (SFAs) on postprandial lipid, glucose, and insulin concentrations and to examine the extent of β cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with high fasting triglyceride concentrations. Fourteen men with fasting hypertriglyceridemia and normal glucose tolerance were given meals (≈10 kcal/kg body weight) containing MUFAs, SFAs, or no fat. Blood samples were collected at baseline and hourly over 8 h for analysis. The high-fat meals significantly increased postprandial concentrations of triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and insulin and postprandial indexes of β cell function. However, postprandial indexes of insulin sensitivity decreased significantly. These effects were significantly attenuated with MUFAs relative to SFAs. MUFAs postprandially buffered β cell hyperactivity and insulin intolerance relative to SFAs in subjects with high fasting triglyceride concentrations. These data suggest that, in contrast with SFAs, MUFA-based strategies may provide cardiovascular benefits to persons at risk by limiting lipid and insulin excursions and may contribute to optimal glycemic control after meal challenges.

  9. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  10. Hypoxia in Combination With Muscle Contraction Improves Insulin Action and Glucose Metabolism in Human Skeletal Muscle via the HIF-1α Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgens, Sven W; Benninghoff, Tim; Eckardt, Kristin; Springer, Christian; Chadt, Alexandra; Melior, Anita; Wefers, Jakob; Cramer, Andrea; Jensen, Jørgen; Birkeland, Kåre I; Drevon, Christian A; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Eckel, Jürgen

    2017-11-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes and develops long before the onset of the disease. It is well accepted that physical activity improves glycemic control, but the knowledge on underlying mechanisms mediating the beneficial effects remains incomplete. Exercise is accompanied by a decrease in intramuscular oxygen levels, resulting in induction of HIF-1α. HIF-1α is a master regulator of gene expression and might play an important role in skeletal muscle function and metabolism. Here we show that HIF-1α is important for glucose metabolism and insulin action in skeletal muscle. By using a genome-wide gene expression profiling approach, we identified RAB20 and TXNIP as two novel exercise/HIF-1α-regulated genes in skeletal muscle. Loss of Rab20 impairs insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in human and mouse skeletal muscle by blocking the translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface. In addition, exercise/HIF-1α downregulates the expression of TXNIP , a well-known negative regulator of insulin action. In conclusion, we are the first to demonstrate that HIF-1α is a key regulator of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle by directly controlling the transcription of RAB20 and TXNIP These results hint toward a novel function of HIF-1α as a potential pharmacological target to improve skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Expression profiling of insulin action in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.; Gaster, Michael; Oakeley, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Myotube cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) represent an experimental in vitro model of T2DM that offers a possibility to perform gene expression studies under standardized conditions. During a time-course of insulin stimulation (1 microM) at 5.5 mM glucose for 0 (no insulin......, metabolic enzymes, and finally cell cycle regulating genes. One-hundred-forty-four genes were differentially expressed in myotubes from donors with type 2 diabetes compared with control subjects, including HSP70, apolipoprotein D/E, tropomyosin, myosin, and actin previously reported from in vivo studies...... of diabetic skeletal muscle. We conclude, (i) that insulin induces a time-dependent inflammatory and pro-angiogenic transcriptional response in cultured human myotubes, (ii) that myotubes in vitro retain a gene expression pattern specific for type 2 diabetes and sharing five genes with that of type 2 diabetic...

  12. Subliminal action priming modulates the perceived intensity of sensory action consequences☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Bauer, Markus; Sidarus, Nura; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Haggard, Patrick; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of control over the consequences of one’s actions depends on predictions about these consequences. According to an influential computational model, consistency between predicted and observed action consequences attenuates perceived stimulus intensity, which might provide a marker of agentic control. An important assumption of this model is that these predictions are generated within the motor system. However, previous studies of sensory attenuation have typically confounded motor-specific perceptual modulation with perceptual effects of stimulus predictability that are not specific to motor action. As a result, these studies cannot unambiguously attribute sensory attenuation to a motor locus. We present a psychophysical experiment on auditory attenuation that avoids this pitfall. Subliminal masked priming of motor actions with compatible prime–target pairs has previously been shown to modulate both reaction times and the explicit feeling of control over action consequences. Here, we demonstrate reduced perceived loudness of tones caused by compatibly primed actions. Importantly, this modulation results from a manipulation of motor processing and is not confounded by stimulus predictability. We discuss our results with respect to theoretical models of the mechanisms underlying sensory attenuation and subliminal motor priming. PMID:24333539

  13. Partial ablation of adult Drosophila insulin-producing neurons modulates glucose homeostasis and extends life span without insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselton, Aaron; Sharmin, Effat; Schrader, Janel; Sah, Megha; Poon, Peter; Fridell, Yih-Woei C

    2010-08-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), neurosecretory insulin-like peptide-producing cells (IPCs), analogous to mammalian pancreatic beta cells are involved in glucose homeostasis. Extending those findings, we have developed in the adult fly an oral glucose tolerance test and demonstrated that IPCs indeed are responsible for executing an acute glucose clearance response. To further develop D. melanogaster as a relevant system for studying age-associated metabolic disorders, we set out to determine the impact of adult-specific partial ablation of IPCs (IPC knockdown) on insulin-like peptide (ILP) action, metabolic outcomes and longevity. Interestingly, while IPC knockdown flies are hyperglycemic and glucose intolerant, these flies remain insulin sensitive as measured by peripheral glucose disposal upon insulin injection and serine phosphorylation of a key insulin-signaling molecule, Akt. Significant increases in stored glycogen and triglyceride levels as well as an elevated level of circulating lipid measured in adult IPC knockdown flies suggest profound modulation in energy metabolism. Additional physiological outcomes measured in those flies include increased resistance to starvation and impaired female fecundity. Finally, increased life span and decreased mortality rates measured in IPC knockdown flies demonstrate that it is possible to modulate ILP action in adult flies to achieve life span extension without insulin resistance. Taken together, we have established and validated an invertebrate genetic system to further investigate insulin action, metabolic homeostasis and regulation of aging regulated by adult IPCs.

  14. Glucose-lowering effect and glycaemic variability of insulin glargine, insulin detemir and insulin lispro protamine in people with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, G; Franzetti, I; Querci, F; Romano, D; D'Angelo, A; Maffioli, P

    2015-06-01

    To compare, using a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, the effect on glycaemic variability of insulin glargine, detemir and lispro protamine. A total of 49 white people with type 1 diabetes, not well controlled by three times daily insulin lispro, taken for at least 2 months before study and on a stable dose, were enrolled. The study participants were randomized to add insulin glargine, detemir or lispro protamine, once daily, in the evening. We used a CGM system, the iPro Digital Recorder (Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA, USA) for 1 week. Glycaemic control was assessed according to mean blood glucose values, the area under the glucose curve above 3.9 mmol/l (AUC(>3.9)) or above 10.0 mmol/l (AUC(>10.0)), and the percentage of time spent with glucose values >3.9 or >10.0 mmol/l. Intraday glycaemic variability was assessed using standard deviation (s.d.) values, the mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions and continuous overlapping of net glycaemic action. Day-to-day glycaemic variability was assessed using the mean of daily differences. The s.d. was found to be significantly lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with insulin detemir. AUC(>3.9) was higher and AUC(>10.0) was lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. The mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions and continuous overlapping net glycaemic action values were lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. In addition, the mean of daily differences was significantly lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. Fewer hypoglycaemic events were recorded during the night-time with insulin lispro protamine compared with glargine and detemir. The results suggest that insulin lispro protamine and glargine are more effective than detemir in reducing glycaemic variability and improving glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes. Insulin lispro protamine seems to lead to fewer hypoglycaemic

  15. Insulin resistance, insulin sensitization and inflammation in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhindsa G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5-10% of women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. While insulin resistance is not part of the diagnostic criteria for PCOS, its importance in the pathogenesis of PCOS cannot be denied. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance independent of total or fat-free body mass. Post-receptor defects in the action of insulin have been described in PCOS which are similar to those found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin sensitizers, metformin and thiazolidinediones, improve both metabolic and hormonal patterns and also improve ovulation in PCOS. Recent studies have shown that PCOS women have higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators like C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor- , tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 . It is possible that the beneficial effect of insulin sensitizers in PCOS may be partly due to a decrease in inflammation.

  16. Insulin resistance and chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Matulewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a condition of reduced biological response to insulin. Growing evidence indicates the role of the chronic low-grade inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Adipose tissue in obesity is characterized by increased lipolysis with the excessive release of free fatty acids, and is also a source of proinflammatory cytokines. Both these factors may inhibit insulin action. Proinflammatory cytokines exert their effect by stimulating major inflammatory NFκB and JNK pathways within the cells. Inflammatory processes in other insulin responsive tissues may also play a role in inducing insulin resistance. This paper is an overview of the chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and endothelial cells during the development of insulin resistance.

  17. Comparison of Subcutaneous Regular Insulin and Lispro Insulin in Diabetics Receiving Continuous Nutrition: A Numerical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Mamie C; Strilka, Richard J; Clemens, Michael S; Armen, Scott B

    2015-06-30

    Optimal management of non-critically ill patients with diabetes maintained on continuous enteral feeding (CEN) is poorly defined. Subcutaneous (SQ) lispro and SQ regular insulin were compared in a simulated type 1 and type 2 diabetic patient receiving CEN. A glucose-insulin feedback mathematical model was employed to simulate type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients on CEN. Each patient received 25 SQ injections of regular insulin or insulin lispro, ranging from 0-6 U. Primary endpoints were the change in mean glucose concentration (MGC) and change in glucose variability (GV); hypoglycemic episodes were also reported. The model was first validated against patient data. Both SQ insulin preparations linearly decreased MGC, however, SQ regular insulin decreased GV whereas SQ lispro tended to increase GV. Hourly glucose concentration measurements were needed to capture the increase in GV. In the type 2 diabetic patient, "rebound hyperglycemia" occurred after SQ lispro was rapidly metabolized. Although neither SQ insulin preparation caused hypoglycemia, SQ lispro significantly lowered MGC compared to SQ regular insulin. Thus, it may be more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Analyses of the detailed glucose concentration versus time data suggest that the inferior performance of lispro resulted from its shorter duration of action. Finally, the effects of both insulin preparations persisted beyond their duration of actions in the type 2 diabetic patient. Subcutaneous regular insulin may be the short-acting insulin preparation of choice for this subset of diabetic patients. Clinical trial is required before a definitive recommendation can be made. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. Polyethyleneglycol RIA (radioimmunoassay) insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Insulin is a polypeptide hormone of M.W. 6,000 composed of two peptide chains, A and B, jointed by two cross-linked disulphide bonds and synthesized by the beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas. Insulin influences most of the metabolic functions of the body. Its best known action is to lower the blood glucose concentration by increasing the rate at which glucose is converted to glycogen in the liver and muscles and to fat in adipose tissue, by stimulating the rate of glucose metabolism and by depressing gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates the synthesis of proteins, DNA and RNA in cells generally, and promotes the uptake of aminoacids and their incorporation into muscle protein. It increases the uptake of glucose in adipose tissue and its conversion into fat and inhibits lipolysis. Insulin primary action is on the cell membrane, where it probably facilitates the transport of glucose and aminoacids into the cells. At the same time it may activate intracellular enzymes such as glycogen synthetase, concerned with glycogen synthesis. (Author) [es

  19. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on renal handling of sodium, fluid retention and weight in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, K V; Jensen, Tonny Joran; Oturai, P

    2012-01-01

    In type 2 diabetic patients, insulin detemir (B29Lys(ε-tetradecanoyl),desB30 human insulin) induces less weight gain than NPH insulin. Due to the proposed reduction of tubular action by insulin detemir, type 2 diabetic patients should have increased urinary sodium excretion, thereby reducing extr...

  20. Subliminal action priming modulates the perceived intensity of sensory action consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Bauer, Markus; Sidarus, Nura; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Haggard, Patrick; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-02-01

    The sense of control over the consequences of one's actions depends on predictions about these consequences. According to an influential computational model, consistency between predicted and observed action consequences attenuates perceived stimulus intensity, which might provide a marker of agentic control. An important assumption of this model is that these predictions are generated within the motor system. However, previous studies of sensory attenuation have typically confounded motor-specific perceptual modulation with perceptual effects of stimulus predictability that are not specific to motor action. As a result, these studies cannot unambiguously attribute sensory attenuation to a motor locus. We present a psychophysical experiment on auditory attenuation that avoids this pitfall. Subliminal masked priming of motor actions with compatible prime-target pairs has previously been shown to modulate both reaction times and the explicit feeling of control over action consequences. Here, we demonstrate reduced perceived loudness of tones caused by compatibly primed actions. Importantly, this modulation results from a manipulation of motor processing and is not confounded by stimulus predictability. We discuss our results with respect to theoretical models of the mechanisms underlying sensory attenuation and subliminal motor priming. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of two methods using plasma triglyceride concentration as a surrogate estimate of insulin action in nondiabetic subjects: triglycerides × glucose versus triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Fahim; Reaven, Gerald M

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to compare relationships between insulin-mediated glucose uptake and surrogate estimates of insulin action, particularly those using fasting triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations. Insulin-mediated glucose uptake was quantified by determining the steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentration during the insulin suppression test in 455 nondiabetic subjects. Fasting TG, HDL-C, glucose, and insulin concentrations were measured; and calculations were made of the following: (1) plasma concentration ratio of TG/HDL-C, (2) TG × fasting glucose (TyG index), (3) homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and (4) insulin area under the curve (insulin-AUC) during a glucose tolerance test. Insulin-AUC correlated most closely with SSPG (r ∼ 0.75, P index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and fasting TG and insulin (r ∼ 0.60, P index correlated with SSPG concentration to a similar degree, and the relationships were comparable to estimates using fasting insulin. The strongest relationship was between SSPG and insulin-AUC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination Treatment of Deep Sea Water and Fucoidan Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Insulin-Resistance in HepG2 Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Peng, Wei-Bing; Zhou, Hong-Lei

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) plays a central role in the development of several metabolic diseases, which leads to increased morbidity and mortality rates, in addition to soaring health-care costs. Deep sea water (DSW) and fucoidans (FPS) have drawn much attention in recent years because of their potential medical and pharmaceutical applications. This study investigated the effects and mechanisms of combination treatment of DSW and FPS in improving IR in HepG2 hepatocytes induced by a high glucose concentration. The results elucidated that co-treatment with DSW and FPS could synergistically repress hepatic glucose production and increase the glycogen level in IR-HepG2 cells. In addition, they stimulated the phosphorylation levels of the components of the insulin signaling pathway, including tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and serine phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β. Furthermore, they increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC, which in turn decreased the intracellular triglyceride level. Taken together, these results suggested that co-treatment with DSW and FPS had a greater improving effect than DSW or FPS alone on IR. They might attenuate IR by targeting Akt/GSK-3β and AMPK pathways. These results may have some implications in the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:29393871

  3. Autocrine effect of Zn²⁺ on the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Daniels, Nigel A; Guo, Aili; Li, Yang V

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that zinc (Zn(2+)) is required for the process of insulin biosynthesis and the maturation of insulin secretory granules in pancreatic beta (β)-cells, and that changes in Zn(2+) levels in the pancreas have been found to be associated with diabetes. Glucose-stimulation causes a rapid co-secretion of Zn(2+) and insulin with similar kinetics. However, we do not know whether Zn(2+) regulates insulin availability and secretion. Here we investigated the effect of Zn(2+) on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Whereas Zn(2+) alone (control) had no effect on the basal secretion of insulin, it significantly inhibited GSIS. The application of CaEDTA, by removing the secreted Zn(2+) from the extracellular milieu of the islets, resulted in significantly increased GSIS, suggesting an overall inhibitory role of secreted Zn(2+) on GSIS. The inhibitory action of Zn(2+) was mostly mediated through the activities of KATP/Ca(2+) channels. Furthermore, during brief paired-pulse glucose-stimulated Zn(2+) secretion (GSZS), Zn(2+) secretion following the second pulse was significantly attenuated, probably by the secreted endogenous Zn(2+) after the first pulse. Such an inhibition on Zn(2+) secretion following the second pulse was completely reversed by Zn(2+) chelation, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism, in which the initial glucose-stimulated Zn(2+) release inhibits subsequent Zn(2+) secretion, subsequently inhibiting insulin co-secretion as well. Taken together, these data suggest a negative feedback mechanism on GSZS and GSIS by Zn(2+) secreted from β-cells, and the co-secreted Zn(2+) may act as an autocrine inhibitory modulator.

  4. Insulin-Mimetic Action of Rhoifolin and Cosmosiin Isolated from Citrus grandis (L. Osbeck Leaves: Enhanced Adiponectin Secretion and Insulin Receptor Phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerra Koteswara Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus grandis (L. Osbeck (red wendun leaves have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several illnesses including diabetes. However, there is no scientific evidence supporting these actions and its active compounds. Two flavone glycosides, rhoifolin and cosmosiin were isolated for the first time from red wendun leaves and, identified these leaves are rich source for rhoifolin (1.1%, w/w. In differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, rhoifolin and cosmosiin showed dose-dependent response in concentration range of o.oo1–5 μM and 1–20 μM, respectively, in biological studies beneficial to diabetes. Particularly, rhoifolin and cosmosiin at 0.5 and 20 μM, respectively showed nearly similar response to that 10 nM of insulin, on adiponectin secretion level. Furthermore, 5 μM of rhoifolin and 20 μM of cosmosiin showed equal potential with 10 nM of insulin to increase the phosphorylation of insulin receptor-β, in addition to their positive effect on GLUT4 translocation. These findings indicate that rhoifolin and cosmosiin from red wendun leaves may be beneficial for diabetic complications through their enhanced adiponectin secretion, tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor-β and GLUT4 translocation.

  5. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularly mediated blockade of hypothalamic insulin action. Euglycemia was maintained, and glucagon was clamped at basal. Both the molecular and metabolic aspects of insulin action were assessed. Blockade of hypothalamic insulin signaling did not alter the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription but blunted the induction of glucokinase gene transcription and completely blocked the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β gene transcription. Thus, central and peripheral insulin action combined to control some, but not other, hepatic enzyme programs. Nevertheless, inhibition of hypothalamic insulin action did not alter the effects of the hormone on hepatic glucose flux (production or uptake). These data indicate that brain insulin action is not a determinant of the rapid (<4 h) inhibition of hepatic glucose metabolism caused by normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia in this large animal model. PMID:23011594

  6. Acclimation temperature affects the metabolic response of amphibian skeletal muscle to insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ann M; Gleeson, Todd T

    2011-09-01

    Frog skeletal muscle mainly utilizes the substrates glucose and lactate for energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on the uptake and metabolic fate of lactate and glucose at rest in skeletal muscle of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeiana, under varying temperature regimens. We hypothesize that lactate and glucose metabolic pathways will respond differently to the presence of insulin in cold versus warm acclimated frog tissues, suggesting an interaction between temperature and metabolism under varying environmental conditions. We employed radiolabeled tracer techniques to measure in vitro uptake, oxidation, and incorporation of glucose and lactate into glycogen by isolated muscles from bullfrogs acclimated to 5 °C (cold) or 25 °C (warm). Isolated bundles from Sartorius muscles were incubated at 5 °C, 15 °C, or 25 °C, and in the presence and absence of 0.05 IU/mL bovine insulin. Insulin treatment in the warm acclimated and incubated frogs resulted in an increase in glucose incorporation into glycogen, and an increase in intracellular [glucose] of 0.5 μmol/g (Pmuscle. When compared to the warm treatment group, cold acclimation and incubation resulted in increased rates of glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis, and a reduction in free intracellular glucose levels (Pmuscles from either acclimation group were incubated at an intermediate temperature of 15 °C, insulin's effect on substrate metabolism was attenuated or even reversed. Therefore, a significant interaction between insulin and acclimation condition in controlling skeletal muscle metabolism appears to exist. Our findings further suggest that one of insulin's actions in frog muscle is to increase glucose incorporation into glycogen, and to reduce reliance on lactate as the primary metabolic fuel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High-Protein Intake during Weight Loss Therapy Eliminates the Weight-Loss-Induced Improvement in Insulin Action in Obese Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon I. Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High-protein (HP intake during weight loss (WL therapy is often recommended because it reduces the loss of lean tissue mass. However, HP intake could have adverse effects on metabolic function, because protein ingestion reduces postprandial insulin sensitivity. In this study, we compared the effects of ∼10% WL with a hypocaloric diet containing 0.8 g protein/kg/day and a hypocaloric diet containing 1.2 g protein/kg/day on muscle insulin action in postmenopausal women with obesity. We found that HP intake reduced the WL-induced decline in lean tissue mass by ∼45%. However, HP intake also prevented the WL-induced improvements in muscle insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, as well as the WL-induced adaptations in oxidative stress and cell structural biology pathways. Our data demonstrate that the protein content of a WL diet can have profound effects on metabolic function and underscore the importance of considering dietary macronutrient composition during WL therapy for people with obesity.

  8. Brain Insulin Resistance at the Crossroads of Metabolic and Cognitive Disorders in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the brain was identified as an insulin-sensitive organ, evidence has rapidly accumulated that insulin action in the brain produces multiple behavioral and metabolic effects, influencing eating behavior, peripheral metabolism, and cognition. Disturbances in brain insulin action can be observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as in aging and dementia. Decreases in insulin sensitivity of central nervous pathways, i.e., brain insulin resistance, may therefore constitute a joint pathological feature of metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Modern neuroimaging methods have provided new means of probing brain insulin action, revealing the influence of insulin on both global and regional brain function. In this review, we highlight recent findings on brain insulin action in humans and its impact on metabolism and cognition. Furthermore, we elaborate on the most prominent factors associated with brain insulin resistance, i.e., obesity, T2D, genes, maternal metabolism, normal aging, inflammation, and dementia, and on their roles regarding causes and consequences of brain insulin resistance. We also describe the beneficial effects of enhanced brain insulin signaling on human eating behavior and cognition and discuss potential applications in the treatment of metabolic and cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Imbalanced insulin action in chronic over nutrition: Clinical harm, molecular mechanisms, and a way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin Jon; Wu, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    The growing worldwide prevalence of overnutrition and underexertion threatens the gains that we have made against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and other maladies. Chronic overnutrition causes the atherometabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of seemingly unrelated health problems characterized by increased abdominal girth and body-mass index, high fasting and postprandial concentrations of cholesterol- and triglyceride-rich apoB-lipoproteins (C-TRLs), low plasma HDL levels, impaired regulation of plasma glucose concentrations, hypertension, and a significant risk of developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, individuals with this syndrome exhibit fatty liver, hypercoagulability, sympathetic overactivity, a gradually rising set-point for body adiposity, a substantially increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and--crucially--hyperinsulinemia. Many lines of evidence indicate that each component of the atherometabolic syndrome arises, or is worsened by, pathway-selective insulin resistance and responsiveness (SEIRR). Individuals with SEIRR require compensatory hyperinsulinemia to control plasma glucose levels. The result is overdrive of those pathways that remain insulin-responsive, particularly ERK activation and hepatic de-novo lipogenesis (DNL), while carbohydrate regulation deteriorates. The effects are easily summarized: if hyperinsulinemia does something bad in a tissue or organ, that effect remains responsive in the atherometabolic syndrome and T2DM; and if hyperinsulinemia might do something good, that effect becomes resistant. It is a deadly imbalance in insulin action. From the standpoint of human health, it is the worst possible combination of effects. In this review, we discuss the origins of the atherometabolic syndrome in our historically unprecedented environment that only recently has become full of poorly satiating calories and incessant enticements to sit. Data are examined that indicate

  10. Eccentric exercise decreases maximal insulin action in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, Svend; Daugaard, J R; Kristiansen, S

    1996-01-01

    subjects participated in two euglycaemic clamps, performed in random order. One clamp was preceded 2 days earlier by one-legged eccentric exercise (post-eccentric exercise clamp (PEC)) and one was without the prior exercise (control clamp (CC)). 2. During PEC the maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake...... for all three clamp steps used (P maximal activity of glycogen synthase was identical in the two thighs for all clamp steps. 3. The glucose infusion rate (GIR......) necessary to maintain euglycaemia during maximal insulin stimulation was lower during PEC compared with CC (15.7%, 81.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 96.4 +/- 8.8 mumol kg-1 min-1, P maximal...

  11. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula I. Moreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ. Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  12. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1...... induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca(2+)]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1...... overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE(-/-) mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway...

  13. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another ou...

  14. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gang [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Hitomi, Hirofumi, E-mail: hitomi@kms.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Hosomi, Naohisa [Department of Cardiorenal and Cerebrovascular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Ma, Hong [Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Griendling, Kathy K. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nishiyama, Akira [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  15. Endothelial Fcγ Receptor IIB Activation Blunts Insulin Delivery to Skeletal Muscle to Cause Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Chambliss, Ken L.; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Ahmed, Mohamed; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Huang, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Modest elevations in C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with type 2 diabetes. We previously revealed in mice that increased CRP causes insulin resistance and mice globally deficient in the CRP receptor Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) were protected from the disorder. FcγRIIB is expressed in numerous cell types including endothelium and B lymphocytes. Here we investigated how endothelial FcγRIIB influences glucose homeostasis, using mice with elevated CRP expressing or lacking endothelial FcγRIIB. Whereas increased CRP caused insulin resistance in mice expressing endothelial FcγRIIB, mice deficient in the endothelial receptor were protected. The insulin resistance with endothelial FcγRIIB activation was due to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake caused by attenuated insulin delivery, and it was associated with blunted endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in skeletal muscle. In culture, CRP suppressed endothelial cell insulin transcytosis via FcγRIIB activation and eNOS antagonism. Furthermore, in knock-in mice harboring constitutively active eNOS, elevated CRP did not invoke insulin resistance. Collectively these findings reveal that by inhibiting eNOS, endothelial FcγRIIB activation by CRP blunts insulin delivery to skeletal muscle to cause insulin resistance. Thus, a series of mechanisms in endothelium that impairs insulin movement has been identified that may contribute to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27207525

  16. TLR4 and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane J. Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a key feature of insulin resistance and obesity. Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4, involved in modulating innate immunity, is an important mediator of insulin resistance and its comorbidities. TLR4 contributes to the development of insulin resistance and inflammation through its activation by elevated exogenous ligands (e.g., dietary fatty acids and enteric lipopolysaccharide and endogenous ligands (e.g., free fatty acids which are elevated in obese states. TLR4, expressed in insulin target tissues, activates proinflammatory kinases JNK, IKK, and p38 that impair insulin signal transduction directly through inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS on serine residues. TLR4 activation also leads to increased transcription of pro-inflammatory genes, resulting in elevation of cytokine, chemokine, reactive oxygen species, and eicosanoid levels that promote further insulin-desensitization within the target cell itself and in other cells via paracrine and systemic effects. Increased understanding of cell type-specific TLR4-mediated effects on insulin action present the opportunity and challenge of developing related therapeutic approaches for improving insulin sensitivity while preserving innate immunity.

  17. Interactive roles of Ras, insulin receptor substrate-1, and proteins with Src homology-2 domains in insulin signaling in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, L M; Hausdorff, S F; Myers, M G; White, M F; Birnbaum, M J; Kahn, C R

    1994-11-04

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serves as the major immediate substrate of insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors and following tyrosine phosphorylation binds to specific Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing proteins including the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and GRB2, a molecule believed to link IRS-1 to the Ras pathway. To investigate how these SH2-containing signaling molecules interact to regulate insulin/IGF-1 action, IRS-1, glutathione S-transferase (GST)-SH2 domain fusion proteins and Ras proteins were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes. We found that pleiotropic insulin actions are mediated by IRS-1 through two independent, but convergent, pathways involving PI 3-kinase and GRB2. Thus, microinjection of GST-fusion proteins of either p85 or GRB2 inhibited IRS-1-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and S6 kinases and oocyte maturation, although only the GST-SH2 of p85 reduced insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activation. Co-injection of a dominant negative Ras (S17N) with IRS-1 inhibited insulin-stimulated MAP and S6 kinase activation. Micro-injection of activated [Arg12,Thr59]Ras increased basal MAP and S6 kinase activities and sensitized the oocytes to insulin-stimulated maturation without altering insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase. The Ras-enhanced oocyte maturation response, but not the elevated basal level of MAP and S6 kinase, was partially blocked by the SH2-p85, but not SH2-GRB2. These data strongly suggest that IRS-1 can mediate many of insulin's actions on cellular enzyme activation and cell cycle progression requires binding and activation of multiple different SH2-domain proteins.

  18. Beta-adrenoceptor-agonist and insulin actions on glucose metabolism in rat skeletal muscle in different thyroid states.

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriadis, G D; Richards, S J; Parry-Billings, M; Leighton, B; Newsholme, E A; Challiss, R A

    1991-01-01

    1. The actions of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline on glucose and glycogen metabolism, in the presence of various concentrations of insulin, were investigated in isolated soleus muscle preparations taken from eu-, hyper- and hypothyroid rats. 2. Hyperthyroidism, induced by 3,3',5-tri-iodo-D-thyronine (T3) administration for 5 days, increased the rate of lactate formation and suppressed the rate of glycogen synthesis in soleus muscle in response to isoprenaline, even in the presence ...

  19. Combining insulins for optimal blood glucose control in type 1 and 2 diabetes: focus on insulin glulisine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Ulrich

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heather Ulrich1,4, Benjamin Snyder1,Satish K Garg1,2,31Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes; 2Department of Medicine; 3Pediatrics; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Normalization of blood glucose is essential for the prevention of diabetes mellitus (DM-related microvascular and macrovascular complications. Despite substantial literature to support the benefits of glucose lowering and clear treatment targets, glycemic control remains suboptimal for most people with DM in the United States. Pharmacokinetic limitations of conventional insulins have been a barrier to achieving treatment targets secondary to adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and weight gain. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed modification of the insulin molecule to produce insulin analogues that overcome these pharmacokinetic limitations. With time action profiles that more closely mimic physiologic insulin secretion, rapid acting insulin analogues (RAAs reduce post-prandial glucose excursions and hypoglycemia when compared to regular human insulin (RHI. Insulin glulisine (Apidra® is a rapid-acting insulin analogue created by substituting lysine for asparagine at position B3 and glutamic acid for lysine at position B29 on the B chain of human insulin. The quick absorption of insulin glulisine more closely reproduces physiologic first-phase insulin secretion and its rapid acting profile is maintained across patient subtypes. Clinical trials have demonstrated comparable or greater efficacy of insulin glulisine versus insulin lispro or RHI, respectively. Efficacy is maintained even when insulin glulisine is administered post-meal. In addition, glulisine appears to have a more rapid time action profile compared with insulin lispro across various body mass indexes (BMIs. The safety and tolerability profile of insulin glulisine is also comparable to that of insulin

  20. Insulin and 20-hydroxyecdysone action in Bombyx mori: Glycogen content and expression pattern of insulin and ecdysone receptors in fat body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshan, Bela; Thounaojam, Bembem; Kh, Sanathoibi D

    2017-01-15

    Insulin and ecdysone signaling play a critical role on the growth and development of insects including Bombyx mori. Our previous study showed that Bombyx larvae reached critical weight for metamorphosis between day 3.5 and 4 of the fifth larval instar. The present study showed that the effect of insulin on the accumulation of glycogen in fat body of Bombyx larvae depends on the critical growth period. When larvae are in active growth period (before reaching critical weight), insulin caused increased accumulation of glycogen, while its treatment in larvae at terminal growth period (after critical period) resulted in an increased mobilization of glycogen. During terminal growth period, insulin and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) showed an antagonistic effect on the accumulation of fat body glycogen in fed, food deprived and decapitated larvae as well as in isolated abdomens. Insulin treatment decreased the glycogen content, whereas, 20E increased it. Food deprivation and decapitation caused an increase in the transcript levels of insulin receptor (InR) and this increase in InR expression might be attributed to a decrease in synthesis/secretion of insulin-like peptides, as insulin treatment in these larvae showed a down-regulation in InR expression. However, insulin showed an up-regulation in InR in isolated abdomens and it suggests that in food deprived and decapitated larvae, the exogenous insulin may interact with some head and/or thoracic factors in modulating the expression of InR. Moreover, in fed larvae, insulin-mediated increase in InR expression indicates that its regulation by insulin-like peptides also depends on the nutritional status of the larvae. The treatment of 20E in fed larvae showed an antagonistic effect on the transcript levels since a down-regulation in InR expression was observed. 20E treatment also led to a decreased expression of InR in food deprived and decapitated larvae as well as in isolated abdomens. Insulin and 20E also modulated the

  1. Using ultra-rapid insulin analogs in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.V. Bolshova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the study was a retrospective comparative analysis of using insulin analogues of the prolonged and ultra-short action and human genetically engineered insulins of middle and short action in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. Materials and methods. The influence of ultra-rapid insulin analog in comparison with human rapid-action insulin on the course of type 1 DM in 100 children and adolescents was studied. It was applied as basal-bolus regimen of insulin therapy. Analysis of parameters which reflect criteria of insulin therapy effectiveness, positive effect of ultra-rapid insulin analog on the course of DM has been performed. Results. Application of ultra-rapid insulin analog before each meal improved parameters of pre- and postprandial glycemia, decreased the range of fluctuations of blood sugar during the day, reduced and maintained HbA1c level without augmentation of frequency and intensity of hypoglycaemia, and also decreased the level of noctural hypoglycaemia. Conclusions. The ultra-rapid insulin analog is the drug of choice for the effective use in insulin pumps.

  2. Dock/Nck facilitates PTP61F/PTP1B regulation of insulin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Lun; Buszard, Bree; Teng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Wei-Lin; Warr, Coral G; Tiganis, Tony; Meng, Tzu-Ching

    2011-10-01

    PTP1B (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B) is a negative regulator of IR (insulin receptor) activation and glucose homoeostasis, but the precise molecular mechanisms governing PTP1B substrate selectivity and the regulation of insulin signalling remain unclear. In the present study we have taken advantage of Drosophila as a model organism to establish the role of the SH3 (Src homology 3)/SH2 adaptor protein Dock (Dreadlocks) and its mammalian counterpart Nck in IR regulation by PTPs. We demonstrate that the PTP1B orthologue PTP61F dephosphorylates the Drosophila IR in S2 cells in vitro and attenuates IR-induced eye overgrowth in vivo. Our studies indicate that Dock forms a stable complex with PTP61F and that Dock/PTP61F associate with the IR in response to insulin. We report that Dock is required for effective IR dephosphorylation and inactivation by PTP61F in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nck interacts with PTP1B and that the Nck/PTP1B complex inducibly associates with the IR for the attenuation of IR activation in mammalian cells. Our studies reveal for the first time that the adaptor protein Dock/Nck attenuates insulin signalling by recruiting PTP61F/PTP1B to its substrate, the IR.

  3. An extract of Urtica dioica L. mitigates obesity induced insulin resistance in mice skeletal muscle via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obanda, Diana N; Ribnicky, David; Yu, Yongmei; Stephens, Jacqueline; Cefalu, William T

    2016-02-26

    The leaf extract of Urtica dioica L. (UT) has been reported to improve glucose homeostasis in vivo, but definitive studies on efficacy and mechanism of action are lacking. We investigated the effects of UT on obesity- induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups: low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD) and HFD supplemented with UT. Body weight, body composition, plasma glucose and plasma insulin were monitored. Skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was analyzed for insulin sensitivity, ceramide accumulation and the post translational modification and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A is activated by ceramides and dephosphorylates Akt. C2C12 myotubes exposed to excess free fatty acids with or without UT were also evaluated for insulin signaling and modulation of PP2A. The HFD induced insulin resistance, increased fasting plasma glucose, enhanced ceramide accumulation and PP2A activity in skeletal muscle. Supplementation with UT improved plasma glucose homeostasis and enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity without affecting body weight and body composition. In myotubes, UT attenuated the ability of FFAs to induce insulin resistance and PP2A hyperactivity without affecting ceramide accumulation and PP2A expression. UT decreased PP2A activity through posttranslational modification that was accompanied by a reduction in Akt dephosphorylation.

  4. Insulin: its role in the central control of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwowska, Joanna H; Fergani, Chrysanthi; Gawałek, Monika; Skowronska, Bogda; Fichna, Piotr; Lehman, Michael N

    2014-06-22

    Insulin has long been recognized as a key regulator of energy homeostasis via its actions at the level of the brain, but in addition, plays a role in regulating neural control of reproduction. In this review, we consider and compare evidence from animal models demonstrating a role for insulin for physiological control of reproduction by effects on GnRH/LH secretion. We also review the role that insulin plays in prenatal programming of adult reproduction, and consider specific candidate neurons in the adult hypothalamus by which insulin may act to regulate reproductive function. Finally, we review clinical evidence of the role that insulin may play in adult human fertility and reproductive disorders. Overall, while insulin appears to have a significant impact on reproductive neuroendocrine function, there are many unanswered questions regarding its precise sites and mechanisms of action, and their impact on developing and adult reproductive neuroendocrine function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Basal insulin analogues in the treatment of diabetes mellitus: What progress have we made?

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, continuous progress has been made in the development of insulin therapy. Basal insulins were developed around 60 years ago. However, existing basal insulins were found to have limitations. An ideal basal insulin should have the following properties viz. longer duration of action, a flat time-action profile, low day-to-day glycaemic variability, and the potential for flexible dosing. Basal insulins have advanced over the years, from lectin and neutral protamine Haged...

  6. Insulin controls food intake and energy balance via NPY neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Loh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Insulin signaling in the brain has been implicated in the control of satiety, glucose homeostasis and energy balance. However, insulin signaling is dispensable in energy homeostasis controlling AgRP or POMC neurons and it is unclear which other neurons regulate these effects. Here we describe an ancient insulin/NPY neuronal network that governs energy homeostasis across phyla. Methods: To address the role of insulin action specifically in NPY neurons, we generated a variety of models by selectively removing insulin signaling in NPY neurons in flies and mice and testing the consequences on energy homeostasis. Results: By specifically targeting the insulin receptor in both fly and mouse NPY expressing neurons, we found NPY-specific insulin signaling controls food intake and energy expenditure, and lack of insulin signaling in NPY neurons leads to increased energy stores and an obese phenotype. Additionally, the lack of insulin signaling in NPY neurons leads to a dysregulation of GH/IGF-1 axis and to altered insulin sensitivity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that insulin actions in NPY neurons is critical for maintaining energy balance and an impairment of this pathway may be causally linked to the development of metabolic diseases. Keywords: Hypothalamus, NPY, Insulin, Obesity

  7. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  8. Parasympathetic blockade attenuates augmented pancreatic polypeptide but not insulin secretion in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Stefan, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    was administered for 120 min at the following doses: 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 micro g. kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1). h(-1). Areas under the curve for early (AUC(0-30 min)) and total (AUC(0-120 min)) postprandial insulin and PP secretory responses were calculated. Early postprandial insulin and PP secretory responses were...

  9. Rac1 in muscle is dispensable for improved insulin action after exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth Liliendal Valbjørn; D'Hulst, Gommaar

    2016-01-01

    sensitivity in inducible muscle-specific Rac1 knockout (mKO) and wildtype littermate (WT) mice. Prior exercise enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity by 40% in WT mice and rescued the insulin intolerance in Rac1 mKO mice by improving whole body insulin sensitivity by 230%. In agreement, prior exercise...... significantly improved insulin sensitivity by 20% in WT and by 40% in Rac1 mKO soleus muscles. These findings suggest that muscle Rac1 is dispensable for the insulin sensitizing effect of exercise. Moreover, insulin resistance in Rac1 mKO mice can be completely normalized by prior exercise explaining why......Exercise has a potent insulin-sensitivity enhancing effect on skeletal muscle but the intracellular mechanisms that mediate this effect are not well understood. In muscle, Rac1 regulates both insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose transport and is dysregulated in insulin resistant muscle...

  10. Insulin Sensitivity Determines Effects of Insulin and Meal Ingestion on Systemic Vascular Resistance in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Meijer, Rick I; Eringa, Etto C; Hoekstra, Trynke; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to insulin's metabolic actions, insulin can dilate arterioles which increase blood flow to metabolically active tissues. This effect is blunted in insulin-resistant subjects. Insulin's effect on SVR, determined by resistance arterioles, has, however, rarely been examined directly. We determined the effects of both hyperinsulinemia and a mixed meal on SVR and its relationship with insulin sensitivity. Thirty-seven lean and obese women underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and 24 obese volunteers underwent a mixed-meal test. SVR was assessed using CPP before and during hyperinsulinemia as well as before and 60 and 120 minutes after a meal. SVR decreased significantly during hyperinsulinemia (-13%; p Insulin decreased SVR more strongly in insulin-sensitive individuals (standardized β: -0.44; p = 0.01). In addition, SVR at 60 minutes after meal ingestion was inversely related to the Matsuda index (β: -0.39; p = 0.04) and the change in postprandial SVR was directly related to postprandial glycemia (β: 0.53; p insulin resistance. This suggests that resistance to insulin-induced vasodilatation contributes to regulation of vascular resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Interleukin-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-12-05

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) promotes insulin resistance in tissues such as liver and skeletal muscle; however the influence of IL-1β on placental insulin signaling is unknown. We recently reported increased IL-1β protein expression in placentas of obese mothers, which could contribute to insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IL-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in cultured primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells. Cultured trophoblasts isolated from term placentas were treated with physiological concentrations of IL-1β (10pg/ml) for 24h. IL-1β increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser307 (inhibitory) and decreased total IRS-1 protein abundance but did not affect insulin receptor β expression. Furthermore, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Tyr612, activation site) and Akt (Thr308) and prevented insulin-stimulated increase in PI3K/p85 and Grb2 protein expression. IL-1β alone stimulated cRaf (Ser338), MEK (Ser221) and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation. The inflammatory pathways nuclear factor kappa B and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which are involved in insulin resistance, were also activated by IL-1β treatment. Moreover, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated System A, but not System L amino acid uptake, indicating functional impairment of insulin signaling. In conclusion, IL-1β inhibited the insulin signaling pathway by inhibiting IRS-1 signaling and prevented insulin-stimulated System A transport, thereby promoting insulin resistance in cultured PHT cells. These findings indicate that conditions which lead to increased systemic maternal or placental IL-1β levels may attenuate the effects of maternal insulin on placental function and consequently fetal growth. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Gastric emptying and timing of insulin injection in insulin-treated diabetics Using99m Te-sulfur colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M.; El-Borrolossy, H.; El-Tawil, A.

    1997-01-01

    Gastric emptying of 99m Tc labelled liquid and solid meals were studied in 112 long-standing insulin insulin treated diabetics to evaluate the relationship of gastroparesis to patients age, sex, gastrointestinal symptoms, diabetic neuropathic complication and glycemic control, and to evaluate the influence of gastric emptying and timing of insulin injection as modifying factors for blood glucose control aiming at objective optimization of timing of insulin injection for every individual patient using the proposed equation: time of insulin injection=onset of insulin action -solid lag time. Patients were classified into three group: A) no neuropathy; B) peripheral neuropathy; and C) peripheral and autonomic neuropathy and compared to healthy volunteers as controls. Diabetics showed statistically significant prolonged gastric lag time and T1/2 for both liquid and solid meals compared to those of controls

  13. Fatty acid metabolism, energy expenditure and insulin resistance in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J; Kraegen, Edward W; Bruce, Clinton R

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are essential elements of all cells and have significant roles as energy substrates, components of cellular structure and signalling molecules. The storage of excess energy intake as fat in adipose tissue is an evolutionary advantage aimed at protecting against starvation, but in much of today's world, humans are faced with an unlimited availability of food, and the excessive accumulation of fat is now a major risk for human health, especially the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Since the first recognition of the association between fat accumulation, reduced insulin action and increased risk of T2D, several mechanisms have been proposed to link excess FA availability to reduced insulin action, with some of them being competing or contradictory. This review summarises the evidence for these mechanisms in the context of excess dietary FAs generating insulin resistance in muscle, the major tissue involved in insulin-stimulated disposal of blood glucose. It also outlines potential problems with models and measurements that may hinder as well as help improve our understanding of the links between FAs and insulin action.

  14. Natural history of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the progression from normal glucose tolerance to impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance: the Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, Kristine; Vaag, Allan; Holst, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS), early-phase insulin release (EPIR), and insulin secretion relative to insulin action (disposition index) were estimated. RESULTS: Five years before the pre-diabetes diagnoses (i-IFG, i-IGT, and IFG/IGT), ISI, HOMA-IS, EPIR, and disposition index were lower than...

  15. Insulin secretion and glucose uptake by isolated islets of the hamster. Effect of insulin, proinsulin and C-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J C; McLaughlin, W J; Walsh, M F.J.; Foa, P P [Sinai Hospital of Detroit, Mich. (USA). Dept. of Research

    1976-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic islets of normal hamsters were perfused either in a closed or in a open system. When the buffer was recirculated and the endogenous insulin was allowed to accumulate, the islets secreted significantly less insulin than when the system was open and the endogenous insulin was washed away. The addition of monocomponent insulin or of proinsulin to the perfusion buffer significantly decreased insulin secretion. The inhibitory action of proinsulin was significantly greater than that of monocomponent insulin. C peptide had no effect. When pancreatic islets were incubated in a fixed volume of stationary buffer containing unlabeled glucose (1.0 mg or 3.0 mg/ml) and glucose-U-/sup 14/C (1.0 ..mu..C/ml), the amount of insulin secreted and the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ produced by each islet decreased progressively as the number of islets in the sample increased. Under these conditions, the concentration of insulin required to inhibit insulin secretion increased with the concentration of glucose in the medium. Proinsulin did not alter the incorporation of leucine-4.5-/sup 3/H into total extractable insulin (insulin + proinsulin). Thus, insulin and proinsulin appear to inhibit insulin release, but not insulin synthesis.

  16. [The sugar decreasing effect of several insulin polymer derivatives following enteric administration to aniamls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V G; Belovintseva, M F; Shchukovskaia, L L; Kropachev, V A; Shvarts, S I

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the hypoglycemic action of polymeric derivatives of insulin was carried out by its enteral administration through a gastric tube into the stomach and into the oral cavity on 105 intract rabbits. A marked hypoglycemic effect significantly differing from the action of crystalline insulin was produced by enteral administration of insulin modified with polymeres. Changes in the character of binding of the protein with the polymere, of the molecular weight of the polymere and of its chemical nature proved to influence the value and the duration of action of insulin modified by polymeres.

  17. Effect of isologous and autologous insulin antibodies on in vivo bioavailability and metabolic fate of immune-complexed insulin in Lou/M rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arquilla, E.R.; McDougall, B.R.; Stenger, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo bioavailability, distribution, and metabolic fate of 125I-labeled insulin complexed to isologous and autologous antibodies were studied in inbred Lou/M rats. There was an impaired bioavailability of the 125I-insulin bound to the isologous and autologous antibodies. Very little of the 125I-insulin in these immune complexes could bind to insulin receptors on hepatocytes or renal tubular cells and be degraded, because the amounts of 125I from degraded 125I-insulin in the blood or secreted into the stomach were markedly attenuated in both cases for at least 30 min after injection. There was a simultaneous accumulation of 125I-insulin immune complexes in the liver and the kidneys of Lou/M rats injected with 125I-insulin complexed with isologous antibodies or when insulin-immunized Lou/M rats were injected with 125I-insulin during the same interval. The impaired bioavailability of immune-complexed insulin and altered distribution of radioactivity due to the accumulation of immune complexes in the liver and kidney were also observed in previous experiments in which Lewis rats were injected with xenogenic guinea pig and homologous insulin antibodies. These observations are therefore submitted as evidence that the Lou/M rat is a valid model in which to study the bioavailability of insulin immune complexed to isologous, homologous, and xenogenic antibodies and the metabolic fate of the respective insulin-antibody immune complexes

  18. Effects of salicylic acid-induced wine rich in anthocyanins on metabolic parameters and adipose insulin signaling in high-fructose fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Lanzi, Cecilia; de Rosas, Inés; Perdicaro, Diahann J; Ponce, María Teresa; Martinez, Liliana; Miatello, Roberto M; Cavagnaro, Bruno; Vazquez Prieto, Marcela A

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of Syrah red wine treated with salicylic acid (RW SA) and its control red wine (RW) on metabolic parameters, systolic blood pressure and adipose tissue insulin signaling in high-fructose (F) fed rats. Grape treated with SA increased the anthocyanin (ANTs) levels in RW. F induced increased systolic blood pressure, dislipidemia and insulin resistance (HOMA:IR). F rats treated with RW significantly prevented these alterations while RW SA partially attenuated triglycerides levels and HOMA:IR without modifications in HDL cholesterol levels. F impaired the adipose tissue response to insulin. Supplementation with RW and RW SA partially attenuated these alterations. Rats supplemented with RW SA had lesser beneficial effects on metabolic alterations than control RW, while both RW and RW SA attenuated altered adipose response to insulin. More studies are necessary to deeply evaluate the effect on SA-induced RW rich in ANTs levels on metabolic alterations associated to MetS.

  19. NADPH Oxidase-Mediated ROS Production Determines Insulin's Action on the Retinal Microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Teruyo; Oku, Hidehiro; Horie, Taeko; Matsuo, Junko; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Fukumoto, Masanori; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether insulin induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in retinal microvessels and to examine the effects of high glucose on the formation of NO. Freshly isolated rat retinal microvessels were incubated in normal (5.5 mM) or high (20 mM) glucose with or without insulin (100 nM). The levels of insulin-induced NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the retinal microvessels were determined semiquantitatively using fluorescent probes, 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate, and hydroethidine, respectively, and a laser scanning confocal microscope. The insulin-induced changes of NO in rat retinal endothelial cells and pericytes cultured at different glucose concentrations (5.5 and 25 mM) were determined using flow cytometry. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) protein levels were determined by Western blot analysis; intracellular levels of ROS were determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of ethidium fluorescence; and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase RNA expression was quantified using real-time PCR. Exposure of microvessels to insulin under normal glucose conditions led to a significant increase in NO levels; however, this increase was significantly suppressed when the microvessels were incubated under high glucose conditions. Intracellular levels of ROS were significantly increased in both retinal microvessels and cultured microvascular cells under high glucose conditions. The expression of NOS and NADPH oxidase were significantly increased in endothelial cells and pericytes under high glucose conditions. The increased formation of NO by insulin and its suppression by high glucose conditions suggests that ROS production mediated by NADPH oxidase is important by insulin's effect on the retinal microvasculature.

  20. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs 3+ decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. → iAs 3+ attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. → iAs 3+ activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. → iAs 3+ impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. → iAs 3+ decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 μM) inorganic arsenite (iAs 3+ ) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs 3+ exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs 3+ exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4 expression may also be involved in arsenic-induced insulin resistance in

  1. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Peng [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Sun, Guifan [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Andersen, Melvin E. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  2. Maximizing effectiveness of adaptation action in Pacific Island communities using coastal wave attenuation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H.; Carruthers, T.; Allison, M. A.; Weathers, D.; Moss, L.; Timmermans, H.

    2017-12-01

    Pacific Island communities are highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change, specifically accelerating rates of sea level rise, changes to storm intensity and associated rainfall patterns resulting in flooding and shoreline erosion. Nature-based adaptation is being planned not only to reduce the risk from shoreline erosion, but also to support benefits of a healthy ecosystem (e.g., supporting fisheries or coral reefs). In order to assess potential effectiveness of the nature-based actions to dissipate wave energy, two-dimensional X-Beach models were developed to predict the wave attenuation effect of coastal adaptation actions at the pilot sites—the villages of Naselesele and Somosomo on Taveuni island, Fiji. Both sites are experiencing serious shoreline erosion due to sea level rise and storm wave. The water depth (single-beam bathymetry), land elevation (truck-based LiDAR), and vegetation data including stem density and height were collected in both locations in a June 2017 field experiment. Wave height and water velocity were also measured for the model setup and calibration using a series of bottom-mounted instruments deployed in the 0-15 m water depth portions of the study grid. The calibrated model will be used to evaluate a range of possible adaptation actions identified by the community members of Naselesele and Somosomo. Particularly, multiple storm scenario runs with management-relevant shoreline restoration/adaptation options will be implemented to evaluate efficiencies of each adaptation action (e.g., no action, with additional planted trees, with sand mining, with seawalls constructed with natural materials, etc.). These model results will help to better understand how proposed adaption actions may influence future shoreline change and maximize benefits to communities in island nations across the SW Pacific.

  3. Do we really need to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells for attenuation of the autoimmune responses in type 1 diabetes: immunoprophylactic effects of precursors to insulin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Rani, Rajni

    2017-07-12

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial autoimmune disorder where pancreatic beta cells are lost before the clinical manifestations of the disease. Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or MSCs differentiated into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) have yielded limited success when used therapeutically. We have evaluated the immunoprophylactic potentials of precursors to insulin-producing cells (pIPCs) and IPCs in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice to ask a basic question: do we need to differentiate MSCs into IPCs or will pIPCs suffice to attenuate autoimmune responses in T1D? Bone marrow-derived MSCs from Balb/c mice were characterized following the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) guidelines. MSCs cultured in high-glucose media for 11 to 13 passages were characterized for the expression of pancreatic lineage genes using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of the PDX1 gene in pIPCs was assessed using Western blot and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Triple-positive MSCs were differentiated into IPCs using a three-step protocol after sorting them for cell surface markers, i.e. CD29, CD44, and SCA-1. Nonobese diabetic mice were administered pIPCs, IPCs, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the tail vein at weeks 9 or 10 and followed-up for 29-30 weeks for fasting blood glucose levels. Two consecutive blood sugar levels of more than 250 mg/dl were considered diabetic. MSCs grown in high-glucose media for 11 to 13 passages expressed genes of the pancreatic lineage such as PDX1, beta2, neurogenin, PAX4, Insulin, and glucagon. Furthermore, Western blot and FACS analysis for PDX-1, a transcription factor necessary for beta cell maturation, confirmed that these cells were precursors of insulin-producing cells (pIPCs). NOD mice administered with pIPCs were better protected from developing diabetes with a protective efficacy of 78.4% (p cells seem to have better potential to arrest autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes when

  4. Possible Involvement of Insulin Resistance in the Progression of Cancer Cachexia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Tomoyasu; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem among cancer patients, affecting up to 85% of patients with certain cancers. In severe cases, malnutrition can progress to cachexia, a specific form of malnutrition characterized by loss of lean body mass and muscle wasting. Although this muscle wasting might be a product of enhanced protein degradation, the precise mechanisms of cancer cachexia are not fully elucidated. Based on basic and clinical research, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance have been postulated to be associated with cancer cachexia. Since insulin in the skeletal muscle inhibits protein degradation and promotes protein synthesis, insulin resistance could be a possible cause of cancer cachexia. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of insulin resistance in the development of cancer cachexia in tumor-bearing mice. The signaling protein in the insulin cascade was attenuated in the skeletal muscle and hypothalamus from tumor-bearing mice. We identified Chrysanthemum morifolium RAMAT., known as Kikuka, as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligand. Treatment with Kikuka attenuates the skeletal muscle changes in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest that this natural PPARγ activator might be an attractive candidate for the treatment of cancer cachexia. In the symposium, we presented the PPARγ activator-induced improvement of cancer cachexia.

  5. The interplay between noncoding RNAs and insulin in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan; Xu, Jia; Du, Xiao; Fu, Xianghui

    2018-04-10

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs and circular RNAs, regulate various biological processes and are involved in the initiation and progression of human diseases. Insulin, a predominant hormone secreted from pancreatic β cells, is an essential factor in regulation of systemic metabolism through multifunctional insulin signaling. Insulin production and action are tightly controlled. Dysregulations of insulin production and action can impair metabolic homeostasis, and eventually lead to the development of multiple metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. Accumulating data indicates that ncRNAs modulate β cell mass, insulin synthesis, secretion and signaling, and their role in diabetes is dramatically emerging. This review summarizes our current knowledge of ncRNAs as regulators of insulin, with particular emphasis on the implications of this interplay in the development of diabetes. We outline the role of ncRNAs in pancreatic β cell mass and function, which is critical for insulin production and secretion. We also highlight the involvement of ncRNAs in insulin signaling in peripheral tissues including liver, muscle and adipose, and discuss ncRNA-mediated inter-organ crosstalk under diabetic conditions. A more in-depth understanding of the interplay between ncRNAs and insulin may afford valuable insights and novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of diabetes, as well as other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Insulin in the nervous system and the mind: Functions in metabolism, memory, and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Zabolotny, Janice M; Huang, Hu; Lee, Hyon; Kim, Young-Bum

    2016-08-01

    Insulin, a pleotrophic hormone, has diverse effects in the body. Recent work has highlighted the important role of insulin's action in the nervous system on glucose and energy homeostasis, memory, and mood. Here we review experimental and clinical work that has broadened the understanding of insulin's diverse functions in the central and peripheral nervous systems, including glucose and body weight homeostasis, memory and mood, with particular emphasis on intranasal insulin. Implications for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and mood disorders are discussed in the context of brain insulin action. Intranasal insulin may have potential in the treatment of central nervous system-related metabolic disorders.

  7. Leptin reverses hyperglycemia and hyperphagia in insulin deficient diabetic rats by pituitary-independent central nervous system actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A da Silva

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis has been postulated to play a major role in mediating the antidiabetic effects of leptin. We tested if the pituitary is essential for the chronic central nervous system mediated actions of leptin on metabolic and cardiovascular function in insulin-dependent diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Male 12-week-old hypophysectomized Sprague-Dawley rats (Hypo, n = 5 were instrumented with telemetry probes for determination of mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR 24-hrs/day and an intracerebroventricular (ICV cannula was placed into the brain lateral ventricle for continuous leptin infusion. In additional groups of Hypo and control rats (n = 5/group, diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, IP. Hypo rats were lighter, had lower MAP and HR (83±4 and 317±2 vs 105±4 mmHg and 339±4 bpm, with similar caloric intake per kilogram of body weight and fasting plasma glucose levels (84±4 vs 80±4 mg/dl compared to controls. Chronic ICV leptin infusion (7 days, 0.62 μg/hr in non-diabetic rats reduced caloric intake and body weight (-10% in Hypo and control rats and markedly increased HR in control rats (~25 bpm while causing only modest HR increases in Hypo rats (8 bpm. In diabetic Hypo and control rats, leptin infusion reduced caloric intake, body weight and glucose levels (323±74 to 99±20 and 374±27 to 108±10 mg/dl, respectively; however, the effects of leptin on HR were abolished in Hypo rats. These results indicate that hypophysectomy attenuates leptin's effect on HR regulation without altering leptin's ability to suppress appetite or normalize glucose levels in diabetes.

  8. The effect of curcumin on insulin release in rat-isolated pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziz, Mohamed T; El-Asmar, Mohamed F; El Nadi, Essam G; Wassef, Mohamed A; Ahmed, Hanan H; Rashed, Laila A; Obaia, Eman M; Sabry, Dina; Hassouna, Amira A; Abdel Aziz, Ahmed T

    2010-08-01

    Curcumin exerts a hypoglycemic action and induces heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We evaluated the effect of curcumin on isolated islets of Langerhans and studied whether its action on insulin secretion is mediated by inducible HO-1. Islets were isolated from rats and divided into control islets, islets incubated in different curcumin concentrations, islets incubated in hemin, islets incubated in curcumin and HO inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP), islets incubated in hemin and SnMP, islets incubated in SnMP only, and islets incubated in 16.7 mmol/L glucose. Heme-oxygenase activity, HO-1 expression, and insulin estimation was assessed. Insulin secretion, HO-1 gene expression and HO activity were significantly increased in islets incubated in curcumin, hemin, and glucose compared with controls. This increase in insulin secretion was significantly decreased by incubation of islets in SnMP. The action of curcumin on insulin secretion from the isolated islets may be, in part, mediated through increased HO-1 gene expression.

  9. Believing and perceiving: authorship belief modulates sensory attenuation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Desantis

    Full Text Available Sensory attenuation refers to the observation that self-generated stimuli are attenuated, both in terms of their phenomenology and their cortical response compared to the same stimuli when generated externally. Accordingly, it has been assumed that sensory attenuation might help individuals to determine whether a sensory event was caused by themselves or not. In the present study, we investigated whether this dependency is reciprocal, namely whether sensory attenuation is modulated by prior beliefs of authorship. Participants had to judge the loudness of auditory effects that they believed were either self-generated or triggered by another person. However, in reality, the sounds were always triggered by the participants' actions. Participants perceived the tones' loudness attenuated when they believed that the sounds were self-generated compared to when they believed that they were generated by another person. Sensory attenuation is considered to contribute to the emergence of people's belief of authorship. Our results suggest that sensory attenuation is also a consequence of prior belief about the causal link between an action and a sensory change in the environment.

  10. Insulin release by glucagon and secretin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Andreu, D; Thams, P

    1988-01-01

    Secretin and glucagon potentiate glucose-induced insulin release. We have compared the effects of secretin and glucagon with that of four hybrid molecules of the two hormones on insulin release and formation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in isolated mouse pancreatic islets. All six peptides potentiated...... the release of insulin at 10 mM D-glucose, and their effects were indistinguishable with respect to the dynamics of release, dose-response relationship, and glucose dependency. However, measurements of cAMP accumulation in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (10(-4) M...... potentiating effects of secretin and glucagon on glucose-induced insulin release, their modes of action may be different....

  11. Stress Hyperglycemia, Insulin Treatment, and Innate Immune Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangming Xiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia (HG and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients.

  12. Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: Sex Differences in Insulin Action and Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ananda; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Sex difference plays a substantial role in the regulation of glucose metabolism in healthy glucose-tolerant humans. The factors which may contribute to the sex-related differences in glucose metabolism include differences in lifestyle (diet and exercise), sex hormones, and body composition. Several epidemiological and observational studies have noted that impaired glucose tolerance is more common in women than men. Some of these studies have attributed this to differences in body composition, while others have attributed impaired insulin sensitivity as a cause of impaired glucose tolerance in women. We studied postprandial glucose metabolism in 120 men and 90 women after ingestion of a mixed meal. Rates of meal glucose appearance, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disappearance were calculated using a novel triple-tracer isotope dilution method. Insulin action and secretion were calculated using validated physiological models. While rate of meal glucose appearance was higher in women than men, rates of glucose disappearance were higher in elderly women than elderly men while young women had lower rates of glucose disappearance than young men. Hence, sex has an impact on postprandial glucose metabolism, and sex differences in carbohydrate metabolism may have important implications for approaches to prevent and manage diabetes in an individual.

  13. Insulin action in the brain : intracellular signaling and FoxO transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, Lars Philip van der

    2004-01-01

    Insulin in the central nervous system affects processes that involve learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. However, the mechanism by which insulin affects these processes is unclear. In addition, the mechanism underlying the negative influence of hyperinsulinemia in the

  14. Postprandial regulation of hepatic microRNAs predicted to target the insulin pathway in rainbow trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A Mennigen

    Full Text Available Rainbow trout are carnivorous fish and poor metabolizers of carbohydrates, which established this species as a model organism to study the comparative physiology of insulin. Following the recent characterisation of key roles of several miRNAs in the insulin action on hepatic intermediary metabolism in mammalian models, we investigated the hypothesis that hepatic miRNA expression is postprandially regulated in the rainbow trout and temporally coordinated in the context of insulin-mediated regulation of metabolic gene expression in the liver. To address this hypothesis, we used a time-course experiment in which rainbow trout were fed a commercial diet after short-term fasting. We investigated hepatic miRNA expression, activation of the insulin pathway, and insulin regulated metabolic target genes at several time points. Several miRNAs which negatively regulate hepatic insulin signaling in mammalian model organisms were transiently increased 4 h after the meal, consistent with a potential role in acute postprandial negative feed-back regulation of the insulin pathway and attenuation of gluconeogenic gene expression. We equally observed a transient increase in omy- miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b 4 h after feeding, whose homologues have potent lipogenic roles in the liver of mammalian model systems. A concurrent increase in the activity of the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and the expression of lipogenic genes (srebp1c, fas, acly was equally observed, while lipolytic gene expression (cpt1a and cpt1b decreased significantly 4 h after the meal. This suggests lipogenic roles of omy-miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b may be conserved between rainbow trout and mammals and that these miRNAs may furthermore contribute to acute postprandial regulation of de novo hepatic lipid synthesis in rainbow trout. These findings provide a framework for future research of miRNA regulation of hepatic metabolism in trout and will help to further elucidate the metabolic

  15. Active inference, sensory attenuation and illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harriet; Adams, Rick A; Parees, Isabel; Edwards, Mark; Friston, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Active inference provides a simple and neurobiologically plausible account of how action and perception are coupled in producing (Bayes) optimal behaviour. This can be seen most easily as minimising prediction error: we can either change our predictions to explain sensory input through perception. Alternatively, we can actively change sensory input to fulfil our predictions. In active inference, this action is mediated by classical reflex arcs that minimise proprioceptive prediction error created by descending proprioceptive predictions. However, this creates a conflict between action and perception; in that, self-generated movements require predictions to override the sensory evidence that one is not actually moving. However, ignoring sensory evidence means that externally generated sensations will not be perceived. Conversely, attending to (proprioceptive and somatosensory) sensations enables the detection of externally generated events but precludes generation of actions. This conflict can be resolved by attenuating the precision of sensory evidence during movement or, equivalently, attending away from the consequences of self-made acts. We propose that this Bayes optimal withdrawal of precise sensory evidence during movement is the cause of psychophysical sensory attenuation. Furthermore, it explains the force-matching illusion and reproduces empirical results almost exactly. Finally, if attenuation is removed, the force-matching illusion disappears and false (delusional) inferences about agency emerge. This is important, given the negative correlation between sensory attenuation and delusional beliefs in normal subjects--and the reduction in the magnitude of the illusion in schizophrenia. Active inference therefore links the neuromodulatory optimisation of precision to sensory attenuation and illusory phenomena during the attribution of agency in normal subjects. It also provides a functional account of deficits in syndromes characterised by false inference

  16. Reversal of diet-induced obesity increases insulin transport into cerebrospinal fluid and restores sensitivity to the anorexic action of central insulin in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P; Mul, Joram D; Liu, Min; Reedy, Brianne M; D'Alessio, David A; Seeley, Randy J; Woods, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) reduces the ability of centrally administered insulin to reduce feeding behavior and also reduces the transport of insulin from the periphery to the central nervous system (CNS). The current study was designed to determine whether reversal of high-fat DIO restores the anorexic efficacy of central insulin and whether this is accompanied by restoration of the compromised insulin transport. Adult male Long-Evans rats were initially maintained on either a low-fat chow diet (LFD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). After 22 weeks, half of the animals on the HFD were changed to the LFD, whereas the other half continued on the HFD for an additional 8 weeks, such that there were 3 groups: 1) a LFD control group (Con; n = 18), 2) a HFD-fed, DIO group (n = 17), and 3) a HFD to LFD, DIO-reversal group (DIO-rev; n = 18). The DIO reversal resulted in a significant reduction of body weight and epididymal fat weight relative to the DIO group. Acute central insulin administration (8 mU) reduced food intake and caused weight loss in Con and DIO-rev but not DIO rats. Fasting cerebrospinal fluid insulin was higher in DIO than Con animals. However, after a peripheral bolus injection of insulin, cerebrospinal fluid insulin increased in Con and DIO-rev rats but not in the DIO group. These data provide support for previous reports that DIO inhibits both the central effects of insulin and insulin's transport to the CNS. Importantly, DIO-rev restored sensitivity to the effects of central insulin on food intake and insulin transport into the CNS.

  17. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance in Endocrine Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Peppa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the existing literature data concerning the involvement of skeletal muscle (SM in whole body glucose homeostasis and the contribution of SM insulin resistance (IR to the metabolic derangements observed in several endocrine disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, adrenal disorders and thyroid function abnormalities. IR in PCOS is associated with a unique postbinding defect in insulin receptor signaling in general and in SM in particular, due to a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Adrenal hormone excess is also associated with disrupted insulin action in peripheral tissues, such as SM. Furthermore, both hyper- and hypothyroidism are thought to be insulin resistant states, due to insulin receptor and postreceptor defects. Further studies are definitely needed in order to unravel the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. In summary, the principal mechanisms involved in muscle IR in the endocrine diseases reviewed herein include abnormal phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins, altered muscle fiber composition, reduced transcapillary insulin delivery, decreased glycogen synthesis, and impaired mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

  18. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptors in the brain: physiological and pathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Haim; LeRoith, Derek

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of insulin, the insulin-like growth factors (IGF1, IGF2) and their receptors in central nervous system development and function has been the focus of scientific interest for more than 30 years. The insulin-like peptides, both locally-produced proteins as well as those transported from the circulation into the brain via the blood-brain barrier, are involved in a myriad of biological activities. These actions include, among others, neuronal survival, neurogenes, angiogenesis, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, regulation of food intake, and cognition. In recent years, a linkage between brain insulin/IGF1 and certain neuropathologies has been identified. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between diabetes (mainly type 2) and Alzheimer׳s disease. In addition, an aberrant decline in IGF1 values was suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer׳s disease. The present review focuses on the expression and function of insulin, IGFs and their receptors in the brain in physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure, antihyperglycemic activity and cellular actions of a novel diglycated human insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Harte, F P; Boyd, A C; McKillop, A M

    2000-01-01

    Human insulin was glycated under hyperglycemic reducing conditions and a novel diglycated form (M(r) 6135.1 Da) was purified by RP-HPLC. Endoproteinase Glu-C digestion combined with mass spectrometry and automated Edman degradation localized glycation to Gly(1) and Phe(1) of the insulin A- and B-...

  20. Short-and long-term glucocorticoid treatment enhances insulin signalling in human subcutaneous adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Gathercole, LL; Morgan, SA; Bujalska, IJ; Stewart, PM; Tomlinson, JW

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoid (GC) excess (Cushing's syndrome) is characterized by increased adiposity and insulin resistance. Although GCs cause global insulin resistance in vivo, we have previously shown that GCs are able to augment insulin action in human adipose tissue, contrasting with their action in skeletal muscle. Cushing's syndrome develops following chronic GC exposure and, in addition, is a state of hyperinsulinemia. Objectives: We have therefore compared the ...

  1. Absorption kinetics and action profiles of subcutaneously administered insulin analogues (AspB9GluB27, AspB10, AspB28) in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S; Brange, J; Burch, A; Vølund, A; Owens, D R

    1991-11-01

    The subcutaneous absorption and resulting changes in plasma insulin or analogue, glucose, C-peptide, and blood intermediary metabolite concentrations after subcutaneous bolus injection of three soluble human insulin analogues (AspB9GluB27, monomeric; AspB28, mixture of monomers and dimers; and AspB10, dimeric) and soluble human insulin were evaluated. Fasting healthy male volunteers (n = 7) were studied on five occasions 1 wk apart randomly receiving 0.6 nmol.kg-1 s.c. 125I-labeled AspB10 or soluble human insulin (Novolin R, Novo, Copenhagen); 1st study and 0.6 nmol.kg-1 s.c. 125I-labeled AspB28, AspB9GluB27 or soluble human insulin (2nd study). Residual radioactivity at the injection site was measured over 8 h with frequent venous sampling for plasma immunoreactive insulin or analogue, glucose, C-peptide, and blood intermediary metabolite concentrations. The three analogues were absorbed 2-3 times faster than human insulin. The mean +/- SE time to 50% residual radioactivity was 94 +/- 6 min for AspB10 compared with 184 +/- 10 min for human insulin (P less than 0.001), 83 +/- 8 min for AspB28 (P less than 0.005), and 63 +/- 9 min for AspB9GluB27 (P less than 0.001) compared with 182 +/- 21 min for human insulin. delta Peak plasma insulin analogue levels were significantly higher after each analogue than after human insulin (P less than 0.005). With all three analogues, the mean hypoglycemic nadir occurred earlier at 61-65 min postinjection compared with 201-210 min for the reference human insulins (P less than 0.005). The magnitude of the hypoglycemic nadir was greater after AspB9GluB27 (P less than 0.05) and AspB28 (P less than 0.001) compared with human insulin. There was a significantly faster onset and offset of responses in C-peptide and intermediary metabolite levels after the analogues than after human insulin (P less than 0.05). The rapid absorption and biological actions of these analogues offer potential therapeutic advantages over the current short

  2. Analyses of insulin-potentiating fragments of human growth hormone by computative simulation; essential unit for insulin-involved biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, K; Hori, H

    2000-07-01

    We analyzed the structural features of insulin-potentiating fragments of human growth hormone by computative simulations. The peptides were designated from the N-terminus sequences of the hormone positions at 1-15 (hGH(1-15); H2N-Phe1-Pro2-Thr3-Ile4-Pro5-Leu6-Ser7-Arg8-L eu9-Phe10-Asp11-Asn12-Ala13-Met14-Leu15 -COOH), 6-13 (hGH(6-13)), 7-13 (hGH(7-13)) and 8-13 (hGH(8-13)), which enhanced insulin-producing hypoglycemia. In these peptide molecules, ionic bonds were predicted to form between 8th-arginyl residue and 11th-aspartic residue, and this intramolecular interaction caused the formation of a macrocyclic structure containing a tetrapeptide Arg8-Leu9-Phe10-Asp11. The peptide positions at 6-10 (hGH(6-10)), 9-13 (hGH(9-13)) and 10-13 (hGH(10-13)) did not lead to a macrocyclic formation in the molecules, and had no effect on the insulin action. Although beta-Ala13hGH(1-15), in which the 13th-alanine was replaced by a beta-alanyl residue, had no effect on insulin-producing hypoglycemia, the macrocyclic region (Arg8-Leu9-Phe10-Asp11) was observed by the computative simulation. An isothermal vibration analysis of both of beta-Ala13hGH(1-15) and hGH(1-15) peptide suggested that beta-Ala13hGH(1-15) is molecule was more flexible than hGH(1-15); C-terminal carboxyl group of Leu15 easily accessed to Arg8 and inhibited the ionic bond formation between Arg8 and Asp11 in beta-Ala13hGH(1-15). The peptide of hGH(8-13) dose-dependently enhanced the insulin-involved fatty acid synthesis in rat white adipocytes, and stabilized the C6-NBD-PC (1-acyl-2-[6-[(7-nitro-2,1,3benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]-caproyl]-sn- glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) model membranes. In contrast, hGH(9-13) had no effect both on the fatty acid synthesis and the membrane stability. In the same culture conditions as the fatty acid synthesis assay, hGH(8-13) had no effect on the transcript levels of glucose transporter isoforms (GLUT 1, 4) and hexokinase isozymes (HK I, II) in rat white adipocytes. Judging from

  3. Insulin sparing action of adenovirus 36 and its E4orf1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurandhar, Nikhil V

    2013-01-01

    Additional drugs are required to effectively manage diabetes and its complications. Recent studies have revealed protective effects of Ad36, a human adenovirus, and its E4orf1 protein on glucose disposal, which may be creatively harnessed to develop novel anti-diabetic agents. Experimental Ad36 infection improves hyperglycemia in animal models and natural Ad36 infection in humans is associated with better glycemic control. Available data indicate distinctive advantages for a drug that may mimic the action of Ad36/E4orf1. The key features of such a potential drug include the ability to increase glucose uptake by adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, to reduce hepatic glucose output independent of proximal insulin signaling, and to up-regulate adiponectin and its hepatic action. The effect of Ad36/E4orf1 on hepatocyte metabolism suggests a role for treating hepatic steatosis. Despite these potential advantages, considerable research is required before such a drug is developed. The in vivo efficacy and safety of E4orf1 in improving hyperglycemia remain unknown, and an appropriate drug delivery system is required. Nonetheless, Ad36 E4orf1 offers a research opportunity to develop a new anti-diabetic agent with multiple potential advantages and conceptually advances the use of a rather unconventional source, microbial proteins, for anti-diabetic drug development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain insulin controls adipose tissue lipolysis and lipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Thomas; O’Hare, James; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly; Schweiger, Martina; Cheng, Bob; Lindtner, Claudia; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Vempati, Prashant; Su, Kai; Dighe, Shveta; Milsom, Thomas; Puchowicz, Michelle; Scheja, Ludger; Zechner, Rudolf; Fisher, Simon J.; Previs, Stephen F.; Buettner, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY White adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (DM2). Unrestrained WAT lipolysis results in increased fatty acid release leading to insulin resistance and lipotoxicity, while impaired de novo lipogenesis in WAT decreases the synthesis of insulin sensitizing fatty acid species like palmitoleate. Here we show that insulin infused into the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of Sprague Dawley rats increases WAT lipogenic protein expression, and inactivates hormone sensitive lipase (Hsl) and suppresses lipolysis. Conversely, mice that lack the neuronal insulin receptor exhibit unrestrained lipolysis and decreased de novo lipogenesis in WAT. Thus, brain and in particular hypothalamic insulin action play a pivotal role in WAT functionality. PMID:21284985

  5. Effects of fasting on insulin action and glucose kinetics in lean and obese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Bryan C; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Horton, Tracy J; Bessesen, Daniel H

    2007-10-01

    The development of insulin resistance in the obese individual could impair the ability to appropriately adjust metabolism to perturbations in energy balance. We investigated a 12- vs. 48-h fast on hepatic glucose production (R(a)), peripheral glucose uptake (R(d)), and skeletal muscle insulin signaling in lean and obese subjects. Healthy lean [n = 14; age = 28.0 +/- 1.4 yr; body mass index (BMI) = 22.8 +/- 0.42] and nondiabetic obese (n = 11; age = 34.6 +/- 2.3 yr; BMI = 36.1 +/- 1.5) subjects were studied following a 12- and 48-h fast during 2 h of rest and a 3-h 40 mUxm(-2)xmin(-1) hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEC). Basal glucose R(a) decreased significantly from the 12- to 48-h fast (lean 1.96 +/- 0.23 to 1.63 +/- 0.15; obese 1.23 +/- 0.07 to 1.07 +/- 0.07 mgxkg(-1)xmin(-1); P = 0.004) and was equally suppressed during the HEC after both fasts. The increase in glucose R(d) during the HEC after the 12-h fast was significantly decreased in lean and obese subjects after the 48-h fast (lean 9.03 +/- 1.17 to 4.16 +/- 0.34, obese 6.10 +/- 0.77 to 3.56 +/- 0.30 mgxkg FFM(-1)xmin(-1); P lean than obese subjects. We conclude that 1) 48 h of fasting produces a marked decline in peripheral insulin action, while suppression of hepatic glucose production is maintained in lean and obese men and women; and 2) the magnitude of this decline is greater in lean vs. obese subjects.

  6. Regulation of skeletal muscle insulin action in relation to dietary fatty acids and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Louise Dalgas

    In the present thesis the aims were 1) to investigate whether insulin sensitivity was different between women and men and whether a lipid load induced insulin resistance to a similar extent in women and men, 2) to determine whether lipid-induced insulin resistance was due to energy surplus...

  7. Effect of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Type 2 Diabetes and Glycemic Traits on a- and ß-cell Function and Insulin Action in Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna; Ladenvall, Claes; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh

    2013-01-01

    Although meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes and/or glycemic traits, there is little information whether these variants also affect a-cell function. The aim of the present study...... was to evaluate the effects of glycemia-associated genetic loci on islet function in vivo and in vitro. We studied 43 SNPs in 4,654 normoglycemic participants from the Finnish population-based PPP-Botnia study. Islet function was assessed, in vivo, by measuring insulin and glucagon concentrations during OGTT, and....... Variants in BCL11A, TSPAN8, and NOTCH2 affected glucagon secretion both in vivo and in vitro. The MTNR1B variant was a clear outlier in the relationship analysis between insulin secretion and action, as well as between insulin, glucose and glucagon. Many of the genetic variants shown to be associated...

  8. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  9. PKB/Akt phosphorylation of ERRγ contributes to insulin-mediated inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hynx, Debby; Wang, Yanning; Yang, Keum-Jin; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kim, Kyung Seok; Yoo, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, In-Kyu; Chae, Ho-Zoon; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Biddinger, Sudha B; Hemmings, Brian A; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2014-12-01

    Insulin resistance, a major contributor to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, leads to increased hepatic glucose production (HGP) owing to an impaired ability of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a major transcriptional regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis. In this study, we investigated insulin-dependent post-translational modifications (PTMs) altering the transcriptional activity of ERRγ for the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. We examined insulin-dependent phosphorylation and subcellular localisation of ERRγ in cultured cells and in the liver of C57/BL6, leptin receptor-deficient (db/db), liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) and protein kinase B (PKB) β-deficient (Pkbβ (-/-)) mice. To demonstrate the role of ERRγ in the inhibitory action of insulin on hepatic gluconeogenesis, we carried out an insulin tolerance test in C57/BL6 mice expressing wild-type or phosphorylation-deficient mutant ERRγ. We demonstrated that insulin suppressed the transcriptional activity of ERRγ by promoting PKB/Akt-mediated phosphorylation of ERRγ at S179 and by eliciting translocation of ERRγ from the nucleus to the cytoplasm through interaction with 14-3-3, impairing its ability to promote hepatic gluconeogenesis. In addition, db/db, LIRKO and Pkbβ (-/-) mice displayed enhanced ERRγ transcriptional activity due to a block in PKBβ-mediated ERRγ phosphorylation during refeeding. Finally, the phosphorylation-deficient mutant ERRγ S179A was resistant to the inhibitory action of insulin on HGP. These results suggest that ERRγ is a major contributor to insulin action in maintaining hepatic glucose homeostasis.

  10. Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.) Attenuates FFA Induced Ceramide Accumulation in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes in an Adiponectin Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obanda, Diana N; Zhao, Peng; Richard, Allison J; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Excess dietary lipids result in the accumulation of lipid metabolites including ceramides that can attenuate insulin signaling. There is evidence that a botanical extract of Urtica dioica L. (stinging nettle) improves insulin action, yet the precise mechanism(s) are not known. Hence, we examined the effects of Urtica dioica L. (UT) on adipocytes. We investigated the effects of an ethanolic extract of UT on free fatty acid (palmitic acid) induced inhibition of insulin-stimulated Akt serine phosphorylation and modulation of ceramidase expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Adipocytes were exposed to excess FFAs in the presence or absence of UT. Effects on adiponectin expression, ceramidase expression, ceramidase activity, ceramide accumulation and insulin signaling were determined. As expected, FFAs reduced adiponectin expression and increased the expression of ceramidase enzymes but not their activity. FFA also induced the accumulation of ceramides and reduced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in adipocytes. The effects of FFA were partially reversed by UT. UT enhanced adiponectin expression and ceramidase activity in the presence of excess FFAs. UT abated ceramide accumulation and increased insulin sensitivity via enhanced Akt phosphorylation. A siRNA knockdown of adiponectin expression prevented UT from exerting positive effects on ceramidase activity but not Akt phosphorylation. In adipocytes, the ability of UT to antagonize the negative effects of FFA by modulating ceramidase activity and ceramide accumulation is dependent on the presence of adiponectin. However, the ability of UT to enhance Akt phosphorylation is independent of adiponectin expression. These studies demonstrate direct effects of UT on adipocytes and suggest this botanical extract is metabolically beneficial.

  11. Molecular aspects of glucose homeostasis in skeletal muscle--A focus on the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnagarin, Revathy; Dharmarajan, Arun M; Dass, Crispin R

    2015-12-05

    Among all the varied actions of insulin, regulation of glucose homeostasis is the most critical and intensively studied. With the availability of glucose from nutrient metabolism, insulin action in muscle results in increased glucose disposal via uptake from the circulation and storage of excess, thereby maintaining euglycemia. This major action of insulin is executed by redistribution of the glucose transporter protein, GLUT4 from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane and storage of glucose in the form of glycogen which also involves modulation of actin dynamics that govern trafficking of all the signal proteins of insulin signal transduction. The cellular mechanisms responsible for these trafficking events and the defects associated with insulin resistance are largely enigmatic, and this review provides a consolidated overview of the various molecular mechanisms involved in insulin-dependent glucose homeostasis in skeletal muscle, as insulin resistance at this major peripheral site impacts whole body glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess hexavalent chromium modifies insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle of rat progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Navaneethabalakrishnan; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael; Tochhawng, Lalmuankimi; Loganathan, Ayyalu; Balaji, Sadhasivam; Kumar, Mani Kathiresh; Banu, Liaquat Alikhan Sheerin; Navin, Ajit Kumar; Mayilvanan, Chinnaiyan; Ilangovan, Ramachandran; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium (Cr), an essential micronutrient potentiates insulin action, whereas excess hexavalent Cr (CrVI) acts as an endocrine disruptor. Pregnant mothers living in areas abutting industries using the metal and chromite ore dumps are exposed to ground water contaminated with Cr. Nevertheless, the impact of prenatal exposure to excess CrVI on insulin signaling in the progeny remains obscure. We tested the hypothesis "transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess CrVI may modify insulin signaling during postnatal life". Pregnant Wistar rats were given drinking water containing 50, 100 and 200 ppm CrVI (K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) from gestational day 9-14 encompassing the period of organogenesis; the male progenies were tested at postnatal day 60. Neither fasting blood glucose nor oral glucose tolerance was altered in CrVI treated progeny. Nevertheless, western blot detection pointed out attenuated expression level of insulin receptor (IR), its downstream signaling molecules (IRS-1, pIRS-1 Tyr632 , Akt and pAkt Ser473 ) and organ specific glucose transporters (GLUT2 in liver and GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle), along with a significant increase in serum insulin level in male progenies exposed to CrVI. While 14 C-2-deoxy glucose uptake increased in the liver, the same decreased in the skeletal muscle whereas, 14 C-glucose oxidation recorded a consistent decrease in both tissues of CrVI exposed rats. These findings support our hypothesis and suggest that transient gestational exposure to excess CrVI may affect insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in the progeny, predictably rendering them vulnerable to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of high fat and high sugar diet on insulin binding and insulin action in isolated rat adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    岡﨑,悟

    1987-01-01

    To clarify on a cellular basis the mechanism of the diabetogenic effect of the westernized diet, insulin binding, insulin stimulated 3-o-methylglucose uptake and glucose oxidation were studied in isolated adipocytes from rats fed experimental diets : low fat-no sugar diet (energy ratio of 10% fat, 70% starch, a model of the traditional Japanese diet), high fat-high sugar diet (40% fat, 20% starch, 20% sugar, a model of the westernized diet), low fat-high sugar diet (10% fat, 50% starch, 20% s...

  14. Evaluation of Jump into Action: A Program to Reduce the Risk of Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in School Children on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, J. David; Lira, Juanita; Kingery, Paul M.; Smith, D. W.; Lane, Dorothy; Goodway, Jackie

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated Jump into Action, a non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)-prevention program that encouraged students to eat well and exercise regularly to reduce NIDDM risks. Surveys of predominantly Hispanic fifth graders and their teachers at Texas-Mexico border schools indicated that the program increased NIDDM-prevention knowledge and…

  15. The brain response to peripheral insulin declines with age: a contribution of the blood-brain barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Peter, Andreas; Heni, Martin; Maetzler, Walter; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M

    2015-01-01

    It is a matter of debate whether impaired insulin action originates from a defect at the neural level or impaired transport of the hormone into the brain. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of aging on insulin concentrations in the periphery and the central nervous system as well as its impact on insulin-dependent brain activity. Insulin, glucose and albumin concentrations were determined in 160 paired human serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. Additionally, insulin was applied in young and aged mice by subcutaneous injection or intracerebroventricularly to circumvent the blood-brain barrier. Insulin action and cortical activity were assessed by Western blotting and electrocorticography radiotelemetric measurements. In humans, CSF glucose and insulin concentrations were tightly correlated with the respective serum/plasma concentrations. The CSF/serum ratio for insulin was reduced in older subjects while the CSF/serum ratio for albumin increased with age like for most other proteins. Western blot analysis in murine whole brain lysates revealed impaired phosphorylation of AKT (P-AKT) in aged mice following peripheral insulin stimulation whereas P-AKT was comparable to levels in young mice after intracerebroventricular insulin application. As readout for insulin action in the brain, insulin-mediated cortical brain activity instantly increased in young mice subcutaneously injected with insulin but was significantly reduced and delayed in aged mice during the treatment period. When insulin was applied intracerebroventricularly into aged animals, brain activity was readily improved. This study discloses age-dependent changes in insulin CSF/serum ratios in humans. In the elderly, cerebral insulin resistance might be partially attributed to an impaired transport of insulin into the central nervous system.

  16. Inhibition of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling attenuates the development of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Sandra M; Lee, Heng-Huan; Lowery, Frank J; Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Xia, Weiya; Zhang, Chenyu; Chang, Shih-Shin; Chou, Chao-Kai; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a common cause of mortality in cancer patients, yet potential therapeutic targets remain largely unknown. The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is known to play a role in the progression of breast cancer and is currently being investigated in the clinical setting for various types of cancer. The present study demonstrates that IGF-IR is constitutively autophosphorylated in brain-seeking breast cancer sublines. Knockdown of IGF-IR results in a decrease of phospho-AKT and phospho-p70s6k, as well as decreased migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231Br brain-seeking cells. In addition, transient ablation of IGFBP3, which is overexpressed in brain-seeking cells, blocks IGF-IR activation. Using an in vivo experimental brain metastasis model, we show that IGF-IR knockdown brain-seeking cells have reduced potential to establish brain metastases. Finally, we demonstrate that the malignancy of brain-seeking cells is attenuated by pharmacological inhibition with picropodophyllin, an IGF-IR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Together, our data suggest that the IGF-IR is an important mediator of brain metastasis and its ablation delays the onset of brain metastases in our model system.

  17. The T allele of rs7903146 TCF7L2 is associated with impaired insulinotropic action of incretin hormones, reduced 24 h profiles of plasma insulin and glucagon, and increased hepatic glucose production in young healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilgaard, K; Jensen, C; Schou, J

    2009-01-01

    h glucose, insulin and glucagon profiles; OGTT; mixed meal test; IVGTT; hyperglycaemic clamp with co-infusion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 or glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP); and a euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp combined with glucose tracer infusion to study hepatic...... and peripheral insulin action. RESULTS: Carriers of the T allele were characterised by reduced 24 h insulin concentrations (p ...-phase insulinotropic action of GLP-1 (p = 0.03) and GIP (p = 0.07) during a 7 mmol/l hyperglycaemic clamp. Secretion of GLP-1 and GIP during the mixed meal test was normal. Despite elevated hepatic glucose production, carriers of the T allele had significantly reduced 24 h glucagon concentrations (p

  18. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24–48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise. PMID:26487009

  19. Increased retinol-free RBP4 contributes to insulin resistance in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmin; Lv, Ping; Du, Mengkai; Liang, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Menglin; Chen, Danqing

    2017-07-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a circulating retinol transporter that is strongly associated with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the RBP4 and retinol level in rat model of gestational diabetes mellitus and the relationship between retinol-free RBP4 (apo-RBP4), retinol-bound RBP4 (holo-RBP4) and insulin resistance. Pregnant rats were administered streptozotocin to induce diabetes. The RBP4 and retinol levels were evaluated in GDM and normal pregnant rats. After then, normal pregnant rats were divided into two groups to receive either apo-RBP4 or vehicle injection. The metabolic parameters and insulin signaling in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver were determined in apo-RBP4 and control groups. Primary human adipocytes were cultured in vitro with different proportions of apo-RBP4 and holo-RBP4 for 24 h. The interaction between RBP4 and STRA6 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, and the expression of JAK-STAT pathway and insulin signaling were detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We found increases in serum RBP4 levels and the RBP4:retinol ratio but not in the retinol levels in GDM rats. Exogenous apo-RBP4 injection attenuated insulin sensitivity in pregnant rats. In vitro, a prolonged interaction between RBP4 and STRA6 was observed when apo-RBP4 was present. In response to increased apo-RBP4 levels, cells showed elevated activation of the JAK2/STAT5 cascade and SOCS3 expression, decreased phosphorylation of IR and IRS1, and attenuated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake upon insulin stimulation. Apo-RBP4 is a ligand that activates the STRA6 signaling cascade, inducing insulin resistance in GDM.

  20. Glucose administration attenuates spatial memory deficits induced by chronic low-power-density microwave exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghui; Xu, Shangcheng; He, Mindi; Chen, Chunhai; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chuan; Chu, Fang; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Zhong, Min

    2012-07-16

    Extensive evidence indicates that glucose administration attenuates memory deficits in rodents and humans, and cognitive impairment has been associated with reduced glucose metabolism and uptake in certain brain regions including the hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose treatment attenuated memory deficits caused by chronic low-power-density microwave (MW) exposure, and the effect of MW exposure on hippocampal glucose uptake. We exposed Wistar rats to 2.45 GHz pulsed MW irradiation at a power density of 1 mW/cm(2) for 3 h/day, for up to 30 days. MW exposure induced spatial learning and memory impairments in rats. Hippocampal glucose uptake was also reduced by MW exposure in the absence or presence of insulin, but the levels of blood glucose and insulin were not affected. However, these spatial memory deficits were reversed by systemic glucose treatment. Our results indicate that glucose administration attenuates the spatial memory deficits induced by chronic low-power-density MW exposure, and reduced hippocampal glucose uptake may be associated with cognitive impairment caused by MW exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin secretion and sensitivity in space flight: diabetogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Uchakin, Peter N.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    2002-01-01

    Nearly three decades of space flight research have suggested that there are subclinical diabetogenic changes that occur in microgravity. Alterations in insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and metabolism of protein and amino acids support the hypothesis that insulin plays an essential role in the maintenance of muscle mass in extended-duration space flight. Experiments in flight and after flight and ground-based bedrest studies have associated microgravity and its experimental paradigms with manifestations similar to those of diabetes, physical inactivity, and aging. We propose that these manifestations are characterized best by an etiology that falls into the clinical category of "other" causes of diabetes, including, but not restricted to, genetic beta-cell defects, insulin action defects, diseases of the endocrine pancreas, endocrinopathies, drug or chemically induced diabetes, infections, immune-mediated metabolic alteration, and a host of genetic related diseases. We present data showing alterations in tumor necrosis factor-alpha production, insulin secretion, and amino acid metabolism in pancreatic islets of Langerhans cultured in a ground-based cell culture bioreactor that mimics some of the effects of microgravity. Taken together, space flight research, ground-based studies, and bioreactor studies of pancreatic islets of Langerhans support the hypothesis that the pancreas is unable to overcome peripheral insulin resistance and amino acid dysregulation during space flight. We propose that measures of insulin secretion and insulin action will be necessary to design effective countermeasures against muscle loss, and we advance the "disposition index" as an essential model to be used in the clinical management of space flight-induced muscle loss.

  2. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Juan, Chi-Chang; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ET A R during insulin resistance, ET A R expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ET A R expression, but not ET B R, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ET A R pathway suppressed insulin

  3. Insulin sensitivity in post-obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toubro, S; Western, P; Bülow, J

    1994-01-01

    1. Both increased and decreased sensitivity to insulin has been proposed to precede the development of obesity. Therefore, insulin sensitivity was measured during a 2 h hyperinsulinaemia (100 m-units min-1 m-2) euglycaemic (4.5 mmol/l) glucose clamp combined with indirect calorimetry in nine weight......-1 kg-1, not significant). Basal plasma concentrations of free fatty acids were similar, but at the end of the clamp free fatty acids were lower in the post-obese women than in the control women (139 +/- 19 and 276 +/- 48 mumol/l, P = 0.02). 3. We conclude that the insulin sensitivity of glucose...... metabolism is unaltered in the post-obese state. The study, however, points to an increased antilipolytic insulin action in post-obese subjects, which may favour fat storage and lower lipid oxidation rate postprandially.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  4. Ghrelin differentially affects hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, A. C.; van den Hoek, A. M.; Parlevliet, E. T.; Havekes, L. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Corssmit, E. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of ghrelin on insulin's capacity to suppress endogenous glucose production and promote glucose disposal in mice. To establish whether the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor can mediate the putative effect of ghrelin on the action of insulin,

  5. RESISTENSI INSULIN TERKAIT OBESITAS: MEKANISME ENDOKRIN DAN INTRINSIK SEL

    OpenAIRE

    Mira Dewi

    2012-01-01

    The number of obese individuals worldwide has reached 2.1 billion and this will lead to explosion of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. Obese individuals will develop re­sistance to celluler action of insulin. The obesity related insulin resistance is the major risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, the disease which number has reached epidemic proportion. The association between obesity and insulin resistance seem to be cause and effect relation because s...

  6. Insulin receptor in mouse neuroblastoma cell line N18TG2: binding properties and visualization with colloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, C; Stefanini, S; Bernardo, A; Augusti-Tocco, G

    1992-08-01

    Insulin function in the nervous system is still poorly understood. Possible roles as a neuromodulator and as a growth factor have been proposed (Baskin et al., 1987, Ann. Rev. Physiol. 49, 335-347). Stable cell lines may provide an appropriate experimental system for the analysis of insulin action on the various cellular components of the central nervous system. We report here a study to investigate the presence and the properties of insulin specific binding sites in the murine neuroblastoma line, N18TG2, together with insulin action on cell growth and metabolism. Also, receptor internalization has been studied. Binding experiments, carried out in standard conditions at 20 degrees C, enabled us to demonstrate that these cells bind insulin in a specific manner, thus confirming previous findings on other cell lines. Saturation curves showed the presence of two binding sites with Kd 0.3 and 9.7 nM. Competition experiments with porcine and bovine insulin showed an IC50 of 1 and 10 nM, respectively. Competition did not occur in the presence of the unrelated hormones ACTH and FSH. Dissociation experiments indicated the existence of an internalization process of the ligand-receptor complex; this was confirmed by an ultrastructural study using gold conjugated insulin. As far as the insulin action in N18TG2 cells is concerned, physiological concentrations stimulate cell proliferation, whereas no stimulation of glucose uptake was observed, indicating that insulin action in these cells is not mediated by general metabolic effects. On the basis of these data, N18TG2 line appears to be a very suitable model for further studies of the neuronal type insulin receptors, and possibly insulin specific action on the nervous system.

  7. The role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J; Prasannarong, Mujalin

    2013-09-25

    The canonical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) involves the initial action of renin to cleave angiotensinogen to angiotensin I (ANG I), which is then converted to ANG II by the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). ANG II plays a critical role in numerous physiological functions, and RAS overactivity underlies many conditions of cardiovascular dysregulation. In addition, ANG II, by acting on both endothelial and myocellular AT1 receptors, can induce insulin resistance by increasing cellular oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity. This insulin resistance associated with RAS overactivity, when coupled with progressive ß-cell dysfunction, eventually leads to the development of type 2 diabetes. Interventions that target RAS overactivity, including ACE inhibitors, ANG II receptor blockers, and, most recently, renin inhibitors, are effective both in reducing hypertension and in improving whole-body and skeletal muscle insulin action, due at least in part to enhanced Akt-dependent insulin signaling and insulin-dependent glucose transport activity. ANG-(1-7), which is produced from ANG II by the action of ACE2 and acts via Mas receptors, can counterbalance the deleterious actions of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis on the insulin-dependent glucose transport system in skeletal muscle. This beneficial effect of the ACE2/ANG-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis appears to depend on the activation of Akt. Collectively, these findings underscore the importance of RAS overactivity in the multifactorial etiology of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and provide support for interventions that target the RAS to ameliorate both cardiovascular dysfunctions and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Associations between insulin action and integrity of brain microstructure differ with familial longevity and with age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; van Buchem, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    [fasted glucose and glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC)], insulin resistance [fasted insulin, AUCinsulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], and pancreatic Beta cell secretory capacity (insulinogenic index). 3 Tesla MRI and Magnetization Transfer (MT) imaging MT-ratio (MTR......-height in gray and white matter was inversely associated with AUCinsulin, fasted insulin, HOMA-IR and insulinogenic-index (all p 65 years): in younger controls, significantly stronger inverse associations were observed between MTR peak-height and fasted glucose......, AUCglucose, fasted insulin, AUCinsulin and HOMA-IR in gray matter; and for AUCglucose, fasted insulin and HOMA-IR in white matter (all P-interaction

  9. Insulin transport into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P

    2015-01-01

    The pancreatic hormone insulin plays a well-described role in the periphery, based principally on its ability to lower circulating glucose levels via activation of glucose transporters. However, insulin also acts within the central nervous system (CNS) to alter a number of physiological outcomes ranging from energy balance and glucose homeostasis to cognitive performance. Insulin is transported into the CNS by a saturable receptor-mediated process that is proposed to be dependent on the insulin receptor. Transport of insulin into the brain is dependent on numerous factors including diet, glycemia, a diabetic state and notably, obesity. Obesity leads to a marked decrease in insulin transport from the periphery into the CNS and the biological basis of this reduction of transport remains unresolved. Despite decades of research into the effects of central insulin on a wide range of physiological functions and its transport from the periphery to the CNS, numerous questions remain unanswered including which receptor is responsible for transport and the precise mechanisms of action of insulin within the brain. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Insulin signaling in various equine tissues under basal conditions and acute stimulation by intravenously injected insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnken, Tobias; Brehm, Ralph; Feige, Karsten; Huber, Korinna

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze key proteins of the equine insulin signaling cascade and their extent of phosphorylation in biopsies from muscle tissue (MT), liver tissue (LT), and nuchal AT, subcutaneous AT, and retroperitoneal adipose tissues. This was investigated under unstimulated (B1) and intravenously insulin stimulated (B2) conditions, which were achieved by injection of insulin (0.1 IU/kg bodyweight) and glucose (150 mg/kg bodyweight). Twelve warmblood horses aged 15 ± 6.8 yr (yr), weighing 559 ± 79 kg, and with a mean body condition score of 4.7 ± 1.5 were included in the study. Key proteins of the insulin signaling cascade were semiquantitatively determined using Western blotting. Furthermore, modulation of the cascade was assessed. The basal expression of the proteins was only slightly influenced during the experimental period. Insulin induced a high extent of phosphorylation of insulin receptor in LT (P < 0.01) but not in MT. Protein kinase B and mechanistic target of rapamycin expressed a higher extent of phosphorylation in all tissues in B2 biopsies. Adenosine monophosphate protein kinase, as a component related to insulin signaling, expressed enhanced phosphorylation in MT (P < 0.05) and adipose tissues (nuchal AT P < 0.05; SCAT P < 0.01; retroperitoneal adipose tissue P < 0.05), but not in LT at B2. Tissue-specific variations in the acute response of insulin signaling to intravenously injected insulin were observed. In conclusion, insulin sensitivity in healthy horses is based on a complex concerted action of different tissues by their variations in the molecular response to insulin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulation of protein synthesis by internalized insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.S.; Sykes, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies showed that microinjected insulin stimulates transcription and translation in Stage 4 Xenopus oocytes by acting at nuclear and cytoplasmic sites. The present report is concerned with the question of whether hormone, internalized from an external medium, can act on those sites to alter cell function. Both intracellular accumulation of undegraded 125I-insulin and insulin-stimulated 35S-methionine incorporation into oocyte protein were measured. Anti-insulin antiserum and purified anti-insulin antibody were microinjected into the cytoplasm of insulin-exposed cells to determine if insulin derived from the medium acted through internal sites. In cells exposed for 2 h to 7 or 70 nM external insulin, methionine incorporation was stimulated, but intracellular hormone accumulation was minimal and microinjected antibody was without effect. In cells exposed for 24 h, methionine incorporation again increased, but now accumulation of undegraded, intracellular hormone was substantial (2.6 and 25.3 fmol with 7 and 70 nM, respectively), and microinjected anti-insulin antibody significantly reduced the insulin-stimulated component of incorporation; basal incorporation was not affected. For cells exposed to 70 nM insulin for 24 h, inhibition of the insulin-stimulated component was maximal at 39%. Thus under those conditions, about 40% of insulin's effects were mediated by the internal sites. Together, the data show that inhibition of insulin-stimulated protein synthesis by microinjected antibody was associated with the intracellular accumulation of insulin. They indicate that when oocytes are exposed to external insulin, hormone eventually gains access to intracellular sites of action and through these stimulates translation. Control of translation appears to be shared between the internal sites and the surface receptor

  12. Prolactin effect on the insulin content of albino rats in different physiological states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, Y.M.; Abdel-Wahab, M.F.; El-Mougi, S.M.; El-Sayed, F.B.; Kuwait Univ.)

    1980-01-01

    The metabolic action of prolactin on insulin levels in plasma and pancreas has been studied. Prolactin was injected in a single dose or single daily doses on 4 successive days into albino rats in six different physiological states. Insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay using 125 I insulin. From the results it is concluded that prolactin injected i.p. influences the output of insulin and stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin into the plasma. (author)

  13. Role of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor Type 1 Receptor in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Defective cognitive function is common in patients with diabetes, suggesting that insulin normally exerts anabolic actions in neuron, namely, diabetic encephalopathy. However, because insulin can cross-activate the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R, which also functions in most of tissues, such as muscle and bone, it has been difficult to establish the direct (IGF-1-independent actions of insulin in the pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy. To overcome this problem, we examined insulin signaling and action in primary PC-12 cells engineered for conditional disruption of the IGF-1 receptor (ΔIGF-1R. The results showed that the lower glucose metabolism and high expression of IGF-1R occurred in the brain of the DE rat model. The results also showed the defect of IGF-1R could significantly improve the ability of glucose consumption and enhance sensitivity to insulin-induced IR and Akt phosphorylation in PC12 cells. And meanwhile, IGF-1R allele gene knockout (IGF-1Rneo mice treated with HFD/STZ had better cognitive abilities than those of wild mice. Those results indicate that insulin exerts direct anabolic actions in neuron-like cells by activation of its cognate receptor and prove that IGF-1R plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-1 protects preimplantation embryos from anti-developmental actions of menadione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James I; Pontes, Eduardo; Hansen, Peter James

    2009-11-01

    Menadione is a naphthoquinone used as a vitamin K source in animal feed that can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause apoptosis. Here, we examined whether menadione reduces development of preimplantation bovine embryos in a ROS-dependent process and tested the hypothesis that actions of menadione would be reduced by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Menadione caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the proportion of embryos that became blastocysts. All concentrations tested (1, 2.5, and 5.0 microM) inhibited development. Treatment with 100 ng/ml IGF-1 reduced the magnitude of the anti-developmental effects of the two lowest menadione concentrations. Menadione also caused a concentration-dependent increase in the percent of cells positive for the TUNEL reaction. The response was lower for IGF-1-treated embryos. The effects of menadione were mediated by ROS because (1) the anti-developmental effect of menadione was blocked by the antioxidants dithiothreitol and Trolox and (2) menadione caused an increase in ROS generation. Treatment with IGF-1 did not reduce ROS formation in menadione-treated embryos. In conclusion, concentrations of menadione as low as 1.0 muM can compromise development of bovine preimplantation embryos to the blastocyst stage of development in a ROS-dependent mechanism. Anti-developmental actions of menadione can be blocked by IGF-1 through effects downstream of ROS generation.

  15. Disruption of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane (MAM) Integrity Contributes to Muscle Insulin Resistance in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Emily; Chanon, Stéphanie; Robert, Maud; Bendridi, Nadia; Bidaux, Gabriel; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Ji-Cao, Jingwei; Durand, Christine; Gauvrit-Ramette, Daphné; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    Modifications of the interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), were recently shown to be involved in the control of hepatic insulin action and glucose homeostasis, but with conflicting results. Whereas skeletal muscle is the primary site of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and the main target for alterations in insulin-resistant states, the relevance of MAM integrity in muscle insulin resistance is unknown. Deciphering the importance of MAMs on muscle insulin signaling could help to clarify this controversy. Here, we show in skeletal muscle of different mice models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) a marked disruption of ER-mitochondria interactions as an early event preceding mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Furthermore, in human myotubes, palmitate-induced insulin resistance is associated with a reduction of structural and functional ER-mitochondria interactions. Importantly, experimental increase of ER-mitochondria contacts in human myotubes prevents palmitate-induced alterations of insulin signaling and action, whereas disruption of MAM integrity alters the action of the hormone. Lastly, we found an association between altered insulin signaling and ER-mitochondria interactions in human myotubes from obese subjects with or without T2D compared with healthy lean subjects. Collectively, our data reveal a new role of MAM integrity in insulin action of skeletal muscle and highlight MAM disruption as an essential subcellular alteration associated with muscle insulin resistance in mice and humans. Therefore, reduced ER-mitochondria coupling could be a common alteration of several insulin-sensitive tissues playing a key role in altered glucose homeostasis in the context of obesity and T2D. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Neutral insulin solutions physically stabilized by addition of Zn2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Havelund, S; Hommel, E; Sørensen, E; Kühl, C

    1986-01-01

    Commercial neutral insulin solutions, all of which contain 2-3 zinc atoms per hexameric unit of insulin, have a relatively limited physical stability when exposed to heat and movement, as for example in insulin infusion pumps. Physical stabilization of neutral insulin solutions has been obtained by addition of two extra Zn2+ per hexamer of insulin. This addition stabilizes porcine and human neutral solutions equally well and does not affect the chemical stability of the insulin. The stabilization is probably obtained by a further strengthening of the hexameric structure of insulin, so that the formation of insoluble insulin fibrils (via the dissociation into the insulin monomer or dimer) is impeded or prevented. The addition of an extra 2 Zn2+ has been shown to be without influence on the insulin immunogenicity in rabbits or on the rate of absorption after subcutaneous injection in diabetic patients. It is concluded that neutral insulin solution can be physically stabilized by addition of extra Zn2+ without affecting other qualities of the insulin preparation including chemical stability, immunogenicity, and duration of action after injection.

  17. Insulin-induced activation of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase by a chiro-inositol-containing insulin mediator is defective in adipocytes of insulin-resistant, type II diabetic, Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farese, R V; Standaert, M L; Yamada, K; Huang, L C; Zhang, C; Cooper, D R; Wang, Z; Yang, Y; Suzuki, S; Toyota, T

    1994-11-08

    Type II diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were insulin-resistant in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. We therefore examined insulin signaling systems in control Wistar and diabetic GK rats. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT), which is activated by headgroup mediators released from glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI), was activated by insulin in intact and cell-free adipocyte preparations of control, but not diabetic, rats. A specific chiro-inositol-containing inositol phosphoglycan (IPG) mediator, prepared from beef liver, bypassed this defect and comparably activated G3PAT in cell-free adipocyte preparations of both diabetic GK and control rats. A myo-inositol-containing IPG mediator did not activate G3PAT. Relative to control adipocytes, labeling of GPI by [3H]glucosamine was diminished by 50% and insulin failed to stimulate GPI hydrolysis in GK adipocytes. In contrast to GPI-dependent G3PAT activation, insulin-stimulated hexose transport was intact in adipocytes and soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of the GK rat, as was insulin-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C. We conclude that (i) chiro-inositol-containing IPG mediator activates G3PAT during insulin action, (ii) diabetic GK rats have a defect in synthesizing or releasing functional chiro-inositol-containing IPG, and (iii) defective IPG-regulated intracellular glucose metabolism contributes importantly to insulin resistance in diabetic GK rats.

  18. CTRP7 deletion attenuates obesity-linked glucose intolerance, adipose tissue inflammation, and hepatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Pia S; Lei, Xia; Wolf, Risa M; Rodriguez, Susana; Tan, Stefanie Y; Little, Hannah C; Schweitzer, Michael A; Magnuson, Thomas H; Steele, Kimberley E; Wong, G William

    2017-04-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and cellular stress are important contributors to obesity-linked metabolic dysfunction. Here, we uncover an immune-metabolic role for C1q/TNF-related protein 7 (CTRP7), a secretory protein of the C1q family with previously unknown function. In obese humans, circulating CTRP7 levels were markedly elevated and positively correlated with body mass index, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance index, hemoglobin A1c, and triglyceride levels. Expression of CTRP7 in liver was also significantly upregulated in obese humans and positively correlated with gluconeogenic genes. In mice, Ctrp7 expression was differentially modulated in various tissues by fasting and refeeding and by diet-induced obesity. A genetic loss-of-function mouse model was used to determine the requirement of CTRP7 for metabolic homeostasis. When fed a control low-fat diet, male or female mice lacking CTRP7 were indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. In obese male mice consuming a high-fat diet, however, CTRP7 deficiency attenuated insulin resistance and enhanced glucose tolerance, effects that were independent of body weight, metabolic rate, and physical activity level. Improved glucose metabolism in CTRP7-deficient mice was associated with reduced adipose tissue inflammation, as well as decreased liver fibrosis and cellular oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results provide a link between elevated CTRP7 levels and impaired glucose metabolism, frequently associated with obesity. Inhibiting CTRP7 action may confer beneficial metabolic outcomes in the setting of obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L. Attenuates FFA Induced Ceramide Accumulation in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes in an Adiponectin Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana N Obanda

    Full Text Available Excess dietary lipids result in the accumulation of lipid metabolites including ceramides that can attenuate insulin signaling. There is evidence that a botanical extract of Urtica dioica L. (stinging nettle improves insulin action, yet the precise mechanism(s are not known. Hence, we examined the effects of Urtica dioica L. (UT on adipocytes.We investigated the effects of an ethanolic extract of UT on free fatty acid (palmitic acid induced inhibition of insulin-stimulated Akt serine phosphorylation and modulation of ceramidase expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Adipocytes were exposed to excess FFAs in the presence or absence of UT. Effects on adiponectin expression, ceramidase expression, ceramidase activity, ceramide accumulation and insulin signaling were determined.As expected, FFAs reduced adiponectin expression and increased the expression of ceramidase enzymes but not their activity. FFA also induced the accumulation of ceramides and reduced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in adipocytes. The effects of FFA were partially reversed by UT. UT enhanced adiponectin expression and ceramidase activity in the presence of excess FFAs. UT abated ceramide accumulation and increased insulin sensitivity via enhanced Akt phosphorylation. A siRNA knockdown of adiponectin expression prevented UT from exerting positive effects on ceramidase activity but not Akt phosphorylation.In adipocytes, the ability of UT to antagonize the negative effects of FFA by modulating ceramidase activity and ceramide accumulation is dependent on the presence of adiponectin. However, the ability of UT to enhance Akt phosphorylation is independent of adiponectin expression. These studies demonstrate direct effects of UT on adipocytes and suggest this botanical extract is metabolically beneficial.

  20. INSULIN AND INSULIN RESISTANCE: NEW MOLECULE MARKERS AND TARGET MOLECULE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY OF DISEASES OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Salmina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review summarizes current data on the role of insulin in the regulation of t glucose metabolism in the central nervous system at physiologic and pathologic conditions. For many years, the brain has been considered as an insulin-independent organ which utilizes glucose without insulin activity. However, it is become clear now that insulin not only regulates glucose transport and metabolism, but also has modulatory efftects in impact on excitability, proliferation and differentiation of brain progenitor cells, synaptic plasticity and memory formation, secretion of neurotransmitters, apoptosis. We have critically reviewed literature information and our own data on the role of insulin and insulin resistance in neuron-glia metabolic coupling, regulation of NAD+ metabolism and action of NAdependent enzymes, neurogenesis, brain development in (pathophysiological conditions. The paper clarifies interrelations between alterations in glucose homeostasis, development of insulin resistance and development of neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, autism, stroke, and depression. We discuss the application of novel molecular markers of insulin resistance (adipokines, α-hydroxybutyrate, BDNF, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, provasopressin and molecular targets for diagnostics and treatment of brain disorders associated with insulin resistance.

  1. Role of increased insulin demand in the adaptation of the endocrine pancreas to pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, AG; Schuiling, GA; Moes, H; Koiter, TR

    During gestation the demand for insulin increases due to a decrease in insulin sensitivity of the maternal tissues. Simultaneously, pancreatic islet-cell proliferation, as well as insulin production and secretion increase. Both phenomena appear to be caused by the actions of pregnancy hormones. We

  2. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yan-Jie [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Juan, Chi-Chang [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kwok, Ching-Fai [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yung-Pei [Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shih, Kuang-Chung [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chin-Chang [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ho, Low-Tone, E-mail: ltho@vghtpe.gov.tw [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-08

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ET{sub A}R during insulin resistance, ET{sub A}R expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ET{sub A}R expression, but not ET{sub B}R, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ET{sub A}R pathway

  3. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy eSmith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori, the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx , the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the effects of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin on ecdysone secretion and molting.

  4. Counterregulation of insulin by leptin as key component of autonomic regulation of body weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Katarina T

    2014-01-01

    A re-examination of the mechanism controlling eating, locomotion, and metabolism prompts formulation of a new explanatory model containing five features: a coordinating joint role of the (1) autonomic nervous system (ANS); (2) the suprachiasmatic (SCN) master clock in counterbalancing parasympathetic digestive and absorptive functions and feeding with sympathetic locomotor and thermogenic energy expenditure within a circadian framework; (3) interaction of the ANS/SCN command with brain substrates of reward encompassing dopaminergic projections to ventral striatum and limbic and cortical forebrain. These drive the nonhomeostatic feeding and locomotor motivated behaviors in interaction with circulating ghrelin and lateral hypothalamic neurons signaling through melanin concentrating hormone and orexin-hypocretin peptides; (4) counterregulation of insulin by leptin of both gastric and adipose tissue origin through: potentiation by leptin of cholecystokinin-mediated satiation, inhibition of insulin secretion, suppression of insulin lipogenesis by leptin lipolysis, and modulation of peripheral tissue and brain sensitivity to insulin action. Thus weight-loss induced hypoleptimia raises insulin sensitivity and promotes its parasympathetic anabolic actions while obesity-induced hyperleptinemia supresses insulin lipogenic action; and (5) inhibition by leptin of bone mineral accrual suggesting that leptin may contribute to the maintenance of stability of skeletal, lean-body, as well as adipose tissue masses. PMID:25317239

  5. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing ∼ 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise [ 125 I]. Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training

  6. Dissociation between fat-induced in vivo insulin resistance and proximal insulin signaling in skeletal muscle in men at risk for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Heidi; Jensen, Christine B; Björnholm, Marie

    2004-01-01

    The effect of short- (2 h) and long-term (24 h) low-grade Intralipid infusion on whole-body insulin action, cellular glucose metabolism, and proximal components of the insulin signal transduction cascade was studied in seven obese male glucose intolerant first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic...... h Intralipid infusion (0.4 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal decreased approximately 25% after short- and long-term fat infusion in both IGT relatives and controls. Glucose oxidation decreased and lipid oxidation increased after both short- and long-term fat infusion in both...... groups. Insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation was higher after long-term as compared with short-term fat infusion in control subjects. Short- or long-term infusion did not affect the absolute values of basal or insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, tyrosine...

  7. Myostatin inhibition therapy for insulin-deficient type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Samantha K; Rebalka, Irena A; D'Souza, Donna M; Deodhare, Namita; Desjardins, Eric M; Hawke, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    While Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia, persons with T1DM also develop insulin resistance. Recent studies have demonstrated that insulin resistance in T1DM is a primary mediator of the micro and macrovascular complications that invariably develop in this chronic disease. Myostatin acts to attenuate muscle growth and has been demonstrated to be elevated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic models. We hypothesized that a reduction in mRNA expression of myostatin within a genetic T1DM mouse model would improve skeletal muscle health, resulting in a larger, more insulin sensitive muscle mass. To that end, Akita diabetic mice were crossed with Myostatin(Ln/Ln) mice to ultimately generate a novel mouse line. Our data support the hypothesis that decreased skeletal muscle expression of myostatin mRNA prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in T1DM. Furthermore, reductions in myostatin mRNA increased Glut1 and Glut4 protein expression and glucose uptake in response to an insulin tolerance test (ITT). These positive changes lead to significant reductions in resting blood glucose levels as well as pronounced reductions in associated diabetic symptoms, even in the absence of exogenous insulin. Taken together, this study provides a foundation for considering myostatin inhibition as an adjuvant therapy in T1DM as a means to improve insulin sensitivity and blood glucose management.

  8. Insulin glargine 300 U/mL for basal insulin therapy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau IT

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ip Tim Lau,1 Ka Fai Lee,2 Wing Yee So,3 Kathryn Tan,4 Vincent Tok Fai Yeung5 1Department of Medicine, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, 2Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Kwong Wah Hospital, 3Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 4Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, 5Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Our Lady of Maryknoll Hospital, Hong Kong, China Objective: To review published clinical studies on the efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 units/mL (Gla-300, a new long-acting insulin analog, for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DMMaterials and methods: Data sources comprised primary research articles on Gla-300, including pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical studies.Results: In pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies, Gla-300 showed a flatter time–action profile and longer duration of action than Gla-100. Noninferiority of Gla-300 versus Gla-100 for lowering of glycated hemoglobin was demonstrated in Phase III clinical studies covering a range of T1DM and T2DM patient populations. Over 6–12 months of follow-up, Gla-300 consistently showed comparable glycemic efficacy with less hypoglycemia vs Gla-100, even during the first 8 weeks of treatment. Although titrated insulin doses were 11%–17% higher with Gla-300 vs Gla-100, changes in body weight were similar or favored Gla-300.Conclusion: Clinical studies provide evidence that the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of Gla-300 may translate into clinical benefits in both T1DM and T2DM. Gla-300 may provide a new option for people initiating basal insulin, those requiring higher basal insulin doses, those with T1DM, and those who may be at increased risk for hypoglycemia, such as people with chronic kidney disease, the elderly, and those with cardiovascular comorbidities. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, long-acting insulin, insulin glargine

  9. Genetic ablation or chemical inhibition of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein attenuates diet-induced hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishova, Ekaterina Y; Stoll, Janis M; Ersoy, Baran A; Shrestha, Sudeep; Scapa, Erez F; Li, Yingxia; Niepel, Michele W; Su, Ya; Jelicks, Linda A; Stahl, Gregory L; Glicksman, Marcie A; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Cuny, Gregory D; Cohen, David E

    2011-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, synonym StARD2) is a highly specific intracellular lipid binding protein that is enriched in liver. Coding region polymorphisms in both humans and mice appear to confer protection against measures of insulin resistance. The current study was designed to test the hypotheses that Pctp-/- mice are protected against diet-induced increases in hepatic glucose production and that small molecule inhibition of PC-TP recapitulates this phenotype. Pctp-/- and wildtype mice were subjected to high-fat feeding and rates of hepatic glucose production and glucose clearance were quantified by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies and pyruvate tolerance tests. These studies revealed that high-fat diet-induced increases in hepatic glucose production were markedly attenuated in Pctp-/- mice. Small molecule inhibitors of PC-TP were synthesized and their potencies, as well as mechanism of inhibition, were characterized in vitro. An optimized inhibitor was administered to high-fat-fed mice and used to explore effects on insulin signaling in cell culture systems. Small molecule inhibitors bound PC-TP, displaced phosphatidylcholines from the lipid binding site, and increased the thermal stability of the protein. Administration of the optimized inhibitor to wildtype mice attenuated hepatic glucose production associated with high-fat feeding, but had no activity in Pctp-/- mice. Indicative of a mechanism for reducing glucose intolerance that is distinct from commonly utilized insulin-sensitizing agents, the inhibitor promoted insulin-independent phosphorylation of key insulin signaling molecules. These findings suggest PC-TP inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Rosiglitazone delayed weight loss and anorexia while attenuating adipose depletion in mice with cancer cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Asp, Michelle L.; Tian, Min; Kliewer, Kara L.; Belury, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by severe weight loss, including adipose and muscle wasting, and occurs in a large percentage of cancer patients. Insulin resistance contributes to dysregulated metabolism in cachexia and occurs prior to weight loss in mice with colon-26 tumor-induced cachexia. Therefore, we hypothesized that the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, would attenuate the loss of adipose and muscle to result in improved outcomes for mice with late-stage cachexia. Male CD2F1 mice were inoc...

  11. High fructose-mediated attenuation of insulin receptor signaling does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Islam; Poulose, Ninu; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Segar, Lakshman

    2016-11-15

    Insulin resistance is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Although high fructose is known to induce insulin resistance, it remains unclear as to how fructose regulates insulin receptor signaling and proliferative phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which play a major role in atherosclerosis. Using human aortic VSMCs, we investigated the effects of high fructose treatment on insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serine phosphorylation, insulin versus platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phosphorylation of Akt, S6 ribosomal protein, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cell cycle proteins. In comparison with PDGF (a potent mitogen), neither fructose nor insulin enhanced VSMC proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. d-[ 14 C(U)]fructose uptake studies revealed a progressive increase in fructose uptake in a time-dependent manner. Concentration-dependent studies with high fructose (5-25mM) showed marked increases in IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, a key adapter protein in insulin receptor signaling. Accordingly, high fructose treatment led to significant diminutions in insulin-induced phosphorylation of downstream signaling components including Akt and S6. In addition, high fructose significantly diminished insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation. Nevertheless, high fructose did not affect PDGF-induced key proliferative signaling events including phosphorylation of Akt, S6, and ERK and expression of cyclin D1 protein. Together, high fructose dysregulates IRS-1 phosphorylation state and proximal insulin receptor signaling in VSMCs, but does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling. These findings suggest that systemic insulin resistance rather than VSMC-specific dysregulation of insulin receptor signaling by high fructose may play a major role in enhancing atherosclerosis and neointimal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Leptin rapidly improves glucose homeostasis in obese mice by increasing hypothalamic insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christiane; Augustine, Rachael A; Steger, Juliane; Ganjam, Goutham K; Benzler, Jonas; Pracht, Corinna; Lowe, Chrishanthi; Schwartz, Michael W; Shepherd, Peter R; Anderson, Greg M; Grattan, David R; Tups, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Obesity is associated with resistance to the actions of both leptin and insulin via mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. To investigate whether leptin resistance per se contributes to insulin resistance and impaired glucose homeostasis, we investigated the effect of acute leptin administration on glucose homeostasis in normal as well as leptin- or leptin receptor-deficient mice. In hyperglycemic, leptin-deficient Lep(ob/ob) mice, leptin acutely and potently improved glucose metabolism, before any change of body fat mass, via a mechanism involving the p110α and β isoforms of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). Unlike insulin, however, the anti-diabetic effect of leptin occurred independently of phospho-AKT, a major downstream target of PI3K, and instead involved enhanced sensitivity of the hypothalamus to insulin action upstream of PI3K, through modulation of IRS1 (insulin receptor substrate 1) phosphorylation. These data suggest that leptin resistance, as occurs in obesity, reduces the hypothalamic response to insulin and thereby impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis, contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Insulin regulates brain function, but how does it get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah M; Meijer, Rick I; Barrett, Eugene J

    2014-12-01

    We have learned over the last several decades that the brain is an important target for insulin action. Insulin in the central nervous system (CNS) affects feeding behavior and body energy stores, the metabolism of glucose and fats in the liver and adipose, and various aspects of memory and cognition. Insulin may even influence the development or progression of Alzheimer disease. Yet, a number of seemingly simple questions (e.g., What is the pathway for delivery of insulin to the brain? Is insulin's delivery to the brain mediated by the insulin receptor and is it a regulated process? Is brain insulin delivery affected by insulin resistance?) are unanswered. Here we briefly review accumulated findings affirming the importance of insulin as a CNS regulatory peptide, examine the current understanding of how peripheral insulin is delivered to the brain, and identify key gaps in the current understanding of this process. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  14. The new era of biotech insulin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J

    1997-07-01

    Many of the structural properties of insulin have evolved in response to the requirements of biosynthesis, processing, transport and storage in the pancreatic beta cells, properties that are not necessary for the biological action of the hormone. It is therefore not surprising that wild-type insulin has far from optimal characteristics for replacement therapy. For example, native human insulin self-associates to hexameric units, which limits the possibilities for the absorption of the molecule by various routes. During the last decade new techniques of molecular design have emerged and recombinant DNA technology offers new and exciting opportunities for rational protein drug design. This review describes examples of recent advances in insulin engineering aimed at optimizing the hormone for therapy. Such approaches focus on improvements in the pharmacokinetic properties, storage stability, and feasibility for less intrusive routes of administration.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article. ,. Molecular ... This review discusses recent advances in understanding of the structure and ... insulin action from receptor to the alteration of blood glucose. Hence, in ... the first protein to have its amino acid sequence determined;2 ... an integral membrane glycoprotein composed of two subunits, a and 13 ...

  16. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  17. Insulin internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan, J.; Trankina, M.; Noel, R.; Ward, W.

    1990-01-01

    This project was designed to determine whether neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, has a significant effect upon the pathways of ligand endocytosis in isolated rat hepatocytes. The pathways studied include receptor-mediated endocytosis and fluid-phase endocytosis. Neomycin causes a dose-dependent acceleration of 125 I-insulin internalization. Since fluid-phase endocytosis can also be a significant factor in 125 I-insulin internalization, lucifer yellow (LY), a marker for fluid-phase endocytosis, was incorporated into an assay similar to the 125 I-insulin internalization procedure. In the presence of 5 mM neomycin, a significant increase in LY uptake was evident at 0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml of LY. At 0.8 mg/ml, a decrease in LY uptake was observed. The increased rate of 125 I-insulin internalization in the presence of neomycin was intriguing. Since one action of neomycin is to inhibit phosphoinositidase C, it suggests that the phosphotidylinositol cycle may be involved in ligand internalization by hepatocytes. At low insulin concentrations, receptor-mediated uptake predominates. Fluid-phase uptake can become an important uptake route as insulin concentrations are increased. Since neomycin stimulates fluid-phase endocytosis, it must also be taken into account when measuring ligand internalization

  18. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo

  19. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhi-Qin [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, key laboratory of pharmaceutical quality control of Hebei province, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, key laboratory of pharmaceutical quality control of Hebei province, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Luo, Du-Qiang, E-mail: duqiangluo999@126.com [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Physical activity attenuates the mid-adolescent peak in insulin resistance but by late adolescence the effect is lost: a longitudinal study with annual measures from 9-16 years (EarlyBird 66).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Brad S; Hosking, Joanne; Henley, William E; Jeffery, Alison N; Mostazir, Mohammod; Voss, Linda D; Wilkin, Terence J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to test whether the mid-adolescent peak in insulin resistance (IR) and trends in other metabolic markers are influenced by long-term exposure to physical activity. Physical activity (7 day ActiGraph accelerometry), HOMA-IR and other metabolic markers (glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c, lipids and BP) were measured annually from age 9 years to 16 years in 300 children (151 boys) from the EarlyBird study in Plymouth, UK. The activity level of each child was characterised, with 95% reliability, by averaging their eight annual physical activity measures. Age-related trends in IR and metabolic health were analysed by multi-level modelling, with physical activity as the exposure measure (categorical and continuous) and body fat percentage (assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and pubertal status (according to age at peak height velocity and Tanner stage) as covariates. The peak in IR at age 12-13 years was 17% lower (p adolescents independently of body fat percentage and pubertal status. However, this difference diminished progressively over the next 3 years and had disappeared completely by the age of 16 years (e.g. difference was -14% at 14 years, -8% at 15 years and +1% at 16 years; 'physical activity × age(2), interaction, p adolescence in the more active group. Our finding that physical activity attenuates IR during mid-adolescence may be clinically important. It remains to be established whether the temporary attenuation in IR during this period has implications for the development of diabetes in adolescence and for future metabolic health generally.

  1. Overexpression of the ped/pea-15 Gene Causes Diabetes by Impairing Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Addition to Insulin Action

    OpenAIRE

    Vigliotta, Giovanni; Miele, Claudia; Santopietro, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Perfetti, Anna; Maitan, Maria Alessandra; Cassese, Angela; Oriente, Francesco; Trencia, Alessandra; Fiory, Francesca; Romano, Chiara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Troncone, Giancarlo; Formisano, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression of the ped/pea-15 gene is a common feature of type 2 diabetes. In the present work, we show that transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing ped/pea-15 exhibited mildly elevated random-fed blood glucose levels and decreased glucose tolerance. Treatment with a 60% fat diet led ped/pea-15 transgenic mice to develop diabetes. Consistent with insulin resistance in these mice, insulin administration reduced glucose levels by only 35% after 45 min, compared to 70% in control mice. In...

  2. Brain Insulin Signaling and Alzheimer's Disease: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Schiöth, Helgi B.; Craft, Suzanne; Brooks, Samantha J.; Frey, William H.; Benedict, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Insulin receptors in the brain are found in high densities in the hippocampus, a region that is fundamentally involved in the acquisition, consolidation, and recollection of new information. Using the intranasal method, which effectively bypasses the blood–brain barrier to deliver and target insulin directly from the nose to the brain, a series of experiments involving healthy humans has shown that increased central nervous system (CNS) insulin action enhances learning and memory processes as...

  3. Anti-hyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects of turmeric and its principle constituent curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2014-10-01

    Turmeric is obtained from the plant Curcuma longa L; its major constituent, curcumin, is a polyphenol with multiple effects which can modulate some signaling pathways. Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In addition, Insulin resistance in peripheral tissue is one of the most important reasons of hyperglycemia which can cause global or systemic effects. The present study reviewed studies published in PubMed from 1998 to 2013, indicating the role of curcumin in attenuation of many pathophysiological processes involved in development and progression of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Curcumin can reduce blood glucose level by reducing the hepatic glucose production, suppression of hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state, stimulation of glucose uptake by up-regulation of GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 genes expressions, activation of AMP kinase, promoting the PPAR ligand-binding activity, stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic tissues, improvement in pancreatic cell function, and reduction of insulin resistance. Curcumin has antihyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects. Thereby, more studies evaluating the effects of curcumin on hyperglycemic state and insulin resistance in related disorders such as diabetes are recommended.

  4. Detemir as a once-daily basal insulin in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson SE

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Scott E NelsonCleveland Family Medicine, Cleveland, Mississippi, USABackground: Insulin detemir, a long-acting basal insulin analog, is labeled for once-daily or twice-daily dosing in patients with type 1 (T1DM or type 2 (T2DM diabetes mellitus. Protocols for some earlier clinical studies of detemir evaluated twice-daily dosing, which may have generated the misperception that detemir should be prescribed twice daily for most patients. This review examines pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD, observational, and controlled studies that have evaluated once-daily and twice-daily detemir in patients with T2DM to determine the efficacy and safety of once-daily dosing.Methods: PubMed was searched using the keywords “detemir,” “once daily,” “twice daily,” and “type 2 diabetes” with the limits of clinical trial, human, and English.Results: Detemir has a relatively flat time–action profile and duration of action of up to 24 hours for patients with T2DM. Once-daily dosing is the most commonly used detemir regimen reported in observational studies, and controlled clinical studies indicate that once-daily dosing controls glycosylated hemoglobin when detemir is administered alone or in combination with a prandial insulin or oral antidiabetes drugs. In comparative clinical trials, detemir had a similar time–action profile and duration of action to another long-acting insulin analog, glargine, with less within-subject variability. Once-daily detemir was associated with no weight gain or less weight gain than comparator regimens. For patients who had not achieved glycemic control with a basal dose of once-daily detemir, adding a prandial insulin provided better glycemic control, less postprandial hypoglycemia, and a lower total daily dose of detemir than twice-daily detemir. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team and the use of a holistic approach for the treatment of T2DM patients are recommended to achieve and maintain the best

  5. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    suppressed lipid oxidation in the controls. It is concluded that patients with congenital generalized lipodystrophy may present severe insulin resistance with regard to hepatic glucose production as well as muscle glycogen synthesis and lipid oxidation. The results suggest a postreceptor defect in the action......, immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels. The patients had fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and the rate of total glucose disposal was severely impaired, primarily due to a decreased non-oxidative glucose metabolism. In the patient studied with muscle biopsy, the expected activation of glycogen synthase by insulin did...... not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  6. [Molecular mechanism for ET-1-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Mazaki, Yuichi; Terada, Koji; Miwa, Soichi

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a condition where the sensitivity to insulin of the tissues expressing insulin receptor (InsR) is decreased due to a functional disturbance of InsR-mediated intracellular signaling. Insulin promotes the entry of glucose into the tissues and skeletal muscle is the most important tissue responsible for the insulin's action of decreasing blood glucose levels. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor and pro-inflammatory peptide, induces insulin resistance through a direct action on skeletal muscle. However, the signaling pathways of ET-1-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle remain unclear. Here we show molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of ET-1 on insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in myotubes of rat L6 skeletal muscle cell line. mRNA expression levels of differentiation marker genes, MyoD and myogenin, were increased during L6 myoblasts differentiation into myotubes. Some of myotubes possessed the ability to spontaneously contract. In myotubes, insulin promoted Akt phosphorylation at Thr 308 and Ser 473 , and [ 3 H]-labelled 2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 3 H]2-DG) uptake. The insulin-facilitated Akt phosphorylation and [ 3 H]2-DG uptake were inhibited by ET-1. The inhibitory effect of ET-1 was counteracted by blockade of ET type A receptor (ET A R), inhibition of G q/11 protein, and siRNA knockdown of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). The exogenously overexpressed GRK2 directly bound to endogenous Akt and their association was facilitated by ET-1. In summary, activation of ET A R with ET-1 inhibits insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and [ 3 H]2-DG uptake in a G q/11 protein- and GRK2-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. These findings indicate that ET A R and GRK2 are potential targets for insulin resistance.

  7. Muscle Attenuation Is Associated With Newly Developed Hypertension in Men of African Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Zmuda, Joseph M; Kuipers, Allison L; Bunker, Clareann H; Patrick, Alan L; Youk, Ada O; Miljkovic, Iva

    2017-05-01

    Increased ectopic adipose tissue infiltration in skeletal muscle is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. We evaluated whether change in skeletal muscle adiposity predicts subsequent development of hypertension in men of African ancestry, a population sample understudied in previous studies. In the Tobago Health Study, a prospective longitudinal study among men of African ancestry (age range 40-91 years), calf intermuscular adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle attenuation were measured with computed tomography. Hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg, or a diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg, or receiving antihypertensive medications. Logistic regression was performed with adjustment for age, insulin resistance, baseline and 6-year change in body mass index, baseline and 6-year change in waist circumference, and other potential confounding factors. Among 746 normotensive men at baseline, 321 (43%) developed hypertension during the mean 6.2 years of follow-up. Decreased skeletal muscle attenuation was associated with newly developed hypertension after adjustment for baseline and 6-year change of body mass index (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] per SD, 1.3 [1.0-1.6]) or baseline and 6-year change of waist circumference (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] per SD, 1.3 [1.0-1.6]). No association was observed between increased intermuscular adipose tissue and hypertension. Our novel findings show that decreased muscle attenuation is associated with newly developed hypertension among men of African ancestry, independent of general and central adiposity and insulin resistance. Further studies are needed to adjust for inflammation, visceral and other ectopic adipose tissue depots, and to confirm our findings in other population samples. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. [Insulin resistance--a physiopathological condition with numerous sequelae: non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), android obesity, essential hypertension, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, O

    1992-05-11

    Recent research has demonstrated that reduced insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle (insulin resistance) and hyperinsulinism are common features in widespread diseases such as essential hypertension, android obesity, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia (in the form of raised serum triglyceride and reduced serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol) and arteriosclerosis. Simultaneously, investigations in a comprehensive group of healthy middle-aged men have revealed insulin resistance in one fourth. On the basis of these observations, a working hypothesis is suggested which postulates that genetic abnormalities in one or more of the candidate genes in the modes of action of insulin occur in a great proportion of the population. These may result in insulin resistance (primary genetic insulin resistance). Primary insulin resistance may be potentiated by a series of circumstances such as ageing, high-fat diet, lack of physical activity, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities or drugs (secondary insulin resistance). As a consequence of the reduced effect of insulin on muscle tissue, compensatory hyperinsulinism develops. Depending on the remaining vulnerability of the individual the hyperinsulinism is presumed to result in development of one or more phenotypes. For example if the beta-cells of the pancreas are unable to secrete sufficient insulin to compensate the insulin resistance on account of genetic defects, glucose intolerance will develop. In a similar manner, hyperinsulinism in insulin-resistant individuals who are predisposed to essential hypertension is presumed to reveal genetic defects in the blood pressure regulating mechanisms and thus contribute to development of the disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Dual pathways for the intracellular processing of insulin. Relationship between retroendocytosis of intact hormone and the recycling of insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, S.

    1985-01-01

    Adipocytes process insulin through either of two pathways: a retroendocytotic pathway that culminates in the release of intact insulin, and a degradative pathway that terminates in the intracellular catabolism and release of degraded ligand. Mechanistically, these pathways were found to differ in several ways. First, temporal differences were found in the rate at which intact and degraded products were extruded. After 125 I-insulin was preloaded into the cell interior, intact ligand was completely released during the first 10 min (t 1/2 = 2 min), whereas degraded insulin was released at a much slower rate over 1 h (t 1/2 greater than 8 min). Secondly, it was found that chloroquine profoundly inhibited the insulin degradative pathway, resulting in the intracellular accumulation of intact ligand and a reduction in the release of degraded products. In contrast, however, chloroquine was without effect on the retroendocytotic processing of insulin. Based on the known actions of chloroquine, it appears that retroendocytosis of insulin does not involve vesicular acidification or dissociation of the insulin-receptor complex and that insulin is most likely carried to the cell exterior in the same vesicles (either receptor-bound or free) as those mediating recycling receptors. Interestingly, accumulation of undergraded insulin within chloroquine-treated cells did not result in the release of additional intact ligand, suggesting that once insulin enters the degradative compartment it is committed to catabolism and cannot exit the cell through the retroendocytotic pathway. A third difference was revealed by the finding that extracellular unlabeled insulin (100 ng/ml) markedly accelerated the rate at which preloaded 125 I-insulin was released from adipocytes (t 1/2 of 3 min versus 7 min in controls cells)

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod Arsen'evich Tkachuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is a phenomenon associated with an impaired ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by target cells and to reduce the blood glucose level. A response increase in insulin secretion by the pancreas and hyperinsulinemia are compensatory reactions of the body. The development of IR leads to the inability of target cells to respond to insulin that results in developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome. For this reason, the metabolic syndrome is defined in practice as a combination of IR with one or more pathologies such as T2DM, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and some others. However, a combination of high blood glucose and insulin levels always serves as its physiological criterion.IR should be considered as a systemic failure of the endocrine regulation in the body. Physiological causes of IR are diverse. The main ones are nutritional overload and accumulation of certain lipids and their metabolites in cells, low physical activity, chronic inflammation and stress of various nature, including oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress (impairment of damaged protein degradation in the cell. Recent studies have demonstrated that these physiological mechanisms likely act through a single intracellular scenario. This is the impairment of signal transduction from the insulin receptor to its targets via the negative feedback mechanism in intracellular insulin-dependent signaling cascades.This review describes the physiological and intracellular mechanisms of insulin action and focuses on their abnormalities upon IR development. Finally, feasible trends in early molecular diagnosis and therapy of IR are discussed.

  11. Direct effects of exendin-(9,39) and GLP-1-(9,36)amide on insulin action, β-cell function, and glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Farrugia, Luca P; Miles, John M; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Vella, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Exendin-(9,39) is a competitive antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at its receptor. However, it is unclear if it has direct and unique effects of its own. We tested the hypothesis that exendin-(9,39) and GLP-1-(9,36)amide have direct effects on hormone secretion and β-cell function as well as glucose metabolism in healthy subjects. Glucose containing [3-(3)H]glucose was infused to mimic the systemic appearance of glucose after a meal. Saline, GLP-1-(9,36)amide, or exendin-(9,39) at 30 pmol/kg/min (Ex 30) or 300 pmol/kg/min (Ex 300) were infused in random order on separate days. Integrated glucose concentrations were slightly but significantly increased by exendin-(9,39) (365 ± 43 vs. 383 ± 35 vs. 492 ± 49 vs. 337 ± 50 mmol per 6 h, saline, Ex 30, Ex 300, and GLP-1-[9,36]amide, respectively; P = 0.05). Insulin secretion did not differ among groups. However, insulin action was lowered by exendin-(9,39) (25 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 4 vs. 18 ± 3 vs. 21 ± 4 10(-4) dL/kg[min per μU/mL]; P = 0.02), resulting in a lower disposition index (DI) during exendin-(9,39) infusion (1,118 ± 118 vs. 816 ± 83 vs. 725 ± 127 vs. 955 ± 166 10(-14) dL/kg/min(2) per pmol/L; P = 0.003). Endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance did not differ significantly among groups. We conclude that exendin-(9,39), but not GLP-1-(9,36)amide, decreases insulin action and DI in healthy humans.

  12. Candidate gene association study in type 2 diabetes indicates a role for genes involved in beta-cell function as well as insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Barroso

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly common, serious metabolic disorder with a substantial inherited component. It is characterised by defects in both insulin secretion and action. Progress in identification of specific genetic variants predisposing to the disease has been limited. To complement ongoing positional cloning efforts, we have undertaken a large-scale candidate gene association study. We examined 152 SNPs in 71 candidate genes for association with diabetes status and related phenotypes in 2,134 Caucasians in a case-control study and an independent quantitative trait (QT cohort in the United Kingdom. Polymorphisms in five of 15 genes (33% encoding molecules known to primarily influence pancreatic beta-cell function-ABCC8 (sulphonylurea receptor, KCNJ11 (KIR6.2, SLC2A2 (GLUT2, HNF4A (HNF4alpha, and INS (insulin-significantly altered disease risk, and in three genes, the risk allele, haplotype, or both had a biologically consistent effect on a relevant physiological trait in the QT study. We examined 35 genes predicted to have their major influence on insulin action, and three (9%-INSR, PIK3R1, and SOS1-showed significant associations with diabetes. These results confirm the genetic complexity of Type 2 diabetes and provide evidence that common variants in genes influencing pancreatic beta-cell function may make a significant contribution to the inherited component of this disease. This study additionally demonstrates that the systematic examination of panels of biological candidate genes in large, well-characterised populations can be an effective complement to positional cloning approaches. The absence of large single-gene effects and the detection of multiple small effects accentuate the need for the study of larger populations in order to reliably identify the size of effect we now expect for complex diseases.

  13. Acute hypertriglyceridemia induces platelet hyperactivity that is not attenuated by insulin in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Myint Myint; Kilpatrick, Eric S; Aburima, Ahmed; Wraith, Katie S; Magwenzi, Simbarashe; Spurgeon, B; Rigby, Alan S; Sandeman, Derek; Naseem, Khalid M; Atkin, Stephen L

    2014-02-28

    Atherothrombosis is associated with platelet hyperactivity. Hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance (IR) are features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The effect of induced hypertriglyceridemia on IR and platelet function was examined in young women with PCOS. Following overnight fasting, 13 PCOS and 12 healthy women were infused with saline or 20% intralipid for 5 hours on separate days. Insulin sensitivity was measured using a hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp in the final 2 hours of each infusion. Platelet responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and prostacyclin (PGI2) were measured by flow cytometric analysis of platelet fibrinogen binding and P-selectin expression using whole blood taken during each infusion (at 2 hours) and at the end of each clamp. Lipid infusion increased triglycerides and reduced insulin sensitivity in both controls (median, interquartile range ) (5.25 [3.3, 6.48] versus 2.60 [0.88, 3.88] mg kg(-1) min(-1), P<0.001) and PCOS (3.15 [2.94, 3.85] versus 1.06 [0.72, 1.43] mg kg(-1) min(-1), P<0.001). Platelet activation by ADP was enhanced and ability to suppress platelet activation by PGI2 diminished during lipid infusion in both groups when compared to saline. Importantly, insulin infusion decreased lipid-induced platelet hyperactivity by decreasing their response to 1 μmol/L ADP (78.7% [67.9, 82.3] versus 62.8% [51.8, 73.3], P=0.02) and increasing sensitivity to 0.01 μmol/L PGI2 (67.6% [39.5, 83.8] versus 40.9% [23.8, 60.9], P=0.01) in controls, but not in PCOS. Acute hypertriglyceridemia induced IR, and increased platelet activation in both groups that was not reversed by insulin in PCOS subjects compared to controls. This suggests that platelet hyperactivity induced by acute hypertriglyceridemia and IR could contribute athero-thrombotic risk. www.isrctn.org. Unique Identifier: ISRCTN42448814.

  14. Interpersonal strategies for disturbance attenuation during a rhythmic joint motor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez-Calderon, A; Komisar, V; Burdet, E

    2015-08-01

    Helping someone carry a table is fairly easy; however, our understanding of such joint motor actions is still poorly understood. We studied how pairs of human subjects (referred to as dyads) collaborate physically to attenuate external mechanical perturbations during a target tracking task. Subjects tracked a target moving in a slow and predictable way using wrist flexion/extension movements, with and without destabilizing torque perturbations. Dyad strategies were classified using interaction torques and muscular activity. During unperturbed interactions (baseline), the dyads tended to stabilize on a particular strategy. The baseline strategy was not the same in all dyads, suggesting that the solution to the task was not global but specific to each particular dyad. After several trials of unperturbed interactions, we introduced mechanical vibrations and analyzed the adaptation process. Dyads showed a tendency to counteract the external disturbances by first increasing co-contraction within each subject (independent co-contraction), and then raising the amount of opposing interaction torques (dyadic co-contraction) with increased perturbation amplitude. The introduction of perturbations impelled dyads to abandon their unperturbed baseline strategy and adopt a more common strategy across dyads, suggesting attractor solutions. Our results establish a framework for future human-human interaction studies, and have implications in human motor control as well as human-robot and robot-robot interactions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Side effect of acting on the world: Acquisition of action-outcome statistic relation alters visual interpretation of action outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eKawabe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans can acquire the statistical features of the external world and employ them to control behaviors. Some external events occur in harmony with an agent’s action, and thus humans should also be able to acquire the statistical features between an action and its external outcome. We report that the acquired action-outcome statistical features alter the visual appearance of the action outcome. Pressing either of two assigned keys triggered visual motion whose direction was statistically biased either upward or downward, and observers judged the stimulus motion direction. Points of subjective equality (PSE for judging motion direction were shifted repulsively from the mean of the distribution associated with each key. Our Bayesian model accounted for the PSE shifts, indicating the optimal acquisition of the action-effect statistical relation. The PSE shifts were moderately attenuated when the action-outcome contingency was reduced. The Bayesian model again accounted for the attenuated PSE shifts. On the other hand, when the action-outcome contiguity was greatly reduced, the PSE shifts were greatly attenuated, and however, the Bayesian model could not accounted for the shifts. The results indicate that visual appearance can be modified by prediction based on the optimal acquisition of action-effect causal relation.

  16. Reduced Insulin Receptor Expression Enhances Proximal Tubule Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Shankar, Kripa; Makhija, Ekta; Gaikwad, Anil; Ecelbarger, Carolyn; Mandhani, Anil; Srivastava, Aneesh; Tiwari, Swasti

    2017-02-01

    Reduced insulin receptor protein levels have been reported in the kidney cortex from diabetic humans and animals. We recently reported that, targeted deletion of insulin receptor (IR) from proximal tubules (PT) resulted in hyperglycemia in non-obese mice. To elucidate the mechanism, we examined human proximal tubule cells (hPTC) and C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat for 20 weeks). Immunoblotting revealed a significantly lower protein level of IR in HFD compare to normal chow diet (NCD). Furthermore, a blunted rise in p-AKT 308 levels in the kidney cortex of HFD mice was observed in response to acute insulin (0.75 IU/kg body weight, i.p) relative to NCD n = 8/group, P gluconeogenesis. Transcript levels of the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK were significantly increased in cAMP/DEXA-stimulated hPTC cells (n = 3, P gluconeogenesis and PEPCK induction was significantly attenuated in IR (siRNA) silenced hPTC (n = 3, P gluconeogenesis. Thus reduced insulin signaling of the proximal tubule may contribute to hyperglycemia in the metabolic syndrome via elevated gluconeogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 276-285, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dietary Anthocyanins and Insulin Resistance: When Food Becomes a Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwal, Tarun; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Habtemariam, Solomon

    2017-10-12

    Insulin resistance is an abnormal physiological state that occurs when insulin from pancreatic β-cells is unable to trigger a signal transduction pathway in target organs such as the liver, muscles and adipose tissues. The loss of insulin sensitivity is generally associated with persistent hyperglycemia (diabetes), hyperinsulinemia, fatty acids and/or lipid dysregulation which are often prevalent under obesity conditions. Hence, insulin sensitizers are one class of drugs currently employed to treat diabetes and associated metabolic disorders. A number of natural products that act through multiple mechanisms have also been identified to enhance insulin sensitivity in target organs. One group of such compounds that gained interest in recent years are the dietary anthocyanins. Data from their in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies are scrutinized in this communication to show their potential health benefit through ameliorating insulin resistance. Specific mechanism of action ranging from targeting specific signal transduction receptors/enzymes to the general antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of insulin resistance are presented.

  18. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Studies on binding and mitogenic effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I in glomerular mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, F.G.; Striker, L.J.; Lesniak, M.A.; MacKay, K.; Roth, J.; Striker, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The mesangial cells are actively involved in regulating glomerular hemodynamics. Their overlying endothelium is fenestrated; therefore, these cells are directly exposed to plasma substances, including hormones such as insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). These peptides may contribute to the mesangial sclerosis and cellular hyperplasia that characterize diabetic glomerulopathy. We report herein the characterization of the receptors and the mitogenic effects of IGF-I and insulin on mouse glomerular mesangial cells in culture. The IGF-I receptor was characterized on intact cells. The Kd of the IGF-I receptor was 1.47 X 10(-9) M, and the estimated number of sites was 64,000 receptors/cell. The binding was time, temperature, and pH dependent, and the receptor showed down-regulation after exposure to serum. The expression of the receptor did not change on cells at different densities. The specific binding for insulin was too low to allow characterization of the insulin receptor on intact cells. However, it was possible to identify the insulin receptor in a wheat germ agglutinin-purified preparation of solubilized mesangial cells. This receptor showed the characteristic features of the insulin receptor, including pH dependence of binding and a curvilinear Scatchard plot. The mitogenic effects of insulin and IGF-I on mesangial cells were measured by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA. IGF-I was more potent than insulin. The half-maximal response to IGF-I stimulation occurred at 1.3 X 10(-10) M, and a similar increase with insulin was observed at concentrations in the range of 10(-7) M, suggesting that this insulin action was mediated through the IGF-I receptor. These data show that the mouse microvascular smooth muscle cells of the glomerulus express a cell surface receptor for IGF-I in vitro and that this peptide is a potent mitogen for these mesangial cells

  20. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism.

  1. Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate insulin resistance by suppressing NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammation in type 2 diabetes rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoya Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance is one of the most common and important pathological features of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Recently, insulin resistance is increasingly considered to be associated with systemic chronic inflammation. Elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β in blood are predictive indicators of the development of T2D. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based therapies have been proven to have potential immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties through their paracrine effects; however, the mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of MSCs in enhancing insulin sensitivity is still uncertain. Methods In the present experiment, we used HepG2 cells, a human hepatoma cell line, and a MSC-HepG2 transwell culturing system to investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs under palmitic acid (PA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced insulin resistance in vitro. Insulin resistance was confirmed by glycogen assay kit and glucose assay kit. Inflammatory factor release was detected by ELISA, gene expression was tested by quantitative real-time PCR, and insulin signaling activation was determined by western blotting analysis. The changes of inflammatory factors and insulin signaling protein were also tested in T2D rats injected with UC-MSCs. Results Treating HepG2 cells with PA–LPS caused NLRP3 inflammation activation, including overexpression of NLRP3 and caspase-1, and overproduction of IL-1β and IL-18 as well as TNF-α from HepG2 cells. The elevated levels of these inflammatory cytokines impaired insulin receptor action and thereby prevented downstream signaling pathways, exacerbating insulin resistance in HepG2 cells. Importantly, UC-MSCs cocultured with HepG2 could effectively alleviate PA and LPS-induced insulin resistance by blocking the NLRP3 inflammasome activation and inflammatory agents. Furthermore, knockdown of NLRP3 or IL-1β partially improved PA and

  2. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis

    2010-01-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus...

  3. Insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in dairy cows with variable fat mobilization around calving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Schäff, C T; Kautzsch, U; Börner, S; Erdmann, S; Görs, S; Röntgen, M; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M

    2016-08-01

    Dairy cows undergo significant metabolic and endocrine changes during the transition from pregnancy to lactation, and impaired insulin action influences nutrient partitioning toward the fetus and the mammary gland. Because impaired insulin action during transition is thought to be related to elevated body condition and body fat mobilization, we hypothesized that over-conditioned cows with excessive body fat mobilization around calving may have impaired insulin metabolism compared with cows with low fat mobilization. Nineteen dairy cows were grouped according to their average concentration of total liver fat (LFC) after calving in low [LLFC; LFC 24.4% total fat/DM; n=10) fat-mobilizing cows. Blood samples were taken from wk 7 antepartum (ap) to wk 5 postpartum (pp) to determine plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and adiponectin. We applied euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (EGHIC) and hyperglycemic clamps (HGC) in wk 5 ap and wk 3 pp to measure insulin responsiveness in peripheral tissue and pancreatic insulin secretion during the transition period. Before and during the pp EGHIC, [(13)C6] glucose was infused to determine the rate of glucose appearance (GlucRa) and glucose oxidation (GOx). Body condition, back fat thickness, and energy-corrected milk were greater, but energy balance was lower in HLFC than in LLFC. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and adiponectin decreased at calving, and this was followed by an immediate increase of glucagon and adiponectin after calving. Insulin concentrations ap were higher in HLFC than in LLFC cows, but the EGHIC indicated no differences in peripheral insulin responsiveness among cows ap and pp. However, GlucRa and GOx:GlucRa during the pp EGHIC were greater in HLFC than in LLFC cows. During HGC, pancreatic insulin secretion was lower, but the glucose infusion rate was higher pp than ap in both groups. Plasma concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids decreased during HGC and EGHIC, but in both

  4. Free fatty acid-induced hepatic insulin resistance is attenuated following lifestyle intervention in obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Marchetti, Christine M; Edmison, John M; González, Frank; Kirwan, John P

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of an exercise/diet lifestyle intervention on free fatty acid (FFA)-induced hepatic insulin resistance in obese humans. Obese men and women (n = 23) with impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned to either exercise training with a eucaloric (EU; approximately 1800 kcal; n = 11) or hypocaloric (HYPO; approximately 1300 kcal; n = 12) diet for 12 wk. Hepatic glucose production (HGP; milligrams per kilogram fat-free mass(-1) per minute(-1)) and hepatic insulin resistance were determined using a two-stage sequential hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m(2) . min(-1)) euglycemic (5.0 mm) clamp with [3-(3)H]glucose. Measures were obtained at basal, during insulin infusion (INS; 120 min), and insulin plus intralipid/heparin infusion (INS/FFA; 300 min). At baseline, basal HGP was similar between groups; hyperinsulinemia alone did not completely suppress HGP, whereas INS/FFA exhibited less suppression than INS (EU, 4.6 +/- 0.8, 2.0 +/- 0.5, and 2.6 +/- 0.4; HYPO, 3.8 +/- 0.5, 1.2 +/- 0.3, and 2.3 +/- 0.4, respectively). After the intervention the HYPO group lost more body weight (P HYPO: -50 +/- 20%, before vs. after, P = 0.02). In contrast, the ability of insulin to overcome FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance and HGP was improved only in the HYPO group (EU: -15 +/- 24% vs. HYPO: -58 +/- 19%, P = 0.02). Both lifestyle interventions are effective in reducing hepatic insulin resistance under basal and hyperinsulinemic conditions. However, the reversal of FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance is best achieved with a combined exercise/caloric-restriction intervention.

  5. Internalization and localization of basal insulin peglispro in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Julie S; Volk, Catherine B; Cao, Julia X C; Zhang, Chen; Ding, Liyun; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; Michael, M Dodson

    2017-10-15

    Basal insulin peglispro (BIL) is a novel, PEGylated insulin lispro that has a large hydrodynamic size compared with insulin lispro. It has a prolonged duration of action, which is related to a delay in insulin absorption and a reduction in clearance. Given the different physical properties of BIL compared with native insulin and insulin lispro, it is important to assess the cellular internalization characteristics of the molecule. Using immunofluorescent confocal imaging, we compared the cellular internalization and localization patterns of BIL, biosynthetic human insulin, and insulin lispro. We assessed the effects of BIL on internalization of the insulin receptor (IR) and studied cellular clearance of BIL. Co-localization studies using antibodies to either insulin or PEG, and the early endosomal marker EEA1 showed that the overall internalization and subcellular localization pattern of BIL was similar to that of human insulin and insulin lispro; all were rapidly internalized and co-localized with EEA1. During ligand washout for 4 h, concomitant loss of insulin, PEG methoxy group, and PEG backbone immunostaining was observed for BIL, similar to the loss of insulin immunostaining observed for insulin lispro and human insulin. Co-localization studies using an antibody to the lysosomal marker LAMP1 did not reveal evidence of lysosomal localization for insulin lispro, human insulin, BIL, or PEG using either insulin or PEG immunostaining reagents. BIL and human insulin both induced rapid phosphorylation and internalization of human IR. Our findings show that treatment of cells with BIL stimulates internalization and localization of IR to early endosomes. Both the insulin and PEG moieties of BIL undergo a dynamic cellular process of rapid internalization and transport to early endosomes followed by loss of cellular immunostaining in a manner similar to that of insulin lispro and human insulin. The rate of clearance for the insulin lispro portion of BIL was slower than

  6. Effects of tetracaine on insulin release and calcium handling by rat pancreatic islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel El Motal, S.M.A.; Pian-Smith, M.C.M.; Sharp, G.W.G.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of tetracaine on insulin release and 45 Ca 2+ handling by rat pancreatic islets have been studied under basal, glucose-stimulated, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-stimulated conditions. Islets were isolated by the use of collagenase and used either directly (freshly isolated islets) or after a period under tissue culture conditions. Tetracaine was found to stimulate insulin release under basal conditions, to inhibit glucose-stimulated insulin release, and to potentiate insulin release stimulated by IBMX. In studies on the mechanisms underlying these effects, tetracaine was found to decrease glucose-stimulated net retention of 45 Ca 2+ (by an action to block the voltage-dependent Ca channels) and to mobilize Ca 2+ from intracellular stores. These two actions form the basis for the inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release, which depends heavily on Ca 2+ entry via the voltage-dependent channels and the synergism with IBMX to potentiate release. No inhibition of IBMX-stimulated release occurs because IBMX does not use the voltage-dependent channels to raise intracellular Ca 2+

  7. Will the next generation of basal insulins offer clinical advantages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, A J

    2014-06-01

    The 21st century has seen the arrival of several insulin analogue products and the refinement of insulin regimens, with widespread advocacy of continuous titration algorithms and earlier initiation of supplementary insulin therapy (predominantly using basal insulins) in type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, many insulin-treated diabetes patients remain in poor glycaemic control. This might reflect insufficient titration effort or lax adherence, but these issues could in some cases result from concerns about hypoglycaemia. Certainly there is scope for improving the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile of basal insulin, and three new products offer this prospect. Insulin degludec, now in clinical use, and PEGylated insulin lispro, in development, have greatly extended action profiles that result from two very different, but unique, mechanisms. With once-daily dosing, these insulins produce stable PK/PD profiles at steady state, associated with a low incidence of hypoglycaemia. The feasibility of varied daily dose timing has also been confirmed with insulin degludec. High strength formulations of insulin glargine and insulin degludec offer the prospect of a reduced injection number/volume in high dose users, and in the case of glargine, the PK/PD profile might also be favourably modified. This review considers critically the clinical evidence and expectations we should have for these new basal insulins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Acute pain induces insulin resistance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, J.; Juhl, C.B.; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    2001-01-01

    Background: Painful trauma results in a disturbed metabolic state with impaired insulin sensitivity, which is related to the magnitude of the trauma. The authors explored whether pain per se influences hepatic and extrahepatic actions of insulin. Methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent two...... randomly sequenced hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic (insulin infusion rate, 0.6 mU · kg-1 · min-1 for 180 min) clamp studies 4 weeks apart. Self-controlled painful electrical stimulation was applied to the abdominal skin for 30 min, to a pain intensity of 8 on a visual analog scale of 0–10, just before...... the clamp procedure (study P). In the other study, no pain was inflicted (study C). Results: Pain reduced whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake from 6.37 ± 1.87 mg · kg-1 · min-1 (mean ± SD) in study C to 4.97 ± 1.38 mg · kg-1 · min-1 in study P (P

  9. Site-specific differences of insulin action in adipose tissue derived from normal prepubertal children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohmann, Malcolm; Stewart, Claire; Welsh, Gavin; Hunt, Linda; Tavare, Jeremy; Holly, Jeff; Shield, Julian; Sabin, Matt; Crowne, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Body fat distribution determines obesity-related morbidity in adults but little is known of the aetiology or pathophysiology in children. This study investigates differences in insulin-mediated metabolism in primary cell cultures of subcutaneous and visceral preadipocytes derived from prepubertal children. The impact of differentiation and responses to TNFα exposure was also investigated. Proliferation rates were greater in subcutaneous versus visceral preadipocytes (41 h(3) versus 69 h(4); P = 0.008). Insulin caused a dose-dependent increase in GSK-3 phosphorylation and an increase in MAPK phosphorylation over time, with increased sensitivity in subcutaneous preadipocytes. Post-differentiation, dose-dependent increases in GSK-3 phosphorylation were maintained, while MAPK phosphorylation was identical in both subtypes. No changes were observed in insulin receptor abundance pre-/post-differentiation. GLUT4 abundance was significantly increased in visceral versus subcutaneous adipocytes by 76(4)%; P = 0.03), coincidental with increased insulin-stimulated 2-deoxy-glucose transport (+150(26)% versus +79(10)%; P = 0.014) and further elevated by acute exposure to TNFα (+230(52)%; P = 0.019 versus +123(24)%; P = 0.025, respectively). TNFα also significantly increased basal glucose transport rates (+44(14)%; P = 0.006 versus +34(11)%; P = 0.007) and GLUT1 localisation to the plasma membrane. These data establish site-specific differences in subcutaneous and visceral fat cells from children. Responses to insulin varied with differentiation and TNFα exposure in the two depots, consistent with parallel changes in GLUT1/4 abundance and localisation

  10. Neuronal Cbl Controls Biosynthesis of Insulin-Like Peptides in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Sun, Ying; He, Shengqi; Yan, Cheng; Rui, Liangyou; Li, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    The Cbl family proteins function as both E3 ubiquitin ligases and adaptor proteins to regulate various cellular signaling events, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathways. These pathways play essential roles in growth, development, metabolism, and survival. Here we show that in Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila Cbl (dCbl) regulates longevity and carbohydrate metabolism through downregulating the production of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) in the brain. We found that dCbl was highly expressed in the brain and knockdown of the expression of dCbl specifically in neurons by RNA interference increased sensitivity to oxidative stress or starvation, decreased carbohydrate levels, and shortened life span. Insulin-producing neuron-specific knockdown of dCbl resulted in similar phenotypes. dCbl deficiency in either the brain or insulin-producing cells upregulated the expression of dilp genes, resulting in elevated activation of the dILP pathway, including phosphorylation of Drosophila Akt and Drosophila extracellular signal-regulated kinase (dERK). Genetic interaction analyses revealed that blocking Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (dEGFR)-dERK signaling in pan-neurons or insulin-producing cells by overexpressing a dominant-negative form of dEGFR abolished the effect of dCbl deficiency on the upregulation of dilp genes. Furthermore, knockdown of c-Cbl in INS-1 cells, a rat β-cell line, also increased insulin biosynthesis and glucose-stimulated secretion in an ERK-dependent manner. Collectively, these results suggest that neuronal dCbl regulates life span, stress responses, and metabolism by suppressing dILP production and the EGFR-ERK pathway mediates the dCbl action. Cbl suppression of insulin biosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved, raising the possibility that Cbl may similarly exert its physiological actions through regulating insulin production in β cells. PMID:22778134

  11. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-04-08

    There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 μM) inorganic arsenite (iAs³(+)) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs³(+) exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs³(+) exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4 expression may also be involved in arsenic-induced insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together our studies suggest that prolonged low-level iAs³(+) exposure activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response, which impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling that is involved in ISGU, and thus causes insulin resistance in adipocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modern basal insulins: an ongoing story or the start of a new era?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Basal insulin represents an essential tool in the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The development of insulin analogues has improved the possibilities of diabetes treatment. Despite significant progress in understanding the physiology, chemistry, kinetics and action of insulin, currently available basal insulin products do not optimally mimic the endogenous profile of insulin. Although basal insulin analogues have some advantages over neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin in diabetes treatment, hypoglycaemia remains the main problem in the achievement of optimal glycaemic control in most patients with diabetes. These unmet clinical needs have stimulated the development of new basal insulin analogues with improved pharmacological profiles. This article reviews the specific characteristics of new long-acting insulin analogues to try and understand their benefits and limitations in the improvement of diabetes management and their possibilities in physiologic and safe insulin replacement.

  13. Insulin, IGF-1, and GH Receptors Are Altered in an Adipose Tissue Depot-Specific Manner in Male Mice With Modified GH Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortebjerg, Rikke; Berryman, Darlene E; Comisford, Ross; Frank, Stuart J; List, Edward O; Bjerre, Mette; Frystyk, Jan; Kopchick, John J

    2017-05-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a determinant of glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue (AT) function. Using 7-month-old transgenic mice expressing the bovine growth hormone (bGH) gene and growth hormone receptor knockout (GHR-/-) mice, we examined whether changes in GH action affect glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance and AT expression of proteins involved in the interrelated signaling pathways of GH, insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and insulin. Furthermore, we searched for AT depot-specific differences in control mice. Glycated hemoglobin levels were reduced in bGH and GHR-/- mice, and bGH mice displayed impaired gluconeogenesis as judged by pyruvate tolerance testing. Serum IGF-1 was elevated by 90% in bGH mice, whereas IGF-1 and insulin were reduced by 97% and 61% in GHR-/- mice, respectively. Igf1 RNA was increased in subcutaneous, epididymal, retroperitoneal, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots in bGH mice (mean increase ± standard error of the mean in all five depots, 153% ± 27%) and decreased in all depots in GHR-/- mice (mean decrease, 62% ± 4%). IGF-1 receptor expression was decreased in all AT depots of bGH mice (mean decrease, 49% ± 6%) and increased in all AT depots of GHR-/- mice (mean increase, 94% ± 8%). Insulin receptor expression was reduced in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and BAT depots in bGH mice (mean decrease in all depots, 56% ± 4%) and augmented in subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and BAT depots in GHR-/- mice (mean increase: 51% ± 1%). Collectively, our findings indicate a role for GH in influencing hormone signaling in AT in a depot-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  14. Insulin glargine 300 U/mL in the management of diabetes: clinical utility and patient perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galan, B.E. de

    2016-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in optimizing basal insulin treatment by developing insulins with a flat pharmacological profile, a long duration of action (typically beyond 24 hours) and minimum day-to-day variation. Glargine-300 is a modified form of the long-acting insulin analog glargine in that it

  15. Fuselage panel noise attenuation by piezoelectric switching control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Onoda, Junjiro; Minesugi, Kenji; Miyakawa, Takeya

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a problem that we encountered in our noise attenuation project and our solution for it. We intend to attenuate low-frequency noise that transmits through aircraft fuselage panels. Our method of noise attenuation is implemented with a piezoelectric semi-active system having a selective switch instead of an active energy-supply system. The semi-active controller is based on the predicted sound pressure distribution obtained from acoustic emission analysis. Experiments and numerical simulations demonstrate that the semi-active method attenuates acoustic levels of not only the simple monochromatic noise but also of broadband noise. We reveal that tuning the electrical parameters in the circuit is the key to effective noise attenuation, to overcome the acoustic excitation problem due to sharp switching actions, as well as to control chattering problems. The results obtained from this investigation provide meaningful insights into designing noise attenuation systems for comfortable aircraft cabin environments

  16. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haizhao Song

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2 but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos. In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism.

  17. Insulin in the nervous system and the mind: Functions in metabolism, memory, and mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwan Lee

    2016-08-01

    Major conclusions: Implications for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and mood disorders are discussed in the context of brain insulin action. Intranasal insulin may have potential in the treatment of central nervous system-related metabolic disorders.

  18. Estrogen and insulin transport through the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Aaron A; Bedel, Nicholas D; Shen, Ling; Woods, Stephen C; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and reduced transport of insulin through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reversal of high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFD-DIO) by dietary intervention improves the transport of insulin through the BBB and the sensitivity of insulin in the brain. Although both insulin and estrogen (E2), when given alone, reduce food intake and body weight via the brain, E2 actually renders the brain relatively insensitive to insulin's catabolic action. The objective of these studies was to determine if E2 influences the ability of insulin to be transported into the brain, since the receptors for both E2 and insulin are found in BBB endothelial cells. E2 (acute or chronic) was systemically administered to ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and male rats fed a chow or a high-fat diet. Food intake, body weight and other metabolic parameters were assessed along with insulin entry into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Acute E2 treatment in OVX female and male rats reduced body weight and food intake, and chronic E2 treatment prevented or partially reversed high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, none of these conditions increased insulin transport into the CNS; rather, chronic E2 treatment was associated less-effective insulin transport into the CNS relative to weight-matched controls. Thus, the reduction of brain insulin sensitivity by E2 is unlikely to be mediated by increasing the amount of insulin entering the CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: adding empagliflozin to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ahmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM management is complex, with few patients successfully achieving recommended glycemic targets with monotherapy, most progressing to combination therapy, and many eventually requiring insulin. Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are an emerging class of antidiabetes agents with an insulin-independent mechanism of action, making them suitable for use in combination with any other class of antidiabetes agents, including insulin. This review evaluates a 78-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the impact of empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, as add-on to basal insulin in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin, with or without metformin and/or a sulfonylurea. Empagliflozin added on to basal insulin resulted in significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels compared with placebo. Empagliflozin has previously been shown to induce weight loss, and was associated with sustained weight loss in this study. This combination therapy was well tolerated, with similar levels of hypoglycemic adverse events in the empagliflozin and placebo groups over the 78-week treatment period. Urinary tract infections and genital infections, side effects associated with SGLT2 inhibitors, were reported more commonly in the empagliflozin group; however, such events led to treatment discontinuation in very few patients. These findings suggest that, with their complementary mechanisms of action, empagliflozin added on to basal insulin may be a useful treatment option in patients on basal insulin who need additional glycemic control without weight gain.

  20. Hyperinsulinism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): role of insulin clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, M C; Vesco, R; Vigneri, E; Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinism are the predominant metabolic defects in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, hyperinsulinism, as well as being compensatory, can also express a condition of reduced insulin clearance. Our aim was to evaluate the differences in insulin action and metabolism between women with PCOS (with normal glucose tolerance) and age- and BMI-matched women with prediabetes (without hyperandrogenism and ovulatory disorders). 22 women with PCOS and 21 age/BMI-matched women with prediabetes were subjected to a Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and an Oral Glucose tolerance Test (OGTT). Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the glucose infusion rate during clamp (M value); insulin secretion by Insulinogenic index, Oral Disposition Index (DIo) and AUC(2h-insulin) during OGTT; and insulin clearance by the metabolic clearance rate of insulin (MCRI) during clamp. Women with PCOS showed significantly higher levels of AUC(2h-insulin) (p PCOS [420 (IQR 227-588) vs. 743 (IQR 597-888) ml m(-2) min(-1): p PCOS group, a strong independent inverse correlation was only observed between MCRI and AUC(2h-insulin) (PCOS: β:-0.878; p PCOS there is peripheral insulin sensitivity similar to that of women with prediabetes. What sets PCOS apart is the hyperinsulinism, today still simplistically defined "compensatory"; actually this is mainly related to decreased insulin clearance whose specific causes and dynamics have yet to be clarified.

  1. The role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) on the pancreatic β-cells and insulin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Habtamu Wondifraw; Mideksa, Seifu; Ambachew, Sintayehu

    2018-03-14

    Polyunsaturated Fatty acids have multiple effects in peripheral tissues and pancreatic beta cell function. The n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty acids prevent and reverse high-fat-diet induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. Insulin secretion is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and glucagon- like peptide-1 in tissue containing high levels of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty acids than lower level of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty acids. Also, n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty acids led to decreased production of prostaglandin, which in turn contributed to the elevation of insulin secretion. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent cytokine-induced cell death in pancreatic islets. Supplementation of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty acids for human subjects prevent beta cell destruction and insulin resistance. It also enhances insulin secretion, reduction in lipid profiles and glucose concentration particularly in type II diabetes patients. Therefore there should be a focus on the treatment mechanism of insulin related obesity and diabetes by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  2. A human model of dietary saturated fatty acid induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ozias, Marlies K; Deer, James; Kurtz, Julie; Salbe, Arline D; Harman, S Mitchell; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    Increased consumption of high-fat diets is associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Current models to study the mechanisms of high-fat diet-induced IR in humans are limited by their long duration or low efficacy. In the present study we developed and characterized an acute dietary model of saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induced insulin resistance. High caloric diets enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) or carbohydrates (CARB) were evaluated in subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance (NGT or IGT). Both diets were compared to a standard eucaloric American Heart Association (AHA) control diet in a series of crossover studies. Whole body insulin resistance was estimated as steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the last 30min of a 3-h insulin suppression test. SSPG was increased after a 24-h SFA diet (by 83±74% vs. control, n=38) in the entire cohort, which was comprised of participants with NGT (92±82%, n=22) or IGT (65±55%, n=16) (all pinsulin resistance in both NGT and IGT subjects. Insulin resistance persisted overnight after the last SFA meal and was attenuated by one day of a healthy diet. This model offers opportunities for identifying early mechanisms and potential treatments of dietary saturated fat induced insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Uric acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance and birthweight in normotensive pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughon, S Katherine; Catov, Janet; Roberts, James M

    2009-12-01

    We sought to investigate whether uric acid concentrations are increased in pregnant women with insulin resistance and to correlate both with fetal growth. Uric acid, glucose, and insulin were measured in plasma at 20.4 (+/-2.0) weeks' gestation in 263 women. The association between uric acid and insulin resistance, as estimated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), was analyzed and related to birthweights. In 212 (80.6%) women who remained normotensive throughout pregnancy, HOMA increased 1.23 U per 1-mg/dL increase in uric acid (95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.42; P=.003). Infants born to normotensive women in the upper quartile of uric acid and lowest HOMA quartile weighed 435.6 g less than infants of women with highest uric acid and HOMA quartiles (Pinsulin resistance in midpregnancy. Hyperuricemia was associated with lower birthweight in normotensive women, and this effect was attenuated by insulin resistance.

  4. Human skeletal muscle ceramide content is not a major factor in muscle insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbro, M; Baranowski, M; Skov-Jensen, C

    2008-01-01

    -hyperinsulinaemic clamp was performed for 120 and 90 min for step 1 and step 2, respectively. Muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis at baseline, and after steps 1 and 2. RESULTS: Glucose infusion rates increased in response to insulin infusion, and significant differences were present between groups (T2D......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In skeletal muscle, ceramides may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance through an attenuation of insulin signalling. This study investigated total skeletal muscle ceramide fatty acid content in participants exhibiting a wide range of insulin sensitivities. METHODS......: The middle-aged male participants (n=33) were matched for lean body mass and divided into four groups: type 2 diabetes (T2D, n=8), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n=9), healthy controls (CON, n=8) and endurance-trained (TR, n=8). A two step (28 and 80 mU m(-2) min(-1)) sequential euglycaemic...

  5. Finding minimal action sequences with a simple evaluation of actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashvin; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are able to discover the minimal number of actions that achieves an outcome (the minimal action sequence). In most accounts of this, actions are associated with a measure of behavior that is higher for actions that lead to the outcome with a shorter action sequence, and learning mechanisms find the actions associated with the highest measure. In this sense, previous accounts focus on more than the simple binary signal of “was the outcome achieved?”; they focus on “how well was the outcome achieved?” However, such mechanisms may not govern all types of behavioral development. In particular, in the process of action discovery (Redgrave and Gurney, 2006), actions are reinforced if they simply lead to a salient outcome because biological reinforcement signals occur too quickly to evaluate the consequences of an action beyond an indication of the outcome's occurrence. Thus, action discovery mechanisms focus on the simple evaluation of “was the outcome achieved?” and not “how well was the outcome achieved?” Notwithstanding this impoverishment of information, can the process of action discovery find the minimal action sequence? We address this question by implementing computational mechanisms, referred to in this paper as no-cost learning rules, in which each action that leads to the outcome is associated with the same measure of behavior. No-cost rules focus on “was the outcome achieved?” and are consistent with action discovery. No-cost rules discover the minimal action sequence in simulated tasks and execute it for a substantial amount of time. Extensive training, however, results in extraneous actions, suggesting that a separate process (which has been proposed in action discovery) must attenuate learning if no-cost rules participate in behavioral development. We describe how no-cost rules develop behavior, what happens when attenuation is disrupted, and relate the new mechanisms to wider computational and biological context. PMID:25506326

  6. Dynamic Metabolomics Reveals that Insulin Primes the Adipocyte for Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Krycer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin triggers an extensive signaling cascade to coordinate adipocyte glucose metabolism. It is considered that the major role of insulin is to provide anabolic substrates by activating GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake. However, insulin stimulates phosphorylation of many metabolic proteins. To examine the implications of this on glucose metabolism, we performed dynamic tracer metabolomics in cultured adipocytes treated with insulin. Temporal analysis of metabolite concentrations and tracer labeling revealed rapid and distinct changes in glucose metabolism, favoring specific glycolytic branch points and pyruvate anaplerosis. Integrating dynamic metabolomics and phosphoproteomics data revealed that insulin-dependent phosphorylation of anabolic enzymes occurred prior to substrate accumulation. Indeed, glycogen synthesis was activated independently of glucose supply. We refer to this phenomenon as metabolic priming, whereby insulin signaling creates a demand-driven system to “pull” glucose into specific anabolic pathways. This complements the supply-driven regulation of anabolism by substrate accumulation and highlights an additional role for insulin action in adipocyte glucose metabolism.

  7. Higher protein kinase C ζ in fatty rat liver and its effect on insulin actions in primary hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available We previously showed the impairment of insulin-regulated gene expression in the primary hepatocytes from Zucker fatty (ZF rats, and its association with alterations of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the molecular mechanism is unknown. A preliminary experiment shows that the expression level of protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ, a member of atypical PKC family, is higher in the liver and hepatocytes of ZF rats than that of Zucker lean (ZL rats. Herein, we intend to investigate the roles of atypical protein kinase C in the regulation of hepatic gene expression. The insulin-regulated hepatic gene expression was evaluated in ZL primary hepatocytes treated with atypical PKC recombinant adenoviruses. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PKCζ, or the other atypical PKC member PKCι/λ, alters the basal and impairs the insulin-regulated expressions of glucokinase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, the catalytic subunit of glucose 6-phosphatase, and insulin like growth factor-binding protein 1 in ZL primary hepatocytes. PKCζ or PKCι/λ overexpression also reduces the protein level of insulin receptor substrate 1, and the insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 and Thr308. Additionally, PKCι/λ overexpression impairs the insulin-induced Prckz expression, indicating the crosstalk between PKCζ and PKCι/λ. We conclude that the PKCζ expression is elevated in hepatocytes of insulin resistant ZF rats. Overexpressions of aPKCs in primary hepatocytes impair insulin signal transduction, and in turn, the down-stream insulin-regulated gene expression. These data suggest that elevation of aPKC expression may contribute to the hepatic insulin resistance at gene expression level.

  8. Munc18-1 Regulates First-phase Insulin Release by Promoting Granule Docking to Multiple Syntaxin Isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oh, E.; Kalwat, M.A.; Kim, M.J.; Verhage, M.; Thurmond, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Attenuated levels of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) protein Munc18-1 in human islet β-cells is coincident with type 2 diabetes, although how Munc18-1 facilitates insulin secretion remains enigmatic. Herein, using conventional Munc18-1

  9. The role of insulin receptor signaling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Leona; Schubert, Markus; Brüning, Jens C

    2005-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is expressed in various regions of the developing and adult brain, and its functions have become the focus of recent research. Insulin enters the central nervous system (CNS) through the blood-brain barrier by receptor-mediated transport to regulate food intake, sympathetic activity and peripheral insulin action through the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and reproductive endocrinology. On a molecular level, some of the effects of insulin converge with those of the leptin signaling machinery at the point of activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), resulting in the regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels. Furthermore, insulin inhibits neuronal apoptosis via activation of protein kinase B in vitro, and it regulates phosphorylation of tau, metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein and clearance of beta-amyloid from the brain in vivo. These findings indicate that neuronal IR signaling has a direct role in the link between energy homeostasis, reproduction and the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. MNAtoolbox: A Monitored Natural Attenuation Site Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borns, David J.; Brady, Patrick V.; Brady, Warren D.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Spalding, Brian P.; Waters, Robert D.; Zhang, Pengchu

    1999-07-12

    Screening of sites for the potential application and reliance upon monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be done using MNAtoolbox, a web-based tool for estimating extent of biodegradation, chemical transformation, and dilution. MNAtoolbox uses site-specific input data, where available (default parameters are taken from the literature), to roughly quantify the nature and extent of attenuation at a particular site. Use of MNAtoolbox provides 3 important elements of site evaluation: (1) Identifies likely attenuation pathways, (2) Clearly identifies sites where MNA is inappropriate, and (3) Evaluates data requirements for subsequent reliance on MNA as a sole or partial corrective action.

  11. Insulin Aspart in the Management of Diabetes Mellitus: 15 Years of Clinical Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansen, Kjeld; Bohl, Mette; Schioldan, Anne Grethe

    2015-01-01

    Limiting excessive postprandial glucose excursions is an important component of good overall glycemic control in diabetes mellitus. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that insulin aspart, which is structurally identical to regular human insulin except for the replacement of a single proline amino acid with an aspartic acid residue, has a more physiologic time?action profile (i.e., reaches a higher peak and reaches that peak sooner) than regular human insulin. As expected with this improved ph...

  12. Supplementation of Lactobacillus plantarum K68 and Fruit-Vegetable Ferment along with High Fat-Fructose Diet Attenuates Metabolic Syndrome in Rats with Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yu Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus plantarum K68 (isolated from fu-tsai and fruit-vegetable ferment (FVF have been tested for antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties in a rat model of insulin resistance, induced by chronic high fat-fructose diet. Fifty rats were equally assigned into control (CON, high fat-fructose diet (HFFD, HFFD plus K68, HFFD plus FVF, and HFFD plus both K68 and FVF (MIX groups. Respective groups were orally administered with K68 (1×109 CFU/0.5 mL or FVF (180 mg/kg or MIX for 8 weeks. We found that HFFD-induced increased bodyweights were prevented, and progressively increased fasting blood glucose and insulin levels were reversed (P<0.01 by K68 and FVF treatments. Elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and HOMA-IR values were controlled in supplemented groups. Furthermore, dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs with HFFD, was significantly (P<0.01 attenuated with MIX. Elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, were controlled (P<0.01 by K68, FVF, and MIX treatments. Moreover, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities were substantially (P<0.01 restored by all treatments. Experimental evidences demonstrate that K68 and FVF may be effective alternative medicine to prevent HFFD-induced hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia, possibly associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant efficacies.

  13. Intramuscular Lipid Metabolism in the Insulin Resistance of Smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Bryan C.; Perreault, Leigh; Hunerdosse, Devon M.; Koehler, Mary C.; Samek, Ali M.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Smoking decreases insulin action and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in humans. Mechanisms responsible for smoking-induced insulin resistance are unclear. We hypothesized smokers would have increased intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) concentration and decreased fractional synthesis rate (FSR) compared with nonsmokers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Nonsmokers (n = 18, aged 20 ± 0.5 years, BMI 22 ± 0.4 kg/m2, body fat 20 ± 2%, 0 cigarettes per day) and smo...

  14. Inflammation and insulin resistance induced by trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid depend on intracellular calcium levels in primary cultures of human adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennedy, Arion; Martinez, Kristina; Chung, Soonkyu

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that trans-10, cis-12 (10,12) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) induced inflammation and insulin resistance in primary human adipocytes by activating nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling. In this study, we demonstrated...... that the initial increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) mediated by 10,12 CLA was attenuated by TMB-8, an inhibitor of calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), by BAPTA, an intracellular calcium chelator, and by D609, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. Moreover, BAPTA, TMB-8, and D609 attenuated......, and suppression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma protein levels and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These data suggest that 10,12 CLA increases inflammation and insulin resistance in human adipocytes, in part by increasing [Ca2+]i levels, particularly calcium from the ER....

  15. Selective Insulin Resistance and the Development of Cardiovascular Diseases in Diabetes: The 2015 Edwin Bierman Award Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The Edwin Bierman Award Lecture is presented in honor of the memory of Edwin L. Bierman, MD, an exemplary scientist, mentor, and leader in the field of diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis. The award and lecture recognizes a leading scientist in the field of macrovascular complications and contributing risk factors in diabetes. George L. King, MD, of the Section of Vascular Cell Biology and Complications, Dianne Nunnally Hoppes Laboratory for Diabetes Complications, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, received the prestigious award at the American Diabetes Association’s 75th Scientific Sessions, 5–9 June 2015, in Boston, MA. He presented the Edwin Bierman Award Lecture, “Selective Insulin Resistance and the Development of Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes,” on Sunday, 7 June 2015. This review is focused on the factors and potential mechanisms that are causing various cardiovascular pathologies. In diabetes, insulin’s actions on the endothelium and other vascular cells have significant influence on systemic metabolisms and the development of cardiovascular pathologies. Our studies showed that insulin receptors on the endothelium are important for insulin transport across the endothelial barrier and mediate insulin’s actions in muscle, heart, fat, and the brain. Insulin actions on the vascular cells are mediated by two pathways involving the actions of either IRS/PI3K/Akt or Grb/Shc/MAPK. Insulin’s activation of IRS/PI3K/Akt results in mostly antiatherogenic actions, as this pathway induces activation of eNOS, the expressions of HO-1 and VEGF, and the reduction of VCAM-1. In contrast, insulin’s activation of the Grb/Shc/MAPK pathway mediates the expressions of ET-1 and PAI-1 and migration and proliferation of contractile cells, which have proatherogenic actions. Elevated levels of glucose, free fatty acids, and inflammatory cytokines due to diabetes and insulin resistance selectively inhibit insulin

  16. [Differences in dynamics of insulin and insulin-like growth I (IGF-I) receptors internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolychev, A P; Ternovskaya, E E; Arsenieva, A V; Shapkina, E V

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and IGF-I are two related peptides performing in the mammalian body functionally different roles of the metabolic and growth hormones, respectively. Internalization of the insulin-receptor complex (IRC) is the most important chain of mechanism of the action of hormone. To elucidate differences in the main stages of internalization of the two related hormones, the internalization dynamics of 125I-insulin and 125I-IGF-I was traced in isolated rat hepatocytes at 37 and 12 degrees C. There were established marked differences in the process of internalization of labeled hormones, which is stimulated by insulin and IGF-I. At 37 degrees C the insulin-stimulated internalization, unlike the process initiated by IGF-I, did not reach the maximal level for 1 h of incubation. However, essential differences in the internalization course of these two related peptide were obvious at the temperature of 12 degrees C. The internalization level of insulin receptors at 12 degrees C decreased by one third in spite of a significant increase of the insulin receptor binding on the hepatocytes plasma membrane. At 12 degrees C a slight decrease of the proportion of intracellular 125I-IGF-I correlated with a decrease in the 125I-IGF-I binding to receptors on the cell membrane. Internalization of IGF-I receptors was not affected by low temperature, as neither its level, nor the rate changed at 12 degrees C. The paradoxical decrease of the insulin-stimulated internalization at low temperature seems to represent a peculiar "inhibition mechanism" of immersion of IRC into the cell, which leads to accumulation of the complexes on the cell surface and possibly to a readjustment of the insulin biological activity. The resistance of internalization of the IGF-I receptor to cold seems to be related to the more ancient origin of this mechanism in the poikilothermal vertebrates.

  17. Mulberry Leaf Extract Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Mediated Testosterone Depletion in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hajizadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been proposed that oxidative stress may contribute to the development of testicular abnormalities in diabetes. Morus alba leaf extract (MAE has hypoglycemic and antioxidant properties. We, therefore, explored the impact of the administration of MAE on steroidogenesis in diabetic rats. Methods: To address this hypothesis, we measured the serum level of glucose, insulin, and free testosterone (Ts as well as oxidative stress parameters (including glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, total antioxidant capacity, and malondialdehyde in the testis of control, untreated and MAE-treated (1 g/day/kg diabetic rats. In order to determine the likely mechanism of MAE action on Ts levels, we analyzed the quantitative mRNA expression level of the two key steroidogenic proteins, namely steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR and P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, by real-time PCR. Results: The MAE-treated diabetic rats had significantly decreased glucose levels and on the other hand increased insulin and free Ts levels than the untreated diabetic rats. In addition, the administration of MAE to the diabetic rats restored the oxidative stress parameters toward control. Induction of diabetes decreased testicular StAR mRNA expression by 66% and MAE treatment enhanced mRNA expression to the same level of the control group. However, the expression of P540scc was not significantly decreased in the diabetic group as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that MAE significantly increased Ts production in the diabetic rats, probably through the induction of StAR mRNA expression levels. Administration of MAE to experimental models of diabetes can effectively attenuate oxidative stress-mediated testosterone depletion. Please cite this article as: Hajizadeh MR, Eftekhar E, Zal F, Jaffarian A, Mostafavi-Pour Z. Mulberry Leaf Extract Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Mediated Testosterone Depletion in

  18. Insulin signaling regulates fatty acid catabolism at the level of CoA activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS. We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis.

  19. [Insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowicki, J

    1994-10-01

    In polycystic ovarian disease there is a strong association between hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism but not with obesity alone. The magnitude of peripheral insulin resistance is similar to that seen in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Mild hyperinsulinemia in PCOD patients is not impair the carbohydrate metabolism. The elimination of the cause of hyperandrogenism by bilateral oophorectomy, long-acting Gn-RH agonist or antiandrogen cyproterone acetate did not improve the associated insulin resistance. In opposition to insulin resistance in the tissues responsible for metabolism of carbohydrate, the ovary remains sensitive to the effects of pancreatic hormone. Presumably this mechanism involved the interaction with IGF-I receptors to stimulate thecal and stromal androgen production. Insulin may sensitize the stroma to the stimulatory effect of LH. In the mechanism of follicular arrest take part increased level of binding proteins for IGF-I, mainly IGFBP 2, -4 and 5 inhibit FSH and IGF-I action.

  20. Alantolactone Improves Prolonged Exposure of Interleukin-6-Induced Skeletal Muscle Inflammation Associated Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The pro-inflammatory cytokine, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, has been proposed to be one of the mediators that link chronic inflammation to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Many studies have demonstrated the effects of IL-6 on insulin action in the skeletal muscle. However, few studies have investigated the effect of long-term treatment of IL-6, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. In the present study, we observed protective effects of alantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Inula helenium against glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by prolonged exposure of IL-6. Alantolactone has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects through IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling pathway. The relationship between IL-6 exposure and expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, involved in inflammation in the skeletal muscle, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. We observed maximum dysregulation of glucose uptake after 40 ng/ml IL-6 induction for 24 h in L6 myotubes. Prolonged IL-6 exposure suppressed glucose uptake regulating alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT phosphorylation; however, pretreatment with alantolactone activated AKT phosphorylation and improved glucose uptake. Alantolactone also attenuated IL-6-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation, followed by an increase in expression of negative regulator suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3. Furthermore, IL-6-induced expression of pathogen recognition receptor, TLR4, was also suppressed by alantolactone pretreatment. Post-silencing of STAT3 using siRNA approach, IL-6-stimulated siRNA-STAT3 improved glucose uptake and suppressed TLR4 gene expression. Taken together, we propose that, as a STAT3 inhibitor, alantolactone, improves glucose regulation in the skeletal muscle by inhibiting IL-6-induced STAT3-SOCS3 signaling followed by inhibition of the TLR4 gene expression. Therefore

  1. Weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir: a consequence of central nervous system-mediated reduced energy intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Jones, D; Danne, T; Hermansen, K; Niswender, K; Robertson, K; Thalange, N; Vasselli, J R; Yildiz, B; Häring, H U

    2015-10-01

    Insulin therapy is often associated with adverse weight gain. This is attributable, at least in part, to changes in energy balance and insulin's anabolic effects. Adverse weight gain increases the risk of poor macrovascular outcomes in people with diabetes and should therefore be mitigated if possible. Clinical studies have shown that insulin detemir, a basal insulin analogue, exerts a unique weight-sparing effect compared with other basal insulins. To understand this property, several hypotheses have been proposed. These explore the interplay of efferent and afferent signals between the muscles, brain, liver, renal and adipose tissues in response to insulin detemir and comparator basal insulins. The following models have been proposed: insulin detemir may reduce food intake through direct or indirect effects on the central nervous system (CNS); it may have favourable actions on hepatic glucose metabolism through a selective effect on the liver, or it may influence fluid homeostasis through renal effects. Studies have consistently shown that insulin detemir reduces energy intake, and moreover, it is clear that this shift in energy balance is not a consequence of reduced hypoglycaemia. CNS effects may be mediated by direct action, by indirect stimulation by peripheral mediators and/or via a more physiological counter-regulatory response to insulin through restoration of the hepatic-peripheral insulin gradient. Although the precise mechanism remains unclear, it is likely that the weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir can be explained by a combination of mechanisms. The evidence for each hypothesis is considered in this review. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Impact of 9 days of bed rest on hepatic and peripheral insulin action, insulin secretion, and whole-body lipolysis in healthy young male offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, Amra C; Højbjerre, Lise; Sonne, Mette P

    2009-01-01

    decrease in whole-body insulin sensitivity in both groups. Hepatic insulin resistance was elevated in FDR subjects prior to bed rest and was significantly augmented by bed rest in FDR (P ... deteriorates with 9 days of bed rest, converging toward similar degrees of whole-body insulin resistance. FDR subjects exhibit hepatic insulin resistance (HIR), which, in contrast to CON subjects, deteriorates in response to physical inactivity. FDR subjects exhibit reduced insulin secretion when seen...... subjects, with no significant differences between the groups. Insulin resistance induced by bed rest was fully accounted for by the impairment of nonoxidative glucose metabolism in both groups (overall P resistant FDR and healthy CON subjects...

  3. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols prevent palmitate-induced renal epithelial mesenchymal transition by alleviating dipeptidyl peptidase-4-mediated insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Ning; Wang, Chau-Jong; Yang, Yi-Sun; Lin, Chih-Li; Peng, Chiung-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy has a significant socioeconomic impact, but its mechanism is unclear and needs to be examined. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols (HPE) inhibited high glucose-induced angiotensin II receptor-1 (AT-1), thus attenuating renal epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Recently, we reported HPE inhibited dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4, the enzyme degrades type 1 glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1)), which mediated insulin resistance signals leading to EMT. Since free fatty acids can realistically bring about insulin resistance, using the palmitate-stimulated cell model in contrast with type 2 diabetic rats, in this study we examined if insulin resistance causes renal EMT, and the preventive effect of HPE. Our findings reveal that palmitate hindered 30% of glucose uptake. Treatment with 1 mg mL(-1) of HPE and the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin completely recovered insulin sensitivity and palmitate-induced signal cascades. HPE inhibited DPP-4 activity without altering the levels of DPP-4 and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). HPE decreased palmitate-induced phosphorylation of Ser307 of insulin receptor substrate-1 (pIRS-1 (S307)), AT-1 and vimentin, while increasing phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (pPI3K). IRS-1 knockdown revealed its essential role in mediating downstream AT-1 and EMT. In type 2 diabetic rats, it suggests that HPE concomitantly decreased the protein levels of DPP-4, AT-1, vimentin, and fibronectin, but reversed the in vivo compensation of GLP-1R. In conclusion, HPE improves insulin sensitivity by attenuating DPP-4 and the downstream signals, thus decreasing AT-1-mediated tubular-interstitial EMT. HPE could be an adjuvant to prevent diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Sesamol ameliorates high-fat and high-fructose induced cognitive defects via improving insulin signaling disruption in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhigang; Sun, Yali; Qiao, Qinglian; Zhao, Tong; Zhang, Wentong; Ren, Bo; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xuebo

    2017-02-22

    Sesamol, a nutritional component from sesame, possesses antioxidant, lipid lowering and antidepressant activities. Nonetheless, few studies report its effects on high-energy-dense diet-induced cognitive loss. The present research aimed to elucidate the action of sesamol on high-fat and high-fructose (HFFD) "western"-diet-induced central nervous system insulin resistance and learning and memory impairment, and further determined the possible underlying mechanism. 3 month-old C57BL/6J mice were divided into 3 groups with/without sesamol in the drinking water (0.05%, w/v) and standard diet, HFFD, and HFFD with sesamol supplementation. Morris water maze tests demonstrated that sesamol improved HFFD-elicited learning and memory loss. Sesamol was also found to attenuate neuron damage in HFFD-fed mice. Importantly, sesamol treatment up-regulated brain insulin signaling by stimulating IRS-1/AKT as well as ERK/CREB/BDNF pathways; meanwhile it down-regulated neuronal death signaling GSK3β and JNK. Moreover, sesamol also normalized mRNA expressions of neurotrophins including BDNF and NT-3, as well as expressions of mitochondrial metabolic and biogenesis related genes Sirt1 and PGC1α. Consistently, sesamol also reversed high-glucose-induced oxidized cellular status, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, insulin signaling inhibition and cell death in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. Taken together, the current study proved that sesamol reduced western-diet-induced cognitive defects in a mouse model by inhibiting insulin resistance, normalizing mitochondrial function and cell redox status, and improving IRS/AKT cell surviving and energy metabolism regulating signaling. This compelling evidence indicated that sesamol is a potential nutritional supplement to prevent unhealthy-diet-induced learning and memory loss.

  5. Insulin delivery route for the artificial pancreas: subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, or intravenous? Pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Insulin delivery is a crucial component of a closed-loop system aiming at the development of an artificial pancreas. The intravenous route, which has been used in the bedside artificial pancreas model for 30 years, has clear advantages in terms of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but cannot be used in any ambulatory system so far. Subcutaneous (SC) insulin infusion benefits from the broad expansion of insulin pump therapy that promoted the availability of constantly improving technology and fast-acting insulin analog use. However, persistent delays of insulin absorption and action, variability and shortterm stability of insulin infusion from SC-inserted catheters generate effectiveness and safety issues in view of an ambulatory, automated, glucose-controlled, artificial beta cell. Intraperitoneal insulin delivery, although still marginally used in diabetes care, may offer an interesting alternative because of its more-physiological plasma insulin profiles and sustained stability and reliability of insulin delivery.

  6. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Saotome, Masao; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Funaki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ m depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H 2 O 2 -induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ m depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin-resistance. • Inhibition of DRP or ROS

  7. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  8. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  9. Akt/PKB activation and insulin signaling: a novel insulin signaling pathway in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie RWA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Richard WA Mackenzie, Bradley T Elliott Department of Human and Health Sciences, Facility of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, London, UK Abstract: Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease categorized primarily by reduced insulin sensitivity, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose production. Treatments reducing hyperglycemia and the secondary complications that result from these dysfunctions are being sought after. Two distinct pathways encourage glucose transport activity in skeletal muscle, ie, the contraction-stimulated pathway reliant on Ca2+/5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK-dependent mechanisms and an insulin-dependent pathway activated via upregulation of serine/threonine protein kinase Akt/PKB. Metformin is an established treatment for type 2 diabetes due to its ability to increase peripheral glucose uptake while reducing hepatic glucose production in an AMPK-dependent manner. Peripheral insulin action is reduced in type 2 diabetics whereas AMPK signaling remains largely intact. This paper firstly reviews AMPK and its role in glucose uptake and then focuses on a novel mechanism known to operate via an insulin-dependent pathway. Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6 kinase 1 (IP6K1 produces a pyrophosphate group at the position of IP6 to generate a further inositol pyrophosphate, ie, diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (IP7. IP7 binds with Akt/PKB at its pleckstrin homology domain, preventing interaction with phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, and therefore reducing Akt/PKB membrane translocation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Novel evidence suggesting a reduction in IP7 production via IP6K1 inhibition represents an exciting therapeutic avenue in the treatment of insulin resistance. Metformin-induced activation of AMPK is a key current intervention in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, this treatment does not seem to improve peripheral insulin resistance. In light of this

  10. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C.P.; Geerling, J.J.; Berg, S.A.A. van den; Diepen, H.C. van; Garcia-Tardõn, N.; Thomas, A.; Schröder-Van Der Elst, J.P.; Ouwens, D.M.; Pijl, H.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Guigas, B.; Romijn, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro.

  11. Effect of hypophysectomy and insulin on lipogenesis in cockerels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kompiang, I P; Gibson, W R [Monash Univ., Clayton (Australia). Dept. of Physiology

    1976-09-01

    Hypophysectomy increases hepatic lipogenesis in cockerels. In an attempt to find the possible hormonal mechanism for this we have examined the effects of hypophysectomy, insulin and pituitary homogenates on hepatic lipogenesis. Insulin (5 U/kg) injected intravenously, simultaneously with glucose-/sup 14/C tracer, increased the amount of /sup 14/C found in liver lipids at 30 min after the injection. Similarly, insulin injected 5 min before killing increased the incorporation of glucose-/sup 14/C and acetate-/sup 14/C by liver slices during a 30 min incubation. Hypophysectomy increased lipogenesis within 24 hours. The effect of insulin was most pronounced in hypophysectomized cockerels. The activity of the lipogenic enzyme, acetyl CoA carboxylase was similarly affected. A homogenate of chicken pituitaries added to the medium reduced lipid synthesis from glucose-/sup 14/C by liver slices. This effect was larger in liver slices in which lipogenesis had been stimulated by insulin. The increased rate of hepatic lipogenesis in hypophysectomized cockerels may be caused partly by increased hepatic sensitivity to the lipogenic action of insulin or by the removal of a direct inhibition by pituitary hormones.

  12. Periparturient dairy cows do not exhibit hepatic insulin resistance, yet adipose-specific insulin resistance occurs in cows prone to high weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachut, M; Honig, H; Striem, S; Zick, Y; Boura-Halfon, S; Moallem, U

    2013-09-01

    The periparturient period in dairy cows is associated with alterations in insulin action in peripheral tissues; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not completely understood. The objective was to examine the response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and to analyze insulin signaling in liver and adipose tissues in pre- and postpartum dairy cows. Liver and adipose tissue biopsies were taken before and after GTT, at 17d prepartum and again at 3 to 5d postpartum from 8 high-yielding Israeli Holstein dairy cows. Glucose clearance rate after GTT was similar pre- and postpartum. Basal insulin concentrations and the insulin response to GTT were approximately 4-fold higher prepartum than postpartum. In accordance, phosphorylation of the hepatic insulin receptor after GTT was higher prepartum than postpartum. Across periods, a positive correlation was observed between the basal and peak plasma insulin and phosphorylated insulin receptor after GTT in the liver. Hepatic phosphorylation of protein kinase B after GTT was elevated pre- and postpartum. Conversely, in adipose tissue, phosphorylation of protein kinase B after GTT pre- and postpartum was increased only in 4 out of 8 cows that lost less body weight postpartum. Our results demonstrate that hepatic insulin signaling is regulated by plasma insulin concentrations as part of the homeorhetic adjustments toward calving, and do not support a model of hepatic insulin resistance in periparturient cows. Nevertheless, we suggest that specific insulin resistance in adipose tissue occurs pre- and postpartum only in cows prone to high weight loss. The different responses among these cows imply that genetic background may affect insulin responsiveness in adipose tissue pre- and postpartum. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin: a theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wenjing; Kang, Zhengzhong; Li, Youzhao; Sun, Tianyang; Wang, Lipei; Liang, Lijun; Lai, Maode; Wu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) can bind to insulin with high affinity which inhibits the early steps of insulin action. Lack of recognition mechanism impairs our understanding of insulin regulation before it binds to insulin receptor. Here we combine computational simulations with experimental methods to investigate the interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that His200 and Arg198 in IGFBP7 were key residues. Verified by experimental data, the interaction remained strong in single mutation systems R198E and H200F but became weak in double mutation system R198E-H200F relative to that in wild-type IGFBP7. The results and methods in present study could be adopted in future research of discovery of drugs by disrupting protein-protein interactions in insulin signaling. Nevertheless, the accuracy, reproducibility, and costs of free-energy calculation are still problems that need to be addressed before computational methods can become standard binding prediction tools in discovery pipelines.

  14. Intranasal administration of insulin to the brain impacts cognitive function and peripheral metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, V; Benedict, C; Schultes, B; Born, J; Hallschmid, M

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, the central nervous system (CNS) has emerged as a principal site of insulin action. This notion is supported by studies in animals relying on intracerebroventricular insulin infusion and by experiments in humans that make use of the intranasal pathway of insulin administration to the brain. Employing neurobehavioural and metabolic measurements as well as functional imaging techniques, these studies have provided insight into a broad range of central and peripheral effects of brain insulin. The present review focuses on CNS effects of insulin administered via the intranasal route on cognition, in particular memory function, and whole-body energy homeostasis including glucose metabolism. Furthermore, evidence is reviewed that suggests a pathophysiological role of impaired brain insulin signaling in obesity and type 2 diabetes, which are hallmarked by peripheral and possibly central nervous insulin resistance, as well as in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease where CNS insulin resistance might contribute to cognitive dysfunction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Insulin in the nervous system and the mind: Functions in metabolism, memory, and mood

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Zabolotny, Janice M.; Huang, Hu; Lee, Hyon; Kim, Young-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin, a pleotrophic hormone, has diverse effects in the body. Recent work has highlighted the important role of insulin's action in the nervous system on glucose and energy homeostasis, memory, and mood. Scope of review: Here we review experimental and clinical work that has broadened the understanding of insulin's diverse functions in the central and peripheral nervous systems, including glucose and body weight homeostasis, memory and mood, with particular emphasis on intra...

  16. Gamma Amino Butyric Acid Attenuates Liver and Kidney Damage Associated with Insulin Alteration in γ-Irradiated and Streptozotocin-Treated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saada, H.N.; Eltahawy, N.A.; Hammad, A.S.; Morcos, N.Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the inhibitory neurotransmitters that may have the ability to relive the intensity of stress. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in modulating insulin disturbance associated with liver and kidney damage in γ-irradiated and streptozotocin-treated rats. Irradiation was performed by whole body exposure to 6 Gy from a Cs-137 source. Streptozotocin (STZ) was administered in a single intraperitoneal dose (60 mg/kg body weight). GABA (200 mg/Kg body weight/day) was administered daily via gavages during 3 weeks to γ-irradiated and STZ-treated-rats. The results obtained showed that γ-irradiation induced hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance (similar to type 2 Diabetes), while STZ-treatment produced hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency with no insulin resistance detected (similar to type 1 Diabetes). In both cases, significant increases of alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) activities, urea and creatinine levels were recorded in the serum. These changes were associated with oxidative damage to the liver and kidney tissues notified by significant decreases of superoxide dismutase (SOD ), catalase and glutathione peroxidase ( GSH-Px) activities in parallel to significant increases of malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein products ( AOPP) levels. The administration of GABA to irradiated as well as STZ-treated rats regulated insulin and glucose levels, minimized oxidative stress and reduced the severity of liver and kidney damage. It could be concluded that GABA could be a useful adjunct to reduce some metabolic complications associated with insulin deficiency and insulin resistance

  17. Insulin Regulates Astrocytic Glucose Handling Through Cooperation With IGF-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ana M; Hernandez-Garzón, Edwin; Perez-Domper, Paloma; Perez-Alvarez, Alberto; Mederos, Sara; Matsui, Takashi; Santi, Andrea; Trueba-Saiz, Angel; García-Guerra, Lucía; Pose-Utrilla, Julia; Fielitz, Jens; Olson, Eric N; Fernandez de la Rosa, Ruben; Garcia Garcia, Luis; Pozo, Miguel Angel; Iglesias, Teresa; Araque, Alfonso; Soya, Hideaki; Perea, Gertrudis; Martin, Eduardo D; Torres Aleman, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity requires a flux of glucose to active regions to sustain increased metabolic demands. Insulin, the main regulator of glucose handling in the body, has been traditionally considered not to intervene in this process. However, we now report that insulin modulates brain glucose metabolism by acting on astrocytes in concert with IGF-I. The cooperation of insulin and IGF-I is needed to recover neuronal activity after hypoglycemia. Analysis of underlying mechanisms show that the combined action of IGF-I and insulin synergistically stimulates a mitogen-activated protein kinase/protein kinase D pathway resulting in translocation of GLUT1 to the cell membrane through multiple protein-protein interactions involving the scaffolding protein GAIP-interacting protein C terminus and the GTPase RAC1. Our observations identify insulin-like peptides as physiological modulators of brain glucose handling, providing further support to consider the brain as a target organ in diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  18. Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg...... and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min...... and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin....

  19. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and gastrocnemius. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD- or insulin-induced increase in hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which are necessary for fatty acid activation. HFD increased mitochondrial contents of long-chain acyl-CoAs, whereas it decreased mitochondrial ADP/ATP ratio, and these HFD-induced changes were prevented by the STZ-induced insulin deficiency. In cultured hepatocytes, we observed that expressions of ACSL1 and -5 were stimulated by insulin signaling. Results in cultured cells also showed that blunting insulin signaling by the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 prevented fat accumulation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to either insulin or oleate plus sera that normally contain insulin. Finally, knockdown of the insulin receptor prevented the oxidative stress and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin or oleate plus sera. Together, our results show that insulin and insulin signaling are required for fat induction of insulin resistance in mice and cultured mouse hepatocytes. PMID:21586696

  20. Effect of intermittent fasting and refeeding on insulin action in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Nils; Henriksen, Morten; Söderhamn, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    (mean +/- SE); body mass index: 25.7 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2)] by subjecting them to intermittent fasting every second day for 20 h for 15 days. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU.min(-1).m(-2)) clamps were performed before and after the intervention period. Subjects maintained body weight (86.4 +/- 2.3 kg...... with the basal levels before and after the intervention (5,922 +/- 991 vs. 3,860 +/- 784 ng/ml, P = 0.02). This experiment is the first in humans to show that intermittent fasting increases insulin-mediated glucose uptake rates, and the findings are compatible with the thrifty gene concept.......; coefficient of variation: 0.8 +/- 0.1%). Plasma free fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were 347 +/- 18 and 0.06 +/- 0.02 mM, respectively, after overnight fast but increased (P fasting, confirming that the subjects were fasting. Insulin...

  1. Does overnight normalization of plasma glucose by insulin infusion affect assessment of glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, P; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: In order to perform euglycaemic clamp studies in Type 2 diabetic patients, plasma glucose must be reduced to normal levels. This can be done either (i) acutely during the clamp study using high-dose insulin infusion, or (ii) slowly overnight preceding the clamp study using a low-dose insulin...... infusion. We assessed whether the choice of either of these methods to obtain euglycaemia biases subsequent assessment of glucose metabolism and insulin action. METHODS: We studied seven obese Type 2 diabetic patients twice: once with (+ ON) and once without (- ON) prior overnight insulin infusion. Glucose...... turnover rates were quantified by adjusted primed-constant 3-3H-glucose infusions, and insulin action was assessed in 4-h euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic (40 mU m-2 min-1) clamp studies using labelled glucose infusates (Hot-GINF). RESULTS: Basal plasma glucose levels (mean +/- sd) were 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 10...

  2. Palmitic acid mediates hypothalamic insulin resistance by altering PKC-θ subcellular localization in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stephen C.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Elias, Carol F.; Abplanalp, William; Herman, James P.; Migrenne, Stephanie; Lefevre, Anne-Laure; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe; Yu, Fang; Niswender, Kevin; Irani, Boman G.; Holland, William L.; Clegg, Deborah J.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin signaling can be modulated by several isoforms of PKC in peripheral tissues. Here, we assessed whether one specific isoform, PKC-θ, was expressed in critical CNS regions that regulate energy balance and whether it mediated the deleterious effects of diets high in fat, specifically palmitic acid, on hypothalamic insulin activity in rats and mice. Using a combination of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we found that PKC-θ was expressed in discrete neuronal populations of the arcuate nucleus, specifically the neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein neurons and the dorsal medial nucleus in the hypothalamus. CNS exposure to palmitic acid via direct infusion or by oral gavage increased the localization of PKC-θ to cell membranes in the hypothalamus, which was associated with impaired hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling. This finding was specific for palmitic acid, as the monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, neither increased membrane localization of PKC-θ nor induced insulin resistance. Finally, arcuate-specific knockdown of PKC-θ attenuated diet-induced obesity and improved insulin signaling. These results suggest that many of the deleterious effects of high-fat diets, specifically those enriched with palmitic acid, are CNS mediated via PKC-θ activation, resulting in reduced insulin activity. PMID:19726875

  3. Palmitic acid mediates hypothalamic insulin resistance by altering PKC-theta subcellular localization in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stephen C; Kemp, Christopher J; Elias, Carol F; Abplanalp, William; Herman, James P; Migrenne, Stephanie; Lefevre, Anne-Laure; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe; Yu, Fang; Niswender, Kevin; Irani, Boman G; Holland, William L; Clegg, Deborah J

    2009-09-01

    Insulin signaling can be modulated by several isoforms of PKC in peripheral tissues. Here, we assessed whether one specific isoform, PKC-theta, was expressed in critical CNS regions that regulate energy balance and whether it mediated the deleterious effects of diets high in fat, specifically palmitic acid, on hypothalamic insulin activity in rats and mice. Using a combination of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we found that PKC-theta was expressed in discrete neuronal populations of the arcuate nucleus, specifically the neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein neurons and the dorsal medial nucleus in the hypothalamus. CNS exposure to palmitic acid via direct infusion or by oral gavage increased the localization of PKC-theta to cell membranes in the hypothalamus, which was associated with impaired hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling. This finding was specific for palmitic acid, as the monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, neither increased membrane localization of PKC-theta nor induced insulin resistance. Finally, arcuate-specific knockdown of PKC-theta attenuated diet-induced obesity and improved insulin signaling. These results suggest that many of the deleterious effects of high-fat diets, specifically those enriched with palmitic acid, are CNS mediated via PKC-theta activation, resulting in reduced insulin activity.

  4. The ERα-PI3K Cascade in Proopiomelanocortin Progenitor Neurons Regulates Feeding and Glucose Balance in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangru; Xu, Pingwen; Cao, Xuehong; Yang, Yongjie; Hinton, Antentor Othrell; Xia, Yan; Saito, Kenji; Yan, Xiaofeng; Zou, Fang; Ding, Hongfang; Wang, Chunmei; Yan, Chunling; Saha, Pradip; Khan, Sohaib A; Zhao, Jean; Fukuda, Makoto; Tong, Qingchun; Clegg, Deborah J; Chan, Lawrence; Xu, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Estrogens act upon estrogen receptor (ER)α to inhibit feeding and improve glucose homeostasis in female animals. However, the intracellular signals that mediate these estrogenic actions remain unknown. Here, we report that anorexigenic effects of estrogens are blunted in female mice that lack ERα specifically in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) progenitor neurons. These mutant mice also develop insulin resistance and are insensitive to the glucose-regulatory effects of estrogens. Moreover, we showed that propyl pyrazole triol (an ERα agonist) stimulates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway specifically in POMC progenitor neurons, and that blockade of PI3K attenuates propyl pyrazole triol-induced activation of POMC neurons. Finally, we show that effects of estrogens to inhibit food intake and to improve insulin sensitivity are significantly attenuated in female mice with PI3K genetically inhibited in POMC progenitor neurons. Together, our results indicate that an ERα-PI3K cascade in POMC progenitor neurons mediates estrogenic actions to suppress food intake and improve insulin sensitivity.

  5. Interleukin-18 activates skeletal muscle AMPK and reduces weight gain and insulin resistance in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Birgitte Lindegaard; Matthews, Vance B; Brandt, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Circulating interleukin (IL)-18 is elevated in obesity, but paradoxically causes hypophagia. We hypothesized that IL-18 may attenuate high fat diet induced insulin resistance by activating AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). We studied mice with a global deletion of the α isoform of the IL-18...... receptor (IL-18R(-/-)), fed a standard chow or high fat diet (HFD). We next performed gain of function experiments in skeletal muscle, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. We show that IL-18 is implicated in metabolic homeostasis, inflammation and insulin resistance via mechanisms involving the activation...

  6. Decrease of miR-146b-5p in monocytes during obesity is associated with loss of the anti-inflammatory but not insulin signaling action of adiponectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Hulsmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low adiponectin, a well-recognized antidiabetic adipokine, has been associated with obesity-related inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Globular adiponectin is an important regulator of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK/NFκB pathway in monocytes of obese subjects. It protects against inflammation and oxidative stress by inducing IRAK3. microRNA (miR-146b-5p inhibits NFκB-mediated inflammation by targeted repression of IRAK1 and TNF receptor-associated factor-6 (TRAF6. Therefore, we measured the expression of miR-146b-5p in monocytes of obese subjects. Because it was low we determined the involvement of this miR in the anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and insulin signaling action of globular adiponectin. METHODS: miR-146b-5p expression in monocytes of obese subjects was determined by qRT-PCR. The effect of miR-146b-5p silencing on molecular markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin signaling and the association with globular adiponectin was assessed in human THP-1 monocytes. RESULTS: miR-146b-5p was downregulated in monocytes of obese persons. Low globular adiponectin decreased miR-146b-5p and IRAK3 in THP-1 monocytes, associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. Intracellular ROS and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1 protein were unchanged. Silencing of miR-146b-5p with an antisense inhibitor resulted in increased expression of IRAK1 and TRAF6 leading to more NFκB p65 DNA binding activity and TNFα. As a response IRAK3 and IRS1 protein increased. Mitochondrial and intracellular ROS production did not increase despite more inflammation. In addition, exposure of miR-146b-5p-depleted THP-1 monocytes to high levels of globular adiponectin resulted in an increased production of TNFα and intracellular ROS. Still, they did not lose their potential to increase IRAK3 and IRS1 protein and to decrease mitochondrial ROS. CONCLUSION: miR-146b-5p, decreased in monocytes

  7. Assessment of insulin action in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus using [6(14)C]glucose, [3(3)H]glucose, and [2(3)H]glucose. Differences in the apparent pattern of insulin resistance depending on the isotope used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, P.M.; Firth, R.G.; Rizza, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    To determine whether [2(3)H], [3(3)H], and [6(14)C]glucose provide an equivalent assessment of glucose turnover in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nondiabetic man, glucose utilization rates were measured using a simultaneous infusion of these isotopes before and during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. In the nondiabetic subjects, glucose turnover rates determined with [6(14)C]glucose during insulin infusion were lower (P less than 0.02) than those determined with [2(3)H]glucose and higher (P less than 0.01) than those determined with [3(3)H]glucose. In IDDM, glucose turnover rates measured with [6(14)C]glucose during insulin infusion were lower (P less than 0.05) than those determined with [2(3)H]glucose, but were not different from those determined with [3(3)H]glucose. All three isotopes indicated the presence of insulin resistance. However, using [3(3)H]glucose led to the erroneous conclusion that glucose utilization was not significantly decreased at high insulin concentrations in the diabetic patients. [6(14)C] and [3(3)H]glucose but not [2(3)H]glucose indicated impairment in insulin-induced suppression of glucose production. These results indicate that tritiated isotopes do not necessarily equally reflect the pattern of glucose metabolism in diabetic and nondiabetic man

  8. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  9. Basal and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle sugar transport in endotoxic and bacteremic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, M.V.; Sayeed, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane glucose transport with and without insulin was studied in soleus muscle from 5-h endotoxic rats (40 mg/kg Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide), and in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles from 12-h bacteremic (Escherichia coli, 4 X 10(10) CFU/kg) rats. Glucose transport was measured in muscles by evaluating the fractional efflux of 14 C-labeled 3-O-methylglucose ( 14 C-3-MG) after loading muscles with 14 C-3-MG. Basal 3-MG transport was elevated in soleus muscles from endotoxic as well as in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles from bacteremic rats compared with time-matched controls. Low insulin concentrations stimulated 14 C-3-MG transport more in bacteremic and endotoxic rat muscles than in controls. However, sugar transport in the presence of high insulin dose was attenuated in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles from bacteremic rats and soleus muscles from endotoxic rats compared with controls. Analysis of the dose-response relationship with ALLFIT revealed that the maximal transport response to insulin was significantly decreased in both models of septic shock. Sensitivity to insulin (EC50) was increased in endotoxic rat muscles, and a somewhat similar tendency was observed in bacteremic rat soleus muscles. Neural and humoral influences and/or changes in cellular metabolic energy may contribute to the increase in basal transport. Shifts in insulin-mediated transport may be due to alterations in insulin-receptor-effector coupling and/or the number of available glucose transporters

  10. Insulin secretion and cellular glucose metabolism after prolonged low-grade intralipid infusion in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens J

    2003-01-01

    We examined the simultaneous effects of a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion on peripheral glucose disposal, intracellular glucose partitioning and insulin secretion rates in twenty young men, by 2-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp [low insulin clamp (LI), 10 mU/m(2) x min; high insulin clamp...... Intralipid infusion. At LI, glucose oxidation decreased by 10%, whereas glucose disposal, glycolytic flux, glucose storage, and glucose production were not significantly altered. At HI, glucose disposal, and glucose oxidation decreased by 12% and 24%, respectively, during Intralipid infusion. Glycolytic flux......, glucose storage, and glucose production were unchanged. Insulin secretion rates increased in response to Intralipid infusion, but disposition indices (DI = insulin action.insulin secretion) were unchanged. In conclusion, a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion caused insulin resistance in the oxidative (but...

  11. Orally active insulin mimics: where do we stand now?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    phosphatase; PDGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor. J. Biosci. | Vol. 26 | No. ..... that of insulin with the additional benefits of the com- pound's action as an .... being carried out along with a strategy for conversion of the peptide and ...

  12. Reduced malonyl-CoA content in recovery from exercise correlates with improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Roepstorff, Carsten; Brandt, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in recovery from acute exercise coincides with reduced malonyl-CoA (MCoA) content in human muscle. Furthermore, we investigated whether a high-fat diet [65 energy-% (Fat)] would alter the content of MCoA and insulin action...... to be compromised, although to a minor extent, by the Fat diet. Collectively, this study indicates that reduced muscle MCoA content in recovery from exercise may be part of the adaptive response leading to improved insulin action on glucose uptake after exercise in human muscle....

  13. Pioglitazone Upregulates Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 Expression in Insulin-Sensitive Tissues in Rats with High-Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs can improve hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Angiotensin (Ang II, the primary effector of renin-angiotensin system (RAS, plays vital roles in the development and progression of NASH. And some AngII-mediated effects can be regulated by TZDs. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE 2, a new component of RAS, can degrade Ang II to attenuate its subsequent physiological actions. We aimed to evaluate the effects of TZDs on ACE2 expression in insulin-sensitive tissues in NASH rats. Methods. Forty rats were divided into the normal control, high-fat diet (HFD, pioglitazone control, and HFD plus pioglitazone groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, we evaluated changes in liver histology and tissue-specific ACE2 expression. Results. ACE2 gene and protein expression was significantly greater in liver and adipose tissue in the HFD group compared with normal control group, while was significantly reduced in skeletal muscle. Pioglitazone significantly reduced the degree of hepatic steatosis compared with the HFD group. Pioglitazone significantly increased ACE2 protein expression in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle compared with the HFD group. Conclusions. Pioglitazone improves hepatic steatosis in the rats with HFD-induced NASH and upregulates ACE2 expression in insulin-sensitive tissues.

  14. Intermittent fasting reduces body fat but exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in young rats regardless of high protein and fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Yoo, Kyung Min; Hyun, Joo Suk; Kang, Suna

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IMF) is a relatively new dietary approach to weight management, although the efficacy and adverse effects have not been full elucidated and the optimal diets for IMF are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a one-meal-per-day intermittent fasting with high fat (HF) or protein (HP) diets can modify energy, lipid, and glucose metabolism in normal young male Sprague-Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity or overweight. Male rats aged 5 weeks received either HF (40% fat) or HP (26% protein) diets ad libitum (AL) or for 3 h at the beginning of the dark cycle (IMF) for 5 weeks. Epidydimal fat pads and fat deposits in the leg and abdomen were lower with HP and IMF. Energy expenditure at the beginning of the dark cycle, especially from fat oxidation, was higher with IMF than AL, possibly due to greater activity levels. Brown fat content was higher with IMF. Serum ghrelin levels were higher in HP-IMF than other groups, and accordingly, cumulative food intake was also higher in HP-IMF than HF-IMF. HF-IMF exhibited higher area under the curve (AUC) of serum glucose at the first part (0-40 min) during oral glucose tolerance test, whereas AUC of serum insulin levels in both parts were higher in IMF and HF. During intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test, serum glucose levels were higher with IMF than AL. Consistently, hepatic insulin signaling (GLUT2, pAkt) was attenuated and PEPCK expression was higher with IMF and HF than other groups, and HOMA-IR revealed significantly impaired attenuated insulin sensitivity in the IMF groups. However, surprisingly, hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen storage was higher in IMF groups than AL. The higher glycogen storage in the IMF groups was associated with the lower expression of glycogen phosphorylase than the AL groups. In conclusion, IMF especially with HF increased insulin resistance, possibly by attenuating hepatic insulin signaling, and lowered glycogen phosphorylase expression despite decreased fat mass in young

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance: Underlying Causes and Modification by Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Barnard, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity. PMID:23720280

  16. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C. P.; Geerling, J. J.; van den Berg, S. A. A.; van Diepen, H. C.; Garcia-Tardón, N.; Thomas, A.; Schröder-van der Elst, J. P.; Ouwens, D. M.; Pijl, H.; Rensen, P. C. N.; Havekes, L. M.; Guigas, B.; Romijn, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed

  17. Flaxseed Oil Alleviates Chronic HFD-Induced Insulin Resistance through Remodeling Lipid Homeostasis in Obese Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Peiyi; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Liegang; Shen, Ruiling; Deng, Qianchun; Yao, Ping

    2017-11-08

    Emerging evidence suggests that higher circulating long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA) levels were intimately associated with lower prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance. However, the understanding of bioactivity and potential mechanism of α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil (ALA-FO) against insulin resistance was still limited. This study evaluated the effect of FO on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice focused on adipose tissue lipolysis. Mice after HFD feeding for 16 weeks (60% fat-derived calories) exhibited systemic insulin resistance, which was greatly attenuated by medium dose of FO (M-FO), paralleling with differential accumulation of ALA and its n-3 derivatives across serum lipid fractions. Moreover, M-FO was sufficient to effectively block the metabolic activation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), thereby improving adipose tissue insulin signaling. Importantly, suppression of hypoxia-inducible factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α were involved in FO-mediated modulation of adipose tissue lipolysis, accompanied by specific reconstitution of n-3PUFA within adipose tissue lipid fractions.

  18. The proteomic signature of insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle reveals increased glycolytic and decreased mitochondrial enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebelstein, J; Poschmann, G; Højlund, K

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in skeletal muscle are incompletely understood. Here, we aimed to obtain a global picture of changes in protein abundance in skeletal muscle in obesity and type 2 diabetes, and those associated with whole-body measures of insulin action....

  19. The insulin receptor substrate 1 associates with phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHPTP2 in liver and muscle of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima M.H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin stimulates the tyrosine kinase activity of its receptor resulting in the phosphorylation of its cytosolic substrate, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 which, in turn, associates with proteins containing SH2 domains. It has been shown that IRS-1 associates with the tyrosine phosphatase SHPTP2 in cell cultures. While the effect of the IRS-1/SHPTP2 association on insulin signal transduction is not completely known, this association may dephosphorylate IRS-1 and may play a critical role in the mitogenic actions of insulin. However, there is no physiological demonstration of this pathway of insulin action in animal tissues. In the present study we investigated the ability of insulin to induce association between IRS-1 and SHPTP2 in liver and muscle of intact rats, by co-immunoprecipitation with anti-IRS-1 antibody and anti-SHPTP2 antibody. In both tissues there was an increase in IRS-1 association with SHPTP2 after insulin stimulation. This association occurred when IRS-1 had the highest level of tyrosine phosphorylation and the decrease in this association was more rapid than the decrease in IRS-1 phosphorylation levels. The data provide evidence against the participation of SHPTP2 in IRS-1 dephosphorylation in rat tissues, and suggest that the insulin signal transduction pathway in rat tissues is related mainly to the mitogenic effects of the hormone.

  20. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  1. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [ 3 H]glucose and 2-deoxy[ 14 C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats

  2. Tartary buckwheat flavonoids ameliorate high fructose-induced insulin resistance and oxidative stress associated with the insulin signaling and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Hou, Zuoxu; Yi, Ruokun; Wang, Zhongming; Sun, Peng; Li, Guijie; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the effects of a purified tartary buckwheat flavonoid fraction (TBF) on insulin resistance and hepatic oxidative stress in mice fed high fructose in drinking water (20%) for 8 weeks. The results indicated that continuous administration of TBF dose-dependently improved the insulin sensitivity and glucose intolerance in high fructose-fed mice. TBF treatment also reversed the reduced level of insulin action on the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B (Akt) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), as well as the translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in the insulin-resistant liver. Furthermore, TBF was found to exert high antioxidant capacity as it acts as a shield against oxidative stress induced by high fructose by restoring the antioxidant status, and modulating nuclear factor E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) translocation to the nucleus with subsequently up-regulated antioxidative enzyme protein expression. Histopathological examinations revealed that impaired pancreatic/hepatic tissues were effectively restored in high fructose-fed mice following TBF treatment. Our results show that TBF intake is effective in preventing the conversion of high fructose-induced insulin resistance and hepatic oxidative stress in mice by improving the insulin signaling molecules and the Nrf2 signal pathway in the liver.

  3. Insulin degludec as an ultralong-acting basal insulin once a day: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fei Wang,1 Justine Surh,1 Manmeet Kaur21University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Storrs, 2Joslin Diabetes Center Affiliate, Hospital of Central Connecticut, New Britain, CT, USABackground: Insulin degludec (IDeg is a neutral, ultralong-acting new generation basal insulin analog developed by NovoNordisk currently in Phase III clinical development. IDeg offers a duration of action of more than 42 hours in adults, much longer than current basal insulin formulations.Objective: The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety data of IDeg in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Relevant English language articles from 2010 to 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, BIOSIS, and Google Scholar. Online conference proceedings of the 71st ADA Scientific Sessions and the 47th EASD Annual Meeting were reviewed. Studies were compared in terms of their study designs, primary and secondary efficacy parameters, and tolerability data.Results: There are a total of nine published trials investigating the clinical efficacy and safety of IDeg in over 3000 subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Only three trials were published in full. All were open-label, randomized multicenter trials with durations of 16 to 52 weeks. IDeg and coformulations of IDeg with insulin aspart (IAsp were compared to insulin glargine (IGlar, detemir, and biphasic IAsp 30 (BIAsp 30.Conclusion: Based upon the available evidence, there appear to be no reported differences between IDeg and IGlar, detemir, or BIAsp 30 in the reduction of the primary efficacy end-points of HbA1c and mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG concentrations. Only flexible dosing of IDeg provided a significant reduction in FPG compared to IGlar. IDeg demonstrated a significant reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, IDeg reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia by 18% and 58% compared to IGlar and

  4. Glucagon-insulin interaction on fat cell metabolism using c14 glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zewail, M.A.; Nielsen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glucagon is known to stimulate the lipolysis in isolated fat cells from young rats, but not in fat cells from old heavy rate (Manganiello 1972). Insulin is known to counteract the lipolytic effect and to stimulate the synthesis of fatty acids from glucose. However, little is known about the interaction between the two hormones on the glucose metabolism. Experiments based on the use of various inhibitors of lipolysis have however, clearly shown that glucagon can also stimulate the entry and overall oxidation of glucose by mechanism which is distinct from its lipolysis stimulating mechanism (M. Blecher et al. 1969). Fat cells from old heavy rats are known to be less responsive to both the lipogenic action of insulin and the lipolytic action of glucagon than fat cells from young lean rats (E.G. Hansen, Nielsen and Gliemann, 1974). The aim of the present study was to see how glucagon affects glucose metabolism in fat cells, and whether this effect was dependent on the lipolytic action of glucagon

  5. Effect of starvation on human muscle protein metabolism and its response to insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryburg, D.A.; Barrett, E.J.; Louard, R.J.; Gelfand, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the effect of fasting on muscle protein turnover in the basal state and in response to insulin, we measured forearm amino acid kinetics, using [3H]phenylalanine (Phe) and [14C]leucine (Leu) infused systemically, in eight healthy subjects after 12 (postabsorptive) and 60 h of fasting. After a 150-min basal period, forearm local insulin concentration was selectively raised by approximately 25 muU/ml for 150 min by intra-arterial insulin infusion (0.02 mU.kg-1. min-1). The 60-h fast increased urine nitrogen loss and whole body Leu flux and oxidation (by 50-75%, all P less than 0.02). Post-absorptively, forearm muscle exhibited a net release of Phe and Leu, which increased two- to threefold after the 60-h fast (P less than 0.05); this effect was mediated exclusively by accelerated local rates of amino acid appearance (Ra), with no reduction in rates of disposal (Rd). Local hyperinsulinemia in the postabsorptive condition caused a twofold increase in forearm glucose uptake (P less than 0.01) and completely suppressed the net forearm output of Phe and Leu (P less than 0.02). After the 60-h fast, forearm glucose disposal was depressed basally and showed no response to insulin; in contrast, insulin totally abolished the accelerated net forearm release of Phe and Leu. The action of insulin to reverse the augmented net release of Phe and Leu was mediated exclusively by approximately 40% suppression of Ra (P less than 0.02) rather than a stimulation of Rd. We conclude that in short-term fasted humans (1) muscle amino acid output accelerates due to increased proteolysis rather than reduced protein synthesis, and (2) despite its catabolic state and a marked impairment in insulin-mediated glucose disposal, muscle remains sensitive to insulin's antiproteolytic action

  6. Effect of starvation on human muscle protein metabolism and its response to insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryburg, D.A.; Barrett, E.J.; Louard, R.J.; Gelfand, R.A. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-10-01

    To assess the effect of fasting on muscle protein turnover in the basal state and in response to insulin, we measured forearm amino acid kinetics, using (3H)phenylalanine (Phe) and (14C)leucine (Leu) infused systemically, in eight healthy subjects after 12 (postabsorptive) and 60 h of fasting. After a 150-min basal period, forearm local insulin concentration was selectively raised by approximately 25 muU/ml for 150 min by intra-arterial insulin infusion (0.02 mU.kg-1. min-1). The 60-h fast increased urine nitrogen loss and whole body Leu flux and oxidation (by 50-75%, all P less than 0.02). Post-absorptively, forearm muscle exhibited a net release of Phe and Leu, which increased two- to threefold after the 60-h fast (P less than 0.05); this effect was mediated exclusively by accelerated local rates of amino acid appearance (Ra), with no reduction in rates of disposal (Rd). Local hyperinsulinemia in the postabsorptive condition caused a twofold increase in forearm glucose uptake (P less than 0.01) and completely suppressed the net forearm output of Phe and Leu (P less than 0.02). After the 60-h fast, forearm glucose disposal was depressed basally and showed no response to insulin; in contrast, insulin totally abolished the accelerated net forearm release of Phe and Leu. The action of insulin to reverse the augmented net release of Phe and Leu was mediated exclusively by approximately 40% suppression of Ra (P less than 0.02) rather than a stimulation of Rd. We conclude that in short-term fasted humans (1) muscle amino acid output accelerates due to increased proteolysis rather than reduced protein synthesis, and (2) despite its catabolic state and a marked impairment in insulin-mediated glucose disposal, muscle remains sensitive to insulin's antiproteolytic action.

  7. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  8. Insulin degludec versus insulin glargine in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinman, Bernard; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Cariou, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).......To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)....

  9. INSULIN IN THE BRAIN: ITS PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR STATES RELATED WITH CENTRAL INSULIN RESISTANCE, TYPE 2 DIABETES AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENRIQUE eBLÁZQUEZ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the brain has been considered an insulin-insensitive organ, recent reports on the location of insulin and its receptors in the brain have introduced new ways of considering this hormone responsible for several functions. The origin of insulin in the brain has been explained from peripheral or central sources, or both. Regardless of whether insulin is of peripheral origin or produced in the brain, this hormone may act through its own receptors present in the brain. The molecular events through which insulin functions in the brain are the same as those operating in the periphery. However, certain insulin actions are different in the CNS, such as hormone-induced glucose uptake due to a low insulin-sensitive GLUT-4 activity, and because of the predominant presence of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3. In addition, insulin in the brain contributes to the control of nutrient homeostasis, reproduction, cognition and memory, as well as to neurotrophic, neuromodulatory, and neuroprotective effects. Alterations of these functional activities may contribute to the manifestation of several clinical entities, such as central insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A close association between T2DM and AD has been reported, to the extent that AD is twice more frequent in diabetic patients, and some authors have proposed the name type 3 diabetes for this association. There are links between AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM through mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress, altered energy and glucose metabolism, cholesterol modifications, dysfunctional protein OGlcNAcylation, formation of amyloid plaques, altered Aβ metabolism, and tau hyperphosphorylation. Advances in the knowledge of preclinical AD and T2DM may be a major stimulus for the development of treatment for preventing the pathogenic events of

  10. Intra-islet glucagon secretion and action in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua eWang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon, a key hormone in the regulation of glucose homeostasis, acts as a counter-regulatory hormone to insulin by promoting hepatic glucose output. Under normal conditions, insulin and glucagon operate in concert to maintain the glucose level within a narrow physiological range. In diabetes, however, while insulin secretion or action is insufficient, the production and secretion of glucagon are excessive, contributing to the development of diabetic hyperglycemia. Within an islet, intra-islet insulin, in cooperation with intra-islet GABA, suppresses glucagon secretion via direct modulation of -cell intracellular signaling pathways involving Akt activation, GABA receptor phosphorylation and the receptor plasma membrane translocation, while intra-islet glucagon plays an important role in modulating β-cell function and insulin secretion. Defects in the insulin-glucagon fine-tuning machinery may result in β-cell glucose incompetence, leading to unsuppressed glucagon secretion and subsequent hyperglycemia, which often occur under extreme conditions of glucose influx or efflux. Therefore, deciphering the precise molecular mechanisms underlying glucagon secretion and action will facilitate our understanding of glucagon physiology, in particular, its role in regulating islet β-cell function, and hence the mechanisms behind body glucose homeostasis.

  11. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucose-stimulated insulin response to exercise training and diet in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Karen R; Brooks, Latina M; Solomon, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    the incretin effect of GIP. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 12-wk exercise training intervention (5 days/wk, 60 min/day, 75% Vo(2 max)) combined with a eucaloric (EX, n = 10) or hypocaloric (EX-HYPO, pre: 1,945 +/- 190, post: 1,269 +/- 70, kcal/day; n = 9) diet on the GIP response......Aging and obesity are characterized by decreased beta-cell sensitivity and defects in the potentiation of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP. Exercise and diet are known to improve glucose metabolism and the pancreatic insulin response to glucose, and this effect may be mediated through...... to ingested glucose, 2) GIP may mediate the attenuated glucose-stimulated insulin response after exercise/diet interventions, and 3) the increased PYY(3-36) response represents an improved capacity to regulate satiety and potentially body weight in older, obese, insulin-resistant adults....

  12. Insulin glargine 300 U/ml in the management of diabetes: clinical utility and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Galan BE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bastiaan E de Galan Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Abstract: There is ongoing interest in optimizing basal insulin treatment by developing insulins with a flat pharmacological profile, a long duration of action (typically beyond 24 hours and minimum day-to-day variation. Glargine-300 is a modified form of the long-acting insulin analog glargine in that it has been concentrated at 300 units/mL rather than the conventional 100 units/mL. Glargine-300 has a longer duration of action and a flatter pharmacological profile than original glargine-100. This property allows for more flexibility around the timing of administration, when injected once per day. Open-label studies in patients with diabetes have shown that treatment with glargine-300 achieves comparable glycemic control compared to treatment with glargine-100, albeit with consistently higher insulin requirements. These studies also showed that treatment with glargine-300 was associated with lower risks of nocturnal hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes, particularly those already on insulin, whereas data are mixed in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes or in patients with type 1 diabetes. Treatment with glargine-300 did not appear to affect the risk of overall hypoglycemia, whereas studies lacked sufficient power to investigate the effect on the risk of severe hypoglycemia. Future studies need to establish the role of glargine-300 in the treatment of diabetes alongside the other new long-acting insulin analog, insulin degludec, which was recently introduced to the market. Keywords: insulin glargine-300, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia, HbA1c, patient-reported outcomes

  13. Synthetic (+)-antroquinonol exhibits dual actions against insulin resistance by triggering AMP kinase and inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C Y; Sulake, R S; Huang, P-K; Shih, H-Y; Sie, H-W; Lai, Y-K; Chen, C; Weng, C F

    2015-01-01

    The fungal product (+)-antroquinonol activates AMP kinase (AMPK) activity in cancer cell lines. The present study was conducted to examine whether chemically synthesized (+)-antroquinonol exhibited beneficial metabolic effects in insulin-resistant states by activating AMPK and inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) activity. Effects of (+)-antroquinonol on DPP IV activity were measured with a DPPIV Assay Kit and effects on GLP-1-induced PKA were measured in AR42J cells. Translocation of the glucose transporter 4, GLUT4, induced either by insulin-dependent PI3K/AKT signalling or by insulin-independent AMPK activation, was assayed in differentiated myotubes. Glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation were assayed in L6 myocytes. Mice with diet-induced obesity were used to assess effects of acute and chronic treatment with (+)-antroquinonol on glycaemic control in vivo. The results showed that of (+)-antroquinonol (100 μM ) inhibited the DPP IV activity as effectively as the clinically used inhibitor, sitagliptin. The phosphorylation of AMPK Thr(172) in differentiated myotubes was significantly increased by (+)-antroquinonol. In cells simultaneously treated with S961 (insulin receptor antagonist), insulin and (+)-antroquinonol, the combination of (+)-antroquinonol plus insulin still increased both GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. Further, (+)-antroquinonol and sitagliptin reduced blood glucose, when given acutely or chronically to DIO mice. Chemically synthesized (+)-antroquinonol exhibits dual effects to ameliorate insulin resistance, by increasing AMPK activity and GLUT4 translocation, along with inhibiting DPP IV activity. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. 2-deoxyglucose tissue levels and insulin levels following tolazamide dosing in normal and obese mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillman, C.A.; Fletcher, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of tolazamide (TZ), a sulfonylurea, on 14 C-2-deoxyglucose ( 14 C-2DG) tissue distribution and insulin levels of normal and obese mice was investigated using an in vivo physiological method. Acute doses of TZ (50 mg/kg ip) increased 14 C-2DG levels in gastrocnemius muscle and retroperitoneal fat and produced a transient elevation of insulin which most likely accounts for the increased 14 C-2DG levels in muscle and fat. The results demonstrate that the in vivo 14 C-2DG method produced results consistent with known actions of sulfonylureas on in vitro hexose assimilation in muscle and fat. Subchronic treatment (7 days) with TZ 50 mg/kg ip twice daily did not result in increased insulin-stimulated 14 C-2DG tissue levels in normal mice when compared to saline treated controls. However, insulin levels were lower in mice treated subchronically with TZ compared to saline controls suggesting an enhancement of insulin action. Viable yellow obese mice represent a model of maturity onset obesity presenting with insulin resistance. The insulin resistance of this obese strain appears to reside in the fat tissue as assessed by comparing 14 C-2DG tissue levels of obese mice with lean littermate controls. Subchronic TZ treatment had no effect on 14 C-2DG uptake in fat or muscle tissue of viable yellow obese mice and did not alter their plasma insulin levels. It appears that genetically obese viable mice may be resistant to subchronic treatment with TZ. (author)

  15. New ways of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  16. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Eduardo Rico

    Full Text Available Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition. Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in

  17. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J. Eduardo; Saed Samii, Sina; Mathews, Alice T.; Lovett, Jacqueline; Haughey, Norman J.; McFadden, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition). Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in peripartal sphingolipids

  18. Endogenous incretin hormone augmentation of acute insulin secretion in normoglycemic relatives of type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alford, Frank P; Rantzau, Christian; Henriksen, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The pathophysiological role of gut incretin hormone argumentation on acute insulin release in the genesis of type 2 diabetes (TDM2) is uncertain. We examined retrospectively at 0 year and 10 years the endogenous incretin hormone action (IHA) on acute insulin release and glucose...

  19. The Role of Insulin, Insulin Growth Factor, and Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Messier, Claude; Teutenberg, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Most brain insulin comes from the pancreas and is taken up by the brain by what appears to be a receptor-based carrier. Type 2 diabetes animal models associated with insulin resistance show reduced insulin brain uptake and content. Recent data point to changes in the insulin receptor cascade in obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting that brain insulin receptors also become less sensitive to insulin, which could reduce synaptic plasticity. Insulin transport to the brain is reduced in a...

  20. Effect of a sustained reduction in plasma free fatty acid concentration on insulin signalling and inflammation in skeletal muscle from human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hanyu; Tantiwong, Puntip; Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Shanmugasundaram, Karthigayan; Mohan, Sumathy; Espinoza, Sara; Defronzo, Ralph A; Dubé, John J; Musi, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Reducing plasma FFA concentration in obese and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanism by which FFA reduction improves insulin sensitivity in human subjects is not fully understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological FFA reduction enhances insulin action by reducing local (muscle) inflammation, leading to improved insulin signalling. Insulin-stimulated total glucose disposal (TGD), plasma FFA species, muscle insulin signalling, IBα protein, c-Jun phosphorylation, inflammatory gene (toll-like receptor 4 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1) expression, and ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG) content were measured in muscle from a group of obese and T2DM subjects before and after administration of the antilipolytic drug acipimox for 7 days, and the results were compared to lean individuals. We found that obese and T2DM subjects had elevated saturated and unsaturated FFAs in plasma, and acipimox reduced all FFA species. Acipimox-induced reductions in plasma FFAs improved TGD and insulin signalling in obese and T2DM subjects. Acipimox increased IBα protein (an indication of decreased IB kinase-nuclear factor B signalling) in both obese and T2DM subjects, but did not affect c-Jun phosphorylation in any group. Acipimox also decreased inflammatory gene expression, although this reduction only occurred in T2DM subjects. Ceramide and DAG content did not change. To summarize, pharmacological FFA reduction improves insulin signalling in muscle from insulin-resistant subjects. This beneficial effect on insulin action could be related to a decrease in local inflammation. Notably, the improvements in insulin action were more pronounced in T2DM, indicating that these subjects are more susceptible to the toxic effect of FFAs.

  1. The antidiabetic action of camel milk in experimental type 2 diabetes mellitus: an overview on the changes in incretin hormones, insulin resistance, and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korish, A A

    2014-06-01

    Folk medicine stories accredited the aptitude of camel milk (CMK) as a hypoglycemic agent and recent studies have confirmed this in the diabetic patients and experimental animals. However, the mechanism(s) by which CMK influences glucose homeostasis is yet unclear. The current study investigated the changes in the glucose homeostatic parameters, the incretin hormones, and the inflammatory cytokines in the CMK-treated diabetic animals. A model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin 40 mg/kg/day for 4 repeated doses. Camel milk treatment was administered for 8 weeks. The changes in glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucose tolerance, fasting and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, insulin resistance (IR), TNF-α, TGF-β1, lipid profile, atherogenic index (AI), and body weight were investigated. The untreated diabetic animals showed hyperglycemia, increased HOMA-IR, hyperlipidemia, elevated AI, high serum incretins [GLP-1 and GIP], TNF-α, and TGF-β1 levels and weight loss as compared with the control group. Camel milk treatment to the diabetic animals resulted in significant lowered fasting glucose level, hypolipidemia, decreased HOMA-IR, recovery of insulin secretion, weight gain, and no mortality during the study. Additionally, CMK inhibits the diabetes-induced elevation in incretin hormones, TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels. The increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, decreased HOMA-IR, modulation of the secretion and/or the action of incretins, and the anti-inflammatory effect are anticipated mechanisms to the antidiabetic effect of CMK and suggest it as a valuable adjuvant antidiabetic therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Dietary fat and insulin resistance: a connection through leptin and PPARγ activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Nader Al-Jada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance refers to reduced insulin action in peripheral tissues and impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production, a state which is critical for maintaining normal glucose homeostasis. Insulin resistance is partly explained by genetic factors and is strongly influenced by the individual's habitual lifestyle. Investigating factors that may influence the development of insulin resistance and their mechanisms of action is highly significant; one of these factors include dietary fat. Both quantitative and qualitative terms of dietary fat have been known to play an important role in the development of insulin resistance, although the mechanism underlying this effect is not fully understood. In this regard, the classical view has been that dietary fat quality mainly affects cell membrane fatty acid composition and consequently the membrane function. Recently, the relationship between dietary fat and insulin resistance has entered an advanced level due to the discovery that different fatty acids can regulate gene expression, transcriptional activity and adipocytokines secretion. In essence, this provides new mechanisms by which fatty acids exert their cellular effects. The present review critically assesses the effect of dietary fat quality on the development of insulin resistance in relation to the adipocytokine, leptin and the activation of the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. It is evident that fat quality influences the development of insulin resistance and has a more important role than quantity. Leptin and PPARγ prove to be potential candidates linking dietary fat with insulin resistance. However, the exact role or mechanism of action of various types of dietary fat in the development of insulin resistance is still uncertain. Further well-controlled studies in humans are necessary to establish better evidence-based dietary fat recommendations for diabetes prevention and its

  3. Attenuation of Self-Generated Tactile Sensations is Predictive, not Postdictive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When one finger touches the other, the resulting tactile sensation is perceived as weaker than the same stimulus externally imposed. This attenuation of sensation could result from a predictive process that subtracts the expected sensory consequences of the action, or from a postdictive process that alters the perception of sensations that are judged after the event to be self-generated. In this study we observe attenuation even when the fingers unexpectedly fail to make contact, supporting a predictive process. This predictive attenuation of self-generated sensation may have evolved to enhance the perception of sensations with an external cause.

  4. Attenuation of self-generated tactile sensations is predictive, not postdictive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Bays

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available When one finger touches the other, the resulting tactile sensation is perceived as weaker than the same stimulus externally imposed. This attenuation of sensation could result from a predictive process that subtracts the expected sensory consequences of the action, or from a postdictive process that alters the perception of sensations that are judged after the event to be self-generated. In this study we observe attenuation even when the fingers unexpectedly fail to make contact, supporting a predictive process. This predictive attenuation of self-generated sensation may have evolved to enhance the perception of sensations with an external cause.

  5. Short-term insulin treatment prevents the diabetogenic action of streptozotocin in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Orskov, C; Holst, J J

    1997-01-01

    Streptozotocin, which induces diabetes mellitus in experimental animals, has been reported to be taken up by beta-cells by means of the glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) and then reduce the cellular level of NAD+, leading to necrosis of the beta-cells. We investigated the effect of insulin pretreatme...

  6. Insulin resistance induced by physical inactivity is associated with multiple transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, A C; Sonne, M P; Højbjerre, L

    2010-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for insulin resistance. We examined the effect of 9 days of bed rest on basal and insulin-stimulated expression of genes potentially involved in insulin action by applying hypothesis-generating microarray in parallel with candidate gene real-time PCR approaches...... contribute to the development of insulin resistance induced by bed rest. Lack of complete normalization of changes after 4 wk of retraining underscores the importance of maintaining a minimum of daily physical activity....

  7. Liraglutide increases FGF-21 activity and insulin sensitivity in high fat diet and adiponectin knockdown induced insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengliu Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue that stimulates insulin secretion and improves β-cell function. However, it is not clear whether liraglutide achieves its glucose lowering effect only by its known effects or whether other as yet unknown mechanisms are involved. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of liraglutide on Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21 activity in High-fat diet (HFD fed ApoE(-/- mice with adiponectin (Acrp30 knockdown. METHOD: HFD-fed ApoE(-/- mice were treated with adenovirus vectors expressing shAcrp30 to produce insulin resistance. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies were performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity of the mouse model. QRT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure the mRNA and protein expression of the target genes. RESULTS: The combination of HFD, ApoE deficiency, and hypoadiponectinemia resulted in an additive effect on insulin resistance. FGF-21 mRNA expressions in both liver and adipose tissues were significantly increased while FGF-21 receptor 1 (FGFR-1 and β-Klotho mRNA levels in adipose tissue, as well as FGFR-1-3 and β-Klotho mRNA levels in liver were significantly decreased in this model. Liraglutide treatment markedly improved insulin resistance and increased FGF-21 expression in liver and FGFR-3 in adipose tissue, restored β-Klotho mRNA expression in adipose tissue as well as FGFR-1-3, β-Klotho levels and phosphorylation of FGFR1 up to the levels observed in control mice in liver. Liraglutide treatment also further increased FGF-21 proteins in liver and plasma. In addition, as shown by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, liraglutide treatment also markedly improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in these animals. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate an additive effect of HFD, ApoE deficiency, and adiponectin knockdown on insulin resistance and unveil that the regulation of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity by liraglutide may be

  8. Direct renin inhibitor ameliorates insulin resistance by improving insulin signaling and oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle from post-infarct heart failure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Arata; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsumoto, Junichi; Furihata, Takaaki; Mizushima, Wataru; Tsuda, Masaya; Yokota, Takashi; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-15

    Insulin resistance can occur as a consequence of heart failure (HF). Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may play a crucial role in this phenomenon. We thus investigated the effect of a direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, on insulin resistance in HF after myocardial infarction (MI). MI and sham operation were performed in male C57BL/6J mice. The mice were divided into 4 groups and treated with sham-operation (Sham, n=10), sham-operation and aliskiren (Sham+Aliskiren; 10mg/kg/day, n=10), MI (n=11), or MI and aliskiren (MI+Aliskiren, n=11). After 4 weeks, MI mice showed left ventricular dilation and dysfunction, which were not affected by aliskiren. The percent decrease of blood glucose after insulin load was significantly smaller in MI than in Sham (14±5% vs. 36±2%), and was ameliorated in MI+Aliskiren (34±5%) mice. Insulin-stimulated serine-phosphorylation of Akt and glucose transporter 4 translocation were decreased in the skeletal muscle of MI compared to Sham by 57% and 69%, and both changes were ameliorated in the MI+Aliskiren group (91% and 94%). Aliskiren administration in MI mice significantly inhibited plasma renin activity and angiotensin II (Ang II) levels. Moreover, (pro)renin receptor expression and local Ang II production were upregulated in skeletal muscle from MI and were attenuated in MI+Aliskiren mice, in tandem with a decrease in superoxide production and NAD(P)H oxidase activities. In conclusion, aliskiren ameliorated insulin resistance in HF by improving insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle, at least partly by inhibiting systemic and (pro)renin receptor-mediated local RAS activation, and subsequent NAD(P)H oxidase-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Crosstalk between insulin and dopamine signaling: A basis for the metabolic effects of antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Abigail I

    2017-10-01

    In the setting of rising rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome, characterized in part by hyperinsulinemia, it is increasingly important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to insulin dysregulation. The higher risk for metabolic syndrome imparted by antipsychotic medication use highlights one such mechanism. Though there is great variation in the number and types of signaling pathways targeted by these medications, the one common mechanism of action is through dopamine. Dopamine's effects on insulin signaling begin at the level of insulin secretion from the pancreas and continue through the central nervous system. In a reciprocal fashion, insulin also affects dopamine signaling, with specific effects on dopamine reuptake from the synapse. This review probes the dopamine-insulin connection to provide a comprehensive examination of how antipsychotics may contribute towards insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. INSULIN SIGNALING AND THE REGULATION OF INSECT DIAPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheolho eSim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A rich chapter in the history of insect endocrinology has focused on hormonal control of diapause, especially the major roles played by juvenile hormones (JHs, ecdysteroids, and the neuropeptides that govern JH and ecdysteroid synthesis. More recently, experiments with adult diapause in Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Culex pipiens, and pupal diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis provide strong evidence that insulin signaling is also an important component of the regulatory pathway leading to the diapause phenotype. Insects produce many different insulin-like peptides (ILPs, and not all are involved in the diapause response; ILP-1 appears to be the one most closely linked to diapause in C. pipiens. Many steps in the pathway leading from perception of daylength (the primary environmental cue used to program diapause to generation of the diapause phenotype remain unknown, but the role for insulin signaling in mosquito diapause appears to be upstream of JH, as evidenced by the fact that application of exogenous JH can rescue the effects of knocking down expression of ILP-1 or the Insulin Receptor. Fat accumulation, enhancement of stress tolerance, and other features of the diapause phenotype are likely linked to the insulin pathway through the action of a key transcription factor, FOXO. This review highlights many parallels for the role of insulin signaling as a regulator in insect diapause and dauer formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  11. Acrolein decreases endothelial cell migration and insulin sensitivity through induction of let-7a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Abplanalp, Wesley; Li, Xiaohong; Cooper, Nigel; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-08-01

    Acrolein is a major reactive component of vehicle exhaust, and cigarette and wood smoke. It is also present in several food substances and is generated endogenously during inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Although previous studies have shown that dietary or inhalation exposure to acrolein results in endothelial activation, platelet activation, and accelerated atherogenesis, the basis for these effects is unknown. Moreover, the effects of acrolein on microRNA (miRNA) have not been studied. Using AGILENT miRNA microarray high-throughput technology, we found that treatment of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells with acrolein led to a significant (>1.5-fold) upregulation of 12, and downregulation of 15, miRNAs. Among the miRNAs upregulated were members of the let-7 family and this upregulation was associated with decreased expression of their protein targets, β3 integrin, Cdc34, and K-Ras. Exposure to acrolein attenuated β3 integrin-dependent migration and reduced Akt phosphorylation in response to insulin. These effects of acrolein on endothelial cell migration and insulin signaling were reversed by expression of a let-7a inhibitor. Also, inhalation exposure of mice to acrolein (1 ppm x 6 h/day x 4 days) upregulated let-7a and led to a decrease in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta. These results suggest that acrolein exposure has broad effects on endothelial miRNA repertoire and that attenuation of endothelial cell migration and insulin signaling by acrolein is mediated in part by the upregulation of let-7a. This mechanism may be a significant feature of vascular injury caused by inflammation, oxidized lipids, and exposure to environmental pollutants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Intercomparison of medium-energy neutron attenuation in iron and concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron attenuation of medium energy below 1 GeV has not been well understood until now. It is desired to obtain common agreements concerning the behaviours of neutrons inside various materials. This is necessary in order to agree on definitions of the attenuation length, which is very important for shielding calculations involving high energy accelerators. As one attempt, it was proposed by Japanese attendants of SATIF-2 to compare the attenuation of medium-energy neutrons inside iron and concrete shields between various computer codes and data, and was cited as a suitable action for SATIF. The first results from three groups were presented at SATIF-3. It has become clear that neutrons above 20 MeV are important for understanding the attenuation inside materials and that the geometry, planar or spherical, does not affect the results very much. Considering the CPU times required for Monte Carlo calculations and this result, revised problems to be calculated were prepared by the Japanese Working Group and sent to the participants of this action. The geometry is only plane, and calculations are required only for neutrons above 20 MeV. The secondary neutrons from high energy protons, which were calculated by H. Nakashima, are also included in the problem. The results from four groups were sent to the organizer at the end of August. This paper presents a comparison between groups concerning the attenuation length together with the neutron spectrum and the future themes which come from this intercomparison. (author)

  13. Anabolic regulation of gluconeogenesis by insulin in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, C.; Bessman, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    The role of substrate availability in the regulation of gluconeogenesis in isolated rat hepatocytes was studied using [U- 14 C]alanine as a tracer in the presence of different concentrations of L-alanine in the incubation medium. At low alanine concentrations (0.5 mM) insulin decreased the 14 C incorporation into the glucose pool and increased the incorporation of tracer carbons into the protein and lipid pools and into CO 2 . The net radioactivity lost from the glucose pool was only a small percentage of the total increase in the activity of the protein, lipid, CO 2 , or glycogen pools, supporting the notion that the effect of insulin in diminishing gluconeogenesis is secondary to its effects on pathways using pyruvate. At higher concentrations of alanine (2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mM) in the incubation medium insulin increased the movement of alanine carbons into protein and glucose. These results were further confirmed by using [U- 14 C]lactate. The increases in observed specific activity of glucose following insulin administration would not be possible if insulin acted by affecting the activity of any enzyme directly involved in the formation or utilization of pyruvate, most of which have been proposed as sites of insulin action. Data presented show that insulin inhibits gluconeogenesis by affecting a change in substrate availability

  14. Effect of insulin degludec versus insulin glargine on glycemic control and daily fasting blood glucose variability in insulin-naïve Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: I'D GOT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Chiba, Yasuko; Sato, Minoru; Fujita, Nobuya; Takada, Yoshihisa; Murano, Shunichi; Kuroda, Hisamoto

    2017-08-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultra-long-acting insulin that has a smooth time/action profile over more than 42h. The present study compared the effects of IDeg and insulin glargine (IGlar) on HbA1c reduction and on within-subject day-to-day variability of fasting blood glucose (FBG) in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible patients were randomly allocated at a 3:1 ratio to receive once-daily IDeg (n=31) or IGlar (n=12). Both basal insulins were administered before breakfast and titrated to achieve a target FBG <110mg/dl. The primary endpoints were the change in HbA1c from baseline to 24weeks of treatment, as well as the standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) of FBG from 8 to 12weeks and from 20 to 24weeks. Secondary endpoints included the QOL evaluated by the Diabetes Therapy-Related QOL questionnaire. After 24weeks, HbA1c was decreased by 1.6% in the IDeg group and 1.7% in the IGlar at the same insulin dosage. At 24weeks, FBG was significantly lower in the IDeg group than in the IGlar group and the CV of FBG was significantly smaller in the IDeg group. The frequency of total and severe hypoglycemic episodes did not differ between the groups. In the IDeg group, QOL showed significant improvement regarding anxiety and dissatisfaction with treatment. Treatment with IDeg or IGlar achieved similar improvement in glycemic control in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. The day-to-day variation of FBG was smaller in patients receiving IDeg. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Mechanisms involved in metformin action in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, A B

    2009-01-01

    The N, N' dimethyl-biguanide : Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that increases glucose utilization in insulin-sensitive tissues. As Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and diabetes share some altered parameters-such as abnormal glucose: insulin ratio, altered lipidic metabolism and insulin-resistance syndrome- the use of metformin has become increasingly accepted and widespread in the treatment of PCOS. Currently, metformin is used to induce ovulation and during early pregnancy in PCOS patients, however, a complete knowledge of the metformin action has not been achieved yet. This review describes beyond the classical reproductive action of metformin and explores other benefits of the drug. In addition, the present work discusses the molecular mechanisms involved further than the classical pathway that involves the AMP-activated protein kinase.

  16. Osteoinductive activity of insulin-functionalized cell culture surfaces obtained using diazonium chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, Anna; Filipowska, Joanna; Osyczka, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Polymeric surfaces suitable for cell culture (DR/Pec) were constructed from diazoresin (DR) and pectin (Pec) in a form of ultrathin films using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The surfaces were functionalized with insulin using diazonium chemistry. Such functionalized surfaces were used to culture human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. The activity of insulin immobilized on the surfaces (DR/Pec/Ins) was compared to that of insulin dissolved in the culture medium. Human MSC grown on insulin-immobilized DR/Pec surfaces displayed increased proliferation and higher osteogenic activity. The latter was determined by means of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, which increases at early stages of osteoblasts differentiation. Insulin dissolved in the culture medium did not stimulate cell proliferation and its osteogenic activity was significantly lower. Addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to the culture medium further increased ALP activity in hMSCs indicating additive osteogenic action of immobilized insulin and rhBMP-2

  17. Osteoinductive activity of insulin-functionalized cell culture surfaces obtained using diazonium chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eMikulska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric surfaces suitable for cell culture (DR/Pec were constructed from diazoresin (DR and pectin (Pec in a form of ultrathin films using the layer-by-layer (LbL technique. The surfaces were functionalized with insulin using diazonium chemistry. Such functionalized surfaces were used to culture human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. The activity of insulin immobilized on the surfaces (DR/Pec/Ins was compared to that of insulin dissolved in the culture medium. Human MSC grown on insulin-immobilized DR/Pec surfaces displayed increased proliferation and higher osteogenic activity. The latter was determined by means of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, which increases at early stages of osteoblasts differentiation. Insulin dissolved in the culture medium did not stimulate cell proliferation and its osteogenic activity was significantly lower. Addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2 to the culture medium further increased ALP activity in hMSCs indicating additive osteogenic action of immobilized insulin and rhBMP-2

  18. Weight loss after bariatric surgery reverses insulin-induced increases in brain glucose metabolism of the morbidly obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Karlsson, Henry K; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Bucci, Marco; Helmiö, Mika; Ovaska, Jari; Soinio, Minna; Salminen, Paulina; Savisto, Nina; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2013-08-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain glucose metabolism. Here, we studied brain glucose metabolism in 22 morbidly obese patients before and 6 months after bariatric surgery. Seven healthy subjects served as control subjects. Brain glucose metabolism was measured twice per imaging session: with and without insulin stimulation (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose scanning. We found that during fasting, brain glucose metabolism was not different between groups. However, the hyperinsulinemic clamp increased brain glucose metabolism in a widespread manner in the obese but not control subjects, and brain glucose metabolism was significantly higher during clamp in obese than in control subjects. After follow-up, 6 months postoperatively, the increase in glucose metabolism was no longer observed, and this attenuation was coupled with improved peripheral insulin sensitivity after weight loss. We conclude that obesity is associated with increased insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in the brain and that this abnormality can be reversed by bariatric surgery.

  19. Selective insulin resistance in homeostatic and cognitive control brain areas in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Veit, Ralf; Scheffler, Klaus; Machann, Jürgen; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2015-06-01

    Impaired brain insulin action has been linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, the central nervous effects of insulin in obese humans still remain ill defined, and no study thus far has evaluated the specific brain areas affected by insulin resistance. In 25 healthy lean and 23 overweight/obese participants, we performed magnetic resonance imaging to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and 15 and 30 min after application of intranasal insulin or placebo. Additionally, participants explicitly rated pictures of high-caloric savory and sweet food 60 min after the spray for wanting and liking. In response to insulin compared with placebo, we found a significant CBF decrease in the hypothalamus in both lean and overweight/obese participants. The magnitude of this response correlated with visceral adipose tissue independent of other fat compartments. Furthermore, we observed a differential response in the lean compared with the overweight/obese group in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in an insulin-induced CBF reduction in lean participants only. This prefrontal cortex response significantly correlated with peripheral insulin sensitivity and eating behavior measures such as disinhibition and food craving. Behaviorally, we were able to observe a significant reduction for the wanting of sweet foods after insulin application in lean men only. Brain insulin action was selectively impaired in the prefrontal cortex in overweight and obese adults and in the hypothalamus in participants with high visceral adipose tissue, potentially promoting an altered homeostatic set point and reduced inhibitory control contributing to overeating behavior. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  1. Odontella aurita-enriched diet prevents high fat diet-induced liver insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Hamza; Benomar, Yacir; Haimeur, Adil; Messaouri, Hafida; Meskini, Nadia; Taouis, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effect of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (w-3 FA) consumption regarding cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and inflammation has been widely reported. Fish oil is considered as the main source of commercialized w-3 FAs, and other alternative sources have been reported such as linseed or microalgae. However, despite numerous reports, the underlying mechanisms of action of w-3 FAs on insulin resistance are still not clearly established, especially those from microalgae. Here, we report that Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in w-3 FAs eicosapentaenoic acid, prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation in the liver of Wistar rats. Indeed, a high fat diet (HFD) increased plasma insulin levels associated with the impairment of insulin receptor signaling and the up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions. Importantly, Odontella aurita-enriched HFD (HFOA) reduces body weight and plasma insulin levels and maintains normal insulin receptor expression and responsiveness. Furthermore, HFOA decreased TLR4 expression, JNK/p38 phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory factors. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that diet supplementation with whole Ondontella aurita overcomes HFD-induced insulin resistance through the inhibition of TLR4/JNK/p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Dissociation of in vitro sensitivities of glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin in NIDDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Kubo, K.; Zawadzki, J.; Lillioja, S.; Young, A.; Abbott, W.; Foley, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    It is unclear from previous studies whether qualitative or only quantitative differences exist in insulin action in adipocytes obtained from obese subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) when compared with equally obese nondiabetic subjects. In addition, the role of changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in NIDDM is still controversial. The authors compared the sensitivities of [ 14 C]-glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin and measured [ 125 I]-insulin binding in abdominal adipocytes obtained from 45 obese nondiabetic, obese diabetic, and 15 nonobese female southwestern American Indians. Compared with the nonobese group, the sensitivities of glucose transport antilipolysis were reduced in both the obese nondiabetic and obese diabetic groups. Compared with the obese nondiabetic subjects, the ED 50 for stimulation of glucose transport was higher in the obese patients with NIDDM. In contrast, the ED 50 S for antilipolysis were similar in obese diabetic patients and obese nondiabetic subjects. No differences was found in insulin binding in patients with NIDDM when compared with the equally obese nondiabetic subjects. These data indicate 1) the mechanism of insulin resistance differs in NIDDM and obesity, and 2) the selective loss of insulin sensitivity in NIDDM precludes changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in this disorder

  3. Nature and regulation of the receptors for insulin-like growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechler, M.M.; Nissley, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Two subtypes of IGF receptors have been identified. Type I IGF receptors have a Mr greater than 300,000 and are composed of disulfide-linked 130,000-dalton (alpha) and approximately 90,000-dalton (beta) subunits. Type I receptors preferentially bind IGF-I but also bind IGF-II and, more weakly, insulin. Type II IGF receptors consist of a 250,000-dalton protein that contains internal disulfide bonds but is not linked to other membrane components. Type II receptors bind IGF-II with higher affinity than IGF-I. They do not interact with even very high concentrations of insulin. Type I IGF receptors and insulin receptors are homologous structures. Type II IGF receptors do not appear to be homologous to type I receptors. Type II receptors do not appear to be downregulated. Insulin acutely upregulates type II IGF receptors in intact rat adipose cells by effecting a redistribution of receptors cycling between a large intracellular pool and the plasma membrane. Insulin and the IGFs elicit the same biological responses, either by cross-reacting with one of the receptors for the heterologous ligand or by concurrent activation of convergent effector pathways by binding to the homologous receptor. Which mechanism is utilized appears to depend more on the tissue than on the biological response. Insulin desensitizes rat hepatoma cells to the actions of insulin and IGFs, mediated by both insulin and IGF receptors, by mechanisms distal to hormone binding and possibly common to IGF and insulin effector pathways

  4. Escitalopram ameliorates hypercortisolemia and insulin resistance in low birth weight men with limbic brain alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Christian Selmer; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Videbech, Poul

    2018-01-01

    CONTEXT: Low birth weight (LBW, insulin resistance and limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA)-axis hyperactivity. OBJECTIVE: First aim was to study insulin action, LHPA-axis function and limbic brain structures in young, healthy LBW-men vs. normal birth...... levels and improved Rdsubmax by ∼24% (p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: LBW vs. NBW displayed alterations in key brain structures modulating LHPA-axis, elevated free cortisol levels and insulin resistance. Escitalopram administration ameliorated these defects, suggesting a potential for LHPA-axis modulation...... weight controls (NBW) (Part 1). Second aim was to investigate the effects of Escitalopram vs. placebo treatment in LBW with regards to LHPA-axis and insulin sensitivity (Part 2). DESIGN SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTION: Maximal (Rdmax) and sub-maximal (Rdsubmax) rates of insulin-stimulated glucose...

  5. Osteocalcin improves insulin resistance and inflammation in obese mice: Participation of white adipose tissue and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, J A C; Esteves, J V; Morais, M R; Zorn, T M; Furuya, D T

    2017-11-26

    The discovery of osteocalcin, a protein synthetized by osteoblasts, as a hormone that has positive effects on insulin resistance, contributed to support the concept of bone as an endocrine organ. However, very little is known about the molecular pathways involved in osteocalcin improved-insulin resistance. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of action of osteocalcin on insulin resistance and inflammation in obese mice and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Lean control, saline-treated obese and uncarboxylated osteocalcin (uOC)-treated obese mice were subjected to insulin tolerance test in vivo. Blood was collect for biochemical/metabolic profile analysis; and, skeletal muscle, white adipose tissue (WAT) and bone were collected for protein (Western blotting) and mRNA (RT-qPCR) analysis. uOC effects on insulin resistance and inflammation were also investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes challenged with tumor necrosis factor. Osteocalcin treatment improved in vivo insulin resistance in obese mice. In WAT, osteocalcin had positive effects such as (1) WAT weight reduction; (2) upregulation of glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 protein and its mRNA (Slc2a4); (3) improved insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation; (4) downregulation of several genes involved in inflammation and inflammassome transcriptional machinery, and (5) reduction of the density of macrophage in crown-like structures (histomorphometrical analysis). Notably, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, osteocalcin restored Slc2a4/GLUT4 content and reduced the expression of inflammatory genes after TNF-a challenge; moreover, osteocalcin treatment increased AKT phosphorylation induced by insulin. Finally, it was observed that in bone, osteocalcin improves insulin resistance by increasing insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation and reducing the expression of genes involved in bone insulin resistance, resulting in increased secretion of uncarboxylated osteocalcin in circulation. We provided some mechanisms of action for osteocalcin in the

  6. Divergent and convergent roles for insulin-like peptides in the worm, fly and mammalian nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hiu E; Chalasani, Sreekanth H

    2014-09-01

    Insulin signaling plays a critical role in coupling external changes to animal physiology and behavior. Despite remarkable conservation in the insulin signaling pathway components across species, divergence in the mechanism and function of the signal is evident. Focusing on recent findings from C. elegans, D. melanogaster and mammals, we discuss the role of insulin signaling in regulating adult neuronal function and behavior. In particular, we describe the transcription-dependent and transcription-independent aspects of insulin signaling across these three species. Interestingly, we find evidence of diverse mechanisms underlying complex networks of peptide action in modulating nervous system function.

  7. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B

    2001-01-01

    before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. IGT relatives were insulin-resistant in oxidative and nonoxidative pathways for glucose metabolism. In vivo insulin infusion increased skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation (P = 0.01) and phosphatidylinositide......To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity (phosphotyrosine and IRS-1 associated) in control subjects (P increase in insulin action on IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation was lower in IGT relatives versus control subjects (P

  8. Beta-cell function is associated with carotid intima-media thickness independently of insulin resistance in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Ronan; Natali, Andrea; Balkau, Beverley

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It is a common belief that early atherosclerosis in prediabetes is causally linked to endothelial insulin resistance. Another condition, a low insulin secretion, may be associated with insufficient insulin action on the vascular wall and consequently favor atherosclerosis. Our aim...... was to test this hypothesis in people without diabetes, taking into account the gold-standard measurement of insulin sensitivity, a major confounder in the relationship between insulin secretion and atherosclerosis. Methods: We studied the European Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular...... Risk cohort of 451 men and 593 women (44±8 years, mean±SD) who were free of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other known chronic or acute conditions. All underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (M/I measured insulin sensitivity), and B-mode carotid...

  9. Resveratrol, a red wine antioxidant, possesses an insulin-like effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui-Chen; Hung, Li-Man; Chen, Jan-Kan

    2006-06-01

    Aberrant energy metabolism is one characteristic of diabetes mellitus (DM). Two types of DM have been identified, type 1 and type 2. Most of type 2 DM patients eventually become insulin dependent because insulin secretion by the islets of Langerhans becomes exhausted. In the present study, we show that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxylstilbene) possesses hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in streptozotocin-induced DM (STZ-DM) rats. In resveratrol-treated STZ-DM rats, the plasma glucose concentration on day 14 was reduced by 25.3 +/- 4.2%, and the triglyceride concentration was reduced by 50.2 +/- 3.2% compared with the vehicle-treated rats. In STZ-nicotinamide DM rats, the plasma glucose concentration on day 14 was reduced by 20.3 +/- 4.2%, and the triglyceride concentration was reduced by 33.3 +/- 2.2% compared with the vehicle-treated rats. Resveratrol administration ameliorates common DM symptoms, such as body weight loss, polyphagia, and polydipsia. In STZ-nicotinamide DM rats, resveratrol administration significantly decreased insulin secretion and delayed the onset of insulin resistance. Further studies showed that glucose uptake by hepatocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle and hepatic glycogen synthesis were all stimulated by resveratrol treatment. Because the stimulation of glucose uptake was not attenuated in the presence of an optimal amount of insulin in insulin-responsive cells, the antihyperglycemic effect of resveratrol appeared to act through a mechanism(s) different from that of insulin.

  10. Potential role of insulin signaling on vascular smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation, and inflammation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Eugenio; Xu, Xiaojing; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-02-15

    To investigate the role of insulin signaling pathways in migration, proliferation, and inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we examined the expression of active components of the phosphatidyl inositol 3 (PI-3) kinase (p-Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p-Erk) in primary cultures of VSMCs from human coronary arteries. VSMCs were treated in a dose-response manner with insulin (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM) for 20 min, and Akt and Erk phosphorylation were measured by Western blot analysis. In separate experiments, we evaluated the effect of 200 μM palmitate, in the presence and absence of 8 μM pioglitazone, on insulin-stimulated (100 nM for 20 min) Akt and Erk phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in VSMCs exhibited a dose dependency with a three- to fourfold increase, respectively, at the highest dose (100 nM). In the presence of palmitate, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was completely abolished, and there was a threefold increase in p-Erk. With addition of pioglitazone, the phosphorylation of Akt by insulin remained unchanged, whereas insulin-stimulated Erk phosphorylation was reduced by pioglitazone. These data in VSMCs indicate that high palmitate decreases insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and stimulates MAPK, whereas preexposure peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone preserves Akt phosphorylation and simultaneously attenuates MAPK signaling. Our results suggest that metabolic and mitogenic insulin signals have different sensitivity, are independently regulated, and may play a role in arterial smooth muscle cells migration, proliferation, and inflammation in conditions of acute hyperinsulinemia.

  11. Development of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I in head and brain of chick embryos: Autoradiographic localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassas, L.; Girbau, M.; Lesniak, M.A.; Roth, J.; de Pablo, F.

    1989-01-01

    In whole brain of chick embryos insulin receptors are highest at the end of embryonic development, while insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptors dominate in the early stages. These studies provided evidence for developmental regulation of both types of receptors, but they did not provide information on possible differences between brain regions at each developmental stage or within one region at different embryonic ages. We have now localized the specific binding of [125I]insulin and [125I]IGF-I in sections of head and brain using autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometric analysis. Embryos have been studied from the latter part of organogenesis (days 6 and 12) through late development (day 18, i.e. 3 days before hatching), and the binding patterns have been compared with those in the adult brain. At all ages the binding of both ligands was to discrete anatomical regions. Interestingly, while in late embryos and adult brain the patterns of [125I]insulin and [125I] IGF-I binding were quite distinct, in young embryos both ligands showed very similar localization of binding. In young embryos the retina and lateral wall of the growing encephalic vesicles had the highest binding of both [125I]insulin and [125I]IGF-I. In older embryos, as in the adult brain, insulin binding was high in the paleostriatum augmentatum and molecular layer of the cerebellum, while IGF-I binding was prominent in the hippocampus and neostriatum. The mapping of receptors in a vertebrate embryo model from early prenatal development until adulthood predicts great overlap in any possible function of insulin and IGF-I in brain development, while it anticipates differential localized actions of the peptides in the mature brain

  12. Insulin-like growth factors and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in mammary gland function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshman, Emma; Streuli, Charles H

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-mediated proliferation and survival are essential for normal development in the mammary gland during puberty and pregnancy. IGFs interact with IGF-binding proteins and regulate their function. The present review focuses on the role of IGFs and IGF-binding proteins in the mammary gland and describes how modulation of their actions occurs by association with hormones, other growth factors and the extracellular matrix. The review will also highlight the involvement of the IGF axis in breast cancer

  13. Antidepressant effects of insulin in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice: Modulation of brain serotonin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-04-22

    Diabetes is a persistent metabolic disorder, which often leads to depression as a result of the impaired neurotransmitter function. Insulin is believed to have antidepressant effects in depression associated with diabetes; however, the mechanism underlying the postulated effect is poorly understood. In the present study, it is hypothesized that insulin mediates an antidepressant effect in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in mice through modulation of the serotonin system in the brain. Therefore, the current study investigated the antidepressant effect of insulin in STZ induced diabetes in mice and insulin mediated modulation in the brain serotonin system. In addition, the possible pathways that lead to altered serotonin levels as a result of insulin administration were examined. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice of either sex were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ. After one week, diabetic mice received a single dose of either insulin or saline or escitalopram for 14days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the behavioral despair effects using forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), followed by biochemical estimations of serotonin concentrations and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the whole brain content. The results demonstrated that, STZ treated diabetic mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility in FST and TST as compared to non-diabetic mice, while insulin treatment significantly reversed the effect. Biochemical assays revealed that administration of insulin attenuated STZ treated diabetes induced neurochemical alterations as indicated by elevated serotonin levels and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B activities in the brain. Collectively, the data indicate that insulin exhibits antidepressant effects in depression associated with STZ induced diabetes in mice through the elevation of the brain serotonin levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-Ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9 (-/-) ) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9 (-/-) mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9 (-/-) mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography-determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance.

  15. Lipid and insulin infusion-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance is likely due to metabolic feedback and not changes in IRS-1, Akt, or AS160 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Andrew J; Brandon, Amanda E; Turner, Nigel; Watt, Matthew J; Bruce, Clinton R; Cooney, Gregory J; Kraegen, Edward W

    2009-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute hyperlipidemia-induced insulin resistance in the presence of hyperinsulinemia was due to defective insulin signaling. Hyperinsulinemia (approximately 300 mU/l) with hyperlipidemia or glycerol (control) was produced in cannulated male Wistar rats for 0.5, 1 h, 3 h, or 5 h. The glucose infusion rate required to maintain euglycemia was significantly reduced by 3 h with lipid infusion and was further reduced after 5 h of infusion, with no difference in plasma insulin levels, indicating development of insulin resistance. Consistent with this finding, in vivo skeletal muscle glucose uptake (31%, P muscle diacylglyceride and ceramide content over the same time course. However, there was an increase in cumulative exposure to long-chain acyl-CoA (70%) with lipid infusion. Interestingly, although muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 protein content was decreased in hyperinsulinemic glycerol-infused rats, this decrease was blunted in muscle from hyperinsulinemic lipid-infused rats. Decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was also observed in lipid- and insulin-infused animals (43%). Overall, these results suggest that acute reductions in muscle glucose metabolism in rats with hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia are more likely a result of substrate competition than a significant early defect in insulin action or signaling.

  16. Methods for quantifying adipose tissue insulin resistance in overweight/obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Horst, K W; van Galen, K A; Gilijamse, P W; Hartstra, A V; de Groot, P F; van der Valk, F M; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Romijn, J A; Serlie, M J

    2017-08-01

    Insulin resistance of adipose tissue is an important feature of obesity-related metabolic disease. However, assessment of lipolysis in humans requires labor-intensive and expensive methods, and there is limited validation of simplified measurement methods. We aimed to validate simplified methods for the quantification of adipose tissue insulin resistance against the assessment of insulin sensitivity of lipolysis suppression during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. We assessed the insulin-mediated suppression of lipolysis by tracer-dilution of [1,1,2,3,3- 2 H 5 ]glycerol during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies in 125 overweight or obese adults (85 men, 40 women; age 50±11 years; body mass index 38±7 kg m -2 ). Seven indices of adipose tissue insulin resistance were validated against the reference measurement method. Low-dose insulin infusion resulted in suppression of the glycerol rate of appearance ranging from 4% (most resistant) to 85% (most sensitive), indicating a good range of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity in the study population. The reference method correlated with (1) insulin-mediated suppression of plasma glycerol concentrations (r=0.960, PInsulin Resistance (Adipo-IR) index (fasting plasma insulin-NEFA product; r=-0.526, Pinsulin-glycerol product (r=-0.467, PInsulin Resistance Index (fasting plasma insulin-basal lipolysis product; r=0.460, PInsulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI)-NEFA index (r=0.621, Pinsulin resistance (area under the curve ⩾0.801, Pinsulin sensitivity (that is, the antilipolytic action of insulin) can be reliably quantified in overweight and obese humans by simplified index methods. The sensitivity and specificity of the Adipo-IR index and the fasting plasma insulin-glycerol product, combined with their simplicity and acceptable agreement, suggest that these may be most useful in clinical practice.

  17. Pramlintide in the management of insulin-using patients with type 2 and type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Pullman

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available John Pullman1, Tamara Darsow2, Juan P Frias21Mercury Street Medical Group, Butte, MT, USA; 2Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc., 9520 Towne Centre Drive, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: In patients with diabetes, dysregulation of multiple glucoregulatory hormones results in chronic hyperglycemia and an array of associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. Optimization of glycemic control, both overall (glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C] and in the postprandial period, may reduce the risk of long-term vascular complications. However, despite significant recent therapeutic advances, most patients with diabetes are unable to attain and/or maintain normal or near-normal glycemia with insulin therapy alone. Pramlintide, an analog of amylin, is the first in a new class of pharmaceutical agents and is indicated as an adjunct to mealtime insulin for the treatment of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. By mimicking the actions of the naturally occurring hormone amylin, pramlintide complements insulin by regulating the appearance of glucose into the circulation after meals via three primary mechanisms of action: slowing gastric emptying, suppressing inappropriate post-meal glucagon secretion, and increasing satiety. In long-term clinical trials, adjunctive pramlintide treatment resulted in improved postprandial glucose control and significantly reduced A1C and body weight compared with insulin alone. The combination of insulin and pramlintide may provide a more physiologically balanced approach to managing diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, pramlintide, postprandial glucose, insulin, A1C, weight

  18. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of a Mr = 160,000 glycoprotein in adipocyte plasma membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.T.; Khalaf, N.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to identify putative substrates for the insulin receptor kinase, adipocyte plasma membranes were incubated with [γ- 32 P]ATP in the presence and absence of insulin. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of its receptor β subunit but does not detectably alter the phosphorylation of other membrane proteins. In contrast, when plasma membranes from insulin-treated adipocytes are phosphorylated, the 32 P-labeling of a Mr=160,000 species (p160) and insulin receptor β subunit are markedly increased when compared to controls. p160 exhibits a rapid response (max. at 1 min) and high sensitivity (ED 50 = 2 x 10 -10 M) to insulin. The stimulatory effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of p160 is rapidly reversed following the addition of anti-insulin serum. Cold chase experiments indicate that insulin promotes the phosphorylation of p160 rather than inhibiting its dephosphorylation. p160 is a glycoprotein as evidenced by its adsorption to immobilized lectins and does not represent the insulin receptor precursor. The action of insulin on p160 tyrosine phosphorylation is mimicked by concanavalin A but not by EGF and other insulin-like agents such as hydrogen peroxide and vanadate. These results suggest that p160 tyrosine phosphorylation is an insulin receptor-mediated event and may participate in signalling by the insulin receptor

  19. Trends in Medicaid Reimbursements for Insulin From 1991 Through 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2015-10-01

    Insulin is a vital medicine for patients with diabetes mellitus. Newer, more expensive insulin products and the lack of generic insulins in the United States have increased costs for patients and insurers. To examine Medicaid payment trends for insulin products. Cost information is available for all 50 states and has been recorded since the 1990s. A time-series analysis comparing reimbursements and prices. Using state- and national-level Medicaid data from 1991 to 2014, we identified all patients who used 1 or more of the 16 insulin products that were continuously available in the United States between 2006 and 2014. Insulin products were classified into rapid-acting and long-acting analogs, short-acting, intermediate, and premixed insulins based on American Diabetes Association Guidelines. Inflation-adjusted payments made to pharmacies by Medicaid per 1 mL (100 IU) of insulin in 2014 US dollars. Since 1991, Medicaid reimbursement per unit (1 mL) of insulin dispensed has risen steadily. In the 1990s, Medicaid reimbursed pharmacies between $2.36 and $4.43 per unit. By 2014, reimbursement for short-acting insulins increased to $9.64 per unit; intermediate, $9.22; premixed, $14.79; and long-acting, $19.78. Medicaid reimbursement for rapid-acting insulin analogs rose to $19.81 per unit. The rate of increase in reimbursement was higher for insulins with patent protection ($0.20 per quarter) than without ($0.05 per quarter) (Preimbursements peaked at $407.4 million dollars in quarter 2 of 2014. Total volume peaked at 29.9 million units in quarter 4 of 2005 and was 21.2 million units in quarter 2 of 2014. Between 1991 and 2014, there was a near-exponential upward trend in Medicaid payments on a per-unit basis for a wide variety of insulin products regardless of formulation, duration of action, and whether the product was patented. Although reimbursements for newer, patent-protected insulin analogs increased at a faster rate than reimbursements for older insulins, payments

  20. MicroRNA-99a inhibits insulin-induced proliferation, migration, dedifferentiation, and rapamycin resistance of vascular smooth muscle cells by inhibiting insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and mammalian target of rapamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-wei; Guo, Rui-wei; Lv, Jin-lin; Wang, Xian-mei; Ye, Jin-shan; Lu, Ni-hong; Liang, Xing; Yang, Li-xia

    2017-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are characterized by insulin resistance and are subsequently at high risk for atherosclerosis. Hyperinsulinemia has been associated with proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been demonstrated to be the underlying signaling pathways. Recently, microRNA-99a (miR-99a) has been suggested to regulate the phenotypic changes of VSMCs in cancer cells. However, whether it is involved in insulin-induced changes of VSCMs has not been determined. In this study, we found that insulin induced proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of mouse VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the stimulating effects of high-dose insulin on proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of mouse VSMCs were found to be associated with the attenuation of the inhibitory effects of miR-99a on IGF-1R and mTOR signaling activities. Finally, we found that the inducing effect of high-dose insulin on proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of VSMCs was partially inhibited by an active mimic of miR-99a. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-99a plays a key regulatory role in the pathogenesis of insulin-induced proliferation, migration, and phenotype conversion of VSMCs at least partly via inhibition of IGF-1R and mTOR signaling. Our results provide evidence that miR-99a may be a novel target for the treatment of hyperinsulinemia-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Suggesting a new mechanism of insulin-triggered VSMC functions. • Providing a new therapeutic strategies that target atherosclerosis in T2DM patients. • Providing a new strategies that target in-stent restenosis in T2DM patients.