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Sample records for atp-binding cassette subfamily

  1. Downregulation of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 increases sensitivity to neoadjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Chang; Wang, Hao; Lao, Xin-Yuan; Chai, Rui; Gao, Xian-Hua; Cao, Guang-Wen; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2013-05-01

    This study was designed to verify the effect of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 on radiosensitivity of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. The expression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 protein in 121 pretreatment tissue samples from locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients was detected by immunohistochemistry. Pathological response to radiotherapy was evaluated according to tumor regression grading by postoperative histological examinations after they received long-course preoperative neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and the association between clinicopathological data and tumor regression grading was analyzed retrospectively. For further validation, short hairpin RNA was constructed and transfected into colorectal carcinoma cell line HT29. The knockdown efficiency was confirmed at both RNA and protein levels. The altered radiosensitivity was evaluated by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, and Hoechst 33258 staining. Univariate analysis revealed that ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 expression (p member 4 expression (p member 4 expression efficiently and persistently. Downregulation of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 expression significantly enhanced inhibition of cell proliferation, decreased colony formation capacity, and increased cell apoptosis induced by irradiation, as examined by a series of experiments in vitro. In addition, radiobiological parameters calculated according to the single-hit multitarget model were also decreased significantly. Our data indicate that ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 may be a useful molecular marker in predicting radiosensitivity, and a potential target in improving the response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients.

  2. Effect of ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 on bovine blastocyst implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, M; Kuwano, T; Kamori, T; Isozaki, Y; Nishihara, T; Yamauchi, N; Hattori, M-A

    2014-03-15

    The ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) is an efflux transporter that excretes xenobiotics and waste matter. High expression of ABCB1 induced by forskolin (FSK) and rifampicin (RIF) in the bovine blastocysts reportedly improves the cellular quality. In the present study, interferon-α, similar to FSK and RIF, was highly potent in inducing the expression of ABCB1 in the bovine blastocysts but did not exhibit an additive effect with FSK and RIF. Bovine blastocysts stimulated by the combined treatment with FSK, RIF, and interferon-α to express high levels of ABCB1 displayed better freezing resistance as indicated by higher cell numbers in post thawing cultures. On transfer to recipients, such embryos established pregnancies with significantly higher frequencies in repeat breeder cows rather than normal ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  4. Modulating the function of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) with inhibitor cabozantinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Barbuti, Anna Maria; Zhu, Xi-Jun; Yu, Xin-Yue; Wen, Ai-Wen; Wurpel, John N D; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-05-01

    Cabozantinib (XL184) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, which targets c-Met and VEGFR2. Cabozantinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced medullary thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of cabozantinib to modulate the function of the ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) by sensitizing cells that are resistant to ABCG2 substrate antineoplastic drugs. We used a drug-selected resistant cell line H460/MX20 and three ABCG2 stable transfected cell lines ABCG2-482-R2, ABCG2-482-G2, and ABCG2-482-T7, which overexpress ABCG2. Cabozantinib, at non-toxic concentrations (3 or 5μM), sensitized the ABCG2-overexpressing cells to mitoxantrone, SN-38, and topotecan. Our results indicate that cabozantinib reverses ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance by antagonizing the drug efflux function of the ABCG2 transporter instead of downregulating its expression. The molecular docking analysis indicates that cabozantinib binds to the drug-binding site of the ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our findings demonstrate that cabozantinib inhibits the ABCG2 transporter function and consequently enhances the effect of the antineoplastic agents that are substrates of ABCG2. Cabozantinib may be a useful agent in anticancer treatment regimens for patients who are resistant to ABCG2 substrate drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acridone suppresses the proliferation of human breast cancer cellsin vitrovia ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Licheng; Li, Shuyan; Liang, Zhi; Lin, Haixia; Fu, Rongzhan

    2018-02-01

    In the past decades, the tricyclic acridone ring system has become a focus of major research by medicinal chemists due to the biological significance of this moiety in drug design and discovery. Acridone has substantial bio-potential since it performs crucial functions, including antibacterial, antimalarial, antiviral and anti-neoplastic activities. However, the anticancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of acridone on breast cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, the anti-tumor function and the underlying mechanisms of acridone were evaluated in vitro . Firstly, an MTT assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of acridone. Subsequently, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was performed to investigate whether ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was associated with the function of acridone. Finally, western blotting was used to confirm the results of RT-qPCR. The present study demonstrated that acridone may decrease the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells dose-dependently. Further experiments revealed that acridone may downregulate the mRNA and protein expression levels of ABCG2, supporting the potential application of acridone in breast cancer treatment. These findings suggested that acridone is a potential agent in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  6. Insulin stimulates uric acid reabsorption via regulating urate transporter 1 and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoki, Daigo; Shibata, Shigeru; Kuribayashi-Okuma, Emiko; Xu, Ning; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-09-01

    Accumulating data indicate that renal uric acid (UA) handling is altered in diabetes and by hypoglycemic agents. In addition, hyperinsulinemia is associated with hyperuricemia and hypouricosuria. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate how diabetes and hypoglycemic agents alter the levels of renal urate transporters. In insulin-depleted diabetic rats with streptozotocin treatment, both UA excretion and fractional excretion of UA were increased, suggesting that tubular handling of UA is altered in this model. In the membrane fraction of the kidney, the expression of urate transporter 1 (URAT1) was significantly decreased, whereas that of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was increased, consistent with the increased renal UA clearance. Administration of insulin to the diabetic rats decreased UA excretion and alleviated UA transporter-level changes, while sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor (SGLT2i) ipragliflozin did not change renal UA handling in this model. To confirm the contribution of insulin in the regulation of urate transporters, normal rats received insulin and separately, ipragliflozin. Insulin significantly increased URAT1 and decreased ABCG2 levels, resulting in increased UA reabsorption. In contrast, the SGLT2i did not alter URAT1 or ABCG2 levels, although blood glucose levels were similarly reduced. Furthermore, we found that insulin significantly increased endogenous URAT1 levels in the membrane fraction of NRK-52E cells, the kidney epithelial cell line, demonstrating the direct effects of insulin on renal UA transport mechanisms. These results suggest a previously unrecognized mechanism for the anti-uricosuric effects of insulin and provide novel insights into the renal UA handling in the diabetic state. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. A selective ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 efflux inhibitor revealed via high-throughput flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Khawaja, Hadya M; Perez, Dominique; Ricci, Jerec; Yao, Tuanli; Weiner, Warren S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simpson, Denise S; Maki, Brooks E; Li, Kelin; Golden, Jennifer E; Foutz, Terry D; Waller, Anna; Evangelisti, Annette M; Young, Susan M; Chavez, Stephanie E; Garcia, Matthew J; Ursu, Oleg; Bologa, Cristian G; Carter, Mark B; Salas, Virginia M; Gouveia, Kristine; Tegos, George P; Oprea, Tudor I; Edwards, Bruce S; Aubé, Jeffrey; Larson, Richard S; Sklar, Larry A

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapeutics tumor resistance is a principal reason for treatment failure, and clinical and experimental data indicate that multidrug transporters such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) B1 and ABCG2 play a leading role by preventing cytotoxic intracellular drug concentrations. Functional efflux inhibition of existing chemotherapeutics by these pumps continues to present a promising approach for treatment. A contributing factor to the failure of existing inhibitors in clinical applications is limited understanding of specific substrate/inhibitor/pump interactions. We have identified selective efflux inhibitors by profiling multiple ABC transporters against a library of small molecules to find molecular probes to further explore such interactions. In our primary screening protocol using JC-1 as a dual-pump fluorescent reporter substrate, we identified a piperazine-substituted pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine substructure with promise for selective efflux inhibition. As a result of a focused structure-activity relationship (SAR)-driven chemistry effort, we describe compound 1 (CID44640177), an efflux inhibitor with selectivity toward ABCG2 over ABCB1. Compound 1 is also shown to potentiate the activity of mitoxantrone in vitro as well as preliminarily in vivo in an ABCG2-overexpressing tumor model. At least two analogues significantly reduce tumor size in combination with the chemotherapeutic topotecan. To our knowledge, low nanomolar chemoreversal activity coupled with direct evidence of efflux inhibition for ABCG2 is unprecedented.

  8. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kostsin, Dzmitry G. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashiwayama, Yoshinori [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi [Laboratory of Plant Gene Expression, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoko University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Imanaka, Tsuneo, E-mail: imanaka@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Morita, Masashi [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  9. An ATP-binding cassette subfamily G full transporter is essential for the retention of leaf water in both wild barley and rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoxiong; Komatsuda, Takao; Ma, Jian Feng; Nawrath, Christiane; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Tagiri, Akemi; Hu, Yin-Gang; Sameri, Mohammad; Li, Xinrong; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Yubing; Li, Chao; Ma, Xiaoying; Wang, Aidong; Nair, Sudha; Wang, Ning; Miyao, Akio; Sakuma, Shun; Yamaji, Naoki; Zheng, Xiuting; Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-07-26

    Land plants have developed a cuticle preventing uncontrolled water loss. Here we report that an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G (ABCG) full transporter is required for leaf water conservation in both wild barley and rice. A spontaneous mutation, eibi1.b, in wild barley has a low capacity to retain leaf water, a phenotype associated with reduced cutin deposition and a thin cuticle. Map-based cloning revealed that Eibi1 encodes an HvABCG31 full transporter. The gene was highly expressed in the elongation zone of a growing leaf (the site of cutin synthesis), and its gene product also was localized in developing, but not in mature tissue. A de novo wild barley mutant named "eibi1.c," along with two transposon insertion lines of rice mutated in the ortholog of HvABCG31 also were unable to restrict water loss from detached leaves. HvABCG31 is hypothesized to function as a transporter involved in cutin formation. Homologs of HvABCG31 were found in green algae, moss, and lycopods, indicating that this full transporter is highly conserved in the evolution of land plants.

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activates Human Multidrug Resistance Transporter 3/ATP-Binding Cassette Protein Subfamily B4 Transcription and Increases Rat Biliary Phosphatidylcholine Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonem, Nisanne S.; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance transporter 3/ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily B4 (MDR3/ABCB4) is a critical determinant of biliary phosphatidylcholine (PC) secretion. Clinically, mutations and partial deficiencies in MDR3 result in cholestatic liver injury. Thus, MDR3 is a potential therapeutic target for cholestatic liver disease. Fenofibrate is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α ligand that has antiinflammatory actions and regulates bile acid detoxification. Here we examined the mechanism by which fenofibrate regulates MDR3 gene expression. Fenofibrate significantly up-regulated MDR3 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in primary cultured human hepatocytes, and stimulated MDR3 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In silico analysis of 5′-upstream region of human MDR3 gene revealed a number of PPARα response elements (PPRE). Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated specific binding of PPARα to the human MDR3 promoter. Targeted mutagenesis of three novel PPREs reduced inducibility of the MDR3 promoter by fenofibrate. In collagen sandwich cultured rat hepatocytes, treatment with fenofibrate increased secretion of fluorescent PC into bile canaliculi. Conclusion Fenofibrate transactivates MDR3 gene transcription by way of the binding of PPARα to three novel and functionally critical PPREs in the MDR3 promoter. Fenofibrate treatment further stimulates biliary phosphatidylcholine secretion in rat hepatocytes, thereby providing a functional correlate. We have established a molecular mechanism that may contribute to the beneficial use of fenofibrate therapy in human cholestatic liver disease. PMID:24122873

  11. Regression of atherosclerosis with apple procyanidins by activating the ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Fumoto, Toshio; Masumoto, Saeko; Shoji, Toshihiko; Miura, Tomisato; Naraoka, Masato; Matsuda, Naoya; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2017-03-01

    Apple polyphenol contains abundant procyanidins, which have been associated with an anti-atherosclerosis and cholesterol-lowering effect. The aim of this study was to investigate whether apple procyanidins (APCs) feature therapeutic efficacy in terms of regressing atherosclerosis and whether this efficacy is due to mechanisms other than a cholesterol-lowering effect. After eight weeks on an atherogenic diet, rabbits were given a normal diet for another eight weeks to normalize the increased serum lipids level. The rabbits in the baseline group were sacrificed at this stage. The control group was subsequently fed a normal diet for eight weeks, while the APCs group was administrated 50 mg/kg/day of APCs in addition to the normal diet. Serum lipids and aortic intimal-medial thickness (IMT) were serially examined, and the resected aorta was examined histologically and through molecular biology. Aortic IMT on ultrasonography and the lipid accumulation area examined using Sudan IV staining were significantly reduced in the APCs group as compared to the control group. Serum lipid profiles were not different between the groups. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly decreased staining of an oxidative stress marker and significantly increased staining of ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1) in the APCs group. Western blotting and RT-PCR also showed increased expression of ABCA1 mRNA and its protein in the APCs group. This study revealed that APCs administration causes a regression of atherosclerosis. APCs might hold promise as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A role for calcium in the regulation of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 3 (ABCC3) gene expression in a model of epidermal growth factor-mediated breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Azimi, Iman; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-03-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process implicated in cancer metastasis, is associated with the transcriptional regulation of members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux pumps, and drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent. In this study induction of EMT was shown to result in the transcriptional up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 3 (ABCC3), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, which has a recognized role in multidrug resistance. Buffering of cytosolic free calcium inhibited EGF-mediated ABCC3 increases, indicating a calcium-dependent mode of regulation. Silencing of TRPM7 (an ion channel involved in EMT associated vimentin induction) did not inhibit ABCC3 up-regulation. Silencing of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway components ORAI1 and STIM1 also did not alter ABCC3 induction by EGF. However, the calcium permeable ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1) appears to contribute to the regulation of both basal and EGF-induced ABCC3 mRNA. Improved understanding of the relationship between calcium signaling, EMT and the regulation of genes important in therapeutic resistance may help identify novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx or out (efflux of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]. ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders.

  14. Pharmacogenetics of ATP-binding cassette transporters and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Haenisch, Sierk

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance is a severe limitation of chemotherapy of various malignancies. In particular efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette family such as ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), the ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein) family, and ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein) have been identified as major determinants of chemoresistance in tumor cells. Bioavailability depends not only on the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes but also to a major extent on the activity of drug transport across biomembranes. They are expressed in the apical membranes of many barrier tissues such as the intestine, liver, blood-brain barrier, kidney, placenta, testis, and in lymphocytes, thus contributing to plasma, liquor, but also intracellular drug disposition. Since expression and function exhibit a broad variability, it was hypothesized that hereditary variances in the genes of membrane transporters could explain at least in part interindividual differences of pharmacokinetics of a variety of anticancer drugs and many others contributing to the clinical outcome of certain leukemias and further malignancies.

  15. ATP-binding cassette transporters in reproduction: a new frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, E.; Ortiga-Carvalho, T.M.; Reis, F.M.; Lye, S.J.; Gibb, W.; Matthews, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The transmembrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters actively efflux an array of clinically relevant compounds across biological barriers, and modulate biodistribution of many physiological and pharmacological factors. To date, over 48 ABC transporters have been identified and shown to be directly and indirectly involved in peri-implantation events and fetal/placental development. They efflux cholesterol, steroid hormones, vitamins, cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins, diverse xenobiotics and environmental toxins, playing a critical role in regulating drug disposition, immunological responses and lipid trafficking, as well as preventing fetal accumulation of drugs and environmental toxins. METHODS This review examines ABC transporters as important mediators of placental barrier functions and key reproductive processes. Expression, localization and function of all identified ABC transporters were systematically reviewed using PubMed and Google Scholar websites to identify relevant studies examining ABC transporters in reproductive tissues in physiological and pathophysiological states. Only reports written in English were incorporated with no restriction on year of publication. While a major focus has been placed on the human, extensive evidence from animal studies is utilized to describe current understanding of the regulation and function of ABC transporters relevant to human reproduction. RESULTS ABC transporters are modulators of steroidogenesis, fertilization, implantation, nutrient transport and immunological responses, and function as ‘gatekeepers’ at various barrier sites (i.e. blood-testes barrier and placenta) against potentially harmful xenobiotic factors, including drugs and environmental toxins. These roles appear to be species dependent and change as a function of gestation and development. The best-described ABC transporters in reproductive tissues (primarily in the placenta) are the multidrug transporters p-glycoprotein and

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in three mosquito species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Xu, Yongyu; Cui, Feng

    2016-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family functions in the ATP-dependent transportation of various substrates across biological membranes. ABC proteins participate in various biological processes and insecticide resistance in insects, and are divided into eight subfamilies (A-H). Mosquitoes are important vectors of human diseases, but the mechanism by which the ABC transporter family evolves in mosquitoes is unknown. In this study, we classified and compared the ABC transporter families of three mosquitoes, namely, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus. The three mosquitoes have 55, 69, and 70 ABC genes, respectively. The C. p. quinquefasciatus had approximately 40% and 65% expansion in the ABCG subfamily, mainly in ABCG1/G4, compared with the two other mosquito species. The ABCB, ABCD, ABCE, and ABCF subfamilies were conserved in the three mosquito species. The C. p. quinquefasciatus transcriptomes during development showed that the ABCG and ABCC genes were mainly highly expressed at the egg and pupal stages. The pigment-transport relative brown, white, and scarlet, as well as the ABCF subfamily, were highly expressed at the egg stage. The highly expressed genes in larvae included three ABCA3 genes. The majority of the highly expressed genes in adults were ABCG1/4 genes. These results provided insights into the evolution of the ABC transporter family in mosquitoes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and Characterization of an ATP Binding Cassette l-Carnitine Transporter in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Katy R.; Harvie, Duncan; Coote, Peter J.; O'Byrne, Conor P.

    2000-01-01

    We identified an operon in Listeria monocytogenes EGD with high levels of sequence similarity to the operons encoding the OpuC and OpuB compatible solute transporters from Bacillus subtilis, which are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) substrate binding protein-dependent transporter superfamily. The operon, designated opuC, consists of four genes which are predicted to encode an ATP binding protein (OpuCA), an extracellular substrate binding protein (OpuCC), and two membrane-associated...

  18. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been....... cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans. Serum albumin can serve as sterol...... donor in ATP-binding cassette-transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of Candida glabrata inside infected humans....

  19. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, M; de Vries, EGE; Timens, W; Scheper, RJ; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Postma, DS

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette ( ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein ( P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 ( MRP1) and

  20. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.P.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Zanden, van J.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, van P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes

  1. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Zanden, J.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes

  2. Association of ATP-binding cassette transporter-A1 polymorphism ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environment might be modified in a more personalized fash- ion to help prevent or delay ... Journal of Genetics, Vol. 90, No. 1, April 2011 ..... aged children. Metabolism 53, 182–186. Yin K., Liao D. F. and Tang C. K. 2010 ATP-binding mem- brane cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1): a possible link between inflammation and ...

  3. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Sugiyama

    Full Text Available LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions.

  4. MicroRNA-320a and microRNA-4496 attenuate Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-induced cancer-initiating potential and chemoresistance by targeting β-catenin and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Woo; Yang, Eun Sun; Noh, Yu Na; Hwang, Won Chan; Jo, Se-Young; Suh, Young-Ah; Park, Won Sang; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2017-04-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is closely linked to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Although cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), a major virulence factor of H. pylori, is known to be a causal factor for gastric carcinogenesis, the molecular link between CagA and gastric cancer-initiating cell (CIC)-like properties remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that CagA is required for increased expression of β-catenin and its target CIC markers via downregulation of microRNA (miR)-320a and miR-4496. CagA promoted gastric CIC properties and was responsible for chemoresistance. miR-320a and miR-4496 attenuated the in vitro self-renewal and tumour-initiating capacity of CagA-expressing CICs by targeting β-catenin. Moreover, miR-320a and miR-4496 decreased CagA-induced chemoresistance by targeting ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, respectively. Combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil and miR-320a/miR-4496 suppressed gastric tumourigenesis and metastatic potential in an orthotopic mouse model, probably via suppression of CagA-induced CIC properties and chemoresistance. Our results provide novel evidence that CIC properties, chemoresistance and tumourigenesis associated with H. pylori are linked to CagA-induced upregulation of β-catenin and ABCG2. These data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of CagA-induced carcinogenisis and the therapeutic potential of of miR-320a and miR-4496. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Expression and regulation of prostaglandin transporters, ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 1 and 9, and solute carrier organic anion transporter family, member 2A1 and 5A1 in the uterine endometrium during the estrous cycle and pregnancy in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwanhee; Choi, Yohan; Yoo, Inkyu; Han, Jisoo; Kim, Minjeong; Ka, Hakhyun

    2017-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) function in various reproductive processes, including luteolysis, maternal pregnancy recognition, conceptus development, and parturition. Our earlier study has shown that PG transporters ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 4 ( ABCC4 ) and solute carrier organic anion transporter family, member 2A1 ( SLCO2A1 ) are expressed in the uterine endometrium in pigs. Since several other PG transporters such as ABCC1 , ABCC9 , SLCO4C1 , and SLCO5A1 are known to be present in the uterine endometrium, this study investigated the expression of these PG transporters in the porcine uterine endometrium and placenta. Uterine endometrial tissues were obtained from gilts on day (D) 12 and D15 of the estrous cycle and days 12, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 114 of pregnancy. ABCC1 , ABCC9 , SLCO4C1 , and SLCO5A1 mRNAs were expressed in the uterine endometrium, and levels of expression changed during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Expression of ABCC1 and ABCC9 mRNAs was localized mainly to luminal and glandular epithelial cells in the uterine endometrium, and chorionic epithelial cells during pregnancy. Conceptuses during early pregnancy and chorioallantoic tissues from mid to late pregnancy also expressed these PG transporters. Estradiol-17β increased the expression of ABCC1 and SLCO5A1 , but not ABCC9 and SLCO4C1 mRNAs and increasing doses of interleukin-1β induced the expression of ABCC9 , SLCO4C1 , and SLCO5A1 mRNAs in endometrial explant tissues. These data showed that several PG transporters such as ABCC1 , ABCC9 , SLCO4C1 , and SLCO5A1 were expressed at the maternal-conceptus interface, suggesting that these PG transporters may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy by regulating PG transport in the uterine endometrium and placenta in pigs.

  6. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  7. Selective substrate uptake: The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kari J; Song, Saemee; Mason, Kevin; Pinkett, Heather W

    2018-04-01

    The uptake of nutrients, including metals, amino acids and peptides are required for many biological processes. Pathogenic bacteria scavenge these essential nutrients from microenvironments to survive within the host. Pathogens must utilize a myriad of mechanisms to acquire these essential nutrients from the host while mediating the effects of toxicity. Bacteria utilize several transport proteins, including ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters to import and expel substrates. ABC transporters, conserved across all organisms, are powered by the energy from ATP to move substrates across cellular membranes. In this review, we will focus on nutrient uptake, the role of ABC importers at the host-pathogen interface, and explore emerging therapies to combat pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of family D ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCD) in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaváč, Viktor; Souček, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, belonging to the family D, are expressed in peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. ABCD transporters play a role in transport of lipids, bile acids and vitamin B12 and associate with peroxisomal disorders. ABCD1 performs transport of coenzyme A esters of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in peroxisomes and a number of mutations in ABCD1 gene were linked to an X-linked adrenoleucodystrophy (X-ALD). The role of ABCD transporters in tumour growth has not been studied in detail, but there is some evidence that ABCDs levels differ between undifferentiated stem or tumour cells and differentiated cells suggesting a possible link to tumorigenesis. In this mini-review, we discuss the available information about the role of ABCD transporters in cancer. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  9. Cell and molecular biology of ATP-binding cassette proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Kazufumi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Takanashi, Kojiro

    2009-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins constitute a large and diverse superfamily of membrane-bound and soluble proteins, which are involved in a wide range of biological processes in all organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Genome analyses of model plants, for example, Arabidopsis and rice, have revealed that plants have more than double numbers of this family member in their genomes compared to animals and insects. In recent years, various biochemical and physiological functions of ABC proteins in plants have been reported. Some are relevant for the defense mechanisms to biotic and abiotic stresses, whereas others are involved in the basic functions necessary for maintaining the plant life. Here, we provide an updated inventory of plant ABC proteins and summarize their tissue specificities, membrane localizations, and physiological functions.

  10. Molecular basis of multidrug transport by ATP-binding cassette transporters : A proposed two-cylinder engine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporters are probably present in all living cells, and are able to export a variety of structurally unrelated compounds at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The elevated expression of these proteins in multidrug resistant cells interferes with the drug-based control

  11. Evidence for two interacting ligand binding sites in human multidrug resistance protein 2 (ATP binding cassette C2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelcer, Noam; Huisman, Maarten T.; Reid, Glen; Wielinga, Peter; Breedveld, Pauline; Kuil, Annemieke; Knipscheer, Puck; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) belongs to the ATP binding cassette family of transporters. Its substrates include organic anions and anticancer drugs. We have used transport assays with vesicles derived from Sf9 insect cells overproducing MRP2 to study the interactions of drugs, organic

  12. The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in pathogenesis and multidrug resistance of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.

    2003-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins that utilise the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to drive the transport of compounds over biological membranes. They are members of one of the largest protein families to date, present in both pro- and eukaryotic

  13. Predictive Structure and Topology of Peroxisomal ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Andreoletti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette (ABC transporters, which are called ABCD1, ABCD2 and ABCD3, are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of various lipids that allow their degradation inside the organelle. Defective ABCD1 leads to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids and is associated with a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder called X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. Although the nucleotide-binding domain is highly conserved and characterized within the ABC transporters family, solid data are missing for the transmembrane domain (TMD of ABCD proteins. The lack of a clear consensus on the secondary and tertiary structure of the TMDs weakens any structure-function hypothesis based on the very diverse ABCD1 mutations found in X-ALD patients. Therefore, we first reinvestigated thoroughly the structure-function data available and performed refined alignments of ABCD protein sequences. Based on the 2.85  Å resolution crystal structure of the mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB10, here we propose a structural model of peroxisomal ABCD proteins that specifies the position of the transmembrane and coupling helices, and highlight functional motifs and putative important amino acid residues.

  14. Expression of ATP-binding cassette membrane transporters in a HIV-1 transgenic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Kevin R; Hoque, Md Tozammel; Bendayan, Reina

    2014-02-21

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, product of Mdr1a and Mdr1b genes), multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), all members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane-associated drug transporters superfamily, can significantly restrict the entry of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) into organs which exhibit a barrier function such as the central nervous system (CNS) and the male genital tract (MGT). In vitro, HIV-1 viral proteins such as glycoprotein-120 (gp120) and transcriptional transactivator (tat) have been shown to alter the expression of these transporters and ARVs permeability. The objective of this study was to compare mRNA expression of these transporters, in vivo, in several tissues obtained from HIV-1 transgenic rats (Tg-rat) (8 and 24 weeks) with those of age-matched wild-type rats. At 24 weeks, significant changes in several drug transporter mRNA expressions were observed, in particular, in brain, kidney, liver and testes. These findings suggest that HIV-1 viral proteins can alter the expression of ABC drug transporters, in vivo, in the context of HIV-1 and further regulate ARVs permeability in several organs including the CNS and MGT, two sites which have been reported to display very low ARVs permeability in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Luminescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy of ATP-binding cassette proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Maria E; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2018-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily includes regulatory and transport proteins. Most human ABC exporters pump substrates out of cells using energy from ATP hydrolysis. Although major advances have been made toward understanding the molecular mechanism of ABC exporters, there are still many issues unresolved. During the last few years, luminescence resonance energy transfer has been used to detect conformational changes in real time, with atomic resolution, in isolated ABC nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and full-length ABC exporters. NBDs are particularly interesting because they provide the power stroke for substrate transport. Luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) is a spectroscopic technique that can provide dynamic information with atomic-resolution of protein conformational changes under physiological conditions. Using LRET, it has been shown that NBD dimerization, a critical step in ABC proteins catalytic cycle, requires binding of ATP to two nucleotide binding sites. However, hydrolysis at just one of the sites can drive dissociation of the NBD dimer. It was also found that the NBDs of the bacterial ABC exporter MsbA reconstituted in a lipid bilayer membrane and studied at 37°C never separate as much as suggested by crystal structures. This observation stresses the importance of performing structural/functional studies of ABC exporters under physiologic conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins in aquatic invertebrates: Evolutionary significance and application in marine ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Hui-Su; Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily is known to play a fundamental role in biological processes and is highly conserved across animal taxa. The ABC proteins function as active transporters for multiple substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. As this superfamily is derived from a common ancestor, ABC genes have evolved via lineage-specific duplications through the process of adaptation. In this review, we summarized information about the ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates, considering their evolution and putative functions in defense mechanisms. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted to examine the evolutionary significance of ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates. Particularly, a massive expansion of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR)-mediated efflux transporters was identified in the absence of the ABCG2 (BCRP) gene in Ecdysozoa and Platyzoa, suggesting that a loss of Abcg2 gene occurred sporadically in these species during divergence of Protostome to Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, in aquatic invertebrates, the ecotoxicological significance of MXR is discussed while considering the role of MXR-mediated efflux transporters in response to various environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. ATP-binding cassette systems in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titball Richard W

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC systems are responsible for the import and export of a wide variety of molecules across cell membranes and comprise one of largest protein superfamilies found in prokarya, eukarya and archea. ABC systems play important roles in bacterial lifestyle, virulence and survival. In this study, an inventory of the ABC systems of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243 and Burkholderia mallei strain ATCC 23344 has been compiled using bioinformatic techniques. Results The ABC systems in the genomes of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei have been reannotated and subsequently compared. Differences in the number and types of encoded ABC systems in belonging to these organisms have been identified. For example, ABC systems involved in iron acquisition appear to be correlated with differences in genome size and lifestyles between these two closely related organisms. Conclusion The availability of complete inventories of the ABC systems in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei has enabled a more detailed comparison of the encoded proteins in this family. This has resulted in the identification of ABC systems which may play key roles in the different lifestyles and pathogenic properties of these two bacteria. This information has the potential to be exploited for improved clinical identification of these organisms as well as in the development of new vaccines and therapeutics targeted against the diseases caused by these organisms.

  18. ATP-binding cassette transporters in tumor endothelial cells and resistance to metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kyoko; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Maishi, Nako; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2017-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in anticancer therapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a role in the multidrug resistance. A new regimen of chemotherapy has been proposed, called "metronomic chemotherapy". Metronomic chemotherapy is the frequent, regular administration of drug doses designed to maintain low, but active, concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs over prolonged periods of time, without causing serious toxicities. Metronomic chemotherapy regimens were developed to optimize the antitumor efficacy of agents that target the tumor vasculature instead of tumor cells, and to reduce toxicity of antineoplastic drugs [1]. Nevertheless, recent studies revealed that ABC transporters are expressed at a higher level in the endothelium in the tumor. To avoid resistance to metronomic anti-angiogenic chemotherapy, ABC transporter inhibition of tumor endothelial cells may be a promising strategy. In this mini-review, we discuss the possible mechanism of resistance to metronomic chemotherapy from the viewpoint of tumor endothelial cell biology, focusing on ABC transporters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Role of pharmacogenetics of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the pharmacokinetics of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2006-11-01

    Interindividual differences of drug response are an important cause of treatment failures and adverse drug reactions. The identification of polymorphisms explaining distinct phenotypes of drug metabolizing enzymes contributed in part to the understanding of individual variations of drug plasma levels. However, bioavailability also depends on a major extent from the expression and activity of drug transport across biomembranes. In particular efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family such as ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp), the ABCC (multidrug resistance-related protein, MRP) family and ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) have been identified as major determinants of chemoresistance in tumor cells. They are expressed in the apical membranes of many barrier tissue such as the intestine, liver, blood-brain barrier, kidney, placenta, testis and in lymphocytes, thus contributing to plasma, liquor, but also intracellular drug disposition. Since expression and function exhibit a broad variability, it was hypothesized that hereditary variances in the genes of membrane transporters could explain at least in part interindividual differences of pharmacokinetics and clinical outcome of a variety of drugs. This review focuses on the functional significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 in in vitro systems, in vivo tissues and drug disposition, as well as on the clinical outcome of major indications.

  20. Divergent action of calcium channel blockers on ATP-binding cassette protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Wakino, Shu; Kanda, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kyoko; Tatematsu, Satoru; Homma, Koichiro; Takamatsu, Ichiro; Sugano, Naoki; Hayashi, Koichi

    2005-12-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used in clinical practice, and have been reported to be effective in preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. We examined whether various types of calcium channel blockers affected the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a factor contributing to anti-atherogenesis. Undifferentiated monocytic cell line, THP-1 cells were maintained in RPMI 1640 medium and treated with different kinds of calcium channel blockers. Among the calcium channel blockers tested, aranidipine and efonidipine increased ABCA1 protein expression without an increase in ABCA1 mRNA expression, whereas other calcium channel blockers (eg, nifedipine, amlodipine, and nicardipine) or T-type calcium channel blockers (eg, mibefradil and nickel chloride) failed to upregulate ABCA1 expression. H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor inhibited the aranidipine-induced ABCA1 protein expression, whereas genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor), or AG490 (a JAK-2 inhibitor) had no effects. Neither of these inhibitors suppressed the efonidipine-induced ABCA1 protein expression. Intracellular cAMP levels were elevated only by aranidipine, but not by efonidipine. In conclusion, aranidipine and efonidipine have the ability to induce ABCA1 protein by distinct mechanisms; protein kinase A is involved in the aranidipine-induced ABCA1 upregulation. This non-class effect of calcium channel blockers may potentially offer beneficial action in the treatment of hypertensive subjects with atherosclerosis.

  1. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Aberuyi, N; S. Rahgozar; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting fr...

  2. A novel flow cytometric HTS assay reveals functional modulators of ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Polireddy

    Full Text Available ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS, can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6's ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity.

  3. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

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    Flavio Alves Lara

    Full Text Available In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may

  4. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  5. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters in normal and pathological lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmer-Bosscha Hetty

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP are highly expressed in bronchial epithelium. This review aims to give new insights in the possible functions of ABC molecules in the lung in view of their expression in different cell types. Furthermore, their role in protection against noxious compounds, e.g. air pollutants and cigarette smoke components, will be discussed as well as the (malfunction in normal and pathological lung. Several pulmonary drugs are substrates for ABC transporters and therefore, the delivery of these drugs to the site of action may be highly dependent on the presence and activity of many ABC transporters in several cell types. Three ABC transporters are known to play an important role in lung functioning. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene can cause cystic fibrosis, and mutations in ABCA1 and ABCA3 are responsible for respectively Tangier disease and fatal surfactant deficiency. The role of altered function of ABC transporters in highly prevalent pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have hardly been investigated so far. We especially focused on polymorphisms, knock-out mice models and in vitro results of pulmonary research. Insight in the function of ABC transporters in the lung may open new ways to facilitate treatment of lung diseases.

  6. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting from articles published inreputable journals from1994 to date and experiments newly performed by our group, a comprehensive review is written about ABCA2 and its role in MDR regarding childhood ALL. ABCA2 transports drugs from the cytoplasm into the lysosomal compartment, where they may become degraded and exported from the cell. The aforementioned mechanism may contribute to MDR. It has been reported that ABCA2 may induce resistance to mitoxantrone, estrogen derivatives and estramustine. It is resistant to the aforementioned compounds. Furthermore, the overexpression ofABCA2 in methotrexate, vinblastine and/or doxorubicin treated Jurkat cells are observed in several publications. The recent study of our group showsthatthe overexpression ofABCA2 gene in children with ALL increases the risk of MDR by 15 times. ABCA2 is the second identified member of the ABCA; ABC transporters' subfamily. ABCA2 gene expression profile is suggested to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in ALL treatment. Better understanding of the MDR mechanisms and the factors involved may improve the therapeutic outcome of ALL by modifying the treatment protocols. PMID:25254091

  7. Genome-wide identification, characterization and phylogenetic analysis of 50 catfish ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter genes.

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    Shikai Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a large set of full-length transcripts was recently assembled in catfish, annotation of large gene families, especially those with duplications, is still a great challenge. Most often, complexities in annotation cause mis-identification and thereby much confusion in the scientific literature. As such, detailed phylogenetic analysis and/or orthology analysis are required for annotation of genes involved in gene families. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene superfamily is a large gene family that encodes membrane proteins that transport a diverse set of substrates across membranes, playing important roles in protecting organisms from diverse environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we identified a set of 50 ABC transporters in catfish genome. Phylogenetic analysis allowed their identification and annotation into seven subfamilies, including 9 ABCA genes, 12 ABCB genes, 12 ABCC genes, 5 ABCD genes, 2 ABCE genes, 4 ABCF genes and 6 ABCG genes. Most ABC transporters are conserved among vertebrates, though cases of recent gene duplications and gene losses do exist. Gene duplications in catfish were found for ABCA1, ABCB3, ABCB6, ABCC5, ABCD3, ABCE1, ABCF2 and ABCG2. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The whole set of catfish ABC transporters provide the essential genomic resources for future biochemical, toxicological and physiological studies of ABC drug efflux transporters. The establishment of orthologies should allow functional inferences with the information from model species, though the function of lineage-specific genes can be distinct because of specific living environment with different selection pressure.

  8. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  9. Endothelial ATP-binding cassette G1 in mouse endothelium protects against hemodynamic-induced atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Shanshan [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Department of Pediatrics, Baodi District People’s Hospital of Tianjin City, Tianjin, 301800 (China); Wang, Jiaxing [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191 (China); Zhang, Xu; Shi, Ying; Li, Bochuan; Bao, Qiankun [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Pang, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191 (China); Ai, Ding [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Zhu, Yi [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China); Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 100191 (China); He, Jinlong, E-mail: hejinlong@tmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China)

    2016-08-19

    Activated vascular endothelium inflammation under persistent hyperlipidemia is the initial step of atherogenesis. ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) is a crucial factor maintaining sterol and lipid homeostasis by transporting cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ABCG1 in endothelial inflammation activation during early-stage atherogenesis in mice and the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific ABCG1 transgenic (EC-ABCG1-Tg) mice were generated and cross-bred with low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient (Ldlr{sup −/−}) mice. After a 4-week Western-type diet, the mice were sacrificed for assessing atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein ECs were treated with different flows, and ABCG1 was adenovirally overexpressed to investigate the mechanism in vitro. Compared with Ldlr{sup −/−} mouse aortas, EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr{sup −/−} aortas showed decreased early-stage lesions. Furthermore, the lesion area in the EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr{sup −/−} mouse aortic arch but not thoracic aorta was significantly reduced, which suggests a protective role of ABCG1 under atheroprone flow. In vitro, overexpression of ABCG1 attenuated EC activation caused by oscillatory shear stress. Overexpression of ABCG1 blunted cholesterol-activated ECs in vitro. In exploring the mechanisms of ABCG1 attenuating endothelial inflammation, we found that ABCG1 inhibited oscillatory flow-activated nuclear factor kappa B and NLRP3 inflammasome in ECs. ABCG1 may play a protective role in early-stage atherosclerosis by reducing endothelial activation induced by oscillatory shear stress via suppressing the inflammatory response. - Highlights: • EC-ABCG1-Tg mice in a Ldlr{sup −/−} background showed decreased atherosclerosis. • Overexpression of ABCG1 in ECs decreased OSS-induced EC activation. • NLRP3 and NF-κB might be an underlying mechanism of ABCG1 protective role.

  10. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, A.L.; Dassa, E.; Orelle, C.; Chen, J. (Purdue)

    2010-07-27

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because they are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and

  11. Molecular phylogenetic study and expression analysis of ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in Oryza sativa in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Jayita; Sengupta, Atreyee; Gupta, Kamala; Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a large gene superfamily that utilizes the energy released from ATP hydrolysis for transporting myriad of substrates across the biological membranes. Although many investigations have been done on the structural and functional analysis of the ABC transporters in Oryza sativa, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression pattern of the complete ABC family in rice. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis constructing neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees based on various statistical methods of different ABC protein subfamily of five plant lineages including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte), Arabidopsis thaliana (dicot) and O. sativa (monocot) to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these ABC genes. We have identified several conserved motifs in nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of ABC proteins among all plant lineages during evolution. Amongst the different ABC protein subfamilies, 'ABCE' has not yet been identified in lower plant genomes (algae, moss and lycophytes). The result indicated that gene duplication and diversification process acted upon these genes as a major operative force creating new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. We have demonstrated that rice ABCI subfamily consists of only half size transporters that represented highly dynamic members showing maximum sequence variations among the other rice ABC subfamilies. The evolutionary and the expression analysis contribute to a deep insight into the evolution and diversity of rice ABC proteins and their roles in response to salt stress that facilitate our further understanding on rice ABC transporters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of ATP-binding cassette transporter-A1 polymorphism ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    binding cassette transporter-A1 polymorphism with apolipoprotein AI level in Tehranian population. Sohrab Halalkhor Seyed Alireza Mesbah-Namin Maryam Sadat Daneshpour Mehdi Hedayati Fereidoun Azizi. Research Note Volume 90 Issue 1 ...

  13. Identification and characterization of novel loss of function mutations in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in patients with low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candini, C.; Schimmel, A. W.; Peter, J.; Bochem, A. E.; Holleboom, A. G.; Vergeer, M.; Dullaart, R. P. F.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; Hovingh, G. K.; Khoo, K. L.; Fasano, T.; Bocchi, L.; Calandra, S.; Kuivenhoven, J. A.; Motazacker, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The current literature provides little information on the frequency of mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels that are referred to the clinic. In 78 patients with low plasma levels of HDL

  14. Endocrine Disruptors Differentially Target ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in the Blood-Testis Barrier and Affect Leydig Cell Testosterone Secretion In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankers, A.C.A.; Roelofs, M.J.; Piersma, A.H.; Sweep, F.C.; Russel, F.G.M.; Berg, M. van den; Duursen, M.B. van; Masereeuw, R.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are considered to cause testicular toxicity primarily via interference with steroid hormone function. Alternatively, EDCs could possibly exert their effects by interaction with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are expressed in the blood-testis

  15. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  16. Maltose-binding protein effectively stabilizes the partially closed conformation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter MalFGK2

    KAUST Repository

    Weng, Jingwei

    2017-02-23

    Maltose transporter MalFGK2 is a type-I importer in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Upon the binding of its periplasmic binding protein, MalE, the ATPase activity of MalFGK2 can be greatly enhanced. Crystal structures of the MalFGK2-MalE-maltose complex in a so-called

  17. LrABCF1, a GCN-type ATP-binding cassette transporter from lilium regale, is involved in defense responses against viral and fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are essential for membrane translocation in diverse biological processes, such as plant development and defense response. Here, a general control non-derepressible (GCN)-type ABC transporter gene, designated LrABCF1, was identified from Cucumber mosaic virus (...

  18. ATP-binding-cassette transporters in hematopoietic stem cells and their utility as therapeutical targets in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, M.

    2007-01-01

    ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporters are evolutionary extremely well-conserved transmembrane proteins that are highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The physiological function in human stem cells is believed to be protection against genetic damage caused by both environmental and

  19. Control of Mycosphaerella graminicola on wheat seedlings by medical drugs known to modulate the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roohparvar, R.; Huser, A.; Zwiers, L.H.; Waard, de M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Medical drugs known to modulate the activity of human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins (modulators) were tested for the ability to potentiate the activity of the azole fungicide cyproconazole against in vitro growth of Mycosphaerella graminicola and to control disease development due

  20. Relation between hepatic expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters G5 and G8 and biliary cholesterol secretion in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosters, A; Frijters, RJJM; Schaap, FG; Vink, E; Plosch, T; Ottenhoff, R; Jirsa, M; De Cuyper, IM; Kuipers, F; Groen, AK

    Background/Aims: Mutations in genes encoding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 underlie sitosterolemia, which is characterized by elevated plasma levels of phytosterols due to increased intestinal absorption and impaired biliary secretion of sterols. The aim of our study

  1. The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 protects against pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure by promoting angiogenesis and antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Sainz, Julie; Nakamura, Kazuto; Takaoka, Minoru; Enomoto, Soichiro; Iwata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kimie; Sahara, Makoto; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagai, Ryozo; Sata, Masataka

    2012-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), expressed in microvascular endothelial cells in the heart, has been suggested to regulate several tissue defense mechanisms. This study was performed to elucidate its role in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Pressure overload was induced in 8- to 12-week-old wild-type and Abcg2-/- mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Abcg2-/- mice showed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling after TAC compared with wild-type mice. In the early phase after TAC, functional impairment in angiogenesis and antioxidant response in myocardium was found in Abcg2-/- mice. In vitro experiments demonstrated that ABCG2 regulates transport of glutathione, an important endogenous antioxidant, from microvascular endothelial cells. Besides, glutathione transported from microvascular endothelial cells in ABCG2-dependent manner ameliorated oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In vivo, glutathione levels in plasma and the heart were increased in wild-type mice but not in Abcg2-/- mice after TAC. Treatment with the superoxide dismutase mimetic ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy in Abcg2-/- mice after TAC to the same extent as that in wild-type mice, although cardiac dysfunction with impaired angiogenesis was observed in Abcg2-/- mice. ABCG2 protects against pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure by promoting angiogenesis and antioxidant response.

  2. Whole-Transcriptome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Family Genes in the Latex-Producing Laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 ‘full-size’, 21 ‘half-size’ and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  3. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette (ABC gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp.

  4. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenzhu; Feng, Shuaisheng; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill) revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp. PMID:27058731

  5. Oct-3/4 modulates the drug-resistant phenotype of glioblastoma cells through expression of ATP binding cassette transporter G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yuki; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Inoue, Akihiro; Kawabe, Yuya; Funahashi, Yu; Kameda, Kenji; Sugimoto, Kana; Yano, Hajime; Harada, Hironobu; Kohno, Shohei; Ohue, Shiro; Ohnishi, Takanori; Tanaka, Junya

    2015-06-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle for the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatment of tumors. Oct-3/4, a self-renewal regulator in stem cells, is expressed in various kinds of solid tumors including glioblastoma. Although Oct-3/4 expression has been implicated in the malignancy and prognosis of glioblastomas, little is known of its involvement in drug resistances of glioblastoma. The involvement of Oct-3/4 in drug resistance of glioblastoma cells was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay, efflux assay of an anticancer drug, poly ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage, and in vivo xenograft experiments. Involvement of a drug efflux pump ATP binding cassette transporter G2 in Oct-3/4-induced drug resistance was evaluated by quantitative PCR analysis and knockdown by shRNA. Oct-3/4 decreased the susceptibility to chemotherapeutic drugs by enhancing excretion of drugs through a drug efflux pump gene, ATP binding cassette transporter G2. Moreover, the expression of Oct-3/4 was well correlated to ATP binding cassette transporter G2 expression in clinical GB tissues. Oct-3/4 elevated the ATP binding cassette transporter G2 expression, leading to acquisition of a drug-resistant phenotype by glioblastoma cells. If the drug-resistance of glioblastoma cells could be suppressed, it should be a highly ameliorative treatment for glioblastoma patients. Therefore, signaling pathways from Oct-3/4 to ATP binding cassette transporter G2 should be intensively elucidated to develop new therapeutic interventions for better efficacy of anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sorafenib modulates the gene expression of multi-drug resistance mediating ATP-binding cassette proteins in experimental hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Katrin; Franz, Clemens; Xiao, Zhi; Mohr, Elvira; Serba, Susanne; Büchler, Markus W; Schemmer, Peter

    2010-11-01

    High ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein expression leads to intrinsic drug resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the potential chemosensitizing effects of sorafenib on the multi-drug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The ABC-protein gene expression and the cellular survival were determined by RT-PCR analysis and MTT assay in HUH7 cells. Sorafenib inhibits MDR. The ABC-protein mRNA expression decreased by up to 51% (p ≤ 0.01). Addition of sorafenib to conventional chemotherapy restored the chemosensitivity. Combination of gemcitabine plus sorafenib decreased the ABC-protein mRNA levels by up to 77%, compared to gemcitabine monotherapy (p ≤ 0.001). Doxorubicin plus sorafenib decreased the ABC-protein mRNA levels up to 74% compared to doxorubicin monotherapy (p ≤ 0.001). This study provides evidence that the MDR phenotype of HCC cells can be modulated by the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib and consequentially may lead towards personalized therapies in patients with highly resistant tumors.

  7. Association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 rs4148217 SNP and serum lipid levels in Mulao and Han nationalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 gene (ABCG8 rs4148217 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and serum lipid profiles is still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Mulao nationality is an isolated minority in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Mulao and Han populations. Methods A total of 634 subjects of Mulao nationality and 717 participants of Han nationality were randomly selected from our previous samples. Genotyping of the ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The genotypic and allelic frequencies of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP were different between the two nationalities (P P P P P P P  Conclusions The ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP is associated with serum TG, HDL-C and ApoA1 levels in our study populations, but this association is different between the Mulao and Han populations. There is a sex (female-specific association in both ethnic groups.

  8. ATP-binding cassette transporter G5 and G8 polymorphisms and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Yin, Rui-Xing; Wei, Xian-Liang; Yan, Ting-Ting; Aung, Lynn Htet Htet; Wu, Dong-Feng; Wu, Jin-Zhen; Lin, Wei-Xiong; Liu, Cheng-Wu; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2012-01-01

    The association of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum lipid profiles is inconsistent. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of ABCG5/G8 SNPs and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels. Genotyping of the ABCG5 (rs4131229 and rs6720173) and ABCG8 (rs3806471 and rs4148211) SNPs was performed in 719 unrelated subjects of Mulao nationality and 782 participants of Han nationality. There were no differences in the genotypic and allelic frequencies of four SNPs between the two ethnic groups besides the genotypic frequencies of rs4131229 SNP in Han. The levels of triglyceride (TG), apolipoprotein (Apo) A1, and ApoA1/ApoB ratio (rs4131229); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and ApoB (rs6720173); high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), ApoA1, ApoB, and ApoA1/ApoB ratio (rs3806471); and HDL-C, ApoA1, and ApoA1/ApoB ratio (rs4148211) in Han were different among their genotypes (PG8 SNPs and serum lipid levels are different between the Mulao and Han populations, or between males and females, suggesting that there may be a racial/ethnic- and/or sex-specific association between ABCG5/G8 SNPs and some serum lipid parameters.

  9. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  10. ATP-binding membrane cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1): a possible link between inflammation and reverse cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kai; Liao, Duan-fang; Tang, Chao-ke

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammatory condition that involves numerous cellular and molecular inflammatory components. A wide array of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and proteins produced by macrophages and other cells, play a critical role in the development and progression of the disease. ATP-binding membrane cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is crucial for cellular cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and is also identified as an important target in antiatherosclerosis treatment. Evidence from several recent studies indicates that inflammation, along with other atherogenic-related mediators, plays distinct regulating roles in ABCA1 expression. Proatherogenic cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-1β have been shown to inhibit the expression of ABCA1, while antiatherogenic cytokines, including IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, have been shown to promote the expression of ABCA1. Moreover, some cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α seem to regulate ABCA1 expression in species-specific and dose-dependent manners. Inflammatory proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 are likely to inhibit ABCA1 expression during inflammation, and inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also found to block the expression of ABCA1. Interestingly, recent experiments revealed ABCA1 can function as an antiinflammatory receptor to suppress the expression of inflammatory factors, suggesting that ABCA1 may be the molecular basis for the interaction between inflammation and RCT. This review aims to summarize recent findings on the role of inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory proteins, inflammatory lipids, and the endotoxin-mediated inflammatory process in expression of ABCA1. Also covered is the current understanding of the function of ABCA1 in modulating the immune response and inflammation through its direct and indirect antiinflammatory mechanisms

  11. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an ATP-binding cassette transporter OtrC from Streptomyces rimosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The otrC gene of Streptomyces rimosus was previously annotated as an oxytetracycline (OTC resistance protein. However, the amino acid sequence analysis of OtrC shows that it is a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function. To our knowledge, none of the ABC transporters in S. rimosus have yet been characterized. In this study, we aimed to characterize the multidrug exporter function of OtrC and evaluate its relevancy to OTC production. Results In order to investigate OtrC’s function, otrC is cloned and expressed in E. coli The exporter function of OtrC was identified by ATPase activity determination and ethidium bromide efflux assays. Also, the susceptibilities of OtrC-overexpressing cells to several structurally unrelated drugs were compared with those of OtrC-non-expressing cells by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC assays, indicating that OtrC functions as a drug exporter with a broad range of drug specificities. The OTC production was enhanced by 1.6-fold in M4018 (P = 0.000877 and 1.4-fold in SR16 (P = 0.00973 duplication mutants, while it decreased to 80% in disruption mutants (P = 0.0182 and 0.0124 in M4018 and SR16, respectively. Conclusions The results suggest that OtrC is an ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function, and plays an important role in self-protection by drug efflux mechanisms. This is the first report of such a protein in S. rimosus, and otrC could be a valuable target for genetic manipulation to improve the production of industrial antibiotics.

  12. Targeted Deletion of Adipocyte Abca1 (ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1) Impairs Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffe, Helen; Liu, Mingxia; Key, Chia-Chi C; Boudyguina, Elena; Sawyer, Janet K; Weckerle, Allison; Bashore, Alexander; Fried, Susan K; Chung, Soonkyu; Parks, John S

    2018-01-18

    Adipose tissue cholesterol increases with adipocyte triglyceride content and size during development of obesity. However, how adipocyte cholesterol affects adipocyte function is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the cellular cholesterol exporter, Abca1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1), on adipose tissue function during diet-induced obesity. Adiponectin Cre recombinase transgenic mice were crossed with Abca1flox/flox mice to generate ASKO (adipocyte-specific Abca1 knockout) mice. Control and ASKO mice were then fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol (45% calories as fat and 0.2% cholesterol) diet for 16 weeks. Compared with control mice, ASKO mice had a 2-fold increase in adipocyte plasma membrane cholesterol content and significantly lower body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and adipocyte size. ASKO versus control adipose tissue had decreased PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein expression, nuclear SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1) protein, lipogenesis, and triglyceride accretion but similar Akt activation after acute insulin stimulation. Acute siRNA-mediated Abca1 silencing during 3T3L1 adipocyte differentiation reduced adipocyte Abca1 and PPARγ protein expression and triglyceride content. Systemic stimulated triglyceride lipolysis and glucose homeostasis was similar between control and ASKO mice. Adipocyte Abca1 is a key regulator of adipocyte lipogenesis and lipid accretion, likely because of increased adipose tissue membrane cholesterol, resulting in decreased activation of lipogenic transcription factors PPARγ and SREBP1. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. ATP-binding cassette transporter G26 is required for male fertility and pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilichini, Teagen D; Friedmann, Michael C; Samuels, A Lacey; Douglas, Carl J

    2010-10-01

    The highly resistant biopolymer, sporopollenin, gives the outer wall (exine) of spores and pollen grains their unparalleled strength, shielding these structures from terrestrial stresses. Despite a limited understanding of the composition of sporopollenin, it appears that the synthesis of sporopollenin occurs in the tapetum and requires the transport of one or more sporopollenin constituents to the surface of developing microspores. Here, we describe ABCG26, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, which is required for pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). abcg26 mutants are severely reduced in fertility, with most siliques failing to produce seeds by self-fertilization and mature anthers failing to release pollen. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed an absence of an exine wall on abcg26-1 mutant microspores. Phenotypic abnormalities in pollen wall formation were first apparent in early uninucleate microspores as a lack of exine formation and sporopollenin deposition. Additionally, the highest levels of ABCG26 mRNA were in the tapetum, during early pollen wall formation, sporopollenin biosynthesis, and sporopollenin deposition. Accumulations resembling the trilamellar lipidic coils in the abcg11 and abcg12 mutants defective in cuticular wax export were observed in the anther locules of abcg26 mutants. A yellow fluorescent protein-ABCG26 protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. Our results show that ABCG26 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development and are consistent with a model by which ABCG26 transports sporopollenin precursors across the tapetum plasma membrane into the locule for polymerization on developing microspore walls.

  14. Evaluation of the in vitro expression of ATP binding-cassette (ABC) proteins in an Ixodes ricinus cell line exposed to ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Carlo; Vismarra, Alice; Kramer, Laura; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Porretta, Daniele; Otranto, Domenico; Epis, Sara; Grandi, Giulio

    2016-04-18

    Ticks are among the most important vectors of pathogens causing human and animal disease. Acaricides are used to control tick infestation, although there are increasing reports of resistance. Recently, over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins (P-glycoproteins, PgP) has been implicated in resistance to the acaricide ivermectin in the ticks Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato. Ixodid tick cell lines have been used to investigate drug resistance mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate expression of several PgPs in the Ixodes ricinus-derived cell line IRE/CTVM19 and to determine modulation of expression following treatment with ivermectin. IRE/CTVM19 cells were treated with different concentrations of ivermectin (0, 11, 22 or 33 μM) and incubated for 10 days. Evaluation of viability and relative expression of ABCB1, ABCB6, ABCB8 and ABCB10 genes were carried out at day 10 post treatment. Cell viability ranged between 84% and 92% with no significant differences between untreated and treated cells. qRT-PCR showed that ABC pump expression was not significantly modulated by ivermectin treatment. Expression of the ABCB8 PgP subfamily revealed a biphasic trend, based on the ivermectin concentration. ABCB6 and ABCB10 gene expression was not modulated by ivermectin treatment and ABCB1 expression was not detected. This is the first report of PgP expression in an I. ricinus-derived tick cell line. Development of an in vitro model for the study of acaricide resistance mechanisms would greatly facilitate screening for drug resistance in ticks.

  15. Functional analysis of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Aspergillus fumigatus by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2013-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the major filamentous fungal pathogen in humans. Although A. fumigatus can be treated with many of the available antifungal drugs, including azole compounds, drug resistant isolates are being recovered at an increasing rate. In other fungal pathogens such as the Candida species, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins play important roles in development of clinically-significant azole resistance phenotypes. Central among these ABC transporter proteins are homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5 multidrug transporter. In this work, we test the two A. fumigatus genes encoding proteins sharing the highest degree of sequence similarity to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 for their ability to be function in a heterologous pdr5Δ strain of S. cerevisiae. Expression of full-length cDNAs for these two Afu proteins failed to suppress the drug sensitive phenotype of a pdr5Δ strain and no evidence could be obtained for their expression as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. To improve the expression of one of these Afu ABC transporters (XP_755847), we changed the sequence of the cDNA to use codons corresponding to the major tRNA species in S. cerevisiae. This codon-optimized (CO Afu abcA) cDNA was efficiently expressed in pdr5Δ cells and able to be detected as a GFP fusion protein. The CO Afu abcA did not correct the drug sensitivity of the pdr5Δ strain and exhibited a high degree of perinuclear fluorescence suggesting that this fusion protein was localized to the S. cerevisiae ER. Interestingly, when these experiments were repeated at 37 °C, the CO Afu abcA was able to complement the drug sensitive phenotype of pdr5Δ cells and exhibited less intracellular fluorescence. Additionally, we found that the CO Afu abcA was able to reduce resistance to drugs like phytosphingosine that act via causing mislocalization of amino acid permeases in fungi. These data suggest that the Afu abcA protein can carry out two different functions of Pdr5: drug

  16. ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 induces rearrangement of actin cytoskeletons possibly through Cdc42/N-WASP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, K; Hirano, K; Tsujii, K; Ikegami, C; Zhongyan, Z; Nishida, Y; Ohama, T; Matsuura, F; Yamashita, S; Matsuzawa, Y

    2001-09-28

    Positional cloning approaches revealed that Tangier disease (TD), a genetic high density lipoprotein deficiency, is associated with mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1) gene. However, the biological function of ABCA1 is still not fully investigated. Recently, we have reported that the cells from the patients with TD had abnormal actin cytoskeletons in association with decreased expression of Cdc42, a member of RhoGTPases family. In the present study, we have found that actin cytoskeletons were altered in HEK293 cells transfected with human ABCA1 (hABCA1) cDNA. Cells expressing hABCA1 were divided into the following two groups by the distinct morphology with altered actin cytoskeletons: one had increased formation of filopodia (designated as Type I) and the other had long protrusions (designated as Type II). Type I cells had morphology similar to that of cells transfected with dominant active form of Cdc42 (Cdc42-DA, V12Cdc42Hs-DA). Type II cells had morphology similar to that of cells transfected with neural Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (N-WASP),one of the established downstream effector molecules of Cdc42. We have obtained the data showing a possible pathway of ABCA1/Cdc42/N-WASP by the following experiments. Introduction of mutant of Cdc42 (dominant negative form of Cdc42, N17Cdc42Hs-DN) and N-WASP (N-WASP lacking verprolin homology domain, N-WASPDeltaVPH), both of which are supposed to have potential to inhibit rearrangement of actin cytoskeletons, significantly inhibited the morphological changes induced by expression of hABCA1. Immunoprecipitation study with FLAG-tagged ABCA1 (hABCA1-FLAG) revealed that Cdc42 was coimmunoprecipitated with hABCA1-FLAG. In addition, we have demonstrated possible intracellular colocalization of these two molecules in the overexpressing cells by the confocal laser microscopy. These results may suggest that hABCA1 regulates actin organization through the possible interaction with Cdc42Hs. Copyright 2001

  17. Association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 rs4148217 SNP and serum lipid levels in Mulao and Han nationalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wei, Xian-Liang; Yin, Rui-Xing

    2012-05-01

    The association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 gene (ABCG8) rs4148217 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and serum lipid profiles is still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Mulao nationality is an isolated minority in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Mulao and Han populations. A total of 634 subjects of Mulao nationality and 717 participants of Han nationality were randomly selected from our previous samples. Genotyping of the ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP were different between the two nationalities (P < 0.01 for each), the frequency of A allele was higher in Mulao than in Han. The A allele carriers in Han had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 levels than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for each), whereas the A allele carriers in Mulao had lower ApoA1 levels than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05). Subgroup analyses showed that the A allele carriers in Han had lower HDL-C and higher triglyceride (TG) levels in females but not in males than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for each), and the A allele carriers in Mulao had lower ApoA1 levels in females but not in males than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05). The levels of TG and HDL-C in Han, and ApoA1 in Mulao were associated with genotypes in females but not in males (P < 0.05-0.01). Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with several environmental factors (P < 0.05-0.001). The ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP is associated with serum TG, HDL-C and ApoA1 levels in our study populations, but this association is different between the Mulao and Han populations. There is a sex (female

  18. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti

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    Estelita Pereira Lima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM. The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM, which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated.

  19. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  20. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  1. Fructose Uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti Is Mediated by a High-Affinity ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Annie; Østerås, Magne; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding ca...

  2. D-helix influences dimerization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP1 nucleotide-binding domain.

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    Ahmet S Vakkasoglu

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters form a large family of transmembrane importers and exporters. Using two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, which form a canonical ATP-sandwich dimer at some point within the transport cycle, the transporters harness the energy from ATP binding and hydrolysis to drive substrate transport. However the structural elements that enable and tune the dimerization propensity of the NBDs have not been fully elucidated. Here we compared the biochemical properties of the NBDs of human and rat TAP1, a subunit of the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP. The isolated human TAP1 NBD was monomeric in solution, in contrast to the previously observed ATP-mediated homodimerization of the isolated rat TAP1 NBD. Using a series of human-rat chimeric constructs, we identified the D-helix, an α-helix N-terminal to the conserved D-loop motif, as an important determinant of NBD dimerization. The ATPase activity of our panel of TAP1 NBD constructs largely correlated with dimerization ability, indicating that the observed dimerization uses the canonical ATP-sandwich interface. The N-terminus of the D-helix from one protomer interacts with the ATP-binding Walker A motif of the second protomer at the ATP-sandwich interface. However, our mutational analysis indicated that residues farther from the interface, within the second and third turn of the D-helix, also influence dimerization. Overall, our data suggest that although the D-helix sequence is not conserved in ABC transporters, its precise positioning within the NBD structure has a critical role in NBD dimerization.

  3. Overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, ABCG2 (Mxr/BCrp/ABCP1), in flavopiridol-resistant human breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robey, R W; Medina-Pérez, W Y; Nishiyama, K

    2001-01-01

    We sought to characterize the interactions of flavopiridol with members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Cells overexpressing multidrug resistance-1 (MDR-1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) did not exhibit appreciable flavopiridol resistance, whereas cell lines...... overexpressing the ABC half-transporter, ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP/ABCP1), were found to be resistant to flavopiridol. Flavopiridol at a concentration of 10 microM was able to prevent MRP-mediated calcein efflux, whereas Pgp-mediated transport of rhodamine 123 was unaffected at flavopiridol concentrations of up to 100...... analysis revealed overexpression of the ABCG2 gene. Western blot confirmed overexpression of ABCG2; neither P-glycoprotein nor MRP overexpression was detected. These results suggest that ABCG2 plays a role in resistance to flavopiridol....

  4. Isolation and characterization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system genes from loofah witches' broom phytoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Lin; Ho, Kuo-Chieh

    2007-10-01

    A clone containing a 3903 bp EcoRI-restriction fragment was obtained from a lambda(ZAP) genomic library of loofah witches' broom (LfWB) phytoplasma by plaque hybridization using a PCR fragment as a probe. Sequence analysis revealed that this fragment contained three open reading frames (ORFs). The deduced amino acid sequences of ORF 1 and ORF 2 showed a high homology with the ATP-binding proteins of the ABC transporter system genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and encoded proteins with a molecular mass of 36 and 30 kDa, respectively. Based on amino acid sequence similarity, secondary structure, hydrophilicity and a signal peptide sequence at the N-terminus, we predicted that ORF 3 might encode a specific solute-binding prolipoprotein of the ABC transporter system with a molecular mass of 62 kDa. The cleavage site of this prolipoprotein signal peptide was similar to those of gram-positive bacteria. In addition to nutrient uptake, ABC transporter systems of bacteria also play a role in signal transduction, drug-resistance and perhaps virulence. The possible implications of the system to the survival and the pathogenesis of phytoplasma were discussed.

  5. The human ATP binding cassette gene ABCA13, located on chromosome 7p12.3, encodes a 5058 amino acid protein with an extracellular domain encoded in part by a 4.8-kb conserved exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, C; Arnould, I; Annilo, T; Shulenin, S; Chen, Z Q; Orosco, L; Triunfol, M; Devaud, C; Maintoux-Larois, C; Lafargue, C; Lemoine, C; Denèfle, P; Rosier, M; Dean, M

    2002-01-01

    The ABCA subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters includes eleven members to date. In this study, we describe a new, unusually large gene on chromosome 7p12.3, ABCA13. This gene spans over 450 kb and is split into 62 exons. The predicted ABCA13 protein consists of 5,058 ami- no acid residues making it the largest ABC protein described to date. Like the other ABCA subfamily members, ABCA13 contains a hydrophobic, predicted transmembrane segment at the N-terminus, followed by a large hydrophilic region. In the case of ABCA13, the hydrophilic region is unexpectedly large, more than 3,500 amino acids, encoded by 30 exons, two of which are 4.8 and 1.7 kb in length. These two large exons are adjacent to each other and are conserved in the mouse Abca13 gene. Tissue profiling of the major transcript reveals the highest expression in human trachea, testis, and bone marrow. The expression of the gene was also determined in 60 tumor cell lines and the highest expression was detected in the SR leukemia, SNB-19 CNS tumor and DU-145 prostate tumor cell lines. ABCA13 has high similarity with other ABCA subfamily genes which are associated with human inherited diseases: ABCA1 with the cholesterol transport disorders Tangier disease and familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and ABCA4 with several retinal degeneration disorders. The ABCA13 gene maps to chromosome 7p12.3, a region that contains an inherited disorder affecting the pancreas (Shwachman-Diamond syndrome) as well as a locus involved in T-cell tumor invasion and metastasis (INM7), and therefore is a positional candidate for these pathologies. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Structural elucidation of transmembrane domain zero (TMD0) of EcdL: A multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) family of ATP-binding cassette transporter protein revealed by atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Krishnendu; Rani, Priyanka; Kishor, Gaurav; Agarwal, Shikha; Kumar, Antresh; Singh, Durg Vijay

    2017-09-20

    ATP-Binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an extensive role in the translocation of diverse sets of biologically important molecules across membrane. EchnocandinB (antifungal) and EcdL protein of Aspergillus rugulosus are encoded by the same cluster of genes. Co-expression of EcdL and echinocandinB reflects tightly linked biological functions. EcdL belongs to Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) subfamily of ABC transporters with an extra transmembrane domain zero (TMD0). Complete structure of MRP subfamily comprising of TMD0 domain, at atomic resolution is not known. We hypothesized that the transportation of echonocandinB is mediated via EcdL protein. Henceforth, it is pertinent to know the topological arrangement of TMD0, with other domains of protein and its possible role in transportation of echinocandinB. Absence of effective template for TMD0 domain lead us to model by I-TASSER, further structure has been refined by multiple template modelling using homologous templates of remaining domains (TMD1, NBD1, TMD2, NBD2). The modelled structure has been validated for packing, folding and stereochemical properties. MD simulation for 0.1 μs has been carried out in the biphasic environment for refinement of modelled protein. Non-redundant structures have been excavated by clustering of MD trajectory. The structural alignment of modelled structure has shown Z-score -37.9; 31.6, 31.5 with RMSD; 2.4, 4.2, 4.8 with ABC transporters; PDB ID 4F4C, 4M1 M, 4M2T, respectively, reflecting the correctness of structure. EchinocandinB has been docked to the modelled as well as to the clustered structures, which reveals interaction of echinocandinB with TMD0 and other TM helices in the translocation path build of TMDs.

  7. Flavone Glucoside Uptake into Barley Mesophyll and Arabidopsis Cell Culture Vacuoles. Energization Occurs by H+-Antiport and ATP-Binding Cassette-Type Mechanisms1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangne, Nathalie; Eggmann, Thomas; Koblischke, Carsten; Weissenböck, Gottfried; Martinoia, Enrico; Klein, Markus

    2002-01-01

    In many cases, secondary plant products accumulate in the large central vacuole of plant cells. However, the mechanisms involved in the transport of secondary compounds are only poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the transport mechanisms for the major barley (Hordeum vulgare) flavonoid saponarin (apigenin 6-C-glucosyl-7-O-glucoside) are different in various plant species: Uptake into barley vacuoles occurs via a proton antiport and is competitively inhibited by isovitexin (apigenin 6-C-glucoside), suggesting that both flavone glucosides are recognized by the same transporter. In contrast, the transport into vacuoles from Arabidopsis, which does not synthesize flavone glucosides, displays typical characteristics of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Transport of saponarin into vacuoles of both the species is saturable with a Km of 50 to 100 μm. Furthermore, the uptake of saponarin into vacuoles from a barley mutant exhibiting a strongly reduced flavone glucoside biosynthesis is drastically decreased when compared with the parent variety. Thus, the barley vacuolar flavone glucoside/H+ antiporter could be modulated by the availability of the substrate. We propose that different vacuolar transporters may be responsible for the sequestration of species-specific/endogenous and nonspecific/xenobiotic secondary compounds in planta. PMID:11842175

  8. Lobular Distribution and Variability in Hepatic ATP Binding Cassette Protein B1 (ABCB1, P-gp: Ontogenetic Differences and Potential for Toxicity

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    Ngu Njei Abanda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ATP Binding Cassette B1 (ABCB1 transporter has critical roles in endo- and xenobiotic efficacy and toxicity. To understand population variability in hepatic transport we determined ABCB1 mRNA and protein levels in total liver lysates sampled from 8 pre-defined sites (n = 24, 18–69 years, and in S9 from randomly acquired samples (n = 87, 7 days–87 years. ABCB1 levels did not differ significantly throughout individual livers and showed 4.4-fold protein variation between subjects. Neither mRNA nor protein levels varied with sex, ethnicity, obesity or triglycerides in lysates or S9 (that showed the same relationships, but protein levels were lower in pediatric S9 (p < 0.0001, with 76% of adult ABCB1 present at birth and predicted to mature in 5 years. Pediatric total liver lysates were not available. In summary, opportunistic collection for studying human hepatic ABCB1 is acceptable. Additionally, ABCB1 may be lower in children, indicating differential potential for toxicity and response to therapy in this special population.

  9. ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1, HDL metabolism, cholesterol efflux, and inflammation: important targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dan; Lammers, Bart; Zhao, Ying; Meurs, Illiana; Van Berkel, T J; Van Eck, Miranda

    2011-05-01

    Atherosclerosis has been characterized as a chronic inflammatory response to cholesterol deposition in arteries. Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels bear a strong independent inverse relationship with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. One central antiatherogenic role of HDL is believed to be its ability to remove excessive peripheral cholesterol back to the liver for subsequent catabolism and excretion, a physiologic process termed reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, the initial step of RCT is the most relevant step with respect to atherosclerosis. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 play crucial roles in the efflux of cellular cholesterol to HDL and its apolipoproteins. Moreover, ABCA1 and ABCG1 affect cellular inflammatory cytokine secretion by modulating cholesterol content in the plasma membrane and within intracellular compartments. In humans, ABCA1 mutations can cause a severe HDL-deficiency syndrome characterized by cholesterol deposition in tissue macrophages and prevalent atherosclerosis. Disrupting Abca1 or Abcg1 in mice promotes accumulation of excessive cholesterol in macrophages, and physiological manipulation of ABCA1 expression affects atherogenesis. Here we review recent advances in the role of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in HDL metabolism, macrophage cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and atherogenesis. Next, we summarize the structure, expression, and regulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Finally, we give an update on the progress and pitfalls of therapeutic approaches that target ABCA1 and ABCG1 to stimulate the flux of lipids through the RCT pathway.

  10. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Deficiency in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Abrogates HDL Biogenesis and Enhances Triglyceride Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Bi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recognized role of the ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1 in high-density lipoprotein (HDL metabolism, our understanding of ABCA1 deficiency in human hepatocytes is limited. To define the functional effects of human hepatocyte ABCA1 deficiency, we generated induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs from Tangier disease (TD and matched control subjects. Control HLCs exhibited robust cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I and formed nascent HDL particles. ABCA1-deficient HLCs failed to mediate lipid efflux or nascent HDL formation, but had elevated triglyceride (TG secretion. Global transcriptome analysis revealed significantly increased ANGPTL3 expression in ABCA1-deficient HLCs. Angiopoietin-related protein 3 (ANGPTL3 was enriched in plasma of TD relative to control subjects. These results highlight the required role of ABCA1 in cholesterol efflux and nascent HDL formation by hepatocytes. Furthermore, our results suggest that hepatic ABCA1 deficiency results in increased hepatic TG and ANGPTL3 secretion, potentially underlying the elevated plasma TG levels in TD patients.

  11. The yeast ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Ycf1p enhances the recruitment of the soluble SNARE Vam7p to vacuoles for efficient membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Terry L; Lawrence, Gus; Karunakaran, Surya; Brown, Christopher; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2013-06-21

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole contains five ATP-binding cassette class C (ABCC) transporters, including Ycf1p, a family member that was originally characterized as a Cd(2+) transporter. Ycf1p has also been found to physically interact with a wide array of proteins, including factors that regulate vacuole homeostasis. In this study, we examined the role of Ycf1p and other ABCC transporters in the regulation of vacuole homotypic fusion. We found that deletion of YCF1 attenuated in vitro vacuole fusion by up to 40% relative to wild-type vacuoles. Plasmid-expressed wild-type Ycf1p rescued the deletion phenotype; however, Ycf1p containing a mutation of the conserved Lys-669 to Met in the Walker A box of the first nucleotide-binding domain (Ycf1p(K669M)) was unable to complement the fusion defect of ycf1Δ vacuoles. This indicates that the ATPase activity of Ycf1p is required for its function in regulating fusion. In addition, we found that deleting YCF1 caused a striking decrease in vacuolar levels of the soluble SNARE Vam7p, whereas total cellular levels were not altered. The attenuated fusion of ycf1Δ vacuoles was rescued by the addition of recombinant Vam7p to in vitro experiments. Thus, Ycf1p contributes in the recruitment of Vam7p to the vacuole for efficient membrane fusion.

  12. The Yeast ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Ycf1p Enhances the Recruitment of the Soluble SNARE Vam7p to Vacuoles for Efficient Membrane Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Terry L.; Lawrence, Gus; Karunakaran, Surya; Brown, Christopher; Fratti, Rutilio A.

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole contains five ATP-binding cassette class C (ABCC) transporters, including Ycf1p, a family member that was originally characterized as a Cd2+ transporter. Ycf1p has also been found to physically interact with a wide array of proteins, including factors that regulate vacuole homeostasis. In this study, we examined the role of Ycf1p and other ABCC transporters in the regulation of vacuole homotypic fusion. We found that deletion of YCF1 attenuated in vitro vacuole fusion by up to 40% relative to wild-type vacuoles. Plasmid-expressed wild-type Ycf1p rescued the deletion phenotype; however, Ycf1p containing a mutation of the conserved Lys-669 to Met in the Walker A box of the first nucleotide-binding domain (Ycf1pK669M) was unable to complement the fusion defect of ycf1Δ vacuoles. This indicates that the ATPase activity of Ycf1p is required for its function in regulating fusion. In addition, we found that deleting YCF1 caused a striking decrease in vacuolar levels of the soluble SNARE Vam7p, whereas total cellular levels were not altered. The attenuated fusion of ycf1Δ vacuoles was rescued by the addition of recombinant Vam7p to in vitro experiments. Thus, Ycf1p contributes in the recruitment of Vam7p to the vacuole for efficient membrane fusion. PMID:23658021

  13. Galectin-3 silencing inhibits epirubicin-induced ATP binding cassette transporters and activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway via β-catenin/GSK-3β modulation in colorectal carcinoma.

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    Yung-Kuo Lee

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells.

  14. Cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) is elevated in prion disease and affects PrPC and PrPSc concentrations in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; McClain, Denise; Young, Rebecca; Carlson, George A

    2008-06-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders of prion protein (PrP) conformation. Prion replication by conversion of benign PrPC isoforms into disease-specific PrPSc isoforms is intimately involved in prion disease pathogenesis and may be initiated in cholesterol-rich caveolae-like domains (CLD). Concentrations of the cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 protein (ABCA1) are elevated in pre-clinical scrapie prion-infected mice and in prion-infected cells in vitro. Elevation of ABCA1 in prion-infected brain is not a direct consequence of local PrPSc accumulation, indeed levels of ABCA1 are comparable in brain regions that differ dramatically in the amount of PrPSc. Similarly, ABCA1 concentrations are identical in normal mice, transgenic mice overexpressing PrP and PrP knockout mice. In contrast, PrPC and PrPSc levels, but not Prnp mRNA, were increased by overexpression of ABCA1 in N2a neuroblastoma cells and scrapie prion-infected N2a cells (ScN2a). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knock down of Abca1 expression decreased the concentrations of PrPC in N2a cells and of PrPSc in ScN2a cells. These results suggest that ABCA1's effects on PrPC levels are post-translational and may reflect an increase in of PrPC stability, mediated either indirectly by increasing membrane cholesterol and CLD formation or by other functions of ABCA1. The increased supply of PrPC available for conversion would lead to increased PrPSc formation.

  15. MicroRNA-144 regulates hepatic ATP binding cassette transporter A1 and plasma high-density lipoprotein after activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Kim, Tammy; Civelek, Mete; Baldán, Ángel; Esau, Christine; Edwards, Peter A

    2013-06-07

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates many aspects of lipid metabolism by variouscomplex and incompletely understood molecular mechanisms. We set out to investigate the molecular mechanisms for FXR-dependent regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify FXR-regulated microRNAs that were subsequently involved in regulating lipid metabolism. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a major determinant of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Here, we show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR in vivo increases hepatic levels of miR-144, which in turn lowers hepatic ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. We identified 2 complementary sequences to miR-144 in the 3' untranslated region of ABCA1 mRNA that are necessary for miR-144-dependent regulation. Overexpression of miR-144 in vitro decreased both cellular ABCA1 protein and cholesterol efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I protein, whereas overexpression in vivo reduced hepatic ABCA1 protein and plasma HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, silencing miR-144 in mice increased hepatic ABCA1 protein and HDL-cholesterol. In addition, we used tissue-specific FXR-deficient mice to show that induction of miR-144 and FXR-dependent hypolipidemia requires hepatic, but not intestinal, FXR. Finally, we identified functional FXR response elements upstream of the miR-144 locus, consistent with direct FXR regulation. We have identified a novel pathway involving FXR, miR-144, and ABCA1 that together regulate plasma HDL-cholesterol.

  16. The capacity of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette transporters to form biofilms and comparison with the wild type

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    Marina Ceruso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne pathogen responsible for human listeriosis, an invasive infection with high mortality rates. Lm has developed efficient strategies for survival under stress conditions such as starvation and wide variations in temperature, pH, and osmolarity. Therefore, Lm can survive in food under multiple stress conditions. Detailed studies to determine the mode of action of this pathogen for survival under stress conditions are important to control Lm in food. It has been shown that genes encoding for ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are induced in Lm in food, in particular under stress conditions. Previous studies showed that these genes are involved in sensitivity to nisin, acids, and salt. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of some ABC transporters in biofilm formation. Therefore, deletion mutants of ABC transporter genes (LMOf2365_1875 and LMOf2365_1877 were created in Lm F2365, and then were compared to the wild type for their capacity to form biofilms. Lm strain F2365 was chosen as reference since the genome is fully sequenced and furthermore this strain is particularly involved in food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis. Our results showed that DLMOf2365_1875 had an increased capacity to form biofilms compared to the wild type, indicating that LMOf2365_1875 negatively regulates biofilm formation. A deeper knowledge on the ability to form biofilms in these mutants may help in the development of intervention strategies to control Lm in food and in the environment.

  17. Localized Induction of the ATP-Binding Cassette B19 Auxin Transporter Enhances Adventitious Root Formation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Poornima; Maloney, Gregory S.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2013-01-01

    Adventitious roots emerge from aerial plant tissues, and the induction of these roots is essential for clonal propagation of agriculturally important plant species. This process has received extensive study in horticultural species but much less focus in genetically tractable model species. We have explored the role of auxin transport in this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings in which adventitious root initiation was induced by excising roots from low-light-grown hypocotyls. Inhibition of auxin transport from the shoot apex abolishes adventitious root formation under these conditions. Root excision was accompanied by a rapid increase in radioactive indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) transport and its accumulation in the hypocotyl above the point of excision where adventitious roots emerge. Local increases in auxin-responsive gene expression were also observed above the site of excision using three auxin-responsive reporters. These changes in auxin accumulation preceded cell division events, monitored by a cyclin B1 reporter (pCYCB1;1:GUS), and adventitious root initiation. We examined excision-induced adventitious root formation in auxin influx and efflux mutants, including auxin insensitive1, pin-formed1 (pin1), pin2, pin3, and pin7, with the most profound reductions observed in ATP-binding cassette B19 (ABCB19). An ABCB19 overexpression line forms more adventitious roots than the wild type in intact seedlings. Examination of transcriptional and translational fusions between ABCB19 and green fluorescent protein indicates that excision locally induced the accumulation of ABCB19 transcript and protein that is temporally and spatially linked to local IAA accumulation leading to adventitious root formation. These experiments are consistent with localized synthesis of ABCB19 protein after hypocotyl excision leads to enhanced IAA transport and local IAA accumulation driving adventitious root formation. PMID:23677937

  18. Functional roles of YPT31 and YPT32 in clotrimazole resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through effects on vacuoles and ATP-binding cassette transporter(s).

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    Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Takase, Daisuke; Okano, Hajime; Tomari, Naohiro; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We identified YPT31, which is involved in Golgi traffic, as a clotrimazole (CTZ)-resistance gene in a multicopy library screen. Multicopies of the YPT31 homolog YPT32 also conferred resistance to CTZ, and single disruption of YPT31 or YPT32 resulted in sensitivity to CTZ. Pdr5p, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter at the plasma membrane, was the most important factor for mediating basal resistance to CTZ, suggesting that Ypt31p and Ypt32p might be involved in the trafficking of Pdr5p to the plasma membrane. However, the activity of Pdr5p was independent of YPT31 or YPT32, and multicopies of YPT31 or YPT32 still conferred resistance to CTZ in pdr5 cells. To elucidate the roles of YPT31 and YPT32 in CTZ resistance, we analyzed mutants of 11 genes that are involved in the following vesicular trafficking: Golgi traffic (kes1, trs33, trs65, gyp1, trs85, and gyp2), vacuole inheritance (ypt7), endocytosis (rcy1 and ypt51) and exocytosis (msb3 and msb4). All of the mutant cells except ypt51, msb3 and msb4 were sensitive to CTZ, indicating that vacuoles were involved in CTZ resistance, since vacuole formation requires proper Golgi-trafficking and endocytosis. Microscopic analysis showed abnormal vacuoles in ypt31 cells. Multicopies of YPT31 or YPT32 conferred resistance to CTZ in AD1-8 cells, which are defective in seven major drug transporters, and in pdr5 ypt7 cells, but not in ypt7 or AD1-8-7 (AD1-8/ypt7) cells. These results indicated that Ypt31p and Ypt32p played minor but compensatory roles in cellular resistance to CTZ through vacuoles and specific ABC transporter(s) other than Pdr5p. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. SALL4, a stem cell factor, affects the side population by regulation of the ATP-binding cassette drug transport genes.

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    Ha-Won Jeong

    Full Text Available Our previous work shows that the stem cell factor SALL4 plays a central role in embryonic and leukemic stem cells. In this study, we report that SALL4 expression was higher in drug resistant primary acute myeloid leukemic patients than those from drug-responsive cases. In addition, while overexpression of SALL4 led to drug resistance in cell lines, cells with decreased SALL4 expression were more sensitive to drug treatments than the parental cells. This led to our investigation of the implication of SALL4 in drug resistance and its role in side population (SP cancer stem cells. SALL4 expression was higher in SP cells compared to non-SP cells by 2-4 fold in various malignant hematopoietic cell lines. Knocking down of SALL4 in isolated SP cells resulted in a reduction of SP cells, indicating that SALL4 is required for their self-renewal. The SP phenotype is known to be mediated by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transport protein family, such as ABCG2 and ABCA3. Using chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay(EMSA, we demonstrated that SALL4 was able to bind to the promoter region of ABCA3 and activate its expression while regulating the expression of ABCG2 indirectly. Furthermore, SALL4 expression was positively correlated to those of ABCG2 and ABCA3 in primary leukemic patient samples. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for SALL4 in drug sensitivity, at least in part through the maintenance of SP cells, and therefore may be responsible for drug-resistance in leukemia. We are the first to demonstrate a direct link between stem cell factor SALL4, SP and drug resistance in leukemia.

  20. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  1. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Mediate Transcriptional Activation of the ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB6 Gene via the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-01-01

    Liver is endowed with a mechanism to induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP450s) in response to therapeutic drugs and environmental contaminants, leading to increased detoxification and elimination of the xenobiotics. Each CYP450 is composed of an apoprotein moiety and a heme prosthetic group, which is required for CYP450 activity. Thus, under conditions of CYP450 induction, there is a coordinate increase in heme biosynthesis to compensate for the increased expression of CYP450s. ABCB6, a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter, which regulates coproporphyrinogen transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria to complete heme biosynthesis, represents a previously unrecognized rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. However, it is not known if exposure to drugs and environmental contaminants induces ABCB6 expression, to assure an adequate and apparently coordinated supply of heme for the generation of functional cytochrome holoprotein. In the present study, we demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the widely distributed environmental toxicants shown to induce porphyrin accumulation causing hepatic porphyria, up-regulate ABCB6 expression in both mice and humans. Using siRNA technology and Abcb6 knock-out mice, we demonstrate that PAH-mediated increase in hepatic porphyrins is compromised in the absence of ABCB6. Moreover, in vivo studies in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knock-out mice demonstrate that PAH induction of ABCB6 is mediated by AhR. Promoter activation studies combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate direct interactions between the AhR binding sites in the ABCB6 promoter and the AhR receptor, implicating drug activation mechanisms for ABCB6 similar to those found in inducible cytochrome P450s. These studies are the first to describe direct transcriptional activation of both mouse and human ABCB6 by xenobiotics. PMID:22761424

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mediate transcriptional activation of the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6 gene via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-09-14

    Liver is endowed with a mechanism to induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP450s) in response to therapeutic drugs and environmental contaminants, leading to increased detoxification and elimination of the xenobiotics. Each CYP450 is composed of an apoprotein moiety and a heme prosthetic group, which is required for CYP450 activity. Thus, under conditions of CYP450 induction, there is a coordinate increase in heme biosynthesis to compensate for the increased expression of CYP450s. ABCB6, a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter, which regulates coproporphyrinogen transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria to complete heme biosynthesis, represents a previously unrecognized rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. However, it is not known if exposure to drugs and environmental contaminants induces ABCB6 expression, to assure an adequate and apparently coordinated supply of heme for the generation of functional cytochrome holoprotein. In the present study, we demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the widely distributed environmental toxicants shown to induce porphyrin accumulation causing hepatic porphyria, up-regulate ABCB6 expression in both mice and humans. Using siRNA technology and Abcb6 knock-out mice, we demonstrate that PAH-mediated increase in hepatic porphyrins is compromised in the absence of ABCB6. Moreover, in vivo studies in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knock-out mice demonstrate that PAH induction of ABCB6 is mediated by AhR. Promoter activation studies combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate direct interactions between the AhR binding sites in the ABCB6 promoter and the AhR receptor, implicating drug activation mechanisms for ABCB6 similar to those found in inducible cytochrome P450s. These studies are the first to describe direct transcriptional activation of both mouse and human ABCB6 by xenobiotics.

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Up-Regulates the Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 via Promoting Nuclear Translocation of PPARα

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    Dong Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 plays a key role in atherogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, a gasotransmitter, has been reported to play an anti-atherosclerotic role. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study we examined whether and how H2S regulates ABCA1 expression. The effect of H2S on ABCA1 expression and lipid metabolism were assessed in vitro by cultured human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and in vivo by ApoE−/− mice with a high-cholesterol diet. NaHS (an exogenous H2S donor treatment significantly increased the expression of ABCA1, ApoA1, and ApoA2 and ameliorated intracellular lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Depletion of the endogenous H2S generator cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE by small RNA interference (siRNA significantly decreased the expression of ABCA1 and resulted in the accumulation of lipids in HepG2 cells. In vivo NaHS treatment significantly reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and low-density lipoproteins (LDL, diminished atherosclerotic plaque size, and increased hepatic ABCA1 expression in fat-fed ApoE−/− mice. Further study revealed that NaHS upregulated ABCA1 expression by promoting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα nuclear translocation. H2S up-regulates the expression of ABCA1 by promoting the nuclear translocation of PPARα, providing a fundamental mechanism for the anti-atherogenic activity of H2S. H2S may be a promising potential drug candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  4. ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transport System Solute-binding Protein-guided Identification of Novel d-Altritol and Galactitol Catabolic Pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58.

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    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Vetting, Matthew W; Chou, Liyushang; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Bouvier, Jason T; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2015-11-27

    Innovations in the discovery of the functions of uncharacterized proteins/enzymes have become increasingly important as advances in sequencing technology flood protein databases with an exponentially growing number of open reading frames. This study documents one such innovation developed by the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI; U54GM093342), the use of solute-binding proteins for transport systems to identify novel metabolic pathways. In a previous study, this strategy was applied to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters. Here, we apply this strategy to the ATP-binding cassette transporters and report the discovery of novel catabolic pathways for d-altritol and galactitol in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. These efforts resulted in the description of three novel enzymatic reactions as follows: 1) oxidation of d-altritol to d-tagatose via a dehydrogenase in Pfam family PF00107, a previously unknown reaction; 2) phosphorylation of d-tagatose to d-tagatose 6-phosphate via a kinase in Pfam family PF00294, a previously orphan EC number; and 3) epimerization of d-tagatose 6-phosphate C-4 to d-fructose 6-phosphate via a member of Pfam family PF08013, another previously unknown reaction. The epimerization reaction catalyzed by a member of PF08013 is especially noteworthy, because the functions of members of PF08013 have been unknown. These discoveries were assisted by the following two synergistic bioinformatics web tools made available by the Enzyme Function Initiative: the EFI-Enzyme Similarity Tool and the EFI-Genome Neighborhood Tool. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette transporters associated with maternal methylmercury disposition and infant neurodevelopment in mother-infant pairs in the Seychelles Child Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Karin; Love, Tanzy M; Watson, Gene E; Zareba, Grazyna; Yeates, Alison; Wahlberg, Karin; Alhamdow, Ayman; Thurston, Sally W; Mulhern, Maria; McSorley, Emeir M; Strain, J J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Myers, G J; Rand, Matthew D; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Broberg, Karin

    2016-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been associated with methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity in experimental animal models. To evaluate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in maternal ABC transporter genes with 1) maternal hair MeHg concentrations during pregnancy and 2) child neurodevelopmental outcomes. Nutrition Cohort 2 (NC2) is an observational mother-child cohort recruited in the Republic of Seychelles from 2008-2011. Total mercury (Hg) was measured in maternal hair growing during pregnancy as a biomarker for prenatal MeHg exposure (N=1313) (mean 3.9ppm). Infants completed developmental assessments by Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID-II) at 20months of age (N=1331). Genotyping for fifteen SNPs in ABCC1, ABCC2 and ABCB1 was performed for the mothers. Seven of fifteen ABC SNPs (ABCC1 rs11075290, rs212093, and rs215088; ABCC2 rs717620; ABCB1 rs10276499, rs1202169, and rs2032582) were associated with concentrations of maternal hair Hg (p<0.001 to 0.013). One SNP (ABCC1 rs11075290) was also significantly associated with neurodevelopment; children born to mothers with rs11075290 CC genotype (mean hair Hg 3.6ppm) scored on average 2 points lower on the Mental Development Index (MDI) and 3 points lower on the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) than children born to mothers with TT genotype (mean hair Hg 4.7ppm) while children with the CT genotype (mean hair Hg 4.0ppm) had intermediate BSID scores. Genetic variation in ABC transporter genes was associated with maternal hair Hg concentrations. The implications for MeHg dose in the developing child and neurodevelopmental outcomes need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. MicroRNA-20a/b regulates cholesterol efflux through post-transcriptional repression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Song, Xiaosu; Bai, Rui; Yang, Huiyu; Yang, Zhiming; Xiao, Chuanshi; Bian, Yunfei

    2017-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a crucial role in reverse cholesterol transport and exhibits anti-atherosclerosis effects. Some microRNAs (miRs) regulate ABCA1 expression, and recent studies have shown that miR-20a/b might play a critical role in atherosclerotic diseases. Here, we attempted to clarify the potential contribution of miR-20a/b in post-transcriptional regulation of ABCA1, cholesterol efflux, and atherosclerosis. We performed bioinformatics analysis and found that miR-20a/b was highly conserved and directly bound to ABCA1 mRNA with low binding free energy. Luciferase-reporter assay also confirmed that miR-20a/b significantly reduced luciferase activity associated with the ABCA1 3' untranslated region reporter construct. Additionally, miR-20a/b decreased ABCA1 expression, which, in turn, decreased cholesterol efflux and increased cholesterol content in THP-1 and RAW 264.7 macrophage-derived foam cells. In contrast, miR-20a/b inhibitors increased ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux, decreased cholesterol content, and inhibited foam-cell formation. Consistent with our in vitro results, miR-20a/b-treated ApoE -/- mice showed decreased ABCA1expression in the liver and reductions of reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. Furthermore, miR-20a/b regulated the formation of nascent high-density lipoprotein and promoted atherosclerotic development, whereas miR-20a/b knockdown attenuated atherosclerotic formation. miR-20 is a new miRNA capable of targeting ABCA1 and regulating ABCA1 expression. Therefore, miR-20 inhibition constitutes a new strategy for ABCA1-based treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter G2 Activity in the Bovine Spermatozoa Is Modulated Along the Epididymal Duct and at Ejaculation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Julieta; Frenette, Gilles; D'Amours, Olivier; Dufour, Maurice; Oko, Richard; Sullivan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    During their epididymal maturation, stabilizing factors such as cholesterol sulfate are associated with the sperm plasma membrane. Cholesterol is sulfated in epididymal spermatozoa by the enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase. Because of its role in the efflux of sulfate conjugates formed intracellularly by sulfotransferases, the ATP-binding cassette membrane transporter G2 (ABCG2) might have a role in the translocation of this compound across the plasma membrane. In the present study we showed that ABCG2 is present in the plasma membrane overlaying the acrosomal region of spermatozoa recovered from testis, epididymis, and after ejaculation. Although ABCG2 is also present in epididymosomes, the transporter is not transferred to spermatozoa via this mechanism. Furthermore, although epididymal sperm ABCG2 was shown to be functional, as determined by its ability to extrude Hoechst 33342 in the presence of the specific inhibitor Fumitremorgin C, ABCG2 present in ejaculated sperm was found to be nonfunctional. Additional experiments demonstrated that phosphorylation of ABCG2 tyrosyl residues, but not its localization in lipid rafts, is the mechanism responsible for its functionality. Dephosphorylation of ABCG2 in ejaculated spermatozoa is proposed to cause a partial protein relocalization to other intracellular compartments. Prostasomes are proposed to have a role in this process because incubation with this fraction of seminal plasma induces a decrease in the amount of ABCG2 in the associated sperm membrane fraction. These results demonstrate that ABCG2 plays a role in epididymal sperm maturation, but not after ejaculation. The loss of ABCG2 function after ejaculation is proposed to be regulated by prostasomes. PMID:22441796

  8. RCN1/OsABCG5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is required for hypodermal suberization of roots in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Katsuhiro; Ando, Miho; Nishiuchi, Shunsaku; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kohtaro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Matsuo, Yuichi; Yasuno, Naoko; Yamanouchi, Utako; Fujimoto, Masaru; Takanashi, Hideki; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus B; Shitan, Nobukazu; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Takamure, Itsuro; Yano, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Schreiber, Lukas; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2014-10-01

    Suberin is a complex polymer composed of aliphatic and phenolic compounds. It is a constituent of apoplastic plant interfaces. In many plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa), the hypodermis in the outer part of roots forms a suberized cell wall (the Casparian strip and/or suberin lamellae), which inhibits the flow of water and ions and protects against pathogens. To date, there is no genetic evidence that suberin forms an apoplastic transport barrier in the hypodermis. We discovered that a rice reduced culm number1 (rcn1) mutant could not develop roots longer than 100 mm in waterlogged soil. The mutated gene encoded an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter named RCN1/OsABCG5. RCN1/OsABCG5 gene expression in the wild type was increased in most hypodermal and some endodermal roots cells under stagnant deoxygenated conditions. A GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 fusion protein localized at the plasma membrane of the wild type. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, well suberized hypodermis developed in wild types but not in rcn1 mutants. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, apoplastic tracers (periodic acid and berberine) were blocked at the hypodermis in the wild type but not in rcn1, indicating that the apoplastic barrier in the mutant was impaired. The amount of the major aliphatic suberin monomers originating from C(28) and C(30) fatty acids or ω-OH fatty acids was much lower in rcn1 than in the wild type. These findings suggest that RCN1/OsABCG5 has a role in the suberization of the hypodermis of rice roots, which contributes to formation of the apoplastic barrier. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Drug resistance is conferred on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of full-length melanoma-associated human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keniya, Mikhail V; Holmes, Ann R; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M; Cannon, Richard D

    2014-10-06

    ABCB5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and may contribute to the extreme resistance of melanomas to chemotherapy by efflux of anti-cancer drugs. Our goal was to determine whether we could functionally express human ABCB5 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in order to demonstrate an efflux function for ABCB5 in the absence of background pump activity from other human transporters. Heterologous expression would also facilitate drug discovery for this important target. DNAs encoding ABCB5 sequences were cloned into the chromosomal PDR5 locus of a S. cerevisiae strain in which seven endogenous ABC transporters have been deleted. Protein expression in the yeast cells was monitored by immunodetection using both a specific anti-ABCB5 antibody and a cross-reactive anti-ABCB1 antibody. ABCB5 function in recombinant yeast cells was measured by determining whether the cells possessed increased resistance to known pump substrates, compared to the host yeast strain, in assays of yeast growth. Three ABCB5 constructs were made in yeast. One was derived from the ABCB5-β mRNA, which is highly expressed in human tissues but is a truncation of a canonical full-size ABC transporter. Two constructs contained full-length ABCB5 sequences: either a native sequence from cDNA or a synthetic sequence codon-harmonized for S. cerevisiae. Expression of all three constructs in yeast was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of the codon-harmonized full-length ABCB5 DNA conferred increased resistance, relative to the host yeast strain, to the putative substrates rhodamine 123, daunorubicin, tetramethylrhodamine, FK506, or clorgyline. We conclude that full-length ABCB5 can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae and confers drug resistance.

  10. Human ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABC1): Genomic organization and identification of the genetic defect in the original Tangier disease kindred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaley, Alan T.; Rust, Stephan; Rosier, Marie; Knapper, Cathy; Naudin, Laurent; Broccardo, Cyril; Peterson, Katherine M.; Koch, Christine; Arnould, Isabelle; Prades, Catherine; Duverger, Nicholas; Funke, Harald; Assman, Gerd; Dinger, Maria; Dean, Michael; Chimini, Giovanna; Santamarina-Fojo, Silvia; Fredrickson, Donald S.; Denefle, Patrice; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1999-01-01

    Tangier disease is characterized by low serum high density lipoproteins and a biochemical defect in the cellular efflux of lipids to high density lipoproteins. ABC1, a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, recently has been identified as the defective gene in Tangier disease. We report here the organization of the human ABC1 gene and the identification of a mutation in the ABC1 gene from the original Tangier disease kindred. The organization of the human ABC1 gene is similar to that of the mouse ABC1 gene and other related ABC genes. The ABC1 gene contains 49 exons that range in size from 33 to 249 bp and is over 70 kb in length. Sequence analysis of the ABC1 gene revealed that the proband for Tangier disease was homozygous for a deletion of nucleotides 3283 and 3284 (TC) in exon 22. The deletion results in a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon starting at nucleotide 3375. The product is predicted to encode a nonfunctional protein of 1,084 aa, which is approximately half the size of the full-length ABC1 protein. The loss of a Mnl1 restriction site, which results from the deletion, was used to establish the genotype of the rest of the kindred. In summary, we report on the genomic organization of the human ABC1 gene and identify a frameshift mutation in the ABC1 gene of the index case of Tangier disease. These results will be useful in the future characterization of the structure and function of the ABC1 gene and the analysis of additional ABC1 mutations in patients with Tangier disease. PMID:10535983

  11. Galectin-3 Silencing Inhibits Epirubicin-Induced ATP Binding Cassette Transporters and Activates the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway via β-Catenin/GSK-3β Modulation in Colorectal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Kuo; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Lo, Yu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi) on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), MDR-associated protein (MRP) 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells. PMID:24303084

  12. Pravastatin Modulate Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 and ATP-Binding Cassette G5 and G8 to Influence Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Atsushi; Hata, Seiji; Takagi, Mai; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ATP-binding cassette (ABC)G5, and ABCG8 mediate intestinal cholesterol absorption. It is unclear whether pravastatin (PR) or ezetimibe (EZ) affect expression of these transporters. We examined the effects of PR and EZ on NPC1L1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells and the murine small intestine. We also assessed expression of the transcription factors liver X receptor (LXR)a, LXRb and sterol regulatory element-binding protein. Transporter mRNA levels were determined in murine small intestines 6 and 24 h after oral PR and EZ administration by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In PR- and EZ-treated HepG2 cells, transporter and transcription factor mRNA and protein levels were examined by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Significant decreases in NPC1L1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 mRNA expression were observed in the duodenum, but not jejunum and ileum, of mice 24 h after treatment with PR, but not EZ. In HepG2 cells, PR but not EZ treatment for 24 h also significantly decreased NPC1L1 protein and ABCG5, and ABCG8 mRNA expression, while increasing LXRa mRNA levels. PR but not EZ treatment reduced duodenal cholesterol transporter expression in mice. PR-induced increases in LXRa mRNA levels may be involved in attenuation of NPC1L1 expression, subsequently decreasing intestinal cholesterol absorption.

  13. Implications of cerebrovascular ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) and apolipoprotein M in cholesterol transport at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Alexandra Carmen; Manavalan, Anil Paul Chirackal; Tam-Amersdorfer, Carmen; Holmér, Andreas; Saeed, Ahmed; Fanaee-Danesh, Elham; Zandl, Martina; Albrecher, Nicole Maria; Björkhem, Ingemar; Kostner, Gerhard M; Dahlbäck, Björn; Panzenboeck, Ute

    2017-06-01

    Impaired cholesterol/lipoprotein metabolism is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral cholesterol homeostasis is maintained by the highly efficient blood-brain barrier (BBB) and flux of the oxysterols 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, potent liver-X-receptor (LXR) activators. HDL and their apolipoproteins are crucial for cerebral lipid transfer, and loss of ATP binding cassette transporters (ABC)G1 and G4 results in toxic accumulation of oxysterols in the brain. The HDL-associated apolipoprotein (apo)M is positively correlated with pre-β HDL formation in plasma; its presence and function in the brain was thus far unknown. Using an in vitro model of the BBB, we examined expression, regulation, and functions of ABCG1, ABCG4, and apoM in primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (pBCEC). RT Q-PCR analyses and immunoblotting revealed that in addition to ABCA1 and scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI), pBCEC express high levels of ABCG1, which was up-regulated by LXR activation. Immunofluorescent staining, site-specific biotinylation and immunoprecipitation revealed that ABCG1 is localized both to early and late endosomes and on apical and basolateral plasma membranes. Using siRNA interference to silence ABCG1 (by 50%) reduced HDL-mediated [3H]-cholesterol efflux (by 50%) but did not reduce [3H]-24(S)-hydroxycholesterol efflux. In addition to apoA-I, pBCEC express and secrete apoM mainly to the basolateral (brain) compartment. HDL enhanced expression and secretion of apoM by pBCEC, apoM-enriched HDL promoted cellular cholesterol efflux more efficiently than apoM-free HDL, while apoM-silencing diminished cellular cholesterol release. We suggest that ABCG1 and apoM are centrally involved in regulation of cholesterol metabolism/turnover at the BBB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 interacts with the putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Lisa N; Swapna, Ganduri; Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Tufariello, JoAnn M; Mi, Kaixia; Drumm, Joshua E; Lam, TuKiet T; Zhu, Guofeng; Zhan, Chenyang; Vilchéze, Catherine; Arcos, Jesus; Chen, Yong; Bi, Lijun; Mehta, Simren; Porcelli, Steven A; Almo, Steve C; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Jacobs, William R; Torrelles, Jordi B; Chan, John

    2017-07-01

    We have previously shown that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth and may be required for the establishment of tuberculous persistence. Here, yeast two-hybrid and affinity chromatography experiments have demonstrated that Rv2623 interacts with one of the two forkhead-associated domains (FHA I) of Rv1747, a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter annotated to export lipooligosaccharides. FHA domains are signaling protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions to modulate a wide variety of biological processes via binding to conserved phosphorylated threonine (pT)-containing oligopeptides of the interactors. Biochemical, immunochemical and mass spectrometric studies have shown that Rv2623 harbors pT and specifically identified threonine 237 as a phosphorylated residue. Relative to wild-type Rv2623 (Rv2623WT), a mutant protein in which T237 has been replaced with a non-phosphorylatable alanine (Rv2623T237A) exhibits decreased interaction with the Rv1747 FHA I domain and diminished growth-regulatory capacity. Interestingly, compared to WT bacilli, an M. tuberculosis Rv2623 null mutant (ΔRv2623) displays enhanced expression of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs), while the ΔRv1747 mutant expresses decreased levels of PIMs. Animal studies have previously shown that ΔRv2623 is hypervirulent, while ΔRv1747 is growth-attenuated. Collectively, these data have provided evidence that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth; and this interaction is mediated via the recognition of the conserved Rv2623 pT237-containing FHA-binding motif by the Rv1747 FHA I domain. The divergent aberrant PIM profiles and the opposing in vivo growth phenotypes of ΔRv2623 and ΔRv1747, together with the annotated lipooligosaccharide exporter function of Rv1747, suggest that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to modulate mycobacterial growth by negatively regulating the activity of Rv1747; and that Rv

  15. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin [Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050 (China); Si, Shuyi, E-mail: sisyimb@hotmail.com [Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  16. Host response transcriptional profiling reveals extracellular components and ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporters gene enrichment in typhoid fever-infected Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resau James H

    2011-09-01

    bacterial invasion. Distinct gene expression profiles can also be obtained from acute vs. convalescent phase during typhoid fever infection. We found novel down-regulation of ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporters genes such as ABCA7, ABCC5, and ABCD4 and ATPase activity as the highest enriched pathway. Conclusions We identified unique extracellular components and ABC transporters gene enrichments in typhoid fever-infected Nigerian children, which have never been reported. These enriched gene clusters may represent novel targeted pathways to improve diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and next-generation vaccine strategies for typhoid fever in Africa.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 interacts with the putative ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa N Glass

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth and may be required for the establishment of tuberculous persistence. Here, yeast two-hybrid and affinity chromatography experiments have demonstrated that Rv2623 interacts with one of the two forkhead-associated domains (FHA I of Rv1747, a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter annotated to export lipooligosaccharides. FHA domains are signaling protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions to modulate a wide variety of biological processes via binding to conserved phosphorylated threonine (pT-containing oligopeptides of the interactors. Biochemical, immunochemical and mass spectrometric studies have shown that Rv2623 harbors pT and specifically identified threonine 237 as a phosphorylated residue. Relative to wild-type Rv2623 (Rv2623WT, a mutant protein in which T237 has been replaced with a non-phosphorylatable alanine (Rv2623T237A exhibits decreased interaction with the Rv1747 FHA I domain and diminished growth-regulatory capacity. Interestingly, compared to WT bacilli, an M. tuberculosis Rv2623 null mutant (ΔRv2623 displays enhanced expression of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs, while the ΔRv1747 mutant expresses decreased levels of PIMs. Animal studies have previously shown that ΔRv2623 is hypervirulent, while ΔRv1747 is growth-attenuated. Collectively, these data have provided evidence that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth; and this interaction is mediated via the recognition of the conserved Rv2623 pT237-containing FHA-binding motif by the Rv1747 FHA I domain. The divergent aberrant PIM profiles and the opposing in vivo growth phenotypes of ΔRv2623 and ΔRv1747, together with the annotated lipooligosaccharide exporter function of Rv1747, suggest that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to modulate mycobacterial growth by negatively regulating the activity of Rv1747

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 interacts with the putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng; Zhan, Chenyang; Vilchéze, Catherine; Arcos, Jesus; Chen, Yong; Bi, Lijun; Porcelli, Steven A.; Almo, Steve C.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Jacobs, William R.; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth and may be required for the establishment of tuberculous persistence. Here, yeast two-hybrid and affinity chromatography experiments have demonstrated that Rv2623 interacts with one of the two forkhead-associated domains (FHA I) of Rv1747, a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter annotated to export lipooligosaccharides. FHA domains are signaling protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions to modulate a wide variety of biological processes via binding to conserved phosphorylated threonine (pT)-containing oligopeptides of the interactors. Biochemical, immunochemical and mass spectrometric studies have shown that Rv2623 harbors pT and specifically identified threonine 237 as a phosphorylated residue. Relative to wild-type Rv2623 (Rv2623WT), a mutant protein in which T237 has been replaced with a non-phosphorylatable alanine (Rv2623T237A) exhibits decreased interaction with the Rv1747 FHA I domain and diminished growth-regulatory capacity. Interestingly, compared to WT bacilli, an M. tuberculosis Rv2623 null mutant (ΔRv2623) displays enhanced expression of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs), while the ΔRv1747 mutant expresses decreased levels of PIMs. Animal studies have previously shown that ΔRv2623 is hypervirulent, while ΔRv1747 is growth-attenuated. Collectively, these data have provided evidence that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth; and this interaction is mediated via the recognition of the conserved Rv2623 pT237-containing FHA-binding motif by the Rv1747 FHA I domain. The divergent aberrant PIM profiles and the opposing in vivo growth phenotypes of ΔRv2623 and ΔRv1747, together with the annotated lipooligosaccharide exporter function of Rv1747, suggest that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to modulate mycobacterial growth by negatively regulating the activity of Rv1747; and that Rv

  19. Diosgenin inhibits atherosclerosis via suppressing the MiR-19b-induced downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yun-cheng; Yang, Jing; Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei; Tang, Yan-yan; Ouyang, Xin-ping; He, Ping-ping; Tan, Yu-lin; Li, Liang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Dan; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Chao-ke

    2015-05-01

    Diosgenin (Dgn), a structural analogue of cholesterol, has been reported to have the hypolipidemic and antiatherogenic properties, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Given the key roles of macrophages in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis, it is critical to investigate macrophage cholesterol efflux and development of atherosclerotic lesion after Dgn treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the potential effects of Dgn on macrophage cholesterol metabolism and the development of aortic atherosclerosis, and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Dgn significantly up-regulated the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein, but didn't affect liver X receptor α levels in foam cells derived from human THP-1 macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) as determined by western blotting. The miR-19b levels were markedly down-regulated in Dgn-treated THP-1 macrophages/MPM-derived foam cells. Cholesterol transport assays revealed that treatment with Dgn alone or together with miR-19b inhibitor notably enhanced ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux, resulting in the reduced levels of total cholesterol, free cholesterol and cholesterol ester as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The fecal 3H-sterol originating from cholesterol-laden MPMs was increased in apolipoprotein E knockout mice treated with Dgn or both Dgn and antagomiR-19b. Treatment with Dgn alone or together with antagomiR-19b elevated plasma high-density lipoprotein levels, but reduced plasma low-density lipoprotein levels. Accordingly, aortic lipid deposition and plaque area were reduced, and collagen content and ABCA1 expression were increased in mice treated with Dgn alone or together with antagomiR-19b. However, miR-19b overexpression abrogated the lipid-lowering and atheroprotective effects induced by Dgn. The present study demonstrates that Dgn enhances ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux and inhibits aortic atherosclerosis

  20. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates the Uptake of α-(1,6)-Linked Dietary Oligosaccharides in Bifidobacterium and Correlates with Competitive Growth on These Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby; Fredslund, Folmer; Andersen, Joakim Mark

    2016-01-01

    The molecular details and impact of oligosaccharide uptake by distinct human gut microbiota (HGM) are currently not well understood. Non-digestible dietary galacto- and gluco--(1,6)-oligosaccharides from legumes and starch, respectively, are preferentially fermented by mainly bifidobacteria...... and lactobacilli in the human gut. Here we show that the solute binding protein (BlG16BP) associated with an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 binds -(1,6)-linked glucosides and galactosides of varying size, linkage, and monosaccharide...

  1. ATP Binding and Hydrolysis Properties of ABCB10 and Their Regulation by Glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liesa, Marc; Carpenter, Elizabeth P.; Shirihai, Orian S.

    2015-01-01

    ABCB10 (ATP binding cassette sub-family B10) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane ABC transporter. ABCB10 has been shown to protect the heart from the impact of ROS during ischemia-reperfusion and to allow for proper hemoglobin synthesis during erythroid development. ABC transporters are proteins that increase ATP binding and hydrolysis activity in the presence of the transported substrate. However, molecular entities transported by ABCB10 and its regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we characterized ATP binding and hydrolysis properties of ABCB10 by using the 8-azido-ATP photolabeling technique. This technique can identify potential ABCB10 regulators, transported substrates and amino-acidic residues required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. We confirmed that Gly497 and Lys498 in the Walker A motif, Glu624 in the Walker B motif and Gly602 in the C-Loop motif of ABCB10 are required for proper ATP binding and hydrolysis activity, as their mutation changed ABCB10 8-Azido-ATP photo-labeling. In addition, we show that the potential ABCB10 transported entity and heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (dALA) does not alter 8-azido-ATP photo-labeling. In contrast, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) stimulates ATP hydrolysis without affecting ATP binding, whereas reduced glutathione (GSH) inhibits ATP binding and hydrolysis. Indeed, we detectABCB10 glutathionylation in Cys547 and show that it is one of the exposed cysteine residues within ABCB10 structure. In all, we characterize essential residues for ABCB10 ATPase activity and we provide evidence that supports the exclusion of dALA as a potential substrate directly transported by ABCB10. Last, we show the first molecular mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative status, through GSH/GSSG, can regulate ABCB10. PMID:26053025

  2. Rosuvastatin activates ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-dependent efflux ex vivo and promotes reverse cholesterol transport in macrophage cells in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohiko; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Tanigawa, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Takashi; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Saku, Keijiro

    2014-10-01

    It is controversial whether statins improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function, which plays an important role in reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin on reverse cholesterol transport in macrophage cells in vivo and their underlying mechanisms. Male C57BL mice were divided into 3 groups (rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, and control groups) and orally administered rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, or placebo for 6 weeks under feeding with a 0.5% cholesterol+10% coconut oil diet. After administration, although there were no changes in plasma HDL cholesterol levels among the groups, plasma from the rosuvastatin group showed an increased ability to promote ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-mediated cholesterol efflux ex vivo. In addition, capillary electrophoresis revealed a shift in HDL toward the pre-β HDL fraction only in the rosuvastatin group. Mice in all 3 groups were intraperitoneally injected with (3)H-cholesterol-labeled and cholesterol-loaded macrophages and then were monitored for the appearance of (3)H-tracer in plasma and feces. The amount of (3)H-tracer excreted into feces during 48 hours in the rosuvastatin group was greater than that in the control group. Finally, (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-HDL was intravenously injected into all groups, blood samples were taken, and the count of (3)H-cholesterol was analyzed. Plasma (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-HDL changed similarly, and no differences in fractional catabolic rates were observed. Rosuvastatin enhanced the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-dependent HDL efflux function of reverse cholesterol transport, and this finding highlights the potential of rosuvastatin for the regression of atherosclerosis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Evidence for direct physical association between a K+ channel (Kir6.2) and an ATP-binding cassette protein (SUR1) which affects cellular distribution and kinetic behavior of an ATP-sensitive K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, E; Alekseev, A E; Krapivinsky, G B; Carrasco, A J; Clapham, D E; Terzic, A

    1998-03-01

    Structurally unique among ion channels, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels are essential in coupling cellular metabolism with membrane excitability, and their activity can be reconstituted by coexpression of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel, Kir6.2, with an ATP-binding cassette protein, SUR1. To determine if constitutive channel subunits form a physical complex, we developed antibodies to specifically label and immunoprecipitate Kir6.2. From a mixture of Kir6.2 and SUR1 in vitro-translated proteins, and from COS cells transfected with both channel subunits, the Kir6.2-specific antibody coimmunoprecipitated 38- and 140-kDa proteins corresponding to Kir6.2 and SUR1, respectively. Since previous reports suggest that the carboxy-truncated Kir6.2 can form a channel independent of SUR, we deleted 114 nucleotides from the carboxy terminus of the Kir6.2 open reading frame (Kir6.2deltaC37). Kir6.2deltaC37 still coimmunoprecipitated with SUR1, suggesting that the distal carboxy terminus of Kir6.2 is unnecessary for subunit association. Confocal microscopic images of COS cells transfected with Kir6.2 or Kir6.2deltaC37 and labeled with fluorescent antibodies revealed unique honeycomb patterns unlike the diffuse immunostaining observed when cells were cotransfected with Kir6.2-SUR1 or Kir6.2deltaC37-SUR1. Membrane patches excised from COS cells cotransfected with Kir6.2-SUR1 or Kir6.2deltaC37-SUR1 exhibited single-channel activity characteristic of pancreatic KATP channels. Kir6.2deltaC37 alone formed functional channels with single-channel conductance and intraburst kinetic properties similar to those of Kir6.2-SUR1 or Kir6.2deltaC37-SUR1 but with reduced burst duration. This study provides direct evidence that an inwardly rectifying K+ channel and an ATP-binding cassette protein physically associate, which affects the cellular distribution and kinetic behavior of a KATP channel.

  4. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojing [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Xu, Yonghong [Institute of Ophthalmological Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 430060 Wuhan (China); Meng, Xiangning [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Watari, Fumio [Department of Biomedical, Dental Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Chen, Xiao, E-mail: mornsmile@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  5. Opposing Gatekeepers of Apical Sterol Transport: Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters G5 and G8 (ABCG5/ABCG8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. Mark; Yu, Liqing

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for the growth and function of all mammalian cells, but abnormally elevated levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). For many years, statin drugs have been used to effectively lower LDL-C, but ASCVD still persists in most of the world. Hence, additional LDL-C lowering is now recommended, and the search for therapeutic strategies that work in synergy with statins has now begun. Intestinal absorption and biliary excretion of cholesterol represent two major pathways and continue to show promise as druggable processes. Importantly, both of these complex physiological pathways are tightly regulated by key proteins located at the apical surface of the small intestine and the liver. One of these proteins, the target of ezetimibe Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1), was recently identified to be essential for intestinal cholesterol absorption and protect against excessive biliary sterol loss. In direct opposition of NPC1L1, the heterodimer of ATP-binding cassette transporters G5 and G8 (ABCG5/ABCG8) has been shown to be critical for promoting biliary cholesterol secretion in the liver, and has also been proposed to play a direct role in intestinal disposal of sterols. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the function of these opposing apical cholesterol transporters, and provide a framework for future studies examining these proteins. PMID:20174593

  6. The bovine ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 Tyr581Ser single-nucleotide polymorphism increases milk secretion of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jon A; Real, Rebeca; de la Fuente, Álvaro; Prieto, Julio G; Marqués, Margarita; Álvarez, Ana I; Merino, Gracia

    2013-03-01

    The bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein) polymorphism Tyr581Ser (Y581S) has recently been shown to increase in vitro transepithelial transport of antibiotics. Since this transporter has been extensively related to the active secretion of drugs into milk, the potential in vivo effect of this polymorphism on secretion of xenobiotics in livestock could have striking consequences for milk production, the dairy industry, and public health. Our purpose was to study the in vivo effect of this polymorphism on the secretion of danofloxacin, a widely used veterinary antibiotic, into milk. Danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg) was administered to six Y/Y 581 homozygous and six Y/S 581 heterozygous lactating cows, and plasma and milk samples were collected and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. No differences were found in the pharmacokinetic parameters of danofloxacin in plasma between the two groups of animals. In contrast, Y/S heterozygous cows showed a 2-fold increase in danofloxacin levels in milk. In addition, the pharmacokinetic elimination parameters, mean residence time and elimination half-life, were significantly lower in the milk of the animals carrying the Y/S polymorphism. These in vivo results are in agreement with our previously published in vitro data, which showed a greater capacity of the S581 variant in accumulation assays, and demonstrate, for the first time, an important effect of the Y581S single-nucleotide polymorphism on antibiotic secretion into cow milk. These findings could be extended to other ABCG2 substrates, and may be relevant for the treatment of mastitis and for the design of accurate and novel strategies to handle milk residues.

  7. Brucella abortus mutants lacking ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins are highly attenuated in virulence and confer protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is an attenuated vaccine strain that has been most frequently used for bovine brucellosis. Although it is known to provide good protection in cattle, it still has some drawbacks including resistance to rifampicin, residual virulence and pathogenicity in humans. Thus, there has been a continuous interest on new safe and effective bovine vaccine candidates. In the present study, we have constructed unmarked mutants by deleting singly cydD and cydC genes, which encode ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, from the chromosome of the virulent Brucella abortus isolate from Korean cow (referred to as IVK15). Both IVK15ΔcydD and ΔcydC mutants showed increased sensitivity to metal ions, hydrogen peroxide and acidic pH, which are mimic to intracellular environment during host infection. Additionally, the mutants exhibited a significant growth defect in RAW264.7 cells and greatly attenuated in mice. Vaccination of mice with either IVK15ΔcydC or IVK15ΔcydD mutant could elicit an anti-Brucella specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclass responses as well as enhance the secretion of interferon-gamma, and provided better protection against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308 than with the commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. Collectively, these results suggest that both IVK15ΔcydC and IVK15ΔcydD mutants could be an attenuated vaccine candidate against B. abortus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The non-synonymous Arg230Cys variant (R230C) of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 is associated with low HDL cholesterol concentrations in Mexican adults: a population based nation wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Mehta, Roopa; Rodriguez-Guillén, Rosario; Ordoñez-Sanchez, María Luisa; Riba, Laura; Tusié-Luna, María Teresa

    2011-05-01

    To search for an association between the non-synonymous Arg230Cys variant (R230C) of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 and low HDL cholesterol levels in a Mexican, population-based nation wide survey. The 2000 National Health Survey is a cross sectional study that included individuals from 400 cities. All individuals who had a 9-12-h fasted blood sample and a DNA sample were selected (n = 1729). These cases were randomly distributed; no bias was detected for sex, education, region or socioeconomic status. The R230C variant was genotyped using TaqMan assays. In individuals with the R230C/C230C genotypes (39.03 mg/dl (36.63-41.43)) lower HDL-C levels (p cholesterol levels between alleles was 5.73 ± 1.4 mg/dl. The magnitude of the effect was significantly greater in males. The C230 allele of ABCA1 was associated with an increased risk for hypoalphalipoproteinemia (OR 1.66 (95%CI 1.08-2.54), p effect of waist circumference and gender, was 12.2% (95%CI 1.4-24.2%). The non-synonymous Arg230Cys variant of ABCA1 is associated with low levels of HDL cholesterol levels in Mexican adults. The HDL cholesterol lowering effect of the variant is greater in males. The size of the effect is greater compared to that reported for other ABCA1 variants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A common highly conserved cadmium detoxification mechanism from bacteria to humans: heavy metal tolerance conferred by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter SpHMT1 requires glutathione but not metal-chelating phytochelatin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévéral, Sandra; Gayet, Landry; Moldes, Cristina; Hoffmann, Jonathan; Mounicou, Sandra; Gruet, Antoine; Reynaud, Florie; Lobinski, Ryszard; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Vavasseur, Alain; Forestier, Cyrille

    2009-02-20

    Cadmium poses a significant threat to human health due to its toxicity. In mammals and in bakers' yeast, cadmium is detoxified by ATP-binding cassette transporters after conjugation to glutathione. In fission yeast, phytochelatins constitute the co-substrate with cadmium for the transporter SpHMT1. In plants, a detoxification mechanism similar to the one in fission yeast is supposed, but the molecular nature of the transporter is still lacking. To investigate further the relationship between SpHMT1 and its co-substrate, we overexpressed the transporter in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain deleted for the phytochelatin synthase gene and heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Escherichia coli. In all organisms, overexpression of SpHMT1 conferred a markedly enhanced tolerance to cadmium but not to Sb(III), AgNO(3), As(III), As(V), CuSO(4), or HgCl(2). Abolishment of the catalytic activity by expression of SpHMT1(K623M) mutant suppressed the cadmium tolerance phenotype independently of the presence of phytochelatins. Depletion of the glutathione pool inhibited the SpHMT1 activity but not that of AtHMA4, a P-type ATPase, indicating that GSH is necessary for the SpHMT1-mediated cadmium resistance. In E. coli, SpHMT1 was targeted to the periplasmic membrane and led to an increased amount of cadmium in the periplasm. These results demonstrate that SpHMT1 confers cadmium tolerance in the absence of phytochelatins but depending on the presence of GSH and ATP. Our results challenge the dogma of the two separate cadmium detoxification pathways and demonstrate that a common highly conserved mechanism has been selected during the evolution from bacteria to humans.

  10. Polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette transporter genes and interaction with diet and life style factors in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Andersen, Vibeke; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family transports various molecules across the enterocytes in the gut protecting the intestine against potentially harmful substances. Moreover, ABC transporters are involved in mucosal immune defence through interaction with cytokines. The study aimed to assess whether polymorphisms in ABCB1, ABCC2 and ABCG2 were associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to investigate gene-environment (dietary factors, smoking and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and gene-gene interactions between previously studied polymorphisms in IL1B and IL10 and ABC transporter genes in relation to CRC risk. We used a Danish prospective case-cohort study of 1010 CRC cases and 1829 randomly selected participants from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Incidence rate ratios were calculated based on Cox' proportional hazards model. None of the polymorphisms were associated with CRC, but ABCB1 and ABCG2 haplotypes were associated with risk of CRC. ABCB1/rs1045642 interacted with intake of cereals and fiber (p-Value for interaction (P(int)) = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). In a three-way analysis, both ABCB1/rs1045642 and ABCG2/rs2231137 in combination with IL10/rs3024505 interacted with fiber intake in relation to risk of CRC (P(int) = 0.0007 and 0.009). Our results suggest that the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance 1 and BRCP, in cooperation with IL-10, are involved in the biological mechanism underlying the protective effect of fiber intake in relation to CRC. These results should be replicated in other cohorts to rule out chance findings.

  11. ATP-Binding Cassette Systems of Brucella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic C. Jenner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a prevalent zoonotic disease and is endemic in the Middle East, South America, and other areas of the world. In this study, complete inventories of putative functional ABC systems of five Brucella species have been compiled and compared. ABC systems of Brucella melitensis 16M, Brucella abortus 9-941, Brucella canis RM6/66, Brucella suis 1330, and Brucella ovis 63/290 were identified and aligned. High numbers of ABC systems, particularly nutrient importers, were found in all Brucella species. However, differences in the total numbers of ABC systems were identified (B. melitensis, 79; B. suis, 72; B. abortus 64; B. canis, 74; B. ovis, 59 as well as specific differences in the functional ABC systems of the Brucella species. Since B. ovis is not known to cause human brucellosis, functional ABC systems absent in the B. ovis genome may represent virulence factors in human brucellosis.

  12. Pharmacophore modeling of nilotinib as an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette drug transporters and BCR-ABL kinase using a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Suneet; Kouanda, Abdul; Silverton, Latoya; Talele, Tanaji T; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2014-07-07

    Nilotinib (Tasigna) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the FDA to treat chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It is also a transport substrate of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) and ABCG2 (BCRP), which may have an effect on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of this drug. The goal of this study was to identify pharmacophoric features of nilotinib in order to potentially develop specific inhibitors of BCR-ABL kinase with minimal interactions with ABC drug transporters. Three-dimensional pharmacophore modeling and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were carried out on a series of nilotinib analogues to identify chemical features that contribute to inhibitory activity of nilotinib against BCR-ABL kinase activity, P-gp, and ABCG2. Twenty-five derivatives of nilotinib were synthesized and were then tested to measure their activity to inhibit BCR-ABL kinase and to inhibit the function of ABC drug transporters. A set of in vitro experiments including kinase activity and cell-based transport assays and photolabeling of P-gp and ABCG2 with a transport substrate, [(125)I]-iodoarylazido-prazosin (IAAP), were carried out in isolated membranes to evaluate the potency of the derivatives to inhibit the function of ABC drug transporters and BCR-ABL kinase. Sixteen, fourteen, and ten compounds were selected as QSAR data sets, respectively, to generate PHASE v3.1 pharmacophore models for BCR-ABL kinase, ABCG2, and P-gp inhibitors. The IC50 values of these derivatives against P-gp, ABCG2, or BCR-ABL kinase were used to generate pharmacophore features required for optimal interactions with these targets. A seven-point pharmacophore (AADDRRR) for BCR-ABL kinase inhibitory activity, a six-point pharmacophore (ADHRRR) for ABCG2 inhibitory activity, and a seven-point pharmacophore (AADDRRR) for P-gp inhibitory activity were generated. The derived models clearly demonstrate high predictive power

  13. Population-Specific Resequencing Associates the ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 4 Gene With Gout in New Zealand Māori and Pacific Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Callum; Boocock, James; Stahl, Eli A; Dobbyn, Amanda; Mandal, Asim K; Cadzow, Murray; Phipps-Green, Amanda J; Topless, Ruth K; Hindmarsh, Jennie Harré; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Choi, Hyon K; Mount, David B; Merriman, Tony R

    2017-07-01

    There is no evidence for a genetic association between organic anion transporters 1-3 (SLC22A6, SLC22A7, and SLC22A8) and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; encoded by ABCC4) with the levels of serum urate or gout. The Māori and Pacific (Polynesian) population of New Zealand has the highest prevalence of gout worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine whether any Polynesian population-specific genetic variants in SLC22A6-8 and ABCC4 are associated with gout. All participants had ≥3 self-reported Māori and/or Pacific grandparents. Among the total sample set of 1,808 participants, 191 hyperuricemic and 202 normouricemic individuals were resequenced over the 4 genes, and the remaining 1,415 individuals were used for replication. Regression analyses were performed, adjusting for age, sex, and Polynesian ancestry. To study the functional effect of nonsynonymous variants of ABCC4, transport assays were performed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. A total of 39 common variants were detected, with an ABCC4 variant (rs4148500) significantly associated with hyperuricemia and gout. This variant was monomorphic for the urate-lowering allele in Europeans. There was evidence for an association of rs4148500 with gout in the resequenced samples (odds ratio [OR] 1.62 [P = 0.012]) that was replicated (OR 1.25 [P = 0.033]) and restricted to men (OR 1.43 [P = 0.001] versus OR 0.98 [P = 0.89] in women). The gout risk allele was associated with fractional excretion of uric acid in male individuals (β = -0.570 [P = 0.01]). A rare population-specific allele (P1036L) with predicted strong functional consequence reduced the uric acid transport activity of ABCC4 by 30%. An association between ABCC4 and gout and fractional excretion of uric acid is consistent with the established role of MRP4 as a unidirectional renal uric acid efflux pump. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Involvement of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 in the augmentation of triacylglycerol excretion by Propionibacterium acnes in differentiated hamster sebocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Koji; Akimoto, Noriko; Kawamura, Mina; Nakase, Keisuke; Noguchi, Norihisa; Sato, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    An onset of acne, a common inflammatory skin disease, is associated with excess sebum production and secretion in sebaceous glands. Because Propionibacterium acnes has been reported to augment intracellular sebum accumulation in sebaceous glands in hamsters, it remains unclear whether P. acnes influences sebum secretion from differentiated sebocytes. Both P. acnes culture media (Acnes73-CM) and formalin-killed P. acnes (F-Acnes73) dose-dependently increased the extracellular levels of triacylglycerol (TG), a major sebum component, and Rhodamine 123, a substrate of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, from differentiated hamster sebocytes (DHS). In addition, the gene expression of the ABC subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) was dose-dependently augmented by adding Acnes73-CM and F-Acnes73 into DHS. Furthermore, the F-Acnes73-induced increase of TG excretion was suppressed by PSC833, a selective ABCB1 inhibitor. On the other hand, peptidoglycan (PGN), which is a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand in P. acnes, increased extracellular TG levels, transporter activity and ABCB1 mRNA expression in DHS. The PGN-augmented TG excretion was suppressed by PSC833. Thus, these results provide novel evidence that P. acnes facilitates sebum secretion due to the activation of ABCB1 concomitantly with the increased ABCB1 expression, which may result from the activation of the TLR2 pathway in DHS. Therefore, the ABCB1 inhibitor is likely to become a candidate as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of acne. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. ATP-binding cassette transporter enhances tolerance to DDT in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, YingZhi; Dang, Huai; Liu, GuangLong; Xiong, Jie; Yuan, DongXia; Feng, LiFang; Miao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The reuse of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) as an indoor residual spray was permitted by the World Health Organization in 2007, and approximately 14 countries still use DDT to control disease vectors. The extensive exposure of insects to DDT has resulted in the emergence of DDT resistance, especially in mosquitoes, and the mechanism for this resistance in mosquitoes has been widely reported. Spraying can also introduce DDT directly into surface water, and DDT can subsequently accumulate in microorganisms, but the mechanism for the resistance to DDT degradation in microorganisms is unclear. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we detected an abcb15 gene that was up-regulated in a specific manner by DDT treatment in T. thermophile. The deduced ABCB15 peptide sequence had two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to form the structure TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD, and each NBD contained three conserved motifs: Walker-A, C-loop, and Walker-B, which indicated the T. thermophila abcb15 was a typical ABC transporter gene. The expression of ABCB15 fused with a C-terminal green fluorescent protein was found to be on the periphery of the cell, suggesting that ABCB15 was a membrane pump protein. In addition, cells with abcb15 partially knocked down (abcb15-KD) grew slower than wild-type cells in the presence of 256 mg L(-1) DDT, indicating the tolerance of abcb15-KD strain to DDT exposure was decreased. Thus, we suggest that in Tetrahymena, the membrane pump protein encoded by ABCT gene abcb15 can enhance the tolerance to DDT and protect cells from this exogenous toxin by efficiently pumping it to the extracellular space.

  16. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine–vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface. PMID:24019465

  17. ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 deficiency causes hypertriglyceridemia by affecting multiple metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-González, Jesús; Julve, Josep; Rotllan, Noemí; Llaverias, Gemma; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in ABCG5 or ABCG8 transporters are responsible for sitosterolemia, an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the accumulation of plant sterols. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ABCG5 and ABCG8 deficiency on TG metabolism in mice. Experiments were carried out in wild-type (G5/G8+/+) mice, mice heterozygous for ABCG5 and ABCG8 deficiency (G5/G8+/-) and ABCG5/G8-deficient (G5/G8-/-) mice fed a chow diet. Plasma TG were 2.6 and 4.3-fold higher in fasted G5/G8+/- and G5/G8-/- mice, respectively, than in G5/G8+/+ mice. Postprandial TG were 5-fold higher in G5/G8-/- mice. TG metabolism studies indicate that: first, the fractional catabolic rate was significantly lower in G5/G8+/- (1.3-fold) and G5/G8-/- mice (1.5-fold) compared to G5/G8+/+ and postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activities were significantly lower in G5/G8+/- (1.8-fold) and G5/G8-/- mice (5.4-fold) than in G5/G8+/+. Second, liver TG secretion was 1.3-fold higher in G5/G8+/- and G5/G8-/- than in G5/G8+/+ mice and this was associated with an increase in liver LXR, FAS, ACAC and CD36 gene expression. Third, TG intestinal secretion, determined after an oral fat gavage of glycerol tri[9,10(n)-(3)H] oleate, was 5.8-fold higher in G5/G8-/- than in G5/G8+/+ mice. Also, the HOMA index was 2.6-fold higher in G5/G8-/- than in G5/G8+/+ mice, reflecting a degree of insulin resistance. In conclusion, ABCG5/G8 deficiency in mice fed a chow diet markedly raises TG levels by impairing TG catabolism and by increasing liver and intestinal TG secretion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a "multitasking" ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Susan P C

    2014-11-07

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Kinetics of signaling-DNA-aptamer-ATP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Issei; Shi, An-Chang; Nutiu, Razvan; Yu, Jasmine M. Y.; Li, Yingfu

    2009-03-01

    DNA aptamers are molecular biosensors consisting of single functionalized DNA molecules, which can bind to specific targets or complementary DNA sequences. The binding kinetics of DNA aptamers is studied by fluorescence quenching at 23°C . A kinetic model for the binding reaction of DNA aptamer, antisense DNA, and ATP target is developed to describe experimental observations. The approach leads to a simple procedure to deduce relevant kinetic reactions and their rate constants. A comparison between theory and experiments indicates that the previously established bimolecular DNA-ATP binding does not provide a complete description of the experimental data. Side reactions such as trimolecular complexation are proposed. Rate constants of the model are determined by comparing the model predictions and experiments. Good agreements between the model and experiments have been obtained. Possible blocking reactions by the misfolded DNA aptamer are also discussed.

  20. Equilibrated atomic models of outward-facing P-glycoprotein and effect of ATP binding on structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G

    2015-01-20

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that alternates between inward- and outward-facing conformations to capture and force substrates out of cells like a peristaltic pump. The high degree of similarity in outward-facing structures across evolution of ABC transporters allowed construction of a high-confidence outward-facing Pgp atomic model based on crystal structures of outward-facing Sav1866 and inward-facing Pgp. The model adhered to previous experimentally determined secondary- and tertiary- configurations during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in the presence or absence of MgATP. Three long lasting (>100 ns) meta-stable states were apparent in the presence of MgATP revealing new insights into alternating access. The two ATP-binding pockets are highly asymmetric resulting in differential control of overall structural dynamics and allosteric regulation of the drug-binding pocket. Equilibrated Pgp has a considerably different electrostatic profile compared to Sav1866 that implicates significant kinetic and thermodynamic differences in transport mechanisms.

  1. SwissProt search result: AK120079 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120079 J013012G06 (O95477) ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ATP-binding casset...te transporter 1) (ATP-binding cassette 1) (ABC-1) (Cholesterol efflux regulatory protein) ABCA1_HUMAN 2e-11 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK059549 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059549 001-029-F10 (O95477) ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ATP-binding casset...te transporter 1) (ATP-binding cassette 1) (ABC-1) (Cholesterol efflux regulatory protein) ABCA1_HUMAN 9e-11 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK070374 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070374 J023051G10 (O95477) ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ATP-binding casset...te transporter 1) (ATP-binding cassette 1) (ABC-1) (Cholesterol efflux regulatory protein) ABCA1_HUMAN 6e-12 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK119274 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119274 001-130-B06 (O95477) ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ATP-binding casset...te transporter 1) (ATP-binding cassette 1) (ABC-1) (Cholesterol efflux regulatory protein) ABCA1_HUMAN 8e-55 ...

  5. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2?) and tungstate (WO4 2?). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  6. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  7. Structural organization of essential iron-sulfur clusters in the evolutionarily highly conserved ATP-binding cassette protein ABCE1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthelme, Dominik; Scheele, Urte; Dinkelaker, Stephanie; Janoschka, Adam; MacMillan, Fraser; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Stagni, Marco Salamone; Bill, Eckhard; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Schuenemann, Volker; Tampe, Robert; Schünemann, Volker

    2007-01-01

    The ABC protein ABCE1, formerly named RNase L inhibitor RLI1, is one of the most conserved proteins in evolution and is expressed in all organisms except eubacteria. Because of its fundamental role in translation initiation and/or ribosome biosynthesis, ABCE1 is essential for life. Its molecular

  8. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  9. Facile conversion of ATP-binding RNA aptamer to quencher-free molecular aptamer beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoojin; Nim-Anussornkul, Duangrat; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Morii, Takashi; Kim, Byeang Hyean

    2018-01-15

    We have developed RNA-based quencher-free molecular aptamer beacons (RNA-based QF-MABs) for the detection of ATP, taking advantage of the conformational changes associated with ATP binding to the ATP-binding RNA aptamer. The RNA aptamer, with its well-defined structure, was readily converted to the fluorescence sensors by incorporating a fluorophore into the loop region of the hairpin structure. These RNA-based QF-MABs exhibited fluorescence signals in the presence of ATP relative to their low background signals in the absence of ATP. The fluorescence emission intensity increased upon formation of a RNA-based QF-MAB·ATP complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Zinc and ATP Binding of the Hexameric AAA-ATPase PilF from Thermus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Ralf; Herzberg, Martin; Nies, Dietrich H.; Joos, Friederike; Rathmann, Barbara; Thielmann, Yvonne; Averhoff, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The traffic AAA-ATPase PilF is essential for pilus biogenesis and natural transformation of Thermus thermophilus HB27. Recently, we showed that PilF forms hexameric complexes containing six zinc atoms coordinated by conserved tetracysteine motifs. Here we report that zinc binding is essential for complex stability. However, zinc binding is neither required for pilus biogenesis nor natural transformation. A number of the mutants did not exhibit any pili during growth at 64 °C but still were transformable. This leads to the conclusion that type 4 pili and the DNA translocator are distinct systems. At lower growth temperatures (55 °C) the zinc-depleted multiple cysteine mutants were hyperpiliated but defective in pilus-mediated twitching motility. This provides evidence that zinc binding is essential for the role of PilF in pilus dynamics. Moreover, we found that zinc binding is essential for complex stability but dispensable for ATPase activity. In contrast to many polymerization ATPases from mesophilic bacteria, ATP binding is not required for PilF complex formation; however, it significantly increases complex stability. These data suggest that zinc and ATP binding increase complex stability that is important for functionality of PilF under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:25202014

  11. The structural basis of a high affinity ATP binding ε subunit from a bacterial ATP synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krah

    Full Text Available The ε subunit from bacterial ATP synthases functions as an ATP sensor, preventing ATPase activity when the ATP concentration in bacterial cells crosses a certain threshold. The R103A/R115A double mutant of the ε subunit from thermophilic Bacillus PS3 has been shown to bind ATP two orders of magnitude stronger than the wild type protein. We use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to derive the structural basis of the high affinity ATP binding to the R103A/R115A double mutant. Our results suggest that the double mutant is stabilized by an enhanced hydrogen-bond network and fewer repulsive contacts in the ligand binding site. The inferred structural basis of the high affinity mutant may help to design novel nucleotide sensors based on the ε subunit from bacterial ATP synthases.

  12. Evaluation of Anti-tumor and Chemoresistance-lowering Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of breast cancer cells with pectolinarigenin reduced the chemoresistance of the cells to doxorubicin. At the same time, mRNA expression of chemoresistance genes (ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2, ABCG2 and ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1, MDR1) was repressed by pectolinarigenin.

  13. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter genes up-regulation in untreated hepatocellular carcinoma is mediated by cellular microRNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borel, Florie; Han, Ruiqi; Visser, Allerdien; Petry, Harald; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Konstantinova, Pavlina

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are drug efflux pumps responsible for the multidrug resistance phenotype causing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment failure. Here we studied the expression of 15 ABC transporters relevant for multidrug resistance in 19 paired HCC

  14. ABC Transporter Subfamily D: Distinct Differences in Behavior between ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 in Subcellular Localization, Function, and Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Kawaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are one of the largest families of membrane-bound proteins and transport a wide variety of substrates across both extra- and intracellular membranes. They play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. To date, four ABC transporters belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 are localized to peroxisomes and lysosomes, respectively. ABCD1 and ABCD2 are involved in the transport of long and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA or their CoA-derivatives into peroxisomes with different substrate specificities, while ABCD3 is involved in the transport of branched chain acyl-CoA into peroxisomes. On the other hand, ABCD4 is deduced to take part in the transport of vitamin B12 from lysosomes into the cytosol. It is well known that the dysfunction of ABCD1 results in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, a severe neurodegenerative disease. Recently, it is reported that ABCD3 and ABCD4 are responsible for hepatosplenomegaly and vitamin B12 deficiency, respectively. In this review, the targeting mechanism and physiological functions of the ABCD transporters are summarized along with the related disease.

  15. ABC Transporter Subfamily D: Distinct Differences in Behavior between ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 in Subcellular Localization, Function, and Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest families of membrane-bound proteins and transport a wide variety of substrates across both extra- and intracellular membranes. They play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. To date, four ABC transporters belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 and ABCD4 are localized to peroxisomes and lysosomes, respectively. ABCD1 and ABCD2 are involved in the transport of long and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) or their CoA-derivatives into peroxisomes with different substrate specificities, while ABCD3 is involved in the transport of branched chain acyl-CoA into peroxisomes. On the other hand, ABCD4 is deduced to take part in the transport of vitamin B12 from lysosomes into the cytosol. It is well known that the dysfunction of ABCD1 results in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, a severe neurodegenerative disease. Recently, it is reported that ABCD3 and ABCD4 are responsible for hepatosplenomegaly and vitamin B12 deficiency, respectively. In this review, the targeting mechanism and physiological functions of the ABCD transporters are summarized along with the related disease. PMID:27766264

  16. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1β release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Kyle L; Chekan, Jonathan R; Cox, Courtney L; Burkhart, Brandon J; Nair, Satish K; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2014-10-01

    Despite intensive research, the cyclodehydratase responsible for azoline biogenesis in thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) natural products remains enigmatic. The collaboration of two proteins, C and D, is required for cyclodehydration. The C protein is homologous to E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes, whereas the D protein is within the YcaO superfamily. Recent studies have demonstrated that TOMM YcaOs phosphorylate amide carbonyl oxygens to facilitate azoline formation. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an uncharacterized YcaO from Escherichia coli (Ec-YcaO). Ec-YcaO harbors an unprecedented fold and ATP-binding motif. This motif is conserved among TOMM YcaOs and is required for cyclodehydration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C protein regulates substrate binding and catalysis and that the proline-rich C terminus of the D protein is involved in C protein recognition and catalysis. This study identifies the YcaO active site and paves the way for the characterization of the numerous YcaO domains not associated with TOMM biosynthesis.

  18. The effects of ADF/cofilin and profilin on the conformation of the ATP-binding cleft of monomeric actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Roland; Pozsonyi, Kinga; Nevalainen, Elisa; Lappalainen, Pekka; Nyitrai, Miklós; Hild, Gábor

    2009-03-18

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin and profilin are small actin-binding proteins, which have central roles in cytoskeletal dynamics in all eukaryotes. When bound to an actin monomer, ADF/cofilins inhibit the nucleotide exchange, whereas most profilins accelerate the nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. In this study the effects of ADF/cofilin and profilin on the accessibility of the actin monomer's ATP-binding pocket was investigated by a fluorescence spectroscopic method. The fluorescence of the actin bound epsilon-ATP was quenched with a neutral quencher (acrylamide) in steady-state and time dependent experiments, and the data were analyzed with a complex form of the Stern-Volmer equation. The experiments revealed that in the presence of ADF/cofilin the accessibility of the bound epsilon-ATP decreased, indicating a closed and more compact ATP-binding pocket induced by the binding of ADF/cofilin. In the presence of profilin the accessibility of the bound epsilon-ATP increased, indicating a more open and approachable protein matrix around the ATP-binding pocket. The results of the fluorescence quenching experiments support a structural mechanism regarding the regulation of the nucleotide exchange on actin monomers by ADF/cofilin and profilin.

  19. Long-range coupling between ATP-binding and lever-arm regions in myosin via dielectric allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takato; Ohnuki, Jun; Takano, Mitsunori

    2017-12-01

    A protein molecule is a dielectric substance, so the binding of a ligand is expected to induce dielectric response in the protein molecule, considering that ligands are charged or polar in general. We previously reported that binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to molecular motor myosin actually induces such a dielectric response in myosin due to the net negative charge of ATP. By this dielectric response, referred to as "dielectric allostery," spatially separated two regions in myosin, the ATP-binding region and the actin-binding region, are allosterically coupled. In this study, from the statistically stringent analyses of the extensive molecular dynamics simulation data obtained in the ATP-free and the ATP-bound states, we show that there exists the dielectric allostery that transmits the signal of ATP binding toward the distant lever-arm region. The ATP-binding-induced electrostatic potential change observed on the surface of the main domain induced a movement of the converter subdomain from which the lever arm extends. The dielectric response was found to be caused by an underlying large-scale concerted rearrangement of the electrostatic bond network, in which highly conserved charged/polar residues are involved. Our study suggests the importance of the dielectric property for molecular machines in exerting their function.

  20. Long-range coupling between ATP-binding and lever-arm regions in myosin via dielectric allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takato; Ohnuki, Jun; Takano, Mitsunori

    2017-12-07

    A protein molecule is a dielectric substance, so the binding of a ligand is expected to induce dielectric response in the protein molecule, considering that ligands are charged or polar in general. We previously reported that binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to molecular motor myosin actually induces such a dielectric response in myosin due to the net negative charge of ATP. By this dielectric response, referred to as "dielectric allostery," spatially separated two regions in myosin, the ATP-binding region and the actin-binding region, are allosterically coupled. In this study, from the statistically stringent analyses of the extensive molecular dynamics simulation data obtained in the ATP-free and the ATP-bound states, we show that there exists the dielectric allostery that transmits the signal of ATP binding toward the distant lever-arm region. The ATP-binding-induced electrostatic potential change observed on the surface of the main domain induced a movement of the converter subdomain from which the lever arm extends. The dielectric response was found to be caused by an underlying large-scale concerted rearrangement of the electrostatic bond network, in which highly conserved charged/polar residues are involved. Our study suggests the importance of the dielectric property for molecular machines in exerting their function.

  1. Design and synthesis of a heterocyclic compound collection for probing the spatial charactistics of ATP binding sites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kenyon, CP

    2006-02-28

    Full Text Available stream_source_info parkinson_2006.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3323 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name parkinson_2006.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Design and Synthesis of a... Heterocyclic Compound Collection for Probing the Spatial Charactistics of ATP Binding Sites Presented at the CSIR Conference Centre CSIR Biosciences C.P. Kenyon, P.M. Matlaba, C.J. Parkinson, A.L. Rousseau and C.W. van der Westhuyzen February 28, 2006...

  2. Membrane topology of the lactococcal bacteriocin ATP-binding cassette transporter protein LcnC : Involvement of LcnC in lactococcin A maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, CM; Tiemersma, J; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1999-01-01

    Many non-lantibiotic bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria are produced as precursors with N-terminal leader peptides different from those present in preproteins exported by the general sec-dependent (type II) secretion pathway. These bacteriocins utilize a dedicated (type I) secretion system for

  3. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeesh Balan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy; and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004. This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004 and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05 cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency for MTLE-HS in south Indian ancestry from Kerala.

  4. Versatile inhibitory effects of the flavonoid-derived PI3K/Akt inhibitor, LY294002, on ATP-binding cassette transporters that characterize stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Yasuo; Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Ono, Yuko; Ueda, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells capable of proliferation, self-renewal, and production of a large number of differentiated progeny. Stem cells exist even in malignancies. They are called cancer stem cells, which may represent the origin of these tumors and may be one of the reasons of chemoresistance. The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is important for the maintenance of pluripotency in stem cells. Flow cytometry assay for identifying stem cells defines a side populati...

  5. Impact of genetic variants of ATP binding cassette B1, AICAR transformylase/IMP cyclohydrolase, folyl-polyglutamatesynthetase, and methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase on methotrexate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Icardo, Luis; Lamana, Amalia; Ortiz, Ana María; García Lorenzo, Elena; Moreno Fresneda, Pablo; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    To analyze the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with well-known functional impact of methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase (MTHFR; rs1801131 and rs1801133), the membrane transporter ABCB1 (rs1045642), the AICAR transformylase/IMP cyclohydrolase (ATIC; rs2372536) and folyl-polyglutamatesynthetase (FPGS; rs1544105), on liver and bone marrow toxicity of methotrexate (MTX). We analyzed 1415 visits from 350 patients of the PEARL (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal) study: (732 with MTX, 683 without MTX). The different SNPs were genotyped using specific TaqMan probes (Applied Biosystems). Multivariate analyzes were performed using generalized linear models in which the dependent variables were the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (liver toxicity), leukocytes, platelets or hemoglobin (hematologic toxicity) and adjusted for clinical variables (disease activity, etc.), analytical (renal function, etc.), sociodemographic (age, sex, etc.) and genetic variants of MTHFR, ABCB1, ATIC and FPGS. The effect of these variables on the MTX doses prescribed throughout follow-up was also analyzed through multivariate analysis nested by visit and patient. When taking MTX, those patients carrying the CC genotype of rs1045642 in ABCB1 showed significantly higher GPT levels (7.1±2.0 U/L; P<.001). Carrying at least one G allele of rs1544105 in FPGS was associated with lower leukocyte (-0.67±0.32; 0.038), hemoglobin (-0.34±0.11g/dL; P=.002), and platelet (-11.8±4.7; P=.012) levels. The presence of the G allele of rs1544105 in FPGS, and the T allele of rs1801133 in MTHFR, was significantly associated with the use of lower doses of MTX. Our data suggest that genotyping functional variants in FGPS and MTHFR enzymes and the transporter ABCB1 could help to identify patients with increased risk of MTX toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome-wide identification and evolution of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila: A case of functional divergence in a multigene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Dongxia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, ABC transporters that utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to expel cellular substrates into the environment are responsible for most of the efflux from cells. Many members of the superfamily of ABC transporters have been linked with resistance to multiple drugs or toxins. Owing to their medical and toxicological importance, members of the ABC superfamily have been studied in several model organisms and warrant examination in newly sequenced genomes. Results A total of 165 ABC transporter genes, constituting a highly expanded superfamily relative to its size in other eukaryotes, were identified in the macronuclear genome of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Based on ortholog comparisons, phylogenetic topologies and intron characterizations, each highly expanded ABC transporter family of T. thermophila was classified into several distinct groups, and hypotheses about their evolutionary relationships are presented. A comprehensive microarray analysis revealed divergent expression patterns among the members of the ABC transporter superfamily during different states of physiology and development. Many of the relatively recently formed duplicate pairs within individual ABC transporter families exhibit significantly different expression patterns. Further analysis showed that multiple mechanisms have led to functional divergence that is responsible for the preservation of duplicated genes. Conclusion Gene duplications have resulted in an extensive expansion of the superfamily of ABC transporters in the Tetrahymena genome, making it the largest example of its kind reported in any organism to date. Multiple independent duplications and subsequent divergence contributed to the formation of different families of ABC transporter genes. Many of the members within a gene family exhibit different expression patterns. The combination of gene duplication followed by both sequence divergence and acquisition of new patterns of expression likely plays a role in the adaptation of Tetrahymen a to its environment.

  7. Deficiency of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters A1 and G1 in Macrophages Increases Inflammation and Accelerates Atherosclerosis in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Pagler, Tamara A.; Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Kappus, Mojdeh S.; Gorman, Darren J.; Nagareddy, Prabhakara R.; Zhu, Xuewei; Abramowicz, Sandra; Parks, John S.; Welch, Carrie; Fisher, Edward A.; Wang, Nan; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Tall, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Plasma high-density lipoprotein levels are inversely correlated with atherosclerosis. Although it is widely assumed that this is attributable to the ability of high-density lipoprotein to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, direct experimental support for this

  8. Tiaozhi Tongmai Granules reduce atherogenesis and promote the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in rabbit atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Sun

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Tiaozhi Tongmai Granules appear to have an anti-atherogenic effect that is most likely mediated by simultaneously upregulating the protein expression of ABCA1 in rabbit atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and in the liver.

  9. Association of three common single nucleotide polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette G8 gene with gallstone disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Cai, Qu; Chen, Er-Zhen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between these polymorphisms and gallstone disease using meta-analysis and compared the hepatic ABCG5/G8 mRNA expression and biliary lipids composition in patients with different genotypes of T400K and Y54C. Data were analyzed using the Stata/SE 11.0 software and a random- effects model was applied irrespective of between-study heterogeneity. Hepatic mRNA expression of ABCG5/G8 genes in 182 patients with gallstone disease and 35 gallstone-free patients who underwent cholecystectomy were determined using real-time PCR. Genotypes of Y54C and T400K in the ABCG8 gene were determined by allelic discrimination using either genomic DNA or hepatic cDNA as template by Taqman assays. Biliary compostion in gallbladder bile was assayed in these patients as well. Ten papers including 13 cohorts were included for the final analysis. In the genotype model, the overall association between genotype with gallstone was significant for D19H (OR = 2.43, 95%CI: 2.23-2.64, P<0.001), and for Y54C (OR = 1.36, 95%CI: 1.01-1.83, P = 0.044), or T400K (OR = 1.17, 95%CI: 0.96-1.43. P = 0.110). In allele model, minor alleles of D19H polymorphism (allele D: OR = 2.25, 95%CI: 2.10-2.42, P<0.001) and of T400K polymorphism (allele K: OR = 1.18, 95%CI: 1.06-1.31, P<0.001) were related with an increased risk of gallstone disease. However, minor allele of Y54C polymorphism (allele Y, OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 0.96-1.21, P = 0.146) was not related with gallstone disease. I(2) statistics indicated no significant between-study heterogeneity for all genetic models for any of the three polymorphisms. Funnel plot and Egger's test suggested the absence of publication bias as well. However, no association of T400K and Y54C polymorphism with hepatic ABCG8/G5 mRNA expression or biliary lipids composition was found. Our study showed strong association of D19H polymorphism with gallstone disease. T400K and Y54C polymorphism, though to a less extent, may also relate with gallstone disease.

  10. Association of three common single nucleotide polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette G8 gene with gallstone disease: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Yan Jiang

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the association between these polymorphisms and gallstone disease using meta-analysis and compared the hepatic ABCG5/G8 mRNA expression and biliary lipids composition in patients with different genotypes of T400K and Y54C.Data were analyzed using the Stata/SE 11.0 software and a random- effects model was applied irrespective of between-study heterogeneity. Hepatic mRNA expression of ABCG5/G8 genes in 182 patients with gallstone disease and 35 gallstone-free patients who underwent cholecystectomy were determined using real-time PCR. Genotypes of Y54C and T400K in the ABCG8 gene were determined by allelic discrimination using either genomic DNA or hepatic cDNA as template by Taqman assays. Biliary compostion in gallbladder bile was assayed in these patients as well.Ten papers including 13 cohorts were included for the final analysis. In the genotype model, the overall association between genotype with gallstone was significant for D19H (OR = 2.43, 95%CI: 2.23-2.64, P<0.001, and for Y54C (OR = 1.36, 95%CI: 1.01-1.83, P = 0.044, or T400K (OR = 1.17, 95%CI: 0.96-1.43. P = 0.110. In allele model, minor alleles of D19H polymorphism (allele D: OR = 2.25, 95%CI: 2.10-2.42, P<0.001 and of T400K polymorphism (allele K: OR = 1.18, 95%CI: 1.06-1.31, P<0.001 were related with an increased risk of gallstone disease. However, minor allele of Y54C polymorphism (allele Y, OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 0.96-1.21, P = 0.146 was not related with gallstone disease. I(2 statistics indicated no significant between-study heterogeneity for all genetic models for any of the three polymorphisms. Funnel plot and Egger's test suggested the absence of publication bias as well. However, no association of T400K and Y54C polymorphism with hepatic ABCG8/G5 mRNA expression or biliary lipids composition was found.Our study showed strong association of D19H polymorphism with gallstone disease. T400K and Y54C polymorphism, though to a less extent, may also relate with gallstone disease.

  11. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Tek Tay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  13. ATP-binding motifs play key roles in Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, function for bi-polar growth control in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Dong Keun; Cho, Bon A; Kim, Hyong Bai

    2005-06-03

    Kinesin is a microtubule-based motor protein with various functions related to the cell growth and division. It has been reported that Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, which belongs to the kinesin heavy chain superfamily, localizes on microtubules and may play an important role in cytokinesis. However, the function of Krp1p has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we overexpressed an intact form and three different mutant forms of Krp1p in fission yeast constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two ATP-binding motifs or by truncation of the leucine zipper-like motif (LZiP). We observed hyper-extended microtubules and the aberrant nuclear shape in Krp1p-overexpressed fission yeast. As a functional consequence, a point mutation of ATP-binding domain 1 (G89E) in Krp1p reversed the effect of Krp1p overexpression in fission yeast, whereas the specific mutation in ATP-binding domain 2 (G238E) resulted in the altered cell polarity. Additionally, truncation of the leucine zipper-like domain (LZiP) at the C-terminal of Krp1p showed a normal nuclear division. Taken together, we suggest that krp1p is involved in regulation of cell-polarized growth through ATP-binding motifs in fission yeast.

  14. Identification of the magnesium-binding domain of the high affinity ATP binding-site of the Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli seca protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, J.P.W.; Klose, M; de Wit, Janny; Blaauwen, T.den; Freudl, R; Driessen, A.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The homodimeric SecA protein is the peripheral subunit of the translocase, and couples the hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of precursor proteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. The high affinity ATP binding activity of SecA resides in the amino-terminal domain of SecA. This domain

  15. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-24

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  16. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of cytoskeleton- and ATP-binding-related genes in MLO-Y4 osteocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Fan; Qi, Yiduo; Hu, Lifang; Li, Dijie; Yin, Chong; Su, Peihong; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Qian, Jing; Zhou, Hongpo; Zou, Yiwei; Qian, Airong

    2016-12-01

    Bone undergoes dynamic modelling and remodelling processes, and it requires gravity-mediated mechanical stimulation for the maintenance of mineral content and structure. Osteocytes are the most commonly found cells in the mature bone, and they are sensitive to mechanical changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of microgravity simulated with a random position machine (RPM) on the gene expression profile of osteocytes. Genes sensitive to RPM treatment were sorted on the basis of biological processes, interactions and signalling pathways. Overall, 504 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in osteocytes cultured under RPM conditions were found. The DEGs were further analysed using bioinformatics tools such as DAVID and iReport. A total of 15 ATP-binding and cytoskeleton-related genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our findings demonstrate that the RPM affected the expression of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodelling and the energy-transfer process in osteocytes. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understanding of the roles of osteocytes in mechanosensation and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone-related diseases.

  17. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  18. Solution structure and function in trifluoroethanol of PP-50, an ATP-binding peptide from F1ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, W J; Abeygunawardana, C; Gittis, A G; Pedersen, P L; Mildvan, A S

    1995-05-10

    PP-50, a synthetic peptide, based on residues 141-190 of the beta-subunit of mitochondrial F1ATPase, containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence for nucleoside triphosphate binding, binds ATP tightly (Kd = 17.5 microM) as found by fluorescence titration at pH 4.0. CD and 2D proton NMR studies at pH 4.0 revealed two beta-turns, regions of extended secondary structure, transient tertiary structure, and flexibility in the GX4GKT region (W.J. Chuang, C. Abeygunawardana, P. L. Pedersen, and A. S. Mildvan, 1992, Biochemistry 31, 7915-7921). CD titration of PP-50 with trifluoroethanol (TFE) reveals a decrease in ellipticity at 208 and 222 nm, saturating at 25% TFE. Computer analysis indicates that 25% TFE increases the helix content from 5.8 to 28.6%, decreases the beta-structure from 30.2 to 20.2% and decreases the coil content from 64 to 51.2%. Fluorescence titrations of H2ATP2- with PP-50 in 25% TFE yields a Kd of 7.3 microM, 2.4-fold tighter than in H2O, probably due to TFE increasing the activity of H2ATP2- . PP-50 completely quenches the fluorescence of H2ATP2- in 25% TFE, while in H2O the fluorescence quenching is only 62%. In H2O the binding of H2ATP2- increases the structure of PP-50 as detected by CD, but in 25% TFE no significant change in CD is found on binding either H2ATP2- or Mg2+ HATP (Kd = 14 microM). The complete proton NMR spectrum of PP-50 in 25% TFE has been assigned. The solution structure, determined by distance geometry, molecular dynamics with simulated annealing, and energy minimization, consists of a coil (residues 1-8), a strand (residues 9-12), a loop (residues 13-22) containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence (residues 16-23), an alpha-helix (residues 23-36), a turn (residues 38-41), and a coil (residues 42-50), similar to that of the corresponding region of the X-ray structure of F1ATPase (J.P. Abrahams, A.G.W. Leslie, R. Lutter, and J. E. Walker, 1994 Nature 370, 621-628) and to the structure of a homologous peptide from the ATP-binding site of

  19. The crustacean gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase: allosteric modulation of high- and low-affinity ATP-binding sites by sodium and potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, D C; Silva, E C C; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L; Furriel, R P M; Leone, F A

    2008-11-15

    The blue crab, Callinectes danae, tolerates exposure to a wide salinity range employing mechanisms of compensatory ion uptake when in dilute media. Although the gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase is vital to hyperosmoregulatory ability, the interactions occurring at the sites of ATP binding on the molecule itself are unknown. Here, we investigate the modulation by Na+ and K+ of homotropic interactions between the ATP-binding sites, and of phosphoenzyme formation of the (Na+,K+)-ATPase from the posterior gills of this euryhaline crab. The contribution of the high- and low-affinity ATP-binding sites to maximum velocity was similar for both Na+ and K+. However, in contrast to Na+, a threshold K+ concentration triggers the appearance of the high-affinity binding sites, displacing the saturation curve to lower ATP concentrations.Further, a low-affinity site for phosphorylation is present on the enzyme. These findings reveal notable differences in the catalytic mechanism of the crustacean (Na+,K+)-ATPase compared to the vertebrate enzyme.

  20. Mevalonate 5-diphosphate mediates ATP binding to the mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from the bacterial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Mermoud, James C.; Paul, Lake N.; Steussy, Calvin Nicklaus; Stauffacher, Cynthia V. (Purdue)

    2017-10-12

    The mevalonate pathway produces isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), a building block for polyisoprenoid synthesis, and is a crucial pathway for growth of the human bacterial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The final enzyme in this pathway, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), acts on mevalonate diphosphate (MVAPP) to produce IPP while consuming ATP. This essential enzyme has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections. Here, we report functional and structural studies on the mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from E. faecalis (MDDEF). The MDDEF crystal structure in complex with ATP (MDDEF–ATP) revealed that the phosphate-binding loop (amino acids 97–105) is not involved in ATP binding and that the phosphate tail of ATP in this structure is in an outward-facing position pointing away from the active site. This suggested that binding of MDDEF to MVAPP is necessary to guide ATP into a catalytically favorable position. Enzymology experiments show that the MDDEF performs a sequential ordered bi-substrate reaction with MVAPP as the first substrate, consistent with the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments. On the basis of ITC results, we propose that this initial prerequisite binding of MVAPP enhances ATP binding. In summary, our findings reveal a substrate-induced substrate-binding event that occurs during the MDDEF-catalyzed reaction. The disengagement of the phosphate-binding loop concomitant with the alternative ATP-binding configuration may provide the structural basis for antimicrobial design against these pathogenic enterococci.

  1. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  3. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by Mismatch and Double-strand Break Repair DNA substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M.; Bianco, Piero R.; Surtees, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3′ non-homologous tail removal (3′NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3′ NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3′ NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3′ NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype. PMID:24746922

  4. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  5. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Moriel-Carretero, María; Montelone, Beth A; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease.

  6. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Herrera-Moyano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes. We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS, we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease.

  7. Zinc and ATP binding of the hexameric AAA-ATPase PilF from Thermus thermophilus: role in complex stability, piliation, adhesion, twitching motility, and natural transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Ralf; Herzberg, Martin; Nies, Dietrich H; Joos, Friederike; Rathmann, Barbara; Thielmann, Yvonne; Averhoff, Beate

    2014-10-31

    The traffic AAA-ATPase PilF is essential for pilus biogenesis and natural transformation of Thermus thermophilus HB27. Recently, we showed that PilF forms hexameric complexes containing six zinc atoms coordinated by conserved tetracysteine motifs. Here we report that zinc binding is essential for complex stability. However, zinc binding is neither required for pilus biogenesis nor natural transformation. A number of the mutants did not exhibit any pili during growth at 64 °C but still were transformable. This leads to the conclusion that type 4 pili and the DNA translocator are distinct systems. At lower growth temperatures (55 °C) the zinc-depleted multiple cysteine mutants were hyperpiliated but defective in pilus-mediated twitching motility. This provides evidence that zinc binding is essential for the role of PilF in pilus dynamics. Moreover, we found that zinc binding is essential for complex stability but dispensable for ATPase activity. In contrast to many polymerization ATPases from mesophilic bacteria, ATP binding is not required for PilF complex formation; however, it significantly increases complex stability. These data suggest that zinc and ATP binding increase complex stability that is important for functionality of PilF under extreme environmental conditions. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

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    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  9. Automated protein subfamily identification and classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan P Brown

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Function prediction by homology is widely used to provide preliminary functional annotations for genes for which experimental evidence of function is unavailable or limited. This approach has been shown to be prone to systematic error, including percolation of annotation errors through sequence databases. Phylogenomic analysis avoids these errors in function prediction but has been difficult to automate for high-throughput application. To address this limitation, we present a computationally efficient pipeline for phylogenomic classification of proteins. This pipeline uses the SCI-PHY (Subfamily Classification in Phylogenomics algorithm for automatic subfamily identification, followed by subfamily hidden Markov model (HMM construction. A simple and computationally efficient scoring scheme using family and subfamily HMMs enables classification of novel sequences to protein families and subfamilies. Sequences representing entirely novel subfamilies are differentiated from those that can be classified to subfamilies in the input training set using logistic regression. Subfamily HMM parameters are estimated using an information-sharing protocol, enabling subfamilies containing even a single sequence to benefit from conservation patterns defining the family as a whole or in related subfamilies. SCI-PHY subfamilies correspond closely to functional subtypes defined by experts and to conserved clades found by phylogenetic analysis. Extensive comparisons of subfamily and family HMM performances show that subfamily HMMs dramatically improve the separation between homologous and non-homologous proteins in sequence database searches. Subfamily HMMs also provide extremely high specificity of classification and can be used to predict entirely novel subtypes. The SCI-PHY Web server at http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu/SCI-PHY/ allows users to upload a multiple sequence alignment for subfamily identification and subfamily HMM construction. Biologists wishing to

  10. Computer modelling reveals new conformers of the ATP binding loop of Na+/K+-ATPase involved in the transphosphorylation process of the sodium pump

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    Gracian Tejral

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of ATP by Na+/K+-ATPase, a P-Type ATPase, catalyzing active Na+ and K+ transport through cellular membranes leads transiently to a phosphorylation of its catalytical α-subunit. Surprisingly, three-dimensional molecular structure analysis of P-type ATPases reveals that binding of ATP to the N-domain connected by a hinge to the P-domain is much too far away from the Asp369 to allow the transfer of ATP’s terminal phosphate to its aspartyl-phosphorylation site. In order to get information for how the transfer of the γ-phosphate group of ATP to the Asp369 is achieved, analogous molecular modeling of the M4–M5 loop of ATPase was performed using the crystal data of Na+/K+-ATPase of different species. Analogous molecular modeling of the cytoplasmic loop between Thr338 and Ile760 of the α2-subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase and the analysis of distances between the ATP binding site and phosphorylation site revealed the existence of two ATP binding sites in the open conformation; the first one close to Phe475 in the N-domain, the other one close to Asp369 in the P-domain. However, binding of Mg2+•ATP to any of these sites in the “open conformation” may not lead to phosphorylation of Asp369. Additional conformations of the cytoplasmic loop were found wobbling between “open conformation”  “semi-open conformation  “closed conformation” in the absence of 2Mg2+•ATP. The cytoplasmic loop’s conformational change to the “semi-open conformation”—characterized by a hydrogen bond between Arg543 and Asp611—triggers by binding of 2Mg2+•ATP to a single ATP site and conversion to the “closed conformation” the phosphorylation of Asp369 in the P-domain, and hence the start of Na+/K+-activated ATP hydrolysis.

  11. Apolipoprotein A-I and HDL Have Anti-Inflammatory Effects on Adipocytes via Cholesterol Transporters: ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) A-1, ABCG-1 and Scavenger Receptor B-1(SRB-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Tomio; Han, Chang Yeop; Mitra, Poulami; Averill, Michelle M.; Tang, Chongren; Goodspeed, Leela; Omer, Mohamed; Subramanian, Savitha; Wang, Shari; Den Hartigh, Laura J.; Wei, Hao; Kim, Eung Ju; Kim, Jinkyu; O'Brien, Kevin D.; Chait, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue associates with insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular disease risk. We previously have shown that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and monocyte chemotactic factors after exposure of adipocytes to saturated fatty acids (SFAs) such as palmitate occurs via translocation of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) into lipid rafts (LRs). The anti-inflammatory effects of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and HDL on macrophages and endothelial cells appears to occur via cholesterol depletion of LRs. However, little is known concerning anti-inflammatory effects of HDL and apoA-I on adipocytes. Objective To determine whether apoA-I and HDL inhibit inflammation in adipocytes and adipose tissue, and whether this is dependent on LRs. Methods and Results In 3T3L-1 adipocytes, apoA-I, HDL and methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibited chemotactic factor expression. ApoA-I and HDL also disrupted LRs, reduced plasma membrane cholesterol content, inhibited NOX4 translocation into LRs, and reduced palmitate-induced ROS generation and monocyte chemotactic factor expression. Silencing ABCA-1 abrogated the effect of apoA-I, but not HDL, while silencing ABCG-1 or SRB-1 abrogated the effect of HDL but not apoA-I. In vivo, apoA-I transgenic mice fed a high fat, high sucrose, cholesterol-containing diet showed reduced chemotactic factor and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. Conclusion ApoA-I and HDL have anti-inflammatory effects in adipocytes and adipose tissue similar to their effects in other cell types. These effects are consistent with disruption and removal of cholesterol from LRs, which are regulated by cholesterol transporters such as ABCA-1, ABCG-1 and SRB-1. PMID:23501697

  12. Polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette transporter genes and interaction with diet and life style factors in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Andersen, Vibeke; Tjonneland, Anne

    2015-01-01

    to assess whether polymorphisms in ABCB1, ABCC2 and ABCG2 were associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to investigate gene-environment (dietary factors, smoking and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and gene-gene interactions between previously studied polymorphisms in IL1B and IL10...... and ABC transporter genes in relation to CRC risk. We used a Danish prospective case-cohort study of 1010 CRC cases and 1829 randomly selected participants from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Incidence rate ratios were calculated based on Cox' proportional hazards model. None...

  13. Two different point mutations in ABL gene ATP-binding domain conferring Primary Imatinib resistance in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Zafar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib (Gleevec is the effective therapy for BCR-ABL positive CML patients. Point mutations have been detected in ATP-binding domain of ABL gene which disturbs the binding of Gleevec to this target leading to resistance. Detection of mutations is helpful in clinical management of imatinib resistance. We established a very sensitive (ASO PCR to detect mutations in an imatinib-resistant CML patient. Mutations C944T and T1052C were detected which cause complete partial imatinib resistance, respectively. This is the first report of multiple point mutations conferring primary imatinib resistance in same patient at the same time. Understanding the biological reasons of primary imatinib resistance is one of the emerging issues of pharmacogenomics and will be helpful in understanding primary resistance of molecularly-targeted cancer therapies. It will also be of great utilization in clinical management of imatinib resistance. Moreover, this ASO-PCR assay is very effective in detecting mutations related to imatinib resistance.

  14. Rad51 ATP binding but not hydrolysis is required to recruit Rad10 in synthesis-dependent strand annealing sites in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Justin; Fischhaber, Paula L

    2013-06-01

    Several modes of eukaryotic of DNA double strand break repair (DSBR) depend on synapsis of complementary DNA. The Rad51 ATPase, the S. cerevisiae homolog of E. coli RecA, plays a key role in this process by catalyzing homology searching and strand exchange between an invading DNA strand and a repair template (e.g. sister chromatid or homologous chromosome). Synthesis dependent strand annealing (SDSA), a mode of DSBR, requires Rad51. Another repair enzyme, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease, acts in the final stages of SDSA, hydrolyzing 3' overhanging single-stranded DNA. Here we show in vivo by fluorescence microscopy that the ATP binding function of yeast Rad51 is required to recruit Rad10 SDSA sites indicating that Rad51 pre-synaptic filament formation must occur prior to the recruitment of Rad1-Rad10. Our data also show that Rad51 ATPase activity, an important step in Rad51 filament disassembly, is not absolutely required in order to recruit Rad1-Rad10 to DSB sites.

  15. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan A.S.

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme, appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase, with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of ..beta..-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% ..cap alpha..-helix, 38% ..beta..-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possible due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% ..cap alpha..-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% ..beta..-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformation changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assess by CD.

  16. Solution structure of the 45-residue ATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as determined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, E.M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildyan, A.S.

    1986-05-01

    In the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase residues 1-45 exist as 47% ..cap alpha..-helix, 29% ..beta..-structure (strands and turns) and 24% coil. The solution structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45, which constitutes the MgATP binding site was studied by 3 independent spectroscopic methods. Globularity of the peptide was shown by its broad NMR resonances which narrow upon denaturation, and by its ability to bind MgATP with similar affinity and conformation as the intact enzyme does. COSY and NOESY NMR methods at 250 and 500 MHz reveal proximities among NH, C..cap alpha.., and C..beta.. protons indicative of >20% ..cap alpha..-helix, and >20% ..beta..-structure. Correlation of regions of secondary structure with the primary sequence by 2D NMR indicates at least one ..cap alpha..-helix (res. 23 to 29) and two ..beta..-strands (res. 12 to 15 and 34 to 38). The broad amide I band in the deconvoluted FTIR spectrum could be fit as the sum of 4 peaks due to specific secondary structures, yielding less than or equal to=45% ..cap alpha..-helix, less than or equal to=40% ..beta..-structure and greater than or equal to=15% coil. The CD spectrum, from 185-250 nm, interpreted with a 3-parameter basis set, yielded 20 +/- 5% ..cap alpha..=helix, and less than or equal to=20% ..beta..-structure. The solution structure of peptide 1-45 thus approximates that of residues 1-45 in the crystal.

  17. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  18. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous metabolites that originate from CNDP2-mediated reverse proteolysis of lactate and amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Robert S; Addie, Ruben; Merkx, Remco; Fish, Alexander; Mahakena, Sunny; Bleijerveld, Onno B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483078X; Altelaar, Maarten|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833517; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J; Borst, P; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances in metabolomics, large parts of the human metabolome are still unexplored. In an untargeted metabolomics screen aiming to identify substrates of the orphan transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5 (ABCC5), we identified a class of mammalian metabolites,

  19. Effect of polymorphisms in the ABCG2, LEPR and SCD1 genes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was performed to investigate the association between polymorphisms in the ABCG2 (ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2), LEPR (leptin receptor) and SCD1 (stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1) genes and milk production traits in Holstein dairy cows in Iran. The analysis was conducted on 816 lactations ...

  20. Genetic and bibliographic information: Abcc9 [GenLibi

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Abcc9 ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C (CFTR/MRP), member 9 rat Hypertension (MeS...H) Cardiovascular Diseases (C14) > Vascular Diseases (C14.907) > Hypertension (C14.907.489) 04A0394477; 05A0803372 ...

  1. AcEST: BP915471 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mily D member 3 OS=Rattus norvegicus GN=Abcd3 PE=1 SV=3 Length = 659 Score = 76.6 bits (187), Expect = 4e-14...096|ABCD3_MOUSE ATP-binding cassette sub-family D member 3 OS=Mus musculus GN=Abcd3 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 659 S

  2. Gene : CBRC-MDOM-11-0105 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-11-0105 UN A UNKNOWN POLX_TOBAC 1e-143 32% gb|AAC49502.1| Pol [Zea mays] ...0.0 97% gnl|UG|Mdm#S37380716 PREDICTED: Monodelphis domestica similar to ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B (MD...NCLFTNVDVSVFRRSDGSLAFKGVLDGKLYLVDFAKEEAGLDACLIAKTSMGWLWHRRLAHVGMKNLHKLLKGEHVIGLTNVHFEKDRPCAACQAGKQVGGAHHSKNVMTTSRPLELLHMD...KWVFRNKQDEHGVVTRNKARLVAKGYAQVAGLDFEETFAPVARLESIRILLAYAAHHSFRLFQMDVKSAFLNGPIKEEVYV

  3. Drosophila ABC Transporter DmHMT-1 Confers Tolerance to Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Half molecule ATP-binding cassette transporters of the HMT1(heavy metal tolerance factor 1)subfamily are required for Cd2+ tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and have homologs in other species, including plants and humans. Based on studies i...

  4. ABCG2 inhibition as a therapeutic approach for overcoming ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-02-16

    Feb 16, 2016 ... Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCP or MXR)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was characterized as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998. ABCG2 physiologically acts as a part of a self- defence mechanism for the organism; it enhances eliminating of toxic ...

  5. ABCG2 inhibition as a therapeutic approach for overcoming ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCP or MXR) / ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was characterized as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998. ABCG2 physiologically acts as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances eliminating of toxic xenobiotic substances ...

  6. Genomewide analysis of ABCBs with a focus on ABCB1 and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The B subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins (ABCB) plays a vital role in auxin efflux. However, no systematic study has been done in apple. In this study, we performed genomewide identification and expression analyses of the ABCB family in Malus domestica for the first time. We identified a total of 25 ...

  7. ABCC6-mediated ATP secretion by the liver is the main source of the mineralization inhibitor inorganic pyrophosphate in the systemic circulation-brief report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Robert S.; Duijst, Suzanne; Mahakena, Sunny; Sommer, Daniela; Szeri, Flóra; Váradi, András; Plomp, Astrid; Bergen, Arthur A.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.; Borst, Piet; van de Wetering, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in ABCC6 underlie the ectopic mineralization disorder pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) and some forms of generalized arterial calcification of infancy, both of which affect the cardiovascular system. Using cultured cells, we recently showed that ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 6

  8. ABCC6-mediated ATP secretion by the liver is the main source of the mineralization inhibitor inorganic pyrophosphate in the systemic circulation-brief report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Robert S; Duijst, Suzanne; Mahakena, Sunny; Sommer, Daniela; Szeri, Flóra; Váradi, András; Plomp, A.S.; Bergen, Arthur A; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Borst, Piet; van de Wetering, Koen

    OBJECTIVE: Mutations in ABCC6 underlie the ectopic mineralization disorder pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) and some forms of generalized arterial calcification of infancy, both of which affect the cardiovascular system. Using cultured cells, we recently showed that ATP-binding cassette subfamily C

  9. AcEST: DK962825 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ly A member 1... 34 0.43 sp|Q8WWZ4|ABCAA_HUMAN ATP-binding cassette sub-family A ...ctase chain 5 OS=C... 31 3.6 sp|Q54R52|ABCAA_DICDI ABC transporter A family member 10 OS=Dict... 31 3.7 sp|P

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15342-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _2( FJ710212 |pid:none) Targeting vector pP{white-STAR}, c... 50 2e-05 AE014298_482( AE014298 |pid:none) Dro...type bezz_... 50 2e-05 (Q99PE7) RecName: Full=ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member ... 50 2e-05 FJ710212

  11. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388144.1 DQ388144 Homo sapiens isolate cftr13838_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388135.1 DQ388135 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11321_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388137.1 DQ388137 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11373_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 2e-45 0 ...

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356259.1 DQ356259 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10975_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  15. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356264.1 DQ356264 Homo sapiens isolate cftr14672_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  16. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388131.1 DQ388131 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10543_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ354389.1 DQ354389 Homo sapiens isolate cftr14683_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388143.1 DQ388143 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11589_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388133.1 DQ388133 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10976_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  20. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ354391.1 DQ354391 Homo sapiens isolate cftr01814_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  1. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388145.1 DQ388145 Homo sapiens isolate cftr13838_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) gene, complete cds; and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) gene, partial cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  2. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356261.1 DQ356261 Homo sapiens isolate cftr14663_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) gene, partial cds; and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) gene, complete cds. PRI 3e-60 0 ...

  3. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388132.1 DQ388132 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10976_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  4. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388141.1 DQ388141 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11521_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  5. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ354390.1 DQ354390 Homo sapiens isolate cftr01814_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  6. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388129.1 DQ388129 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10540_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388134.1 DQ388134 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11321_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  8. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388128.1 DQ388128 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10540_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  9. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356257.1 DQ356257 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10471_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 7e-51 0 ...

  10. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356260.1 DQ356260 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10975_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 7e-51 0 ...

  11. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356258.1 DQ356258 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10471_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) gene, partial cds; and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) gene, complete cds. PRI 3e-60 0 ...

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ354388.1 DQ354388 Homo sapiens isolate cftr14683_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356262.1 DQ356262 Homo sapiens isolate cftr14663_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388140.1 DQ388140 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11521_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  15. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388139.1 DQ388139 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11376_B cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  16. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388130.1 DQ388130 Homo sapiens isolate cftr10543_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 2e-45 0 ...

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388142.1 DQ388142 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11589_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 5e-63 0 ...

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ356263.1 DQ356263 Homo sapiens isolate cftr14672_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK287488 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287488 J043029O04 DQ388138.1 DQ388138 Homo sapiens isolate cftr11376_A cystic fib...rosis transmembrane conductance regulator ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 7 (CFTR) and CTTNBP2 (CTTNBP2) genes, complete cds. PRI 6e-63 0 ...

  20. AcEST: BP914455 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T ATP-binding cassette sub-family D member 3 OS=Rattus norvegicus GN=Abcd3 PE=1 SV=3 Length = 659 Score = 11...bjct: 453 DVLIRDLNFEVRSGANVLICGPNGCGKSS 481 >sp|P55096|ABCD3_MOUSE ATP-binding cassette sub-family D member ...ed protein OS=Trich... 111 3e-23 tr|B0XAF4|B0XAF4_CULQU Peroxisomal membrane protein 70 abcd3 OS=... 110 4e-...7GS0_AEDAE Peroxisomal membrane protein 70 abcd3 OS=... 108 2e-22 >tr|A9T1K4|A9T1K4_PHYPA ATP-binding casset

  1. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  2. CryoEM and Molecular Dynamics of the Circadian KaiB-KaiC Complex Indicates That KaiB Monomers Interact with KaiC and Block ATP Binding Clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, Seth A.; Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; Stewart, Phoebe L. [Case Western; (Vanderbilt); (Vanderbilt-MED)

    2014-10-02

    The circadian control of cellular processes in cyanobacteria is regulated by a posttranslational oscillator formed by three Kai proteins. During the oscillator cycle, KaiA serves to promote autophosphorylation of KaiC while KaiB counteracts this effect. Here, we present a crystallographic structure of the wild-type Synechococcus elongatus KaiB and a cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of a KaiBC complex. The crystal structure shows the expected dimer core structure and significant conformational variations of the KaiB C-terminal region, which is functionally important in maintaining rhythmicity. The KaiBC sample was formed with a C-terminally truncated form of KaiC, KaiC-Δ489, which is persistently phosphorylated. The KaiB–KaiC-Δ489 structure reveals that the KaiC hexamer can bind six monomers of KaiB, which form a continuous ring of density in the KaiBC complex. We performed cryoEM-guided molecular dynamics flexible fitting simulations with crystal structures of KaiB and KaiC to probe the KaiBC protein–protein interface. This analysis indicated a favorable binding mode for the KaiB monomer on the CII end of KaiC, involving two adjacent KaiC subunits and spanning an ATP binding cleft. A KaiC mutation, R468C, which has been shown to affect the affinity of KaiB for KaiC and lengthen the period in a bioluminescence rhythm assay, is found within the middle of the predicted KaiBC interface. The proposed KaiB binding mode blocks access to the ATP binding cleft in the CII ring of KaiC, which provides insight into how KaiB might influence the phosphorylation status of KaiC.

  3. The thnR gene is a negative transcription regulator of the thurincin H genetic cassette in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casados-Vázquez, Luz E; Bideshi, Dennis K; Barboza-Corona, José E

    2017-03-01

    Thurincin H is a bacteriocin synthesized by some strains of Bacillus thuringiensis. In this study, the thurincin H genetic cassette, which contains ten genes, from a Mexican strain of B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni (Btm) was cloned and sequenced. To study the function of the thnR gene component in the cassette, we generated various constructs with or without thnR for expression in Btm. All transformants harboring thnR in recombinant plasmids showed a decrease of ~15 to ~90 % in inhibitory activity against the target strain, Bacillus cereus 183. Importantly, a ~90 % reduction in inhibition occurred with Btm harboring a construct containing thnR alone, suggesting that ThnR, indeed, functions as a negative transcription regulator of the thurincin H cassette. Based on sequence homology, ThnR was classified as a member of the YtrA subfamily of the GntR superfamily of transcriptional regulators.

  4. Finger-Actuated, Self-Contained Immunoassay Cassettes

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Xianbo; Thompson, Jason A.; Chen, Zongyuan; Liu, Changchun; Chen, Dafeng; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Mauk, Michael G; Ongagna, Serge; Barber, Cheryl; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Paul L A M Corstjens; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    The building blocks for an inexpensive, disposable, luminescence-based microfluidic immunoassay cassette are described, and their integration in a point-of-care diagnostic system is demonstrated. Fluid motion in the cassette is driven by depressing finger-actuated pouches. All reagents needed for the immunoassay can be stored in the cassette in liquid form. Prior to use, the cassette consists of two separate parts. A top storage component contains pouches, sealed storage chambers, a metering ...

  5. Fuel cell cassette with compliant seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Haltiner, Jr. J.; Anthony, Derose J.; Klotzbach, Darasack C.; Schneider, Jonathan R.

    2017-11-07

    A fuel cell cassette for forming a fuel cell stack along a fuel cell axis includes a cell retainer, a plate positioned axially to the cell retainer and defining a space axially with the cell retainer, and a fuel cell having an anode layer and a cathode layer separated by an electrolyte layer. The outer perimeter of the fuel cell is positioned in the space between the plate and the cell retainer, thereby retaining the fuel cell and defining a cavity between the cell retainer, the fuel cell, and the plate. The fuel cell cassette also includes a seal disposed within the cavity for sealing the edge of the fuel cell. The seal is compliant at operational temperatures of the fuel cell, thereby allowing lateral expansion and contraction of the fuel cell within the cavity while maintaining sealing at the edge of the fuel cell.

  6. Molecular evolution of the AP2 subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigyo, Mikao; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Ito, Motomi

    2006-02-01

    The AP2 (APETALA2)/EREBP (Ethylene Responsive Element Binding Protein) multigene family includes developmentally and physiologically important transcription factors. AP2/EREBP genes are divided into two subfamilies: AP2 genes with two AP2 domains and EREBP genes with a single AP2/ERF (Ethylene Responsive Element Binding Factor) domain. Based on previous phylogenetic analyses, AP2 genes can be divided into two clades, AP2 and ANT groups. To clarify the molecular evolution of the AP2 subfamily, we isolated and sequenced genes with two AP2 domains from three gymnosperms, Cycas revoluta, Ginkgo biloba, and Gnetum parvifolium,as well as from the moss Physcomitrella patens. Expressions of AP2-like genes, including AP2, in Arabidopsis thaliana are regulated by the microRNA miR172. We found that the target site of miR172 is significantly conserved in gymnosperm AP2 homologs, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms of gene expression using microRNA have been conserved over the three hundred million years since the divergence of gymnosperm and flowering plant lineages. We inferred a phylogenetic relationship of these genes with the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and seed-plant genes available in public DNA databases. The phylogenetic tree showed that the AP2 subfamily diverged into the AP2 and ANT groups before the last common ancestor of land plants and after C. reinhardtii diverged from the land-plant lineage. The tree also indicated that each AP2 and ANT group further diverged into several clades through gene duplications prior to the divergence of gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  7. Disinfection Effect of Film Cassettes by Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    A bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department. Studies have demonstrated a bactericidal effect of ultraviolet irradiation, and to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic and pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection practices suitable for bacteria. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In conclusion, ultraviolet irradiate on film cassette over the surface more than 2 minutes. Ultraviolet dose of 1565 {mu}W {center_dot} s/cm{sup 2}Win in 30 second relative to ultraviolet dose in time.

  8. A study on contamination and disinfection of film cassette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Chung, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Won [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2000-04-15

    In July 2000, a bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient to prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the four different cassette size of the contact surface. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. Also the education of nosocomial infection for radiographer will be required.

  9. A Cassette Based System for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Wayne E.

    2006-11-29

    A hydrogen storage system is described and evaluated. This is based upon a cassette, that is a container for managing hydrogen storage materials. The container is designed to be safe, modular, adaptable to different chemistries, inexpensive, and transportable. A second module receives the cassette and provides the necessary infrastructure to deliver hydrogen from the cassette according to enduser requirements. The modular concept has a number of advantages over approaches that are all in one stand alone systems. The advantages of a cassette based system are discussed, along with results from model and laboratory testing.

  10. Finger-Actuated, Self-Contained Immunoassay Cassettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xianbo; Thompson, Jason A.; Chen, Zongyuan; Liu, Changchun; Chen, Dafeng; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Mauk, Michael G.; Ongagna, Serge; Barber, Cheryl; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-01-01

    The building blocks for an inexpensive, disposable, luminescence-based microfluidic immunoassay cassette are described, and their integration in a point-of-care diagnostic system is demonstrated. Fluid motion in the cassette is driven by depressing finger-actuated pouches. All reagents needed for the immunoassay can be stored in the cassette in liquid form. Prior to use, the cassette consists of two separate parts. A top storage component contains pouches, sealed storage chambers, a metering chamber, and needle seats. The bottom processing component contains connection needles, a mixing chamber, and a detection chamber with immobilized proteins. Subsequent to sample introduction, the storage and processing components are mated. The needles form hydraulic connections between the two parts and, in some cases, close valves. The pouches are then actuated sequentially to induce flow of various reagents and facilitate process operations. The cassette is compatible with different detection modalities. Both a cassette with immunochromatographic-based detection and a cassette with microbead-based detection were constructed and evaluated. The immunochromatographic cassette was used to detect antibodies to HIV in saliva samples. The bead-based cassette was used to detect the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8. The experimental data demonstrates good repeatability and reasonable sensitivity. PMID:19597994

  11. Recombination between the dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 Cassette Array and an aadA1 Gene Cassette Creates a Hybrid Cassette, aadA8b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestal, Alicia M.; Stokes, H. W.; Partridge, Sally R.; Hall, Ruth M.

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination between closely related gene cassettes, such as aadA1 and aadA2, which are 89% identical, can create hybrid cassettes and hybrids of existing cassette arrays. A new cassette array, dfrA12-orfF-aadA8b, which was created by such a recombination event occurring within the aadA2 cassette in the dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 array, has been identified. PMID:16251327

  12. Associations between dru Types and SCCmec Cassettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette D; Boye, Kit; Oliveira, Duarte C

    2013-01-01

    isolates with dru type variants indicating that dru typing is not useful as a first line epidemiological typing tool. However, MRSA isolates cultured from a single patient over a three year period exhibited a single dru type. The finding of dt10a in most SCCmec types suggests that dru and mecA originate......Molecular typing is an important tool in the investigation of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreaks and in following the evolution of MRSA. The staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) contains a hypervariable region with a variable number of 40 bp repeats named direct...... repeat units (dru). The dru region has been suggested as a supplementary typing method for MRSA and an international nomenclature exists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity and variability of the dru region in a diverse collection of MRSA. We studied 302 MRSA isolates harbouring...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-05-0099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-05-0099 ref|NP_001028091.1| breast cancer resistance protein [Macaca mula...tta] sp|Q5MB13|ABCG2_MACMU ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (CD338 antigen) gb|AAW28901.1| breast cancer resistance protein [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028091.1 3e-70 30% ...

  14. Observing cassette culture: user interface implications for digital music libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Toal, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Many people keep their collections of music on cassette tape even if they rarely listen to them. Images of these collections can be found online on photo sharing websites. What can we learn from such collections and what might they tell us about designing interfaces for new digital music libraries? The author conducts an online ethnographic study of over two hundred cassette tape collections, and over sixty participants with the aim of guiding future design of music collections. The author pr...

  15. Transcription, Processing, and Function of CRISPR Cassettes in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Pougach, Ksenia; Semenova, Ekaterina; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Djordjevic, Marko; Wanner, Barry L.; Severinov, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas, bacterial and archaeal systems of interference with foreign genetic elements such as viruses or plasmids, consist of DNA loci called CRISPR cassettes (a set of variable spacers regularly separated by palindromic repeats) and associated cas genes. When a CRISPR spacer sequence exactly matches a sequence in a viral genome, the cell can become resistant to the virus. The CRISPR/Cas systems function through small RNAs originating from longer CRISPR cassette transcripts. While laborato...

  16. A Suggested New Bacteriophage Genus, “Kp34likevirus”, within the Autographivirinae Subfamily of Podoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Eriksson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae phages vB_KpnP_SU503 (SU503 and vB_KpnP_SU552A (SU552A are virulent viruses belonging to the Autographivirinae subfamily of Podoviridae that infect and kill multi-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. Phages SU503 and SU552A show high pairwise nucleotide identity to Klebsiella phages KP34 (NC_013649, F19 (NC_023567 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1 (NC_025418. Bioinformatic analysis of these phage genomes show high conservation of gene arrangement and gene content, conserved catalytically active residues of their RNA polymerase, a common and specific lysis cassette, and form a joint cluster in phylogenetic analysis of their conserved genes. Also, we have performed biological characterization of the burst size, latent period, host specificity (together with KP34 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1, morphology, and structural genes as well as sensitivity testing to various conditions. Based on the analyses of these phages, the creation of a new phage genus is suggested within the Autographivirinae, called “Kp34likevirus” after their type phage, KP34. This genus should encompass the recently genome sequenced Klebsiella phages KP34, SU503, SU552A, F19 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1.

  17. Construction of deletion mutants in the phosphotransferase transport system and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters in Listeria monocytogenes and analysis of their growth under different stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ceruso

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional genomics approaches enable us to investigate the biochemical, cellular, and physiological properties of each gene product and are nowadays applied to enhance food safety by understanding microbial stress responses in food and host-pathogen interactions. Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes listeriosis and is difficult to eliminate this pathogen since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Detailed studies are needed to determine its mode of action and to understand the mechanisms that protect the pathogen when it is subjected to stress. In this study, deletion mutants of phosphotransferase transport system genes (PTS and adenosine triphosphate(ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 were created using molecular techniques. These mutants and the wild-type were tested under different stress conditions, such as in solutions with different NaCl concentration, pH value and for nisin resistance. Results demonstrate that the behaviour of these deletion mutants is different from the wild type. In particular, deleted genes may be involved in L. monocytogenes resistance to nisin and to acid and salt concentrations. Functional genomics research on L. monocytogenes allows a better understanding of the genes related to stress responses and this knowledge may help in intervention strategies to control this food-borne pathogen. Furthermore, specific gene markers can be used to identify and subtype L. monocytogenes. Thus, future development of this study will focus on additional functional analyses of important stress response-related genes, as well as on methods for rapid and sensitive detection of L. monocytogenes such as using DNA microarrays.

  18. [Integrons and resistance gene cassettes: structure and role against antimicrobials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gerardo; Mella, Sergio; Zemelman, Raúl; Bello, Helia; Domínguez, Mariana

    2004-05-01

    Bacteria have developed sophisticated and successful genetic mechanisms to evade the action of antimicrobials. Bacterial multiresistance has caused serious problems in the treatment of nosocomial infections. Integrons and gene cassettes are considered the main genetic elements in the evolution of plasmids and transposons that actively participate in the mobilization of genes, codifying different bacterial resistance mechanisms. This article reviews the historical and structural aspects of integrons and resistance gene cassettes and the presence of these structures in gram negative bacteria isolated from Chilean hospitals in the last ten years.

  19. The Real World Spanish Cassette Program. Script Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternburg, Sheldon G.

    This dual cassette program, accompanied by a script book, is designed to give students listening practice in Spanish, particularly for regional differences of pronunciation and for variety in idiomatic construction. The program may be integrated with texts used in intermediate and advanced levels of instruction. The announcements, jingles, and…

  20. [Integrons and antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes in Shigella flexneri strains ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jeannette; Bello, Helia; Domínguez, Mariana; Mella, Sergio; Zemelman, Raúl; González, Gerardo

    2003-07-01

    The resistance of Shigella flexneri to antimicrobial agents can be associated to the presence of integrons that may contain and express antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes. To study antimicrobial resistance and the presence of integrons and antimicrobial gene cassettes in Shigella flexneri strains. In vitro susceptibility to 27 antimicrobials was studied in twenty four Shigella flexneri strains isolated from stools. The presence of integrons class 1, 2 and 3 and antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers for each gene. Most strains were resistant to one of the following antimicrobials: ampicillin, sulphonamide, trimethoprim, tetracycline, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim or chloramphenicol. Twenty nine percent were simultaneously resistant to all these antimicrobials. Integrons class 1 and 2 were found in 19 strains (79%). Class 3 integrons were not found. Gene cassettes dfrA1 and ant(3")I were associated to integrons class 2 in most strains (15/20, 75%). Genes cat, tetB and blarTEM were detected in 18/24 (75%), 7/24 (29%) and 4/24 (17%) of the strains, respectively and were not associated to any of the studied integrons. Genes that codify enzymes AAC(6')Ib and APH(3')VI were not detected in any strain. The high frequency of integrons found in the studied strains, could partly explain the increasing antimicrobial resistance of Shigella flexneri strains, isolated in Chile.

  1. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 3. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies using a mathematical paradigm. Sk Sarif Hassan Pabitra Pal Choudhury Amita Pal R L Brahmachary Arunava Goswami. Articles Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 389-393 ...

  2. Identification and characterization of the Populus AREB/ABF subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lexiang; Wang, Jia; Ye, Meixia; Li, Ying; Guo, Bin; Chen, Zhong; Li, Hao; An, Xinmin

    2013-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone that plays an important role in responses to abiotic stresses. The ABA-responsive element binding protein/ABRE-binding factor (AREB/ABF) gene subfamily contains crucial transcription factors in the ABA-mediated signaling pathway. In this study, a total of 14 putative AREB/ABF members were identified in the Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray. genome using five AREB/ABF amino acid sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana L. as probes. The 14 putative Populus subfamily members showed high protein similarities, especially in the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain region. A neighbor-joining analysis combined with gene structure data revealed homology among the 14 genes. The expression patterns of the Populus AREB/ABF subfamily suggested that the most abundant transcripts of 11 genes occurred in leaf tissues, while two genes were most transcribed in root tissues. Significantly, eight Populus AREB/ABF gene members were upregulated after treatment with 100 μM exogenous ABA, while the other six members were downregulated. We identified the expression profiles of the subfamily members in Populus tissues and elucidated different response patterns of Populus AREB/ABF members to ABA stress. This study provided insight into the roles of Populus AREB/ABF homologues in plant response to abiotic stresses. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Co-assortment in integron-associated gene cassette assemblages in environmental DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Carolyn A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that integron-associated gene cassettes exist largely in tandem arrays of variable size, ranging from antibiotic resistance arrays of three to five cassettes up to arrays of more than 100 cassettes associated with the vibrios. Further, the ecology of the integron/gene cassette system has been investigated by showing that very many different cassettes are present in even small environmental samples. In this study, we seek to extend the ecological perspective on the integron/gene cassette system by investigating the way in which this diverse cassette metagenome is apportioned amongst prokaryote lineages in a natural environment. Results We used a combination of PCR-based techniques applied to environmental DNA samples and ecological analytical techniques to establish co-assortment within cassette populations, then establishing the relationship between this co-assortment and genomic structures. We then assessed the distribution of gene cassettes within the environment and found that the majority of gene cassettes existed in large co-assorting groups. Conclusions Our results suggested that the gene cassette diversity of a relatively pristine sampling environment was structured into co-assorting groups, predominantly containing large numbers of cassettes per group. These co-assorting groups consisted of different gene cassettes in stoichiometric relationship. Conservatively, we then attributed co-assorting cassettes to the gene cassette complements of single prokaryote lineages and by implication, to large integron-associated arrays. The prevalence of large arrays in the environment raises new questions about the assembly, maintenance and utility of large cassette arrays in prokaryote populations.

  4. Co-assortment in integron-associated gene cassette assemblages in environmental DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Carolyn A; Andrew, Nigel R

    2010-08-10

    It has been shown that integron-associated gene cassettes exist largely in tandem arrays of variable size, ranging from antibiotic resistance arrays of three to five cassettes up to arrays of more than 100 cassettes associated with the vibrios. Further, the ecology of the integron/gene cassette system has been investigated by showing that very many different cassettes are present in even small environmental samples. In this study, we seek to extend the ecological perspective on the integron/gene cassette system by investigating the way in which this diverse cassette metagenome is apportioned amongst prokaryote lineages in a natural environment. We used a combination of PCR-based techniques applied to environmental DNA samples and ecological analytical techniques to establish co-assortment within cassette populations, then establishing the relationship between this co-assortment and genomic structures. We then assessed the distribution of gene cassettes within the environment and found that the majority of gene cassettes existed in large co-assorting groups. Our results suggested that the gene cassette diversity of a relatively pristine sampling environment was structured into co-assorting groups, predominantly containing large numbers of cassettes per group. These co-assorting groups consisted of different gene cassettes in stoichiometric relationship. Conservatively, we then attributed co-assorting cassettes to the gene cassette complements of single prokaryote lineages and by implication, to large integron-associated arrays. The prevalence of large arrays in the environment raises new questions about the assembly, maintenance and utility of large cassette arrays in prokaryote populations.

  5. Reaching Out: The Role of Audio Cassette Communication in Rural Development. Occasional Paper 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarya, Ronny; Colle, Royal D.

    This report describes the state-of-the-art of audio cassette technology (ACT) and reports findings from field tests, case studies, and pilot projects in several countries which demonstrate the potential of audio cassettes as a medium for communicating with rural people. Specific guidance is also offered on how a project can use cassettes as a…

  6. Evolutionary Origin of the Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolo, Joana; Worning, Peder; Nielsen, Jesper Boye

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the most primitive staphylococcal species, those of the Staphylococcus sciuri group, were involved in the first stages of evolution of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), the genetic element carrying the β-lactam resistance gene mecA. Howev....... aureus clones) originated in S. sciuri possibly by a recombination event in a human host or a human-created environment and later was transferred to S. aureus....

  7. Systematics of the neotropical fish subfamily Glandulocaudinae (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naércio A. Menezes

    Full Text Available The systematics of the Glandulocaudinae is reviewed in detail and justification for the recognition of the group as a subfamily is discussed. The subfamily Glandulocaudinae consists of three genera: Lophiobrycon with one species plesiomorphic in some anatomical features but some others exclusively derived relative to the species in the other genera; Glandulocauda with two species intermediate in phylogenetic derivation; and Mimagoniates with seven species (one new, all more phylogenetically derived concerning their pheromone producing caudal-fin organs and with other anatomical characters presumably more derived than in the species of the other genera. Glandulocauda melanogenys Eigenmann, 1911, is considered a junior synonym of Hyphessobrycon melanopleurus Ellis, 1911. A replacement name, Glandulocauda caerulea Menezes & Weitzman, is proposed for G. melanopleura Eigenmann, 1911. Gland cells found in the caudal-fin organs of all species are histologically indistinguishable from club cells and probably secrete a pheromone during courtship. The club cells are associated with somewhat modified to highly derived caudal scales forming a pheromone pumping organ in the more derived genera and species. This subfamily is distributed in freshwaters of eastern and southern Brazil, Paraguay, and northeastern Uruguay.

  8. Polycistronic transcription of fused cassettes and identification of translation initiation signals in an unusual gene cassette array from Pseudomonas aeruginosa [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica L. Fonseca

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gene cassettes found in class 1 integrons are generally promoterless units composed by an open reading frame (ORF, a short 5’ untranslated region (UTR and a 3’ recombination site (attC. Fused gene cassettes are generated by partial or total loss of the attC from the first cassette in an array, creating, in some cases, a fusion with the ORF from the next cassette. These structures are rare and little is known about their mechanisms of mobilization and expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic of mobilization and transcription of the gcu14-blaGES-1/aacA4 gene cassette array, which harbours a fused gene cassette represented by blaGES-1/aacA4. The cassette array was analyzed by Northern blot and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in order to assess the transcription mechanism of blaGES-1/aacA4 fused cassette. Also, inverse polymerase chain reactions (PCR were performed to detect the free circular forms of gcu14, blaGES-1 and aacA4. The Northern blot and real time RT-PCR revealed a polycistronic transcription, in which the fused cassette blaGES-1/aacA4 is transcribed as a unique gene, while gcu14 (with a canonical attC recombination site has a monocistronic transcription. The gcu14 cassette, closer to the weak configuration of cassette promoter (PcW, had a higher transcription level than blaGES-1/aacA4, indicating that the cassette position affects the transcript amounts. The presence of ORF-11 at attI1, immediately preceding gcu14, and of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream blaGES-1/aacA4 composes a scenario for the occurrence of array translation. Inverse PCR generated amplicons corresponding to gcu14, gcu14-aacA4 and gcu14-blaGES-1/aacA4 free circular forms, but not to blaGES-1 and aacA4 alone, indicating that the GES-1 truncated attC is not substrate of integrase activity and that these genes are mobilized together as a unique cassette. This study was original in showing the transcription

  9. Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Marek L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The generic classification of the ant subfamily Dorylinae is revised, with the aim of facilitating identification of easily-diagnosable monophyletic genera. The new classification is based on recent molecular phylogenetic evidence and a critical reappraisal of doryline morphology. New keys and diagnoses based on workers and males are provided, along with reviews of natural history and phylogenetic relationships, distribution maps, and a list of valid species for each lineage. Twenty-eight genera (27 extant and 1 extinct) are recognized within the subfamily, an increase from 20 in the previous classification scheme. Species classified in the polyphyletic Cerapachys and Sphinctomyrmex prior to this publication are here distributed among 9 and 3 different genera, respectively. Amyrmex and Asphinctanilloides are synonymized under Leptanilloides and the currently recognized subgenera are synonymized for Dorylus. No tribal classification is proposed for the subfamily, but several apparently monophyletic genus-groups are discussed. Valid generic names recognized here include: Acanthostichus (= Ctenopyga), Aenictogiton, Aenictus (= Paraenictus, Typhlatta), Cerapachys (= Ceratopachys), Cheliomyrmex, Chrysapace gen. rev., Cylindromyrmex (= Holcoponera, Hypocylindromyrmex, Metacylindromyrmex), Dorylus (= Alaopone syn. n., Anomma syn. n., Cosmaecetes, Dichthadia syn. n., Rhogmus syn. n., Shuckardia, Sphecomyrmex, Sphegomyrmex, Typhlopone syn. n.), Eburopone gen. n., Eciton (= Camptognatha, Holopone, Mayromyrmex), Eusphinctus gen. rev., Labidus (= Nycteresia, Pseudodichthadia), Leptanilloides (= Amyrmex syn. n., Asphinctanilloides syn. n.), Lioponera gen. rev. (= Neophyracaces syn. n., Phyracaces syn. n.), Lividopone, Neivamyrmex (= Acamatus, Woitkowskia), Neocerapachys gen. n., Nomamyrmex, Ooceraea gen. rev. (= Cysias syn. n.), Parasyscia gen. rev., †Procerapachys, Simopone, Sphinctomyrmex, Syscia gen. rev., Tanipone, Vicinopone, Yunodorylus gen. rev., Zasphinctus

  10. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...... technique that involved replacing this portion of the v-rasH effector domain with a linker carrying two BspMI sites in opposite orientations. Since BspMI cleaves outside its recognition sequence, BspMI digestion of the plasmid completely removed the linker, creating a double-stranded gap whose missing ras...

  11. Is this charred material from a VHS video cassette?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtenicht, Tara; Blackledge, Robert D.; Williams, Teresa R.

    2010-06-01

    At his residence, a victim in a double homicide had installed a home-built video surveillance system. The suspects either knew of or discovered this system and removed it. In a backyard at a location associated with the suspects was a barrel used for burning trash. Could charred debris recovered from a metal bowl found among the contents of the barrel be the remains of a VHS video cassette? A positive answer to the question was obtained through a combination of optical microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS).

  12. Recombinogenic engineering of conjugative plasmids with fluorescent marker cassettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Molin, Søren; Zechner, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    An efficient approach for the insertion of fluorescent marker genes with sequence specificity into conjugative plasmids in Escherichia coli is described. For this purpose, homologous recombination of linear double-stranded targeting DNA was mediated by the bacteriophage lambda recombination...... resistance genes and fluorescent markers. The choice of 5' non-homologous extensions in primer pairs used for amplifying the marker cassettes determines the site specificity of the targeting DNA. This methodology is applicable to the modification of all plasmids that replicate in E coli and is not restricted...

  13. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes.

  14. Cassettes for solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2012-10-23

    Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack assembly designs are consistently investigated to develop an assembly that provides optimal performance, and durability, within desired cost parameters. A new design includes a repeat unit having a SOFC cassette and being characterized by a three-component construct. The three components include an oxidation-resistant, metal window frame hermetically joined to an electrolyte layer of a multi-layer, anode-supported ceramic cell and a pre-cassette including a separator plate having a plurality of vias that provide electrical contact between an anode-side collector within the pre-cassette and a cathode-side current collector of an adjacent cell. The third component is a cathode-side seal, which includes a standoff that supports a cathode channel spacing between each of the cassettes in a stack. Cassettes are formed by joining the pre-cassette and the window frame.

  15. Top-Down Clustering for Protein Subfamily Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eduardo P.; Vens, Celine; Blockeel, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel method for the task of protein subfamily identification; that is, finding subgroups of functionally closely related sequences within a protein family. In line with phylogenomic analysis, the method first builds a hierarchical tree using as input a multiple alignment of the protein sequences, then uses a post-pruning procedure to extract clusters from the tree. Differently from existing methods, it constructs the hierarchical tree top-down, rather than bottom-up and associates particular mutations with each division into subclusters. The motivating hypothesis for this method is that it may yield a better tree topology with more accurate subfamily identification as a result and additionally indicates functionally important sites and allows for easy classification of new proteins. A thorough experimental evaluation confirms the hypothesis. The novel method yields more accurate clusters and a better tree topology than the state-of-the-art method SCI-PHY, identifies known functional sites, and identifies mutations that alone allow for classifying new sequences with an accuracy approaching that of hidden Markov models. PMID:23700359

  16. An AC electrokinetics facilitated biosensor cassette for rapid pathogen identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Mohan, Ruchika; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Mach, Kathleen E; Sin, Mandy L Y; McComb, Mason; Joshi, Janhvi; Gau, Vincent; Wong, Pak Kin; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-07-07

    To develop a portable point-of-care system based on biosensors for common infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, the sensing process needs to be implemented within an enclosed fluidic system. On chip sample preparation of clinical samples remains a significant obstacle to achieving robust sensor performance. Herein AC electrokinetics is applied in an electrochemical biosensor cassette to enhance molecular convection and hybridization efficiency through electrokinetics induced fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation. Using E. coli as an exemplary pathogen, we determined the optimal electrokinetic parameters for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA in the biosensor cassette based on the current output, signal-to-noise ratio, and limit of detection. In addition, a panel of six probe sets targeting common uropathogenic bacteria was demonstrated. The optimized parameters were also validated using patient-derived clinical urine samples. The effectiveness of electrokinetics for on chip sample preparation will facilitate the implementation of point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the future.

  17. AC Electrokinetics Facilitated Biosensor Cassette for Rapid Pathogen Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Mohan, Ruchika; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Mach, Kathleen E.; Sin, Mandy L. Y.; McComb, Mason; Joshi, Janhvi; Gau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    To develop a portable point-of-care system based on biosensors for common infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, the sensing process needs to be implemented within an enclosed fluidic system. On chip sample preparation of clinical samples remains a significant obstacle to achieve robust sensor performance. Herein AC electrokinetics is applied in an electrochemical biosensor cassette to enhance molecular convection and hybridization efficiency though electrokinetic induced fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation. Using E. coli as an exemplary pathogen, we determined the optimal electrokinetic parameters for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA in the biosensor cassette based on the current output, signal-to-noise ratio, and limit of detection. In addition, a panel of six probe sets targeting common uropathogenic bacteria was demonstrated. The optimized parameters were also validated using patient-derived clinical urine samples. The effectiveness of electrokinetic for on chip sample preparation will facilitate the implementation of point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the future. PMID:23626988

  18. Subfamily logos: visualization of sequence deviations at alignment positions with high information content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitz Eric

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of relevant sequence deviations can be valuable for elucidating functional differences between protein subfamilies. Interesting residues at highly conserved positions can then be mutated and experimentally analyzed. However, identification of such sites is tedious because automated approaches are scarce. Results Subfamily logos visualize subfamily-specific sequence deviations. The display is similar to classical sequence logos but extends into the negative range. Positive, upright characters correspond to residues which are characteristic for the subfamily, negative, upside-down characters to residues typical for the remaining sequences. The symbol height is adjusted to the information content of the alignment position. Residues which are conserved throughout do not appear. Conclusion Subfamily logos provide an intuitive display of relevant sequence deviations. The method has proven to be valid using a set of 135 aligned aquaporin sequences in which established subfamily-specific positions were readily identified by the algorithm.

  19. A survey of the radiographic cassettes disinfection of university hospitals in seoul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom [College of School, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moon Sun; Kim, Dong Sung [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to prevent nosocomial infection in patients through contact of radiographic cassettes. Data were collected from radiographers working in 29 university hospitals in Seoul in February and March 2001. Radiographic cassettes were disinfected daily in 5 hospitals, weekly in 4 hospitals, monthly in 5 hospitals, bimonthly in 1 hospital and once every three months in another hospital. 12 other hospitals do not practice regular disinfections of radiographic cassettes. Gauze soaked in disinfectant solution is used in 7 hospitals while 11 hospitals used cotton and cloth soaked in disinfectant solution to clean the radiographic cassettes. 26 hospitals used 99% alcohol based disinfectant solutions while 3 hospitals used 75% alcohol based disinfectant, 26 hospitals use of intercourse cassettes outpatients and in patients. In 26 hospitals, all patients shared the same set of radiographic cassettes used in the hospitals, or in 26 hospitals, separate sets of radiographic cassettes are used for outpatients and inpatients. Separate sets of cassettes are used for ICU and inpatients in 6 others hospitals. 23 hospitals used the same sets of radiographic cassettes for all their patients. radiographic cassettes are cleaned in wash area in the study room of the radiographic department in 17 hospitals. 12 other hospitals do not have designated cleaning areas for the cassettes. All radiographers practiced hands washing with soap. All 29 hospitals surveyed have infection control committee. However, only 9 out of the 29 hospitals surveyed provided Infection {center_dot} disinfections control education to radiographers. Only 3 hospitals have radiographers sitting in the infection control committee. Infection management education is conducted in 63 hospitals annually, twice a year in 1 hospital and once every 3 months in 2 hospitals.

  20. An investigation of infection control for x-ray cassettes in a diagnostic imaging department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Matthew [School of Allied Health Professions and Science, Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Rope Walk, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1LT (United Kingdom); Harvey, Jane M. [School of Allied Health Professions and Science, Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Rope Walk, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1LT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.harvey@ucs.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    Introduction: This research was conducted to investigate if X-ray cassettes could be a possible source of pathogens capable of causing nosocomial infections, and if they could be a possible vector for cross infection within the hospital environment. Method: The research involved the swabbing of X-ray cassettes in a Diagnostic Imaging Department of a large hospital in the east of England. Two areas of the Diagnostic Imaging Department were included in the study. Research concentrated on X-ray cassettes used for mobile radiography, accident and emergency and inpatient use. Forty cassettes were swabbed in total specifically for general levels of bacterial contamination, also for the presence or absence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A mapping exercise was completed following the location of an X-ray cassette typically used in mobile radiography. The exercise noted the level of direct contact with patient's skin and other possible routes of infection. Results: The results demonstrated that there were large levels of growth of samples taken from cassettes and developed in the Microbiology Department. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Micrococci, Diptheroids and species of Bacillus were all identified. The mapping exercise in which the journey of a 35/43 cm cassette used for mobile radiography was tracked found that contact with patient's skin and potential pathogens or routes of cross infection was a common occurrence whilst undertaking mobile radiography. Conclusion: The research has identified the presence of bacterial contamination on cassettes. The research established that X-ray cassettes/imaging plates are often exposed to pathogens and possible routes of cross infection; also that patient's skin often comes directly in contact with the X-ray cassette/imaging plate. The research also shows that as cassettes/imaging plates are a potential source of cross infection, the Diagnostic Imaging Department may be partly responsible

  1. Phylogeny of seed dormancy in Convolvulaceae, subfamily Convolvuloideae (Solanales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya, K M G Gehan; Baskin, Jerry M; Geneve, Robert L; Baskin, Carol C

    2009-01-01

    The water gap is an important morphoanatomical structure in seeds with physical dormancy (PY). It is an environmental signal detector for dormancy break and the route of water into the non-dormant seed. The Convolvulaceae, which consists of subfamilies Convolvuloideae (11 tribes) and Humbertoideae (one tribe, monotypic Humberteae), is the only family in the asterid clade known to produce seeds with PY. The primary aim of this study was to compare the morphoanatomical characteristics of the water gap in seeds of species in the 11 tribes of the Convolvuloideae and to use this information, and that on seed dormancy and storage behaviour, to construct a phylogenetic tree of seed dormancy for the subfamily. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to define morphological changes in the hilum area during dormancy break; hand and vibratome sections were taken to describe the anatomy of the water gap, hilum and seed coat; and dye tracking was used to identify the initial route of water entry into the non-dormant seed. Results were compared with a recent cladogram of the family. Species in nine tribes have (a) layer(s) of palisade cells in the seed coat, a water gap and orthodox storage behaviour. Erycibe (Erycibeae) and Maripa (Maripeae) do not have a palisade layer in the seed coat or a water gap, and are recalcitrant. The hilar fissure is the water gap in relatively basal Cuscuteae, and bulges adjacent to the micropyle serve as the water gap in the Convolvuloideae, Dicranostyloideae (except Maripeae) and the Cardiochlamyeae clades. Seeds from the Convolvuloideae have morphologically prominent bulges demarcated by cell shape in the sclereid layer, whereas the Dicranostyloideae and Cardiochlamyeae have non-prominent bulges demarcated by the number of sub-cell layers. The anatomy and morphology of the hilar pad follow the same pattern. PY in the subfamily Convolvuloideae probably evolved in the aseasonal tropics from an ancestor with recalcitrant non-dormant seeds, and

  2. Morphology of Some Species in the Subfamily Papilionoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Adeola OWOLABI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphological study of ten species in the subfamily Papilionoideae was carried out with the view to documenting diagnostic characters that would distinguish or group the species. The species studied belong to four tribes, namely: tribe Desmodieae – Desmodium tortuosum (Sw. DC., Desmodium scorpiurus (Sw. Desv., Desmodium adscendens (Sw. DC., tribe Phaseoleae – Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp., Calopogonium mucunoides Desv., Centrosema molle (Mart. ex. Benth., Mucuna pruriens (Linn. Walp., Vigna unguiculata (Linn. Walp., tribe Crotalarieae – Crotalaria retusa Linn., tribe Robinieae – Gliricidia sepium (Jacq. Walp. Qualitative and quantitative traits which had not been documented in previous works, especially in Nigeria, were studied. These include plant life span; leaf/leaflet apex, base, margin and pubescence; stem type, colour, shape and pubescence; sepal colour and pubescence; nature of margin of petal standard and presence or absence of pedicel; fruit colour, pubescence, tip and shape; seed colour, shape, surface and presence or absence of prominent hilum on the seed; number of seeds per fruit; pedicel length; length and width of petal standard, keel and wing. Characters of taxonomic value documented in this study were leaf type, leaf shape, leaf base, petiole type, stem type, seed shape, petal standard length, petal keel length and petal wing width. Data were subjected to one - way analysis of variance using Duncan’s multiple range test. It was noted that the important characters that can be used in establishing taxonomic relationship in the sub-family Papilionoideae were leaf type, leaf shape, leaf base, petiole type, stem shape, petal colour, petal margin and seed shape.

  3. A novel mutation in the ABCD1 gene of a Moroccan patient with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkar, Adnane; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bakhchane, Amina; Fettah, Houda; Slassi, Ilham; Dorboz, Imen; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Nadifi, Sellama

    2015-11-25

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD; OMIM: 300100) is the most common peroxisomal disease caused by mutations in the ATP-binding cassette, sub-family D member 1 gene or ABCD1 (geneID: 215), the coding gene for the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), which is an ATP-binding transport protein associated to an active transport of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Dysfunction of ALDP induces an accumulation of VLCFAs in all tissues leading to a neurodegenerative disorder that involves the nervous system white matter. In our case report, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as the high levels of VLCFAs prompted the diagnosis the X-ALD. Molecular analysis of ABCD1 gene have shown a pathogenic homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1677C > G; p.(Tyr559*)) in exon 7. Thus, we identified here a novel mutation in the ABCD1 gene in a Moroccan patient causing X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

  4. Nine novel microsatellite markers for the army ant Simopelta pergandei (subfamily Ponerinae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, D.J.C.; Boomsma, J.J.; Pierce, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    Simopelta (subfamily Ponerinae) army ants are specialized predators of other ants in New World tropical forests. Although they show a striking convergence in overall life-history with the well known army ants of the subfamilies Aenictinae, Dorylinae, and Ecitoninae, the genus has been little stud...

  5. On the correct name for some subfamilies of Mustelidae (Mammalia, Carnivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Oliveira do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mustelids (Mustelidae exhibit a wide morphological and ecological diversity, ranging from aquatic to semi arboreal and fossorial forms. It is the most diversity family in Carnivora, and this has promoted a great number of taxonomic arrangements for subfamilies, which can range from two to 15 depending on the author. The relatively recent use of molecular data has helped to elucidate the classification of mustelids, and eight subfamilies are currently recognized: Mustelinae, Galictinae, Helictidinae, Martinae, Melinae, Mellivorinae, Taxidiinae and Lutrinae. However, some of these subfamilies have nomenclatural problems, not receiving the oldest available name. The subfamily that includes martens (Martes, Charronia and Pekania, tayra (Eira and wolverine (Gulo has received the name of Martinae Wagner, 1841, but the oldest available name is Guloninae Gray, 1825. This problem also occurs for the subfamily that includes the grisons (Galictis, Patagonian weasel (Lyncodon, marbled polecat (Vormela and striped weasels (Ictonyx and Poecilogale, which are known as Grisoninae Pocock, 1921, but the correct name for this group is Ictonychinae, Pocock, 1921. The subfamily that includes ferret badgers (Melogale retains the name Helictidinae Gray, 1865, because its validity is not affected when the type-genus of the subfamily becomes a junior synonym of another genus. Furthermore, a list of the extant subfamilies of Mustelidae and their respective synonyms and included genera is provided.

  6. Generation of two induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryeon Son

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is an inherited disorder caused by a mutation in the ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily D member 1 (ABCD1 gene. We generated two induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines from X-ALD patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN by Sendai virus containing OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Established iPSC lines expressed various pluripotency markers, had differentiation potential of three germ layers in vitro, had normal karyotype and retained ABCD1 mutation.

  7. A two-cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product inclusion body formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dual cassette reporter system capable of assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding. The present invention further relates to vectors and host cells comprising the dual cassette reporter system. In addition the invention relates to the use...... of the dual cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding....

  8. Context-driven discovery of gene cassettes in mobile integrons using a computational grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsafnat, Guy; Coiera, Enrico; Partridge, Sally R; Schaeffer, Jaron; Iredell, Jon R

    2009-09-08

    Gene discovery algorithms typically examine sequence data for low level patterns. A novel method to computationally discover higher order DNA structures is presented, using a context sensitive grammar. The algorithm was applied to the discovery of gene cassettes associated with integrons. The discovery and annotation of antibiotic resistance genes in such cassettes is essential for effective monitoring of antibiotic resistance patterns and formulation of public health antibiotic prescription policies. We discovered two new putative gene cassettes using the method, from 276 integron features and 978 GenBank sequences. The system achieved kappa = 0.972 annotation agreement with an expert gold standard of 300 sequences. In rediscovery experiments, we deleted 789,196 cassette instances over 2030 experiments and correctly relabelled 85.6% (alpha > or = 95%, E analysis demonstrated that for 72,338 missed deletions, two adjacent deleted cassettes were labeled as a single cassette, increasing performance to 94.8% (mean sensitivity = 0.92, specificity = 1, F-score = 0.96). Using grammars we were able to represent heuristic background knowledge about large and complex structures in DNA. Importantly, we were also able to use the context embedded in the model to discover new putative antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. The method is complementary to existing automatic annotation systems which operate at the sequence level.

  9. Context-driven discovery of gene cassettes in mobile integrons using a computational grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaeffer Jaron

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene discovery algorithms typically examine sequence data for low level patterns. A novel method to computationally discover higher order DNA structures is presented, using a context sensitive grammar. The algorithm was applied to the discovery of gene cassettes associated with integrons. The discovery and annotation of antibiotic resistance genes in such cassettes is essential for effective monitoring of antibiotic resistance patterns and formulation of public health antibiotic prescription policies. Results We discovered two new putative gene cassettes using the method, from 276 integron features and 978 GenBank sequences. The system achieved κ = 0.972 annotation agreement with an expert gold standard of 300 sequences. In rediscovery experiments, we deleted 789,196 cassette instances over 2030 experiments and correctly relabelled 85.6% (α ≥ 95%, E ≤ 1%, mean sensitivity = 0.86, specificity = 1, F-score = 0.93, with no false positives. Error analysis demonstrated that for 72,338 missed deletions, two adjacent deleted cassettes were labeled as a single cassette, increasing performance to 94.8% (mean sensitivity = 0.92, specificity = 1, F-score = 0.96. Conclusion Using grammars we were able to represent heuristic background knowledge about large and complex structures in DNA. Importantly, we were also able to use the context embedded in the model to discover new putative antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. The method is complementary to existing automatic annotation systems which operate at the sequence level.

  10. Characterizing common substructures of ligands for GPCR protein subfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguner, Bekir; Hattori, Masahiro; Goto, Susumu; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily is the largest class of proteins with therapeutic value. More than 40% of present prescription drugs are GPCR ligands. The high therapeutic value of GPCR proteins and recent advancements in virtual screening methods gave rise to many virtual screening studies for GPCR ligands. However, in spite of vast amounts of research studying their functions and characteristics, 3D structures of most GPCRs are still unknown. This makes target-based virtual screenings of GPCR ligands extremely difficult, and successful virtual screening techniques rely heavily on ligand information. These virtual screening methods focus on specific features of ligands on GPCR protein level, and common features of ligands on higher levels of GPCR classification are yet to be studied. Here we extracted common substructures of GPCR ligands of GPCR protein subfamilies. We used the SIMCOMP, a graph-based chemical structure comparison program, and hierarchical clustering to reveal common substructures. We applied our method to 850 GPCR ligands and we found 53 common substructures covering 439 ligands. These substructures contribute to deeper understanding of structural features of GPCR ligands which can be used in new drug discovery methods.

  11. Phylogeny of ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): are the subfamilies monophyletic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, A; Lecompte, E; Magné, F; Hemptinne, J-L; Crouau-Roy, B

    2010-03-01

    The Coccinellidae (ladybirds) is a highly speciose family of the Coleoptera. Ladybirds are well known because of their use as biocontrol agents, and are the subject of many ecological studies. However, little is known about phylogenetic relationships of the Coccinellidae, and a precise evolutionary framework is needed for the family. This paper provides the first phylogenetic reconstruction of the relationships within the Coccinellidae based on analysis of five genes: the 18S and 28S rRNA nuclear genes and the mitochondrial 12S, 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes. The phylogenetic relationships of 67 terminal taxa, representative of all the subfamilies of the Coccinellidae (61 species, 37 genera), and relevant outgroups, were reconstructed using multiple approaches, including Bayesian inference with partitioning strategies. The recovered phylogenies are congruent and show that the Coccinellinae is monophyletic but the Coccidulinae, Epilachninae, Scymninae and Chilocorinae are paraphyletic. The tribe Chilocorini is identified as the sister-group of the Coccinellinae for the first time. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A clinical trial of a rare earth screen/film system in a periapical cassette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogon, S.L.; Stephens, R.G.; Reid, J.A.; Lubus, N.J.

    1984-04-01

    In a clinical trial, a slow rare earth screen/film system (Siemens Titan 2D/Kodak XG) was used to obtain intraoral radiographs at conventional monitoring stages in endodontic treatment. The screen film image proved to be an effective substitute for the direct-exposure Ultraspeed periapical film. The intraoral cassettes, designed and fabricated for the study, were an adaptation of the flexible, vacuum-sealed cassettes used in mammography. It is believed that when a practicable periapical cassette is manufactured, many additional indications for the system are probable. Major reductions in patient exposure of at least 85% to 90% per periapical film would be effected.

  13. TBX2 subfamily suppression in lung cancer pathogenesis: a high-potential marker for early detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Athar A.; Sivakumar, Smruthy; Lucas, Frances Anthony San; McDowell, Tina; Lang, Wenhua; Tabata, Kazuhiro; Fujimoto, Junya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Spira, Avrum; Scheet, Paul; Nemer, Georges; Kadara, Humam

    2017-01-01

    The TBX2 subfamily (TBXs 2, 3, 4 and 5) transactivates or represses genes involved in lung organogenesis. Yet TBX2 subfamily expression in pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common lung malignancy, remains elusive. We sought to probe the expression profile of the TBX2 subfamily in early phases of NSCLC. Expression of TBX2 subfamily was analyzed in datasets of pan-normal specimens as well as NSCLCs and normal lung tissues. TBX2 subfamily expression in matched normal lungs, premalignant hyperplasias and NSCLCs was profiled by transcriptome sequencing. TBX2 subfamily expression was evaluated in the cancerization field consisting of matched NSCLCs and adjacent cytologically-normal airways relative to distant normal lungs and in a dataset of normal bronchial samples from smokers with indeterminate nodules suspicious for malignancy. Statistical analysis was performed using R. TBX2 subfamily expression was markedly elevated in normal lungs relative to other organ-specific normal tissues. Expression of the TBXs was significantly suppressed in NSCLCs relative to normal lungs (P cancer status (P cancer detection in high-risk smokers. PMID:28978111

  14. amdSYM, a new dominant recyclable marker cassette for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solis-Escalante, D.; Kuijpers, N.G.A.; Bongaerts, N.; Bolat, I.; Bosman, L.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the large collection of selectable marker genes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, marker availability can still present a hurdle when dozens of genetic manipulations are required. Recyclable markers, counterselectable cassettes that can be removed from the targeted genome after use,

  15. A Preliminary Study on the Thermal Performance of a Ventilated Honey Cassette for Stingless Bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basrawi Firdaus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stingless bees are very sensitive to the changes of surrounding temperature. A report stated that fertility rate in broodcell is 0% when the broodcell temperature is higher than 34°C or lower than 26°C. In addition, propolis made honey pot in a honey cassette also could melt when temperature is high. Therefore, the objective of this research is to investigate the temperature profile of a ventilated honey cassette exposed to outdoor conditions, and to evaluate the temperature regulation in the hive using the ventilated honey cassette. To achieve these objectives, two hives with conventional and ventilated honey cassettes were exposed under sun light in cloudy and sunny day. Temperature inside each hive was measured at 3 points and was compared. It was found that there is no significant different between the hives when both hives were exposed under direct sunlight in a cloudy day. However, two significant improvements were found for ventilated hive in sunny day. It could help to reduce temperature at wall of honey cassette consistently below 33°C. This could avoid the melting of propolis around the ventilated wall area. Furthermore, it could facilitate in better temperature reduction as compared to the conventional honey cassette. However, further study when there is a colony inside the hives must also be conducted to validate the results.

  16. Characterization of the novel In1059 harbouring VIM gene cassette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongguo Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background VIM-type enzyme encodes the most widely acquired metallo-β-lactamases in Gram- negative bacteria. To obtain current epidemiological data for integrons from enterobacteriae in hospital, the study characterizes the genetic structure in In1059 by comparison with In846 integrons harbouring VIM gene and other class 1 integrons including In37, In62, In843 and In1021 with the aim of identifying the putative mechanisms involved integron mobilization and infer evolution of relevant integrons. Methods Six of 69 recombinant plasmids from clinical strains were found to be class 1 integrons by digestion with BamHI, drug susceptibility testing, conjugation experiments, PCR amplification, integron cloning and sequencing, genome comparison, and detection of carbapenemase activity. Results The sequences of the six recombinant plasmids encoding In1021, In843, In846, In37, In62, and the novel In1059 integron had approximate lengths of ~4.8-, 4.1-, 5.1-, 5.3-, 5.3- and 6.6- kb, respectively. The genetic structures of these integrons were mapped and characterized, and the carbapenemase activities of their parental strains were assessed. Conclusions Our results suggest that the six variable integron structures and regular variations that exist in the gene cassettes provide a putative mechanism for the integron changes. Our study has also shown that the genetic features in the integrons named above fall within a scheme involving the stepwise and parallel evolution of class 1 integron variation likely under antibiotic selection pressure in clinical settings.

  17. Analgesia and Opioids: A Pharmacogenetics Shortlist for Implementation in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Maja; de Wildt, Saskia N; Tibboel, Dick; van Schaik, Ron H N

    2017-07-01

    The use of opioids to alleviate pain is complicated by the risk of severe adverse events and the large variability in dose requirements. Pharmacogenetics (PGx) could possibly be used to tailor pain medication based on an individual's genetic background. Many potential genetic markers have been described, and the importance of genetic predisposition in opioid efficacy and toxicity has been demonstrated in knockout mouse models and human twin studies. Such predictors are especially of value for neonates and young children, in whom the assessment of efficacy or side effects is complicated by the inability of the patient to communicate this properly. The current problem is determining which of the many potential candidates to focus on for clinical implementation. We systematically searched publications on PGx for opioids in 5 databases, aiming to identify PGx markers with sufficient robust data and high enough occurrence for potential clinical application. The initial search yielded 4257 unique citations, eventually resulting in 852 relevant articles covering 24 genes. From these genes, we evaluated the evidence and selected the most promising 10 markers: cytochrome P450 family 2 subfamily D member 6 ( CYP2D6 ), cytochrome P450 family 3 subfamily A member 4 ( CYP3A4 ), cytochrome P450 family 3 subfamily A member 5 ( CYP3A5 ), UDP glucuronosyltransferase family 2 member B7 ( UGT2B7 ), ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1 ( ABCB1 ), ATP binding cassette subfamily C member 3 ( ABCC3 ), solute carrier family 22 member 1 ( SLC22A1 ), opioid receptor kappa 1 ( OPRM1 ), catechol- O -methyltransferase ( COMT ), and potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily J member 6 ( KCNJ6 ). Treatment guidelines based on genotype are already available only for CYP2D6 . The application of PGx in the management of pain with opioids has the potential to improve therapy. We provide a shortlist of 10 genes that are the most promising markers for clinical use in this context. © 2016

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0896 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0896 ref|XP_001258991.1| ATP-binding cassette transporter [Neosartorya fischer...i NRRL 181] gb|EAW17094.1| ATP-binding cassette transporter [Neosartorya fischeri NRRL 181] XP_001258991.1 3.5 26% ...

  19. Pc promoter from class 2 integrons and the cassette transcription pattern it evokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Érica Lourenço; dos Santos Freitas, Fernanda; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2011-04-01

    Integrons are considered expression systems due to the presence of Pc promoters that drive gene cassette transcription. The role and configurations of Pc are well known in class 1 integrons; however, this region has not yet been identified in class 2 integrons. This study aimed to characterize the Pc promoter from class 2 integrons and to determine the effect of gene cassette position on transcription driven by this promoter. The class 2 cassette arrays from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae strains were determined by sequencing. Transcription analyses were performed by real-time RT-PCR and relative quantification was carried out by comparing the transcripts of each normalized gene inserted in the integron to each other. The resistance profile was determined by the disc diffusion method. The class 2 Pc promoter was characterized by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and promoter prediction programs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of the dfrA1-sat2-aadA1-ybeA and sat2-aadA1-ybeA arrangements in K. pneumoniae and V. cholerae strains, respectively. Real-time RT-PCR showed that the transcription of the first cassettes was higher than that of distal ones in wild-type and recombinant strains. All strains were resistant, indicating cassette expression. The Pc promoter of class 2 integrons (-35 TTTAAT |16 bp| -10 TAAAAT) was determined based on in silico analyses and on the transcription start site sequence of the class 2 integron cassette array. The Pc from class 2 integrons was characterized for the first time and the cassette position effect on transcription was demonstrated.

  20. Ground Testing of the EMCS Seed Cassette for Biocompatibility with the Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, Sigrid; Myers, Zachary Alan; DeSimone, Julia Carol; Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David

    2014-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System, EMCS, was developed by ESA for plant experiments. We performed ground testing to determine whether ARC EMCS seed cassettes could be adapted for use with tardigrades for future spaceflight experiments. Tardigrades (water bears) are small invertebrates that enter the tun state in response to desiccation or other environmental stresses. Tardigrade tuns have suspended metabolism and have been shown to be survive exposure to space vacuum, high pressure, temperature and other stresses. For spaceflight experiments using the EMCS, the organisms ideally must be able to survive desiccation and storage in the cassette at ambient temperature for several weeks prior to the initiation of the experiment by the infusion of water to the cassette during spaceflight. The ability of tardigrades to survive extremes by entering the tun state make them ideal candidates for growth experiments in the EMCS cassettes. The growth substratum in the cassettes is a gridded polyether sulfone (PES) membrane. A blotter beneath the PES membrane contains dried growth medium. The goals of our study were to (1) determine whether tardigrades survive and reproduce on PES membranes, (2) develop a consistent method for dehydration of the tardigrades with high recovery rates upon rehydration, (3) to determine an appropriate food source for the tardigrades that can also be dehydrated/rehydrated and (4) successful mock rehydration experiment in cassettes with appropriate food source. We present results that show successful multigenerational growth of tardigrades on PES membranes with a variety of wet food sources. We have successfully performed a mock rehydration with tardigrades and at least one candidate food, protonema of the moss Polytrichum, that supports multigenerational growth and whose spores germinate quickly enough to match tardigrade feeding patterns post rehydration. Our results indicate that experiments on the ISS using the tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini

  1. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Subfamily specific conservation profiles for proteins based on n-gram patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new algorithm has been developed for generating conservation profiles that reflect the evolutionary history of the subfamily associated with a query sequence. It is based on n-gram patterns (NP{n,m} which are sets of n residues and m wildcards in windows of size n+m. The generation of conservation profiles is treated as a signal-to-noise problem where the signal is the count of n-gram patterns in target sequences that are similar to the query sequence and the noise is the count over all target sequences. The signal is differentiated from the noise by applying singular value decomposition to sets of target sequences rank ordered by similarity with respect to the query. Results The new algorithm was used to construct 4,248 profiles from 120 randomly selected Pfam-A families. These were compared to profiles generated from multiple alignments using the consensus approach. The two profiles were similar whenever the subfamily associated with the query sequence was well represented in the multiple alignment. It was possible to construct subfamily specific conservation profiles using the new algorithm for subfamilies with as few as five members. The speed of the new algorithm was comparable to the multiple alignment approach. Conclusion Subfamily specific conservation profiles can be generated by the new algorithm without aprioi knowledge of family relationships or domain architecture. This is useful when the subfamily contains multiple domains with different levels of representation in protein databases. It may also be applicable when the subfamily sample size is too small for the multiple alignment approach.

  3. Effect of attC structure on cassette excision by integron integrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larouche André

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrons are genetic elements able to integrate and disseminate genes as cassettes by a site-specific recombination mechanism. These elements contain a gene coding for an integrase that carries out recombination by interacting with two different target sites; the attI site in cis with the integrase and the palindromic attC site of a gene cassette. Integron integrases (IntIs bind specifically to the bottom strand of attC sites. The extrahelical bases resulting from folding of attC bottom strands are important for the recognition by integrases. These enzymes are directly involved in the accumulation and formation of new cassette arrangements in the variable region of integrons. Thus, it is important to better understand interactions between IntIs and their substrates. Results We compared the ability of five IntIs to carry out excision of several cassettes flanked by different attC sites. The results showed that for most cassettes, IntI1 was the most active integrase. However, IntI2*179E and SonIntIA could easily excise cassettes containing the attCdfrA1 site located upstream, whereas IntI1 and IntI3 had only a weak excision activity for these cassettes. Analysis of the secondary structure adopted by the bottom strand of attCdfrA1 has shown that the identity of the extrahelical bases and the distance between them (A-N7-8-C differ from those of attCs contained in the cassettes most easily excisable by IntI1 (T-N6-G. We used the attCdfrA1 site upstream of the sat2 gene cassette as a template and varied the identity and spacing between the extrahelical bases in order to determine how these modifications influence the ability of IntI1, IntI2*179E, IntI3 and SonIntIA to excise cassettes. Our results show that IntI1 is more efficient in cassette excision using T-N6-G or T-N6-C attCs while IntI3 recognizes only a limited range of attCs. IntI2*179E and SonIntIA are more tolerant of changes to the identity and spacing of extrahelical

  4. Cassettes for PCR-mediated gene tagging in Candida albicans utilizing nourseothricin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Stephen W; Cheetham, Jill; Lloyd, Deborah; Aves, Stephen; Bates, Steven

    2011-12-01

    In recent years a number of molecular tools have been reported for use in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, including PCR-mediated approaches for gene disruption, conditional expression and epitope tagging. Traditionally these methods have utilized auxotrophic markers; however, the availability of auxotrophic markers can be limiting and in some instances their use may also impact on the interpretation of results. As a result, the use of positive selection markers has now become more commonplace. Here we report the development and validation of a set of cassettes for PCR-mediated gene tagging and overexpression studies utilizing the nourseothricin resistance (CaNAT1) positive selection marker. In particular we have produced cassettes containing yeast-enhanced GFP, YFP, CFP, RFP and a combined V5-6xHis epitope tag. The cassettes are engineered for use in PCR-mediated gene tagging strategies where insertion is targeted to the 3' end of the gene of interest. In addition, to facilitate protein functional analysis and genetic suppression studies through the use of overexpression, we have also constructed a promoter replacement cassette containing the ENO1 promoter which is known to be expressed at a high level. These cassettes expand on the range of molecular tools available for working with C. albicans and may also be used in other Candida species that display sensitivity to nourseothricin. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The role of recombination in the origin and evolution of Alu subfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teixeira-Silva

    Full Text Available Alus are the most abundant and successful short interspersed nuclear elements found in primate genomes. In humans, they represent about 10% of the genome, although few are retrotransposition-competent and are clustered into subfamilies according to the source gene from which they evolved. Recombination between them can lead to genomic rearrangements of clinical and evolutionary significance. In this study, we have addressed the role of recombination in the origin of chimeric Alu source genes by the analysis of all known consensus sequences of human Alus. From the allelic diversity of Alu consensus sequences, validated in extant elements resulting from whole genome searches, distinct events of recombination were detected in the origin of particular subfamilies of AluS and AluY source genes. These results demonstrate that at least two subfamilies are likely to have emerged from ectopic Alu-Alu recombination, which stimulates further research regarding the potential of chimeric active Alus to punctuate the genome.

  6. Novel streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance gene as a gene cassette within a class 1 integron isolated from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aadA genes, encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin, have been found as gene cassettes in different gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species. The present study has revealed the sequence of a new gene, aadA5, integrated as a gene cassette together with the trimethoprim...

  7. Development of a modified gentamicin resistance cassette for genetic manipulation of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jiang; Fenno, J Christopher; Li, Chunhao

    2012-03-01

    Herein, we report that a modified gentamicin cassette and a PCR-based method can be used for targeted mutagenesis of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola. This approach minimizes polar effects and spontaneous antibiotic resistance. Therefore, it can serve as a reliable tool for genetic manipulation of T. denticola.

  8. Engineered XcmI cassette-containing vector for PCR-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T-vector; direct cloning; XcmI cassette; sequencing; PCR; marine population genetics. Author Affiliations. Futoshi Aranishi1 2 Takane Okimoto1 3. Molecular Biology Division, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Yokohama 236-8648, Japan; Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Mirjazaki University, ...

  9. Simultaneous acquisition of storage phosphor and asymmetric screen-film chest images using a hybrid cassette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Kimme-Smith, Carolyn; Johnson, Sandra L.; Johnson, Timothy; Aberle, Denise R.

    1994-05-01

    A hybrid cassette has been developed for simultaneous acquisition of storage phosphor and asymmetric screen-film chest images. This is important for the collection of images for Receiver Operating Characteristic studies comparing conventional radiography and computed radiography, without either increased exposure or non-identical imaging conditions. This hybrid radiographic cassette consists of a computed radiography imaging plate (in front) and an intact, high contrast variant of a commercially available asymmetric screen-film system (in the rear) with a speed of approximately 425. The high contrast, speed and efficiency of this screen-film system allow for positioning of the storage phosphor plate in the front of the cassette. As the imaging plate absorption is approximately 35%, the fast screen-film system provides high quality diagnostic images. There is minimal beam hardening, which is ameliorated by the high contrast of the asymmetric front screen. There is minimal differences in the Plexiglas step wedge phantom gray level values for CR and CR-hybrid images and in optical density values for InSightTM and InSightTM-hybrid films. The signal to noise ratio of either hybrid image, while fractionally less than their standard counterparts, is negligibly so. Only a slight modification in radiographic technique is required (10%) for use of this hybrid cassette, providing images that are virtually the same as those obtained through the standard CR and InSightTM ITC imaging methods.

  10. A fluorescent cassette-based strategy for engineering multiple domain fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorchid Ahmad

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The engineering of fusion proteins has become increasingly important and most recently has formed the basis of many biosensors, protein purification systems, and classes of new drugs. Currently, most fusion proteins consist of three or fewer domains, however, more sophisticated designs could easily involve three or more domains. Using traditional subcloning strategies, this requires micromanagement of restriction enzymes sites that results in complex workaround solutions, if any at all. Results Therefore, to aid in the efficient construction of fusion proteins involving multiple domains, we have created a new expression vector that allows us to rapidly generate a library of cassettes. Cassettes have a standard vector structure based on four specific restriction endonuclease sites and using a subtle property of blunt or compatible cohesive end restriction enzymes, they can be fused in any order and number of times. Furthermore, the insertion of PCR products into our expression vector or the recombination of cassettes can be dramatically simplified by screening for the presence or absence of fluorescence. Conclusions Finally, the utility of this new strategy was demonstrated by the creation of basic cassettes for protein targeting to subcellular organelles and for protein purification using multiple affinity tags.

  11. Identification of a novel streptococcal gene cassette mediating SOS mutagenesis in Streptococcus uberis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varhimo, Emilia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Jalava, Jari; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Varmanen, Pekka

    Streptococci have been considered to lack the classical SOS response, defined by increased mutation after UV exposure and regulation by LexA. Here we report the identification of a potential self-regulated SOS mutagenesis gene cassette in the Streptococcaceae family. Exposure to UV light was found

  12. Trinucleotide cassettes increase diversity of T7 phage-displayed peptide library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon James B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid sequence diversity is introduced into a phage-displayed peptide library by randomizing library oligonucleotide DNA. We recently evaluated the diversity of peptide libraries displayed on T7 lytic phage and M13 filamentous phage and showed that T7 phage can display a more diverse amino acid sequence repertoire due to differing processes of viral morphogenesis. Methods In this study, we evaluated and compared the diversity of a 12-mer T7 phage-displayed peptide library randomized using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes with a T7 and an M13 12-mer phage-displayed peptide library constructed using the degenerate codon randomization method. Results We herein demonstrate that the combination of trinucleotide cassette amino acid codon randomization and T7 phage display construction methods resulted in a significant enhancement to the functional diversity of a 12-mer peptide library. This novel library exhibited superior amino acid uniformity and order-of-magnitude increases in amino acid sequence diversity as compared to degenerate codon randomized peptide libraries. Comparative analyses of the biophysical characteristics of the 12-mer peptide libraries revealed the trinucleotide cassette-randomized library to be a unique resource. Conclusion The combination of T7 phage display and trinucleotide cassette randomization resulted in a novel resource for the potential isolation of binding peptides for new and previously studied molecular targets.

  13. Functional Analysis of Detergent‐Solubilized and Membrane‐Reconstituted ATP‐Binding Cassette Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Doeven, Mark K.; Geertsma, Eric R.; Biemans‐Oldehinkel, Esther; Konings, Wil N.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2005-01-01

    ATP‐binding cassette (ABC) transporters are vital to any living system and are involved in the translocation of a wide variety of substances, from ions and nutrients to high molecular weight proteins. This chapter describes methods used to purify and membrane reconstitute ABC transporters in a fully

  14. Keys: Career Exploration. Cassettes and Films, Career Guidance and the Kuder Interest Inventories, and Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Jack; Grinager, Marilyn

    This set of 17 related items, intended for Grades 6-9, consists of 10 filmstrips, 5 cassettes, and a manual. The first filmstrip explains the Kuder E. interest profile and gives an overview of the filmstrip series, and the remaining filmstrips are divided along the 10 Kuder E. General Interest Survey categories. However, the filmstrips and…

  15. ATimer-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassette for Detecting Molecular Markers in Oral Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Ongagna, Serge; Chen, Dafeng; Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive, hand-held, point-of-care, disposable, self-contained, immunoassay cassette comprised of air pouches for pumping, a metering chamber, reagents storage chambers, a mixer, and a lateral flow strip was designed, constructed, and tested. The assay was carried out in a consecutive flow format. The detection was facilitated with up-converting, phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The automated, timely pumping of the various reagents was driven by a spring-loaded timer. The utility of the cassette was demonstrated by detecting antibodies to HIV in saliva samples and further evaluated with a non-contagious, haptenized DNA assay. The cassette has several advantages over dip sticks such as sample preprocessing, integrated storage of reagents, and automated operation that reduces operator errors and training. The cassette and actuator described herein can readily be extended to detect biomarkers of other diseases in body fluids and other fluids at the point of care. The system is particularly suitable for resource poor countries, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. PMID:19255658

  16. A novel thin NIPAM gel cassette dosimeter for photon-beam radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ling Hsieh

    Full Text Available The response of thin polymer gel cassettes (called NIPAM gels to ionizing radiation was investigated in this study. The NIPAM gels were prepared from gelatin, N-isopropyl acrylamide, tetrakis (hydroxymethyl phosphoniumchloride, and N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide. Gel cassettes were irradiated in a phantom using a linear accelerator, and the polymerization morphology of irradiated NIPAM gel was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The dose-response sensitivity of the NIPAM gels was evaluated using the differences in optical densities. The optical densities were obtained using a computer-controlled CCD camera that was connected to a planar illumination source for acquisition of optical transmission images. The central axis depth dose profiles of the phantom were extracted, and a comparison with ionization chamber measurements demonstrated similarities in profiles. The sensitivity, linearity of the response, accuracy, and reproducibility of the polymer gel cassettes were acceptable. However, the profiles of the half-blocked field irradiation showed no significant dispersion in the visible region. This study also extensively investigated the spatial stability of the NIPAM gel. The results showed that the gel cassette response remains stable for up to three months after irradiation.

  17. Utilizing ARC EMCS Seedling Cassettes as Highly Versatile Miniature Growth Chambers for Model Organism Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David; Reinsch, S.; DeSimone, Julia C.; Myers, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our ground testing was to demonstrate the capability of safely putting specific model organisms into dehydrated stasis, and to later rehydrate and successfully grow them inside flight proven ARC EMCS seedling cassettes. The ARC EMCS seedling cassettes were originally developed to support seedling growth during space flight. The seeds are attached to a solid substrate, launched dry, and then rehydrated in a small volume of media on orbit to initiate the experiment. We hypothesized that the same seedling cassettes should be capable of acting as culture chambers for a wide range of organisms with minimal or no modification. The ability to safely preserve live organisms in a dehydrated state allows for on orbit experiments to be conducted at the best time for crew operations and more importantly provides a tightly controlled physiologically relevant growth experiment with specific environmental parameters. Thus, we performed a series of ground tests that involved growing the organisms, preparing them for dehydration on gridded Polyether Sulfone (PES) membranes, dry storage at ambient temperatures for varying periods of time, followed by rehydration. Inside the culture cassettes, the PES membranes were mounted above blotters containing dehydrated growth media. These were mounted on stainless steel bases and sealed with plastic covers that have permeable membrane covered ports for gas exchange. The results showed we were able to demonstrate acceptable normal growth of C.elegans (nematodes), E.coli (bacteria), S.cerevisiae (yeast), Polytrichum (moss) spores and protonemata, C.thalictroides (fern), D.discoideum (amoeba), and H.dujardini (tardigrades). All organisms showed acceptable growth and rehydration in both petri dishes and culture cassettes initially, and after various time lengths of dehydration. At the end of on orbit ISS European Modular Cultivation System experiments the cassettes could be frozen at ultra-low temperatures, refrigerated, or chemically

  18. Seed morphology and anatomy and its utility in recognizing subfamilies and tribes of Zingiberaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, John C; Smith, Selena Y; Collinson, Margaret E; Leong-Škorničková, Jana; Specht, Chelsea D; Marone, Federica; Xiao, Xianghui; Parkinson, Dilworth Y

    2015-11-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data suggested that the monocot family Zingiberaceae be separated into four subfamilies and four tribes. Robust morphological characters to support these clades are lacking. Seeds were analyzed in a phylogenetic context to test independently the circumscription of clades and to better understand evolution of seed characters within Zingiberaceae. Seventy-five species from three of the four subfamilies were analyzed using synchrotron based x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) and scored for 39 morphoanatomical characters. Zingiberaceae seeds are some of the most structurally complex seeds in angiosperms. No single seed character was found to distinguish each subfamily, but combinations of characters were found to differentiate between the subfamilies. Recognition of the tribes based on seeds was possible for Globbeae, but not for Alpinieae, Riedelieae, or Zingibereae, due to considerable variation. SRXTM is an excellent, nondestructive tool to capture morphoanatomical variation of seeds and allows for the study of taxa with limited material available. Alpinioideae, Siphonochiloideae, Tamijioideae, and Zingiberoideae are well supported based on both molecular and morphological data, including multiple seed characters. Globbeae are well supported as a distinctive tribe within the Zingiberoideae, but no other tribe could be differentiated using seeds due to considerable homoplasy when compared with currently accepted relationships based on molecular data. Novel seed characters suggest tribal affinities for two currently unplaced Zingiberaceae taxa: Siliquamomum may be related to Riedelieae and Monolophus to Zingibereae, but further work is needed before formal revision of the family. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Seed morphology and anatomy and its utility in recognizing subfamilies and tribes of Zingiberaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, John C.; Smith, Selena Y.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Leong-Skornickova, Jana; Specht, Chelsea D.; Marone, Federica; Xiao, Xianghui; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2015-11-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Recent phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data suggested that the monocot family Zingiberaceae be separated into four subfamilies and four tribes. Robust morphological characters to support these clades are lacking. Seeds were analyzed in a phylogenetic context to test independently the circumscription of clades and to better understand evolution of seed characters within Zingiberaceae. METHODS: Seventy-five species from three of the four subfamilies were analyzed using synchrotron based x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) and scored for 39 morphoanatomical characters. KEY RESULTS: Zingiberaceae seeds are some of the most structurally complex seeds in angiosperms. No single seed character was found to distinguish each subfamily, but combinations of characters were found to differentiate between the subfamilies. Recognition of the tribes based on seeds was possible for Globbeae, but not for Alpinieae, Riedelieae, or Zingibereae, due to considerable variation. CONCLUSIONS: SRXTM is an excellent, nondestructive tool to capture morphoanatomical variation of seeds and allows for the study of taxa with limited material available. Alpinioideae, Siphonochiloideae, Tamijioideae, and Zingiberoideae are well supported based on both molecular and morphological data, including multiple seed characters. Globbeae are well supported as a distinctive tribe within the Zingiberoideae, but no other tribe could be differentiated using seeds due to considerable homoplasy when compared with currently accepted relationships based on molecular data. Novel seed characters suggest tribal affinities for two currently unplaced Zingiberaceae taxa: Siliquamomum may be related to Riedelieae and Monolophus to Zingibereae, but further work is needed before formal revision of the family.

  20. The Ptychanthoideae of Latin America: An Overview (Studies on Lejeuneaceae Subfamily Ptychanthoideae XVI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradstein, S. Rob

    1985-01-01

    Recent taxonomic studies on the Lejeuneaceae subfamily Ptychanthoideae indicate that there are 59 species in 21 genera in Latin America. The ptychanthoid flora is very different from that of the Old World and has much fewer species but is slightly richer in endemic genera. About one third of the

  1. A new record of the subfamily Isometopinae (Heteroptera: Miridae) from the Korean Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunghoon; Duwal, Ram K; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-01-21

    The subfamily Isometopinae (Heteroptera: Miridae) is recognized for the first time in the Korean Peninsula based on a single female specimen, Isometopus amurensis Kerzhner. Herein, diagnosis of a female specimen, illustration of female genitalia, and habitus figures with biological notes are provided. 

  2. Some remarks on the wood structure of Pinzona and allied genera of the subfamily Tetraceroideae (Dilleniaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baretta-Kuipers, T.

    1972-01-01

    Included phloem of the concentric type is always present in the secondary wood of the genera Pinzona and Doliocarpus of the subfamily Tetraceroideae (Dilleniaceae). Raphide containing cells are found in the ray parenchyma of all genera of the Tetraceroideae, i.e. in Curatella, Davilla, Doliocarpus,

  3. Wood anatomy of the Euphorbiaceae, in particular of the subfamily Phyllanthoideae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennega, Alberta M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The great variety in wood structure of the large family Euphorbiaceae makes it impossible to describe briefly a general wood pattern. Nevertheless, a more or less clear division into four anatomical groups can be made. A short overview is given of the wood structure of the uni-ovulate subfamilies

  4. Generic revision of the subfamily Betylobraconinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and other groups with modified fore tarsus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    1995-01-01

    The genera of the subfamilies Betylobraconinae, Hormiinae, Lysiterminae, Pambolinae-Chremylini, and Doryctinae-Ypsistocerini are revised. A key is given to the genera of groups belonging to the cyclostome grade including species with shortened and/or (partly) widened fore tarsus. Sixteen new genera

  5. Ground Testing of the EMCS Seed Cassette for Biocompatibility with the Cellular Slime Mold, Dictyostelium Discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanely, Julia C.; Reinsch, Sigrid; Myers, Zachary A.; Freeman, John; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System, EMCS, was developed by ESA for plant experiments. To expand the use of flight verified hardware for various model organisms, we performed ground experiments to determine whether ARC EMCS Seed Cassettes could be adapted for use with cellular slime mold for future space flight experiments. Dictyostelium is a cellular slime mold that can exist both as a single-celled independent organism and as a part of a multicellular colony which functions as a unit (pseudoplasmodium). Under certain stress conditions, individual amoebae will aggregate to form multicellular structures. Developmental pathways are very similar to those found in Eukaryotic organisms, making this a uniquely interesting organism for use in genetic studies. Dictyostelium has been used as a genetic model organism for prior space flight experiments. Due to the formation of spores that are resistant to unfavorable conditions such as desiccation, Dictyostelium is also a good candidate for use in the EMCS Seed Cassettes. The growth substratum in the cassettes is a gridded polyether sulfone (PES) membrane. A blotter beneath the PES membranes contains dried growth medium. The goals of this study were to (1) verify that Dictyostelium are capable of normal growth and development on PES membranes, (2) develop a method for dehydration of Dictyostelium spores with successful recovery and development after rehydration, and (3) successful mock rehydration experiments in cassettes. Our results show normal developmental progression in two strains of Dictyostelium discoideum on PES membranes with a bacterial food source. We have successfully performed a mock rehydration of spores with developmental progression from aggregation to slug formation, and production of morphologically normal spores within 9 days of rehydration. Our results indicate that experiments on the ISS using the slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum could potentially be performed in the flight verified hardware of

  6. The monosaccharide transporter gene family in land plants is ancient and shows differential subfamily expression and expansion across lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Michael A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, tandem, segmental and whole-genome duplications are prevalent, resulting in large numbers of duplicate loci. Recent studies suggest that duplicate genes diverge predominantly through the partitioning of expression and that breadth of gene expression is related to the rate of gene duplication and protein sequence evolution. Here, we utilize expressed sequence tag (EST data to study gene duplication and expression patterns in the monosaccharide transporter (MST gene family across the land plants. In Arabidopsis, there are 53 MST genes that form seven distinct subfamilies. We created profile hidden Markov models of each subfamily and searched EST databases representing diverse land plant lineages to address the following questions: 1 Are homologs of each Arabidopsis subfamily present in the earliest land plants? 2 Do expression patterns among subfamilies and individual genes within subfamilies differ across lineages? 3 Has gene duplication within each lineage resulted in lineage-specific expansion patterns? We also looked for correlations between relative EST database representation in Arabidopsis and similarity to orthologs in early lineages. Results Homologs of all seven MST subfamilies were present in land plants at least 400 million years ago. Subfamily expression levels vary across lineages with greater relative expression of the STP, ERD6-like, INT and PLT subfamilies in the vascular plants. In the large EST databases of the moss, gymnosperm, monocot and eudicot lineages, EST contig construction reveals that MST subfamilies have experienced lineage-specific expansions. Large subfamily expansions appear to be due to multiple gene duplications arising from single ancestral genes. In Arabidopsis, one or a few genes within most subfamilies have much higher EST database representation than others. Most highly represented (broadly expressed genes in Arabidopsis have best match orthologs in early divergent lineages

  7. Phylogeny of Celastraceae subfamily Hippocrateoideae inferred from morphological characters and nuclear and plastid loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughenour, Jennifer M; Simmons, Mark P; Lombardi, Julio A; Yakobson, Kendra; Archer, Robert H

    2011-05-01

    The phylogeny of Celastraceae subfamily Hippocrateoideae (∼ 100 species and 19 genera in the Old and New World tropics) was inferred using morphological characters together with plastid (matK, trnL-F) and nuclear (ITS and 26S rDNA) genes. The subfamily is easily recognized by the synapomorphies of transversely flattened, deeply lobed capsules and seeds with membranous basal wings or narrow stipes together with bisexual, 5-merous flowers that generally have an extrastaminal disk and three stamens. Hippocrateoideae, like Salacioideae, are inferred to have an Old World origin. The narrow stipes of Neotropical species that are water-dispersed are inferred to be derived within the subfamily from ancestral species with wind-dispersed winged seeds. Helictonema, a monotypic genus endemic to tropical Africa, has a small, white, spongy aril that is located at the base of the seed wing and appears to be unique within Hippocrateoideae. Our inference that Helictonema is sister to the remaining members of the subfamily, considered in the context of Sarawakodendron being sister to Salacioideae, suggests that small arils and capsular fruit were primitive within both subfamilies. The aril became dramatically enlarged within Salacioideae, in which the fruits are berries, and lost entirely within Hippocrateoideae, in which the fruits are transversely flattened capsules. All five Old World taxa of Prionostemma and all eight currently recognized species within Simirestis are transferred to Pristimera, one South African variety of Pristimera is raised to species level, and all three taxa in Pristimera subgenus Trochantha are transferred to the new genus Trochantha. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  9. Dramatic Number Variation of R Genes in Solanaceae Species Accounted for by a Few R Gene Subfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunhua; Chen, Jiongjiong; Kuang, Hanhui

    2016-01-01

    Most disease resistance genes encode nucleotide-binding-site (NBS) and leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domains, and the NBS-LRR encoding genes are often referred to as R genes. Using newly developed approach, 478, 485, 1,194, 1,665, 2,042 and 374 R genes were identified from the genomes of tomato Heinz1706, wild tomato LA716, potato DM1-3, pepper Zunla-1 and wild pepper Chiltepin and tobacco TN90, respectively. The majority of R genes from Solanaceae were grouped into 87 subfamilies, including 16 TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) and 71 non-TNL subfamilies. Each subfamily was annotated manually, including identification of intron/exon structure and intron phase. Interestingly, TNL subfamilies have similar intron phase patterns, while the non-TNL subfamilies have diverse intron phase due to frequent gain of introns. Prevalent presence/absence polymorphic R gene loci were found among Solanaceae species, and an integrated map with 427 R loci was constructed. The pepper genome (2,042 in Chiltepin) has at least four times of R genes as in tomato (478 in Heinz1706). The high number of R genes in pepper genome is due to the amplification of R genes in a few subfamilies, such as the Rpi-blb2 and BS2 subfamilies. The mechanism underlying the variation of R gene number among different plant genomes is discussed.

  10. Identification and characterization of subfamily-specific signatures in a large protein superfamily by a hidden Markov model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikura Mitsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most profile and motif databases strive to classify protein sequences into a broad spectrum of protein families. The next step of such database studies should include the development of classification systems capable of distinguishing between subfamilies within a structurally and functionally diverse superfamily. This would be helpful in elucidating sequence-structure-function relationships of proteins. Results Here, we present a method to diagnose sequences into subfamilies by employing hidden Markov models (HMMs to find windows of residues that are distinct among subfamilies (called signatures. The method starts with a multiple sequence alignment (MSA of the subfamily. Then, we build a HMM database representing all sliding windows of the MSA of a fixed size. Finally, we construct a HMM histogram of the matches of each sliding window in the entire superfamily. To illustrate the efficacy of the method, we have applied the analysis to find subfamily signatures in two well-studied superfamilies: the cadherin and the EF-hand protein superfamilies. As a corollary, the HMM histograms of the analyzed subfamilies revealed information about their Ca2+ binding sites and loops. Conclusions The method is used to create HMM databases to diagnose subfamilies of protein superfamilies that complement broad profile and motif databases such as BLOCKS, PROSITE, Pfam, SMART, PRINTS and InterPro.

  11. Rare codons effect on expression of recombinant gene cassette in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghil Esmaeili-Bandboni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the sensitivity of expression of fusion genes to existence of a large number of rare codons in recombinant gene sequenced. Methods: Primers for amplification of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were designed by Primer3 software and synthesized. All of these 3 genes were cloned. Then the genes were fused together by restriction sites and enzymatic method. Two linkers were used as a flexible bridge in connection of these genes. Results: Cloning and fusion of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were done correctly. After that, expression of the recombinant gene construction was surveyed. Conclusions: According to what was seen, because of the accumulation of 12 rare codons of Shiga toxin B and 19 rare codons of cholera toxin B in this gene cassette, the expression of the recombinant gene cassette, in Escherichia coli BL21, failed.

  12. Type designations and taxonomic remarks for Nearctic sap beetles in the subfamily Carpophilinae Erichson (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Gareth S; Cline, Andrew R

    2017-05-16

    The subfamily Carpophilinae, in particular the genus Carpophilus Stephens, represents one of the most speciose lineages within Nitidulidae. The subfamily is comprised of more than 250 described species that are found worldwide in every habitable region, and have been transported by man in stored products to remote islands and archipelagos (Ewing & Cline 2005; Parsons 1943). The ubiquitous Carpophilus dimidiatus (L.) is an example of a cosmopolitan species that has been reported from every continent except Antarctica, but likely has been transported there as well. Members of Carpophilinae are well recognized by their abbreviated elytra, compact bodies, and distinct three-segmented antennal club. Many taxa are present in fermenting food products and dried goods. Some members are also commonly found in flowering plants such as cacti, cycads, and agricultural plants such as atemoya (a hybrid of sugar-apple and cherimoya) (Nagel et al. 1989).

  13. [DNA-fingerprinting of representatives of Bovinae subfamilies using the telomere markers (TTAGGG)4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, S K; Vasil'ev, V A; Steklenev, E P; Prosniak, M I; Ryskov, A P

    1999-01-01

    The (TTAGGG)4 oligonucleotide homologous to telomeric tandem repeats of human chromosomes was used for the first time as a multilocus hybridization probe for the analysis of genome variability in the two genera (Bos and Bison) of the Bovinae subfamily. DNA profiles for cattle, banteng, aurochs, and bison were obtained. Hybridization spectra were represented by the discrete individual- and species-specific bands characterized by codominant inheritance. For comparison, DNA profiles of the same samples obtained using the bacteriophage M13 DNA probe are presented. The usefulness of the microsatellite examined for the testing of pedigrees, description of intra- and interbreed variability as well as for determining relationships and the origins of the species of the Bovinae subfamily is discussed.

  14. A new genus and four new species of subfamily Cyclocypridinae (Crustacea, Ostracoda) from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savatenalinton, Sukonthip

    2017-03-15

    A new genus, Dentocypria n. gen., in the subfamily Cyclocypridinae Kaufmann, 1900 is described from Thailand. The main distinguishing characters of the new genus are the presence of an internal tooth on the antero-ventral part of the left valve, the marginal tubercles on the right valve, the very elongated terminal segment of the madibular palp, the absence of setae on the basal segment of the second thoracopod (T2), the unusually long e-seta of T2, the short terminal segment of the third thoracopod (T3), the long Sp seta of the caudal ramus and the morphology of prehensile palps and hemipenis. Four new species of the new genus are here described: Dentocypria mesquitai n. gen. n. sp., Dentocypria chantaranothaii n. gen. n. sp., Dentocypria smithi n. gen. n. sp. and Dentocypria aequiloba n. gen. n. sp. A brief discussion on the generic characters and a key to the genera of the subfamily are provided.

  15. Concept design of DEMO divertor cassette remote handling: Simply supported beam approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzillo, Rocco [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Di Gironimo, Giuseppei, E-mail: peppe.digironimo@gmail.com [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Mäkinen, Harri [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Miccichè, Gioacchino [ENEA – CR Brasimone, I-40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Määttä, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The present work focused on a new approach to the design of DEMO Divertor Cassette Remote Handling Equipment. • The work provides an alternative approach to the design based on the concept of a simply supported beam. • The approach proposed focuses a Divertor Cassette mover that performs the maintenance of the three cassettes at each port. • First rough dimensioning of the main components has been provided and demonstrating the feasibility of the design solutions. • The main idea of the work consisted on a design capable to use knowledge already adopted in industrial contexts. - Abstract: The present work focused on the development of a new approach to the concept design of DEMO Divertor Cassette (DC) Remote Handling Equipment (RHE). The approach is based on three main assumptions: the DC remote handling activities and the equipment shall be simplified as much as possible; technologies well known and consolidated in the industrial context can be adopted also in the nuclear fusion field; the design of the RHE should be based on a simply supported beam approach instead of cantilever approach. In detail, during the maintenance activities the barycentre of the DC is centred with respect to DC supports. This solution could simplify the design of RHE with a consequent reduction of the design and development costs. Moreover also the DC remote handling tasks shall be simplified in order to better manage the DC maintenance processes. For this reason the DC assembly and disassembly process has been simplified dividing the main sequences in basic movements. For each movement a dedicated tool has been conceived.

  16. A novel multi-purpose cassette for repeated integrative epitope tagging of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Antoni, A; Gallwitz, D

    2000-04-04

    Gene tagging can be achieved by homologous recombination in yeast. The kan(r) marker gene plays an important role in PCR-mediated gene disruption and PCR-mediated epitope tagging experiments. In this paper, new modules containing a tag-loxP-kanMX-loxP cassette are described that allow tagging of different genes by using the kan(r) marker repeatedly.

  17. Functional Analysis of Detergent‐Solubilized and Membrane‐Reconstituted ATP‐Binding Cassette Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Poolman, Bert; Doeven, Mark K.; Geertsma, Eric R.; Biemans‐Oldehinkel, Esther; Konings, Wil N.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2005-01-01

    ATP‐binding cassette (ABC) transporters are vital to any living system and are involved in the translocation of a wide variety of substances, from ions and nutrients to high molecular weight proteins. This chapter describes methods used to purify and membrane reconstitute ABC transporters in a fully functional state. The procedures are largely based on our experience with substrate‐binding protein‐dependent ABC uptake systems from bacteria, but the approaches should be applicable to multisubu...

  18. Energy transfer cassettes based on organic fluorophores: construction and applications in ratiometric sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiangli; Hu, Mingming; Zhan, Peng; Peng, Xiaojun

    2013-01-07

    This tutorial review presents some recent developments in the construction and applications of cassettes based on resonance energy transfer between fluorescent dyes in the visible and infrared region. We focused on the contributions of different connections between the energy donor and acceptor according to the "through-space" and "through-bond" methods, and emphasised their applications in ratiometric sensing for the detection of ions and small molecules.

  19. Evolution of substrate recognition sites (SRSs) in cytochromes P450 from Apiaceae exemplified by the CYP71AJ subfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Bjørn; Krieger, Celia; Drew, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large proliferations of cytochrome P450 encoding genes resulting from gene duplications can be termed as 'blooms', providing genetic material for the genesis and evolution of biosynthetic pathways. Furanocoumarins are allelochemicals produced by many of the species in Apiaceaous plants...... belonging to the Apioideae subfamily of Apiaceae and have been described as being involved in the defence reaction against phytophageous insects. Results: A bloom in the cytochromes P450 CYP71AJ subfamily has been identified, showing at least 2 clades and 6 subclades within the CYP71AJ subfamily. Two...

  20. Predaceous diving beetles in Maine: Faunal list and keys to subfamilies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobar, L.R.; Spangler, P.J.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Hopkins, K.M.

    1998-01-01

    Records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) collected in Maine are summarized. These records are augmented by field surveys of beetles in Aroostook Co., Maine during 1993-95. Keys to subfamilies are presented with color plates for selected species. A list of diving beetles that have been collected near Maine (state or province) is presented so that investigators will know what additional species might be expected in Maine. Basic taxonomy is presented to facilitate use of keys.

  1. The gymnosperm Pinus pinea contains both AOX gene subfamilies, AOX1 and AOX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, António Miguel; Zavattieri, Maria Amely; Campos, Maria Doroteia; Cardoso, Hélia Guerra; McDonald, Allison E; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2009-12-01

    The gymnosperm Pinus pinea L. (stone pine) is a typical Mediterranean pine used for nuts and timber production, and as an ornamental around the world. Pine genomes are large in comparison to other species. The hypothesis that retrotransposons, such as gymny, made a large contribution to this alteration in genome size was recently confirmed. However, P. pinea is unique in other various aspects. P. pinea demonstrates a different pattern of gymny organization than other Pinus subgenera. Additionally, P. pinea has a highly recalcitrant behaviour in relation to standard conifer protocols for the induction of somatic embryogenesis or rooting. Because such types of cell reprogramming can be explained as a reaction of plant cells to external stress, it is of special interest to study sequence peculiarities in stress-inducible genes, such as the alternative oxidase (AOX). This is the first report containing molecular evidence for the existence of AOX in gymnosperms at the genetic level. P. pinea AOXs were isolated by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach and three genes were identified. Two of the genes belong to the AOX1 subfamily and one belongs to the AOX2 subfamily. The existence of both AOX subfamilies in gymnosperms is reported here for the first time. This discovery supports the hypothesis that AOX1 and AOX2 subfamilies arose prior to the separation of gymnosperms and angiosperms, and indicates that the AOX2 is absent in monocots because of subsequent gene loss events. Polymorphic P. pinea AOX1 sequences from a selected genetic clone are presented indicating non-allelic, non-synonymous and synonymous translation products.

  2. Conservation of gene cassettes among diverse viruses of the human gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Minot

    Full Text Available Viruses are a crucial component of the human microbiome, but large population sizes, high sequence diversity, and high frequencies of novel genes have hindered genomic analysis by high-throughput sequencing. Here we investigate approaches to metagenomic assembly to probe genome structure in a sample of 5.6 Gb of gut viral DNA sequence from six individuals. Tests showed that a new pipeline based on DeBruijn graph assembly yielded longer contigs that were able to recruit more reads than the equivalent non-optimized, single-pass approach. To characterize gene content, the database of viral RefSeq proteins was compared to the assembled viral contigs, generating a bipartite graph with functional cassettes linking together viral contigs, which revealed a high degree of connectivity between diverse genomes involving multiple genes of the same functional class. In a second step, open reading frames were grouped by their co-occurrence on contigs in a database-independent manner, revealing conserved cassettes of co-oriented ORFs. These methods reveal that free-living bacteriophages, while usually dissimilar at the nucleotide level, often have significant similarity at the level of encoded amino acid motifs, gene order, and gene orientation. These findings thus connect contemporary metagenomic analysis with classical studies of bacteriophage genomic cassettes. Software is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/optitdba/.

  3. Optimized invertase expression and secretion cassette for improving Yarrowia lipolytica growth on sucrose for industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Rossignol, Tristan; Verbeke, Jonathan; Crutz-Le Coq, Anne-Marie; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Robak, Małgorzata

    2013-11-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica requires the expression of a heterologous invertase to grow on a sucrose-based substrate. This work reports the construction of an optimized invertase expression cassette composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Suc2p secretion signal sequence followed by the SUC2 sequence and under the control of the strong Y. lipolytica pTEF promoter. This new construction allows a fast and optimal cleavage of sucrose into glucose and fructose and allows cells to reach the maximum growth rate. Contrary to pre-existing constructions, the expression of SUC2 is not sensitive to medium composition in this context. The strain JMY2593, expressing this new cassette with an optimized secretion signal sequence and a strong promoter, produces 4,519 U/l of extracellular invertase in bioreactor experiments compared to 597 U/l in a strain expressing the former invertase construction. The expression of this cassette strongly improved production of invertase and is suitable for simultaneously high production level of citric acid from sucrose-based media.

  4. Gene Structures, Classification, and Expression Models of the DREB Transcription Factor Subfamily in Populus trichocarpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunlin; Zhang, Haizhen; Mao, Xuliang; Li, Chenghao

    2013-01-01

    We identified 75 dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein genes in Populus trichocarpa. We analyzed gene structures, phylogenies, domain duplications, genome localizations, and expression profiles. The phylogenic construction suggests that the PtrDREB gene subfamily can be classified broadly into six subtypes (DREB A-1 to A-6) in Populus. The chromosomal localizations of the PtrDREB genes indicated 18 segmental duplication events involving 36 genes and six redundant PtrDREB genes were involved in tandem duplication events. There were fewer introns in the PtrDREB subfamily. The motif composition of PtrDREB was highly conserved in the same subtype. We investigated expression profiles of this gene subfamily from different tissues and/or developmental stages. Sixteen genes present in the digital expression analysis had high levels of transcript accumulation. The microarray results suggest that 18 genes were upregulated. We further examined the stress responsiveness of 15 genes by qRT-PCR. A digital northern analysis showed that the PtrDREB17, 18, and 32 genes were highly induced in leaves under cold stress, and the same expression trends were shown by qRT-PCR. Taken together, these observations may lay the foundation for future functional analyses to unravel the biological roles of Populus' DREB genes. PMID:24324388

  5. Gene Structures, Classification, and Expression Models of the DREB Transcription Factor Subfamily in Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified 75 dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB protein genes in Populus trichocarpa. We analyzed gene structures, phylogenies, domain duplications, genome localizations, and expression profiles. The phylogenic construction suggests that the PtrDREB gene subfamily can be classified broadly into six subtypes (DREB A-1 to A-6 in Populus. The chromosomal localizations of the PtrDREB genes indicated 18 segmental duplication events involving 36 genes and six redundant PtrDREB genes were involved in tandem duplication events. There were fewer introns in the PtrDREB subfamily. The motif composition of PtrDREB was highly conserved in the same subtype. We investigated expression profiles of this gene subfamily from different tissues and/or developmental stages. Sixteen genes present in the digital expression analysis had high levels of transcript accumulation. The microarray results suggest that 18 genes were upregulated. We further examined the stress responsiveness of 15 genes by qRT-PCR. A digital northern analysis showed that the PtrDREB17, 18, and 32 genes were highly induced in leaves under cold stress, and the same expression trends were shown by qRT-PCR. Taken together, these observations may lay the foundation for future functional analyses to unravel the biological roles of Populus’ DREB genes.

  6. A large-scale chloroplast phylogeny of the Lamiaceae sheds new light on its subfamilial classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Cantino, Philip D.; Olmstead, Richard G.; Bramley, Gemma L. C.; Xiang, Chun-Lei; Ma, Zhong-Hui; Tan, Yun-Hong; Zhang, Dian-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Lamiaceae, the sixth largest angiosperm family, contains more than 7000 species distributed all over the world. However, although considerable progress has been made in the last two decades, its phylogenetic backbone has never been well resolved. In the present study, a large-scale phylogenetic reconstruction of Lamiaceae using chloroplast sequences was carried out with the most comprehensive sampling of the family to date (288 species in 191 genera, representing approximately 78% of the genera of Lamiaceae). Twelve strongly supported primary clades were inferred, which form the phylogenetic backbone of Lamiaceae. Six of the primary clades correspond to the current recognized subfamilies Ajugoideae, Lamioideae, Nepetoideae, Prostantheroideae, Scutellarioideae, and Symphorematoideae, and one corresponds to a portion of Viticoideae. The other five clades comprise: 1) Acrymia and Cymaria; 2) Hymenopyramis, Petraeovitex, Peronema, and Garrettia; 3) Premna, Gmelina, and Cornutia; 4) Callicarpa; and 5) Tectona. Based on these results, three new subfamilies—Cymarioideae, Peronematoideae, and Premnoideae—are described, and the compositions of other subfamilies are updated based on new findings from the last decade. Furthermore, our analyses revealed five strongly supported, more inclusive clades that contain subfamilies, and we give them phylogenetically defined, unranked names: Cymalamiina, Scutelamiina, Perolamiina, Viticisymphorina, and Calliprostantherina. PMID:27748362

  7. Molecular Evolutionary Characterization of a V1R Subfamily Unique to Strepsirrhine Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Anne D.; Chan, Lauren M.; dos Reis, Mario; Larsen, Peter A.; Campbell, C. Ryan; Rasoloarison, Rodin; Barrett, Meredith; Roos, Christian; Kappeler, Peter; Bielawski, Joseph; Yang, Ziheng

    2014-01-01

    Vomeronasal receptor genes have frequently been invoked as integral to the establishment and maintenance of species boundaries among mammals due to the elaborate one-to-one correspondence between semiochemical signals and neuronal sensory inputs. Here, we report the most extensive sample of vomeronasal receptor class 1 (V1R) sequences ever generated for a diverse yet phylogenetically coherent group of mammals, the tooth-combed primates (suborder Strepsirrhini). Phylogenetic analysis confirms our intensive sampling from a single V1R subfamily, apparently unique to the strepsirrhine primates. We designate this subfamily as V1Rstrep. The subfamily retains extensive repertoires of gene copies that descend from an ancestral gene duplication that appears to have occurred prior to the diversification of all lemuriform primates excluding the basal genus Daubentonia (the aye-aye). We refer to the descendent clades as V1Rstrep-α and V1Rstrep-β. Comparison of the two clades reveals different amino acid compositions corresponding to the predicted ligand-binding site and thus potentially to altered functional profiles between the two. In agreement with previous studies of the mouse lemur (genus, Microcebus), the majority of V1Rstrep gene copies appear to be intact and under strong positive selection, particularly within transmembrane regions. Finally, despite the surprisingly high number of gene copies identified in this study, it is nonetheless probable that V1R diversity remains underestimated in these nonmodel primates and that complete characterization will be limited until high-coverage assembled genomes are available. PMID:24398377

  8. Extending the Glucosyl Ceramide Cassette Approach: Application in the Total Synthesis of Ganglioside GalNAc-GM1b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miku Konishi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of a novel cyclic glucosyl ceramide cassette acceptor for efficient glycolipid syntheses was investigated. p-Methoxybenzyl (PMB groups were selected as protecting groups at C2 and C3 of the glucose residue with the aim of improving the functionality of the cassette acceptor. The choice of the PMB group resulted in a loss of β-selectivity, which was corrected by using an appropriate tether to control the spatial arrangement and the nitrile solvent effect. To investigate the effect of linker structure on the β-selectivity of intramolecular glycosylation, several linkers for tethering the glucose and ceramide moiety were designed and prepared, namely, succinyl, glutaryl, dimethylmalonyl, and phthaloyl esters. The succinyl ester linker was the best for accessing the cassette form. The newly designed glucosyl ceramide cassette acceptor was then applied in the total synthesis of ganglioside GalNAc-GM1b.

  9. Enhanced performance of methamphetamine lateral flow cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jerome P; Sammons, Deborah L; Robertson, Shirley A; Snawder, John E

    2015-01-01

    Surface contamination from methamphetamine in meth labs continues to be a problem. We had previously developed a lateral flow assay cassette for field detection of methamphetamine contamination that is commercially available and has been used by a number of groups to assess contamination. This cassette uses the complete disappearance of the test line as an end point for detection of 50 ng/100 cm2 of methamphetamine contamination for surface sampling with cotton swabs. In the present study, we further evaluate the response of the cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader to measure the intensities of the test and control lines. The cassettes were capable of detecting 0.25 ng/ml for calibration solutions. For 100 cm2 ceramic tiles that were spiked with methamphetamine and wiped with cotton-tipped wooden swabs wetted in assay/sampling buffer, 1 ng/tile was detected using the reader. Semi-quantitative results can be produced over the range 0-10 ng/ml for calibration solutions and 0-25 ng/tile for spiked tiles using either a 4-parameter logistic fit of test line intensity versus concentration or spiked mass or the ratio of the control line to the test line intensity fit to concentration or spiked mass. Recovery from the tiles was determined to be about 30% using the fitted curves. Comparison of the control line to the test line was also examined as a possible visual detection end point and it was found that the control line became more intense than the test line at 0.5 to 1 ng/ml for calibration solutions or 1 to 2 ng/tile for spiked tiles. Thus the lateral flow cassettes for methamphetamine have the potential to produce more sensitive semi-quantitative results if an electronic lateral flow reader is used and can be more sensitive for detection if the comparison of the control line to the test line is used as the visual end point.

  10. Organization and evolution of two SIDER retroposon subfamilies and their impact on the Leishmania genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bringaud Frédéric

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently identified two large families of extinct transposable elements termed Short Interspersed DEgenerated Retroposons (SIDERs in the parasitic protozoan Leishmania major. The characterization of SIDER elements was limited to the SIDER2 subfamily, although members of both subfamilies have been shown to play a role in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Apparent functional domestication of SIDERs prompted further investigation of their characterization, dissemination and evolution throughout the Leishmania genus, with particular attention to the disregarded SIDER1 subfamily. Results Using optimized statistical profiles of both SIDER1 and SIDER2 subgroups, we report the first automated and highly sensitive annotation of SIDERs in the genomes of L. infantum, L. braziliensis and L. major. SIDER annotations were combined to in-silico mRNA extremity predictions to generate a detailed distribution map of the repeat family, hence uncovering an enrichment of antisense-oriented SIDER repeats between the polyadenylation and trans-splicing sites of intergenic regions, in contrast to the exclusive sense orientation of SIDER elements within 3'UTRs. Our data indicate that SIDER elements are quite uniformly dispersed throughout all three genomes and that their distribution is generally syntenic. However, only 47.4% of orthologous genes harbor a SIDER element in all three species. There is evidence for species-specific enrichment of SIDERs and for their preferential association, especially for SIDER2s, with different metabolic functions. Investigation of the sequence attributes and evolutionary relationship of SIDERs to other trypanosomatid retroposons reveals that SIDER1 is a truncated version of extinct autonomous ingi-like retroposons (DIREs, which were functional in the ancestral Leishmania genome. Conclusion A detailed characterization of the sequence traits for both SIDER subfamilies unveils

  11. Evolution of substrate recognition sites (SRSs) in cytochromes P450 from Apiaceae exemplified by the CYP71AJ subfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Bjørn; Krieger, Celia; Drew, Damian

    2015-01-01

    belonging to the Apioideae subfamily of Apiaceae and have been described as being involved in the defence reaction against phytophageous insects. Results: A bloom in the cytochromes P450 CYP71AJ subfamily has been identified, showing at least 2 clades and 6 subclades within the CYP71AJ subfamily. Two...... of the subclades were functionally assigned to the biosynthesis of furanocoumarins. Six substrate recognition sites (SRS1-6) important for the enzymatic conversion were investigated in the described cytochromes P450 and display significant variability within the CYP71AJ subfamily. Homology models underline...... a significant modification of the accession to the iron atom, which might explain the difference of the substrate specificity between the cytochromes P450 restricted to furanocoumarins as substrates and the orphan CYP71AJ. Conclusion: Two subclades functionally assigned to the biosynthesis of furanocoumarins...

  12. A comparative proteomic study identified LRPPRC and MCM7 as putative actors in imatinib mesylate cross-resistance in Lucena cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa Stephany

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment has improved since the introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM, cases of resistance have been reported. This resistance has been associated with the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR phenotype, as a BCR-ABL independent mechanism. The classic pathway studied in MDR promotion is ATP-binding cassette (ABC family transporters expression, but other mechanisms that drive drug resistance are largely unknown. To better understand IM therapy relapse due to the rise of MDR, we compared the proteomic profiles of K562 and Lucena (K562/VCR cells. Results The use of 2-DE coupled with a MS approach resulted in the identification of 36 differentially expressed proteins. Differential mRNA levels of leucine-rich PPR motif-containing (LRPPRC protein, minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (MCM7 and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B (MDR/TAP member 1 (ABCB1 were capable of defining samples from CML patients as responsive or resistant to therapy. Conclusions Through the data presented in this work, we show the relevance of MDR to IM therapy. In addition, our proteomic approach identified candidate actors involved in resistance, which could lead to additional information on BCR-ABL-independent molecular mechanisms.

  13. Phylogeny and evolutionary patterns in the Dwarf crayfish subfamily (Decapoda: Cambarellinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pedraza-Lara

    Full Text Available The Dwarf crayfish or Cambarellinae, is a morphologically singular subfamily of decapod crustaceans that contains only one genus, Cambarellus. Its intriguing distribution, along the river basins of the Gulf Coast of United States (Gulf Group and into Central México (Mexican Group, has until now lacked of satisfactory explanation. This study provides a comprehensive sampling of most of the extant species of Cambarellus and sheds light on its evolutionary history, systematics and biogeography. We tested the impact of Gulf Group versus Mexican Group geography on rates of cladogenesis using a maximum likelihood framework, testing different models of birth/extinction of lineages. We propose a comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis for the subfamily based on mitochondrial and nuclear loci (3,833 bp using Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods. The phylogenetic structure found two phylogenetic groups associated to the two main geographic components (Gulf Group and Mexican Group and is partially consistent with the historical structure of river basins. The previous hypothesis, which divided the genus into three subgenera based on genitalia morphology was only partially supported (P = 0.047, resulting in a paraphyletic subgenus Pandicambarus. We found at least two cases in which phylogenetic structure failed to recover monophyly of recognized species while detecting several cases of cryptic diversity, corresponding to lineages not assigned to any described species. Cladogenetic patterns in the entire subfamily are better explained by an allopatric model of speciation. Diversification analyses showed similar cladogenesis patterns between both groups and did not significantly differ from the constant rate models. While cladogenesis in the Gulf Group is coincident in time with changes in the sea levels, in the Mexican Group, cladogenesis is congruent with the formation of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Our results show how similar allopatric

  14. Reassessment of Species Diversity of the Subfamily Denticollinae (Coleoptera: Elateridae through DNA Barcoding.

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    Taeman Han

    Full Text Available The subfamily Denticollinae is a taxonomically diverse group in the family Elateridae. Denticollinae includes many morphologically similar species and crop pests, as well as many undescribed species at each local fauna. To construct a rapid and reliable identification system for this subfamily, the effectiveness of molecular species identification was assessed based on 421 cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI sequences of 84 morphologically identified species. Among the 84 morphospecies, molecular species identification of 60 species (71.4% was consistent with their morphological identifications. Six cryptic and/or pseudocryptic species with large genetic divergence (>5% were confirmed by their sympatric or allopatric distributions. However, 18 species, including a subspecies, had ambiguous genetic distances and shared overlapping intra- and interspecific genetic distances (range: 2.12%-3.67% suggesting incomplete lineage sorting, introgression of mitochondrial genome, or affection by endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia infection, between species and simple genetic variation within species. In this study, we propose a conservative threshold of 3.6% for convenient molecular operational taxonomic unit (MOTU identification in the subfamily Denticollinae based on the results of pairwise genetic distances analyses using neighbor-joining, mothur, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery analysis, and tree-based species delimitation by Poisson Tree Processes analysis. Using the 3.6% threshold, we identified 87 MOTUs and found 8 MOTUs in the interval between 2.5% to 3.5%. Evaluation of MOTUs identified in this range requires integrative species delimitation, including review of morphological and ecological differences as well as sensitive genetic markers. From this study, we confirmed that COI sequence is useful for reassessing species diversity for polymorphic and polytypic species occurring in sympatric and allopatric distributions, and for a single species having

  15. Identification and characterization of a novel gene differentially expressed in zebrafish cross-subfamily cloned embryos

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    Wang Ya-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-species nuclear transfer has been shown to be a potent approach to retain the genetic viability of a certain species near extinction. However, most embryos produced by cross-species nuclear transfer were compromised because that they were unable to develop to later stages. Gene expression analysis of cross-species cloned embryos will yield new insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in cross-species nuclear transfer and embryonic development. Results A novel gene, K31, was identified as an up-regulated gene in fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos using SSH approach and RACE method. K31 complete cDNA sequence is 1106 base pairs (bp in length, with a 342 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a putative protein of 113 amino acids (aa. Comparative analysis revealed no homologous known gene in zebrafish and other species database. K31 protein contains a putative transmembrane helix and five putative phosphorylation sites but without a signal peptide. Expression pattern analysis by real time RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH shows that it has the characteristics of constitutively expressed gene. Sub-cellular localization assay shows that K31 protein can not penetrate the nuclei. Interestingly, over-expression of K31 gene can cause lethality in the epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC cells in cell culture, which gave hint to the inefficient reprogramming events occurred in cloned embryos. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicated that K31 gene is a novel gene differentially expressed in fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos and over-expression of K31 gene can cause lethality of cultured fish cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of novel genes involved in nucleo-cytoplasmic interaction of fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos.

  16. Phylogeny of the fern subfamily Pteridoideae (Pteridaceae; Pteridophyta), with the description of a new genus: Gastoniella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Xin-Mao; Lu, Ngan Thi; Zhang, Li-Bing

    2017-04-01

    As the second most genera-rich fern family, Pteridaceae contain more than 1000 species contributing to ca. 10% of extant leptosporangiate fern diversity. The subfamily Pteridoideae is one of the five subfamilies often recognized. The circumscription of Pteridoideae has not been clear. A large number of species have not yet been included in any molecular analyses before. In this study, DNA sequences of six plastid loci of 154 accessions representing ca. 87 species in 14 genera of Pteridaceae subfam. Pteridoideae and four accessions representing two species in subfam. Parkerioideae and one species of subfam. Adiantoideae as outgroups were used to infer a phylogeny using maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony. Our analyses show that (1) Pteridoideae is monophyletic and the newly defined subfamily is composed of 14 genera including a newly described genus; (2) Pteridoideae is resolved into four strongly supported monophyletic clades: the Pteris clade, the Actiniopteris+Onychium clade, the JAPSTT clade, and the GAPCC clade, these being supported by not only molecular data but also morphological features and distribution information; (3) Onychium is confirmed as monophyletic and accessions of Onychium are resolved into two strongly supported clades, the O. cryptogrammoides clade and the O. siliculosum clade; and (4) Accessions of the traditionally defined Anogramma are resolved as paraphyletic in relation to Cerosora, Cosentinica, and Pityrogramma. Three species traditionally treated in Anogramma are in fact more closely related to Cerosora and Pityrogramma than they are to Anogramma. Gastoniella Li Bing Zhang & Liang Zhang, gen. nov. is described to accommodate these species and three new combinations are provided. Three currently known species of Gastoniella are distributed in the Ascension Island in South Atlantic Ocean, central Mexico, and tropical America, respectively. The new genus is distinct from Anogramma s.s. in having ultimate segments linear not obviously

  17. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W Florian; Johnsen, Pål J; da Silva, Gabriela J; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much

  18. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Domingues

    Full Text Available We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like. Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE, Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation

  19. Hygromycin B and apramycin antibiotic resistance cassettes for use in Campylobacter jejuni.

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    Andrew Cameron

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni genetic manipulation is restricted by the limited number of antibiotic resistance cassettes available for use in this diarrheal pathogen. In this study, two antibiotic resistance cassettes were developed, encoding for hygromycin B and apramycin resistance, for use in mutagenesis or for selection of gene expression and complementation constructs in C. jejuni. First, the marker genes were successfully modified to allow for insertional mutagenesis or deletion of a gene-of-interest, and were bracketed with restriction sites for the facilitation of site-specific cloning. These hygromycin B and apramycin markers are encoded by plasmids pAC1H and pAC1A, respectively. We also modified an insertional gene-delivery vector to create pRRH and pRRA, containing the hygromycin B and apramycin resistance genes, and 3 unique restriction sites for the directional introduction of genes into the conserved multi-copy rRNA gene clusters of the C. jejuni chromosome. We determined the effective antibiotic concentrations required for selection, and established that no harmful effects or fitness costs were associated with carrying hygromycin B or apramycin resistance under standard C. jejuni laboratory conditions. Using these markers, the arylsulfatase reporter gene astA was deleted, and the ability to genetically complement the astA deletion using pRRH and pRRA for astA gene insertion was demonstrated. Furthermore, the relative levels of expression from the endogenous astA promoter were compared to that of polycistronic mRNA expression from the constitutive promoter upstream of the resistance gene. The development of additional antibiotic resistance cassettes for use in Campylobacter will enable multiple gene deletion and expression combinations as well as more in-depth study of multi-gene systems important for the survival and pathogenesis of this important bacterium.

  20. Cassette dosing for pharmacokinetic screening in drug discovery: comparison of clearance, volume of distribution, half-life, mean residence time, and oral bioavailability obtained by cassette and discrete dosing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagilla, Rakesh; Nord, Melanie; McAtee, Jeff J; Jolivette, Larry J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare selected pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters obtained by cassette and discrete dosing of compounds in rats. The concordance of PK properties obtained by the two dosing strategies was evaluated for 116 compounds representing various therapeutic programs and diverse chemical structures. The correspondence between cassette- and discrete-dosing-derived PK properties was examined semiquantitatively and qualitatively. For semiquantitative comparison, compounds with cassette-to-discrete PK parameter ratios between 0.5 and 2 (inclusive) were considered to be in agreement. For qualitative comparison, compounds were divided into three categories (low, moderate, and high) based on the value of the PK parameter; compounds that fell into the same category following cassette and discrete dosing were considered to be in agreement. Of the 116 compounds evaluated, 89%, 91%, 80%, and 91% of the compounds were semiquantitatively equivalent for the intravenous PK parameters of clearance (CL), volume of distribution (Vdss), terminal elimination plasma half-life (HL), and mean residence time (MRT), respectively, whereas 79%, 80%, 79%, and 72% were qualitatively similar for CL, Vdss, MRT, and terminal elimination plasma HL, respectively. Following oral administration, bioavailability concordance was 72% when assessed qualitatively and 78% when determined semiquantitatively. Results from these analyses indicate that a cassette dosing strategy is a viable approach to screen compounds for PK properties within a drug discovery setting. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Phantoms of Gondwana?-phylogeny of the spider subfamily Mynogleninae (Araneae: Linyphiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frick, Holger; Scharff, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    and Micronetini), and Erigoninae, and a representative of the family Pimoidae, the sister-group to Linyphiidae. No fewer than 147 of the morphological characters used in this study are new and defined for this study, and come mainly from male and female genitalia. Parsimony analysis with equal weights resulted...... in three most parsimonious trees of length 871. The monophyly of the subfamily Mynogleninae and the genera Novafroneta, Parafroneta, Laminafroneta, Afroneta, Promynoglenes, Metamynoglenes, and Haplinis are supported, whereas Pseudafroneta is paraphyletic. The remaining seven mynoglenine genera are either...

  2. Current status of subfamily Ichneumoninae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) from Malaysia and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhafiza, A. F.; Idris, A. B.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, 25 genera and 38 species under 10 tribes (Alomyini, Compsophorini, Goedartiini, Heresiarchini, Ichneumonini, Ischnojoppini, Joppocryptini, Listrodromini, Oedicephalini and Platylabini) of the subfamily Ichneumoninae housed in the Centre for Insect Systematics, UKM and Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research (National University of Singapore) are reported from Malaysia and Singapore. The tribe Heresiarchini has the greatest number of species (13) followed by Ichneumonini with six species. Imeria is the largest genus which contains five species recorded. Six species in this study are new records for Malaysia.

  3. A homologous subfamily of satellite III DNA on human chromosomes 14 and 22.

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, K H; Earle, E; McQuillan, C.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a new subfamily of human satellite III DNA that is represented on two different acrocentric chromosomes. This DNA is composed of a tandemly repeated array of diverged 5-base-pair monomer units of the sequence GGAAT or GGAGT. These monomers are organised into a 1.37-kilobase higher-order structure that is itself tandemly reiterated. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing specific human chromosomes, this higher-order structure is demonstrated on chromosomes 14 and 22, but ...

  4. Haemonchus contortus acetylcholine receptors of the DEG-3 subfamily and their role in sensitivity to monepantel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucien Rufener

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-intestinal nematodes in ruminants, especially Haemonchus contortus, are a global threat to sheep and cattle farming. The emergence of drug resistance, and even multi-drug resistance to the currently available classes of broad spectrum anthelmintics, further stresses the need for new drugs active against gastro-intestinal nematodes. A novel chemical class of synthetic anthelmintics, the Amino-Acetonitrile Derivatives (AADs, was recently discovered and the drug candidate AAD-1566 (monepantel was chosen for further development. Studies with Caenorhabditis elegans suggested that the AADs act via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR of the nematode-specific DEG-3 subfamily. Here we identify nAChR genes of the DEG-3 subfamily from H. contortus and investigate their role in AAD sensitivity. Using a novel in vitro selection procedure, mutant H. contortus populations of reduced sensitivity to AAD-1566 were obtained. Sequencing of full-length nAChR coding sequences from AAD-susceptible H. contortus and their AAD-1566-mutant progeny revealed 2 genes to be affected. In the gene monepantel-1 (Hco-mptl-1, formerly named Hc-acr-23H, a panel of mutations was observed exclusively in the AAD-mutant nematodes, including deletions at intron-exon boundaries that result in mis-spliced transcripts and premature stop codons. In the gene Hco-des-2H, the same 135 bp insertion in the 5' UTR created additional, out of frame start codons in 2 independent H. contortus AAD-mutants. Furthermore, the AAD mutants exhibited altered expression levels of the DEG-3 subfamily nAChR genes Hco-mptl-1, Hco-des-2H and Hco-deg-3H as quantified by real-time PCR. These results indicate that Hco-MPTL-1 and other nAChR subunits of the DEG-3 subfamily constitute a target for AAD action against H. contortus and that loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding genes may reduce the sensitivity to AADs.

  5. Expression of heterologous genes from an IRES translational cassette in replication competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, M L

    1999-01-01

    We describe replication competent retroviruses capable of expressing heterologous genes during multiple rounds of infection. An internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus was inserted in the U3 region of Akv- and SL3-3-murine leukemia viruses (MLV) to direct translation...... of neo or the enhanced green fluorescence protein gene (EGFP). Akv-MLV's with IRES-neo and IRES-EGFP cassettes replicated with titers of about 10(6) infectious units/ml while SL3-3-MLV with IRES-neo gave about 10(3)-fold lower titers. Interestingly, RNA analysis showed a drastic reduction in the amount...

  6. Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5 kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like β propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the

  7. Two CRM protein subfamilies cooperate in the splicing of group IIB introns in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yukari; Bayraktar, Omer Ali; Barkan, Alice

    2008-11-01

    Chloroplast genomes in angiosperms encode approximately 20 group II introns, approximately half of which are classified as subgroup IIB. The splicing of all but one of the subgroup IIB introns requires a heterodimer containing the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase homolog CRS2 and one of two closely related proteins, CAF1 or CAF2, that harbor a recently recognized RNA binding domain called the CRM domain. Two CRS2/CAF-dependent introns require, in addition, a CRM domain protein called CFM2 that is only distantly related to CAF1 and CAF2. Here, we show that CFM3, a close relative of CFM2, associates in vivo with those CRS2/CAF-dependent introns that are not CFM2 ligands. Mutant phenotypes in rice and Arabidopsis support a role for CFM3 in the splicing of most of the introns with which it associates. These results show that either CAF1 or CAF2 and either CFM2 or CFM3 simultaneously bind most chloroplast subgroup IIB introns in vivo, and that the CAF and CFM subunits play nonredundant roles in splicing. These results suggest that the expansion of the CRM protein family in plants resulted in two subfamilies that play different roles in group II intron splicing, with further diversification within a subfamily to accommodate multiple intron ligands.

  8. The AFL subfamily of B3 transcription factors: evolution and function in angiosperm seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonero, Pilar; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Seed development follows zygotic embryogenesis; during the maturation phase reserves accumulate and desiccation tolerance is acquired. This is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level and the AFL (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2) subfamily of B3 transcription factors (TFs) play a central role. They alter hormone biosynthesis, mainly in regards to abscisic acid and gibberellins, and also regulate the expression of other TFs and/or modulate their downstream activity via protein-protein interactions. This review deals with the origin of AFL TFs, which can be traced back to non-vascular plants such as Physcomitrella patens and achieves foremost expansion in the angiosperms. In green algae, like the unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or the pluricellular Klebsormidium flaccidum, a single B3 gene and four B3 paralogous genes are annotated, respectively. However, none of them present with the structural features of the AFL subfamily, with the exception of the B3 DNA-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis groups the AFL TFs into four Major Clusters of Ortologous Genes (MCOGs). The origin and function of these genes is discussed in view of their expression patterns and in the context of major regulatory interactions in seeds of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow: An Intricate Subfamily of Proteins

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    Maegen A. Ackermann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C consists of a family of thick filament associated proteins. Three isoforms of MyBP-C exist in striated muscles: cardiac, slow skeletal, and fast skeletal. To date, most studies have focused on the cardiac form, due to its direct involvement in the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we focus on the slow skeletal form, discuss past and current literature, and present evidence to support that: (i MyBP-C slow comprises a subfamily of four proteins, resulting from complex alternative shuffling of the single MyBP-C slow gene, (ii the four MyBP-C slow isoforms are expressed in variable amounts in different skeletal muscles, (iii at least one MyBP-C slow isoform is preferentially found at the periphery of M-bands and (iv the MyBP-C slow subfamily may play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeric M- and A-bands and regulate the contractile properties of the actomyosin filaments.

  10. A consistent nomenclature of antimicrobial peptides isolated from frogs of the subfamily Phyllomedusinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiche, Mohamed; Ladram, Ali; Nicolas, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    A growing number of cationic antimicrobial peptides have been isolated from the skin of hylid frogs belonging to the Phyllomedusinae subfamily. The amino acid sequences of these peptides are currently located in several databases under identifiers with no consistent system of nomenclature to describe them. In order to provide a workable terminology for antimicrobial peptides from Phyllomedusid frogs, we have made a systematic effort to collect, analyze, and classify all the Phyllomedusid peptide sequences available in databases. We propose that frogs belonging to the Phyllomedusinae subfamily should be described by the species names set out in Amphibian Species of the World: http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.php, American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA. Multiple alignments analysis of at least 80 antimicrobial peptides isolated from 12 Phyllomedusinae species were distributed in seven distinct peptide families including dermaseptin, phylloseptin, plasticin, dermatoxin, phylloxin, hyposin and orphan peptides, and will be considered as the name of the headgroup of each family. The parent peptide's name should be followed by the first upper letter of the species for orthologous peptides and publication date determines priority. For example, the abbreviation B for bicolor and H for hypochondrialis. When two species begin with the same letter, two letters in upper case should be used (the first letter followed by the second or the third letter and so on). For example, the abbreviation DI for distincta, DU for duellmani, VA for vaillanti and VN for vanzolinii. Paralogous peptides should bear letter(s) in upper case followed by numbers.

  11. Functional interactome of Aquaporin 1 sub-family reveals new physiological functions in Arabidopsis Thaliana

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    Mohamed Ragab Abdel Gawwad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are channel proteins found in plasma membranes and intercellular membranes of different cellular compartments, facilitate the water flux, solutes and gases across the cellular plasma membranes. The present study highlights the sub-family plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP predicting the 3-D structure and analyzing the functional interactome of it homologs. PIP1 homologs integrate with many proteins with different plant physiological roles in Arabidopsis thaliana including; PIP1A and PIP1B: facilitate the transport of water, diffusion of amino acids and/or peptides from the vacuolar compartment to the cytoplasm, play a role in the control of cell turgor and cell expansion and involved in root water uptake respectively. In addition we found that PIP1B plays a defensive role against Pseudomonas syringae infection through the interaction with the plasma membrane Rps2 protein. Another substantial function of PIP1C via the interaction with PIP2E is the response to nematode infection. Generally, PIP1 sub-family interactome controlling many physiological processes in plant cell like; osmoregulation in plants under high osmotic stress such as under a high salt, response to nematode, facilitate the transport of water across cell membrane and regulation of floral initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  12. Species tree of a recent radiation: the subfamily Delphininae (Cetacea, Mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana R; Jackson, Jennifer A; Möller, Luciana M; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Manuela Coelho, M

    2012-07-01

    Lineages undergoing rapid radiations provide exceptional opportunities for studying speciation and adaptation, but also represent a challenge for molecular systematics because retention of ancestral polymorphisms and the occurrence of hybridization can obscure relationships among lineages. Dolphins in the subfamily Delphininae are one such case. Non-monophyly, rapid speciation events, and discordance between morphological and molecular characters have made the inference of phylogenetic relationships within this subfamily very difficult. Here we approach this problem by applying multiple methods intended to estimate species trees using a multi-gene dataset for the Delphininae (Sousa, Sotalia, Stenella, Tursiops, Delphinus and Lagenodelphis). Incongruent gene trees obtained indicate that incomplete lineage sorting and possibly hybridization are confounding the inference of species history in this group. Nonetheless, using coalescent-based methods, we have been able to extract an underlying species-tree signal from divergent histories of independent genes. This is the first time a molecular study provides support for such relationships. This study further illustrates how methods of species-tree inference can be very sensitive both to the characteristics of the dataset and the evolutionary processes affecting the evolution of the group under study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Flight patterns and sex ratio of beetles of the subfamily Dynastinae (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae

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    Larissa Simões Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dynastinae is one of the most representative subfamilies of Melolonthidae (Scarabaeoidea and has considerable ecological importance due mainly to interactions with plants of the families Araceae and Annonaceae. This relationship has led to the evolution of nocturnal activity patterns, which are influenced by environmental conditions. In the present study, abiotic factors were investigated to comprehend the influence on the flight patterns and identify the sex ratio of beetles from this subfamily. A study was conducted at Campo de Instrução Marechal Newton Cavalcanti in northeastern Brazil between December 2010 and November 2011. Thirteen species of Dynastinae were identified, most of which were from the genus Cyclocephala. Abundance and richness were greater in the dry season. Six species exhibited peak flight activity at specific periods of the night. More females than males were recorded for Cyclocephala distincta and C. paraguayensis. The present findings suggest that rainfall reduces the flight activity of these beetles and different time schedules may be related to mating behavior, foraging behavior and the avoidance of interspecific resource competition.

  14. A new genus of the subfamily Cillaeinae (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae) from the Philippines and New Guinea with notes on the taxonomy and phylogeny of the subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirejtshuk, Alexander G; Kovalev, Alexey V

    2016-12-06

    Allenipeplus gen. nov. represented by A. philippinensis sp. nov., type species (Philippines, Luzon), A. alius sp. nov. (Philippines, Mindoro), A. harmonicus sp. nov. (Philippines, Mindanao) and A. vitellinus sp. nov. (Indonesian New Guinea), is described. This new genus combines characters with a mosaic spread among other cillaeine genera. We present a wide comparison of genera among the subfamily Cillaeinae, making it possible to elaborate a detailed diagnosis of the new genus and trace some order in character patterns and propose a hypothesis on the relationship of this genus to other groups known from the Indo-Malayan and Australian Regions. A detailed diagnosis of the new genus and key to the new species are given. The Adocimus-complex of the related genera including Allenipeplus gen. nov., Adocimus Murray, 1864, Ithyphenes Murray, 1864, Platynema Ritsema, 1885 and probably Brittonema Kirejtshuk, 2011 is defined. Some notes on the taxonomy of the genera Liparopeplus Murray, 1864 and Xanthopeplus Fairmaire, 1880, stat. nov. are given. Additionally, designation of a lectotype for Liparopeplus colastoides Murray, 1864 is made.

  15. Fully Automated Data Collection Using PAM and the Development of PAM/SPACE Reversible Cassettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shokei; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miki, Kunio; Baba, Seiki; Ueno, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Tanaka, Isao

    2010-06-01

    To remotely control and automatically collect data in high-throughput X-ray data collection experiments, the Structural Biology Research Center at the Photon Factory (PF) developed and installed sample exchange robots PAM (PF Automated Mounting system) at PF macromolecular crystallography beamlines; BL-5A, BL-17A, AR-NW12A and AR-NE3A. We developed and installed software that manages the flow of the automated X-ray experiments; sample exchanges, loop-centering and X-ray diffraction data collection. The fully automated data collection function has been available since February 2009. To identify sample cassettes, PAM employs a two-dimensional bar code reader. New beamlines, BL-1A at the Photon Factory and BL32XU at SPring-8, are currently under construction as part of Targeted Proteins Research Program (TPRP) by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. However, different robots, PAM and SPACE (SPring-8 Precise Automatic Cryo-sample Exchanger), will be installed at BL-1A and BL32XU, respectively. For the convenience of the users of both facilities, pins and cassettes for PAM and SPACE are developed as part of the TPRP.

  16. Ratiometric Matryoshka biosensors from a nested cassette of green- and orange-emitting fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ast, Cindy; Foret, Jessica; Oltrogge, Luke M; De Michele, Roberto; Kleist, Thomas J; Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Frommer, Wolf B

    2017-09-05

    Sensitivity, dynamic and detection range as well as exclusion of expression and instrumental artifacts are critical for the quantitation of data obtained with fluorescent protein (FP)-based biosensors in vivo. Current biosensors designs are, in general, unable to simultaneously meet all these criteria. Here, we describe a generalizable platform to create dual-FP biosensors with large dynamic ranges by employing a single FP-cassette, named GO-(Green-Orange) Matryoshka. The cassette nests a stable reference FP (large Stokes shift LSSmOrange) within a reporter FP (circularly permuted green FP). GO- Matryoshka yields green and orange fluorescence upon blue excitation. As proof of concept, we converted existing, single-emission biosensors into a series of ratiometric calcium sensors (MatryoshCaMP6s) and ammonium transport activity sensors (AmTryoshka1;3). We additionally identified the internal acid-base equilibrium as a key determinant of the GCaMP dynamic range. Matryoshka technology promises flexibility in the design of a wide spectrum of ratiometric biosensors and expanded in vivo applications.Single fluorescent protein biosensors are susceptible to expression and instrumental artifacts. Here Ast et al. describe a dual fluorescent protein design whereby a reference fluorescent protein is nested within a reporter fluorescent protein to control for such artifacts while preserving sensitivity and dynamic range.

  17. CRISPR-Mediated Integration of Large Gene Cassettes Using AAV Donor Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus O. Bak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been shown to facilitate high levels of precise genome editing using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors to serve as donor template DNA during homologous recombination (HR. However, the maximum AAV packaging capacity of ∼4.5 kb limits the donor size. Here, we overcome this constraint by showing that two co-transduced AAV vectors can serve as donors during consecutive HR events for the integration of large transgenes. Importantly, the method involves a single-step procedure applicable to primary cells with relevance to therapeutic genome editing. We use the methodology in primary human T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to site-specifically integrate an expression cassette that, as a single donor vector, would otherwise amount to a total of 6.5 kb. This approach now provides an efficient way to integrate large transgene cassettes into the genomes of primary human cells using HR-mediated genome editing with AAV vectors.

  18. Use of cassette-electrode microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Morio; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-02-01

    Cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells (CE-MFCs) have been developed for the conversion of biomass wastes into electric energy. The present study modified CE-MFC for its application to wastewater treatment and examined its utility in a long-term (240 days) experiment to treat a synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and a detergent (approximately 500 mg of total chemical oxygen demand [COD] per liter). A test MFC reactor (1 l in capacity) was equipped with 10 cassette electrodes with total anode and cathode projection areas of 1440 cm(2), and the operation was initiated by inoculating with rice paddy-field soil. It was demonstrated that CE-MFC achieved COD removal rates of 80% at hydraulic-retention times of 6 h or greater, and electricity was generated at a maximum power density of 150 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiency of 20%. Microbial communities established on anodes of CEs were analyzed by pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, showing that Geobacter, Clostridium, and Geothrix were abundantly detected in anode biofilms. These results demonstrate the utility of CE-MFC for wastewater treatment, in which Geobacter and Geothrix would be involved in the electricity generation. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. All rights reserved.

  19. CRISPR-Mediated Integration of Large Gene Cassettes Using AAV Donor Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Rasmus O; Porteus, Matthew H

    2017-07-18

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been shown to facilitate high levels of precise genome editing using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to serve as donor template DNA during homologous recombination (HR). However, the maximum AAV packaging capacity of ∼4.5 kb limits the donor size. Here, we overcome this constraint by showing that two co-transduced AAV vectors can serve as donors during consecutive HR events for the integration of large transgenes. Importantly, the method involves a single-step procedure applicable to primary cells with relevance to therapeutic genome editing. We use the methodology in primary human T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to site-specifically integrate an expression cassette that, as a single donor vector, would otherwise amount to a total of 6.5 kb. This approach now provides an efficient way to integrate large transgene cassettes into the genomes of primary human cells using HR-mediated genome editing with AAV vectors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electricity generation from cattle manure slurry by cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kengo; Ito, Toshihiro; Kawano, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Miyahara, Morio; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-11-01

    Cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells (CE-MFCs) are efficient and scalable devices for electricity production from organic waste. Previous studies have demonstrated that CE-MFCs are capable of generating electricity from artificial wastewater at relatively high efficiencies. In this study, a single-cassette CE-MFC was constructed, and its capacity for electricity generation from cattle manure suspended in water (solid to water ratio of 1:50) was examined. The CE-MFC reactor was operated in batch mode for 49 days; electricity generation became stable 2 weeks after initiating the operation. The maximum power density was measured at 16.3 W m⁻³ on day 26. Sequencing analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained from the original manure and from anode biofilms suggested that Chloroflexi and Geobacteraceae were abundant in the anode biofilm (29% and 18%, respectively), whereas no Geobacteraceae sequences were detected in the original manure sample. The results of this study suggest that CE-MFCs can be used to generate electricity from water-suspended cattle manure in a scalable MFC system. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqiu Diao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons. Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons” that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system.

  2. Impaired Insulin Secretion in Four Tangier Disease Patients with ABCA1 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koseki, Masahiro; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Nakatani, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Miwako; Nakaoka, Hajime; Kawase, Ryota; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Masuda, Daisaku; C. Sandoval, Jose; Ohama, Tohru; Nakagawa-Toyama, Yumiko; Matsuura, Fumihiko; Nishida, Makoto; Ishigami, Masato; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Sakane, Naoki; Kumon, Yoshitaka; Suehiro, Tadashi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Tangier disease (TD), caused by deficiency of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, is characterized by the absence of high density lipoprotein and the accumulation of cholesteryl esters in many tissues...

  3. Reference: 342 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lls and initiation of hyphae by B. g. hordei, suggesting that PEN3 contributes to defenses at the cell wall ...vate the salicylic acid pathway. Arabidopsis PEN3/PDR8, an ATP binding cassette transporter, contribute

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_001136 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and arsenite; also transports unconjugated bilirubin; similar to human cystic fibrosis protein CFTR; Ycf1p [... transporter of the ATP-binding cassette family, has a role in detoxifying metals such as cadmium, mercury,

  5. A Cassette Containing Thiostrepton, Gentamicin Resistance Genes, and dif sequences Is Effective in Construction of Recombinant Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugweru, Julius; Makafe, Gaelle; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Bangxing; Huang, Shaobo; Njire, Moses; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Tan, Yaoju; Li, Xinjie; Liu, Jianxiong; Tan, Shouyong; Deng, Jiaoyu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is limited by the availability of selection markers. Spontaneous resistance mutation rate of M. tuberculosis to the widely used kanamycin is relatively high which often leads to some false positive transformants. Due to the few available markers, we have created a cassette containing thiostrepton resistance gene (tsr) for selection in M. tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG, and gentamicin resistance gene (aacC1) for Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis mc(2)155, flanked with dif sequences recognized by the Xer system of mycobacteria. This cassette adds to the limited available selection markers for mycobacteria.

  6. Whole genome identification, phylogeny and evolution of the cytochrome P450 family 2 (CYP2) sub-families in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Khan, Imran

    2016-01-01

    genomes representing all major extant bird clades. Overall, 12 CYP2 subfamilies were identified, including the first description of the CYP2F, CYP2G and several CYP2AF genes in avian genomes. Some of the CYP2 genes previously described as being lineage-specific, such as CYP2K and CYP2W, are ubiquitous...... to all avian groups. Furthermore, we identified a large number of CYP2J copies, which have been associated previously with water reabsorption. We detected positive selection in the avian CYP2C, CYP2D, CYP2H, CYP2J, CYP2K and CYP2AC subfamilies. Moreover, we identified new substrate recognition sites (SRS...... that there has been active enzyme site selection on CYP2 subfamilies and differential selection associated with different life history traits among birds....

  7. Key biosynthetic gene subfamily recruited for pheromone production prior to the extensive radiation of Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Tomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moths have evolved highly successful mating systems, relying on species-specific mixtures of sex pheromone components for long-distance mate communication. Acyl-CoA desaturases are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of these compounds and to a large extent they account for the great diversity of pheromone structures in Lepidoptera. A novel desaturase gene subfamily that displays Δ11 catalytic activities has been highlighted to account for most of the unique pheromone signatures of the taxonomically advanced ditrysian species. To assess the mechanisms driving pheromone evolution, information is needed about the signalling machinery of primitive moths. The currant shoot borer, Lampronia capitella, is the sole reported primitive non-ditrysian moth known to use unsaturated fatty-acid derivatives as sex-pheromone. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches we elucidated the biosynthesis paths of its main pheromone component, the (Z,Z-9,11-tetradecadien-1-ol and bring new insights into the time point of the recruitment of the key Δ11-desaturase gene subfamily in moth pheromone biosynthesis. Results The reconstructed evolutionary tree of desaturases evidenced two ditrysian-specific lineages (the Δ11 and Δ9 (18C>16C to have orthologs in the primitive moth L. capitella despite being absent in Diptera and other insect genomes. Four acyl-CoA desaturase cDNAs were isolated from the pheromone gland, three of which are related to Δ9-desaturases whereas the fourth cDNA clusters with Δ11-desaturases. We demonstrated that this transcript (Lca-KPVQ exclusively accounts for both steps of desaturation involved in pheromone biosynthesis. This enzyme possesses a Z11-desaturase activity that allows transforming the palmitate precursor (C16:0 into (Z-11-hexadecenoic acid and the (Z-9-tetradecenoic acid into the conjugated intermediate (Z,Z-9,11-tetradecadienoic acid. Conclusion The involvement of a single Z11-desaturase in pheromone

  8. Genetic variation in ABCA1 predicts ischemic heart disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, BG; Jensen, Gorm B

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 6 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ATP-Binding-Cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) affect risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in the general population.......We tested the hypothesis that 6 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ATP-Binding-Cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) affect risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in the general population....

  9. On the entomofauna of Mt. Durmitor (Northern Montenegro: Braconid wasps of the subfamily Opiinae (Braconidae, Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajković M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Braconids are primary parasites of other insects and their eggs, larvae, and adults, and species have been recently discovered that lay their eggs in plant seeds. Classified into about 25 genera, more than 1,400 species of Opiinae are known at the present time in the world fauna. They have been registered in all zoogeographic regions. The Opiinae are solitary endoparasites of the larvae of cyclorhaphous Diptera, most often those of species belonging to the families Agromyzidae, Tephritidae, Anthomyiidae Ephydridae. In investigations conducted on Mt. Durmitor since 1982, we have up to now established 10 species of braconids of the subfamily Opiinae (Opius peterseni Fi., O. caudatus Wesm., O. parvungula Th., O. levisWesm., O. pallipesWesm., O. quasiquisti Fi., O. exilis Hal., O. filicornis Th., O. lugens Hal., and O. meracus Fi, eight of which are new for the fauna of Serbia and Montenegro.

  10. Citrus (Rutaceae SNP Markers Based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; Transferability Across the Aurantioideae Subfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Garcia-Lor

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level.

  11. DNA Barcoding of the parasitoid wasp subfamily Doryctinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae from Chamela, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gutiérrez-Arellano

    2015-05-01

    Results and conclusions. A total of 961 specimens were collected, from which 883 COI sequences were obtained. The sequences generated corresponded to 289 barcoding species and 30 identified genera. The most speciose genera were Heterospilus Haliday (170 spp., Ecphylus Förster (19 spp., Allorhogas Gahan (15 spp. and Callihormius Ashmead (14 spp.. Addition of previously collected material increased the diversity of the subfamily in the region to 34 genera and 290 species. Paraphyly of Heterospilus with respect to Neoheterospilus and Heterospathius was again recovered. Twenty new species and two new genera (Sabinita Belokobylskij, Zaldívar-Riverón et Martínez, Ficobolus Martínez, Belokobylskij et Zaldívar-Riverón have been described so far from the material collected in this work.

  12. Quill mites of the subfamily Picobiinae (Acari: Syringophilidae) associated with woodpeckers (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Kavetska, Katarzyna; Kaszewska, Katarzyna

    2014-03-01

    The paper contains a review of quill mites of the subfamily Picobiinae (Acari: Prostigmata: Syringophilidae) associated with woodpeckers (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae). Three new species are described: Picobia mentalis Skoracki et Unsoeld sp. nov. from Picus mentalis Temminck, Neopicobia ea Skoracki et Unsoeld sp. nov. from Celeus flavus (St. Mueller) (type host), C. elegans (St. Mueller), C. torquatus (Boddaert), and Neopicobia freya Skoracki et Unsoeld sp. nov. from Dryocopus galeatus (Temminck) (type host) and Piculus rubiginosus (Swainson). Additionally, six new host species for Picobia heeri Haller, 1878 and 12 new host species for Picobia dryobatis (Fritsch, 1956) are reported. A complete list of the picobiines parasitising birds of the family Picidae is presented in the tabular form.

  13. Evaluation of urine-circulating cathodic antigen (Urine-CCA) cassette test for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in areas of moderate prevalence in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erko, Berhanu; Medhin, Girmay; Teklehaymanot, Tilahun; Degarege, Abraham; Legesse, Mengistu

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of antigen detecting urine-CCA cassette test for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in areas of moderate prevalence in Ethiopia. Stool specimens were collected from 620 schoolchildren on three consecutive days. The samples were microscopically examined using double Kato slides; midstream urine specimens were also collected for three consecutive days and tested for S. mansoni. The sensitivity of the urine-CCA cassette test was determined using combined results of six Kato-Katz thick smears and three urine-CCA cassette tests as gold standard. The specificity of the urine-CCA cassette test was evaluated in an area where schistosomiasis is not endemic. Prevalence of S. mansoni infection as determined by single urine-CCA cassette test was 65.9%, by single Kato-Katz smear 37.3% and by six Kato-Katz thick smears 53.1% (P CCA cassette test was significantly (P CCA cassette test showed 100% specificity in endemic settings. In moderate and high prevalence areas, urine-CCA cassette test is more sensitive than the Kato-Katz method and can be used for screening and mapping of S. mansoni infection. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of two cation chloride cotransporter subfamily members of Hydra vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Pisella, Lucie I; Medina, Igor; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs) comprise secondary active membrane proteins mainly mediating the symport of cations (Na+, K+) coupled with chloride (Cl-). They are divided into K+-Cl- outward transporters (KCCs), the Na+-K+-Cl- (NKCCs) and Na+-Cl- (NCCs) inward transporters, the cation chloride cotransporter interacting protein CIP1, and the polyamine transporter CCC9. KCCs and N(K)CCs are established in the genome since eukaryotes and metazoans, respectively. Most of the physiological and functional data were obtained from vertebrate species. To get insights into the basal functional properties of KCCs and N(K)CCs in the metazoan lineage, we cloned and characterized KCC and N(K)CC from the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris. HvKCC is composed of 1,032 amino-acid residues. Functional analyses revealed that hvKCC mediates a Na+-independent, Cl- and K+ (Tl+)-dependent cotransport. The classification of hvKCC as a functional K-Cl cotransporter is furthermore supported by phylogenetic analyses and a similar structural organization. Interestingly, recently obtained physiological analyses indicate a role of cnidarian KCCs in hyposmotic volume regulation of nematocytes. HvN(K)CC is composed of 965 amino-acid residues. Phylogenetic analyses and structural organization suggest that hvN(K)CC is a member of the N(K)CC subfamily. However, no inorganic ion cotransport function could be detected using different buffer conditions. Thus, hvN(K)CC is a N(K)CC subfamily member without a detectable inorganic ion cotransporter function. Taken together, the data identify two non-bilaterian solute carrier 12 (SLC12) gene family members, thereby paving the way for a better understanding of the evolutionary paths of this important cotransporter family.

  15. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of two cation chloride cotransporter subfamily members of Hydra vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Hartmann

    Full Text Available Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs comprise secondary active membrane proteins mainly mediating the symport of cations (Na+, K+ coupled with chloride (Cl-. They are divided into K+-Cl- outward transporters (KCCs, the Na+-K+-Cl- (NKCCs and Na+-Cl- (NCCs inward transporters, the cation chloride cotransporter interacting protein CIP1, and the polyamine transporter CCC9. KCCs and N(KCCs are established in the genome since eukaryotes and metazoans, respectively. Most of the physiological and functional data were obtained from vertebrate species. To get insights into the basal functional properties of KCCs and N(KCCs in the metazoan lineage, we cloned and characterized KCC and N(KCC from the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris. HvKCC is composed of 1,032 amino-acid residues. Functional analyses revealed that hvKCC mediates a Na+-independent, Cl- and K+ (Tl+-dependent cotransport. The classification of hvKCC as a functional K-Cl cotransporter is furthermore supported by phylogenetic analyses and a similar structural organization. Interestingly, recently obtained physiological analyses indicate a role of cnidarian KCCs in hyposmotic volume regulation of nematocytes. HvN(KCC is composed of 965 amino-acid residues. Phylogenetic analyses and structural organization suggest that hvN(KCC is a member of the N(KCC subfamily. However, no inorganic ion cotransport function could be detected using different buffer conditions. Thus, hvN(KCC is a N(KCC subfamily member without a detectable inorganic ion cotransporter function. Taken together, the data identify two non-bilaterian solute carrier 12 (SLC12 gene family members, thereby paving the way for a better understanding of the evolutionary paths of this important cotransporter family.

  16. Comparative Mitogenomic Analysis of Species Representing Six Subfamilies in the Family Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the architecture and evolution of the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome, mitogenomes of ten specimens representing six subfamilies in Tenebrionidae were selected, and comparative analysis of these mitogenomes was carried out in this study. Ten mitogenomes in this family share a similar gene composition, gene order, nucleotide composition, and codon usage. In addition, our results show that nucleotide bias was strongly influenced by the preference of codon usage for A/T rich codons which significantly correlated with the G + C content of protein coding genes (PCGs. Evolutionary rate analyses reveal that all PCGs have been subjected to a purifying selection, whereas 13 PCGs displayed different evolution rates, among which ATPase subunit 8 (ATP8 showed the highest evolutionary rate. We inferred the secondary structure for all RNA genes of Tenebrio molitor (Te2 and used this as the basis for comparison with the same genes from other Tenebrionidae mitogenomes. Some conserved helices (stems and loops of RNA structures were found in different domains of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs and the cloverleaf structure of transfer RNAs (tRNAs. With regard to the AT-rich region, we analyzed tandem repeat sequences located in this region and identified some essential elements including T stretches, the consensus motif at the flanking regions of T stretch, and the secondary structure formed by the motif at the 3′ end of T stretch in major strand, which are highly conserved in these species. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses using mitogenomic data strongly support the relationships among six subfamilies: ((Tenebrionidae incertae sedis + (Diaperinae + Tenebrioninae + (Pimeliinae + Lagriinae, which is consistent with phylogenetic results based on morphological traits.

  17. Chimeric proteins tagged with specific 3xHA cassettes may present instability and functional problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Baggetto, Sara; Méndez, Ester; Quilis, Inma; Igual, J Carlos; Bañó, M Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Epitope-tagging of proteins has become a widespread technique for the analysis of protein function, protein interactions and protein localization among others. Tagging of genes by chromosomal integration of PCR amplified cassettes is a widely used and fast method to label proteins in vivo. Different systems have been developed during years in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, we analysed systematically a set of yeast proteins that were fused to different tags. Analysis of the tagged proteins revealed an unexpected general effect on protein level when some specific tagging module was used. This was due in all cases to a destabilization of the proteins and caused a reduced protein activity in the cell that was only apparent in particular conditions. Therefore, an extremely cautious approach is required when using this strategy.

  18. Chimeric proteins tagged with specific 3xHA cassettes may present instability and functional problems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Saiz-Baggetto

    Full Text Available Epitope-tagging of proteins has become a widespread technique for the analysis of protein function, protein interactions and protein localization among others. Tagging of genes by chromosomal integration of PCR amplified cassettes is a widely used and fast method to label proteins in vivo. Different systems have been developed during years in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, we analysed systematically a set of yeast proteins that were fused to different tags. Analysis of the tagged proteins revealed an unexpected general effect on protein level when some specific tagging module was used. This was due in all cases to a destabilization of the proteins and caused a reduced protein activity in the cell that was only apparent in particular conditions. Therefore, an extremely cautious approach is required when using this strategy.

  19. Mechanical properties research of the cassette balance for impulse wind tunnel based on inertia compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Q.; Lv, J. Z.; Wu, Y. C.

    2017-09-01

    The aerodynamic load signals acquired though the cassette force balance is transient while the model was tested in an impulse combustion wind tunnel. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the dynamic properties of the force balance. Firstly, it is simplified as a springs-damping-beam system, and then, the dynamic equation is deduced. Secondly, the mechanical properties of the force balance are researched through the finite element method. The output histories of the balance under step and sine loading are acquired. Results show that the mean elastic output of the balance approximates to the load exerting on it. Furthermore, the inertia compensation could not only improve the accuracy of mean output significantly, but also could reduce the transient error between output and input sharply.

  20. A precisely regulated gene expression cassette potently modulates metastasis and survival in multiple solid cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful tumor development and progression involves the complex interplay of both pro- and anti-oncogenic signaling pathways. Genetic components balancing these opposing activities are likely to require tight regulation, because even subtle alterations in their expression may disrupt this balance with major consequences for various cancer-associated phenotypes. Here, we describe a cassette of cancer-specific genes exhibiting precise transcriptional control in solid tumors. Mining a database of tumor gene expression profiles from six different tissues, we identified 48 genes exhibiting highly restricted levels of gene expression variation in tumors (n = 270 compared to nonmalignant tissues (n = 71. Comprising genes linked to multiple cancer-related pathways, the restricted expression of this "Poised Gene Cassette" (PGC was robustly validated across 11 independent cohorts of approximately 1,300 samples from multiple cancer types. In three separate experimental models, subtle alterations in PGC expression were consistently associated with significant differences in metastatic and invasive potential. We functionally confirmed this association in siRNA knockdown experiments of five PGC genes (p53CSV, MAP3K11, MTCH2, CPSF6, and SKIP, which either directly enhanced the invasive capacities or inhibited the proliferation of AGS cancer cells. In primary tumors, similar subtle alterations in PGC expression were also repeatedly associated with clinical outcome in multiple cohorts. Taken collectively, these findings support the existence of a common set of precisely controlled genes in solid tumors. Since inducing small activity changes in these genes may prove sufficient to potently influence various tumor phenotypes such as metastasis, targeting such precisely regulated genes may represent a promising avenue for novel anti-cancer therapies.

  1. Targeting cancer stem cell-specific markers and/or associated signaling pathways for overcoming cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranji, Peyman; Salmani Kesejini, Tayyebali; Saeedikhoo, Sara; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of tumor cells with capabilities of self-renewal, dedifferentiation, tumorigenicity, and inherent chemo-and-radio therapy resistance. Tumor resistance is believed to be caused by CSCs that are intrinsically challenging to common treatments. A number of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, receptor tyrosine kinase, aldehyde dehydrogenases, epithelial cell adhesion molecule/epithelial specific antigen, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 have been proved as the useful targets for defining CSC population in solid tumors. Furthermore, targeting CSC markers through new therapeutic strategies will ultimately improve treatments and overcome cancer drug resistance. Therefore, the identification of novel strategies to increase sensitivity of CSC markers has major clinical implications. This review will focus on the innovative treatment methods such as nano-, immuno-, gene-, and chemotherapy approaches for targeting CSC-specific markers and/or their associated signaling pathways.

  2. Generation of an Abcc8 heterozygous mutation human embryonic stem cell line using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongsheng; Liu, Haikun; Gao, Ge; Ruzi, Aynisahan; Wang, Kepin; Wu, Han; Lai, Keyu; Liu, Yanli; Yang, Fan; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Yin-Xiong

    2016-11-01

    The gene of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 8 (Abcc8) is cytogenetically located at 11p15.1 and encodes the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1). SUR1 is a subunit of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KAPT) in the β-cell regulating insulin secretion. Mutations of ABCC8 are responsible for congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). Here we reported that an Abcc8 heterozygous mutant cell line was generated by CRISPR/Cas9 technique with 1bp insertion resulting in abnormal splicing on human embryonic stem cell line H1. The phenotypic characteristics of this cell line reveal defective KATP channel and diazoxide-responsive that provides ideal model for molecular pathology research and drug screening for CHI. Copyright © 2016 Michael Boutros, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Generation of an Abcc8 homozygous mutation human embryonic stem cell line using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongsheng; Liu, Haikun; Gao, Ge; Ruzi, Aynisahan; Wang, Kepin; Wu, Han; Lai, Keyu; Liu, Yanli; Yang, Fan; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Yin-Xiong

    2016-11-01

    The gene of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 8 (Abcc8) is cytogenetically located at 11p15.1 and encodes the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1). SUR1 is a subunit of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KAPT) in the β-cell regulating insulin secretion. Mutations of ABCC8 are responsible for congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). Here we generated an Abcc8 homozygous mutant cell line by CRISPR/Cas9 technique with 22bp deletion resulting in abnormal splicing on human embryonic stem cell line H1. The phenotypic characteristics of this cell line reveal defective KATP channel and diazoxide-unresponsive that provides an ideal model for molecular pathology research and drug screening for CHI. Copyright © 2016 Michael Boutros, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Subpopulations of stem-like cells in side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z-F; Huang, Y-J; Lin, T-X; Zhou, Y-X; Jiang, C; Xu, K-W; Huang, H; Yin, X-B; Huang, J

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cells can be isolated from human tumours using specific cell surface markers. Bladder cancer cells, however, lack specific cell surface markers, making this approach impracticable. In this study an alternative method was used, involving isolation of side population cells to explore the stem cell characteristics of bladder cancer. Side population cells were isolated from the bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 and examined for potential stem cell characteristics related to proliferation, cell cycle distribution, self-renewal and differentiation. It was observed that T24 side population cells have stronger proliferative and colony formation abilities than non-side population cells. Side population cells were also more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which may be due to expression of the ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, sub-family G, member 2 protein. Overall, the results suggest that side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 harbour stem-like cells.

  5. Integron gene cassettes and degradation of compounds associated with industrial waste: the case of the Sydney tar ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E Koenig

    Full Text Available Integrons are genetic platforms that accelerate lateral gene transfer (LGT among bacteria. They were first detected on plasmids bearing single and multiple drug resistance determinants in human pathogens, and it is abundantly clear that integrons have played a major role in the evolution of this public health menace. Similar genetic elements can be found in nonpathogenic environmental bacteria and in metagenomic environmental DNA samples, and it is reasonable to suppose that integrons have facilitated microbial adaptation through LGT in niches outside infectious disease wards. Here we show that a heavily impacted estuary, exposed for almost a century to products of coal and steel industries, has developed a rich and unique cassette metagenome, containing genes likely to aid in the catabolism of compounds associated with industrial waste found there. In addition, we report that the most abundant cassette recovered in this study is one that encodes a putative LysR protein. This autoregulatory transcriptional regulator is known to activate transcription of linked target genes or unlinked regulons encoding diverse functions including chlorocatechol and dichlorophenol catabolism. Finally, only class 1 integrase genes were amplified in this study despite using different primer sets, and it may be that the cassettes present in the Tar Ponds will prove to be associated with class 1 integrase genes. Nevertheless, our cassette library provides a snapshot of a complex evolutionary process involving integron-meditated LGT likely to be important in natural bioremediation.

  6. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  7. Two new species and a new genus of neotropical mailed catfishes of the subfamily Loricariinae Swainson, 1838 (Pisces, Siluriformes, Loricariidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isbrücker, I.J.H.; Nijssen, H.

    1978-01-01

    A new monotypic genus and two new species of South American mailed catfishes of the subfamily Loricariinae are described and figured. A discussion of and comparative notes on related taxa are added. Ricola genus novum is established for the species originally described by Regan (1904) as Loricaria

  8. Cloning of MASK, a novel member of the mammalian germinal center kinase III subfamily, with apoptosis-inducing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Ippeita; Ong, Shao-En; Watanabe, Norinobu M

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned a novel human GCK family kinase that has been designated as MASK (Mst3 and SOK1-related kinase). MASK is widely expressed and encodes a protein of 416 amino acid residues, with an N-terminal kinase domain and a unique C-terminal region. Like other GCK-III subfamily kinases, MASK do...

  9. Frames of exponentials:lower frame bounds for finite subfamilies, and approximation of the inverse frame operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Lindner, Alexander M

    2001-01-01

    We give lower frame bounds for finite subfamilies of a frame of exponentials {e(i lambdak(.))}k is an element ofZ in L-2(-pi,pi). We also present a method for approximation of the inverse frame operator corresponding to {e(i lambdak(.))}k is an element ofZ, where knowledge of the frame bounds for...

  10. Three new genera and nine new species of the subfamily Candoninae (Crustacea, Ostracoda, Podocopida) from the Pilbara region (Western Australia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karanovic, Ivana; Marmonier, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Three new ostracod genera: Humphreyscandona n. gen., Pilbaracandona n. gen., and Notacandona n. gen., and nine new species are described from subterranean waters of the Pilbara Region, Western Australia. They belong to the subfamily Candoninae of the order Podocopida, and are characterized by a

  11. Checklist of the subfamilies Mirinae and Orthotylinae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae in western parts of Kerman Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Shamsi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A faunal study was carried out on the subfamilies Mirinae and Orthotylinae (Heteroptera: Miridae from different parts of western Kerman Province on various host plants. In total 16 species belonging to 14 genera were collected and identified from different host plants and localities.

  12. Australian water mites of the subfamily Notoaturinae Besch (Acari: Hydrachnidia: Aturidae), with the description of 24 new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.

    2010-01-01

    New data are presented on the subfamily Notoaturinae from Australia. Twenty-four new species are described: Austraturus aculeatus n. sp., A. canaliculatus n. sp., A. lamingtonensis n. sp., A. longigenitalis n. sp., A. montanus n. sp., A. otwayensis n. sp., A. tasmanicus n. sp., Azugaturus

  13. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Deficiency Promotes Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-/-Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Petteri; Kadiri, James J; Velasco-Delgado, Mauricio; Nuutinen, Salla; Viitala, Miro; Hollmén, Maija; Rami, Martina; Savontaus, Eriika; Steffens, Sabine

    2018-02-01

    The MC1-R (melanocortin 1 receptor) is expressed by monocytes and macrophages where it mediates anti-inflammatory actions. MC1-R also protects against macrophage foam cell formation primarily by promoting cholesterol efflux through the ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily A member 1) and ABCG1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 1). In this study, we aimed to investigate whether global deficiency in MC1-R signaling affects the development of atherosclerosis. Apoe -/- (apolipoprotein E deficient) mice were crossed with recessive yellow (Mc1r e/e ) mice carrying dysfunctional MC1-R and fed a high-fat diet to induce atherosclerosis. Apoe -/- Mc1r e/e mice developed significantly larger atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic sinus and in the whole aorta compared with Apoe -/- controls. In terms of plaque composition, MC1-R deficiency was associated with less collagen and smooth muscle cells and increased necrotic core, indicative of more vulnerable lesions. These changes were accompanied by reduced Abca1 and Abcg1 expression in the aorta. Furthermore, Apoe -/- Mc1r e/e mice showed a defect in bile acid metabolism that aggravated high-fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. Flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte profile revealed that dysfunctional MC1-R enhanced arterial accumulation of classical Ly6C high monocytes and macrophages, effects that were evident in mice fed a normal chow diet but not under high-fat diet conditions. In support of enhanced arterial recruitment of Ly6C high monocytes, these cells had increased expression of L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1. The present study highlights the importance of MC1-R in the development of atherosclerosis. Deficiency in MC1-R signaling exacerbates atherosclerosis by disturbing cholesterol handling and by increasing arterial monocyte accumulation. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Stimulation of murine biliary cholesterol secretion by thyroid hormone is dependent on a functional ABCG5/G8 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Ylva; Plösch, Torsten; Kuipers, Folkert; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2012-11-01

    Secretion of cholesterol into bile is important for the elimination of cholesterol from the body. Thyroid hormone (TH) increases biliary cholesterol secretion and hepatic gene expression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette, subfamily G (WHITE), member 5 (ABCG5) and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G (WHITE), member 8 (ABCG8), two half-transporters that act as a heterodimeric complex promoting sterol secretion. In addition, nuclear liver x receptor-alpha (LXRa), also regulated by TH, induces gene expression of ABCG5/G8. We here investigated if the TH-induced stimulation of biliary cholesterol secretion is mediated by the ABCG5/G8 complex in vivo, and if so, whether LXRa is involved. Mice homozygous for disruption of Abcg5 (Abcg5(-/-) ) or Lxra (Lxra(-/-) ) and their wild-type counterparts were treated with triiodothyronine (T3) for 14 days and compared to untreated mice of corresponding genetic backgrounds. Bile was collected by gallbladder cannulation, and liver samples were analyzed for gene expression levels. Basal biliary cholesterol secretion in Abcg5(-/-) mice was 72% lower than in Abcg5(+/+) mice. T3 treatment increased cholesterol secretion 3.1-fold in Abcg5(+/+) mice, whereas this response was severely blunted in Abcg5(-/-) mice. In contrast, biliary cholesterol secretion in T3-treated Lxra(+/+) and Lxra(-/-) mice was increased 3.5- and 2.6-fold, respectively, and did not differ significantly. TH-induced secretion of cholesterol into bile is largely dependent on an intact ABCG5/G8 transporter complex, whereas LXRa is not critical for this effect. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. A new subfamily of Feaellidae (Arachnida, Chelonethi, Feaelloidea) from Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Mark L I

    2017-04-26

    The first extant representatives of the pseudoscorpion family Feaellidae from Southeast Asia are described. Cybella n. gen. is proposed for Cybella deharvengi n. sp. (type species), collected from an isolated limestone hill in Hon Chong Province, Vietnam, and C. bedosae n. sp., found in a limestone cave in Kampuchea, Cambodia. Cybella species seem to be restricted to karst formations and are probably troglophilic. The type localities of the two known species are threatened by quarrying activities, these being particularly pressing in the case of C. deharvengi n. sp. Cybella shows important differences from other Feaellidae that require a modification of the familial diagnosis and justify the erection of a new subfamily, Cybellinae. The discovery of this group provides insights into the evolution of the unusual morphology of the family, notably concerning the pleural plates of Feaellinae, which are lacking in Cybellinae. The smaller sclerites of the pleura of Pseudogarypidae and Feaellidae are shown to be muscle apodemes, which provide an additional synapomorphy for Feaelloidea. Two types of coxal spines, termed primary and secondary, are distinguished in Feaelloidea, based on the presence of a lumen within the primary spines and its absence in secondary spines. The new morphological term atrial plate is proposed for a sclerotized plate of the male genitalia, extending between the lateral rods and the lateral apodemes. Claims that the internal genital setae of males of non-chthonioid pseudoscorpions are secretory are reviewed and found to lack support.        Additional information concerning the fossil genus Protofeaella Henderickx, 2016 is provided, based on an adult male in amber from the Cretaceous (lowermost Cenomanian) of Myanmar. Protofeaella shares with Cybella the absence of pleural plates and the antiaxial position of the chemosensory setae of the movable chelal finger. However, it differs from both Cybellinae and Feaellinae in having relatively

  16. Development of remote pipe welding tool for divertor cassettes in JT-60SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takao, E-mail: hayashi.takao@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Sakurai, Shinji; Sakasai, Akira; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Kono, Wataru; Ohnawa, Toshio; Matsukage, Takeshi [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Remote pipe welding tool accessing from inside of the pipe has been newly developed. • Cooling pipe with a jut on the edge expands the acceptable welding gap up to 0.5 mm. • Positioning accuracy of the laser beam is realized to be less than ±0.1 mm. • We have achieved robust welding for an angular misalignment of 0.5°. - Abstract: Remote pipe welding tool accessing from inside of the pipe has been newly developed for JT-60SA. Remote handling (RH) system is necessary for the maintenance and repair of the divertor cassette in JT-60SA. Because the space around the cooling pipe connected with the divertor cassette is very limited, the cooling pipe is to be remotely cut and welded from inside for the maintenance. A laser welding method was employed to perform circumferential welding by rotating the focusing mirror inside the pipe. However, the grooves of connection pipes are not precisely aligned for welding. The most critical issue is therefore to develop a reliable welding tool for pipe connection without a defect such as undercut weld due to a gap caused by angular and axial misalignments of grooves. In addition, an angular misalignment between two pipes due to inclination of pipe has to be taken into account for the positioning of the laser beam during welding. In this paper, the followings are proposed to solve the above issues: (1) Cooling pipe connected with the divertor is machined to have a jut on the edge so as to expand the acceptable welding gap up to 0.5 mm by filling the gap with welded jut. (2) Positioning accuracy of the laser beam for reliable welding is realized to be less than ±0.1 mm along the circumferential target for welding by a position control mechanism provided in the tool even in the case of up to angular misalignment of 0.5° between connection pipes. Based on the above proposals, we have achieved robust welding for a large gap up to 0.5 mm as well as the maximum angular misalignment of 0.5° between connection pipes

  17. Diversity in subcellular targeting of the PP2A B'eta subfamily members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Polina; Meyer, Christian; Lillo, Cathrine

    2009-10-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase comprising a catalytic subunit (C), a scaffolding subunit (A), and a regulatory subunit (B). The B subunits are believed to be responsible for substrate specificity and localization of the PP2A complex. In plants, three families of B subunits exist, i.e. B (B55), B', and B''. Here, we report differential subcellular targeting within the Arabidopsis B'eta subfamily, which consists of the close homologs B'eta, B'theta, B'gamma and B'zeta. Phenotypes of corresponding knockouts were observed, and particularly revealed delayed flowering for the B'eta knockout. The B' subunits were linked to fluorescent tags and transiently expressed in various tissues of onion, tobacco and Arabidopsis. B'eta and B'gamma targeted the cytosol and nucleus. B'zeta localized to the cytoplasm and partly co-localized with mitochondrial markers when the N-terminus was free. Provided its C-terminus was free, the B'theta subunit targeted peroxisomes. The importance of the C-terminal end for peroxisomal targeting was further confirmed by truncation of the C-terminus. The results revealed that the closely related B' subunits are targeting different organelles in plants, and exemplify the usage of the peptide serine-serine-leucine as a PTS1 peroxisomal signaling peptide.

  18. Crystal structure of a novel prolidase from Deinococcus radiodurans identifies new subfamily of bacterial prolidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, Venkata N; Jamdar, Sahayog N; Ghosh, Biplab; Goyal, Venuka Durani; Kumar, Ashwani; Neema, Sanchit; Gadre, Rekha; Makde, Ravindra D

    2017-12-01

    Xaa-Pro peptidases (XPP) are dinuclear peptidases of MEROPS M24B family that hydrolyze Xaa-Pro iminopeptide bond with a trans-proline at the second position of the peptide substrate. XPPs specific towards dipeptides are called prolidases while those that prefer longer oligopeptides are called aminopeptidases P. Though XPPs are strictly conserved in bacterial and archaeal species, the structural and sequence features that distinguish between prolidases and aminopeptidases P are not always clear. Here, we report 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of a novel XPP from Deinococcus radiodurans (XPPdr). XPPdr forms a novel dimeric structure via unique dimer stabilization loops of N-terminal domains such that their C-terminal domains are placed far apart from each other. This novel dimerization is also the consequence of a different orientation of N-terminal domain in XPPdr monomer than those in other known prolidases. The enzymatic assays show that it is a prolidase with broad substrate specificity. Our structural, mutational, and molecular dynamics simulation analyses show that the conserved Arg46 of N-terminal domain is important for the dipeptide selectivity. Our BLAST search found XPPdr orthologs with conserved sequence motifs which correspond to unique structural features of XPPdr, thus identify a new subfamily of bacterial prolidases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of habitat conditions and plant traits on leaf damage in the Carduoideae subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzbergová, Zuzana; Skuhrovec, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Plant traits are the key factors that determine herbivore foraging selection. The traits serving as defense traits against herbivores represent a wide range of traits, such as chemical, physiological, morphological and life-history traits. While many studies considered plant defense traits at the within-species scale, much less is known from comparisons of a wide range of closely related species. The aim of this study was to identify factors responsible for the intensity of leaf damage in the Carduoideae subfamily of Asteraceae, which hosts many invasive species and thus is potential candidate plant species that could be controlled by biological control. Specifically, we wanted to see the relative importance of habitat characteristics, plant size and plants traits in determining the degree of folivory. The study identified several defense traits able to explain differences in herbivory between species after accounting for differences in the habitats in which the species occur and the plant size. Specifically, the most important traits were traits related to the quality of the leaf tissue expressed as the content of phosphorus, water and specific leaf area, which suggests that the leaf quality had a more important effect on the degree of herbivory than the presence of specific defense mechanisms such as spines and hair. Leaf quality is thus a candidate factor that drives herbivore choice when selecting which plant to feed on and should be considered when assessing the danger that a herbivore will switch hosts when introduced to a new range.

  20. The Eucalyptus Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein (TIP gene subfamily: genomic organization, structural features and expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Iara Rodrigues

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant aquaporins are water channels implicated in various physiological processes, including growth, development and adaptation to stress. In this study, the Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein (TIP gene subfamily of Eucalyptus, an economically important woody species, was investigated and characterized. A genome-wide survey of the Eucalyptus grandis genome revealed the presence of eleven putative TIP genes (referred as EgTIP, which were individually assigned by phylogeny to each of the classical TIP1–5 groups. Homology modelling confirmed the presence of the two highly conserved NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala motifs in the identified EgTIPs. Residue variations in the corresponding selectivity filters, that might reflect differences in EgTIP substrate specificity, were observed. All EgTIP genes, except EgTIP5.1, were transcribed and the majority of them showed organ/tissue-enriched expression. Inspection of the EgTIP promoters revealed the presence of common cis-regulatory elements implicated in abiotic stress and hormone responses pointing to an involvement of the identified genes in abiotic stress responses. In line with these observations, additional gene expression profiling demonstrated increased expression under polyethylene glycol-imposed osmotic stress. Overall, the results obtained suggest that these novel EgTIPs might be functionally implicated in eucalyptus adaptation to stress.

  1. Modulation of the Rat Hepatic Cytochrome P4501A Subfamily Using Biotin Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ronquillo-Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found that biotin favors glucose and lipid metabolism, and medications containing biotin have been developed. Despite the use of biotin as a pharmacological agent, few studies have addressed toxicity aspects including the possible interaction with cytochrome P450 enzyme family. This study analyzed the effects of pharmacological doses of biotin on the expression and activity of the cytochrome P4501A subfamily involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Wistar rats were treated daily with biotin (2 mg/kg, i.p., while the control groups were treated with saline. All of the rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation after 1, 3, 5, or 7 days of treatment. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs were modified by biotin while enzyme activity and protein concentration were not affected. The lack of an effect of biotin on CYP1A activity was confirmed using other experimental strategies, including (i cotreatment of the animals with biotin and a known CYP1A inducer; (ii the addition of biotin to the reaction mixtures for the measurement of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 activities; and (iii the use of an S9 mixture that was prepared from control and biotin-treated rats to analyze the activation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP into mutagenic metabolites using the Ames test. The results suggest that biotin does not influence the CYP1A-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics.

  2. Cysteine-rich venom proteins from the snakes of Viperinae subfamily - molecular cloning and phylogenetic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, Anna S; Starkov, Vladislav G; Osipov, Alexey V; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Filkin, Sergey Yu; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine-rich proteins found in animal venoms (CRISP-Vs) are members of a large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs). CRISP-Vs acting on different ion channels were found in venoms or mRNA (cDNA) encoding CRISP-Vs were cloned from snakes of three main families (Elapidae, Colubridae and Viperidae). About thirty snake CRISP-Vs were sequenced so far, however no complete sequence for CRISP-V from Viperinae subfamily was reported. We have cloned and sequenced for the first time cDNAs encoding CRISP-Vs from Vipera nikolskii and Vipera berus vipers (Viperinae). The deduced mature CRISP-V amino acid sequences consist of 220 amino acid residues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that viper proteins are closely related to those of Crotalinae snakes. The presence of CRISP-V in the V. berus venom was revealed using a combination of gel-filtration chromatography, electrophoresis and MALDI mass spectrometry. The finding of the putative channel blocker in viper venom may indicate its action on prey nervous system.

  3. Floral Development in the Tribe Cedreleae (Meliaceae, Sub-family Swietenioideae): Cedrela and Toona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvêa, Cantídio Fernando; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier; Rodriguez, Adriana Pinheiro Martinelli

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Floral development of Cedrela and Toona, the genera comprising the basal tribe Cedreleae of the sub-family Swietenioideae of Meliaceae, is described. The focus was on three endangered, ecologically and economically important species: Cedrela fissilis, Cedrela odorata and Toona ciliata. The aims of the study were to characterize the patterns of floral development in the tribe and to establish apomorphic and plesiomorphic floral characters in relation to other taxa within the family based on the current molecular phylogeny of Meliaceae. Methods A detailed floral structural and developmental study was completed using both scanning electron microscopy and visualization of microtome sections with a light microscope. Key Results Twelve floral developmental stages were identified. The initial development of the pentamerous flowers of both Toona and Cedrela is strikingly similar. The morphological differences observed between them are due to differential patterns of organ elongation and adnation/connation occurring late in development. Additionally, the formation of functionally male and female flowers was found to occur at specific positions within the inflorescence. Conclusions Due to the basal position of the tribe Cedreleae in the phylogeny of Meliaceae, functionally either male or female pentamerous flowers and the presence of (at least partially) free stamens may be considered plesiomorphic traits within the family. In contrast, sympetaly and the absence of nectaries in Cedrela species are synapomorphies. PMID:17981877

  4. Markiana nigripinnis (Perugia, 1891 as a putative member of the subfamily Stevardiinae (Characiformes: Characidae: spermatic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarianna Martins Baicere-Silva

    Full Text Available The genus Markiana was until recently recognized as incertae sedis in the family Characidae, even though alternative placements for this genus have been advanced since its original description. More recently, it was hypothesized that Markiana nigripinnis is part of a clade informally named the Astyanax clade, indicating the putative close relationship of Markiana with the genus Astyanax. Examination of sperm ultrastructure of representatives of Astyanax and M. nigripinnis shows no evidence for this hypothesized close relationship. Rather, the spermatozoa of M. nigripinnis share characters found in spermatozoa of the non-inseminating members of the subfamily Stevardiinae, such as an angle of nuclear rotation equal to 85º resulting in a lateral position of the double nuclear fossa and flagellum. As with the non-inseminating Stevardiinae, sperm nuclei are also slightly elongate toward the flagellum, the proximal centriole is partially inside the nuclear fossa and anterior and oblique to the distal centriole, and the midpiece is short and strongly asymmetric. Additionally, M. nigripinnis shares with the other members of the Stevardiinae the presence of only four teeth in the inner row of the premaxillary and a short triangular ectopterygoid, which is never more than twice the length of the palatine.

  5. A homologous subfamily of satellite III DNA on human chromosomes 14 and 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, K H; Earle, E; McQuillan, C

    1990-10-11

    We describe a new subfamily of human satellite III DNA that is represented on two different acrocentric chromosomes. This DNA is composed of a tandemly repeated array of diverged 5-base-pair monomer units of the sequence GGAAT or GGAGT. These monomers are organised into a 1.37-kilobase higher-order structure that is itself tandemly reiterated. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing specific human chromosomes, this higher-order structure is demonstrated on chromosomes 14 and 22, but not on the remaining acrocentric chromosomes. In situ hybridisation studies have localised the sequence to the proximal p-arm region of these chromosomes. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) reveals that 70-110 copies of the higher-order structure are tandemly organised on a chromosome into a major domain which appears to be flanked on both sides by non-tandemly repeated genomic DNA. In addition, some of the satellite III sequences are interspersed over a number of other PFGE fragments. This study provides fundamental knowledge on the structure and evolution of the acrocentric chromosomes, and should extend our understanding of the complex process of interchromosomal interaction which may be responsible for Robertsonian translocation and meiotic nondisjunction involving these chromosomes.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the highly diversified catfish subfamily Loricariinae (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) reveals incongruences with morphological classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covain, Raphaël; Fisch-Muller, Sonia; Oliveira, Claudio; Mol, Jan H; Montoya-Burgos, Juan I; Dray, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The Loricariinae belong to the Neotropical mailed catfish family Loricariidae, the most species-rich catfish family. Among loricariids, members of the Loricariinae are united by a long and flattened caudal peduncle and the absence of an adipose fin. Despite numerous studies of the Loricariidae, there is no comprehensive phylogeny of this morphologically highly diversified subfamily. To fill this gap, we present a molecular phylogeny of this group, including 350 representatives, based on the analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear genes (8426 positions). The resulting phylogeny indicates that Loricariinae are distributed into two sister tribes: Harttiini and Loricariini. The Harttiini tribe, as classically defined, constitutes a paraphyletic assemblage and is here restricted to the three genera Harttia, Cteniloricaria, and Harttiella. Two subtribes are distinguished within Loricariini: Farlowellina and Loricariina. Within Farlowellina, the nominal genus formed a paraphyletic group, as did Sturisoma and Sturisomatichthys. Within Loricariina, Loricaria, Crossoloricaria, and Apistoloricaria are also paraphyletic. To solve these issues, and given the lack of clear morphological diagnostic features, we propose here to synonymize several genera (Quiritixys with Harttia; East Andean members of Crossoloricaria, and Apistoloricaria with Rhadinoloricaria; Ixinandria, Hemiloricaria, Fonchiiichthys, and Leliella with Rineloricaria), to restrict others (Crossoloricaria, and Sturisomatichthys to the West Andean members, and Sturisoma to the East Andean species), and to revalidate the genus Proloricaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel MSCRAMM sub-family in Coagulase negative staphylococcal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srishtee eArora

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coagulase negative staphylococci are important opportunistic pathogens. Staphylococcus epidermidis, a coagulase negative staphylococcus, is the third leading cause of nosocomial infections in the US. Surface proteins like Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules (MSCRAMMs are major virulence factors of pathogenic gram positive bacteria. Here, we identified a new chimeric protein; SesJ in S. epidermidis, which represents a prototype of a new subfamily of MSCRAMMs. Structural predictions show that SesJ has structural features characteristic of a MSCRAMM along with a N-Terminal repeat region and an Aspartic acid containing repeat region, features that have not been previously observed in staphylococcal MSCRAMMs but have been found in other surface proteins from gram positive bacteria. We identified and analyzed structural homologs of SesJ in three other coagulase negative staphylococci. These homologs of SesJ have an identical structural organization but varying sequence identities within the domains. Using flow cytometry, we also show that SesJ is expressed constitutively on the surface of a representative S. epidermidis strain, from early exponential to stationary growth phase. Thus SesJ is positioned to interact with protein targets in the environment and play a role in S. epidermidis virulence.

  8. Subfamily Coleoscirinae (Acari: Trombidiformes: Cunaxidae), with Description of One New Species from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Muhammad Hamid; Afzal, Muhammad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Ali, Shaukat; Kamran, Muhammad; Honey, Sabyan Faris

    2014-01-01

    The Coleoscirinae (Acari: Trombidiformes: Cunaxidae) from Pakistan are summarized in this paper. Two species of Scutascirus Den Heyer (S. pirgus Chaudhri and Akbar and S. tactus Chaudhri and Akbar), ten species of Coleoscirus Berlese (C. baptos (Chaudhri and Akbar), C. carex (Inayatullah and Shahid), C. carnus Muhammad and Chaudhri, C. comis Muhammad and Chaudhri, C. disparis Muhammad and Chaudhri, C. irroratus Muhammad and Chaudhri, C. mardi (Inatullah and Shahid), C. raviensis Afzal, Ashfaq and Khan, C. tobaensis Bashir, Afzal, Ashfaq, and Khan, and C. trudus Bashir, Afzal and Akbar), and three species of Pseudobonzia Smiley (P. ashfaqi Bashir, Afzal and Akbar, P. numida Chaudhri and Akbar, and P. parilus Chaudhri) have been previously reported. One new species of Pseudobonzia, Pseudobonzia bakeri sp. n., is herein described and illustrated. A key to the genera of the subfamily and keys to the species in each genus are given to incorporate the new species from Pakistan. Distribution records of all known species in Pakistan are also given.

  9. Phytolith indices as proxies of grass subfamilies on East African tropical mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond, Laurent; Alexandre, Anne; Wooller, Matthew J.; Hély, Christelle; Williamson, David; Schäfer, Peter A.; Majule, Amos; Guiot, Joël

    2008-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to provide researchers that investigate fossil phytolith assemblages and model/data comparisons a new tool for estimating C 3/C 4 grass composition over time. We tested the reliability of modern soil phytolith assemblages and phytolith indices for tracing the dominance of different grass subfamilies and tree cover density. We analyzed modern soil phytolith assemblages from sites over elevation gradients on Mount Kenya (Kenya), Mount Rungwe and around Lake Masoko (southern Tanzania). These data were compared with available botanical data. A phytolith index named Ic, proved to be an effective proxy of the proportions of Pooideae, Arundinoideae and Bambusoideae grasses (mainly C 3 grasses) versus Panicoideae grasses (mainly C 4 grasses), increasing with elevation in East-Africa. When tropical mountains are covered by open habitats (e.g . grasses and shrublands), Ic should be a reliable proxy of the C 3/C 4 grass composition. These results highlight the value of the phytolith index Ic, when interpreting paleo-environmental records from tropical mountains, to: 1) better understand past local and regional C 3/C 4 grass distributions and associated climatic changes and 2) increase the set of C 3/C 4 data available for model/data comparisons.

  10. Modulation of the Rat Hepatic Cytochrome P4501A Subfamily Using Biotin Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo-Sánchez, M. D.; Camacho-Carranza, R.; Fernandez-Mejia, C.; Hernández-Ojeda, S.; Elinos-Baez, M.; Espinosa-Aguirre, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have found that biotin favors glucose and lipid metabolism, and medications containing biotin have been developed. Despite the use of biotin as a pharmacological agent, few studies have addressed toxicity aspects including the possible interaction with cytochrome P450 enzyme family. This study analyzed the effects of pharmacological doses of biotin on the expression and activity of the cytochrome P4501A subfamily involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Wistar rats were treated daily with biotin (2 mg/kg, i.p.), while the control groups were treated with saline. All of the rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation after 1, 3, 5, or 7 days of treatment. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs were modified by biotin while enzyme activity and protein concentration were not affected. The lack of an effect of biotin on CYP1A activity was confirmed using other experimental strategies, including (i) cotreatment of the animals with biotin and a known CYP1A inducer; (ii) the addition of biotin to the reaction mixtures for the measurement of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 activities; and (iii) the use of an S9 mixture that was prepared from control and biotin-treated rats to analyze the activation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) into mutagenic metabolites using the Ames test. The results suggest that biotin does not influence the CYP1A-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics. PMID:23984390

  11. DNA sequence data reveal a subfamily-level divergence within Thamnophilidae (Aves: Passeriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Gustavo A; Remsen, J V; Whitney, Bret M; Brumfield, Robb T

    2012-10-01

    The Thamnophilidae is a diverse radiation of insectivorous passerine birds that comprises nearly 220 species and is mostly restricted to the lowlands and lower montane forests of the Neotropics. Current classification within Thamnophilidae relies primarily on morphological variation, but recent incorporation of molecular and vocal data has promoted changes at various taxonomic levels. Here we demonstrate that the genus Terenura is polyphyletic because Terenura callinota, T. humeralis, T. spodioptila, and T. sharpei are phylogenetically distant from the type species of the genus, Terenura maculata. More importantly, the former four species are not particularly closely related to any other thamnophilids and represent a clade that is sister to all other members of the family. Because no genus name is available for this previously undetected lineage in the Thamnophilidae, we describe the genus Euchrepomis for callinota, humeralis, spodioptila, and sharpei, and erect the subfamily Euchrepomidinae. We discuss the taxonomic and evolutionary significance of this divergent lineage. This study highlights the importance of taxonomic coverage and the inclusion of type taxa to redefine classifications to reflect accurately evolutionary relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Additional cassettes for epitope and fluorescent fusion proteins in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Dulmage, Keely; Berman, Judith

    2009-07-01

    Epitope tags that confer specific properties, including affinity for resins or antibodies or detection by fluorescence microscopy, are highly useful for biochemical and cell biological investigations. In Candida albicans and several other related yeasts, the CUG codon specifies serine instead of leucine, requiring that molecular tools be customized for use in this important human fungal pathogen. Here we report the construction of a set of plasmids containing 13-Myc, 3HA, GST, V5 or His9 epitope cassettes that facilitate PCR-mediated construction of epitope-tagged proteins. Common primer sets amplify the different tags with two different selectable markers. In addition, we report construction of a codon-optimized Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRFP) gene. Like mCherryRFP, this DsRFP signal is detectable in transformants at the colony level and is useful in double-labelling experiments with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Finally, we describe a construct that directs PCR-mediated two-step insertion of GFP internal to a coding sequence, which facilitates tagging of secreted proteins, including GPI-anchor cell wall proteins that require endogenous N- and C-termini for function. These reagents expand the repertoire of molecular tools available for working with C. albicans and other members of the CUG clade of pathogenic yeasts.

  13. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) in a mammalian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M; Patterson, Stacey S; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S

    2010-08-27

    The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2)) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2) supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  14. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  15. Integrating retroviral cassette extends gene delivery of HSV-1 expression vectors to dividing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Felipe, P; Izquierdo, M; Wandosell, F; Lim, F

    2001-08-01

    Retroviral vectors have long been used in a wide variety of gene transfer applications but have certain drawbacks, such as small cargo size, limited tropism, and low titers. HSV expression vectors overcome these disadvantages, but, because they persist in target cells as nonreplicative episomes, they are not retained in all the progeny of dividing cells. Chimeric HSV/AAV products that can mediate transgene integration in human mitotic cells have been constructed, but, to date, genetic modification of dividing cells in animal models using HSV products has not been possible. Here, we report the construction of hybrid HSV/retroviral vectors that exhibit up to 50-fold higher transgene integration efficiency compared to vectors containing only HSV-1 components. Efficient integration of a retroviral transgene cassette encoding pac in human cells required expression of the Moloney murine leukemia virus gag-pol genes, but in murine cells, could also be mediated by endogenous activities, albeit at a lower level. Gene delivery was equally efficient in BHK21, a cell line resistant to retroviral infection, and transgene retention and expression were observed to be stable for least one month in Hs683 human glioma cells. These vectors have wide applications for the genetic modification of many cell types.

  16. Melanin binding study of clinical drugs with cassette dosing and rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Laura; Tengvall-Unadike, Unni; Ruponen, Marika; Kidron, Heidi; Del Amo, Eva M; Reinisalo, Mika; Urtti, Arto

    2017-11-15

    Melanin pigment is a negatively charged polymer found in pigmented human tissues. In the eye, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are heavily pigmented. Several drug molecules are known to bind to melanin, but larger sets of drugs have not been compared often in similar test conditions. In this study, we introduce a powerful tool for screening of melanin binding. The binding of a set of 34 compounds to isolated porcine RPE melanin was determined by cassette (n-in-one) dosing in rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts and the binding was quantitated with LC-MS/MS analytics. The compounds represented large variety in melanin binding (from 8.6%, ganciclovir) to over 95% bound (ampicillin and ciprofloxacin). The data provides information on melanin binding of small molecular weight compounds that are used for ocular (e.g. brinzolamide, ganciclovir) and systemic (e.g. tizanidine, indomethacin) therapy. Interestingly, competition among compounds was seen for melanin binding and the binding did not show any correlation with plasma protein binding. These results increase the understanding of melanin binding of ocular drugs and can be further exploited to predict pharmacokinetics in the eye. Pigment binding provides an interesting option for improved drug distribution to retina and choroid that are difficult target tissues in drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Energy use of televisions and video cassette recorders in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-03-01

    In an effort to more accurately determine nationwide energy consumption, the U.S. Department of Energy has recently commissioned studies with the goal of improving its understanding of the energy use of appliances in the miscellaneous end-use category. This study presents an estimate of the residential energy consumption of two of the most common domestic appliances in the miscellaneous end-use category: color televisions (TVs) and video cassette recorders (VCRs). The authors used a bottom-up approach in estimating national TV and VCR energy consumption. First, they obtained estimates of stock and usage from national surveys, while TV and VCR power measurements and other data were recorded at repair and retail shops. Industry-supplied shipment and sales distributions were then used to minimize bias in the power measurement samples. To estimate national TV and VCR energy consumption values, ranges of power draw and mode usage were created to represent situations in homes with more than one unit. Average energy use values for homes with one unit, two units, etc. were calculated and summed to provide estimates of total national TV and VCR energy consumption.

  18. Analysis of Species-Selectivity of Human, Mouse and Rat Cytochrome P450 1A and 2B Subfamily Enzymes using Molecular Modeling, Docking and Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Bagavathy Shanmugam; Suvaithenamudhan, Suvaiyarasan; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader; Parthasarathy, Subbiah

    2017-03-29

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and 2B subfamily enzymes are important drug metabolizing enzymes, and are highly conserved across species in terms of sequence homology. However, there are major to minor structural and macromolecular differences which provide for species-selectivity and substrate-selectivity. Therefore, species-selectivity of CYP1A and CYP2B subfamily proteins across human, mouse and rat was analyzed using molecular modeling, docking and dynamics simulations when the chiral molecules quinine and quinidine were used as ligands. The three-dimensional structures of 17 proteins belonging to CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies of mouse and rat were predicted by adopting homology modeling using the available structures of human CYP1A and CYP2B proteins as templates. Molecular docking and dynamics simulations of quinine and quinidine with CYP1A subfamily proteins revealed the existence of species-selectivity across the three species. On the other hand, in the case of CYP2B subfamily proteins, no role for chirality of quinine and quinidine in forming complexes with CYP2B subfamily proteins of the three species was indicated. Our findings reveal the roles of active site amino acid residues of CYP1A and CYP2B subfamily proteins and provide insights into species-selectivity of these enzymes across human, mouse, and rat.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domain cassettes 8 and 13 are associated with severe malaria in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Turner, Louise; Saguti, Fredy

    2012-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Plasmodium falciparum infections ranges from asymptomatic parasitemia to severe malaria syndromes associated with high mortality. The virulence of P. falciparum infections is associated with the type of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) expressed...... amplifying var subtype-specific loci covering most var/PfEMP1 subtypes. In addition, we characterized the near-full-length sequence of the most prominently expressed var genes in three patients diagnosed with severe anemia and/or cerebral malaria. The combined analysis showed that severe malaria syndromes......, including severe anemia and cerebral malaria, are associated with high transcript levels of PfEMP1 domain cassette 8-encoding var genes. Transcript levels of group A var genes, including genes encoding domain cassette 13, were also significantly higher in patients with severe syndromes compared with those...

  20. Characteriz ation of integrons and associated gene cassettes in Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from intensive care unit in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Goudarzi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, the frequency of integrons and associated gene cassettes in Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii strains isolated from selected hospital intensive care units. Methods: During a ten-month period, 120 A. baumannii isolates were studied. The resistance rates to different classes of antimicrobial agents were determined. PCR was used to detect different types of integrons and associated gene cassettes. Results: The resistance rates to the majority of antibiotics tested were found to be between 39.3% and 99.1%. No isolate was observed to be resistant to colistin and polymyxin B. The rate of extensive drug-resistance among these clinical isolates was 62.5%. The prevalence of class 1 and 2 integrons was found to be 74.1% and 12.5%, respectively. Seven different gene cassettes (ampC, aacA4-catB8, ISAba1-blaOXA-23-GES-14, aadA2-cm1A6-GES-14-qacF, VIM-25-GES-24-qacF, dfrA5-ISAba1-blaOXA-51-blaOXA-40 and aadA2-GES-11-IMP-1 were observed in Class 1 integron-carrying strains. Three gene cassettes (IMP-4, VIM-2-VEB-aacA4 and dfrA2-sat-2-aadA4 were detected in class 2 integron-bearing A. baumannii strains. Conclusions: A high prevalence of integron was described among multidrug resistant A. baumannii in the hospital. The findings highlighted the need for continuous surveillance in order to prevent dissemination of multidrug resistance among A. baumannii strains in Iran.

  1. High-level expression from two independent expression cassettes in replication-incompetent adenovirus type 35 vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogels, Ronald; Zuijdgeest, David; van Meerendonk, Michelle; Companjen, Arjen; Gillissen, Gert; Sijtsma, Jeroen; Melis, Irene; Holterman, Lennart; Radosevic, Katarina; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo J E

    2007-11-01

    Replication-incompetent adenovirus type 35 (rAd35) represents a potent vaccine carrier that elicits strong, antigen-specific T- and B-cell responses in diverse preclinical models. Moreover, Ad35 is rare in human populations, resulting in the absence of neutralizing antibodies against this carrier, in contrast to the commonly used rAd5. Therefore, rAd35 is being investigated as a vaccine carrier for a number of diseases for which an effective vaccine is needed, including malaria, AIDS and tuberculosis. However, it can be perceived that effective immunization will require insertion of multiple antigens into adenoviral vectors. We therefore wanted to create rAd35 vectors carrying double expression cassettes, to expand within one vector the number of insertion sites for foreign DNA encoding antigenic proteins. We show that it is possible to generate rAd35 vectors carrying two cytomegalovirus promoter-driven expression cassettes, provided that the polyadenylation signals in each expression cassette are not identical. We demonstrate excellent rAd35 vector stability and show that expression of a transgene is not influenced by the presence of a second expression cassette. Moreover, by using two model vaccine antigens, i.e. the human immunodeficiency virus-derived Env-gp120 protein and the Plasmodium falciparum-derived circumsporozoite protein, we demonstrate that potent T- and B-cell responses are induced to both antigens expressed from a single vector. Such rAd35 vectors thus expand the utility of rAd35 vaccine carriers for the development of vaccines against, for example, malaria, AIDS and tuberculosis.

  2. Computational prediction of CRISPR cassettes in gut metagenome samples from Chinese type-2 diabetic patients and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Mangericao, Tatiana C.; Peng, Zhanhao; Zhang, Xuegong

    2016-01-01

    Background CRISPR has been becoming a hot topic as a powerful technique for genome editing for human and other higher organisms. The original CRISPR-Cas (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats coupled with CRISPR-associated proteins) is an important adaptive defence system for prokaryotes that provides resistance against invading elements such as viruses and plasmids. A CRISPR cassette contains short nucleotide sequences called spacers. These unique regions retain a history...

  3. Structural design of DEMO Divertor Cassette Body: provisional FEM analysis and introductive application of RCC-MRx design rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frosi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.frosi@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mazzone, Giuseppe [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); You, Jeong-Ha [Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the early steps in developing a structural fem model of DEMO Divertor. The study is focused on the thermal and structural analysis of the Cassette Body: a new geometry has been developed for this component: it is foreseen that the plasma facing component (PFC) will be directly placed on the cassette but for the Dome no choice has been adopted yet. For now the model contains only a suitable schematization of the Cassette Body and its objective is to analyze the effect produced by the main loads (electromagnetic loads, coolant pressure, thermal neutron and convective loads) on itself: an available estimate of loads is that one derived from ITER: for a proper translation some assumptions have been made and they are described in the paper. Now it is not a primary purpose to obtain some definitive statements about stresses, displacements, temperatures and so on; the authors want to construct a set of FEM models that will help all the decisions of DEMO Divertor design in its future development. This set is conceived as a tool that shall be improved to account for all the main enhancements that will be found in geometry, in material properties data and in load evaluations. Moreover, the main design variables (loads, material properties, some geometric items, mesh element size) are defined as parameters. This work considers also an introductive approach for future structural verification of the Divertor Cassette Body: so a concern of the Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical Components of Nuclear Installation (RCC-MRx) has been implemented. The FEM code used is Ansys rel. 15.

  4. Emergence of a multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii ST8 harboring an unusual VIM-4 gene cassette in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Majewski

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: All unusual gene cassettes containing VIM-DR (direct repeat described thus far have been harbored by non-fermenters, i.e., Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas, underscoring the importance of resistance determinant mobility, which may go even beyond genus, family, and order boundaries. Great efforts need to be taken to explore pathways of resistance to ‘last-resort’ antimicrobials, especially among clinically relevant pathogens.

  5. Mid-tertiary dispersal, not Gondwanan vicariance explains distribution patterns in the wax palm subfamily (Ceroxyloideae: Arecaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trénel, Philipp; Gustafsson, Mats; Baker, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Ceroxyloideae is a small but heterogeneous subfamily of palms (Arecaceae, Palmae). It includes a Caribbean lineage (tribe Cyclospathae), a southern hemisphere disjunction (tribe Ceroxyleae), and an amphi-Andean element (tribe Phytelepheae), until recently considered a distinct subfamily (Phyt...... proposed. Radiation in this tribe coincides largely with the major uplift of the Andes, favoring Andean orogeny over Pleistocene climatic changes as a possible speciation-promoting factor in this tribe........ Austral interplate dispersal of Oraniopsis to Australia could have occurred, but apparently only in the mid-Eocene/early Oligocene interval after global cooling had begun. Our data do not support Pleistocene climatic changes as drivers for speciation in the Andean-centered Phytelepheae as previously...

  6. Characterisation of class 3 integrons with oxacillinase gene cassettes in hospital sewage and sludge samples from France and Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo Tchuinte, Pierrette Landrie; Stalder, Thibault; Venditti, Silvia; Ngandjio, Antoinette; Dagot, Christophe; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Barraud, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    In this study, antibiotic resistance class 3 integrons in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from hospital sewage and sludge and their genetic contents were characterised. Two samples of hospital effluent from France and Luxembourg and one sample of sludge from a wastewater treatment plant in France were collected in 2010 and 2011. Bacteria were cultured on selective agar plates and integrons were detected in colonies by quantitative PCR. Integron gene cassette arrays and their genetic environments were analysed by next-generation sequencing. Three class 3 integron-positive isolates were detected, including Acinetobacter johnsonii LIM75 (French hospital effluent), Aeromonas allosaccharophila LIM82 (sludge) and Citrobacter freundii LIM86 (Luxembourg hospital effluent). The gene cassettes were all implicated in antibiotic (aminoglycoside and β-lactam) or antiseptic resistance. An oxacillinase gene cassette (blaOXA-10, blaOXA-368 or blaOXA-2) was found in each integron. All of the class 3 integrons were located on small mobilisable plasmids. This study highlights the role of class 3 integrons in the dissemination of clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes, notably oxacillinase genes, in hospital effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus Zn-glyoxalase I: new subfamily of glyoxalase I family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirgadze, Yuri N. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290, Moscow Region, Russia; Boshkova, Eugenia A. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290, Moscow Region, Russia; Battaile, Kevin P. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, IMCA-CAT, Argonne, IL 60439, USA; Mendes, Vitor G. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1GA, UK; Lam, Robert [Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Chan, Tiffany S. Y. [Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Romanov, Vladimir [Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Pai, Emil F. [Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y. [Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada; X-CHIP Technologies Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    2017-01-16

    The crystal structures of protein SA0856 from Staphylococcus aureus in its apo-form and in complex with a Zn2+-ion have been presented. The 152 amino acid protein consists of two similar domains with α + β topology. In both crystalline state and in solution, the protein forms a dimer with monomers related by a twofold pseudo-symmetry rotation axis. A sequence homology search identified the protein as a member of the structural family Glyoxalase I. We have shown that the enzyme possesses glyoxalase I activity in the presence of Zn2+, Mg2+, Ni2+, and Co2+, in this order of preference. Sequence and structure comparisons revealed that human glyoxalase I should be assigned to a subfamily A, while S. aureus glyoxalase I represents a new subfamily B, which includes also proteins from other bacteria. Both subfamilies have a similar protein chain fold but rather diverse sequences. The active sites of human and staphylococcus glyoxalases I are also different: the former contains one Zn-ion per chain; the latter incorporates two of these ions. In the active site of SA0856, the first Zn-ion is well coordinated by His58, Glu60 from basic molecule and Glu40*, His44* from adjacent symmetry-related molecule. The second Zn3-ion is coordinated only by residue His143 from protein molecule and one acetate ion. We suggest that only single Zn1-ion plays the role of catalytic center. The newly found differences between the two subfamilies could guide the design of new drugs against S. aureus, an important pathogenic micro-organism.

  8. Structural, biochemical, and evolutionary characterization of glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductases shows their division into two distinct subfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Jan; Shabalin, Ivan G; Matelska, Dorota; Handing, Katarzyna; Gasiorowska, Olga; Sroka, Piotr; Gorna, Maria W; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Minor, Wladek

    2018-01-08

    The D-2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (2HADH) family illustrates a complex evolutionary history with multiple lateral gene transfers, gene duplications, and losses. As a result, the exact functional annotation of individual members can be extrapolated to a very limited extent. Here, we revise the previous simplified view on the classification of the 2HADH family; specifically, we show that the previously delineated glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductase (GHPR) subfamily consists of two evolutionary separated GHRA and GHRB subfamilies. We compare two representatives of these subfamilies from Sinorhizobium meliloti (SmGhrA and SmGhrB), employing a combination of biochemical, structural, and bioinformatics approaches. Our kinetic results show that both enzymes reduce several 2-ketocarboxylic acids with overlapping, but not equivalent, substrate preferences. SmGhrA and SmGhrB show highest activity with glyoxylate and hydroxypyruvate, respectively; in addition, only SmGhrB reduces 2-keto-D-gluconate, and only SmGhrA reduces pyruvate (with low efficiency). We present nine crystal structures of both enzymes in apo-forms and in complexes with cofactors and substrates/substrate analogs. In particular, we determined a crystal structure of SmGhrB with 2-keto-D-gluconate, which is the biggest substrate crystallized with a 2HADH member. The structures reveal significant differences between SmGhrA and SmGhrB, both in the overall structure and within the substrate-binding pocket, offering insight into the molecular basis for the observed substrate preferences and subfamily differences. In addition, we provide an overview of all GHRA and GHRB structures complexed with a ligand in the active site.

  9. On the phylogeny of Mustelidae subfamilies: analysis of seventeen nuclear non-coding loci and mitochondrial complete genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Muyeong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mustelidae, as the largest and most-diverse family of order Carnivora, comprises eight subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationships among these Mustelidae subfamilies remain argumentative subjects in recent years. One of the main reasons is that the mustelids represent a typical example of rapid evolutionary radiation and recent speciation event. Prior investigation has been concentrated on the application of different mitochondrial (mt sequence and nuclear protein-coding data, herein we employ 17 nuclear non-coding loci (>15 kb, in conjunction with mt complete genome data (>16 kb, to clarify these enigmatic problems. Results The combined nuclear intron and mt genome analyses both robustly support that Taxidiinae diverged first, followed by Melinae. Lutrinae and Mustelinae are grouped together in all analyses with strong supports. The position of Helictidinae, however, is enigmatic because the mt genome analysis places it to the clade uniting Lutrinae and Mustelinae, whereas the nuclear intron analysis favores a novel view supporting a closer relationship of Helictidinae to Martinae. This finding emphasizes a need to add more data and include more taxa to resolve this problem. In addition, the molecular dating provides insights into the time scale of the origin and diversification of the Mustelidae subfamilies. Finally, the phylogenetic performances and limits of nuclear introns and mt genes are discussed in the context of Mustelidae phylogeny. Conclusion Our study not only brings new perspectives on the previously obscured phylogenetic relationships among Mustelidae subfamilies, but also provides another example demonstrating the effectiveness of nuclear non-coding loci for reconstructing evolutionary histories in a group that has undergone rapid bursts of speciation.

  10. The Cylapinae (Insecta, Hemiptera, Heteroptera: Miridae) of India: review of the subfamily with description of new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshwanth, H M; Chérot, F; Gorczyca, J; Wolski, A

    2016-02-26

    The subfamily Cylapinae (Insecta, Heteroptera: Miridae) from India is reviewed. Three tribes, seven genera and nineteen species are cited from the country, keyed and described. Six species are described as new: Fulvius kadapaensis sp. nov., Peritropis kodava sp. nov., Peritropis pathaki sp. nov., Peritropis sangai sp. nov., Peritropis yasunagai sp. nov. and Rhinomiris prathapani sp. nov. A new synonymy is published: Peritropis lewisi (Distant, 1904) (valid name) = Peritropis indicus Gorczyca, 2006b (new junior subjective synonym).

  11. RH421 binds into the ATP-binding site on the Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huličiak, Miroslav; Bazgier, V.; Berka, K.; Kubala, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 10 (2017), s. 2113-2122 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : sodium-potassium pump * crystal-structure * conformational-changes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  12. Novel mutation in ATP-binding domain of ABCD1 gene in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MRI of the patient showed peritrigonal and cerebellar semioval white matter hypodensities and hyperintense areas (T2/fluid atten- uated inversion recovery) in bilateral cerebral white mat- ter, predominantly in parieto–occipital region. The molecu- lar analysis by direct sequencing of the ABCD1 gene showed the presence ...

  13. Conformational changes produced by ATP binding to the plasma membrane calcium pump

    OpenAIRE

    Mangialavori, Irene C.; Ferreira Gomes, Mariela S.; Saffioti, Nicolas A.; Gonzalez-Lebrero, Rodolfo Martin; Rossi, Rolando Carlos; Rossi, Juan Pablo Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA) reaction cycle by characterizing conformational changes associated with calcium, ATP, and vanadate binding to purified PMCA. This was accomplished by studying the exposure of PMCA to surrounding phospholipids by measuring the incorporation of the photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine analog 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholin...

  14. Novel mutation in ATP-binding domain of ABCD1 gene in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Department of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Kalawati Saran Childrens' Hospital, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 001, India; Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110 029, India; Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110 029, ...

  15. RINL, guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rab5-subfamily, is involved in the EphA8-degradation pathway with odin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kajiho

    Full Text Available The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs. Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference-like (RINL, which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that RINL has GEF activity for the Rab5 subfamily proteins by measuring their GTP-bound forms in cultured cells. We also found that RINL interacts with odin, a member of the ankyrin-repeat and sterile-alpha motif (SAM domain-containing (Anks protein family. In addition, the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor EphA8 formed a ternary complex with both RINL and odin. Interestingly, RINL expression in cultured cells reduced EphA8 levels in a manner dependent on both its GEF activity and interaction with odin. In addition, knockdown of RINL increased EphA8 level in HeLa cells. Our findings suggest that RINL, as a GEF for Rab5 subfamily, is implicated in the EphA8-degradation pathway via its interaction with odin.

  16. Alternative splicing produces two transcripts encoding female-biased pheromone subfamily receptors in the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F Garczynski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Insect odorant receptors are key sensors of environmental odors and members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily are thought to play important roles in mate finding by recognizing sex pheromones. Much research has been done to identify putative pheromone receptors in lepidopteran males, but little attention has been given to female counterparts. In this study, degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed against a conserved amino acid region in the C-terminus of lepidopteran pheromone receptors were used in 3’ RACE reactions to identify candidate pheromone receptors expressed in the antennae of female navel orangeworm. Two near full-length transcripts of 1469 nt and 1302 nt encoding the complete open reading frames for proteins of 446 and 425 amino acids, respectively, were identified. Based on BLAST homology and phylogenetic analyses, the putative proteins encoded by these transcripts are members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily. Characterization of these transcripts indicates that they are alternatively spliced products of a single gene. Tissue expression studies indicate that the transcripts are female-biased with detection mainly in female antennae. To the best of our knowledge, these transcripts represent the first detection of alternatively spliced female-biased members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily.

  17. Origin and evolution of GALA-LRR, a new member of the CC-LRR subfamily: from plants to bacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V Kajava

    Full Text Available The phytopathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum encodes type III effectors, called GALA proteins, which contain F-box and LRR domains. The GALA LRRs do not perfectly fit any of the previously described LRR subfamilies. By applying protein sequence analysis and structural prediction, we clarify this ambiguous case of LRR classification and assign GALA-LRRs to CC-LRR subfamily. We demonstrate that side-by-side packing of LRRs in the 3D structures may control the limits of repeat variability within the LRR subfamilies during evolution. The LRR packing can be used as a criterion, complementing the repeat sequences, to classify newly identified LRR domains. Our phylogenetic analysis of F-box domains proposes the lateral gene transfer of bacterial GALA proteins from host plants. We also present an evolutionary scenario which can explain the transformation of the original plant LRRs into slightly different bacterial LRRs. The examination of the selective evolutionary pressure acting on GALA proteins suggests that the convex side of their horse-shoe shaped LRR domains is more prone to positive selection than the concave side, and we therefore hypothesize that the convex surface might be the site of protein binding relevant to the adaptor function of the F-box GALA proteins. This conclusion provides a strong background for further functional studies aimed at determining the role of these type III effectors in the virulence of R. solanacearum.

  18. Systematics of Australian Thrasorinae (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae with descriptions of Mikeiinae, new subfamily, two new genera, and three new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Paretas-Martínez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Thrasorinae are revised and Mikeius is transferred to Mikeiinae Paretas-Martínez & Pujade-Villar, subfam. n., and M. clavatus Pujade-Villar & Restrepo-Ortiz, sp. n., is described. Two new genera of Thrasorinae are erected: Cicatrix Paretas-Martínez, gen. n., including C. pilosiscutum (Girault, comb. n. from Amblynotus, C. schauffi (Buffington, comb. n. from Mikeius, and C. neumannoides Paretas-Martínez & Restrepo-Ortiz, sp. n.; and Palmiriella Pujade-Villar & Paretas-Martínez, gen. n., including P. neumanni (Buffington, comb. n. from Mikeius, Thrasorus rieki Paretas-Martínez & Pujade-Villar, sp. n., is also described. A phylogenetic analysis of 176 morphological and biological characters, including all these new taxa and all genera previously included in Thrasorinae, was conducted. All subfamilies were recovered as monophyletic, with the following relationships: Parnipinae (Euceroptrinae (Mikeiinae (Plectocynipinae (Thrasorinae. A worldwide key to the subfamilies of Figitidae is provided that includes the new subfamily, as well as a key to genera Thrasorinae.

  19. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan; (Oxford)

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  20. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Pavia); (Lund); (Southern Research)

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  1. The crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase reveals a distinct subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Timothy H; Christoffersen, S; Allan, Paula W; Parker, William B; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I; Terreni, M; Ealick, Steven E

    2011-08-02

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 Å resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an α/β monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is ∼7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  2. Multilocus molecular phylogeny of the suckermouth armored catfishes (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) with a focus on subfamily Hypostominae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Nathan K; Armbruster, Jonathan W; Lovejoy, Nathan R; López-Fernández, Hernán

    2015-01-01

    The Neotropical catfish family Loricariidae is the fifth most species-rich vertebrate family on Earth, with over 800 valid species. The Hypostominae is its most species-rich, geographically widespread, and ecomorphologically diverse subfamily. Here, we provide a comprehensive molecular phylogenetic reappraisal of genus-level relationships in the Hypostominae based on our sequencing and analysis of two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci (4293bp total). Our most striking large-scale systematic discovery was that the tribe Hypostomini, which has traditionally been recognized as sister to tribe Ancistrini based on morphological data, was nested within Ancistrini. This required recognition of seven additional tribe-level clades: the Chaetostoma Clade, the Pseudancistrus Clade, the Lithoxus Clade, the 'Pseudancistrus' Clade, the Acanthicus Clade, the Hemiancistrus Clade, and the Peckoltia Clade. Results of our analysis, which included type- and non-type species for every valid genus in Hypostominae, support the reevaluation and restriction of several historically problematic genera, including Baryancistrus, Cordylancistrus, Hemiancistrus, and Peckoltia. Much of the deep lineage diversity in Hypostominae is restricted to Guiana Shield and northern Andean drainages, with three tribe-level clades still largely restricted to the Guiana Shield. Of the six geographically widespread clades, a paraphyletic assemblage of three contain lineages restricted to drainages west of the Andes Mountains, suggesting that early diversification of the Hypostominae predated the late Miocene surge in Andean uplift. Our results also highlight examples of trophic ecological diversification and convergence in the Loricariidae, including support for three independent origins of highly similar and globally unique morphological specializations for eating wood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Potassium Channel Subfamily K Member 3 (KCNK3) Contributes to the Development of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antigny, Fabrice; Hautefort, Aurélie; Meloche, Jolyane; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Manoury, Boris; Rucker-Martin, Catherine; Péchoux, Christine; Potus, François; Nadeau, Valérie; Tremblay, Eve; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Bourgeois, Alice; Dorfmüller, Peter; Breuils-Bonnet, Sandra; Fadel, Elie; Ranchoux, Benoît; Jourdon, Philippe; Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2016-04-05

    Mutations in the KCNK3 gene have been identified in some patients suffering from heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). KCNK3 encodes an outward rectifier K(+) channel, and each identified mutation leads to a loss of function. However, the pathophysiological role of potassium channel subfamily K member 3 (KCNK3) in PAH is unclear. We hypothesized that loss of function of KCNK3 is a hallmark of idiopathic and heritable PAH and contributes to dysfunction of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells, leading to pulmonary artery remodeling: consequently, restoring KCNK3 function could alleviate experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH). We demonstrated that KCNK3 expression and function were reduced in human PAH and in monocrotaline-induced PH in rats. Using a patch-clamp technique in freshly isolated (not cultured) pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells, we found that KCNK3 current decreased progressively during the development of monocrotaline-induced PH and correlated with plasma-membrane depolarization. We demonstrated that KCNK3 modulated pulmonary arterial tone. Long-term inhibition of KCNK3 in rats induced distal neomuscularization and early hemodynamic signs of PH, which were related to exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell, adventitial fibroblasts, and pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Lastly, in vivo pharmacological activation of KCNK3 significantly reversed monocrotaline-induced PH in rats. In PAH and experimental PH, KCNK3 expression and activity are strongly reduced in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. KCNK3 inhibition promoted increased proliferation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation. In vivo pharmacological activation of KCNK3 alleviated monocrotaline-induced PH, thus demonstrating that loss of KCNK3 is a key event in PAH pathogenesis and thus could be therapeutically targeted.

  4. Comparison of otoacoustic emissions within gecko subfamilies: morphological implications for auditory function in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergevin, Christopher

    2011-04-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are sounds emitted by the ear and provide a non-invasive probe into mechanisms underlying peripheral auditory transduction. This study focuses upon a comparison of emission properties in two phylogenetically similar pairs of gecko: Gekko gecko and Hemidactylus turcicus and Eublepharis macularius and Coleonyx variegatus. Each pair consists of two closely related species within the same subfamily, with quantitatively known morphological properties at the level of the auditory sensory organ (basilar papilla) in the inner ear. Essentially, the comparison boils down to an issue of size: how does overall body size, as well as the inner-ear dimensions (e.g., papilla length and number of hair cells), affect peripheral auditory function as inferred from OAEs? Estimates of frequency selectivity derived from stimulus-frequency emissions (emissions evoked by a single low-level tone) indicate that tuning is broader in the species with fewer hair cells/shorter papilla. Furthermore, emissions extend outwards to higher frequencies (for similar body temperatures) in the species with the smaller body size/narrower interaural spacing. This observation suggests the smaller species have relatively improved high-frequency sensitivity, possibly related to vocalizations and/or aiding azimuthal sound localization. For one species (Eublepharis), emissions were also examined in both juveniles and adults. Qualitatively similar emission properties in both suggests that inner-ear function is adult like soon after hatching and that external body size (e.g., middle-ear dimensions and interaural spacing) has a relatively small impact upon emission properties within a species.

  5. Dynamic Distribution and Interaction of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 Subfamily Splicing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Nancy; Schloesser, Marie; Joris, Marine; Sauvage, Eric; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Ser/Arg-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two pathways, either dependent or independent on the XPO1 receptor. Here, we examined the expression profiles and shuttling dynamics of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 subfamily (SR30, SR34, SR34a, and SR34b) under control of their endogenous promoter in Arabidopsis and in transient expression assay. Due to its rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and high expression level in transient assay, we analyzed the multiple determinants that regulate the localization and shuttling dynamics of SR34. By site-directed mutagenesis of SR34 RNA-binding sequences and Arg/Ser-rich (RS) domain, we further show that functional RRM1 or RRM2 are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. However, mutations of both RRMs induced aggregation of the protein whereas mutation in the RS domain decreased the stability of the protein and suppressed its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the XPO1 (CRM1/Exportin-1) receptor pathway, but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen with SR34 as bait and discovered SR45 as a new interactor. SR45 is an unusual SR splicing factor bearing two RS domains. These interactions were confirmed in planta by FLIM-FRET and BiFC and the roles of SR34 domains in protein-protein interactions were further studied. Altogether, our report extends our understanding of shuttling dynamics of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Dynamic Distribution and Interaction of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 Subfamily Splicing Factors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Nancy; Schloesser, Marie; Joris, Marine; Sauvage, Eric; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ser/Arg-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two pathways, either dependent or independent on the XPO1 receptor. Here, we examined the expression profiles and shuttling dynamics of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 subfamily (SR30, SR34, SR34a, and SR34b) under control of their endogenous promoter in Arabidopsis and in transient expression assay. Due to its rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and high expression level in transient assay, we analyzed the multiple determinants that regulate the localization and shuttling dynamics of SR34. By site-directed mutagenesis of SR34 RNA-binding sequences and Arg/Ser-rich (RS) domain, we further show that functional RRM1 or RRM2 are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. However, mutations of both RRMs induced aggregation of the protein whereas mutation in the RS domain decreased the stability of the protein and suppressed its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the XPO1 (CRM1/Exportin-1) receptor pathway, but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen with SR34 as bait and discovered SR45 as a new interactor. SR45 is an unusual SR splicing factor bearing two RS domains. These interactions were confirmed in planta by FLIM-FRET and BiFC and the roles of SR34 domains in protein-protein interactions were further studied. Altogether, our report extends our understanding of shuttling dynamics of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors. PMID:26697894

  7. Revision of Drusinae subfamily (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae: divergence by paraproct and paramere: speciation in isolation by integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh, János

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years we have described over 70 new incipient sibling limnephild species applying the discovered Trichoptera speciation traits of the paraproct and paramere for species recognition and delimitation. In this revision on Drusinae subfamily, comprising 177 species, we have applied these subtle, but rapid and stable speciation traits and described 49 new sibling species from the “well studied” European mountain ranges. Discussing the theoretical background we have elaborated and adapted a new character state ranking system of phenomics to revise the long-neglected taxonomy of the Drusinae subfamily and synonymised the Cryptothrix, Monocentra, Metanoea, Leptodrusus, Anomalopterygella, Hadimina genera with the Drusus genus. These old genera of artificial constructs were established exclusively by divergences of secondary sexual traits known already to have only species level ranking value. According to our new character ranking system in the Drusinae subfamily, beside the Drusus genus, only the Ecclisopteryx genus has been retained having robust generic level divegences of paraproct loss and ancestral duplication of spine organising centre on the paramere pattern. Speciation trait function of the peg-packed surface on the paraproct head in Drusus genus moved to the gonopod apices and integrated into variously shaped stimulatory organ in the Ecclisopteryx genus. In the Drusus genus the ancestral divergence of the single spine organising centre has integrated 11 species groups with remarkably stable paramere spine pattern. Based upon ancestral divergences in the paraproct architecture we have differenciated 28 species complexes inside the 11 species groups. The delineation of the 163 mostly incipient siblings species, inside the 28 species complexes with 44 new Drusus species, was based primarily on the divergences of speciation trait, that is in the stimulatory head shape of the apical arms on the dorsal branches of the paraproct

  8. The gRNA-miRNA-gRNA Ternary Cassette Combining CRISPR/Cas9 with RNAi Approach Strongly Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Ruiyang; Ding, Shanlong; Zhang, Tianying; Yuan, Quan; Guan, Guiwen; Chen, Xiangmei; Zhang, Ting; Zhuang, Hui; Nunes, Frederick; Block, Timothy; Liu, Shuang; Duan, Zhongping; Xia, Ningshao; Xu, Zhongwei; Lu, Fengmin

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a novel genome editing technology which has been successfully used to inhibit HBV replication. Here, we described a novel gRNA-microRNA (miRNA)-gRNA ternary cassette driven by a single U6 promoter. With an anti-HBV pri-miR31 mimic integrated between two HBV-specific gRNAs, both gRNAs could be separated from the long transcript of gRNA-miR-HBV-gRNA ternary cassette through Drosha/DGCR8 processing. The results showed that the gRNA-miR-HBV-gRNA ternary cassette could efficiently express two gRNAs and miR-HBV. The optimal length of pri-miRNA flanking sequence in our ternary cassette was determined to be 38 base pairs (bp). Besides, HBV-specific gRNAs and miR-HBV in gRNA-miR-HBV-gRNA ternary cassette could exert a synergistic effect in inhibiting HBV replication and destroying HBV genome in vitro and in vivo. Most importantly, together with RNA interference (RNAi) approach, the HBV-specific gRNAs showed the potent activity on the destruction of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). Since HBV cccDNA is an obstacle for the elimination of chronic HBV infection, the gRNA-miR-HBV-gRNA ternary cassette may be a potential tool for the clearance of HBV cccDNA. PMID:28839466

  9. Contamination of X-ray cassettes with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus in a radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Han-Sung; Park, Ji-Young; Koo, Hyun-Sook; Choi, Chul-Sun; Song, Wonkeun; Cho, Hyoun Chan; Lee, Kyu Man

    2012-05-01

    We performed surveillance cultures of the surfaces of X-ray cassettes to assess contamination with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The surfaces of 37 X-ray cassettes stored in a radiology department were cultured using mannitol salt agar containing 6 µg/mL oxacillin. Suspected methicillin-resistant staphylococcal colonies were isolated and identified by biochemical testing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was performed to determine the clonal relationships of the contaminants. Six X-ray cassettes (16.2%) were contaminated with MRSA. During the isolation procedure, we also detected 19 X-ray cassettes (51.4%) contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MRSH), identified as yellow colonies resembling MRSA on mannitol salt agar. PFGE analysis of the MRSA and MRSH isolates revealed that most isolates of each organism were identical or closely related to each other, suggesting a common source of contamination. X-ray cassettes, which are commonly in direct contact with patients, were contaminated with MRSA and MRSH. In hospital environments, contaminated X-ray cassettes may serve as fomites for methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

  10. Improving yeast strains using recyclable integration cassettes, for the production of plant terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids constitute a large family of natural products, attracting commercial interest for a variety of uses as flavours, fragrances, drugs and alternative fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers a versatile cell factory, as the precursors of terpenoid biosynthesis are naturally synthesized by the sterol biosynthetic pathway. Results S. cerevisiae wild type yeast cells, selected for their capacity to produce high sterol levels were targeted for improvement aiming to increase production. Recyclable integration cassettes were developed which enable the unlimited sequential integration of desirable genetic elements (promoters, genes, termination sequence at any desired locus in the yeast genome. The approach was applied on the yeast sterol biosynthetic pathway genes HMG2, ERG20 and IDI1 resulting in several-fold increase in plant monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The improved strains were robust and could sustain high terpenoid production levels for an extended period. Simultaneous plasmid-driven co-expression of IDI1 and the HMG2 (K6R variant, in the improved strain background, maximized monoterpene production levels. Expression of two terpene synthase enzymes from the sage species Salvia fruticosa and S. pomifera (SfCinS1, SpP330 in the modified yeast cells identified a range of terpenoids which are also present in the plant essential oils. Co-expression of the putative interacting protein HSP90 with cineole synthase 1 (SfCinS1 also improved production levels, pointing to an additional means to improve production. Conclusions Using the developed molecular tools, new yeast strains were generated with increased capacity to produce plant terpenoids. The approach taken and the durability of the strains allow successive rounds of improvement to maximize yields.

  11. The evolution of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) as a real-time bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted.

  12. A Precisely Regulated Gene Expression Cassette Potently Modulates Metastasis and Survival in Multiple Solid Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun; Ganesan, Kumaresan; Tan, Lay Keng; Laban, Mirtha; Wu, Jeanie; Zhao, Xiao Dong; Li, Hongmin; Leung, Carol Ho Wing; Zhu, Yansong; Wei, Chia Lin; Hooi, Shing Chuan; Miller, Lance; Tan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Successful tumor development and progression involves the complex interplay of both pro- and anti-oncogenic signaling pathways. Genetic components balancing these opposing activities are likely to require tight regulation, because even subtle alterations in their expression may disrupt this balance with major consequences for various cancer-associated phenotypes. Here, we describe a cassette of cancer-specific genes exhibiting precise transcriptional control in solid tumors. Mining a database of tumor gene expression profiles from six different tissues, we identified 48 genes exhibiting highly restricted levels of gene expression variation in tumors (n = 270) compared to nonmalignant tissues (n = 71). Comprising genes linked to multiple cancer-related pathways, the restricted expression of this “Poised Gene Cassette” (PGC) was robustly validated across 11 independent cohorts of ∼1,300 samples from multiple cancer types. In three separate experimental models, subtle alterations in PGC expression were consistently associated with significant differences in metastatic and invasive potential. We functionally confirmed this association in siRNA knockdown experiments of five PGC genes (p53CSV, MAP3K11, MTCH2, CPSF6, and SKIP), which either directly enhanced the invasive capacities or inhibited the proliferation of AGS cancer cells. In primary tumors, similar subtle alterations in PGC expression were also repeatedly associated with clinical outcome in multiple cohorts. Taken collectively, these findings support the existence of a common set of precisely controlled genes in solid tumors. Since inducing small activity changes in these genes may prove sufficient to potently influence various tumor phenotypes such as metastasis, targeting such precisely regulated genes may represent a promising avenue for novel anti-cancer therapies. PMID:18636107

  13. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Sayler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted.

  14. Improving yeast strains using recyclable integration cassettes, for the production of plant terpenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Terpenoids constitute a large family of natural products, attracting commercial interest for a variety of uses as flavours, fragrances, drugs and alternative fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers a versatile cell factory, as the precursors of terpenoid biosynthesis are naturally synthesized by the sterol biosynthetic pathway. Results S. cerevisiae wild type yeast cells, selected for their capacity to produce high sterol levels were targeted for improvement aiming to increase production. Recyclable integration cassettes were developed which enable the unlimited sequential integration of desirable genetic elements (promoters, genes, termination sequence) at any desired locus in the yeast genome. The approach was applied on the yeast sterol biosynthetic pathway genes HMG2, ERG20 and IDI1 resulting in several-fold increase in plant monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The improved strains were robust and could sustain high terpenoid production levels for an extended period. Simultaneous plasmid-driven co-expression of IDI1 and the HMG2 (K6R) variant, in the improved strain background, maximized monoterpene production levels. Expression of two terpene synthase enzymes from the sage species Salvia fruticosa and S. pomifera (SfCinS1, SpP330) in the modified yeast cells identified a range of terpenoids which are also present in the plant essential oils. Co-expression of the putative interacting protein HSP90 with cineole synthase 1 (SfCinS1) also improved production levels, pointing to an additional means to improve production. Conclusions Using the developed molecular tools, new yeast strains were generated with increased capacity to produce plant terpenoids. The approach taken and the durability of the strains allow successive rounds of improvement to maximize yields. PMID:21276210

  15. Unprecedented enhancement of transient gene expression from minimal cassettes using a double terminator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getu; Buenrostro-Nava, Marco T; Damaj, Mona B; Gao, San-Ji; Molina, Joe; Mirkov, T Erik

    2011-01-01

    The potential of using vector-free minimal gene cassettes (MGCs) with a double terminator for the enhancement and stabilization of transgene expression was tested in sugarcane biolistic transformation. The MGC system used consisted of the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) reporter gene driven by the maize ubiquitin-1 (Ubi) promoter and a single or double terminator from nopaline synthase (Tnos) or/and Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (35ST). Transient EYFP expression from Tnos or 35ST single terminator MGC was very low and unstable, typically peaking early (8-16 h) and diminishing rapidly (48-72 h) after bombardment. Addition of a ~260 bp vector sequence (VS) to the single MGC downstream of Tnos (Tnos + VS) or 35ST (35ST + VS) enhanced EYFP expression by 1.25- to 25-fold. However, a much more significant increase in EYFP expression was achieved when the VS in 35ST + VS was replaced by Tnos to generate a 35ST-Tnos double terminator MGC, reaching its maximum at 24 h post-bombardment. The enhanced EYFP expression from the double terminator MGC was maintained for a long period of time (168 h), resulting in an overall increase of 5- to 65-fold and 10- to 160-fold as compared to the 35ST and Tnos single terminator MGCs, respectively. The efficiency of the double terminator MGC in enhancing EYFP expression was also demonstrated in sorghum and tobacco, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is highly conserved among monocots and dicots. Our results also suggest the involvement of posttranscriptional gene silencing in the reduced and unstable transgene expression from single terminator MGCs in plants.

  16. A new genus of mites of the subfamily Platyseiinae associated with Azteca ant galleries in Cecropia trees in Costa Rica (Acari: Mesostigmata: Blattisociidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindquist, E.E; Moraza, M.L

    2016-01-01

    The genus Calyptoseius gen. nov. of the subfamily Platyseiinae Evans is described, based on adults and nymphs of one newly described species associated with ants of the genus Azteca occupying hollow stems of Cecropia in lowland rain...

  17. Cephalocteinae Mulsant et Rey, 1866 (Hemiptera, Heteroptera), a subfamily of Cydnidae new for the Italian fauna: first record of Cephalocteus scarabaeoides (Fabricius, 1807) from Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancello, Luca; Cillo, Davide; Bazzato, Erika

    2016-01-25

    Cephalocteus scarabaeoides is recorded from the south-western coast of Sardinia, in sandy habitat (marine dunes near the beach), for the first time. The species and the subfamily are new for the Italian fauna.

  18. Optimized paired-sgRNA/Cas9 cloning and expression cassette triggers high-efficiency multiplex genome editing in kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zupeng; Wang, Shuaibin; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Qiong; Li, Li; Zhong, Caihong; Liu, Yifei; Huang, Hongwen

    2018-01-13

    Kiwifruit is an important fruit crop; however, technologies for its functional genomic and molecular improvement are limited. The clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system has been successfully applied to genetic improvement in many crops, but its editing capability is variable depending on the different combinations of the synthetic guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 protein expression devices. Optimizing conditions for its use within a particular species is therefore needed to achieve highly efficient genome editing. In this study, we developed a new cloning strategy for generating paired-sgRNA/Cas9 vectors containing four sgRNAs targeting the kiwifruit phytoene desaturase gene (AcPDS). Comparing to the previous method of paired-sgRNA cloning, our strategy only requires the synthesis of two gRNA-containing primers which largely reduces the cost. We further compared efficiencies of paired-sgRNA/Cas9 vectors containing different sgRNA expression devices, including both the polycistronic tRNA-sgRNA cassette (PTG) and the traditional CRISPR expression cassette. We found the mutagenesis frequency of the PTG/Cas9 system was 10-fold higher than that of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, coinciding with the relative expressions of sgRNAs in two different expression cassettes. In particular, we identified large chromosomal fragment deletions induced by the paired-sgRNAs of the PTG/Cas9 system. Finally, as expected, we found both systems can successfully induce the albino phenotype of kiwifruit plantlets regenerated from the G418-resistance callus lines. We conclude that the PTG/Cas9 system is a more powerful system than the traditional CRISPR/Cas9 system for kiwifruit genome editing, which provides valuable clues for optimizing CRISPR/Cas9 editing system in other plants. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons

  19. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  20. Novel environmental class 1 integrons and cassette arrays recovered from an on-farm bio-purification plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, María Carla; Quiroga, María Paula; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Centrón, Daniela; Papa, María Florencia Del

    2017-12-27

    Rapid dissemination and emergence of novel antibiotic resistance genes among bacteria are rising problems worldwide. Since their discovery in clinical isolates in the late 1980s, class 1 integrons have been found in a wide range of bacterial genera and have been extensively studied as contributors to dissemination of antibiotic resistance.The present study aimed to investigate the presence and structure of class 1 integrons in plasmid-carrying bacterial isolates obtained from a biopurification system used for decontamination of pesticide-contaminated water as well as their possible role as reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance gene cassettes. A total of 35 representative isolates were screened for the presence of class 1 integron integrase encoded by intI1. PCR and DNA sequencing revealed the presence of six class 1 integrons with four variable regions: 5'CS-aadA1b-3'CS, 5'CS-aadA2-3'CS, 5'CS-aadA11cΔ-3'CS and 5'CS-dfrB3-aadA1di-catB2-aadA6k-3'CS, the last two being unseen arrays of antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes associated with novel environmental alleles of intI1. These four class 1 integrons were identified as being present in four different genera, including Ochrobactrum, and Variovorax, where class 1 integrons have not been previously reported. The results provide evidence of the biopurification systems as a tank of class 1 integron carrying strains and novel environmental class 1 integron integrases associated with antimicrobial-resistance gene cassette arrays. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Revision and phylogeny of the caddisfly subfamily Protoptilinae (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae) inferred from adult morphology and mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Desiree R; Holzenthal, Ralph W

    2013-01-01

    Protoptilinae Ross, 1956, is the most diverse subfamily belonging to the saddle- or tortoise-case-making caddisfly family Glossosomatidae Wallengren, 1891. The subfamily has a disjunct distribution: 5 genera are known from the East Palae-arctic and Oriental regions; the remaining 13 are restricted to the Nearctic and Neotropical regions. Monophyly of Pro-toptilinae and each of 17 genera was tested using 80 taxa, 99 morphological characters, and mitochondrial DNA (COI). Additionally, homologies of morphological characters were assessed across genera and a standardized terminology for those structures was established. Mitochondrial DNA data were unavailable for 55 of the 80 taxa included in this study. To test the effects of the missing molecular data, 5 different datasets were analyzed using both parsimony and Bayesian methods. There was incongruence between the COI and morphological data, but results suggest the inclusion of COI data in a combined analysis, although incomplete, improved the overall phylogenetic signal. Bayesian and parsimony analyses of all 5 datasets strongly supported the monophyly of Protoptilinae. Monophyly of the following genera was also support-ed: Canoptila Mosely, 1939; Culoptila Mosely, 1954; Itauara Müller, 1888; Mastigoptila Flint, 1967; Mortoniella Ulmer, 1906; Protoptila Banks, 1904; and Tolhuaca Schmid, 1964. Several taxonomic changes were necessary for classification to reflect phylogeny accurately. Accordingly, Matrioptila Ross, 1938; Poeciloptila Schmid, 1991; Temburongpsyche Malicky, 1992; and Nepaloptila Kimmins, 1964, are designated new junior synonyms of Padunia Martynov, 1910. Addition-ally, the endemic Caribbean genera Campsiophora Flint, 1964, and Cubanoptila Sykora, 1973, are designated new junior synonyms of Cariboptila Flint, 1964. Diagnoses and a key to the subfamilies of Glossosomatidae and world genera of Protoptilinae incorporating these taxonomic changes are provided.

  2. Protein complex interactor analysis and differential activity of KDM3 subfamily members towards H3K9 methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brauchle

    Full Text Available Histone modifications play an important role in chromatin organization and gene regulation, and their interpretation is referred to as epigenetic control. The methylation levels of several lysine residues in histone tails are tightly controlled, and JmjC domain-containing proteins are one class of broadly expressed enzymes catalyzing methyl group removal. However, several JmjC proteins remain uncharacterized, gaps persist in understanding substrate recognition, and the integration of JmjC proteins into signaling pathways is just emerging. The KDM3 subfamily is an evolutionarily conserved group of histone demethylase proteins, thought to share lysine substrate specificity. Here we use a systematic approach to compare KDM3 subfamily members. We show that full-length KDM3A and KDM3B are H3K9me1/2 histone demethylases whereas we fail to observe histone demethylase activity for JMJD1C using immunocytochemical and biochemical approaches. Structure-function analyses revealed the importance of a single amino acid in KDM3A implicated in the catalytic activity towards H3K9me1/2 that is not conserved in JMJD1C. Moreover, we use quantitative proteomic analyses to identify subsets of the interactomes of the 3 proteins. Specific interactor candidates were identified for each of the three KDM3 subfamily members. Importantly, we find that SCAI, a known transcriptional repressor, interacts specifically with KDM3B. Taken together, we identify substantial differences in the biology of KDM3 histone demethylases, namely enzymatic activity and protein-protein interactions. Such comparative approaches pave the way to a better understanding of histone demethylase specificity and protein function at a systems level and are instrumental in identifying the more subtle differences between closely related proteins.

  3. Members of rice plasma membrane intrinsic proteins subfamily are involved in arsenite permeability and tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Mcdermott, Joseph; Liu, Zijuan; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2012-12-01

    Rice accumulates high level of arsenic (As) in its edible parts and thus plays an important role in the transfer of As into the food chain. However, the mechanisms of As uptake and its detoxification in rice are not well understood. Recently, members of the Nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of plant aquaporins were shown to transport arsenite in rice and Arabidopsis. Here we report that members of the rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are also involved in As tolerance and transport. Based on the homology search with the mammalian AQP9 and yeast Fps1 arsenite transporters, we identified and cloned five rice PIP gene subfamily members. qRT-PCR analysis of PIPs in rice root and shoot tissues revealed a significant down regulation of transcripts encoding OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3, OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in response to arsenite treatment. Heterologous expression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of arsenite. Overexpression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Arabidopsis yielded enhanced arsenite tolerance and higher biomass accumulation. Further, these transgenic plants showed no significant accumulation of As in shoot and root tissues in long term uptake assays. Whereas, short duration exposure to arsenite caused both active influx and efflux of As in the roots. The data suggests a bidirectional arsenite permeability of rice PIPs in plants. These rice PIPs genes will be highly useful for engineering important food and biofuel crops for enhanced crop productivity on contaminated soils without increasing the accumulation of toxic As in the biomass or edible tissues.

  4. Alu Sb2 subfamily is present in all higher primates but was most succesfully amplified in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richer, C.; Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D. [Universite de Montreal, Que (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Alu repeats can be classified into subfamilies which amplified in primate genomes at different evolutionary time periods. A young Alu subfamily, Sb2, with a characteristic 7-nucleotide duplication at position 256, has been described in seven human loci. An Sb2 insertion found near the HD gene was unique to two HD families, indicating that Sb2 was still retropositionally active. Here, we have shown that the Sb2 insertion in the CHOL locus was similarly rare, being absent in 120 individuals of Caucasian, Oriental and Black origin. In contrast, Sb2 inserts in five other loci were found fixed (non-polymorphic), based on measurements in the same population sample, but absent from orthologous positions in higher apes. This suggest that Sb2 repeats spread relatively early in the human lineage following divergence from other primates and that these elements may be human-specific. By quantitative PCR, we investigated the presence of Sb2 sequences in different primate DNA, using one PCR primer anchored at the 5{prime} Alu-end and the other complementary to the duplicated Sb2-specific segment. With an Sb2-containing plasmid as a standard, we estimated the number of Sb2 repeats at 1500-1800 copies per human haploid equivalent; corresponding numbers in chimpanzee and gorilla were almost two orders of magnitude lower, while the signal observed in orangutan and gibbon DNAs was consistent with the presence of a single copy. The analysis of 22 human, 11 chimpanzee and 10 gorilla sequences indicates that the Alu Sb2 dispersed independently in these three primate lineages; gorilla consensus differs from the human Sb2 sequence by one position, while all chimpanzee repeats have their linker expanded by up to eight A-residues. Should they be thus considered as separate subfamilies? It is possible that sequence modifications with respect to the human consensus are responsible for poor retroposition of Sb2 in apes.

  5. New insights into evolutionary relationships within the subfamily Lamioideae (Lamiaceae) based on pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tilottama; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2015-10-01

    Lamioideae, one of the most species-rich subfamilies within Lamiaceae, exhibits a remarkable diversity in morphology and habit and is found in many temperate to subtropical regions across the globe. Previous studies based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence data produced a tribal classification of Lamioideae, but so far this has not been confirmed with nuclear DNA loci. We investigated sequence variation in a low-copy nuclear pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) region and compared the phylogenetic results with previously published sequence data from a concatenated data set comprising four cpDNA loci. We incorporated representatives of all 10 lamioid tribes and some unclassified taxa, analyzed the data using phylogenetic inference, and estimated divergence times and ancestral areas for major nodes. Our results showed overall topological similarities between the cpDNA and PPR phylogenies with strong support for most tribes. However, we also observed incongruence in the circumscription of some tribes, including Gomphostemmateae and Pogostemoneae and in the relationships among tribes. Our results suggest an Oligocene-Miocene origin of the Lamioideae crown group. Asia and the Mediterranean region appear to have been centers of diversity and place of origin for many lamioid tribes. This study represents the first phylogeny of subfamily Lamioideae inferred from low-copy nuclear DNA data. We show that most lamioid tribes are corroborated, although the exact circumscription of two tribes is questioned. We have shed further light on the evolutionary relationships within Lamioideae, and this study demonstrates the utility of the PPR region for such subfamilial-level phylogenetic studies. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  6. Structural variations of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec Type IVa in Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 8 and unrelated lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Boye, Kit

    2011-01-01

    PCR mapping of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IVa and adjacent mobile elements in 94 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains identified two primary structures (A and B) that could be further classified into two (A1 and A2) and five (B1 to B5) variants, primarily...... based on structural differences in the orfX-J3 region. While spa type t008 (USA300) invariably contained the A variants, other spa types belonging to clonal complex 8 and unrelated lineages generally contained B variants. These findings have important implications for the typing and identification...

  7. The lysis cassette of bacteriophage ϕKMV encodes a signal-arrest-release endolysin and a pinholin

    OpenAIRE

    Briers, Yves; Peeters, Liesbet M; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The lysis cassette of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage ϕKMV encodes a holin, endolysin, Rz and Rz1 in the canonical order. It has a tight organization with a high degree of overlapping genes and is highly conserved (between 96 and 100% identity at the protein level) among several other members of the “phiKMV-like viruses.” The endolysin KMV45 exhibits characteristics as expected for a signal-arrest-release (SAR) endolysin, whereas the holin KMV44 is a typical pinholin. KMV45 is initially secreted...

  8. Sea snakes in Australian waters (Serpentes: subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae)—a review with an updated identification key

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Sanders, Kate Laura; Guinea, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Sea snakes (Elapidae, subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae) reach high species richness in the South China Sea and in the Australian region; however, most countries in the two regions still lack up-to-date checklists and identification tools for these snakes. We present an updated reviewed...... checklist and a new complete identification key to sea snakes in Australian waters. The identification key includes 29 species documented and 4 possibly occurring taxa and is based mostly on easy-to-use external characters. We find no evidence for breeding populations of Laticauda in Australian waters...

  9. Sea snakes in Australian waters (Serpentes: subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae)--a review with an updated identification key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Arne Redsted; Sanders, Kate Laura; Guinea, Michael L; Amey, Andrew P

    2014-10-02

    Sea snakes (Elapidae, subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae) reach high species richness in the South China Sea and in the Australian region; however, most countries in the two regions still lack up-to-date checklists and identification tools for these snakes. We present an updated reviewed checklist and a new complete identification key to sea snakes in Australian waters. The identification key includes 29 species documented and 4 possibly occurring taxa and is based mostly on easy-to-use external characters. We find no evidence for breeding populations of Laticauda in Australian waters, but include the genus on the list of possibly occurring taxa. 

  10. [Differentiation of spa types and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated in medical sites of Gdańsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzyk, Joanna; Piechowicz, Lidia; Wiśniewska, Katarzyna; Dziewit, Łukasz; Bronk, Marek; Świeć, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are one of the key etiological factors of hospital-acquired and community-acquired infections. MRSA strains have an ability of causing a broad spectrum infections: from a relatively mild skin infections to severe life-threatening systemic infections. They are characterized by multi-drug resistance, virulence of a number of factors, may clonally spread within the hospitals and between hospitals. The study embraced a number of 75 isolates of MRSA isolated from patients of 7 medical sites of the Gdansk region within the period of six months (June to December 2013). Strains have derived from various clinical materials, both of hospitalized patients (n=59) and outpatient (n=16). The isolates were tested for the susceptibility to antimicrobial agents accordance with the guidelines EUCAST. To estimate of the variability of occurrence of S. aureus clones used were standard spa gene, consisting in the amplified polymorphic region of the X gene encoding the protein A gene (spa). After receiving the results, a spa types were identified using international database Ridom Spa Server (www.spaserver.ridom.de). To determine the polymorphism cassette carrying the inecA gene from MRSA strains, used typing five major chromosomal cassette SCCmec (I-V) by multiplex PCR. MRSA population genetic analysis carried out on the basis of typing SCCmec cassettes and spa gene has showed a predominance of strains with SCCmec type II casette (46.7%) and SCCmec IV casette (38.7%). Less frequently detected were strains containing SCCmec I cassette (12.0%) and SCCmec III cassette (2.6%). Spa typing revealed the presence of 13 gene types in MRSA. The most frequently observed spa types were: t151 (24.0%), t003 (16.0%) in strains of the SCCmec II cassette and t437 (16.0%) and t008 (14.8%) in the isolates with SCCmec cassette IV, whereas staphylococcus with the type of spa t011 (12.0%) had SCCmec cassette I. In our population most frequent strains

  11. Markiana nigripinnis (Perugia, 1891 as a putative member of the subfamily Stevardiinae (Characiformes: Characidae: spermatic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarianna Martins Baicere-Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Markiana was until recently recognized as incertae sedis in the family Characidae, even though alternative placements for this genus have been advanced since its original description. More recently, it was hypothesized that Markiana nigripinnis is part of a clade informally named the Astyanax clade, indicating the putative close relationship of Markiana with the genus Astyanax. Examination of sperm ultrastructure of representatives of Astyanax and M. nigripinnis shows no evidence for this hypothesized close relationship. Rather, the spermatozoa of M. nigripinnis share characters found in spermatozoa of the non-inseminating members of the subfamily Stevardiinae, such as an angle of nuclear rotation equal to 85º resulting in a lateral position of the double nuclear fossa and flagellum. As with the non-inseminating Stevardiinae, sperm nuclei are also slightly elongate toward the flagellum, the proximal centriole is partially inside the nuclear fossa and anterior and oblique to the distal centriole, and the midpiece is short and strongly asymmetric. Additionally, M. nigripinnis shares with the other members of the Stevardiinae the presence of only four teeth in the inner row of the premaxillary and a short triangular ectopterygoid, which is never more than twice the length of the palatine.O gênero Markiana até recentemente foi reconhecido como incertae sedis na família Characidae, apesar da localização alternativa para este gênero desde sua descrição original. Mais recentemente, surgiu a hipótese de que Markiana nigripinnis faz parte de um clado chamado informalmente de "Astyanax clade", indicando a suposta relação de Markiana com o gênero Astyanax. A análise da ultraestrutura dos espermatozoides de representantes do gênero Astyanax e M. nigripinnis não mostra nenhuma evidência de estreita relação. Pelo contrário, os espermatozóides de M. nigripinnis compartilham o padrão encontrado nos espermatozoides dos membros n

  12. Isolation of an ABA Transporter-Like 1 Gene from Arachis hypogaea That Affects ABA Import and Reduces ABA Sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Kui; Liu, Xing; Li, Xiaoyun; Hu, Bo; Li, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) transporters are essential for the transport of ABA from its sites of synthesis to its multiple sites of action within plants and are key players in plant stress responses. Despite their importance, there is limited information on ABA transporters in crop plants. In this study, we isolated and characterized an ABA transporter-like 1 (AhATL1) gene from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) whose cognate protein, AhATL1, is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter G subfamily and localizes to the plasma membrane. The expression of both the AhATL1 transcript and the corresponding protein were upregulated by water stress and treatment with exogenous ABA. Overexpression of AhATL1 in ecotype Columbia (Col) Arabidopsis (AhATL1-OX) plants reduced ABA sensitivity. When AhATL1-OX and Arabidopsis Col plants were subjected to dehydration stress, the expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 3 (AtNCED3) and responsive to desiccation 29 A (AtRD29A) accumulated rapidly in rosette leaves of both lines. In contrast, while expression of ATP-binding cassette G 40 (AtABCG40) was increased in Col rosette leaves, there was no change in expression of AtABCG40 in AhATL1-OX leaves. Similarly, water loss from detached leaves of AhATL1-OX plants was more rapid than from Col leaves. Therefore, we suggest that the function of AhATL1 is probably to modulate ABA sensitivity by specifically influencing ABA import into cells.

  13. Concept design of the DEMO divertor cassette-to-vacuum vessel locking system adopting a systems engineering approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gironimo, G., E-mail: giuseppe.digironimo@unina.it [Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80135 Napoli (Italy); Carfora, D. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tekniikankatu 1, PO Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80135 Napoli (Italy); Esposito, G.; Lanzotti, A.; Marzullo, D. [Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80135 Napoli (Italy); Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tekniikankatu 1, PO Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • An iterative and incremental design process for cassette-to-VV locking system of DEMO divertor is presented. • Three different concepts have been developed with a systematic design approach. • The final concept has been selected with Fuzzy-Analytic Hierarchy Process in virtual reality. - Abstract: This paper deals with pre-concept studies of DEMO divertor cassette-to-vacuum vessel locking system under the work program WP13-DAS-07-T06: Divertor Remote Maintenance System pre-concept study. An iterative design process, consistent with Systems Engineering guidelines and named Iterative and Participative Axiomatic Design Process (IPADeP), is used in this paper to propose new innovative solutions for divertor locking system, which can overcome the difficulties in applying the ITER principles to DEMO. The solutions conceived have been analysed from the structural point of view using the software Ansys and, eventually, evaluated using the methodology known as Fuzzy-Analytic Hierarchy Process. Due to the lack and the uncertainty of the requirements in this early conceptual design stage, the aim is to cover a first iteration of an iterative and incremental process to propose an innovative design concept to be developed in more details as the information will be completed.

  14. A homing endonuclease and the 50-nt ribosomal bypass sequence of phage T4 constitute a mobile DNA cassette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonocora, Richard P.; Zeng, Qinglu; Abel, Ethan V.; Shub, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Since its initial description more than two decades ago, the ribosome bypass (or “hop”) sequence of phage T4 stands out as a uniquely extreme example of programmed translational frameshifting. The gene for a DNA topoisomerase subunit of T4 has been split by a 1-kb insertion into two genes that retain topoisomerase function. A second 50-nt insertion, beginning with an in-phase stop codon, is inserted near the start of the newly created downstream gene 60. Instead of terminating at this stop codon, approximately half of the ribosomes skip 50 nucleotides and continue translation in a new reading frame. However, no functions, regulatory or otherwise, have been imputed for the truncated peptide that results from termination at codon 46 or for the bypass sequence itself. Moreover, how this unusual mRNA organization arose and why it is maintained have never been explained. We show here that a homing endonuclease (MobA) is encoded in the insertion that created gene 60, and the mobA gene together with the bypass sequence constitute a mobile DNA cassette. The bypass sequence provides protection against self-cleavage by the nuclease, whereas the nuclease promotes horizontal spread of the entire cassette to related bacteriophages. Group I introns frequently provide protection against self-cleavage by associated homing endonucleases. We present a scenario by which the bypass sequence, which is otherwise a unique genetic element, might have been derived from a degenerate group I intron. PMID:21930924

  15. Emergence of a multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii ST8 harboring an unusual VIM-4 gene cassette in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Piotr; Wieczorek, Piotr; Łapuć, Izabela; Ojdana, Dominika; Sieńko, Anna; Sacha, Paweł; Kłoczko, Janusz; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2017-08-01

    The growing incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria is an emerging challenge in modern medicine. The utility of carbapenems, which are considered 'last-line' agents, is being diminished by the growing incidence of various resistance mechanisms in Gram-negative bacteria. A molecular investigation was performed of an MDR carbapenem-resistant Citrobacter freundii of sequence type 8 (ST8) isolated from a hematology patient with acute myeloid leukemia. Multilocus sequence typing and analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the class I integron were performed using PCR and Sanger sequencing. Transformation of the resistance plasmid isolated following the alkaline lysis method was performed using chemically competent E. coli TOP10. Molecular analysis of the carbapenem-resistant C. freundii revealed the presence of the VIM-4 isoenzyme located on the ∼55-kb transferable resistance plasmid. Interestingly, the blaVIM-4 gene was inserted into an unusual gene cassette containing a 169-bp direct repeat of the 3' segment of the blaVIM-4 gene. All unusual gene cassettes containing VIM-DR (direct repeat) described thus far have been harbored by non-fermenters, i.e., Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas, underscoring the importance of resistance determinant mobility, which may go even beyond genus, family, and order boundaries. Great efforts need to be taken to explore pathways of resistance to 'last-resort' antimicrobials, especially among clinically relevant pathogens. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The First Mitochondrial Genome for the Fishfly Subfamily Chauliodinae and Implications for the Higher Phylogeny of Megaloptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyu; Liu, Xingyue; Winterton, Shaun L.; Yang, Ding

    2012-01-01

    Megaloptera are a basal holometabolous insect order with larvae exclusively predacious and aquatic. The evolutionary history of Megaloptera attracts great interest because of its antiquity and important systematic status in Holometabola. However, due to the difficulties identifying morphological apomorphies for the group, controversial hypotheses on the monophyly and higher phylogeny of Megaloptera have been proposed. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of a fishfly species, Neochauliodes punctatolosus Liu & Yang, 2006, representing the first mt genome of the subfamily Chauliodinae. A phylogenomic analysis was carried out based on the mt genomic sequences of 13 mt protein-coding genes (PCGs) and two rRNA genes of nine Neuropterida species, comprising all three orders of Neuropterida and all families and subfamilies of Megaloptera. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly support the monophyly of Megaloptera, which was recovered as the sister of Neuroptera. Within Megaloptera, the sister relationship between Corydalinae and Chauliodinae was corroborated. The divergence time estimation suggests that stem lineage of Neuropterida and Coleoptera separated in the Early Permian. The interordinal divergence within Neuropterida might have occurred in the Late Permian. PMID:23056623

  17. Structural and Functional Elucidation of Peptide Ts11 Shows Evidence of a Novel Subfamily of Scorpion Venom Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Cremonez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, several families of peptide toxins specifically interacting with ion channels in scorpion venom have been described. One of these families comprise peptide toxins (called KTxs, known to modulate potassium channels. Thus far, 202 KTxs have been reported, belonging to several subfamilies of KTxs (called α, β, γ, κ, δ, and λ-KTxs. Here we report on a previously described orphan toxin from Tityus serrulatus venom, named Ts11. We carried out an in-depth structure-function analysis combining 3D structure elucidation of Ts11 and electrophysiological characterization of the toxin. The Ts11 structure is highlighted by an Inhibitor Cystine Knot (ICK type scaffold, completely devoid of the classical secondary structure elements (α-helix and/or β-strand. This has, to the best of our knowledge, never been described before for scorpion toxins and therefore represents a novel, 6th type of structural fold for these scorpion peptides. On the basis of their preferred interaction with voltage-gated K channels, as compared to all the other targets tested, it can be postulated that Ts11 is the first member of a new subfamily, designated as ε-KTx.

  18. The first mitochondrial genome for the fishfly subfamily Chauliodinae and implications for the higher phylogeny of Megaloptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyu Wang

    Full Text Available Megaloptera are a basal holometabolous insect order with larvae exclusively predacious and aquatic. The evolutionary history of Megaloptera attracts great interest because of its antiquity and important systematic status in Holometabola. However, due to the difficulties identifying morphological apomorphies for the group, controversial hypotheses on the monophyly and higher phylogeny of Megaloptera have been proposed. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial (mt genome of a fishfly species, Neochauliodes punctatolosus Liu & Yang, 2006, representing the first mt genome of the subfamily Chauliodinae. A phylogenomic analysis was carried out based on the mt genomic sequences of 13 mt protein-coding genes (PCGs and two rRNA genes of nine Neuropterida species, comprising all three orders of Neuropterida and all families and subfamilies of Megaloptera. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly support the monophyly of Megaloptera, which was recovered as the sister of Neuroptera. Within Megaloptera, the sister relationship between Corydalinae and Chauliodinae was corroborated. The divergence time estimation suggests that stem lineage of Neuropterida and Coleoptera separated in the Early Permian. The interordinal divergence within Neuropterida might have occurred in the Late Permian.

  19. [DNA fingerprinting of individual species and intergeneric and interspecific hybrids of genera Bos and Bison, subfamily Bovinae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V A; Steklenev, E P; Morozova, E V; Semenova, S K

    2002-04-01

    Genome fingerprinting with a hypervariable minisatellite sequence of phage M13 DNA was used to study the genetic variation in individual species of the genera Bos and Bison (subfamily Bovinae) and in their interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. DNA fingerprints were obtained for domestic cow Bos taurus primigenius, vatussy Bos taurus macroceros, banteng Bos javanicus, gaur Bos gaurus, wisent Bison bonasus, bison Bison bison, and for the interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. Compared with the original species, most hybrids showed a greater variation in number and size of hybridization fragments. An association was revealed between the number of hybridization fragments and blood composition of interspecific hybrids resulting from unique crossing of domestic cow and banteng. Pairwise similarity coefficients were calculated to construct a dendrogram of genetic similarity, which reflected the relationships between the parental species and hybrids varying in blood composition. The applicability of the method for identifying interspecific and intergeneric hybrids and for studying the consequences of distant hybridization in the subfamily Bovinae is discussed.

  20. Checklist of helminth parasites of Goodeinae (Osteichthyes: Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae), an endemic subfamily of freshwater fishes from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Mendoza-Palmero, Carlos A; Aguilar-Aguilar, Rogelio; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2014-08-22

    From August 2008 to July 2010, 1,471 fish belonging to the subfamily Goodeinae (representing 28 species) were collected from 47 localities across central Mexico and analyzed for helminth parasites. In addition, a database with all available published accounts of the helminth parasite fauna of goodeines was assembled. Based on both sources of information, a checklist containing all the records was compiled as a necessary first step to address future questions in the areas of ecology, evolutionary biology and biogeography of this host-parasite association. The checklist is presented in two tables, a parasite-host list and a host-parasite list. The checklist contains 51 nominal species, from 34 genera and 26 families of helminth parasites. It includes 8 species of adult digeneans, 9 metacercarie, 6 monogeneans, 3 adult cestodes, 9 metacestodes, 1 adult acanthocephalan, 1 cystacanth, 6 adult nematodes and 8 larval nematodes. Based on the amount of information contained in the checklist, we pose that goodeines, a subfamily of viviparous freshwater fishes endemic to central Mexico, might be regarded as the first group of wildlife vertebrate for which a complete inventory of their helminth parasite fauna has been completed.