WorldWideScience

Sample records for atopic dermatitis

  1. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood...... may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural history, clinical features, and treatment of atopic dermatitis....

  2. Atopic dermatitis - children - homecare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantile eczema; Dermatitis - atopic children; Eczema - atopic - children ... child's provider what kind is right for your child. Atopic dermatitis is usually treated with medicines placed directly on ...

  3. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Annette; Bjerke, Torbjørn; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2004-01-01

    to focus on this phenotype, and specific susceptibility genes remain to be found. To identify candidate regions holding genes for atopic dermatitis we performed a genome-scan in Danish affected sib-pair families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype definition of both clinical atopic dermatitis...... and confirmed specific allergy. The scan was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers and non-parametric linkage results were obtained from the MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. We found evidence of linkage to three candidate regions in chromosomes 3p (MLS=2.14), 4p (MLS=2.00) and 18q (MLS=2.25), one of which...

  4. Atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Wade

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic skin disorder that can significantly impact the quality of life of affected individuals as well as their families. Although the pathogenesis of the disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. There are no specific diagnostic tests for AD; therefore, the diagnosis is based on specific clinical criteria that take into account the patient’s history and clinical manifestations. Successful management of the disorder requires a multifaceted approach that involves education, optimal skin care practices, anti-inflammatory treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs, the use of first-generation antihistamines to help manage sleep disturbances, and the treatment of skin infections. Systemic corticosteroids may also be used, but are generally reserved for the acute treatment of severe flare-ups. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line pharmacologic treatments for AD, and evidence suggests that these agents may also be beneficial for the prophylaxis of disease flare-ups. Although the prognosis for patients with AD is generally favourable, those patients with severe, widespread disease and concomitant atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, are likely to experience poorer outcomes.

  5. [Atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    1994-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial skin disease with a chronic or a chronic-relapsing course which often starts during infancy. The persistence rate of AD after the puberty is certainly higher than mostly assumed. 60% of the patients also develop respiratory atopies as hay fever or bronchial asthma. The etiology of this distressing skin condition is still obscure, but an immunological disturbance of the T-cell immune response is most probably implicated in its pathogenesis. The demonstration of IgE-bearing epidermal Langerhans cells with high-affinity receptors for IgE opens up new perspectives in its pathophysiology. As no efficient treatment of AD is known and a symptomatic treatment, local with emolients, corticosteroids and/or disinfectants as well as internal with antihistamines, is often difficult and unsatisfactory, prevention is of particular importance. The efficacy of prolonged breast-feeding, a strict prohibition of cow milk, egg, fish--during the first six months of life--and of keeping pets as well as a consequent treatment against house-dust mites can reduce the incidence of AD in 'at risk' children with a family history of atopy. Besides symptomatic treatment a substitution of essential fatty acids, a UV therapy and a climate therapy are other possible approaches in the management of such patients.

  6. Allergens in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y-S

    2007-12-01

    Allergens play an essential role in atopic dermatitis, either intrinsic or extrinsic. They provoke cutaneous inflammation via IgE-dependent and cell-mediated immune reactions. Food allergens have a well-known contribution to disease activity of atopic dermatitis, especially in infants and young children. However, the importance of inhaled allergens is still under investigation. For clinical implication, identification of individualized allergens is an ideal strategy for better control of atopic dermatitis and avoidance of atopic march. The aim of this article is to discuss the common allergens in atopic dermatitis (AD), the specificity and sensitivity of laboratory tests for allergens, and the clinical effect of various preventions.

  7. Atopic dermatitis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000418.htm Atopic dermatitis - self-care To use the sharing features on ... skin disorder characterized by scaly and itchy rashes. Atopic dermatitis is the most common type. Atopic dermatitis is ...

  8. Atopic dermatitis: professional orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimat, Paul; Boughattas, Wided; Even, Dorothée

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is often exacerbated by the working environment. In order to reduce the risk of allergy, young people must receive better medical guidance when they choose a career. This is all the more relevant for young atopic patients.

  9. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  10. Atopic dermatitis 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    No, Daniel J; Amin, Mina; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago.......Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago....

  11. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed...... opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor...... atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis...

  12. Itch in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Furue, Masutaka; Ulzii, Dugarmaa; Nakahara, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic itch in inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, markedly diminishes the quality of life of affected individuals. Comprehensive progress has been made in understanding itch signaling and associated mediators in the skin, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and central nervous system, which may amplify or suppress atopic itch. Conventional therapies for atopic dermatitis are capable of reducing atopic itch; however, most patients are not satisfied with the antipruritic capacity of conventional treatments. Exploring itch pathways and mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for atopic itch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathie Page, Sarah; Weston, Stephanie; Loh, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a frequent reason for presentation to general practice. A large number of children are affected by this condition and its treatment can cause significant anxiety for parents. The role of the general practitioner (GP) is to provide advice and allay concerns regarding conventional and alternative treatments. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of atopic dermatitis management in children in the general practice setting. This article also reviews when it is necessary to refer to specialists, the evidence for management and the link to allergies. Prescribing topical steroids to young children with atopic dermatitis involves a thorough understanding of this condition. Achieving treatment compliance partly involves providing adequate explanation to parents in order to reduce their concerns regarding the long-term side effects of topical corticosteroids. Making GPs confident and knowledgeable about atopic dermatitis will make the interaction between the practitioner, families and children more rewarding.

  14. Comorbidities of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review article, we summarize the current evidence about atopic dermatitis (AD)-associated comorbidities, beyond the traditional atopic and allergic conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Patients with AD may have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, certain malignancies...

  15. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a mouse (left) shows no ... that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema. The finding ...

  16. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2011-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2009 (ADGL2009” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle.

  17. Omalizumab for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper Grønlund; Agner, Tove; Sand, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE, registered for the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria and severe allergic asthma. We present a case series of nine patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated off-label with omalizumab...

  18. Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize...

  19. Microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Claire E; McShane, Diana B; Gilligan, Peter H; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with drastic impacts on pediatric health. The pathogenesis of this common disease is not well understood, and the complex role of the skin microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of atopic dermatitis is being elucidated. Skin commensal organisms promote normal immune system functions and prevent the colonization of pathogens. Alterations in the skin microbiome may lead to increased Staphylococcus aureus colonization and atopic dermatitis progression. Despite the evidence for their important role, probiotics have not been deemed efficacious for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, although studies suggest that probiotics may be effective at preventing the development of atopic dermatitis when given to young infants. This review will cover the most recent published work on the microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Prevention of atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Hywel C.; Chalmers, Joanne R; Simpson, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis now affects one in five children, and may progress to asthma and hay fever. In the absence of effective treatments that influence disease progression, prevention is a highly desirable goal. The evidence for most existing disease prevention strategies, such as avoidance of allergens and dietary interventions, has been unconvincing and inconsistent. Fresh approaches to prevention include trying to induce tolerance to allergens in early life, and enhancing the defective skin ba...

  1. Immunology of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piloto Valdés, L J; Valdés Sánchez, A F; Gómez Echevarría, A H

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-two adult patients with atopic dermatitis were studied at the Allergology Service of the "Hnos. Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital. The diagnosis was established following the criteria of Hanifin and Lobitz. A detailed medical history was written for the patients; the study of some immunological parameters, such as the serum immunoglobulin quantification, delayed skin tests with a battery of antigens, and the spontaneous rosette-test, was also carried out. Almost all the patients showed serum IgE values above 150 UI, by means of the ELISA test modified by C.E.N.I.C. The mean values of the spontaneous rosette-test were low; this was more noticeable during the exacerbation period of the lesions. Candida sp, Mantoux and Streptokinase-Streptodornase antigens showed negative results in a high proportion of patients with atopic dermatitis, in relation with the control group. In atopic dermatitis, there are humoral disorders of immunity; this was demonstrated in our group by increased values of IgE and cellular disorders due to skin anergy, and to a low percentage of rosette forming cells; this does not allow to state that these phenomena have an active participation in the etiopathogenesis of this entity.

  2. New insights into atopic dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leung, Donald Y M; Boguniewicz, Mark; Howell, Michael D; Nomura, Ichiro; Hamid, Qutayba A

    2004-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with cutaneous hyperreactivity to environmental triggers and is often the first step in the atopic march that results in asthma and allergic rhinitis...

  3. Atopic Dermatitis and Homeopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Chukwudi Nwabudike

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, relapsing disorder of the skin associated with allergen sensitization and impaired barrier function. There is often a family history of pruritic skin disease or asthma.Materials and Methods: Three cases of atopic dermatitis treated with homeopathy are presented. Case 1 is a case of a 22-year-old female, with AD since early childhood, which had not responded to standard topical therapy. She received several homeopathic medicines, with transitory effect until she finally received the medicine Aurum metallicum, at M potency. At present, 1 year after cessation of treatment, she remains lesion-free. Case 2 is a case of a 10-month-old baby with a an 8-month history of itchy rash and poor sleep, that had failed to respond to treatment. The patient was given the homeopathic medicine Lachesis at C30 potency and responded. The rashes receded and the patient was able to sleep better at night. Case 3 is a case of an 11-month-old boy with a 3-month history of itchy rash, diagnosed as having AD and treated with topical steroids. After 3 months of unsuccessful treatment, the patient was brought in for homeopathic therapy. He received the homeopathic medicine Lachesis, at C30 potency. He improved under this treatment and is currently lesion-free, 6 months after cessation of treatment.Conclusions: Three cases of atopic dermatitis that failed to respond to treatment were given homeopathic therapy and responded adequately. The patients remained free of lesions even after cessation of treatment.

  4. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Microbiome in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting ~10–20% of the general population. AD is characterized by disturbances in epidermal barrier function and hyperactive immune response. Recently, changes in the skin and intestinal microbiome have been analyzed in more detail. The available data suggest a link between disturbed skin microbiome and course of the disease. Flares of the disease are associated with an expansion of Staphylococcus aureus on lesional skin and a substantial loss of biodiversity in skin microbiome. Staphylococci exoproteins and superantigens evoke inflammatory reactions in the host. Skin microbiome includes superficial stratum corneum that is affected by environmental factors such as exposure to germs and cleansing. Available evidence argues for a link between epidermal barrier impairment and disturbances in skin microbiome in AD. In contrast to skin microbiome, intestinal microbiome seems to become stabilized after infancy. There is also a significant heritable component for intestinal microbiome. The microbial taxa, relative percentages and quantities vary remarkably between the different parts of the intestinal tract. Early intestinal microbial colonization may be a critical step for prevention of further development of AD. Skin barrier-aimed topical treatments help to develop a neo-microbiome from deeper compartments. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics have been investigated for the treatment of AD, but further investigations are needed. Targeted treatment options to normalize skin and intestinal microbiome in AD are under investigation. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, microbiome, staphylococci, skin, intestine, antimicrobial peptides

  6. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Darsow (U.); A. Wollenberg (A.); D. Simon; A. Taieb; T. Werfel; A.P. Oranje (Arnold); C. Gelmetti (C.); Ã. Svensson (Ãke); M. Deleuran (M.); A.M. Calza; F. Giusti; J. Lübbe (Jann); S. Seidenari (Stefania); J. Ring (J.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDifficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for

  7. [Atopic dermatitis: pathophysiology update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Alain

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is very common in industrialized countries, where it affects 15% to 30% of children and 2% to 10% of adults. AD has a complex determinism, combining environmental influences and genetic predisposition, hitherto dominated by an immunological perspective, particularly after the discovery of associated high IgE serum levels. DA is a possible mode of onset of asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergies, resulting in the poorly understood "atopic march". The discovery of mutations in the filaggrin gene, a key protein for stratum corneum maturation, have refocused attention on the skin and operated a Copernican revolution in our understanding of this group of disorders. AD has become a prototype of inflammatory epithelial barrier diseases. The epidermal barrier has three major elements: the stratum corneum, which provides an air-liquid barrier, tight junctions in the granular layer (liquid-liquid barrier), and Langerhans cells that capture antigens (immunological barrier). Better knowledge of the molecular events underlying epidermal barrier function and its dysfunction in AD should lead to ways of preventing and eventually curing this group of disorders.

  8. Retrospective Study: Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Sihaloho, Kristina; Indramaya, Diah Mira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronically and relapsing inflammatory skin disease affecting individuals with atopic history or their families. Atopic dermatitis affects all ageswith percentage 15-30% in children and 1-2% in adults. Chronic pruritus, skin infection, sleep disorder, and growth disorder are signs and symptomps commonly found in childhood atopic dermatitis. Evaluation of the profile and management of DA were needed to improve the management of atopic dermatitis. Purpose:To e...

  9. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Ricci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated around 5-15% in European countries. AD persists from childhood through adolescence in around 40% of cases and some risk factors have been identified: female sex, sensitization to inhalant and food allergens, allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, the practice of certain jobs. During adolescence, AD mainly appears on the face and neck, often associated with overinfection by Malassezia, and on the palms and soles. AD persistence during adolescence is correlated with psychological diseases such as anxiety; moreover, adolescents affected by AD might have problems in the relationship with their peers. Stress and the psychological problems represent a serious burden for adolescents with AD and cause a significant worsening of the patients’ quality of life (QoL. The pharmacological treatment is similar to other age groups. Educational and psychological approaches should be considered in the most severe cases.

  10. Dermatitis, atopic on the legs (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are caused by an inherited allergic condition called atopic dermatitis. Many of these areas have been scratched until ... infection triggering and perpetuating the problem. In adults, atopic dermatitis frequently involves the body creases, such as inside ...

  11. Dermatitis, atopic on the arms (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This person has inherited allergic skin inflammation (atopic dermatitis) on the arms. Red (erythematous), scaly plaques can be seen on the inside of the elbows (antecubital fossa). In adults, atopic dermatitis usually ...

  12. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S

    2016-01-01

    terms for AD. METHODS: A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. RESULTS: In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only...... 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD...... was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals...

  13. Psychological interventions in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Jan P. C.

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease that places a large burden on patients and their families. It is characterized as a chronic inflammatory disease that most commonly begins in early childhood. Prevalence is high, especially in children, and increases in western countries. Originally,

  14. Genetics Home Reference: atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DY. Filaggrin mutations associated with skin and allergic diseases. N Engl J Med. 2011 Oct 6;365(14):1315-27. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra1011040. Review. Citation on PubMed Liang Y, Chang C, Lu Q. The Genetics and Epigenetics of Atopic Dermatitis-Filaggrin and Other Polymorphisms. Clin ...

  15. The history of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Owen N; Strom, Mark A; Ladizinski, Barry; Lio, Peter A

    Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the suspected historical precursors of this disease and reported treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2017-04-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the “Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016” together with those for other allergic diseases.

  17. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2014-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  18. Evolving Concepts in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidbury, Robert; Khorsand, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in the field of atopic dermatitis in the past 5 years. We will explore developments in burden of disease, co-morbidities, pathogenesis, prevention, and management. The tremendous burden moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) places on families from a medical, psychosocial, and financial perspective has been characterized. Epidemiologic studies have identified intriguing new associations beyond the well-characterized "atopic march" of food allergies, asthma, and hay fever. Studies of primary prevention have gained traction including the remarkable impacts of early emollient therapy. Basic advances have simultaneously elucidated the nature of atopic inflammation, setting the stage for an explosion of new potential therapeutic targets. After a fallow period of nearly 15 years without a substantial therapeutic advance, this year has already seen two new FDA-approved treatments for AD. AD has a tremendous impact on quality of life with an underappreciated burden of disease; there are important newly described co-morbidities including ADHD and anemia; new insights into etio-pathogenesis have paved the way for novel topical therapies like crisaborole, and new systemic interventions like dupilumab.

  19. Contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A B; Johansen, J D; Deleuran, M

    2017-01-01

    The importance of contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis is frequently debated. Previously, patients with atopic dermatitis were believed to have a reduced ability to produce a type IV immunological response. However, this belief has been challenged and authors have highlighted the risk...... of underestimating and overlooking allergic contact dermatitis in children with atopic dermatitis. Several studies have been published aiming to shed light on this important question but results are contradictory. To provide an overview of the existing knowledge, we systematically reviewed studies that report...... frequencies of positive patch test reactions in children with atopic dermatitis. We identified 436 manuscripts of which 31 met the inclusion criteria. Although the literature is conflicting, it is evident that contact allergy is a common problem in children with atopic dermatitis....

  20. Clinical management of atopic dermatitis: practical highlights and updates from the atopic dermatitis practice parameter 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Peter A; Lee, Margaret; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Timmons, Karol G; Schneider, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a challenging condition for clinicians and patients. Recent advances were documented in the Atopic Dermatitis Practice Parameter 2012, and we want to provide clinicians with key points from the Atopic Dermatitis Practice Parameter 2012. In this article, we highlight the evidence-based therapy of atopic dermatitis as well as provide practical tips for clinicians and families. An updated review of immunopathology provides a firm basis for patient education and therapy. We also review clinical diagnosis and ways to improve quality of life for patients with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. News from dendritic cells in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäkel, Knut; Hänsel, Anja

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cells are essential for the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, which makes them stay on center stage when studying the immuno pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This review will discuss recent findings on the role of dendritic cells subsets in atopic dermatitis and will report novel findings on how the microenvironment conditions dendritic cells to fuel atopic dermatitis. Several microenvironmental factors characteristic for atopic dermatitis and with direct relevance for the disease have been defined. We now increasingly understand how thymic stromal lymphopoietin and histamine contribute to the disease by modulating the function of dendritic cells. We have learned much about the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis by the studies on inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells. However, the current analysis on the functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of dendritic cells in eczematous skin lesions may lead to the definition of additional dendritic cell types relevant in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. In this respect, it appears interesting to further discuss the parallels and differences in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Understanding the heterogeneity of dendritic cells and their functional alteration by local factors in the inflamed skin will provide essential clues to the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  2. Childhood Atopic Dermatitis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Jen; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Yeh, Kuo-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) appears to have increased dramatically over the past decades. It is generally believed that such rapid increase in prevalence cannot be explained fully by genetic factors. Environmental factors might play a role in such an increment. Children with AD are most likely to suffer considerable school absences, family stress, and health care expenditures. Because the onset of AD occurs relatively early in life, identification of early life risk factors and early management for AD to prevent the development of atopic march are of critical importance. However, there is still no consensus on coordinated prevention and management for AD in Taiwan. In this review, we discuss the specific risk factors of AD and important results of recent articles on AD from Taiwan. The management and prevention strategies of AD for Asian skin are also discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Childhood Atopic Dermatitis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Jen Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD appears to have increased dramatically over the past decades. It is generally believed that such rapid increase in prevalence cannot be explained fully by genetic factors. Environmental factors might play a role in such an increment. Children with AD are most likely to suffer considerable school absences, family stress, and health care expenditures. Because the onset of AD occurs relatively early in life, identification of early life risk factors and early management for AD to prevent the development of atopic march are of critical importance. However, there is still no consensus on coordinated prevention and management for AD in Taiwan. In this review, we discuss the specific risk factors of AD and important results of recent articles on AD from Taiwan. The management and prevention strategies of AD for Asian skin are also discussed.

  4. Patient Burden of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Cathryn; Drucker, Aaron M

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is associated with significant patient burden, with impacts from symptoms and visible physical manifestations of the disease. Consequences include detrimental effects on quality of life (QoL), sleep, self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, participation in leisure and sports, and attendance or performance at school or work. Patients also spend a significant amount of time on treatments and care. Worsening severity of disease appears to be associated with a higher risk of impaired QoL, and pharmacologic and educational interventions that improve disease severity appear to, for the most part, simultaneously improve QoL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastrointestinal disorders in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokaite, Rūta; Labanauskas, Liutauras

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the peculiarities of allergies to food; to determine gastrointestinal disorders, endoscopic signs of mucosal damage and histological lesions of the mucosa and to establish their relation to the extent of atopic dermatitis and its degree of severity. A total of 164 children (86 boys and 78 girls) suffering only from atopic dermatitis were examined. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed using standard diagnostic criteria; extent of disease (the Basic Clinical Scoring System (BCSS)) and the severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index), total serum IgE levels were determined; skin prick and patch tests with the main food allergens were performed. Using questionnaire gastrointestinal disorders with the symptoms of atopic dermatitis were ascertained. In children with atopic dermatitis suffering from chronic dyspepsia esophagealgastroduodenoscopy was performed and biopsy samples from the antrum of the stomach and duodenum were taken. The age of patients ranged from 6 months to 18 years. According to extent of atopic dermatitis and degree of severity localized, mild atopic dermatitis prevailed. Analysis of the changes in total Ig E levels showed different degree of sensitization of the children examined. Considering the type of allergic reaction, immediate-type allergic reactions dominated only in 11.6% of children with atopic dermatitis, whereas delayed-type allergic reactions manifested in 44.5% of children. No food allergy was present in one-fifth of children with atopic dermatitis. One hundred four (63.4%) children complained of gastrointestinal disorders. Of these 104 patients, 17 children (mean age 6.9 years) who underwent esophagealgastroduodenoscopy with biopsy had no pathology; however, histological examination of mucosa revealed eosinophilic infiltration in the gastric antrum and duodenum in three children. The most common gastrointestinal disorders are: abdominal pain vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal distention, and

  6. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  7. Family management of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Dong Hee; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Heejung; Chung, Kyoungmee; Kim, Hee-Soon

    2018-02-22

    To identify the variables that affect family management of childhood atopic dermatitis and establish a prediction model based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent skin disease and common health problem in childhood. It is necessary to use an approach that includes parental factors when considering the effective management of childhood atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study design. A convenience sample, comprising 168 Korean mothers caring for a child with atopic dermatitis under the age of 13, was recruited from the pediatric outpatient departments of two general hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. Data were collected using structured self-reported questionnaires including severity, antecedents, effort, self-efficacy and family management of childhood atopic dermatitis from 1 November 1 2015 - 28 February 28 2016. Descriptive statistics regarding the participants and variables were examined and data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The hypothetical model had an adequate fit to the data, indicating that severity, antecedents, effort and self-efficacy influenced family management of childhood atopic dermatitis. These results suggest that strategies to support children with atopic dermatitis and their family should consider the influence of such variables. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. [From atopic dermatitis to asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businco, L; Marziali, M; Furcolo, G; Meglio, P

    1997-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic skin disorder in infancy and childhood and is the main hallmark of atopic constitution. The disease is multifactorial, and although genetic predisposition is certainly a prerequisite, a number of environmental factors modulate the phenotypic expression of AD. The majority of affected children shows IgE sensitisation towards a large variety of foods and aeroallergens. Since at least 1600, it has been recognized that patients with AD have a high predisposition to develop asthma. Recent epidemiological studies show that AD is commonly seen in individuals from families with a history of asthma. In addition, in population where asthma is uncommon, AD is also uncommon. The sex distribution of AD and asthma is the same, with boys affected significantly more often by these two atopic diseases and in similar proportions. The ETAC project (Early Treatment of the Atopic Child) is a large multicenter, multi-national, double blind, placebo controlled, randomised trial. The main objective of the study is to stop the progression from AD to asthma in young children with AD using early therapeutic intervention with Cetirizine and the second objective is to investigate the main risk factors for the onset of asthma. The results of this study indicate that exposure to potent allergens such as cat or mite significantly increased the risk of sensitisation to these allergens. Prolonged breast feeding was associated with a lowest sensitisation rate to cow milk proteins and to egg. Therefore environmental factors seem to play a crucial role in IgE sensitisation in children with AD.

  9. Management of Children with Atopic Dermatitis: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Golpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing skin disorder that affects all ages including infancy and childhood. There are many proved and unproved treatments for atopic dermatitis. Evidence Acquisition Data sources of this narrative review included studies about pediatric atopic dermatitis with the following keywords, pediatric, atopic dermatitis, immunity, acute, chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disorder, infancy, childhood, diagnosis, management and treatment. All of the articles were written in English language with full text on management or treatment. Results Innate and adaptive immune system involved atopic dermatitis. Major characteristics of atopic dermatitis include pruritus, chronic or relapsing lesions and personal or family history of atopic disease. There is no specific treatment for atopic dermatitis. The treatment included rehydration, emollients, topical steroid, calcineurin inhibitors and immunosuppressant. Crisaborole topical ointment, a PDE4 anti-inflammatory topical agent (phase three of the research could be effective in atopic dermatitis. Conclusions Avoidance from trigger factors and emollients are basic treatments of atopic dermatitis.

  10. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection contribute to disease exacerbation and thus justify additional antimicrobial / antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) may relieve pruritus but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength. “Eczema school” educational programs have been proven to be helpful. PMID:23663504

  11. Qualitative vs. quantitative atopic dermatitis criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, R M; Thyssen, J P; Maibach, H I

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based on the imp......This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based...... phenomenon. Specific pheno- and endotypes are now emerging potentially enabling us to better classify patients with AD, but the influence of these on the diagnosis of AD is so far unclear. Few diagnostic models use quantitative scoring systems to establish AD cases from normal population, which, however, may...

  12. Atopic dermatitis in the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2016-01-01

    Dogs may develop a syndrome of spontaneous, inflammatory, pruritic dermatitis that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis, including a young age of onset, characteristic lesion distribution, immunoglobulin E sensitization to common environmental allergen sources, and evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction. There are also several important differences between canine and human atopic dermatitis. Although dogs may suffer from multiple-organ hypersensitivity syndromes, there is no evidence that this species experiences the progressive evolution from cutaneous to respiratory allergy characteristic of the human atopic march. Despite the presence of epidermal barrier derangement, there is no significant association between canine atopic dermatitis and mutations in filaggrin. Finally, treatment of canine disease relies much less heavily on topical therapy than does its human counterpart, while allergy testing and allergen-specific immunotherapy provide an often essential component of effective clinical management of affected dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Eric L; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic ...

  14. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: JAK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, David G; Schairer, David; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2018-03-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway is a conserved master regulator of immunity and myeloproliferation. Advanced understanding of this pathway has led to development of targeted inhibitors of Janus kinases (Jakinibs). As a class, JAK inhibitors effectively treat a multitude of hematologic and inflammatory diseases. Given such success, use of JAK inhibitors for mitigation of atopic dermatitis is under active investigation. Herein, we review the evolving data on the safety and efficacy of JAK inhibitors in treatment of atopic dermatitis. Although it is still early in the study of JAK inhibitors for atopic dermatitis, evidence identifies JAK inhibitors as effective alternatives to conventional therapies. Nonetheless, multiple large safety and efficacy trials are needed before widespread use of JAK inhibitors can be advocated for atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Atopic dermatitis in Tunisian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouri, Meriem; Masmoudi, Abderahmen; Borgi, Nozha; Rebai, Ahmed; Turki, Hamida

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) is low in North Africa. We describe the epidemiology of this atopic condition among school children in Tunisia. We conducted a Cross-sectional survey study of 5 to 6-year-old schoolchildren from 21 primary schools of Sfax. The diagnosis of AD was based on the U.K. Working Party diagnostic criteria. A questionnaire including these criteria and some risk factors of AD was issued to the children. All children were examined by one dermatologist. Among the 1617 examined children, ten had AD giving a one-year prevalence of 0.65%. The overall sex ratio was 2.33. The disease occurred before the age of 2 years in 3 children. Pure AD without concomitant respiratory allergies was noted in 3 cases. One first-degree family member with atopy was at least noted in seven children. The strongest associated factor was the presence of AD in at least one parent and maternal age at the time of the child birth. Nor breast-feeding neither environmental characteristics of the house did correlate with AD. The prevalence of AD in Tunisian schoolchildren is low but comparable to those of other developing countries. Family history of atopy and maternal age at the birth time was the most important associated factors.

  16. [Atopic dermatitis in children. New aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnopp, C; Mempel, M

    2015-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis in childhood is controlled by adaequate topical treatment in the majority of cases. Severe manifestations, recurrent superinfections, associated food allergy and psychosocial aspects of a chronic disease in childhood need special consideration. Furthermore, prevention is an important issue in this age group. The following article focuses on new aspects with repercussions on the management of childhood atopic dermatitis and possible implications for the future.

  17. Common Allergens in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bonyadi, MR. (PhD; Ezzati, F. (MSc

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Being exposed to different allergens, followed by the production of specific IgE, has an important role in causing atopic dermatitis, recognizing the allergens and applying immunotherapy for treatment. We aimed to determine the frequency of common allergens in the patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: In this descriptive- analytical study the serum level of total IgE and frequency of specific IgE were measured by Immunoblotting method again...

  18. Atopic dermatitis phenotypes and the need for personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Brehler, Ann-Christin; Novak, Natalija

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent developments in therapies which target the molecular mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Recent findings Current advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis are leading to the stratification of different atopic dermatitis phenotypes. New therapies offer the option to target-specific molecules involved in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Current new therapies under investigation aim to modulate specific inflammatory pathways associated with distinctive atopic dermatitis phenotypes, which would potentially translate into the development of personalized, targeted-specific treatments of atopic dermatitis. Summary Despite the unmet need for well tolerated, effective, and personalized treatment of atopic dermatitis, the current standard treatments of atopic dermatitis do not focus on the individual pathogenesis of the disease. The development of targeted, phenotype-specific therapies has the potential to open a new promising era of individualized treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:28582322

  19. ATOPIC DERMATITIS: NEW ASPECTS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease, which demands a prolonged treatment. A modern views on the main approaches to treatment of atopic dermatitis in children and adults are analyzed in this article. The treatment is based on the permanent use of emollients in order to achieve an anti-inflammatory effect — topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, and short courses (5 days of topical corticosteroids during relapses. For the 10-year period of topical calcineurin inhibitors usage in treatment of atopic dermatitis a great amount of experimental and clinical data have been accumulated. Two the most important changes and additions in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in recent times were related to a new hypothesis of proactive therapy with the use of topical tacrolimus and closing of «black box» warnings, associated to malignization risk due to the long-term usage of topical calcineurin inhibitors. Since atopic dermatitis is characterized by relapsing course, nowadays topical tacrolimus should be considered the most appropriate treatment approach, both in adults and children. The results of investigations confirmed more than 6-times decrease in relapse rate, as well as the significant improvement of quality of life, when the above-mentioned treatment scheme is used, both in children and adults.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, emollients, treatment, tacrolimus.

  20. Typical and atypical clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    Atopic dermatitis is a complex, systemic inflammatory disorder associated with a variety of clinical features. The original criteria of Hanifin and Rajka include major criteria and a list of about two dozen minor criteria however, even the minor criteria do not include some features of atopic dermatitis noted less commonly but still seen with some frequency. This contribution first reviews the common clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis in infancy, childhood, and adulthood, as well as the less typical appearances, including lichenoid atopic dermatitis; juvenile plantar dermatosis; nummular-type atopic dermatitis; follicular atopic dermatitis; alopecia of atopic dermatitis; eczema coxsackium; and psoriasiform, perineal, and lip licker's dermatitis. The clinician will be able to recognize and treat rarer forms of atopic dermatitis and incorporate this into their daily practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease which usually starts during the first years of life. In the management of AD, the correct approach requires a combination of multiple treatments to identify and eliminate trigger factors, and to improve the alteration of the skin barrier. In this article we try to explain the importance of skin care in the management of AD in relation to the use of textiles: they may be useful to improve disrupted skin but they are also a possible cause of triggering or worsening the lesions. Garments are in direct contact with the skin all day long, and for this reason it is important to carefully choose suitable fabrics in atopic subjects who have disrupted skin. Owing to their hygienic properties fabrics produced from natural fibres are preferential. Wool fibres are frequently used in human clothes but are irritant in direct contact with the skin. Wool fibre has frequently been shown to be irritant to the skin of atopic patients, and for this reason wool intolerance was included as a minor criterion in the diagnostic criteria of AD by Hanifin and Rajka in 1980. Cotton is the most commonly used textile for patients with AD; it has wide acceptability as clothing material because of its natural abundance and inherent properties like good folding endurance, better conduction of heat, easy dyeability and excellent moisture absorption. Silk fabrics help to maintain the body temperature by reducing the excessive sweating and moisture loss that can worsen xerosis. However, the type of silk fabric generally used for clothes is not particularly useful in the care and dressing of children with AD since it reduces transpiration and may cause discomfort when in direct contact with the skin. A new type of silk fabric made of transpiring and slightly elastic woven silk is now commercially available (Microair Dermasilk) and may be used for the skin care of children with AD. The presence of increased bacterial colonization

  2. [Food allergy in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, K; Heratizadeh, A; Werfel, T

    2012-04-01

    Food allergy predominantly affects children rather than adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Early sensitization to foods has been found to be significantly associated with AD. Three different patterns of clinical reactions to food allergens in AD patients exist: i. immediate-type reaction, ii. isolated late-type reaction, iii. combined reaction (i. + ii.). While in children allergens from cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat, fish, peanut or tree nuts are mostly responsible for allergic reactions, birch-pollen related food allergens seem to play a major role in adolescent and adults with AD in Central and Northern Europe. Defects of the epidermal barrier function seem to facilitate the development of sensitization to allergens following epicutaneous exposure. The relevance of defects of the gut barrier as well as genetic characteristics associated with an increased risk for food allergy remain to be further investigated. Numerous studies focus on prevention strategies which include breast-feeding or feeding with hydrolyzed milk substitute formula during the first 4 months of life.

  3. Emerging drugs for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Peck Y

    2009-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, affecting 10-20% of children and 2% of adults worldwide. Preventive treatment of AD consists of daily skin hydration and emollient therapy; but the majority of patients still require symptomatic treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors, both of which may be associated with potential long-term side effects. With increasing evidence supporting the role of skin barrier defects in the pathogenesis of AD, there is also a parallel increase in medications that claim to assist barrier repair. The current review discusses some exciting results with these medications, as well as the challenges that lie ahead of them. While barrier repair treatments offer some promise, there continues to be a need for safer anti-inflammatory medications. Some of these medications under investigation are phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, urocanic acid oxidation products and IL-4/IL-13 receptor blockers. The review also discusses anti-staphylococcal treatments including nanocrystalline silver cream, silver and antimicrobial-coated fabrics, and anti-itch treatments including mu-opiod receptor antagonists, chymase inhibitors and cannabinoid receptor agonists. These medications may become an integral part of AD therapy.

  4. Correction of pancreatic insufficiency in young children with atopic dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solodovnichenko, I.G; Voloshina, L.G; Babadzhanyan, E.N; Savitskaya, E.V

    2016-01-01

    ...% of patients with atopic dermatitis. Objective: evaluation of the effectiveness of the enzyme mini-tableted Ermital 10,000 for the compensation of pancreatic insufficiency in children with atopic dermatitis...

  5. Hyperlinearity in atopic dermatitis, on the palm (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture shows a manifestation of atopic dermatitis on the palm. Individuals with atopic dermatitis characteristically have increased numbers and depth of skin lines (hyperlinearity) on the palms with little ...

  6. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Ichiro; Aihara, Michiko; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shimojo, Naoki; Shoji, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masami; Yamada, Hidekazu

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016" together with those for other allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunological mechanisms in atopic dermatitis : clinical and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tengvall Linder, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate immunological mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Serum IgE levels are elevated in 80% of atopic dermatitis patients and CD4+ T cells and environmental allergens are known to be of importance in the pathogenesis of the disease. It was therefore of interest to further elucidate the role of these factors in atopic dermatitis. Cyclosporin A (CSA) was used as a tool for exploring the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, with emphasis on the...

  8. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. METHODS......: The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34...

  9. Immune response to Varicella vaccine in children with atopic dermatitis compared to non-atopic controls

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Lynda; Weinberg, Adriana; Boguniewicz, Mark; Taylor, Patricia; Oettgen, Hans; Heughan, Lisa; Zaccaro, Daniel; Armstrong, Brian; Holliday, Aaron; Leung, Donald Y. M.

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis subjects and controls had similar cellular immune responses to Varicella vaccine. Atopic dermatitis subjects with a history of eczema herpeticum made high levels of Varicella specific IgE.

  10. [Adulthood atopic dermatitis: epidemiology, clinical symptoms, provoking and prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pónyai, Györgyi; Temesvári, Erzsébet; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2007-01-07

    The prevalence of atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma bronchiale and atopic dermatitis is increasing both in children and adults at different parts of the world. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting mostly children, but the atopic trait continues, not only for later respiratory allergies, but also for skin symptoms in adulthood. In this form dry skin, flexural lichenification, head and neck dermatitis, hand dermatitis are typical. The exact etiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, in the background interactions of genetical predisposition, skin barrier defects and immunological and environmental factors can be verified. In the complex approach of atopic dermatitis, a pivotal role is ascribed to the evaluation and possibly the elimination of provoking factors, like gender, family structure, clothing, aero-, alimentary and contact allergens, psychosocial stress, migration, infections, and personal home environment. Authors review clinical manifestations, triggering and prognostic factors of the adulthood atopic dermatitis.

  11. New Developments in Biomarkers for Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Judith L.; Seggelen, Wouter van; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein de; Hijnen, DirkJan

    2015-01-01

    The application of biomarkers in medicine is evolving. Biomarkers do not only give us a better understanding of pathogenesis, but also increase treatment efficacy and safety, further enabling more precise clinical care. This paper focuses on the current use of biomarkers in atopic dermatitis, new

  12. Is atopic dermatitis associated with obesity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte; Agner, Tove

    2018-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with atopic dermatitis (AD), however the results have been conflicting. Our aim was to provide an update on current knowledge from observational studies addressing the possible association between obesity and AD. Systematic literature review was performed by identifying...

  13. Use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drucker, A M; Eyerich, K; de Bruin-Weller, M S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines discourage the use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis (AD), but their use remains widespread. OBJECTIVES: To reach consensus among an international group of AD experts on the use of systemic corticosteroids for AD. METHODS: A survey consisting of statements...

  14. Association of atopic dermatitis with smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, Robert; Kim, Ashley; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco exposure might be a modifiable risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: We examine the association between AD and exposure to tobacco smoke. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies (n = 86) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and ...

  15. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers w...

  16. T-cell inhibitors for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, W James; Fowler, Joseph F

    2018-03-01

    The management of atopic dermatitis is changing with the development of novel biologic agents to target specific molecules in the inflammatory cascade. Following the ability of dupilumab has proved its ability to act on the interleukin 4 receptor in treating atopic dermatitis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin monoclonal antibody (AMG157/MEDI9929) and OX40 blocking antibody (GBR 830) were developed by targeting the same pathway as dupilumab further upstream. The clinical data on the efficacy for these drugs are not yet known. There is some early evidence that AMG157/MEDI9929 attenuates most measures of allergen-induced asthmatic responses. However, there are no public data on its ability to treat atopic dermatitis. In a phase 2a study, GBR 830 showed at least a 50% reduction in the Eczema Area and Severity Index scores of 17 of 23 patients, but it was not sufficiently powered for identification of statistical differences between GBR 830 versus placebo. Although there is potential for these 2 drugs to greatly improve the management of severe atopic dermatitis, significant clinical trials have not yet been completed to prove efficacy, and there are not yet any available phase 3 clinical trials, which are needed to truly evaluate their efficacy in affecting T-cells. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Egeberg, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have an altered prevalence or risk for contact sensitization. Increased exposure to chemicals in topical products together with impaired skin barrier function suggest a higher risk, whereas the immune profile suggests a lower ...

  18. Diagnostic clinical features of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Lata

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common disease which varies widely in clinical presentation at different ages and places. Although authors working in western countries on white races have suggested many criteria, there is no uniform set which can be used in large population studies in this part of the world. Hence keeping in mind differences in environment and ethnicity of population, the present study was carried out. Seventy- three patients of atopic dermatitis and 71 age matched controls were studied. All the subjects were examined using a set of 34 potentially useful clinical features selected from different studies, including features for evaluation of photosensitivity. Multiple regression technique was used for analysing the data. It was found that 6 clinical features were diagnostic, 1. presence of itch, 2. history of flexural involvement, 3. history of dry skin, 4. family history of atopy, 5. personal history of diagnosed asthma and 6, visible flexural dermatitis. Photosensitivity was not a significant feature.

  19. AAPE proliposomes for topical atopic dermatitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Alexander; Song, Chung Kil; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Hong, Soon-Sun; Lee, Ju-Hee; Chung, Suk-Jae; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2014-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effect of advanced adipose stem cell derived protein extract (AAPE) could be improved by minimising protein degradation. To develop a proliposomal formulation of AAPE for the treatment of topical atopic dermatitis. Proliposomal powder was manufactured by evaporating a solution of soy phosphatidyl choline, AAPE and Poloxamer 407 in ethanol under vacuum on sorbitol powder. Characterisation of proliposomes (zeta potential, diameter, stability and flowability) as well as in vivo efficacy in a dermatitis mouse model was investigated. Reconstitution of the proliposomal powder formed liposomes of 589 ± 3.6 nm diameter with zeta potential of -51.33 ± 0.36 mV. Protein stability was maintained up to 90 days at 25 °C as proliposomes. In vivo studies on atopic dermatitis mouse model showed a significant reduction in IgE levels after topical AAPE proliposome treatment. AAPE proliposomes maintained protein stability and showed promising results for atopic dermatitis treatment.

  20. Characterization by phenotype of families with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, M; Kockum, I; Söderhäll, C; Van Hage-Hamsten, M; Luthman, H; Nordenskjöld, M; Wahlgren, C F

    2000-01-01

    The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is probably multifactorial, with interactions between several genetic and environmental factors. Twin studies indicate a strong genetic factor, but the susceptibility genes are unknown. This paper, describing the phenotypes of family material, forms part of a large genetic study seeking to identify susceptibility genes for atopic dermatitis by linkage analysis. We selected families with at least 2 siblings affected with atopic dermatitis (1,097 affected siblings who together form 650 affected sib pairs and 49 affected half-sib pairs). We established a phenotype database of information about the affected siblings and their relatives, in total 5,830 individuals. All siblings were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and participated in a standardized interview covering aspects of atopy and atopic dermatitis. Of the affected siblings, 72% suffered or had suffered from asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 74% had raised total and/or allergen-specific IgE serum levels. Seventeen percent of the siblings had been hospitalized for atopic dermatitis. Sixty-nine percent had 1 or both parents with atopic dermatitis. Among siblings with 1 parent with atopic dermatitis, 37% had a father with atopic dermatitis and 63% had a mother with atopic dermatitis, indicating maternal preponderance. Analysis of the occurrence of atopic dermatitis in relation to the birth order in the sibship shows an increased risk of atopic dermatitis in persons born early in a sibship. Although the families were selected for genetic sib-pair linkage analysis, we believe that this material is representative of atopic dermatitis families managed at hospitals in Stockholm.

  1. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many literature data show that probiotics may modulate the intestinal microflora composition and may have immunomodulatory effect. Based on this hypothesis, probiotics are supposed to confer benefits to allergic diseases. Administration of probiotics when a natural population of indigenous intestinal bacteria is still developing could theoretically influence immune development by favoring the balance between Th1 and Th2 inflammatory responses. For this reason, some studies have evaluated the potential impact of probiotics supplementation in the prevention of atopic dermatitis, with contrasting results. Clinical improvement in immunoglobulin (IgE-sensitized (atopic eczema following probiotic supplementation has been reported in some published studies and the therapeutic effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis seemed to be encouraging. However, as far as the usefulness of probiotics as a prevention strategy is concerned, results are still inconclusive. In fact, the clinical benefits of probiotic therapy depend upon numerous factors, such as the type of bacteria, dosing regimen, delivery method and other underlying host factors, such as age and diet. More studies are still needed to definitively prove the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic eczema.

  2. Twin Studies of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmose, Camilla; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    about filaggrin and its role in the atopic march and provide suggestions for future research in this area. Methods. We identified all twin studies (published after 1970) that have calculated the concordance rate and/or the heritability of AD, or the genetic and environmental correlations between AD...... was around 85% explained by genetic pleiotropy. Conclusions. Genetic factors account for most of the variability in AD susceptibility and for the association between AD and asthma. Controversy remains as to whether the atopic diseases are causally related or whether they are diverse clinical manifestations...

  3. Sweat mechanisms and dysfunctions in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Aleksi J; Vaughn, Alexandra R; Clark, Ashley K; Yosipovitch, Gil; Shi, Vivian Y

    2018-02-01

    Skin barrier dysfunction is inherent to atopic dermatitis (AD), causing dryness, irritation, and increased permeability to irritants, allergens and pathogens. Eccrine sweat functions as part of the skin's protective barrier. Variations in sweat responses have been observed in patients with AD, and altered sweat composition and dynamics are under-recognized as important factors in the disease cycle. This review discusses the role that sweat plays in the pathogenesis of AD, examines evidence on abnormal sweat composition, secretion, and neuro-immune responses to sweat in atopic skin, and highlights the value of sweat management. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbard, Christina M; Hebert, Adelaide A

    2008-02-02

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  5. THE APPLICATION OF ENTEROSORBENTS TO TREAT ATOPIC DERMATITIS AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. Shcherbakov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the study of the peculiarities of atopic dermatitis run from the viewpoint of allergistcimmunologist and gastroenterologist. The authors give an analysis of the reasons for atopic dermatitis development conditioned by the food allergy and define the place and meaning of the digestive apparatus function within the mechanisms of the disease development. The authors dwell in detail on the state of the intestinal tract mucosa and peculiarities of its lesion during atopic dermatitis. They give the schemes of the combined treatment for atopic dermatitis aimed at recovery of the affected small bowel mucosa and recovery of its protective properties with the help of cytomucoprotective adsorbing agents. They also present the findings of their own clinical experience of treatment of children, suffering from atopic dermatitis and having various lesions of the digestive apparatus.Key words: atopic dermatitis, children, food allergy, cytomucoprotection, adsorbing agents, dioctahedral smectite.

  6. Treating pediatric atopic dermatitis: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriades VR; Wisner E

    2015-01-01

    Victoria R Dimitriades, Elizabeth Wisner Division of Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Children's Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition which affects millions of people worldwide. It is most commonly seen in children but may also progress into adulthood. Management of this complex disease requires a multi-pronged approach which can address th...

  7. Non-pharmacologic therapies for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) continues to present significant therapeutic challenges, especially in severe cases. Navigating the line between risk and benefit can be difficult for more powerful medications such as immunosuppressants, but non-pharmacologic treatments are often overlooked and underutilized. Creative application of these more physical therapies can serve to minimize the pharmacologic treatments and their side effects, and possibly even create synergy between modalities, to maximize benefit to the patient.

  8. ROLE OF PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL DISTRESSES IN CHILD ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Sidorenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the relation between vegetative and psycho emotional distresses in cases of child atopic dermatitis. The authors applied instrumental research methods to estimate the condition of vegetative nervous system (cardiointer valography together with anamnestic analysis and clinical psychopathological methods. Authors established the methods of correcting diagnosed distresses. Using psycho corrective therapy significantly increases the efficiency of complex treatment of atopic child dermatitis.Key words: atopic dermatitis, psycho emotional disorders, treatment, children.

  9. Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joanna Marciniak; Adam Reich; Jacek C. Szepietowski

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic dermatitis in children. The influence of AD on quality of life of parents of children with AD was studied using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI...

  10. Respiratory comorbidity in South African children with atopic dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C L Gray; M E Levin; G du Toit

    2017-01-01

    Background. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an early and important step in the propagation of the allergic march, enhancing food and respiratory allergies via epicutaneous sensitisation to allergens. Objectives...

  11. [Atopic dermatitis in children and adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipozencić, Jasna; Ljubojević, Suzana; Gregurić, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease characterized by itching and typical clinical features, depending on patient age. It is often associated with other atopic diseases such as asthma or allergic rhinitis, resulting from the complex etiology and pathogenesis. It occurs more frequently in people with genetic predisposition for atopic diseases. The intensity and extent of skin lesions (Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis, SCORAD Index) vary significantly among AD patients, depending on whether it is acute or chronic, and there are variations in laboratory parameters, especially immune. In the future, it will be necessary to reach consensus on the new criteria for defining AD instead of the old ones (brought by Hanifin and Rajka 31 years ago). What is needed is effective and safe treatment, and control of the early stages of AD as well as maintaining AD remission. The new therapeutic approach in AD has greatly improved the quality of life of AD patients. As the prevalence of the disease continues to increase, we emphasize the importance of prevention, prompt recognition and optimal treatment of the many patients with AD.

  12. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G.; Thuesen, Betina H.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis and hand eczema often impair the ability of people to work. Only a few studies have investigated whether individuals with loss-of-function filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, who often have severe and early onset of dermatitis, experience occupational consequences....... Objective: To investigate the personal consequences of having atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema and FLG mutations. Method: Adult Danes from the general population (n = 3247) and patients with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 496) were genotyped for common FLG mutations, and completed...... in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1...

  13. Rutin suppresses atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common allergic inflammatory skin disease caused by a combination of eczematous, scratching, pruritus and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. The aim of our study was to examine whether rutin, a predominant flavonoid having anti-inflammatory and antioxidative potential, modulates AD and ACD symptoms. We established an atopic dermatitis model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) extract (DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. In addition, 2,4-dinitroflourobenzene-sensitized a local lymph node assay was used for the ACD model. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD symptoms. Topical application of rutin reduced AD based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE levels. Rutin inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. Rutin suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-31, IL-32 and interferon (INF)-γ in the tissue. In addition, rutin suppressed ACD based on ear thickness and lymphocyte proliferation, serum IgG2a levels, and expression of INF-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor-α in ACD ears. This study demonstrates that rutin inhibits AD and ACD, suggesting that rutin might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic skin diseases.

  14. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2002-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our

  15. Clinical Profile Of Atopic Dermatitis In Benin City, Nigeria | Onunu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The clinical characteristics of atopic dermatitis in our study population were similar to the pattern in other parts of the world. There is need for increased awareness of its importance as a cause of morbidity especially in children. Keywords: Atopic dermatitis, Clinical profile,Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Clinical ...

  16. Feasibility of actigraphy wristband monitoring of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, C J; O'Neill, J; Hix, E; McLaren, D T; Buxton, O M; Feldman, S R

    2014-11-01

    Actigraphy monitors are used to monitor sleep and scratching. Previous studies have implemented these monitors to evaluate behavior in adult patients with atopic dermatitis. However, such monitoring devices have been implemented in a paucity of studies involving pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of actigraphy monitoring in children with mild-to-severe atopic dermatitis. A total of six pediatric subjects were recruited. The severity of atopic dermatitis at the wrist area was assessed prior to placement of the wristband monitor. After wearing the wristbands for 7 days, subjects returned to clinic to undergo reassessment of the wrist area to determine if atopic dermatitis was exacerbated by the wrist-worn device. Data on sleep quality and how often patients wore the wristband monitors were also collected. No subjective data from the subjects or parents/caregivers were collected on tolerability of the monitors. None of the subjects exhibited exacerbation of atopic dermatitis at the wrist area after wearing the actigraphy monitors for 7 days. No adverse events were reported. Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis exhibited less total sleep time compared with children evaluated in previous actigraphy studies. Actigraphy wristband monitoring can be used to continuously assess disease severity in children with atopic dermatitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The course of life of patients with childhood atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elian, E.; Brenninkmeijer, A.; Legierse, C.M.; Sillevis Smitt, J.H.; Last, B.F.; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Bos, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis mainly covers the period of infancy to adulthood, an important period in the development of an individual. The impairment of quality of life and the psychological wellbeing of children with atopic dermatitis have been well documented but so far no data exist about the impact of

  18. The Course of Life of Patients with Childhood Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenninkmeijer, Elian E. A.; Legierse, Catharina M.; Sillevis Smitt, J. Henk; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Jan D.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis mainly covers the period of infancy to adulthood, an important period in the development of an individual. The impairment of quality of life and the psychological wellbeing of children with atopic dermatitis have been well documented but so far no data exist about the impact of

  19. Clinical Profile Of Atopic Dermatitis In Benin City, Nigeria | Onunu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the clinical presentation and management problems of atopic dermatitis in Benin City, Nigeria. Design: A 15-year retrospective study from May 1985 to April 2000. Setting: Dermatology clinics of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Subjects: All new cases of atopic dermatitis ...

  20. Allergic contact dermatitis in children with and without atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Donatella; Papagrigoraki, Anastasia; Tessari, Gianpaolo; Peroni, Anna; Sabbadini, Chiara; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence and causes of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in children vary with time and geographical area. This study aimed to determine the relevant allergens causing ACD in children and the relation between ACD and atopic dermatitis (AD). A cohort study on 349 children (0-15 years old) patch tested over a 7-year period was conducted. Patch test results were positive for at least 1 allergen in 69.3% of patients and were relevant in 69.8%. The highest sensitization rate (76.7%) was observed in children who are 0 to 5 years old (n = 86, 64% females), followed by the group of 6- to 10-year olds (70%, n = 157, 47.8% females), whereas 62.3% of 11- to 15-year-old children (n = 106, 59.4%) were sensitized. The most frequent allergens were nickel (16.3%), cobalt (6.9%), Kathon CG (5.4%), potassium dichromate (5.1%), fragrance mix (4.3%), and neomycin (4.3%). Body areas mostly affected were upper limbs and hands (31%). Approximately one third of children also had AD. Allergic contact dermatitis was more widespread in children with AD. Patch tests resulted positive in 55.3% (50% relevant) of AD compared with 76.9% (77.5% relevant) of the children without AD. Sensitizers were similar to children without AD. Very young children showed a high rate of relevant positive patch test reactions to common haptens. Allergic contact dermatitis may easily coexist with AD.

  1. Contact sensitivity in patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Masuda, Koji; Ueda, Sachiko; Nakamura, Naomi; Hotta, Eri; Hattori, Junko; Minamiyama, Rina; Yamazaki, Akiko; Katoh, Norito

    2015-07-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis are usually responsive to conventional treatment such as topical steroids; however, they are sometimes refractory to the treatment. The influence of contact sensitivities on the course of patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether contact sensitivities affect the course of patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis. We evaluated 45 patients with atopic dermatitis who had failed conventional therapy. Patch testing was performed with the Japanese standard series, metal series and/or suspected items. A total of 15 patients had a positive patch test reaction to at least one allergen. The most common allergens were nickel, topical drugs and rubber accelerators. Avoidance of products or food containing allergic substances greatly or partially improved skin symptoms in nine patients. These results suggest that contact allergens and metals may be critical factors causing eczematous lesions in patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  2. Atopic Dermatitis: Racial and Ethnic Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Yen Yong, Adeline; Tay, Yong-Kwang

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic inflammatory skin condition affecting up to 20% of children and 3% of adults worldwide. There is wide variation in the prevalence of AD among different countries. Although the frequency of AD is increasing in developing countries, it seems to have stabilized in developed countries, affecting approximately 1 in 5 schoolchildren. Adult-onset AD is not uncommon and is significantly higher, affecting between 11% and 13% of adults in some countries, for example, Singapore, Malaysia, and Sweden. AD is thus associated with significant health care economic burden in all age groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Atopic Dermatitis and Comorbidities: Added Value of Comprehensive Dermatoepidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is common and in its severe form is devastating. This chronic inflammatory dermatosis is part of the atopic syndrome, which includes asthma, food allergies, and hay fever and is known to be associated with mental health disorders. In line with psoriasis, several recent observational studies using national survey and linkage data have suggested a link between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease. The atopic dermatitis field can benefit from the past experiences in psoriasis research and should not follow the same path, but, rather, aim for a more comprehensive approach from the beginning. A recent German consortium studying links between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease first screened a large claims database, followed by analyses of more deeply phenotyped (birth) cohorts with longitudinal data. In addition, genetic and metabolic analyses assessing the predisposition of patients with atopic dermatitis for cardiovascular disease were performed. Overall, the association between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease was at most modest, but in more refined cohorts the cardiovascular risk profile and genetic architecture was comparable. A more integrated approach could create clarity about the clinical relevance of cardiovascular disease in individuals with atopic dermatitis sooner, avoid speculation that affects patient care, and save scientific resources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Murota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1 leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2 heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This “contagious itch” can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such

  5. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1) leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2) heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This "contagious itch" can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such causes. Copyright

  6. Treating pediatric atopic dermatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriades VR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Victoria R Dimitriades, Elizabeth Wisner Division of Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Children's Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition which affects millions of people worldwide. It is most commonly seen in children but may also progress into adulthood. Management of this complex disease requires a multi-pronged approach which can address the myriad of issues which underscore its development. Avoidance of triggering factors is imperative in establishing consistent control of skin irritation while daily moisturization can be very effective in skin barrier repair and maintenance. Judicious use of anti-inflammatory medications has been shown to make a significant impact on both treatment as well as prevention of disease. Unfortunately, pruritus, a key feature of AD, has proven much harder to control. Finally, awareness of the risks of colonization and infection in patients with AD should be incorporated into their surveillance and management plans. While our understanding has progressed greatly regarding this disease, further research is still needed regarding future directions for both treatment and prevention. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, eczema, treatment, corticosteroids, antipruritic

  7. Systemic therapy of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Nathaniel A; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common childhood inflammatory disease that, in a small percentage of cases, can become severe enough to require potent systemic treatment. Many trials have been conducted with systemic agents for the treatment of severe pediatric AD; we review the evidence here. Although corticosteroids are widely used in practice, they are not generally recommended as a systemic treatment option for AD in children. Most patients experience a relatively rapid and robust response to cyclosporine. Treating children with cyclosporine long term is troubling; however, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate are all reasonable alternatives for maintenance therapy in recalcitrant cases. Several additional options are available for the most refractory cases, including interferon-γ, intravenous immunoglobulin, and various biologics. Phototherapy is another modality that can be effective in treating severe AD. Ultimately the choice of agent is individualized. Systemic therapy options are associated with potentially severe adverse effects and require careful monitoring. Nonsystemic approaches toward prevention of flares and long-term control of atopic dermatitis in pediatric patients should be continued in conjunction with systemic therapy. In the future, more targeted systemic treatments hold the potential for effective control of disease with fewer side effects than broadly immunosuppressive agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukaya M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mototsugu Fukaya,1 Kenji Sato,2 Mitsuko Sato,3 Hajime Kimata,4 Shigeki Fujisawa,5 Haruhiko Dozono,6 Jun Yoshizawa,7 Satoko Minaguchi8 1Tsurumai Kouen Clinic, Nagoya, 2Department of Dermatology, Hannan Chuo Hospital, Osaka, 3Sato Pediatric Clinic, Osaka, 4Kimata Hajime Clinic, Osaka, 5Fujisawa Dermatology Clinic, Tokyo, 6Dozono Medical House, Kagoshima, 7Yoshizawa Dermatology Clinic, Yokohama, 8Department of Dermatology, Kounosu Kyousei Hospital, Saitama, Japan Abstract: The American Academy of Dermatology published a new guideline regarding topical therapy in atopic dermatitis in May 2014. Although topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome had been mentioned as possible side effects of topical steroids in a 2006 review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, no statement was made regarding this illness in the new guidelines. This suggests that there are still controversies regarding this illness. Here, we describe the clinical features of topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome, based on the treatment of many cases of the illness. Because there have been few articles in the medical literature regarding this illness, the description in this article will be of some benefit to better understand the illness and to spur discussion regarding topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome. Keywords: topical steroid addiction, atopic dermatitis, red burning skin syndrome, rebound, corticosteroid, eczema

  9. Topical tacrolimus as treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masutaka Furue

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Masutaka Furue, Satoshi TakeuchiDepartment of Dermatology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic, relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. The mainstays of treatment for AD are topical tacrolimus and topical steroids. Tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, not only complements existing treatment options but also overcomes some of the drawbacks of topical steroid therapy when given topically and thus meets the long-term needs of patients in preventing disease progression. Topical tacrolimus has been widely recognized in terms of its short- and long-term efficacies and safety, and it is also accepted as a first-line treatment for inflammation in AD. The recent proactive use of topical tacrolimus may emphasize a long-term benefit of this calcineurin inhibitor for AD treatment. To reduce possible long-term adverse effects, it is important to monitor its topical doses in daily clinics.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical tacrolimus, topical steroids, dose, proactive use, adverse effects

  10. Atopic Dermatitis in Adults: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre Salvador, J F; Romero-Pérez, D; Encabo-Durán, B

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a prevalence of 1%-3% in adults. Adult-onset AD has only been defined recently, and lack of familiarity with this condition and confusion regarding the appropriate terminology persist. AD may first appear in childhood or de novo in adults and is characterized by pronounced clinical heterogeneity. The disease often deviates from the classic pattern of flexural dermatitis, and there are forms of presentation that are specific to adults, such as head-and-neck dermatitis, chronic eczema of the hands, multiple areas of lichenification, or prurigo lesions. Although diagnosis is clinical, adult-onset AD frequently does not fit the traditional diagnostic criteria for the disease, which were developed for children. Thus, AD is often a diagnosis of exclusion, especially in de novo cases. Additional diagnostic tests, such as the patch test, prick test, skin biopsy, or blood test, are usually necessary to rule out other diseases or other types of eczema appearing concomitantly with AD. This article presents an update of the different forms of clinical presentation for AD in adults along with a proposed diagnostic approach, as new treatments will appear in the near future and many patients will not be able to benefit from them unless they are properly diagnosed.

  11. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Gelbard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Gelbard1, Adelaide A Hebert1,21Departments of Dermatology; 2Pediatrics, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IFN-γ

  12. Quality of life in children and teenagers with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cláudia Soïdo Falcão do; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto

    2012-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis is a disease which has increased during the past years despite our improved understanding of it. To assess the impact of Atopic Dermatitis in the quality of life of children and teenagers and their family. A descriptive cross-sectional method with prospective data collection of 50 children and teenagers diagnosed with Atopic Dermatitis ranging in age from 5-16 years. Fifty parents and/or guardians answered the quality of life questionnaires The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index and Family Dermatitis Impact Questionnaire. The socio-demographic and clinical variables were evaluated by a clinical record chart designed specifically for the research and socioeconomic standardized questionnaire by the Brazilian Association of Research Enterprises, which evaluates assets acquired and the educational level of the head of the household. Thirty-five out of the 50 patients were female (70%), and 28 (56%) of them were from social class C. The Questionnaire Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index showed that 19 (38%) patients ranged from 7 to 12 points (moderate impact of atopic dermatitis) and 17 patients (34%) ranged from 13 to 30 points (high impact of atopic dermatitis). The Family Dermatitis Impact Questionnaire revealed that 15 (30%) families had scores between 7 and 12 points and 22 families (44%) scored between 13 and 30 points. The results show that there is a very high impact on the QoL for atopic dermatitis patients and their families. This makes us suggest the importance of including the quality of life study in clinical evaluations.

  13. Atopic dermatitis: new evidence on the role of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heratizadeh, Annice

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease. In the presence of a complex genetic background, there is increasing evidence for the role of specific allergenic trigger factors in perpetuating skin inflammation in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients. In this review, clinical and in-vitro data so far published on allergen-induced adaptive immune responses in atopic dermatitis are summarized. Emerging new data have been published particularly on adaptive immune responses to inhalant allergens in atopic dermatitis. In a randomized controlled study, the induction of a flare-up by grass pollen exposure in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients could be demonstrated for the first time. T cells directed to the two major allergens of house dust mite have been characterized to display a Th2, and moreover, a Th17 and Th2/Th17 phenotype in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients. With regard to microbial antigens, T cell-mediated immune responses directed to proteins of the species themselves can be observed - as has been published for Staphylococcus aureus and Malassezia spp. Beyond this, specific T-cell activation to cross-reacting human proteins might further trigger the disease in distinct patients. The role of 'autoallergic' phenomena in atopic dermatitis, because of human antigens without known cross-reactivity to environmental allergens, is currently under investigation as well. Recent findings on immunological and clinical characteristics of adaptive immune responses to allergens in atopic dermatitis, but also on the identification of new, potentially relevant allergen sources might contribute to the development of effective treatment strategies 'customized' for allergic inflammation in atopic dermatitis in future.

  14. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema? A systematic review, meta-analysis, and recommendation for uniform use of 'atopic dermatitis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S; Silverberg, J I

    2016-10-01

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates unnecessary confusion for patients, healthcare providers, and researchers. It also negatively impacts accurate communication of research in the scientific literature. We sought to determine the most commonly used terms for AD. A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals. Atopic dermatitis is the most commonly used term and appears to be increasing in popularity. Given that eczema is a nonspecific term that describes the morphological appearance of several forms of dermatitis, we strongly suggest the use of a more specific term, AD, in publications, healthcare clinician training, and patient education. Support from researchers, reviewers, and editors is key to success. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. RESULTS OF APPLYING POLYVITAMIN COMPLEX FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Ivanova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents findings of applying vitamin-and-mineral complex (VMC for children frequently suffering from diseases and children with atopic dermatitis. It shows that usage of VMC within a complex therapy promotes regression of subnormal vitamin provision symptoms, as well as symptoms of the core disease. This happens against heightened vitamin content in child's organism — which was proven with the test of A and E vitamins content in blood. The research has demonstrated a quite good tolerance of VMC by children suffering from atopic dermatitis.Key words: children frequently suffering from diseases, atopic dermatitis, vitamins, treatment.

  16. The association between atopic dermatitis and hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruff, S M D; Engebretsen, K A; Zachariae, C

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and hand eczema (HE) are common chronic and relapsing inflammatory skin conditions that often co-occur. While several studies have addressed their relationship, the exact association estimate is unknown. We systematically reviewed published literature on the association...... between AD and HE in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science using the following search terms; (atopic dermatitis OR atopic eczema) AND (hand dermatitis OR hand eczema). Meta-analyses were then performed to examine the association between AD and the point-, one-year- and lifetime prevalence of HE, respectively...

  17. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGENS ON ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wardhana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic eczematous skin disease that develops in a patient with atopic diathesis, which is characterized by an increased liability to produce IgE antibodies for allergens mostly derived from environmental or inhalant allergens and food allergens. They are produced by cell-mediated allergic contact reactions, and recently contact sensitivity to various environmental allergens has been demonstrated in patients with AD. Atopic patients are recognized by their ability to produce large amounts of specific IgE antibodies to common substances as environmental allergens, i.e. house dust mites, grass pollens, animal danders, molds, food, etc. These antibodies can be detected by skin prick test. The aim of this study was to identify the sensitization against environmental or inhalants allergens through skin prick tests in the patients with atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, descriptive study. We revised all medical records of patients with AD since January 2002 to December 2004 in the Out Patients Unit of Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. The variables studied were: gender, age, work related, diagnosis associates to AD, and prick test of environmental allergens. Results: In 3 years periods we had revised 46 of patients with AD that was done skin prick tests. The median age was 38 years (range 29-54 years, 34/46 (73.9 % of these were male and 12 (26.1 % female. Twenty nine patients presented pure AD, and 17 patients had AD with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Only 16 (34.7% of patients had no history of allergic disease. Thirsty six of 46 (78.20% of all tested AD patients had a positive skin prick tests against inhalant (aeroallergens 16 patients and food allergens 21 patients. Sixteen patients with positive of skin test include; dust mite in 12 patients, animal dander in 10 patients, grass pollen in 9 patients and cockroach in 6 patients. Conclusion: We concluded that

  18. SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes modern data on risk factors of severe course of atopic dermatitis in children: the role of alimentary and inhalant allergens, cutaneous infections, allergic reactions to drugs used in the treatment of disease. The most important questions of differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis in children and the distinctive features of the illness, which may be mistaken for atopic dermatitis (primary immunodeficiencies, keratosis pilaris, psoriasis, enteropatic acrodermatitis; cutaneous bacterial and fungal infections, and drug-induced contact dermatitis to topical creams and ointments are discussed. Treatment of atopic dermatitis is based on modern approaches and includes recommendations on the use of emolents, anti-inflammatory drugs (topical glucocorticoids and calcineurin inhibitors. The article provides indications and contraindications to the administration of anti-inflammatory drugs. Special recommendations for use of cleansers and emolents at all degrees of severity of atopic dermatitis, which helps reduce the risk of side effects of topical corticosteroids, complications such as cutaneous infections and helps to maintain remission of disease are given. The importance of training programs patients is emphasized. Compliance of patients and/or their parents contributes to the achievement of the desired effect of the treatment of atopic dermatitis, which will improve the patients’ quality of life.

  19. Breastfeeding and maternal diet in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Tina Y; Goldman, Ran D

    2011-12-01

    Many children are affected by atopic dermatitis (AD) at a very young age. I often consider whether nonpharmacologic interventions could prevent or mitigate the development of AD. Do breastfeeding or changes to the maternal diet help prevent the development of childhood AD? The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that lactating mothers with infants at high risk of developing AD should avoid peanuts and tree nuts, and should consider eliminating eggs, cow's milk, and fish from their diets. The World Health Organization also recommends breastfeeding infants up to 2 years of age. Studies have shown that breastfeeding can have a protective effect for AD in children; however, other studies have found insignificant or reversal effects. More research in this area is required.

  20. Genetic and epigenetic studies of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Lianghua; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the complex interaction of genetic, immune and environmental factors. There have many recent discoveries involving the genetic and epigenetic studies of AD. A retrospective PubMed search was carried out from June 2009 to June 2016 using the terms "atopic dermatitis", "association", "eczema", "gene", "polymorphism", "mutation", "variant", "genome wide association study", "microarray" "gene profiling", "RNA sequencing", "epigenetics" and "microRNA". A total of 132 publications in English were identified. To elucidate the genetic factors for AD pathogenesis, candidate gene association studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and transcriptomic profiling assays have been performed in this period. Epigenetic mechanisms for AD development, including genomic DNA modification and microRNA posttranscriptional regulation, have been explored. To date, candidate gene association studies indicate that filaggrin (FLG) null gene mutations are the most significant known risk factor for AD, and genes in the type 2 T helper lymphocyte (Th2) signaling pathways are the second replicated genetic risk factor for AD. GWAS studies identified 34 risk loci for AD, these loci also suggest that genes in immune responses and epidermal skin barrier functions are associated with AD. Additionally, gene profiling assays demonstrated AD is associated with decreased gene expression of epidermal differentiation complex genes and elevated Th2 and Th17 genes. Hypomethylation of TSLP and FCER1G in AD were reported; and miR-155, which target the immune suppressor CTLA-4, was found to be significantly over-expressed in infiltrating T cells in AD skin lesions. The results suggest that two major biologic pathways are responsible for AD etiology: skin epithelial function and innate/adaptive immune responses. The dysfunctional epidermal barrier and immune responses reciprocally affect each other, and thereby drive development of AD.

  1. ENTEROSORBENTS AS A PART OF COMPLEX THERAPY OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Alexeeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common allergic diseases in children which is assuming ever greater medical and social importance. Risk factors of AD include gastro-intestinal tract disturbances, especially intestinal dysbiosis, which is revealed in 89–94,1% of children with atopic dermatitis. Both correlation of the dysbiosis and AD manifestations severity and increase of underlying disease treatment efficacy as a result of target influence on intestinal microflora confirm that. For many decades guidelines of atopic dermatitis treatment in children along with elimination diet, antihistamine drugs and topic medicines include enterosorbents. The most effective drugs are those ones, consisting of prebiotics and sorbents. The wide experience of prebiotic drug with sorbent action (Lactofiltrum in complex therapy of atopic dermatitis in children is reviewed in this article.

  2. [Skin and mucous membrane microbiocenosis during atopic dermatitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetskaia, M N; Maslov, Iu N; Shaĭdullina, E V; Burdina, O M

    2014-01-01

    Study the microbial landscape and determine the interaction between biocenoses of skin, oropharynx and intestine mucous membranes during atopic dermatitis in children. 60 children with atopic dermatitis were examined, bacteriologic study of skin, oropharynx, intestine was carried out. Significant changes were detected in both quantitative and qualitative composition of microbiocenosis of skin, oropharynx and intestine mucous membranes. Skin of patients is more frequently colonized by Staphylococcus aureus. Gram-positive bacteria dominated in oropharynx microflora. Comparative characteristics of microflora of skin and oropharynx mucous membrane revealed a direct of correlation. During microbiological study of intestine microflora, all the examined had microbial landscape disruptions of varying severity degree. Taking into consideration the direct correlation of microflora of skin and oropharynx mucous membrane during atopic dermatitis, seeding of oropharynx washes are recommended to be included into the examination complex of patients with subsequent correction of microbiocenosis. Examination of all the children with atopic dermatitis for the presence of intestine dysbiosis is advisable.

  3. Apgar score is related to development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3-9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis....... We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit) = 1.23 (1.06-1.44), P = 0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06-1.61), P...... = 0.012, were risk factors for atopic dermatitis in cotwin control analysis, whereas birth anthropometric factors were not significantly related to disease development. Risk estimates in monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different for the identified risk factors. Conclusions...

  4. Soy allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmila, Celakovská; Květuše, Ettlerová; Karel, Ettler; Jaroslava, Vaněčková; Josef, Bukač

    2013-07-01

    The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sensitization to soy was found in another 27.2% patients with no clinical manifestation after soy ingestion. The correlation between the positive results of examinations to soy and between the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy was confirmed in statistics. Almost one third of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis are sensitized to soy without clinical symptoms. The early allergic reaction to soy occur in minority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  5. Soy Allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celakovská Jarmila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Materials and Methods: Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. Results : The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sensitization to soy was found in another 27.2% patients with no clinical manifestation after soy ingestion. The correlation between the positive results of examinations to soy and between the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy was confirmed in statistics. Conclusion: Almost one third of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis are sensitized to soy without clinical symptoms. The early allergic reaction to soy occur in minority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  6. Atopic dermatitis: global epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutten, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease posing a significant burden on health-care resources and patients' quality of life. It is a complex disease with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and combinations of symptoms. AD affects up to 20% of children and up to 3% of adults; recent data show that its prevalence is still increasing, especially in low-income countries. First manifestations of AD usually appear early in life and often precede other allergic diseases such as asthma or allergic rhinitis. Individuals affected by AD usually have genetically determined risk factors affecting the skin barrier function or the immune system. However, genetic mutations alone might not be enough to cause clinical manifestations of AD, and it is merely the interaction of a dysfunctional epidermal barrier in genetically predisposed individuals with harmful effects of environmental agents which leads to the development of the disease. AD has been described as an allergic skin disease, but today, the contribution of allergic reactions to the initiation of AD is challenged, and it is proposed that allergy is rather a consequence of AD in subjects with a concomitant underlying atopic constitution. Treatment at best achieves symptom control rather than cure; there is thus a strong need to identify alternatives for disease prevention. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. [Atopic dermatitis: a modern view of pediatricians and pediatric allergologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikova, O M

    2011-01-01

    The article presents the views of pediatric allergologist on the problem of atopic dermatitis/ atopic eczema in children. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is considered from a modern viewpoint of allergic 'march', which is characteristic (typical) for children with atopy. These data indicate to systemic nature of atopic 'march', the first step of which is atopic eczema. Further evolution of atopic dermatitis leads to a transformation of it in other atopic diseases--allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma; this fact indicates that immunopathological disorders are united in these diseases and it conditions the possibility of prevention. It has taken into consideration the systemic nature of atopic diseases, combined therapy is great important and has to include not only basic local therapy, in particular topical corticosteroids (mometasone furoate--Elokom) during the exacerbation, and the systematic elimination of trigger factors, diet, the removal of the digestive system dysfunctions and the imbalance of vitamins. A long-time systemic basic therapy by H1-antihistamines of second generation, such as desloratadine (Aerius) takes a special place in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  8. Innovative technologies of teaching self-government atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz S.R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The new understanding of the disease requires the development of modern methods in the management strategy of atopic dermatitis. Individual approach to educate patients with use of modern gadgets in addition to the standard methods of treatment is a relatively new concept in dermatology. Educational programs for atopic dermatitis have a positive impact on the severity of dermatoses, as well as on psychological status.

  9. Parents' reported preference scores for childhood atopic dermatitis disease states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Emmanuel B

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to elicit preference weights from parents for health states corresponding to children with various levels of severity of atopic dermatitis. We also evaluated the hypothesis that parents with children who had been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis would assign different preferences to the health state scenarios compared with parents who did not have a child with atopic dermatitis. Methods Subjects were parents of children aged 3 months to 18 years. The sample was derived from the General Panel, Mommies Sub-Panel, and Chronic Illness Sub-Panel of Harris Interactive. Participants rated health scenarios for atopic dermatitis, asthma, and eyeglasses on a visual analog scale, imagining a child was experiencing the described state. Results A total of 3539 parents completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent had a child with a history of atopic dermatitis. Mean preference scores for atopic dermatitis were as follows: mild, 91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 91.5; mild/moderate, 84 (95%CI, 83.5 to 84.4; moderate, 73 (95%CI, 72.5 to 73.6; moderate/severe, 61 (95%CI, 60.6 to 61.8; severe, 49 (95% CI, 48.7 to 50.1; asthma, 58 (95%CI, 57.4 to 58.8; and eyeglasses, 87(95%CI, 86.3 to 87.4. Conclusions Parents perceive that atopic dermatitis has a negative effect on quality of life that increases with disease severity. Estimates of parents' preferences can provide physicians with insight into the value that parents place on their children's treatment and can be used to evaluate new medical therapies for atopic dermatitis.

  10. Linear growth in prepubertal children with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, L.; Clayton, P; Addison,G.; Price, D.; David, T

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To define the evolution of prepubertal growth in atopic dermatitis and the factors influencing that growth pattern.
METHODS—Height and height velocity over two years, weight, triceps and subscapular skin fold thickness, and bone age were assessed in 80 prepubertal patients with atopic dermatitis and a control group of 71 healthy prepubertal school children.
RESULTS—Height standard deviation scores (SDS) and height velocity SDS did not differ between patients ...

  11. Soy Allergy in Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Celakovská Jarmila; Ettlerová Kvetuše; Ettler Karel; Vanecková Jaroslava; Bukac Josef

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Materials and Methods: Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. Results : The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sen...

  12. A Pragmatic Approach to Patch Testing Atopic Dermatitis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jennifer K; Jacob, Sharon E; Nedorost, Susan T

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may complicate the clinical course of atopic dermatitis (AD), and patch testing remains the criterion standard for diagnosing ACD. To date, there have been no guidelines or consensus recommendations on when and how to patch test individuals with AD. Failure...... in AD patients with dermatitis that fails to improve with topical therapy; with atypical/changing distribution of dermatitis, or pattern suggestive of ACD; with therapy-resistant hand eczema in the working population; with adult- or adolescent-onset AD; and/or before initiating systemic...... immunosuppressants for the treatment of dermatitis. A suggested patch testing algorithm for AD patients is provided....

  13. A short-term trial of tacrolimus ointment for atopic dermatitis. European Tacrolimus Multicenter Atopic Dermatitis Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruzicka, T.; Bieber, T.; Schöpf, E.; Rubins, A.; Dobozy, A.; Bos, J. D.; Jablonska, S.; Ahmed, I.; Thestrup-Pedersen, K.; Daniel, F.; Finzi, A.; Reitamo, S.

    1997-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK 506) is an effective immunosuppressant drug for the prevention of rejection after organ transplantation, and preliminary studies suggest that topical application of tacrolimus is effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. We conducted a randomized, doubleblind, multicenter study

  14. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use | Langa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), the dermatological manifestation of the atopic diathesis, has a variety of clinical presentations. It is a chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder, requiring a multifaceted treatment approach. Topical corticosteroids are the backbone of therapy. However, concerns over adverse drug reactions ...

  15. Impact of adult atopic dermatitis on topical drug penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Ortiz, Patricia; Hansen, Steen H; Shah, Vinod P

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate methodologies for the determination of drug penetration in diseased skin have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a metronidazole cream formulation in atopic dermatitis, employing dermal microdialysis and tape strip sampling...... in the atopic dermatitis compared with uninvolved skin (p... techniques. Non-invasive measuring methods were used for the quantification of the severity of the dermatitis. Skin thickness and the depth of the microdialysis probes in the skin were measured by 20 MHz ultrasound scanning. Metronidazole concentration, sampled by microdialysis, was 2.4-fold higher...

  16. Truth or fiction: risk factors for childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Kendra Gail

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is increasing in prevalence throughout the developed world, in parallel with asthma and hay fever. The reasons for the increase remain unclear. As a practical question, it is valuable to understand which interventions might decrease risk for childhood atopic disease. Prospective studies among infants and children are challenging to design and to execute. Fortunately, several large studies from Europe and the United States are better characterizing whether behavioral interventions such as breastfeeding, delayed introduction of solid foods, hydrolyzed protein infant formulas, or pets in the home might be protective or impart increased risk of developing atopic dermatitis. As this body of literature grows, physicians will be able to recommend behavioral interventions that can prevent atopic dermatitis in individuals and ideally decrease prevalence over the population.

  17. [Assessment of nutritional status in children with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, Xiomara; Castro-Almarales, Raúl Lázaro; Massip Nicot, Juliette

    2011-01-01

    There has been described some exacerbating factors for atopic dermatitis, including foods. Several investigations have reported controversial results about the influence of foods on atopic dermatitis. But there is scarce information about the nutritional status of patients with atopic dermatitis. To characterize the nutritional condition in a sample of children with atopic dermatitis in Old Havana, Cuba. In this descriptive study, were included 60 children, aged between 2 and 14 years, with the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis from the Allergy Department in the municipality Havana, from January to April of 2008. For every patient we evaluated anthropometrics, biochemical and immunologic measurements, as well the frequency of meals ingestion and the types of foods. We found that 83.3% of the patients were younger than 6 years, with a slight prevalence of females (53.3%). Ninety-seven percent of the children had a normal height for its age and 48.3% had a normal weight for their height, and 20% of the patients had malnutrition. It was detected mild and moderate anemia in 63.3%. The daily frequency of taking breakfast was carried out in 55%, the lunch in 100% and dinner in 95%. The products of regular consumption are carbohydrates, candies nd sodas in 76.6%. Fish and shellfish are consumed only for 16% of the patients. In the studied sample of children with atopic dermatitis we found a high prevalence of malnutrition associated with poor dietary habits. Breast milk feeding was related to a less malnutrition percentage in children with atopic dermatitis.

  18. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan A. Rather

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, recurrent, chronic inflammatory skin disease that is a cause of considerable economic and social burden. Its prevalence varies substantially among different countries with an incidence rate proclaimed to reach up to 20% of children in developed countries and continues to escalate in developing nations. This increased rate of incidence has changed the focus of research on AD toward epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. The effects of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of AD remain elusive. However, evidence from different research groups show that probiotics could have positive effect on AD treatment, if any, that depend on multiple factors, such as specific probiotic strains, time of administration (onset time, duration of exposure, and dosage. However, till date we still lack strong evidence to advocate the use of probiotics in the treatment of AD, and questions remain to be answered considering its clinical use in future. Based on updated information, the processes that facilitate the development of AD and the topic of the administration of probiotics are addressed in this review.

  19. House dust mites in pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adham, Tamer M; Tawfik, Safwat A; Abdo, Naglaa M

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate hypersensitivity to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus) and D. farinae in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), and to assess the therapeutic value of using acaricides with other environmental anti house dust mites (HDM) measures. Ninety-eight children with AD were chosen randomly from the Pediatric Allergy Clinic in Al-Noor Hospital, Khalifa branch, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates during the period between January 2008 to January 2009 and were evaluated for severity and chronicity. They were subjected to skin prick test (SPT) including D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae antigens and were also assessed for the therapeutic value of acaricides and environmental anti HDM measures. We found that 74.5% of patients were sensitive to one or both strains of HDM. A highly significant association was found between the severity of the symptoms of AD and its persistence with hypersensitivity to HDM (p=0.001). Acaricides and environmental anti HDM measures can improve patients with mild AD. Hypersensitivity to HDM is an important factor for the more acute, more chronic, and more severe AD. Anti HDM measures including the use of acaricides can help control mild AD. We recommend SPT as a part of the work up of patients with AD. The HDM sensitive patients can benefit from anti HDM measures.

  20. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  1. Immunoadsorption for treatment of severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Joanna; Weinmann-Menke, Julia; von Stebut, Esther

    2017-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease affecting up to 10-20% of the population with the largest disease burden in childhood. Treatment options include basic emollient treatment, topical as well as systemic immunosuppressants. The pathogenesis is complex and among various triggers, genetic predisposition and immunological alterations contribute to development of disease. Atopy is common in patients with AD and many patients have high levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE), some of which recognizes exogenous or auto/self-allergens. Treatment options targeting IgE such as specific immunotherapy against e.g. house dust mites or using anti-IgE antibodies (omalizumab) showed variable results that were not convincing. We now review recent data on the application of unspecific and IgE-selective immunoadsorption (IA) in AD. All in all, 53 patients have been treated with non-specific pan Ig IA and 28 patients with IgE-selective IA. Side effects were rarely seen. The efficacy of IgE depletion was generally high (<∼80%) for each IA cycle, but transient and lasted only a few days/weeks. Of note, disease activity appeared to improve in almost all cases and lasted for several weeks. Although the evidence is still weak, these case studies suggest that IgE depletion in AD is effective and helped control the disease. The mechanism of action is not understood yet. Future controlled trials are needed to validate this observation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Atopic dermatitis - risk factors and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska, Martyna; Trojacka, Ewelina; Savitskyi, Stepan; Terlikowska-Brzósko, Agnieszka; Galus, Ryszard

    2017-08-21

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by severe itching and eczematic skin lesions. In Poland from 1.5 to 2.5 million people suffer from AD. The pathophysiologic complexity and the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes cause diagnostic and therapeutic problems and this is the basis for the division of the disease into subtypes. Heterogeneity of the disease is also confirmed in the study of the genotype of the disease. In relation with AZS more than 1000 loci in chromosomes were demonstrated. The roles of certain genes and the pathophysiology of lesions caused by their polymorphism were described. Wide spectrums of AD risk factors are: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption during pregnancy, obesity and high and low birth weight. The quality of life in patients with AD is impaired, the disease disrupts family and professional relationships. Biological medical products are an example of an individual approach to the treatment of AD. It seems, individual approach to disease and treatment can be a successive solution to the problem.

  3. ATOPIC DERMATITIS AS A CLINICAL CHALLENGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Davidovic

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease which is characterized by rash, pruritus and xerosis.The disease is most prevalent in infants and small children with about 70% of cases presenting before the age of 5.The prevalence of AD has increased two to three times during the past thirty years in industrially developed countries and, today, AD is considered to be a major public health concern.AD is a complex, multifactorial disease resulting from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Although the pathogenesis of AD is not completely clear, it is known that T-helper cells play the central role in it. Its characteristic is predomination of Th2-type response to allergens instead of the Th1 response which is predominant in normal individuals.Disease runs a chronic course, with remissions and exacerbations, while clinical presentation varies among patients depending on age and disease severity.There is no cure for AD, and an adequate disease control generally involves a combination of preventive measures and an individualised therapeutic approach. The conventional management includes the use of emollients to maintain the proper skin hydratation. Topical corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment to control disease flares. However the use of these agents is limited to intermittent and short-term treatment due to potentially adverse effects, such as skin atrophy. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are steroid-free topical immunomodulators, providing safe and effective treatment for moderate to severe AD.

  4. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H; Skov, Lone; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-02-01

    An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Nationwide health registers were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. AD was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. This study was limited to adult patients with AD. No information about AD severity or degree of tobacco consumption was available. Results from a hospital population of AD patients cannot be generalized to the general population. Our results suggest a susceptibility of autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD, especially in smokers. While we cannot conclude on causality based on these data, an increased awareness of autoimmune comorbidities in patients with AD may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdali, Anna M; Anna, Bogdali M; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga; Aleksander, Obtulowicz; Anna, Bialecka; Andrzej, Kasprowicz; Zofia, Magnowska; Krystyna, Obtulowicz

    2016-01-01

    The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus in atopic dermatitis. Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy volunteers without nickel allergy. The elevated secretion of IL-2 under nickel sulfate stimulation in vitro was exclusively found in atopic patients with nickel allergy infected by S. aureus. Our data suggest that nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus are linked in atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Specific IgE to Common Food Allergens in Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mozhgan Moghtaderi; Shirin Farjadian; Sara Kashef; Soheila Alyasin; Maryam Afrasiabi; Marzieh Orooj

    2012-01-01

    .... Although hypersensitivity to foods is assumed to play an essential role in the development of atopic dermatitis in some patients, little is known about common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. Objectives...

  7. Atopic dermatitis is associated with a fivefold increased risk of polysensitisation in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, Suzanne; Brand, Paulus

    Aim: It has been hypothesised that in atopic dermatitis, the dysfunctional skin barrier facilitates the transcutaneous presentation of allergens to the immune system. This study examined whether atopic dermatitis increased the likelihood of polysensitisation, namely sensitisation to five or more

  8. Atopic dermatitis: Burden of illness, quality of life, and associated complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Aaron M

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin condition that is burdensome for individuals with the disease, their families, and for society as a whole. The purpose of this review was to provide a broad overview of the burden of atopic dermatitis, including quality of life and its associated complications. This article was divided into four main sections: (1) atopic dermatitis prevalence, persistence, and population-level burden; (2) burden of atopic dermatitis for individuals and their families; (3) medical complications and comorbidities of atopic dermatitis; and (4) assessment of the burden of atopic dermatitis in clinical practice. Having an understanding of the burden of atopic dermatitis is important for clinicians as they assess and manage atopic dermatitis in the clinical setting.

  9. Increasing Comorbidities Suggest that Atopic Dermatitis Is a Systemic Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Patrick M.; Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Paller, Amy S.; Kabashima, Kenji; Amagai, Masayuki; Luger, Thomas A.; Deleuran, Mette; Werfel, Thomas; Eyerich, Kilian; Stingl, Georg; Bagot, Martine; Hijnen, Dirk Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815519; Ardern-Jones, Michael; Reynolds, Nick; Spuls, Phyllis; Taieb, Alain

    Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of

  10. Clinical implications of new mechanistic insights into atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-08-01

    The review will examine recent advances in our understanding of atopic dermatitis and how these mechanisms provide a framework for new approaches to the management of this common skin disease. The mechanisms by which epithelial skin barrier and immune responses contribute to the complex clinical phenotypes found in atopic dermatitis are being elucidated. Atopic dermatitis often precedes food allergy because reduced skin barrier function allows environmental food allergens to penetrate the skin leading to systemic allergen sensitization. There is increasing evidence that atopic dermatitis is a systemic disease. New treatments are focused on intervention in polarized immune responses leading to allergic diseases. This includes antagonism of IL-4 and IL-13 effects. Prevention strategies involve maintaining normal skin barrier function with emollients to prevent allergens and microbes from penetrating the skin. Recent work on the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis has important implications for its clinical management, including the development of effective barrier creams and biologicals targeting specific polarized immune pathways resulting in skin inflammation.

  11. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: The prostaglandin/leukotriene pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Daniel A; Mosser-Goldfarb, Joy L

    2018-03-01

    The role of leukotrienes and prostaglandins in development of atopy has been prototypically established in studies of asthma pathogenesis. Likewise, both in vitro and in vivo studies of atopic dermatitis have demonstrated that these molecules maintain important pathophysiologic roles. Thus, it follows that targeted therapies against these molecules may be promising in management of atopic dermatitis. Montelukast has had questionable efficacy in patients with atopic dermatitis, whereas small pilots using zileuton did have some clinically significant improvement. There are several agents in development that target leukotrienes and/or prostaglandins as well, including OC000459, Q301, and ZPL-521. In atopic dermatitis, OC000459 did not demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials, and the efficacy of the other 2 agents remains to be seen. Should these medications prove promising, these topical agents may play a future role in chronic maintenance therapy and flare prophylaxis in atopic dermatitis, as antileukotriene therapy does in asthma. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of contact allergy in children suffering from atopic dermatitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis and in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silny, Wojciech; Bartoszak, Leszek; Jenerowicz, Dorota; Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Goździewska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. There is only scarce literature data on the prevalence of contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis. To assess the prevalence of contact allergy among children with atopic dermatitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis and in a population of healthy children. Patch tests were performed in 104 children aged 1-20 years treated for atopic dermatitis in the Department of Dermatology, University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, and also in 2 control groups: 15 subjects with seborrhoeic dermatitis (15-20 years) and 36 healthy children (1-20 years). In children with atopic dermatitis, contact allergy was observed in 47/104 patients (45.2%). With regards to the 3 age subgroups, positive patch test results were detected in 30/43 in children aged 1-5 years (69.8%), 13/36 in children aged 6-14 years (36.1%) and in 4/25 adolescents 15-20 years of age (16%). The highest proportion of positive patch tests was detected in the youngest subgroup of healthy children. Comparative analysis revealed type IV hypersensitivity statistically significantly more frequent in children with atopic dermatitis than in the 2 control groups. The statistically significant positive results in the highest proportion of patch tests in the youngest age subpopulation of children with atopic dermatitis, and detection of contact allergy most commonly in the youngest subgroup of healthy children, may suggest nonspecifically positive results associated with the immaturity of the epidermal barrier during the first years of life. Concentrations of contact allergens included in current pediatric sets of patch tests seems to be too high and should be verified.

  13. Histamine and antihistamines in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddenkotte, Jörg; Maurer, Marcus; Steinhoff, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Itching (pruritus) is perhaps the most common symptom associated with inflammatory skin diseases and can be a lead symptom ofextracutaneous disease (e.g., malignancy, infection, metabolic disorders). In atopic dermatitis itching sensations constitute one of the most prominent and distressing features. The most characteristic response to itching is the scratch reflex: a more or less voluntary, often sub-conscious motor activity, to counteract the itch by slightly painful stimuli. The benefit of a short-termed relieve from itching through this scratch reflex though is counteracted by a simultaneous damage of the epidermal layer of the skin which leads to increased transepidermal water loss and drying, which in turn results in a cycle of more itching and more scratching. A wide range of peripheral itch-inducing stimuli generated within or administered to the skin are able to trigger pruritus, one of them being histamine. Based on early experiments, histamine has been suggested to may play a key role in the pathogenesis ofAD. This is reflected by a history for antihistamines in the therapeutic medication of AD patients. Antihistamines are believed to share a common antipruritic effect and therefore are prescribed to the vast majority of AD patient suffering from itch to act alleviating. The level of evidence in support of the benefits of antihistamine treatment, however, is low. To assess the benefit of antihistamines in the treatment of AD in a better way, their mechanisms and specific effects need to be understood more precisely. In particular their precise indication is crucial for successful use. This book chapter will therefore summarize and assess the role of histamine in AD and the efficacy of antihistamines in its treatment based on results of basic research and clinical studies.

  14. Development of atopic dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Esben; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Høst, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Eller E, Kjaer HF, Høst A, Andersen KE, Bindslev-Jensen C. Development of Atopic Dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2009. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/SThe aim was to describe the relapsing pattern, sensitization and prognosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) in the first 6 yr...... in a population-based, prospective birth cohort. The DARC cohort includes 562 children with clinical examinations, specific-IgE and skin prick test at all follow-ups. All children were examined for the development of AD using Hanifin-Rajka criteria and for food hypersensitivity by oral challenges. Severity of AD...

  15. Effect of probiotic Lactobacillus strains in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that oral bacteriotherapy with probiotics might be useful in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical and anti-inflammatory effect of probiotic supplementation in children with AD. METHODS...... intervention (ie, better, unchanged, or worse). The clinical severity of the eczema was evaluated by using the scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) score. As inflammatory markers, eosinophil cationic protein in serum and cytokine production by PBMCs were measured. RESULTS: After active treatment, 56...

  16. Atopic dermatitis-like pre-Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Baranska-Rybak, Wioletta; Cegielska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    We describe here 4 patients with Sézary syndrome masquerading as adult-onset atopic dermatitis. The patients presented with a clinical picture compatible with wide-spread atopic dermatitis and did not fulfil the criteria for Sézary syndrome (lack of lymphoadenopathy and blood involvement, skin...... histology without presence of atypical cells). In our patients, overt Sézary syndrome developed after immunosuppressive treatment (including cyclosporine). These cases support the validity of the concept of pre-Sézary syndrome, which is a long-lasting, pre-malignant condition, and which may develop to true...

  17. Clinical profile of atopic dermatitis in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onunu, A N; Eze, E U; Kubeyinje, E P

    2007-12-01

    To study the clinical presentation and management problems of atopic dermatitis in Benin City, Nigeria. A 15-year retrospective study from May 1985 to April 2000. Dermatology clinics of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. All new cases of atopic dermatitis presenting to the clinic during the study period. 594 patients suffering from atopic dermatitis, representing 7.92% of new dermatological cases were seen during the study period. There was a slight male preponderance; the male to female ratio was 1.2: 1. Most patients were below 30 years of age with the peak incidence in the 0 9-year age group, with most presenting in the first six months of life. Forty-six percent of the patients had a positive family history of atopy, while 73% also had other atopic disorders. The clinical patterns seen were infantile, childhood and adult forms, which is in keeping with reports from other parts of the world. Precipitating factors were most often obscure; however, high temperatures and humidity were the most common aggravating factors. The important problems encountered were misuse of topical medications, oral antibiotics, anti-fungal drugs and a high follow-up default rate. The clinical characteristics of atopic dermatitis in our study population were similar to the pattern in other parts of the world. There is need for increased awareness of its importance as a cause of morbidity especially in children.

  18. Atopic Dermatitis and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ali R.  Tehrani; Zahra Rahnama; Elham Ahmadi

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Atopic diseases, including asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis, are characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction mediated by T helper 2 cells, while type 1 diabetes mellitus is mediated by T helper 1 cells. Approach: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of atopic dermatitis between children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and age-matched controls. We conducted a case-control study enrolling 150 cases with type 1 diabetes mellitus between 2-20 years from pe...

  19. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort: prevalence, persistence and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortz, C G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C; Barington, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2015-07-01

    While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34.1%), and a considerable number of adults still suffered from atopic dermatitis evaluated both by questionnaire (17.1%) and clinical examination (10.0%). Persistent atopic dermatitis was found in 50% of those diagnosed in school age, and persistent atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with early onset, childhood allergic rhinitis and hand eczema. A close association was also found with allergic contact dermatitis and increased specific IgE to Malassezia furfur, but not with filaggrin gene defect. Persistence of atopic dermatitis in adulthood is common and affects quality of life. Persistent atopic dermatitis is particularly prevalent in those with early onset, allergic rhinitis and hand eczema in childhood. It is important to recognizing atopic dermatitis as a common and disabling disease not only in children but also in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Significance of dietotherapy on the clinical course of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokaite, Rūta; Labanauskas, Liutauras; Balciūnaite, Sigita; Vaideliene, Laimute

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of individual balanced replacement diet in treatment of children with atopic dermatitis, to compare the course of atopic dermatitis and gastrointestinal disorders, as well as the data of skin patch test after a one-year period of dietary treatment. The study group included 154 children (their age varied from 6 months to 18 years) with atopic dermatitis, for whom food allergens were determined by allergic skin tests (skin prick and patch). These children were recommended an individual balanced replacement diet, where possible food allergens were replaced by other products that do not cause allergic reactions. After a one-year dietary treatment, 109 (70.8%) children (such number came for the second study) were tested repeatedly. The following aspects were evaluated for all these children: clinical course of atopic dermatitis (children's mothers provided answers about exacerbation of allergic rash during the last 12 months, gastrointestinal disorders, and used medicines), severity of the progress of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD index). Besides, skin patch test with 25 food allergens was carried out. Children who followed dietary recommendations were younger than children who failed to follow dietary recommendations because of a variety of reasons (P=0.01). Even 49 (62.8%) patients who followed dietary recommendations have shown the following results during the second test: allergic rash disappeared and they did not have to take medicines against allergy anymore. Patients who followed their individual dietary recommendations more rarely suffered from severe allergic rash problems during a 12-month period (P=0.01) and they had to take fewer medicines against allergy, compared to children who did not follow their dietary recommendations (P=0.001). Clinical course of atopic dermatitis in children who followed individual dietary recommendations was easier compared to children who did not follow such recommendations (P=0

  1. Allergic march in children: Atopic dermatitis in Japanese children with bronchial asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsufumi Mayumi; Yusei Ohshima; Kenji Katamura; Setsuko Ito; Takao Hirao; Hiroshi Akutagawa; Naomi Kondo; Akihiro Morikawa

    1996-01-01

    Atopic diseases in children often develop in series and atopic dermatitis usually occurs first. To clarify the serial development of atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma in atopic children in Japan, the present and/or past history of atopic dermatitis in patients with bronchial asthma was examined. Patients (n=280) with bronchial asthma in five prefectures in Japan were examined at a mean (± SD) age of 8.2 (±4.5) years and asked about prior and/or concurrent atopic dermatitis. The mean (± S...

  2. Review of Critical Issues in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F; Simpson, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    About a decade age, loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin molecule were first implicated in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris and, subsequently, of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. Since then, intensive study of the role of filaggrin null mutations have led to other milestones in understanding the pathologic pathways in these diseases, including the initiation, maintenance, and promotion of the disease processes. The result has been new and emerging clinical and pharmacologic strategies for early identification of and intervention in atopic diseases. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S89-S91. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. Serum prolactin levels in atopic dermatitis and the relationship with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugrul Ayanoğlu, Burcu; Muştu Koryürek, Özgül; Yıldırm Başkara, Songül

    2017-10-01

    Prolactin performs as a neuroendocrine modulator of skin epithelial cell proliferation and the skin immune system. The aim was to assess the serum prolactin levels in patients with atopic dermatitis and the relationship with disease severity. The study was performed on 46 patients with atopic dermatitis and 100 healthy controls aged between 0.5 years and 19.5 years. The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis was based on clinical findings and the severity of the disease was documented. Venous blood sampling was performed in order to measure prolactin levels. Prolactin levels in atopic dermatitis were not different from controls and there was no relationship between the severity of atopic dermatitis and serum prolactin levels. Prolactin may not have a role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Further studies with larger sample sizes and measurement of prolactin levels in the skin may help to understand the role of prolactin in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  4. Relationship between breast milk feeding and atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y; Oki, I; Tanihara, S; Ojima, T; Ito, Y; Yamazaki, O; Iwama, M; Tabata, Y; Katsuyama, K; Sasai, Y; Nakagawa, M; Matsushita, A; Hossaka, K; Sato, J; Hidaka, Y; Uda, H; Nakamata, K; Yanagawa, H; Hosaka, K

    2000-03-01

    To determine whether or not the breast milk feeding has a role in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis among children. The target population of the study was all children participating in health check-up program for 3-year-old children in 60 municipalities locating 10 selected prefectures during designated 2 months between October and December 1997. Using a questionnaire, information on nutrition in infants (breast milk only, bottled milk only, or mixed), parity, mothers' age at birth, and a history of atopic dermatitis was obtained. Besides, data on potential confounding factors were obtained. Questionnaires from 3856 children (81.6% of those who were to participate in the programs, and 96.4% of children who participated them) were analyzed. After the adjustment for all potential confounding factors using unconditional logistic models, the risk of atopic dermatitis was slightly higher among children with breast milk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16 with 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.40). Mothers' age at birth (OR for those who were more than 30 years or older in comparison with those who were younger than 30 years = 1.15; 95% CI, 0.96-1.37) and those with second or later parity orders (OR = 1.14, 95% CI; 0.95-1.35) showed odds ratios that were higher than unity without statistical significance. Breast milk elevates the risk of atopic dermatitis slightly without statistical significance; the risk may be, however, higher in children in second or later parity orders.

  5. clinical profile of atopic dermatitis in benin city, nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    encountered were misuse 'of topical medications, oral antibiotics, anti-fungal drugs and a high follow-up default rate. Conclusion: The clinical characteristics of atopic dermatitis in our study population were similar to the pattern in other parts of the world. There is need for increased awareness of its importance as a cause of ...

  6. Inpatient Financial Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narla, Shanthi; Hsu, Derek Y; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the inpatient burden of atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to determine the risk factors and financial burden of hospitalizations for AD in the United States. Data were analyzed from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, including a 20% representative sample of all...

  7. Alcohol during pregnacu and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, a; Petersen, Janne; Grønbæk, M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...

  8. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...

  9. Distinct molecular signatures of mild extrinsic and intrinsic atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta Cathrina; Litman, Thomas; Hald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with underlying defects in epidermal function and immune responses. In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate differences in gene expression in lesional skin from patients with mild extrinsic or intrinsic AD compared...

  10. Epidemiology of atopic dermatitis | Todd | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological studies on atopic dermatitis, primarily performed in children, have shown that the one-year prevalence rate of symptoms is population and area dependent. The few studies that have been done in South Africa among children of different age groups showed one-year prevalence rates of 1 - 13.3%. In adults ...

  11. Nonhistaminergic and mechanical itch sensitization in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H. H.; Elberling, J.; Sølvsten, H.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic or episodic severe itch is recurrent in atopic dermatitis (AD). Nonhistaminergic itch pathways are suggested to dominate in AD itch, contributing to an "itch-scratch-itch cycle" that prolongs and worsens itch, pain, and skin lesions. We hypothesized that nonhistaminergic neuronal...

  12. Non-pharmacological treatment modalities for atopic dermatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-pharmacological measures to improve the management of atopic dermatitis (AD) are as important as pharmacotherapy for true healing of the skin. Skin dryness (which contributes to inflammation, loss of suppleness (leading to fissuring), impaired barrier function, and increased adherence of Staphylococcus aureus ...

  13. Atopic dermatitis of the face, scalp, and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Poulsen, L K; With, H

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that a lipophilic yeast, Pityrosporum ovale (P. ovale) produced a high frequency of positive skin prick tests and in vitro histamine-release (HR) tests in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) of the face, scalp, and neck. In the present study, our aim...

  14. Gallstone risk in adult patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Andersen, Yuki M.F.; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Adult atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with overweight, obesity and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Americans, similarly to psoriasis, but no increased risk of CVD has been shown in European patients with AD. This study investigated the prevalence and risk of gallstones in adults with AD...

  15. Neonatal risk factors of atopic dermatitis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Andersen, Yuki M F; Gislason, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Studies have suggested that several perinatal factors may influence the risk of AD in early childhood. We investigated possible neonatal risk factors such as jaundice, blue light...

  16. Induction of atopic dermatitis by inhalation of house dust mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tupker, RA; DeMonchy, JGR; Coenraads, PJ; vanderMeer, JB

    Background: The pathogenetic role of house dust mite in atopic dermatitis remains controversial. Recent studies have shown that intensive epicutaneous contact of house dust mite allergen with premanipulated skin may induce dematitis. It is, however, uncertain whether such conditions are met during

  17. Editorial update on emerging treatments of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Peck Y

    2012-06-01

    Various new agents are in the research pipeline for atopic dermatitis. These include IL-4 receptor antagonist, cis-urocanic acid, κ-opiod receptor agonist, neurokinin receptor antagonist and antimicrobial peptide. The current review updates the status of these clinical trials and provides insight into other potential molecular targets including IL-22 and TLR-2.

  18. Lactose malabsorption in young Lithuanian children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzeviciene, O; Narkeviciute, I; Eidukevicius, R

    2004-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of lactose malabsorption in young Lithuanian atopic dermatitis children; to evaluate the relationship between lactose malabsorption and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and the relationship between lactose malabsorption and cow's milk intolerance in parents and grandparents. 144 children with atopic dermatitis aged 1.5-24 mo (study group) and 32 children without symptoms of allergic diseases aged 1.5-23 mo (control group) were investigated. Lactose and glucose-galactose absorption tests based on serial blood glucose determination, culture of stool, latex agglutination test for rotavirus and microscopic examination of stool for parasites were performed. Lactose malabsorption was determined in 59 (40.9%) and glucose-galactose malabsorption in 17 (11.8%) children with atopic dermatitis. The risk of developing lactose malabsorption was higher in children fed exclusively on breast milk up to 1 mo of age than in children fed exclusively on breast milk for 4 to 6 mo (OR: 2.62; 95% CI: 1.02-6.75). Lactose malabsorption was significantly more frequent in patients whose mothers did not tolerate cow's milk (20/30; 66.7%) than in patients whose mothers were tolerant to it (39/95; 41.1%) (p = 0.02). Lactose malabsorption was determined in 40.9% of Lithuanian atopic dermatitis children aged under 2 y. Lactose malabsorption appeared to be associated with the duration of exclusive breastfeeding up to only 1 mo and mothers' milk intolerance.

  19. Colloidal oatmeal formulations as adjunct treatments in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F; Nebus, Judith; Wallo, Warren; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2012-07-01

    Colloidal oatmeal has been used for decades to soothe and ameliorate atopic dermatitis and other pruritic and/or xerotic dermatoses. In-vitro and/or in-vivo studies have confirmed the anti-inflammatory, barrier repair, and moisturizing properties of this compound. A broad set of studies has been conducted in recent years to assess the effects of colloidal oatmeal as adjunct treatment in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). This paper will review these studies. In these investigations, patients in all age groups (3 months to 60 years) with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis were included and allowed to continue their prescribed topical medications. These studies found that the daily use of moisturizers and/or cleansers containing colloidal oatmeal significantly improved many clinical outcomes of atopic dermatitis from baseline: investigator's assessment (IGA), eczema area and severity index (EASI), itch, dryness, and quality of life indices. Safety results showed that the formulations were well tolerated in babies, children, and adults with AD.

  20. Cause specific mortality in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Skov, Lone; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adult atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with several co-morbidities, but cause-specific mortality risk is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To examine cause-specific death rates and risk in adults with AD. METHODS: We performed cross-linkage of nationwide health care and cause of death re...

  1. Respiratory comorbidity in South African children with atopic dermatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an early and important step in the propagation of the allergic march, enhancing food and respiratory allergies via epicutaneous sensitisation to allergens. Objectives. To determine the prevalence and patterns of aeroallergen sensitisation, asthma and allergic rhinitis in South African ...

  2. Surfactant protein D in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwy, Thomas; Otkjaer, Kristian; Madsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    was examined using immunohistochemistry on skin biopsies from patients with the two major dermatologic diseases, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. SP-D was located in the stratum basale of all biopsies with similar intense staining in both diseased and normal skin. Differences were detected in stratum spinosum......, no substantial up-regulation of SP-D mRNA was detected in lesional psoriatic skin, and a comparison of serum levels of SP-D between patients with atopic dermatitis or psoriasis and a group of age matched healthy controls did not show significant differences. In conclusion SP-D was significantly more abundant...... where involved psoriatic skin showed intense staining through the entire region significantly different from uninvolved and normal skin. Lesional atopic skin showed moderate staining extending through the basal three-fourths of stratum spinosum. Using real time polymerase chain reaction analysis...

  3. Phototherapy in atopic dermatitis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferriols, A; Aranegui, B; Pujol-Montcusí, J A; Martín-Gorgojo, A; Campos-Domínguez, M; Feltes, R A; Gilaberte, Y; Echeverría-García, B; Alvarez-Pérez, A; García-Doval, I

    2015-06-01

    Phototherapy is a treatment option for atopic dermatitis recommended by several guidelines. To perform a systematic review of the efficacy of different modalities of phototherapy and photochemotherapy in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. We considered all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) performed in patients with atopic dermatitis, and accepted all outcome measures. Articles were identified via an online search of the MEDLINE (via Ovid) and Embase databases and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We also searched for clinical trials registered in Current Controlled Trials and in the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Twenty-one RCTs (961 patients) were included in the qualitative analysis. Two of the trials included children and adolescents (32 patients). The efficacy of narrow-band UV-B and UV-A1 phototherapy was similar for the different outcome measures contemplated. Two RCTs assessed the efficacy of psoralen plus UV-A therapy (PUVA). No serious adverse events were described. In general, the publications reviewed were characterized by a high risk of bias and poor reporting of methodology and results. There is evidence for the use of narrow-band UV-B and UV-A1 phototherapy in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Evidence supporting the use of PUVA in atopic dermatitis is scarce and there is little information on the use of phototherapy in childhood. For the purpose of future studies, it would be advisable to use comparable criteria and scales for the evaluation of disease severity and patients, to standardize radiation methods, and to establish a minimum follow-up time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, J M; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2001-01-01

    dermatitis in the same group of adolescents. OBJECTIVES: To assess prevalence measures of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents in Odense municipality, Denmark. METHODS: The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study among 1501 eighth grade...... prevalence 3.6% (Hanifin and Rajka criteria). In the interview the lifetime prevalence of inhalant allergy was estimated as 17.7% (6.9% allergic asthma, 15.7% allergic rhinitis). The lifetime prevalence of hand eczema based on the questionnaire was 9.2%, the 1-year period prevalence was 7.3% and the point......BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are common in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological knowledge is sparse for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis in this age group. Furthermore, no population-based studies have evaluated the prevalence of atopic diseases and hand and contact...

  5. [Relationship between breast milk and atopic dermatitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y; Oki, I; Tanihara, S; Ojima, T; Kuwano, T; Tsukada, M; Momose, M; Kobayashi, M; Yanagawa, H

    1999-04-01

    To determine whether or not dioxins and furans in breast milk have a role in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis among children. The target population of the study was all children participating in health check-up program for 3-year-old children in Tochigi Prefecture in September and October 1997. Using a questionnaire, information on nutrition in infants (breast milk only, bottled milk only, or mixed), parity, mothers' age at birth, and a history of atopic dermatitis was obtained. Besides, data on potential confounding factors were obtained. Questionnaires from 2,968 children (85.3% of those who were to participate in the programs, and 90.2% of children who participated them) were analyzed. The risk of atopic dermatitis was higher among children with breast milk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.37 with 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.83) and those with mixed nutrition (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.94-1.57) in comparison with children with only bottled milk. Mothers' age at birth (OR for those who were more than 30 years or older in comparison with those who were younger than 30 years = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.01-1.62) and those with second or later parity orders (OR = 1.32, 95% CI; 1.04-1.67) were also risk factors of the dermatitis after the adjustment for some potential confounding factors. Breast milk elevates the risk of atopic dermatitis slightly; the risk is, however, higher in children in second or later parity orders. If the PCDDs and PCDFs in breast milk cause the dermatitis, this would contradict the assumed metabolism of these chemicals in human bodies.

  6. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti; Chiara Mameli; Valentina Fabiano; Fabio Meneghin

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many ...

  7. Treating atopic dermatitis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of a ceramide hyaluronic acid emollient foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacha O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Pacha, Adelaide A HebertDepartment of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Advances in current understanding of the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis have led to improved targeting of the structural deficiencies in atopic skin. Ceramide deficiency appears to be one of the major alterations in atopic dermatitis and the replenishment of this epidermal component through topically applied ceramide based emollients appears to be safe, well tolerated, and effective. Recently a ceramide hyaluronic acid foam has become commercially available and increasing evidence supports its safety and efficacy in patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, ceramide, Hylatopic, eczema, non-steroidal, dermatology

  8. Contact sensitization in Dutch children and adolescents with and without atopic dermatitis - a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbes, Stefanie; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Smitt, Johannes H. Sillevis; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; Middelkamp-Hup, Maritza A

    Background. Allergic contact dermatitis is known to occur in children with and without atopic dermatitis, but more data are needed on contact sensitization profiles in these two groups. Objectives. To identify frequent allergens in children with and without atopic dermatitis suspected of having

  9. Reduced occurrence of early atopic dermatitis because of immunoactive prebiotics among low-atopy-risk infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grueber, Christoph; van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Mosca, Fabio; Moro, Guido; Chirico, Gaetano; Braegger, Christian P.; Riedler, Josef; Boehm, Guenther; Wahn, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most infants developing atopic dermatitis have a low risk for atopy. Primary prevention of atopic dermatitis is difficult. Objective: To assess the effect of supplementation of an infant and follow-on formula with prebiotic and immunoactive oligosaccharides on the occurrence of atopic

  10. Comparison of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis guidelines-an argument for aggressive atopic dermatitis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Mary E; Lio, Peter A

    2017-11-01

    The development of effective systemic treatments has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. The availability of safe new treatments and the understanding of psoriasis as a systemic disease with comorbidities and effects on quality of life have driven the current aggressive treatment paradigm of psoriasis. Historically the morbidity of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been dismissed, given the perception of AD as "just" a rash. Differences in the guidelines for psoriasis and AD management may suggest variations in the current conceptualization of disease severity and effects on quality of life. Published guidelines from the American Academy of Dermatology for the management of psoriasis and AD were reviewed. We recorded the similarities and differences in disease assessment and therapy. The threshold to use biologic agents for moderate to severe psoriasis highlights the aggressive nature of modern psoriasis treatment. AD guidelines include an assessment of quality of life but do not designate a disease severity threshold for systemic treatment. AD and psoriasis have a tremendous effect on quality of life. The AD guidelines have a less aggressive approach to disease management than the psoriasis guidelines. We should think critically about rapid advancement to systemic agents in AD management, especially now that more and better agents are being developed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Satisfaction with treatment of atopic dermatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Maciejewska-Franczak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Atopic dermatitis is a frequent chronic skin disease in children. The major clinical manifestations include itching and dryness of the skin. The pathomechanism of skin changes results from an interaction of genetic and environmental factors as well as impairments of skin barrier function and immune response. Despite chronic treatment the disease is characterized by exacerbation and remission periods and lowers the quality of life of patients and their families. Objective. To evaluate treatment satisfaction in children with atopic dermatitis, identify components of medical care which contribute to treatment satisfaction, and evaluate the relationship between satisfaction and adherence to a doctor’s recommendations. Material and methods. One hundred and nineteen children (6 months to 12 years old, mean age 4.9 years with atopic dermatitis were enrolled in the study. The doctor performed physical examinations and history taking and filled in questionnaires evaluating the course and exacerbation of the disease, the type of administered therapy and diagnostics. The patients’ parents completed two questionnaires: a questionnaire assessing satisfaction with the therapy (the type of recommended therapy, adherence to recommendations, contact with the doctor, obtained information, degree of psychological support, role of parents in taking decisions regarding the therapy and a quality of life questionnaire. Results. The authors observed that 56% of parents were dissatisfied with the administered treatment, and 40% failed to adhere to at least one therapeutic recommendation. Parents of children with mild atopic dermatitis significantly more often stop using emollients. It was also observed that lack of treatment satisfaction in children with severe atopic dermatitis whose parents are insufficiently educated contributes to decreased adherence. The authors identified independent factors of lack of treatment satisfaction: failure to obtain

  12. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Drives Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H; Kong, Heidi H; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-04-21

    Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of the skin microbiome in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, R D; Bandier, J; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Dysbiosis is a hallmark of atopic dermatitis (AD). The composition of skin microbiome communities and the causality of dysbiosis in eczema have not been well established. The objective of this review is to describe the skin microbiome profile in AD and address whether there is a causal relationship...... low bacterial diversity (lowest at dermatitis-involved sites) and three studies showed depletion of Malassezia spp. and high non-Malassezia fungal diversity. The relative abundance of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were elevated and other genera were reduced, including...

  14. USAGE OF DIOCTAHEDRAL SMECTITE IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Botkina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of enter sorbent — dioctahedral Smectite (Neosmektin — usage as part of complex therapy of children with atopic dermatitis (ATD. It is shown that the administration of Smectite favored better efficacy of baseline treatment of ATD, more express and quick regression of skin manifestations of the disease, decrease in number of children with eosinophilia. High efficacy of ATD treatment with Smectite indicates the pathogenetic justification of efferent therapy of the disease. Observation results witness the good tolerability of Smectite: side effects related to the treatment were only observed in 14 percent of children.Key words: children, atopic dermatits, smectite, treatment.

  15. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    addition, increased permeability to topical corticosteroids is noted at anatomical sites with a thin epidermis like the ... Pitted nails. Irritant contact dermatitis. History of exposure to irritants. Rash in area of exposure. Damage to skin barrier. Absence of family history. Insect bites. Symmetric distribution around the scalp, neck,.

  16. Management of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: The Role of Emollient Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Catherine Mack Correa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder that afflicts a growing number of young children. Genetic, immune, and environmental factors interact in a complex fashion to contribute to disease expression. The compromised stratum corneum found in atopic dermatitis leads to skin barrier dysfunction, which results in aggravation of symptoms by aeroallergens, microbes, and other insults. Infants—whose immune system and epidermal barrier are still developing—display a higher frequency of atopic dermatitis. Management of patients with atopic dermatitis includes maintaining optimal skin care, avoiding allergic triggers, and routinely using emollients to maintain a hydrated stratum corneum and to improve barrier function. Flares of atopic dermatitis are often managed with courses of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. This paper discusses the role of emollients in the management of atopic dermatitis, with particular emphasis on infants and young children.

  17. Evaluation of Immune Indices and Serum Vitamin D Content in Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska-Opałka, Agnieszka; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Lewicki, Sławomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Kalicki, Bolesław

    2017-01-01

    The influence of vitamin D on allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis, is linked to the presence of vitamin D nuclear receptors in immune cells. The present study seeks to determine the possible relationship between serum vitamin D content and immune indices in children with atopic dermatitis. The study was conducted in 19 children with atopic dermatitis. The control consisted of 17 age-matched healthy children. A single significant finding was a distinctly lower number of serum regulatory T cells in atopic dermatitis compared with controls (p atopic dermatitis. In conclusion, the results point to a regulatory role of T cells in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, but fail to substantiate the influence of vitamin D on the course of the disease.

  18. The Association Between Bathing Habits and Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroulis, Ioannis; Pyle, Tia; Kopylov, David; Little, Anthony; Gaughan, John; Kratimenos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that frequently affects children. The current recommendations on management using lifestyle modification are highly variable, leading to confusion and uncertainty among patients. To determine current bathing behaviors and the subsequent impact on disease severity. This was an observational cross-sectional study conducted at an urban pediatric emergency department. Parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning the patient's bathing habits. The results were correlated with the atopic dermatitis severity determined by the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) tool. No difference between variables was found to be significant for bathing frequency, time spent bathing, or use of moisturizers. Multivariate analysis showed that atopic dermatitis severity increased with age greater than 2 years (P = .0004) and with greater bathing duration (P = .001). Atopic dermatitis severity may be associated with a longer duration of bathing. The frequency of bathing does not appear to affect atopic dermatitis severity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Consensus Conference on Clinical Management of pediatric Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elena; Neri, Iria; Ricci, Giampaolo; Baldo, Ermanno; Barone, Maurizio; Belloni Fortina, Anna; Bernardini, Roberto; Berti, Irene; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Capra, Lucetta; Carello, Rossella; Cipriani, Francesca; Comberiati, Pasquale; Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, Maya; Fontana, Elena; Gruber, Michaela; Haddock, Ellen; Maiello, Nunzia; Meglio, Paolo; Patrizi, Annalisa; Peroni, Diego; Scarponi, Dorella; Wielander, Ingrid; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2016-03-02

    The Italian Consensus Conference on clinical management of atopic dermatitis in children reflects the best and most recent scientific evidence, with the aim to provide specialists with a useful tool for managing this common, but complex clinical condition. Thanks to the contribution of experts in the field and members of the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) and the Italian Society of Pediatric Dermatology (SIDerP), this Consensus statement integrates the basic principles of the most recent guidelines for the management of atopic dermatitis to facilitate a practical approach to the disease. The therapeutical approach should be adapted to the clinical severity and requires a tailored strategy to ensure good compliance by children and their parents. In this Consensus, levels and models of intervention are also enriched by the Italian experience to facilitate a practical approach to the disease.

  20. The role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębińska, Anna; Sikorska-Szaflik, Hanna; Urbanik, Magdalena; Boznański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has been suggested to have an important impact on a much wider aspects on human health than calcium homeostasis and mineral metabolism, specifically in the field of human immunology. It has been reported that vitamin D influences the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems, which makes the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases a field of interest. Although many studies have sought to determine whether vitamin D has an influence on progression of allergic disease, the impact of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis development and severity remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies relating vitamin D to atopic dermatitis and discuss its possible role in the pathogenesis of allergic skin diseases, emphasizing the need for well-designed, prospective trials on vitamin D supplementation in the context of prevention and treatment for allergic conditions.

  1. [Hypnotherapy of atopic dermatitis in an adult. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczel, Kristóf; Gál, János

    2016-01-17

    Hypnosis is well known for its modulatory effects on immune and inflammatory processes, and it is a therapeutic option for certain diseases of such pathogenesis. The authors report treatment of an adult patient with extensive atopic dermatitis, who was only minimally responsive to conservative treatment. In a 15 session hypnotherapy the authors combined the use of direct, symptom-oriented suggestive techniques with hypnotic procedures to identify and modify comorbid psychological issues. To monitor the effect of the treatment, patient diaries (quality and quantity of sleep, intensity of pain and itch) and repeated psychometric tests were used. At the end of treatment there were improvements in all measured dimensions (itch, pain, insomnia, activity, anxiety and emotional state) both clinically and psychometrically. The authors conclude, that hypnosis can be an effective adjunctive therapy in atopic dermatitis, and in certain severe cases may constitute a salvage therapy.

  2. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: TRPV1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchak, Jonathan G; Swerlick, Robert A

    2018-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are important mediators of somatosensory signaling throughout the body. Our understanding of the contribution of TRPs to a multitude of cutaneous physiologic processes has grown substantially in the past decade. TRP cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), one of the better-understood members of this large family of ion channels, affects multiple pathways involved in pruritus. Further, TRPV1 appears to play a role in maintaining skin barrier function. Together, these properties make TRPV1 a ripe target for new therapies in atopic dermatitis. Neurokinin antagonists may affect similar pathways and have been studied to this effect. Early trials data suggest that these therapies are safe, but assessment of their efficacy in atopic dermatitis is pending as we await publication of phase II and III clinical trials data. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-Interleukin-31 Receptor A Antibody for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Thomas; Hanifin, Jon M; Furue, Masutaka; Pulka, Grazyna; Mlynarczyk, Izabela; Wollenberg, Andreas; Galus, Ryszard; Etoh, Takafumi; Mihara, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hiroki; Stewart, Jonathan; Kabashima, Kenji

    2017-03-02

    Interleukin-31 may play a role in the pathobiologic mechanism of atopic dermatitis and pruritus. We wanted to assess the efficacy and safety of nemolizumab (CIM331), a humanized antibody against interleukin-31 receptor A, in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. In this phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial, we assigned adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis that was inadequately controlled by topical treatments to receive subcutaneous nemolizumab (at a dose of 0.1 mg, 0.5 mg, or 2.0 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo every 4 weeks or an exploratory dose of 2.0 mg of nemolizumab per kilogram every 8 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage improvement from baseline in the score on the pruritus visual-analogue scale (on which a negative change indicates improvement) at week 12. Secondary end points included changes in the score on the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI, on which a negative change indicates improvement), and body-surface area of atopic dermatitis. Of 264 patients who underwent randomization, 216 (82%) completed the study. At week 12, among the patients who received nemolizumab every 4 weeks, changes on the pruritus visual-analogue scale were -43.7% in the 0.1-mg group, -59.8% in the 0.5-mg group, and -63.1% in the 2.0-mg group, versus -20.9% in the placebo group (Patopic dermatitis were -7.5%, -20.0%, and -19.4% with nemolizumab, versus -15.7% with placebo. Among the patients receiving nemolizumab every 4 weeks, treatment discontinuations occurred in 9 of 53 patients (17%) in the 0.1-mg group, in 9 of 54 (17%) in the 0.5-mg group, and in 7 of 52 (13%) in the 2.0-mg group, versus in 9 of 53 (17%) in the placebo group. In this phase 2 trial, nemolizumab at all monthly doses significantly improved pruritus in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, which showed the efficacy of targeting interleukin-31 receptor A. The limited size and length of the trial preclude conclusions regarding

  4. Epidemiology of Asthma in 94 Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaldo Cantani

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present 94 children affected with Atopic Dermatitis (AD), aggravated by respiratory allergy, asthma and/ or Allergic Rhinitis (AR). AD is a common disorder, frequently complicated by asthma-like symptoms, we debate either disorder and concluded that both AR and asthma can afflict most babies with AD, especially when both parents smoke. We confirm our previous statistics, according to which little children not fed breast milk may react to smallest doses of allergens.

  5. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis history in asthmatic children

    OpenAIRE

    Rifda Suryati; Arwin AP Akib; I Boediman; Abdul Latief

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a risk factor of asthma. There is still limited information about its prevalence and characteristics in asthmatic children. Objective To find out the prevalence of AD history in asthmatic children. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the De- partment of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, from July until December 2004. Patients with asthma who were at or less than 5 years of age were included in the...

  6. Selected aspects of quality of life in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kasznia-Kocot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic dermatological disease of multifactorial pathogenesis with persistent pruritus and extreme skin dryness including typical skin changes caused by many interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The study aims to evaluate the selected aspects of quality of life in AD. Material and methods. To what extent does the disease affect the daily practice of the patient and their family, what are their expenditures in connection with the treatment, and also how they perceive themselves and emotional, sexual, social behavior. 71 adult subjects 48(68% women and 23 (32% men were selected from the allergology clinics in the region of Silesia for this questionnaire based study. Results. Pruritus was felt by everyone, skin pain by 69%, and skin burning by 86%. The great majority of subjects had some constrains in doing housework due to skin complaints. The disease also affected professional work and school achievements. Almost everyone agreed that money spent on medication purchase and skin care agents impacted on financial resources. Atopic dermatitis affected 75% in social functioning, leisure time, sports practicing. The disease affected self-esteem level and confidence. Half of the examined subjects experienced bad feelings in contact with a partner, or felt stigmatized by negative reactions of the environment because of the skin appearance. Often atopic dermatitis caused problems with sound sleep (65% various emotional disorders and also disorders in the sexual sphere (32%. Every fourth subject felt depressed and every seventh thought of suicide. Conclusions. Atopic dermatitis is a disease which adversely influences many aspects of life and undoubtedly impairs the quality of life in a serious and distressing way. Therefore its treatment should be supported by psychotherapy.

  7. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Adults With Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter R; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2017-01-01

    , socioeconomic status, health care consumption, smoking, alcohol abuse, diabetes, and cholesterol-lowering drug use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The outcome was initiation of pharmacotherapy used for treatment of ED. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 1,756,679 Danish men (age range = 30-100 years), of which 2...... population for men with AD. Egeberg A, Hansen PR, Gislason GH, et al. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Adults With Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis. J Sex Med 2017;XX:X-XX....

  8. Lack of efficacy of topical cyclosporin A in atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rie, M. A.; Meinardi, M. M.; Bos, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Since oral cyclosporin A (CsA) has demonstrated its effectiveness in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, efforts have been made to develop a topical CsA formulation, thus avoiding systemic adverse events. A limited number of publications are available on the use of topical CsA in allergic contact

  9. Development of atopic dermatitis and its association with prenatal and early life exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Roduit, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of children in industrialized countries are affected by atopic dermatitis. From epidemiological studies, it is quite obvious that the worldwide prevalence of atopic dermatitis has considerably increased over the past decades and constitutes a major public health problem. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that occurs in very early life and frequently precedes the development of asthma and allergic rhinitis during the first several years of life. Although a large...

  10. APPLICATION EXPERIENCE OF CETIRIZINE SYRUP IN THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Makarova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the findings of the scientific research, whose purpose was to study the impact of cetirizine syrup (Zodiac, Zentiva, Czech Republic on the run of atopic dermatitis among 36 children aged between 2 and 6 years old. The work shows that introduction of the medication into the complex therapy of atopic dermatitis among children provides a fast clinical effect. Cetirizine syrup is well tolerated by the children.Key words: atopic dermatitis, children, cetirizine, treatment.

  11. Comparison of Dermatology and Allergy Guidelines for Atopic Dermatitis Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Girish C; Lio, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin condition treated by dermatologists, allergists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians. Several treatment guidelines and therapeutic parameters exist for the management of this disease. Health care professionals may be unaware of guidelines created by specialty organizations other than their own. To review, compare, and contrast the most recent AD management guidelines. The guidelines for AD management published by the American Academy of Dermatology 2014 work group were compared with those created by the 2012 Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. International guidelines created by the 2012 European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis and the 2013 Asia-Pacific Consensus Group for Atopic Dermatitis were also considered. Several differences among the guidelines suggest that there may be disparity in the perceptions of AD between US dermatologists and allergists and health care professionals in other areas of the world. There are notable differences among the guidelines regarding the recommendations for the use of diluted bleach baths, vitamin D, and environmental modifications. Comparison of different guidelines may ultimately augment knowledge of treatment strategies and enhance realization of biases in the understanding and management of AD.

  12. The Skin Microbiome in Atopic Dermatitis and Its Relationship to Emollients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynde, Charles W; Andriessen, Anneke; Bertucci, Vince; McCuaig, Catherine; Skotnicki, Sandy; Weinstein, Miriam; Wiseman, Marni; Zip, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Human-associated bacterial communities on the skin, skin microbiome, likely play a central role in development of immunity and protection from pathogens. In atopic patients, the skin bacterial diversity is smaller than in healthy subjects. To review treatment strategies for atopic dermatitis in Canada, taking the skin microbiome concept into account. An expert panel of 8 Canadian dermatologists explored the role of skin microbiome in clinical dermatology, specifically looking at atopic dermatitis. The panel reached consensus on the following: (1) In atopic patients, the skin microbiome of lesional atopic skin is different from nonlesional skin in adjacent areas. (2) Worsening atopic dermatitis and smaller bacterial diversity are strongly associated. (3) Application of emollients containing antioxidant and antibacterial components may increase microbiome diversity in atopic skin. The skin microbiome may be the next frontier in preventive health and may impact the approach to atopic dermatitis treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Suicidal Ideation in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: A German Cross-sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dieris-Hirche

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was performed to assess symptoms of suicidality, depression and anxiety in adult patients with atopic dermatitis. The study describes the relationships between these psychiatric symptoms and skin-specific factors, such as atopic dermatitis severity and skin satisfaction. A sample of 181 German patients with atopic dermatitis was compared with a control group of 64 persons with healthy skin with a similar age and sex distribution. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess suicidality (Pöldinger’s Scale, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS, quality of life (Dermatology Life Quality Index; DLQI, atopic dermatitis severity (Patient-Oriented Scoring Atopic Dermatitis; PO-SCORAD and skin satisfaction (Skin Satisfaction Questionnaire; SSQ. The prevalence of suicidal ideation among patients with atopic dermatitis was high (21.3%; 3.9% scored above the cut-off that might be an indicator for acute suicidality. Depression symptoms, high severity of atopic dermatitis, lower age, and little touching within the family were identified as significant factors to predict suicidality in atopic dermatitis. Psychiatric screening in dermatological treatment of atopic dermatitis is discussed.

  14. The Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: Summary of a Report for the National Eczema Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Aaron M; Wang, Annie R; Li, Wen-Qing; Sevetson, Erika; Block, Julie K; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2017-01-01

    To assess the patient-level and societal burden of atopic dermatitis, we comprehensively reviewed the literature related to quality of life, social, economic, academic, and occupational impacts. Atopic dermatitis has profound impacts on patient and family quality of life. A conservative estimate of the annual costs of atopic dermatitis in the United States is $5.297 billion (in 2015 USD). People with atopic dermatitis may change their occupation because of their skin disease. Research gaps include quality of life assessments outside of tertiary care centers, impacts on partners and families of adult patients, and updated comprehensive cost estimates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...... at the site of each biopsy. After fixation and plastic embedding, the biopsies were cut into 2 microns serial sections. Ten sections, 30 microns apart, from each biopsy were examined and stained alternately with either toluidine blue or Giemsa stain and mast cell profile numbers were determined. The study...

  16. Cost-effectiveness of Prophylactic Moisturization for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Immaneni, Supriya; Hazen, Gordon B; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Paller, Amy S; Lio, Peter A

    2017-02-06

    Emerging evidence suggests that the use of moisturizers on newborns and infants (ie, from birth to 6 months of age) is potentially helpful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis. To investigate the cost-effectiveness of using a daily moisturizer as prevention against atopic dermatitis among high-risk newborns. In a cost-effectiveness analysis, the average cost of total-body moisturization using 7 common moisturizers from birth to 6 months of age was determined for male and female infants. We assumed the same unit of weight per moisturizer used for a given body surface area. Based on previously reported data (relative risk reduction of 50%), the incremental gain in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) was determined using a 6-month time window. The cost-effectiveness of each moisturizer was determined by assuming equal efficacy. A sensitivity analysis was conducted by varying the relative risk from 0.28 to 0.90. Use of prophylactic moisturizing compounds. The primary outcomes were the incremental cost-effectiveness values ($/QALY) for each moisturizer in preventing atopic dermatitis during a 6-month time window. The calculated amount of daily all-body moisturizer needed at birth was 3.6 g (0.12 oz) per application, which increased to 6.6 g (0.22 oz) at 6 months of age. Of the 7 products evaluated, the average price was $1.07/oz (range, $0.13/oz-$2.96/oz). For a 6-month time window, the average incremental QALY benefit was 0.021. The sensitivity analysis showed that the incremental gain of QALY ranged from 0.0041 to 0.030. Petrolatum was the most cost-effective ($353/QALY [95% CI, $244-$1769/QALY) moisturizer in the cohort. Even assuming the lowest incremental QALYs for the most expensive moisturizer, the intervention was still less than $45 000/QALY. Overall, atopic dermatitis represents a major health expenditure and has been associated with multiple comorbidities. Daily moisturization may represent a cost-effective, preventative strategy to reduce the

  17. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2007-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were......?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared...... with a threefold increased risk among cotwins of an affected fraternal twin, relative to the general population. Genes accounted for 82% and nonshared environmental factors accounted for 18% of the individual susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to atopic...

  18. Specific IgE to common food allergens in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin; Kashef, Sara; Alyasin, Soheila; Afrasiabi, Maryam; Orooj, Marzieh

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a major public health problem, often starting in early childhood and sometimes followed by other allergic diseases. Although hypersensitivity to foods is assumed to play an essential role in the development of atopic dermatitis in some patients, little is known about common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. This study was designed to identify probable food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis and find the relationship between food sensitization and the severity of atopic dermatitis. This study included 90 children aged 2-48 months with atopic dermatitis. Skin prick tests for cow's milk, hen's egg, almond, potato and soybean were done. Serum specific IgE to 20 food allergens was also screened. Among children with atopic dermatitis, the frequency of food sensitization was 40% by skin prick test and 51% by food-specific IgE. Children with atopic dermatitis were most commonly sensitized to cow's milk (31%), hen's egg (17.7%), tree nuts (17.7%), wheat (12.2%), potato (11.1%), tomato (8.8%) and peanut (8.8%). In 42 children with moderate to severe eczema, sensitivity to food allergens was 78.5% by skin prick test and 88% by serum specific IgE evaluation. Our results showed that cow's milk, hen's egg and tree nuts were the most common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. Sensitization to foods was much higher in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Determining specific IgE in children with atopic dermatitis can be helpful in managing these patients.

  19. Pattern of contact sensitization in patients with and without atopic dermatitis in a hospital-based clinical database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization are common conditions; however, a definite understanding of the relationship between contact sensitization and atopic dermatitis has not been reached. OBJECTIVES: In this descriptive study, we investigated the differences between positi...

  20. Proceedings of the 4th Georg Rajka International Symposium on Atopic Dermatitis, Arcachon, France, September 15-17, 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taïeb, Alain; Hanifin, Jon; Cooper, Kevin; Bos, Jan D.; Imokawa, Genji; David, Tim J.; Ring, Johannes; Gelmetti, Carlo; Kapp, Alexander; Furue, Masutaka; de Prost, Yves; Darsow, Ulf; Werfel, Thomas; Atherton, David; Oranje, Arnold P.

    2006-01-01

    The 4th Georg Rajka International Symposium on Atopic Dermatitis presented a comprehensive view of our current understanding and management of atopic dermatitis (AD). These proceedings highlight contributions related to the history of AD doctrines; genetic and epigenetic background; epidemiology;

  1. Cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malajian, Dana; Belsito, Donald V

    2013-08-01

    Literature on the relationship between atopic dermatitis (AD) and cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity is inconclusive. We sought to compare the rates of positive patch test reactions to allergens on the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) standard tray among patients with and without AD, and, to assess whether atopic patients in our database were more likely to patch test positive to certain classes of allergens. A total of 2305 patients underwent patch testing to the NACDG standard screening series. The incidence of positive patch test reactions among patients with AD (n = 297) and without AD (n = 2008) was assessed. Statistical analysis was done using a χ(2) test with Yates continuity correction. Compared with nonatopic patients, those with AD were statistically more likely to have positive patch tests. AD was associated with contact hypersensitivity to nickel, cobalt, and chromium, but was not associated with contact sensitization to fragrances. Only patients suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis were tested. Our population was geographically limited to metropolitan Kansas City (including Kansas City, MO, Kansas City, KS, and the adjoining suburbs). Compared with nonatopics, patients with AD are significantly more likely to have at least 1 positive patch test reaction and to develop contact hypersensitivity to metal allergens. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic Agents for Severe Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaro, Eliza R; Sidbury, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), or eczema, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by relapsing pruritic, scaly, erythematous papules and plaques frequently associated with superinfection. The lifelong prevalence of AD is over 20 % in affluent countries. When a child with severe AD is not responding to optimized topical therapy including phototherapy, and relevant triggers cannot be identified or avoided, systemic therapy should be considered. If studies show early aggressive intervention can prevent one from advancing along the atopic march, and relevant triggers such as food allergies cannot be either identified or avoided, systemic therapy may also play a prophylactic role. Though the majority of evidence exists in adult populations, four systemic non-specific immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory drugs have demonstrated efficacy in AD and are used in most patients requiring this level of intervention regardless of age: cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, methotrexate, and azathioprine. This article reviews the use of these medications as well as several promising targeted therapies currently in development including dupilumab and apremilast. We briefly cover several other systemic interventions that have been studied in children with atopic dermatitis.

  3. Atopic dermatitis in the first six months of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, E; Meneghini, C L

    1989-01-01

    1,476/2,320 of our cases of atopic dermatitis (AD) start in the first six months of life. The diagnosis is usually easy, but at this age it is sometimes more difficult, mainly because of lack of or rare evidence of scratching, but also because of the brief clinical history that does not allow observation of the characteristic chronic and relapsing course. Moreover, the major atopic disorders-asthma, rhinitis-usually appears later in the natural history of atopic subjects. From a differential diagnosis point of view, AD is the most definite dermatological disorder at this age. Other not well defined conditions occurring in the first six months of life are usually referred to as infantile seborrheic dermatitis, a name that has been used for at least four different disorders: cradle cap, cradle cap with involvement of inguinal, axillary and retroauricular folds, napkin psoriasis and Leiner's erythroderma. From a clinical point of view, AD in the first months of life is characterized by the prevalence of exudating lesions; moreover, the lack of or the rare evidence of scratching allows us to observe isolated vesicular lesions that are found with difficulty in the further course of the disease.

  4. CYCLOSPORINE IN TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Alekseeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AtD is one of the most widespread types of allergic lesions of skin in children. Increase of severe types of AtD with lesion of big parts of skin, high frequency of exacerbations, presence of concomitant atopic diseases, and inefficiency of standard therapeutic approaches, torpid clinical course and early development of disability, causes an anxiety. Present standard approaches can be ineffective in children with severe clinical course of AtD and they are not able to prevent progression of disease, development of severe exacerbations and child’s disability. One of therapeutic alternatives for these patients is treatment with immunosuppressive agents. The article describes questions of treatment with cyclosporine in systemic therapy of severe resistant forms of AtD in children. Author discusses effectiveness and safety of a drug, formulated rules of treatment of severe AtD with cyclosporine. Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, cyclosporine, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:117-120

  5. Atopic dermatitis in adults: clinical and epidemiological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Leão Orfali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory disease causing intense pruritus, and with typical clinical features. There are few epidemiological studies concerning AD in adults, as well as little information about its prognostic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological course of adults with AD. METHODS: 80 patients aged above 18 years (mean age = 29 years were selected (30 males and 50 females and interviewed about hospitalization, systemic corticoid usage, age of AD onset, and personal and/or familial history of atopy. Disease severity was evaluated through the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD tool. Laboratory examination included IgE serum levels and eosinophil blood count. RESULTS: 71 out of 80 patients referred association with respiratory symptoms (18 had asthma, 17 had rhinitis, and 36 had both conditions; nine out of 80 patients denied any respiratory disease. AD patients were divided in mild (n = 25, moderate (n = 30, and severe (n = 25; 56% had one or more hospitalizations due to AD. A positive association was found between IgE serum levels, eosinophil blood count, and disease severity. CONCLUSION: Adult AD represents a clinical challenge that needs to be better characterized, since it can be misdiagnosed and interferes with the patient's social and personal life. The association of skin and respiratory atopic disease is frequent, and laboratory parameters such as circulating IgE levels and eosinophil blood count may be helpful to assess disease severity.

  6. Case for diagnosis. Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1: differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lorena Maria Lima de; Souza, Marcos Vilela de; Guedes, Antonio Carlos Martins; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi

    2017-01-01

    Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH) is the main cutaneous marker of HTLV-1 infection. This disease occurs primarily in children and should be differentiated from other eczemas, especially from atopic dermatitis. The largest series of IDH are from Jamaica and Brazil. There are an estimated 15 to 20 million infected people in the world, and Brazil is one of the endemic regions. Studies suggest that IDH in children may be a marker for the development of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) or myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM / TSP) in adulthood.

  7. Analysis of food allergy in atopic dermatitis patients - association with concomitant allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few reports demonstrate the comorbidity of food allergy and allergic march in adult patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate, if there is some relation in atopic dermatitis patients at the age 14 years and older who suffer from food allergy to common food allergens to other allergic diseases and parameters as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed; these parameters were examined: food allergy (to wheat flour, cow milk, egg, peanuts and soy, the occurrence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. The statistical evaluation of the relations among individual parameters monitored was performed. Results: Food allergy was altogether confirmed in 65 patients (29% and these patients suffer significantly more often from bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Persistent atopic dermatitis lesions and positive data in family history about atopy are recorded significantly more often in patients with confirmed food allergy to examined foods as well. On the other hand, the onset of atopic dermatitis under 5 year of age is not recorded significantly more often in patients suffering from allergy to examined foods. Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis patients suffering from food allergy suffer significantly more often from allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, persistent eczematous lesions and have positive data about atopy in their family history.

  8. Prebiotics and probiotics: the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolad, N; Armstrong, A W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify whether supplementation with prebiotics and/or probiotics help prevent the development or reduce the severity of atopic dermatitis in children less than three years of age. Since 1997, immunostimulatory supplements, such as prebiotics and probiotics, have been investigated. Various supplementations include probiotics (single strain or mix), probiotics with formula, probiotics mix with prebiotics, and prebiotics. In this narrative review, we examined 13 key articles on prebiotics and/or probiotics, and their effects on infant atopic dermatitis. Among the selected studies, a total of 3,023 participants received supplements or placebo. Eight out of the 13 (61.5%) studies reported a significant effect on the prevention of atopic dermatitis after supplementation with probiotics and/or prebiotics. Five out of the 13 (38.5%) studies indicated significant reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis after supplementation. Based on the available studies, supplementation with certain probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) appears to be an effective approach for the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis. A mix of specific probiotic strains prevented atopic dermatitis among infants. Based on studies with prebiotics, there was a long-term reduction in the incidence of atopic dermatitis. Supplementation with prebiotics and probiotics appears useful for the reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis. Additional interventional studies exploring prebiotics and probiotics are imperative before recommendations can be made.

  9. Serum IgE and atopic dermatitis | Abdulla | Sudanese Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic disease that starts early in infancy and may continue into adolescence presenting a consistent problem to the patient and in severe cases to the whole family. Many hypotheses claimed to explain the clinical course of Atopic Dermatitis by attributing a central role to serum ...

  10. Atopic dermatitis in dogs_novel insights into mechanisms of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlotter, Y.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311450806

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis in dogs Novel insights into mechanisms of disease Atopic dermatitis in dogs is the most important canine pruritic disorder, described for the first time in 1971. It is defined as a genetically-predisposed inflammatory and pruritic allergic skin disease with characteristic clinical

  11. Patch testing with dermatophagoides and its correlation with chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Chetna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic eczema is commonly encountered in the Indian set up. So also is atopic dermatitis. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides are implicated in various diseases like atopic dermatitis, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. It has also been proven that patch testing with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP is important for detection of contact sensitization in chronic dermatitis. Aims: To study clinical characteristics of DP mix positive patients with regards to chronic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Methods: Dermatology outpatients presenting to the department of Skin and STD of Kasturba Medical College (KMC, with clinically diagnosed atopic dermatitis and chronic eczema were chosen for the study. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were well demarked. Eighty six randomly selected patients of dermatitis were subjected to patch testing with standard series and DP mix. Results: Of the 86, 50 (58% showed positive reaction to DP mix. Among these positive patients, chronic dermatitis was seen in 42 (84% with involvement of exposed parts in 37 (74%. Atopic dermatitis was seen in 19 patients (38% from DP positive group whereas it was observed in 4 patients (17% from the other group. Conclusion: Dermatophagoides mix positivity was statistically significant in chronic eczema as well as atopic dermatitis. Patch testing is an important tool to detect delayed type allergy to house dust mite.

  12. Skin pH, Atopic Dermatitis, and Filaggrin Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2014-01-01

    mutations may influence skin pH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the epidermal pH in different groups stratified by filaggrin mutations and atopic dermatitis. Further, we investigated the changes in pH according to severity of mutational status among patients with dermatitis, irrespective of skin condition....... METHODS: pH was measured with a multiprobe system pH probe (PH 905), and the study population was composed of 67 individuals, who had all been genotyped for 3 filaggrin mutations (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X). RESULTS: We found no clear pattern in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status. Individuals...... with wild-type filaggrin displayed both the most acidic and most alkaline values independent of concomitant skin disease; however, no statistical differences between the groups were found. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of significant diversity in skin pH in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status suggests...

  13. Prevalence and Clinical Features of Atopic Dermatitis in China

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    Xin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The epidemiology of atopic dermatitis (AD in Chinese outpatients is yet to be clarified. Objectives. To investigate population-based prevalence and clinical features of AD in Chinese outpatients. Methods. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals in 15 provinces. Results. This study included 682 patients diagnosed with AD, with the mean age of 28.8±20.1 years and the median course of 5.3±6.9 years. AD patients had more severe itching (30.4% versus 13.8%, p<0.001 and clinically suspected bacterial infection (21.7% versus 16.1%, p<0.001 than those of other types of dermatitis. Older patients were more susceptible to have a history of flexion dermatitis (p<0.001, bacterial infection (p=0.005, and severe itching (p<0.001. Outpatients with clinically suspected bacterial infection had 3.53-fold increased risk of AD than those without it (p<0.001. The morbidity rate of AD in the (20–25°N region is 2.86 times higher than that in the (40–45°N region [OR (95% CI: 0.352 (0.241–0.514, p<0.001]. Conclusions. AD is characterized by unique clinical/demographic features. Bacterial infection and latitude region may have an impact on the incidence of AD in China.

  14. Thymus is enlarged in children with current atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Braae; Andersen, G.; Jeppesen, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    is associated with an unbalanced establishment of the peripheral T-lymphocyte system. This cross-sectional study was performed to compare thymus sizes in patients with atopic dermatitis and healthy controls. Thirty-seven children with current atopic dermatitis were enrolled and compared with 29 healthy controls....... An interview and medical examination were performed by one doctor, an ultrasound scan was performed within 3 days of the examination, and the thymus index, a marker of thymus size, was measured. The thymus index was on average 32% higher (95% CI 3%-67%) in children with active atopic dermatitis compared...... with healthy controls. It declined with age in both children with atopic dermatitis and healthy controls, but the reduction in size was only significant for healthy controls. We demonstrate increased size of thymus among children with active atopic dermatitis compared with healthy controls. The larger size...

  15. Evaluation Of Prick Test In Atopic Dermatitis And Chronic Urticaria

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    Dhar Sandipan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available “Prick test” was carried out in 15 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and 10 patients with chronic urticaria (CU. Of the various aeroallergens tested, house dust mite (HDM, pollens, aspergillus furnigatus and insects were found to be most commonly positive. The common food allergens showing prick test positivity were egg white, fish, milk, brinjal, dal, groundnut and banana. Use of nasal filters showed 10-20% improvement in AD and 5 â€" 10% improvement in urticaria. Withdrawal of the responsible food article(s showed 20-30% improvement in patients with AD and urticaria.

  16. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

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    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  17. Atopic dermatitis in children: clinical features, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J; Milner, Joshua D; Stone, Kelly D

    2015-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia, and other allergic diseases. Medications such as antihistamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. New approaches to the prevention of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, C; Mann, J

    2014-01-01

    There has been a steep rise in the burden of atopic dermatitis (AD), and up to 20% of children in developed countries now suffer of the disease. At present, treatment at best achieves symptom control rather than cure, and there is a strong need to identify new methods of disease prevention. While earlier approaches focused on allergen avoidance strategies, there has been a clear shift towards attempts to induce tolerance and enhancement of skin barrier function, as skin barrier breakdown plays an important role in AD development. This article reviews the latest developments in the prevention of AD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis

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    Allison L. Goddard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed “effective” in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  20. GUIDELINES OF CARE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Tom, Wynnis L.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Feldman, Steven R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Simpson, Eric L.; Berger, Timothy G.; Bergman, James N.; Cohen, David E.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Davis, Dawn M.; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J.; Paller, Amy S.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Elmets, Craig A.; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G.; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2–3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in AD management and care, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of four sections, methods for diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. PMID:24290431

  1. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Allison L; Lio, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed "effective" in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  2. Leptin and Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, SungChul; Yoon, Won Suck; Cho, Yunjung; Park, Sang Hee; Choung, Ji Tae; Yoo, Young

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) and obesity have been increasing considerably in Korean school-children. AD is a chronic pruritic recurrent inflammatory skin disorder. Leptin is secreted by adipocytes which has been suggested to be immunologically active; however, their role in AD has not yet been well understood. A total of 227 subjects out of 2,109 elementary school children were defined as having AD based on the ISAAC questionnaire survey. Ninety subjects with AD, aged between 6 and 12 years, completed scoring of severity of AD (SCORAD), skin prick testing, blood tests for total IgE, eosinophil counts, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and lipid profiles. Serum leptin levels were also measured. A subject with atopic AD was defined as an AD patient showing at least 1 positive reaction to allergens in skin prick testing. There were no significant differences in age, body mass index, percentage of breast milk feeding, mode of delivery, prevalence of atopy, and lipid profiles between atopic AD and non-atopic AD subjects. The serum leptin levels (log mean±SD) were significantly higher in non-atopic AD group than in the atopic AD group (0.86±0.57 ng/mL vs 0.53±0.72 ng/mL, p=0.045). Subjects with mild-to-moderate AD showed significantly higher serum leptin levels than those with severe AD (0.77±0.67 ng/mL vs 0.33±0.69 ng/mL, p=0.028). There was a marginal inverse correlation between the SCORAD index and the serum leptin concentration in total AD subjects (r=-0.216, p=0.053). The serum leptin levels were significantly higher in non-atopic AD subjects or mild-to-moderate AD subjects. Leptin did not seem to be associated with IgE-mediated inflammation in AD. Obesity-associated high leptin differed between non-atopic AD and atopic AD subjects.

  3. Is frictional lichenoid dermatitis a minor variant of atopic dermatitis or a photodermatosis

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    Kabir Sardana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis. Background: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis (FLE is an entity that is probably under diagnosed and has been variably associated with either friction and/or atopy with a distinctive seasonal variation. Aims and Objectives : To study correlation of FLE with UV index and to assess its association with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional analysis of children with FLE was done, over a period of 6 years in two tertiary hospitals. A detailed history and examination was done to assess the features of atopic dermatitis. The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index. Two-tailed significance tests using Pearson′s coefficient of correlation and T-test were used to interpret the data. (P < 0.05. Results: One hundred seventy-four patients were studied using the UKC criterion 17.2% of the patients had AD while xerosis (40.3% was the predominant cutaneous finding. The number of patients seen in summer was more than in winter (P < 0.05 but there was no statistical difference between the cases in winter and spring. There was a significant correlation of the number of cases per month with UV index (P = 0.019. Almost 42% of patients gave a history of recurrence. Conclusions : FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion. Statistical Analysis Used: The Pearson′s coefficient of correlation was used for comparing the cases per month with the UV index. The tests of hypothesis used included the paired T-tests. F-test of variance, Welch test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test. P < 0.05 was considered significant.

  4. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

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    İjlal Erturan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore, we aimed to investigate self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with atopic dermatitis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. The Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI were used for determining self-esteem and quality of life. The Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD Index was used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. Results: It was found that patient group had lower self-esteem than healthy controls according to the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale. A statistically significant difference was observed in happiness/satisfaction and anxiety subscale scores between the patients and healthy controls while there was no significant difference between the other sub-scale scores. Mean value of dermatological quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in healthy controls. A moderate negative correlation was found between self-esteem and CDLQI scores among adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Discussion: This study results have shown that self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were adversely affected in adolescents with atopic dermatitis irrespective of gender. These patients should be examined psychiatrically besides dermatological examination and treatment. We suggest that improvement will be observed in self-esteem and quality of

  5. Topical ROR Inverse Agonists Suppress Inflammation in Mouse Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Acute Irritant Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Choo, Min-Kyung; Park, Jin Mo; Fisher, David E

    2017-12-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors RORα and RORγ are critical for the functions of specific subsets of T cells and innate lymphoid cells, which are key drivers of inflammatory disease in barrier tissues. Here, we investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of SR1001, a synthetic RORα/γ inverse agonist, in mouse models of atopic dermatitis and acute irritant dermatitis. Topical treatment with SR1001 reduces epidermal and dermal features of MC903-induced atopic dermatitis-like disease and suppresses the production of type 2 cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in lesional skin. In the epidermis, SR1001 treatment blocks MC903-induced expression of TSLP and reverses impaired keratinocyte differentiation. SR1001 is also effective in alleviating acute dermatitis triggered by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Overall, our results suggest that RORα/γ are important therapeutic targets for cutaneous inflammation and suggest topical usage of inhibitory ligands as an approach to treating skin diseases of inflammatory etiology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Children with Atopic Dermatitis Should Always be Patch-tested if They Have Hand or Foot Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Olhardt, Sanna; Rådehed, Jeanette; Svensson, Åke

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease among children in industrialised countries. Many factors influence this disease in a negative way and contact allergy is one such factor. The aim of the study was to examine the frequency of contact allergy among children with the diagnosis atopic dermatitis. Contact allergy was found in 22/82 children (26.8%), the most common from Amerchol L101 (11.0%), potassium dichromate (7.3%), and nickel sulfate (4.9%). A statistically significant difference in contact allergy frequency was demonstrated for those with hand and/or foot eczema compared to those without. Children with atopic dermatitis who suffer from hand and/or foot dermatitis should always be patch-tested to evaluate whether they have a relevant contact allergy and thus allergic contact dermatitis.

  7. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: section 1. Diagnosis and assessment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Tom, Wynnis L; Chamlin, Sarah L; Feldman, Steven R; Hanifin, Jon M; Simpson, Eric L; Berger, Timothy G; Bergman, James N; Cohen, David E; Cooper, Kevin D; Cordoro, Kelly M; Davis, Dawn M; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J; Paller, Amy S; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A; Williams, Hywel C; Elmets, Craig A; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G; Smith Begolka, Wendy; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic, inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2% to 3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in the management and care of AD, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of 4 sections, methods for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment, and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anna, Bogdali M.; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga

    2016-01-01

    . aureus in atopic dermatitis. Methods: Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B...

  9. Chinese herbal medicine for atopic dermatitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hsiewe Ying; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Chen, DaCan; Xue, Charlie Changli; Lenon, George Binh

    2013-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, itching skin disease, and conventional therapies offer inadequate symptom management. Patients with AD are increasingly turning to Chinese medicine. We systematically evaluated the clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety of oral Chinese herbal medicine for AD. Searches were conducted on major electronic databases using the following key words: "randomized controlled trials," "atopic dermatitis," "traditional Chinese medicine," "traditional East Asian medicine," "herbal medicine," "Chinese herbal drugs," "medicinal plants," "phytotherapy," "Kampo medicine," and "Korean traditional medicine." The results were screened to include English/Chinese randomized controlled trials. A metaanalysis was conducted on suitable outcome measures. Seven randomized controlled trials were included (1 comparing Chinese herbal medicine and Western medicine with Western medicine alone; 6 comparing Chinese herbal medicine with placebo). Combined Chinese herbal medicine with Western medicine was superior to Western medicine alone. Three placebo controlled trials showed significant treatment efficacy and 2 showed significantly reduced concurrent therapy with Chinese herbal medicine. No abnormalities in safety profile or severe adverse events were reported. A metaanalysis of all included studies could not be conducted because of study heterogeneity. Chinese herbal medicine significantly improved symptom severity of AD and was reported as well tolerated. However, the poor quality of studies did not allow for valid conclusions to support its tolerability and routine use. Additional studies addressing the methodologic issues are warranted to determine the therapeutic benefit of Chinese herbal medicine for AD. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Histopathology of Subcapsular Cataract in a Patient with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Daisy Yao; Ong, Keith; Lovicu, Frank J

    2017-02-01

    To report the histopathological features of anterior subcapsular cataract associated with atopic dermatitis. A 29-year-old man with atopic dermatitis presented with bilateral anterior subcapsular cataract. After routine cataract surgery, the anterior subcapsular cataractous tissue was obtained as an anterior capsulorhexis flap and prepared as a wholemount for histological analysis. The wholemount consisted of a well-demarcated central grayish-white plaque surrounded by transparent capsule, corroborating the slit-lamp biomicroscopic appearance. Higher magnification of the plaque revealed a fibrous and amorphous mass, most likely extracellular matrix owing to the presence of irregularly arranged bundled strands of fibrils, typical of collagen. Lens epithelial cells at the plaque were densely packed and myofibroblast-like and immunoreactive for alpha-smooth muscle actin. In contrast, lens epithelial cells more distant from the plaque retained their regular cuboidal arrangement and regular spacing, and were not labeled for alpha-smooth muscle actin, similar to lens epithelial cells obtained from a non-cataractous case. The presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin-reactive elongated cells at the plaque suggests that the cuboidal lens epithelial cells making up the anterior subcapsular cataract have transdifferentiated into spindle-shaped myofibroblastic cells that produce and deposit aberrant extracellular matrix. This transdifferentiation process, more commonly known as an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, contributes to a fibrotic response leading to the development of human anterior subcapsular cataract.

  11. Children with atopic dermatitis show clinical improvement after Lactobacillus exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-J; Wang, J-Y

    2015-04-01

    The role of probiotics in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) is not clearly established. Further clinical trials with new probiotic formulations are warranted. To assess the effects of Lactobacillus paracasei (LP) and Lactobacillus fermentum (LF), and their mixture on the disease severity, quality of life, and immune biomarkers of children with AD. A double-blind, prospective, randomized placebo-controlled study was conducted on 220 children aged 1-18 years with moderate-to-severe AD (Trial number: NCT01635738). The children were randomized to receive LP, LF, LP + LF mixture, and placebo for 3 months. Changes in severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD), Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI), and Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) scores in the different groups and at different visits were evaluated. Skin prick tests, levels of IgE, IFN-γ, IL-4, TGF-β, and TNF-α, and urine biomarkers were also evaluated. Children who received LP, LF, and LP + LF mixture showed lower SCORAD scores than the placebo group (P children younger than age 12, with breastfeeding > 6 months, and with mite sensitization (P children with AD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effects of Indoor Air Pollutants on Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JaKyoung; Kim, HyungJin; Lim, DaeHyun; Lee, Young-Kyu; Kim, Jeong Hee

    2016-12-09

    The increasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with variations in indoor environments. In Korea, many inner walls of homes are covered with wallpaper: such walls emit indoor air pollutants, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde. This randomized, double-blind study investigated the effects of wallpaper on indoor air quality and AD. Thirty-one children (aged three to eight years) with moderate AD were assigned to environmentally-friendly (EF) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) wallpaper groups. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs, natural VOCs (NVOCs), formaldehyde, and total suspended bacteria were measured before and two (W₂) and eight weeks (W₈) after wallpapering. Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) evaluations and blood tests were performed during the same period. The EF wallpaper and PVC wallpaper groups showed similar trends in the changes in total VOCs (TVOC) and formaldehyde content in the indoor air. However, the EF wallpaper group showed more improvement on the SCORAD at W₂ and W₈ than the PVC wallpaper group. The SCORAD index was positively correlated with several indoor air pollutants. Further, the SCORAD index and NVOC % were negatively correlated. Improved SCORAD index and effects of wallpapering on indoor air quality improvements occurred within a short period of time in both groups. We believe that NVOCs in indoor air after EF wallpapering have a beneficial effect on health.

  13. Effects of Indoor Air Pollutants on Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JaKyoung Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD is associated with variations in indoor environments. In Korea, many inner walls of homes are covered with wallpaper: such walls emit indoor air pollutants, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs and formaldehyde. This randomized, double-blind study investigated the effects of wallpaper on indoor air quality and AD. Thirty-one children (aged three to eight years with moderate AD were assigned to environmentally-friendly (EF and polyvinyl chloride (PVC wallpaper groups. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs, natural VOCs (NVOCs, formaldehyde, and total suspended bacteria were measured before and two (W2 and eight weeks (W8 after wallpapering. Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD evaluations and blood tests were performed during the same period. The EF wallpaper and PVC wallpaper groups showed similar trends in the changes in total VOCs (TVOC and formaldehyde content in the indoor air. However, the EF wallpaper group showed more improvement on the SCORAD at W2 and W8 than the PVC wallpaper group. The SCORAD index was positively correlated with several indoor air pollutants. Further, the SCORAD index and NVOC % were negatively correlated. Improved SCORAD index and effects of wallpapering on indoor air quality improvements occurred within a short period of time in both groups. We believe that NVOCs in indoor air after EF wallpapering have a beneficial effect on health.

  14. Cause-specific mortality in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Skov, Lone; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Adult atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with several comorbidities, but cause-specific mortality risk is unknown. To examine cause-specific death rates and risk in adults with AD. We performed cross-linkage of nationwide health care and cause of death registers. Adult patients with AD were matched with 10 controls per study subject. We calculated incidence rates per 1000 person-years and hazard ratios (HRs) of cause-specific death with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) using Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 8686 patients and 86,860 matched controls were studied. The risk for death due to any cause was significantly increased in patients with AD (HR 1.27, 95%CI 1.11-1.45). Significant causes included cardiovascular (HR 1.45; 95% CI 1.07-1.96), infectious (HR 3.71; 95% CI 1.43-9.60), and urogenital diseases (HR 5.51; 95% CI 1.54-19.80). No increased risk for death due to cancer, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, respiratory, or gastroenterologic disease was observed. The results might not be generalizable to patients seen exclusively by primary care physicians. Adults with atopic dermatitis had slightly increased risk for death during follow-up. While the risk for death from cardiovascular, urogenital, and infectious diseases was slightly elevated among patients with AD, the absolute risk was very low. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Joong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA- induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC- γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK. These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  16. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Cha, Hae-Sim; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Seo Ho; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM) on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE)/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA-) induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC-) γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK). These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  17. Extended implementation of educational programs for atopic dermatitis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Birgit; Staab, Doris

    2015-05-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis (AD) suffer from chronic relapsing inflammatory skin lesions accompanied by insatiable itching, dryness, excoriated skin, or even (super-)infections. This burden impairs the quality of life of affected children and their families. Due particularly to the recurrent course of the disease, patients often lose confidence in treatment and fear side effects of steroids. Family education programs for AD have been established in the last decades to provide appropriate education and psychosocial support. However, the need for long-lasting strategies in treatment and prevention has even increased. Recent findings not only underline the importance of an intact skin barrier in regard to acute therapy but also suggest that an impairment of skin barrier integrity promotes the development of subsequent atopic diseases in the course of the atopic march. Moreover, in addition to the psychosocial burden due to stigmatized appearance or sleep disturbance, new observations document an increased presence of psychosomatic comorbidities in patients with AD. We reviewed recent educational interventions regarding the theoretical background and here will discuss the heterogeneous approaches of existing programs in childhood. Despite high variations of educational strategies, an overriding aim should be the broader integration of supporting programs in the treatment of children with AD to empower the affected child and its caregiver's to obtain the best possible care, quality of life, and to promote (secondary) prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A study of targeted enhanced patient care for pediatric atopic dermatitis (STEP PAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Maren; Morrell, Dean S; Goldsmith, Lowell A

    2008-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin condition in children. Treatment strategies often require stringent adherence to skin care regimens for symptom resolution. As many factors influence the course of the condition, we investigated the role of a designated "atopic dermatitis educator" in a pediatric dermatology clinic. We planned to determine whether the individual interaction with an atopic dermatitis educator affects the course of disease severity, resolution, and quality of life in atopic children. New and return pediatric atopic dermatitis patients from English-speaking families were recruited from a pediatric dermatology clinic with a single pediatric dermatologist. The 151 subjects were randomized to either the control or the intervention group. A total of 106 subjects completed the study. Those in the intervention group received the atopic dermatitis educator's individual counseling/education session. Subjects' severity was determined by the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis severity index and quality of life by either the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index or the Infants' Dermatitis Quality of Life index depending on the patient's age. Analysis of covariance was measured. No significant difference was found in the percentage change of severity or quality of life between the groups.

  19. Children with atopic dermatitis in Daejeon, Korea: individualized nutrition intervention for disease severity and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hee; Lee, Jae Ho; Ly, Sun Yung

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common pediatric chronic inflammatory skin diseases, and certain food allergens and nutrients are closely related to the development and severity of atopic dermatitis. While avoidance of the causative foods is considered the mainstay of treatment, unverified excessive restriction might induce unnecessary limitations in the food intake, consequently leading to nutritional deficiencies and poor growth. This study aimed to identify the characteristics and nutrient intake status in children with atopic dermatitis and to investigate the effects of individualized nutrition intervention. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records of 77 pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis who received 4 months of individualized nutrition intervention combined with an elimination diet. The patient characteristics, nutrient intake status, and clinical status were examined before and after the intervention. Before the intervention, 5 children had a weight for height z-score below -2.0, and 48.1% had experienced food restriction; these children showed a significantly higher SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis index than those without experiences, with the number of restricted foods before the intervention positively correlating with the disease severity. The intakes of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, calcium, folate, and vitamin D were lower than the recommended nutrient intakes for Koreans. After the intervention, the weight for height z-score of 35 children was significantly increased and their SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis index was significantly reduced (pnutrition intervention appears useful for alleviating the severity of atopic dermatitis and improving the growth status by improving the nutrient intake.

  20. Children with Dry Skin and Atopic Predisposition: Outcome Measurement with Validated Scores for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky, Sabine; Schario, Marianne; Stroux, Andrea; Lünnemann, Lena; Zuberbier, Torsten; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Garcia Bartels, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Dry skin is a common skin condition in childhood. Few studies exist investigating the influence of daily skin care on dry skin in infants at risk of developing atopic dermatitis (AD). We aimed to assess the effect of skin care on dry skin in this special cohort using validated scores for AD and analysis of skin microtopography. 43 children were randomized to group 1 (G1) and group 2 (G2) and 22 infants to group 3 (G3). During 16 weeks, G1 and G3 applied daily a plant-based emollient and G2 a petrolatum-based emollient. The core outcome was assessed by Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) and Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD). The influence on the parents' life was evaluated by a questionnaire and microtopography by Visioscan® VC 98. The SCORAD index declined significantly until week (W) 16 in all groups (p ≤ 0.041). The sleeplessness score analyzed by PO-SCORAD was highly reduced after W12 in G1 and after W16 in G2 (p ≤ 0.030). The influence on the parents' anxiety was reduced in G3 at W12 and W16 (p = 0.016). The Visioscan parameter scaliness strongly diminished at W4 (p ≤ 0.049) and W16 (p ≤ 0.013) in all groups. This trial demonstrates improved skin conditions and sleep following daily emollient application in infants and children having dry skin and being at risk of AD. Especially parents of infants showed a reduced fear that their children might develop AD. Further studies are required to investigate the preventive effect of daily emollient therapy in this special cohort evaluating the outcome measures used in this trial. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. COMMUNICATORY WORK AS A BASIS OF INITIAL PROPHYLAXIS OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN OF EARLY AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Yangutova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An experience of complex approach to the problem of initial prophylaxis of atopic dermatitis on level of municipality is presented in this work. An efficacy of education of pregnant women with compromised allergic history and members of their family was demonstrated. Authors presented information about experience of address providing of children of first year of life with hypoallergenic nutrition. Decrease of incidence of atopic dermatitis in children of first year of life and increase of duration of breast feeding were the overall results of 4 year work in this sphere.Key words: initial prophylaxis, atopic dermatitis, effective nutrition, educational program.

  2. EXTERNAL NON-STEROID TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS: TREATMENT, CARE, PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Tikhomirov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis remains an important medico-social problem due to its high spread in the population and development of complications. External non-steroid therapy remains first line treatment. This article presents treatment results of 40 patients aged 1 to 17 years old with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis with Zinocap cream (pirition zinc. Clinical efficacy of the treatment was assessed using SCORAD index and DLQI questionnaire at a first visit and on days 8, 15 and 22 of treatment.Key words: atopic dermatitis, zinc pirition, children. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 122–127

  3. Skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis using enzyme-containing detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Hundevadt; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Mosbech, H

    1998-01-01

    Detergent enzymes may cause skin irritation and occasionally hypersensitivity reactions. The potential hazards of these enzymes have led some physicians to advise atopic dermatitis patients against the use of enzyme-enriched detergents. A three-phased randomised, double-blind, cross-over experiment...... differences in any of the primary or secondary parameters comparing treatment and placebo periods. Our data therefore seem to exclude that atopic dermatitis may exacerbate during 1 month's exposure to enzyme-enriched detergents. Since no significant irritant capacity was detected in atopic dermatitis patients...

  4. [Methodology and didactics of training children and adolescents in topical treatment of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseti, J; Dimopulos, U; Hübscher, W

    1998-11-01

    There are increasing numbers of education programmes for children and young people with atopic dermatitis. These also include directions for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. However, the methods to be followed and the treatment to be applied are usually not clearly defined or explained. Presented are the key aspects of the local treatment of atopic dermatitis to be taught to children. The introduction of a basic therapeutic concept helps sort out which are the best preparations to use, some with and others without active ingredients. The interactions between basic care, active ingredients and skin conditions are explained in such a way that children can understand them.

  5. Burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adults: Analysis of data from the 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Kazuhiko; Gupta, Shaloo; Gadkari, Abhijit; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kono, Takeshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Demiya, Sven; Eckert, Laurent

    2018-01-31

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. The objective of this study was to characterize the burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adult patients relative to the general population. Japanese adults (≥18 years) with a self-reported diagnosis of atopic dermatitis and adult controls without atopic dermatitis/eczema/dermatitis were identified from the 2013 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey. Atopic dermatitis patients were propensity-score matched with non-atopic dermatitis controls (1:2 ratio) on demographic variables. Patient-reported outcome data on comorbidities, mood and sleep disorders, health-related quality of life, work productivity and activity impairment, and health-care resource utilization were analyzed in atopic dermatitis patients and matched controls. A total of 638 Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis were identified, of whom 290 (45.5%) rated their disease as "moderate/severe" and 348 (54.5%) as "mild". The analysis cohort comprised 634 atopic dermatitis patients and 1268 matched controls. Atopic dermatitis patients reported a significantly higher prevalence of arthritis, asthma, nasal allergies/hay fever, anxiety, depression and sleep disorders compared with controls (all P Atopic dermatitis patients also reported a significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher overall work and activity impairment, and higher health-care resource utilization (all P atopic dermatitis reported a substantial disease burden relative to adults without atopic dermatitis, suggesting an unmet need for effective strategies targeting disease management. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. [Atopic dermatitis in scholar children from Ciudad Guzman, Mexico. Prevalence and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla Barajas, Martín; Barrera Zepeda, Ana Teresa; Morales Romero, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an ever more frequent disease in children; its etiology is unknown, although a genetic predisposition along with environment factors could be the origin. To determine the prevalence of atopic dermatitis among school-children and the main associated risk factors. A randomized, stratified and conglomerated sample of 6 to 12 year-old school-children was obtained. Their parents answered the main ISAAC questionnaire, to which some variables were added, such as family and hereditary history, tobacco smoking exposure and nutritional condition according to the body mass index as associated risk factors. We found a prevalence of 3% for atopic dermatitis, and the presence of dermatitis symptoms during the last twelve months was found in 6.8% of the cases. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an elevated risk for atopic dermatitis in children of mothers with any type of allergic disease (OR 2.75, CI 95% 1.09 to 6.92, p = 0.031). The frequency of atopic dermatitis as well as that of the symptoms was low, similar to previous reports conducted in Mexico. Maternal atopy was the only factor associated with atopic dermatitis.

  7. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Kieler, Helle; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. Using national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross-national, population-based cohort study. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child cohorts were ascertained through disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication, specific hospital contacts, or both. In both countries the incidence rate of atopic dermatitis was stable during the study periods. The incidence rate of asthma increased until 2006 and stabilized for the rest of the study period in Denmark and increased in Sweden. The incidence rate of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis decreased in both countries. The study revealed similar trends, with stable incidence rates of atopic dermatitis in both Danish and Swedish children, an increase and then stabilization in asthma incidence rates in Denmark and an increase in Sweden, and a decrease in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis incidence rates. At age 5 years, one third of all children were affected with at least one of the conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Grading Of Severity Of Atopic Dermatitis In North Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Severity of atopic dermatitis (AD was assessed in 80 children (up to12 years, 48 boys and 32 girls, using grading system as suggested by Rajka and Langeland. Thirty-three (41.25%, 44 (55% and 3(3.75% patients had mid, moderate and severe diseases respectively. Mean severity scores were 3.5,5.7 and 8.3 respectively in these 3 groups. Boys had a more Severe disease than girls. Patients with early (0-3 months and late onset (6-9 years of disease had maximum severity, mean severity scores being 5 and 5.3 respectively. Patients with moderate AD had a more prolonged course than those with mild disease. Family history of atopy had no impact on the severity of AD, although personal history of atopy was common in patients with moderate AD. Face was equally affected in mild disease group.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Stone, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia and other allergic diseases. Staphylococcus aureus colonization is common and may contribute to disease progression and severity. Targeted therapies to restore both impaired skin barrier and control inflammation are required for optimal outcomes for patients with moderate to severe disease. Pruritus is universal among patients with AD and has a dominant impact on diminishing quality of life. Medications such as anti-histamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. PMID:25459583

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorder: Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Jong Sic; Cho, Dae Ho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The pathogenesis of AD is poorly understood, and the treatment of recalcitrant AD is still challenging. There is accumulating evidence for new gene polymorphisms related to the epidermal barrier function and innate and adaptive immunity in patients with AD. Newly-found T cells and dendritic cell subsets, cytokines, chemokines and signaling pathways have extended our understanding of the molecular pathomechanism underlying AD. Genetic changes caused by environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. We herein present a review of the genetics, epigenetics, barrier dysfunction and immunological abnormalities in AD with a focus on updated molecular biology. PMID:27483258

  11. Colloidal oatmeal formulations and the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    Colloidal oatmeal suspensions are currently available in bath soaps, shampoos, shaving gels, and moisturizing creams, and several studies have been conducted that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of colloidal oatmeal for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions. The diverse chemical polymorphism of oats translates into numerous clinical utilities for atopic dermatitis (AD) and eczema. Avenanthramides are the principle polyphenolic antioxidants in oats, and they have been shown to assuage inflammation in murine models of contact hypersensitivity and neurogenic inflammation and also reduce pruritogen-induced scratching in a murine itch model. Moreover, avenanthramides are a potent antioxidant. This paper will discuss various studies that have found colloidal oatmeal compounds to be beneficial in the treatment of AD and also as adjunctive treatments for AD.

  12. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...... days) of age. RESULTS: Alcohol during pregnancy was associated with a significant and dose-dependent increased risk of AD in early infancy. This effect was mainly seen in high-risk infants (two parents with allergic disease). Thus, the highest risk of AD in early infancy was seen in high-risk infants...

  13. Gallstone Risk in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Andersen, Yuki M F; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2017-01-01

    Adult atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with overweight, obesity and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Americans, similarly to psoriasis, but no increased risk of CVD has been shown in European patients with AD. This study investigated the prevalence and risk of gallstones in adults with AD...... and in those with psoriasis as a proxy for obesity using nationwide data for all Danish citizens ≥ 30 years of age. Outcome was a diagnosis of gallstones. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated by logistic regression (cross-sectional study) and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by Cox regression (cohort study.......14-1.23) for psoriasis. During follow-up, adjusted HRs were 0.72 (0.56-0.90) for AD and 1.10 (1.02-1.18) for psoriasis. The findings highlight important differences in obesity and lifestyle factors among patients with AD and those with psoriasis....

  14. Domestic dog exposure at birth reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, S; Thyssen, J P; Stokholm, J; Vissing, N H; Waage, J; Bisgaard, H

    2016-12-01

    While the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis is complex and poorly understood, neonatal exposures are important for disease occurrence. However, the effect of dog exposure on the risk of atopic dermatitis is unresolved. We investigated whether domestic dog exposure affected the risk of atopic dermatitis in children during the first 3 years of life. Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) are ongoing prospective clinical birth cohort studies. Data from 411 children born to mothers with asthma (COPSAC 2000 ) and 700 unselected children (COPSAC 2010 ) were analyzed following the same protocols at the same research site. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed prospectively according to the Hanifin-Rajka criteria. Parental history of asthma, eczema, or rhinitis was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis. In the COPSAC 2000 , maternal specific serum IgE against eight inhalant allergens was sampled after the children's birth and at pregnancy week 24 in the COPSAC 2010 cohort. Associations between dog exposure and atopic dermatitis were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression models and adjusted for lifestyle confounders. In the COPSAC 2000 and COPSAC 2010 cohorts, the risk of atopic dermatitis was significantly lower in children with domestic dog exposure ( adjusted HR = 0.46 [0.25-0.87], P = 0.02; and adjusted HR = 0.58 [0.36-0.93], P = 0.03, respectively). The risk of atopic dermatitis decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing number of dogs ( adjusted HR = 0.58 [0.38-0.89], P = 0.01) in the COPSAC 2010 . The protective effect was restricted to children born to mothers with atopic disease in the unselected COPSAC 2010 cohort ( adjusted HR = 0.39 [0.19-0.82], P = 0.01), as no effect was observed in children born to mothers without atopic disease ( adjusted HR = 0.92 [0.49-1.73], P = 0.79). Paternal atopic status did not affect the risk of atopic dermatitis. We found no significant interaction between the CD14 T/T genotype and

  15. Serum clusterin level in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, In Suk; Kim, Yoon Hee; Lee, Kyung Eun; Hong, Jung Yeon; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Yun Seon; Oh, Mi Seon; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, Seo Hee; Park, Young A; Kim, Kyung Won; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Clusterin is a sensitive cellular biosensor of oxidative stress and has been studied as a marker to assess inflammatory diseases. The clusterin levels in AD have not been evaluated thus far. We evaluated serum clusterin levels in children with AD and assessed the relationship between serum clusterin levels and the severity of AD. The study enrolled a total 140 children, of whom 100 had AD (n = 100) and 40 were healthy (n = 40). The severity of AD was scored by using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). Total serum immunoglobulin E and specific immunoglobulin E levels against egg whites, cow's milk, peanuts, soybeans, wheat, and Dermatophagoides farinae were measured. Clusterin levels in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean (interquartile range) age of the children was 5.1 years (1.3-8.4 years), and 92 (69.3%) of the children were boys. The mean (standard deviation) SCORAD index was 50.4 ± 17. The mean (standard deviation) clusterin level of children with AD was higher than that in the healthy control group children (148.13 ± 4.3 pg/mL versus 144.85 ± 5.1 pg/mL; p = 0.001). Serum clusterin levels were correlated with the SCORAD index (r = 0.327, p = 0.002). The serum clusterin level was higher in children with AD than in the healthy control group and increased with the severity of AD. Serum clusterin may be a candidate molecule that reflects AD and its severity.

  16. Improvement of atopic dermatitis with topical application of Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Ji; Kim, Mi Hye; Choi, You Yeon; Kim, Eun Hye; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Kyuseok; Yang, Woong Mo

    2016-03-02

    Spirodela polyrhiza has been used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of urticarial, acute nephritis, inflammation, as well as skin disease. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized hyperplasia of skin lesion and increase of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) level. In this study, the topical effects of S. polyrhiza (SP) on 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD mice model were investigated by several experiments. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups as NOR, CON, DEX, SP 1, and SP 100 groups (n=5, respectively). To induce atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, DNCB had been applied on shaved dorsal skin. SP was topically treated to DNCB-induced mice as 1 and 100mg/mL concentrations. Histological changes were showed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and the infiltration of mast cells was detected by toluidine blue staining. In addition, the level of IgE and each cytokines were measured and expressions of inflammatory signaling factors were analyzed by western blotting assay. SP treatment improved a hyperplasia of epidermis and dermis in DNCB-induced AD-like skin lesion. The infiltration of mast cells was also decreased by treatment of SP. In addition, SP reduced the level of IgE in serum and attenuated the secretion of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Treatment of SP also inhibited the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), phosphor-IκB-α, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)s. From these data, we propose that SP ameliorates AD via modulation of pro-inflammatory mediators. SP may have the potential to be used as an alternative for treatment of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov PV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pavel V Chernyshov Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children’s development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child’s problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother–child attachment. The child’s AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, stigmatization, self-perception, quality of life, children, pediatric dermatology, skin disease

  18. Atopic dermatitis: understanding the disease and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M L

    2007-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic, inflammatory skin disease that can significantly reduce the quality of life of not only patients but also entire families. This review will focus on the currently available non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for the control and management of AD. A review of English-language articles from January 1953 to May 2006 was performed within the MEDLINE database. Search terms included, but were not limited to, atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, and topical calcineurin inhibitors. Studies evaluating the diagnosis, physical and psychological burden, and underlying pathophysiology of AD were included. Particular focus was placed on literature presenting key safety and efficacy data from clinical trials involving AD treatment. Although good skin care and trigger avoidance are fundamental to AD management, most patients also require pharmacologic intervention. Topical therapies comprise the foundation of AD treatment. In particular, topical corticosteroids have been a mainstay in AD treatment for several decades and the newer topical calcineurin inhibitors have become a valuable addition to the therapeutic armamentarium. TCIs are a safe and effective AD treatment; they limit the number of disease flares, extend the time between flares, and provide a steroid-sparing option that may be of particular benefit in the pediatric population. The use of more potent therapies, such as systemic (oral/injected) agents or phototherapy, is typically limited to the treatment of severe, refractory disease. Additionally, owing to the increased risk for bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in patients with AD, topical or systemic antimicrobials are an important component of treatment. Case reports and small-scale studies were typically not included in this analysis and owing to the limited number of trials evaluating TCSs, consensus statements and comprehensive review articles were used to obtain information pertaining to the

  19. Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Marciniak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is the most common chronic dermatitis in children. The influence of AD on quality of life of parents of children with AD was studied using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI. Fifty children with AD were included in the study (age range 2–24 months together with their parents. Children’s AD was found to influence the quality of life of both parents; however, it had a more significant influence on quality of life of mothers than that of fathers (mean FDLQI: 17.1 ± 5.3 vs. 14.7 ± 5.8 points; p < 0.001. Due to the children’s AD, mothers spent more time caring for them and carried out more household duties. Childhood AD had a greater impact on quality of life of fathers through influence on their work or education. The influence of AD on the quality of life of family members is significant, and this should be taken into account in the therapeutic process.

  20. Lack of Association Between Dust Mite Sensitivity and Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan Ian; Hanifin, Jon M; Law, Sandra; White, Kevin; Storrs, Frances J

    2016-01-01

    Dust mites (DMs) play a role in type I respiratory allergy. Studies relating to DM irritant versus immune reactions are somewhat conflicting in atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic use of patch testing to DM in patients with AD and other dermatitides. We performed a prospective study of 323 adults recruited in a patch testing clinic. Patch testing antigens were DM extract (0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 10%, and 20% in petrolatum; Chemotechnique) and/or 200 index of reactivity in petrolatum (Stallergenes). Patches were placed and read at 48 hours with delayed readings after 72 to 168 hours. There was no association of DM positivity with AD, asthma, hay fever, or demographic factors. There was no association of DM positivity with the clinical diagnosis or phenotype. The number of positive (+, ++, and +++) and doubtful reactions to Chemotechnique DM extract increased with higher concentrations. Positive reactions to DM had a morphological appearance characterized by numerous discrete erythematous papules and, rarely, papulovesicles. Positive reactions to Stallergenes DM 200 IR were infrequent and all weak reactions, similar to DM 0.01%. Patch testing to DM does not seem to have clinical use for determining the etiology of dermatitis.

  1. Kaposi’s Varicelliform Eruption During Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis with Pimecrolimus Cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Canpolat

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption is a widespread viral infection frequently caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, and less frequently Coxsackie A-16 and vaccinia virus superimposed on a pre-existing dermatosis. It is often associated with atopic dermatitis. The topical immunomodulator pimecrolimus have proven effective in managing atopic dermatitis. Reported adverse effects are infrequent; however, cutaneous infections are potential complications of its application. Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption is the most important problem in treating patients with atopic dermatitis with pimecrolimus. Even though the causative effect of this topical immunomodulator remains unclear, patients should be thought to recognise herpes simplex virus infection and stop application to prevent the spreading of the infection. Herein we report a child with atopic dermatitis who developed Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption during treatment with pimecrolimus because of its rare occurence

  2. DIET THERAPY PECULIARITIES IN THE EVENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN INFANTS ON ARTIFICIAL FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.G. Malanicheva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research was to study the efficiency of the highly hydrolyzed adapted formula in artificially fed infants with severe atopic dermatitis. The researchers examined 30 artificially fed children aged from 1 month to 1 year with severe atopic dermatitis. In 56,6% of cases, they noticed an associated skin and gastrointestinal tract allergy. Application of the highly hydrolyzed adapted compound as a part of the complex antiallergic therapy led to a long>term clinical effect in 93,3% of cases. This was achieved by the remission of severe atopic dermatitis and associated gastrointestinal allergy on the 16th day on average from the treatment commencement against the decreased serum levels of general Ige and specific Ige to the к cow's milk proteins and casein. In each case the adequate growth and physical development of infants is ensured.Key words: atopic dermatitis, children, highly hydrolyzed adapted formula.

  3. Children with atopic dermatitis may have unacknowledged contact allergies contributing to their skin symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A B; Johansen, J D; Deleuran, M

    2017-01-01

    the skin symptoms. METHODS: In a cross sectional study, 100 children and adolescents aged 5-17 years with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis were patch tested with a pediatric series of 31 allergens. RESULTS: Thirty percent of the children had at least one positive patch test reaction and 17% had at least......BACKGROUND: Whether children with atopic dermatitis have an altered risk of contact allergy than children without atopic dermatitis is frequently debated and studies have been conflicting. Theoretically, the impaired skin barrier in AD facilitates the penetration of potential allergens and several...... one contact allergy that was relevant to the current skin symptoms. The risk of contact allergy was significantly correlated to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Metals and components of topical skin care products were the most frequent sensitizers. CONCLUSION: Patch testing is relevant...

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Pimecrolimus in Atopic Dermatitis : A 5-Year Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Boznanski, Andrzej; Todd, Gail; Vertruyen, Andre; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; Zhu, Xuejun; Schauer, Uwe; Qaqundah, Paul; Poulin, Yves; Kristjansson, Sigurdur; von Berg, Andrea; Nieto, Antonio; Boguniewicz, Mark; Paller, Amy S.; Dakovic, Rada; Ring, Johannes; Luger, Thomas

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Atopic dermatitis (AD) primarily affects infants and young children. Although topical corticosteroids (TCSs) are often prescribed, noncorticosteroid treatments are needed because compliance with TCSs is poor due to concerns about their side effects. In this longest and

  5. Supplementation with long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in treatment of atopic dermatitis in children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaczmarski, Maciej; Cudowska, Beata; Sawicka-Żukowska, Małgorzata; Bobrus-Chociej, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Some recent studies indicate that unsaturated fatty acids, components of cellular membranes and precursors of immunomodulators, play a significant role in the pathogenesis of some symptoms of atopic dermatitis...

  6. [Activity of B and D factors of complement alternative pathway in children with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, N V; Kozlov, L V; Logunov, O V; Bashkina, O A; Rubalskiĭ, O V; Aleshkin, V A

    2014-01-01

    Development of enzyme immunoassay detection of B and D factors of complement alternative pathway functional activity for solving diagnostic and prognostic problems of patient therapy. Study activity of these factors in blood sera of children with atopic dermatitis before and after therapy for elucidation of the role of complement alternative pathway in pathogenesis of this disease. Children aged 6 months to 18 years with atopic dermatitis were examined for functional activity of B and D factors in blood sera before and after therapy by the developed methods. The developed enzyme immunoassay methods for determination of functional activity of B and D complement alternative pathway showed high sensitivity and reliability. In children with atopic dermatitis factor B and D activity was significantly lower than normal before treatment. After treatment these activity increased significantly (p atopic dermatitis in children and the possibility of use of factor B and D functional activity analysis for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

  7. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis--own observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotsztejn, Helena; Frankowska, Joanna; Kamer, Barbara; Trznadel-Grodzka, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor...

  8. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis in Arar, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaifallah A. Alenizi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: 65% of Saudi children with atopic dermatitis are colonized with S. aureus in their skin lesions. The rate of colonization is affected by severity of the disease and by the age of the patient.

  9. Role of Microbial Modulation in Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, Lies; Land, Belinda Van't; Sprikkelman, Aline B.; Garssen, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD) is multifactorial and is a complex interrelationship between skin barrier, genetic predisposition, immunologic development, skin microbiome, environmental, nutritional, pharmacological, and psychological factors. Several microbial modulations of the

  10. Sensitization patterns in Compositae-allergic patients with current or past atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2013-01-01

    Background. An association between Compositae sensitization and atopic dermatitis has been suggested on the basis of case reports and clinical studies. Objectives. To describe the characteristics of sensitization in Compositae-allergic patients with current and/or past atopic dermatitis. Patients....../materials/methods. Consecutive Compositae-sensitive patients were selected for analysis if they had a history of (i) present and/or past atopic dermatitis or (ii) childhood flexural eczema or (iii) childhood eczema of any kind and a positive prick test result. Results. Fifty-one persons (35 females and 16 males) were included......, except that dandelion was an important allergen in children. Cobalt allergy was the most frequent other contact allergy, occurring in 37%. Conclusions. Persons with current or past atopic dermatitis may become sensitized to Compositae at any age, both occupationally and non-occupationally. They should...

  11. Identification of atopic dermatitis subgroups in children from two longitudinal birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Savenije, Olga E M; Heron, Jon; Evans, David M; Vonk, Judith M; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet H; Henderson, A John; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brown, Sara J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a prevalent disease with variable natural history. Longitudinal birth cohort studies provide an opportunity to define subgroups based on disease trajectories, which may represent different genetic and environmental pathomechanisms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the

  12. [Prevalence of atopic dermatitis in 6-14 year old children in Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Orozco, Alain R; Núñez Tapia, Rosa María

    2007-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a frequent chronic dermatosis in children. To determine the prevalence of atopic dermatitis in a pediatric population from Morelia, Michoacan. An observational, descriptive and comparative study was done to estimate the prevalence and underdiagnosis of atopic dermatitis in children and teenagers from Morelia, Michoacan (n=9578). This study had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.92. A prevalence of 10.1% and 5.4% was found in children from 6 to 10 years old and teenagers from 11 to 16 years old. The diagnosis was done in only 20% of all cases. The high underdiagnosis suggests taking emergent actions of preventive medicine. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis in pediatric population from Morelia is similar of that reported in the United States and less than of Mexico City.

  13. Increasing Comorbidities Suggest that Atopic Dermatitis Is a Systemic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Patrick M; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Paller, Amy S; Kabashima, Kenji; Amagai, Masayuki; Luger, Thomas A; Deleuran, Mette; Werfel, Thomas; Eyerich, Kilian; Stingl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of the International Eczema Council found a strong pattern of immune activation in peripheral blood and the propensity to both skin and systemic infections. Associations with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, and malignant diseases were increasingly reported, but confirmation of their link with atopic dermatitis requires longitudinal studies. Given the possibility of atopic dermatitis-related systemic immune activation, future investigations of new interventions should concurrently examine the impact on these comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Turning the inside out: the microbiology of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüssow, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Allergy is on the rise worldwide. The hygiene hypothesis of atopic diseases linked microbes with atopic dermatitis (AD) both as drivers and modulators of skin pathology. The earlier literature favoured an inside-outside model of AD where an immunological abnormality compounded by a gut microbiota dysbiosis is the primary event. Probiotic intervention trials with lactobacilli and bifidobacteria as well as the application of bifidogenic oligosaccharide prebiotics showed indeed promising clinical results, but no consistent gut microbiota dysbiosis could be linked with AD. An alternative hypothesis known as outside-inside model of AD considers a genetic skin barrier effect compounded by a skin microbiota dysbiosis as primary pathogenic event. Cultivation microbiology has demonstrated strong skin colonization with superantigen-encoding Staphylococcus aureus in AD patients; microbiota and molecular microbiome analyses demonstrated that S. aureus abundance fluctuates and parallels clinical symptoms. In a mouse model, δ-toxin of S. aureus induced mast cell degranulation, leading to AD-like symptoms. Mutant mice developing AD symptoms showed increased skin colonization with S. aureus; antibiotic treatment alleviated the symptoms. Clinical trials showed that various treatments reducing S. aureus skin load also reduced AD symptoms, suggesting S. aureus as a potential critical driver of AD and a target for antimicrobial interventions other than antibiotics. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Maternal psychologic problems increased the risk of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I J; Wen, H J; Chiang, T L; Lin, S J; Guo, Y L

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the effect of postnatal maternal psychologic problems on the development of childhood atopic disorders. To assess the association between early life maternal psychologic problems and atopic dermatitis (AD) in children in a national birth cohort. We used multistage, stratified systematic sampling to recruit 24,200 mother-newborn pairs from the Taiwan national birth registration. Maternal psychologic problems and potential confounders were gathered by the standard questionnaire at 6 months old. At 3 years of age, information about the development of AD was assessed by International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood via home interviews. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association of postnatal maternal psychologic problems (postpartum depression (PPD) and maternal mental health index) and AD. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed AD was 10.5%. PPD increased the risk of subsequent physician-diagnosed AD in children after adjusting for potential confounders and other maternal mental health index (aOR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.21-1.66). We observed that the risk of AD associated with PPD was not confounded by other social demographic factors such as maternal AD, maternal education, family income, breastfeeding, day care, and number of siblings. Postpartum depression increased the risk of childhood AD even when other maternal mental health index and social demographic factors are considered. Early intervention of PPD might be helpful for AD prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Phenotypes of Atopic Dermatitis Depending on the Timing of Onset and Progression in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roduit, Caroline; Frei, Remo; Depner, Martin; Karvonen, Anne M; Renz, Harald; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Schmausser-Hechfellner, Elisabeth; Pekkanen, Juha; Riedler, Josef; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; von Mutius, Erika; Lauener, Roger Pascal; Hyvärinen, Anne; Kirjavainen, Pirkka; Remes, Sami; Roponen, Marjut; Dalphin, Marie-Laure; Kaulek, Vincent; Ege, Markus; Genuneit, Jon; Illi, Sabina; Kabesch, Micahel; Schaub, Bianca; Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Doekes, Gert

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory, pruritic skin disease that often occurs in early infancy with a chronic course. However, a specific description of subtypes of atopic dermatitis depending on the timing of onset and progression of the disease in childhood is lacking. To identify different phenotypes of atopic dermatitis using a definition based on symptoms before age 6 years and to determine whether some subtypes are more at risk for developing other allergic diseases. The Protection Against Allergy Study in Rural Environments (PASTURE) is a European birth cohort where pregnant women were recruited between August 2002 and March 2005 and divided in 2 groups dependent on whether they lived on a farm. Children from this cohort with data on atopic dermatitis from birth to 6 years of age were included. Atopic dermatitis, defined as an itchy rash on typical locations from birth to 6 years. The latent class analysis was used to identify subtypes of atopic dermatitis in childhood based on the course of symptoms. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to analyze the association between atopic dermatitis phenotypes and other allergic diseases. We included 1038 children; of these, 506 were girls. The latent class analysis model with the best fit to PASTURE data separated 4 phenotypes of atopic dermatitis in childhood: 2 early phenotypes with onset before age 2 years (early transient [n = 96; 9.2%] and early persistent [n = 67; 6.5%]), the late phenotype with onset at age 2 years or older (n = 50; 4.8%), and the never/infrequent phenotype (n = 825; 79.5%), defined as children with no atopic dermatitis. Children with both parents with history of allergies were 5 times more at risk to develop atopic dermatitis with an early-persistent phenotype compared with children with parents with no history of allergies. Both early phenotypes were strongly associated with food allergy. The risk of developing asthma was significantly increased among the early

  17. Atopic dermatitis is associated with active and passive cigarette smoking in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available The relationship between passive smoking and atopic dermatitis has previously been reported, but few studies have simultaneously evaluated the association of atopic dermatitis with active and passive smoking.The relationships between atopic dermatitis and active and passive smoking were evaluated in Korean adolescents. We used a large, representative, population-based survey (The Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey conducted in 2011 and 2012. Active smoking was classified into 3 groups (0 days, 1-19 days, and ≥ 20 days/month. Passive smoking was categorized into 3 groups (0 days, 1-4 days, and ≥ 5 days/week. Atopic dermatitis diagnosed by a medical doctor either during the past 1 month or during the participant's lifetime was surveyed. Age, sex, obesity status, region of residence, economic level, and parental educational level of the participants were adjusted as confounders. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling.A total of 6.8% (10,020/135,682 of the participants reported atopic dermatitis during the last 12 months. Active smoking was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 20 days/month = 1.18 [1.07-1.29]; 1-19 days/month = 1.11 [0.99-1.23], P = 0.002. Passive smoking was also related to atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 5 days/week = 1.12 [1.05-1.20]; 1-4 days/week = 1.08 [1.03-1.13], P < 0.001.Atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with active and passive smoking in Korean adolescents.

  18. Genome-wide comparative analysis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis gives insight into opposing genetic mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    IRVINE, ALAN; CORVIN, AIDEN; MORRIS, DEREK

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Export Date: 3 March 2015 Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing im- mune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data fro...

  19. IMMUNOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF BREAST MILK IN WOMEN, WHO HAVE CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    OpenAIRE

    M.Yu. Belitskaya; I.Ya. Kon'; T.N. Korotkova

    2008-01-01

    100 mothers and children in couple were observed in this trial. All children had atopic dermatitis, developed against breast feeding. Analysis of immunologic characteristics of breast milk in 53 women showed a presence of allergencpecific Ide and Igg antybodies and common Ige in it. The level of those characteristics was lower if mothers were consistent with diet with goat's milk «amaltea».Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, breast feeding, dietotherapy.

  20. IMMUNOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF BREAST MILK IN WOMEN, WHO HAVE CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Belitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 100 mothers and children in couple were observed in this trial. All children had atopic dermatitis, developed against breast feeding. Analysis of immunologic characteristics of breast milk in 53 women showed a presence of allergencpecific Ide and Igg antybodies and common Ige in it. The level of those characteristics was lower if mothers were consistent with diet with goat's milk «amaltea».Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, breast feeding, dietotherapy.

  1. Probiotics supplementation during pregnancy or infancy for the prevention of atopic dermatitis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, Claudio; Chatenoud, Liliane; Turati, Federica; Galeone, Carlotta; Moja, Lorenzo; Bach, Jean-François; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2012-05-01

    The study of probiotics to prevent allergic conditions has yielded conflicting results in children. We undertook a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to investigate whether probiotic use during pregnancy and early life decreases the incidence of atopic dermatitis and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated atopic dermatitis in infants and young children. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library, updated to October 2011. The intervention was diet supplementation with probiotics versus placebo. Primary outcomes were incidence of atopic dermatitis and IgE-associated atopic dermatitis. We calculated summary relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), using both fixed- and random-effects models. We computed summary estimates across several strata, including study period, type of patient, dose, and duration of intervention, and we assessed the risk of bias within and across trials. We identified 18 publications based on 14 studies. Meta-analysis demonstrated that probiotic use decreased the incidence of atopic dermatitis (RR = 0.79 [95% CI = 0.71-0.88]). Studies were fairly homogeneous (I = 24.0%). The corresponding RR of IgE-associated atopic dermatitis was 0.80 (95% CI = 0.66-0.96). No appreciable difference emerged across strata, nor was there evidence of publication bias. This meta-analysis provided evidence in support of a moderate role of probiotics in the prevention of atopic dermatitis and IgE-associated atopic dermatitis in infants. The favorable effect was similar regardless of the time of probiotic use (pregnancy or early life) or the subject(s) receiving probiotics (mother, child, or both).

  2. Relevance of inhalant and food allergens to the etiology and management of patients with atopic dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platts-Mills, T.A.; Mitchell, E.B.; Rowntree, S.; Heymann, P.W.; Chapman, M.D.

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have IgE antibodies to common environmental antigens, both foods and inhalants. Such antibodies are probably relevant and exposure to the corresponding antigens can give rise to eczema. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved and the role of other etiologies, e.g. contact reactions, remain to be elucidated. Patients with atopic dermatitis should have comprehensive evaluations to determine the role of environmental antigens.

  3. Atopic dermatitis is associated with active and passive cigarette smoking in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between passive smoking and atopic dermatitis has previously been reported, but few studies have simultaneously evaluated the association of atopic dermatitis with active and passive smoking. The relationships between atopic dermatitis and active and passive smoking were evaluated in Korean adolescents. We used a large, representative, population-based survey (The Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey) conducted in 2011 and 2012. Active smoking was classified into 3 groups (0 days, 1-19 days, and ≥ 20 days/month). Passive smoking was categorized into 3 groups (0 days, 1-4 days, and ≥ 5 days/week). Atopic dermatitis diagnosed by a medical doctor either during the past 1 month or during the participant's lifetime was surveyed. Age, sex, obesity status, region of residence, economic level, and parental educational level of the participants were adjusted as confounders. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling. A total of 6.8% (10,020/135,682) of the participants reported atopic dermatitis during the last 12 months. Active smoking was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months) (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 20 days/month = 1.18 [1.07-1.29]; 1-19 days/month = 1.11 [0.99-1.23], P = 0.002). Passive smoking was also related to atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months) (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 5 days/week = 1.12 [1.05-1.20]; 1-4 days/week = 1.08 [1.03-1.13], P Atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with active and passive smoking in Korean adolescents.

  4. Forsythia suspensa Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Jang, Seol; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Forsythia suspensa (F. suspensa) is a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of an ethanol extract from F. suspensa fruits on atopic dermatitis both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the inhibitory effects of F. suspensa extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model exposed to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract. Topical application of F. suspensa extract to the mice attenuated...

  5. The natural history of atopic dermatitis and its association with Atopic March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanunt, Sinjira; Chinratanapisit, Sasawan; Pacharn, Punchama; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the first manifestation of Atopic March. The natural history of AD and predictive factors for Atopic March have not been widely studied in Asia. To study the natural history and associated factors of disease remission and risk of respiratory allergy in Thai children with AD. Medical records of AD patients attending Allergy clinic at Siriraj hospital from 2004-2014 were reviewed. Patients were further followed-up to obtain current symptoms and treatment. One hundred and two AD patients (60.8% female) were followed for 10.2±4.7 years. The median age at diagnosis was 1.5 (0.1-12.0) years. The most common allergen sensitization was Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae. Forty-four percent of patients had complete remission at the median age of 6.3 (2.0-15.0) years. Forty-seven percent of early AD patients (onset children had complete remission at school age with a better prognosis in early AD. At preschool age, two-thirds and one-third developed AR and asthma, respectively. Early AD and food allergy were risk factors of early asthma.

  6. Cost of illness of atopic dermatitis in children: a societal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew S

    2003-01-01

    Childhood atopic dermatitis is a disorder with considerable social and financial costs. Consideration of these costs is increasingly important in view of the growing prevalence of atopic dermatitis, particularly in developed countries over recent decades. The family stress related to the care of children with moderate or severe atopic dermatitis is significantly greater than that of the care of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The factors contributing to family stress include sleep deprivation, loss of employment, time taken for care of atopic dermatitis and financial costs. The financial costs for the family and community include medical and hospital direct costs of treatments and indirect costs from loss of employment. There are many interventions utilised in the treatment of childhood atopic dermatitis which involve not only medical practitioners but nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, psychologists and purveyors of so-called alternative therapies such as naturopathy, aromatherapy and bioresonance, all of which contribute to the financial burdens on the parents and the community. It is possible that appropriate interventions directed to reducing trigger factors might produce worthwhile savings, although the cost benefit of these measures has not been demonstrated. In conclusion, atopic dermatitis should not be regarded as a minor skin disorder but as a condition which has the potential to be a major handicap with considerable personal, social and financial consequences both to the family and the community.

  7. Atopic dermatitis is associated with a fivefold increased risk of polysensitisation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeks, Suzanne A; Brand, Paul L P

    2017-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that in atopic dermatitis, the dysfunctional skin barrier facilitates the transcutaneous presentation of allergens to the immune system. This study examined whether atopic dermatitis increased the likelihood of polysensitisation, namely sensitisation to five or more allergens. We examined the electronic hospital charts of 1743 children aged 0-17 years who had visited primary or secondary care physicians with allergic symptoms, whose blood was examined for the presence of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) to the 10 most common inhaled and food allergens and whose files contained documentation of the presence of atopic dermatitis and other skin disorders. Sensitisation was defined as a specific IgE level of ≥0.35 kU/L. Polysensitisation was more common in children with atopic dermatitis (268/1197, 22.4%) than those without (30/546, 5.5%, p children with atopic dermatitis than those without. This supports the hypothesis that sensitisation occurs through a defective skin barrier and appears to be specific for atopic dermatitis. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Factors associated with the resilience of school-aged children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Yeo Jin; Kim, Dong Hee

    2012-01-01

    To identify the factors associated with the resilience of school-aged children with atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis, a common chronic skin condition in childhood with an increasing incidence rate, can impose many challenges to children and their families. Survey. The participants were 102 children, 7-15 years old, who were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis at least six months prior to data collection. The instruments used were a self-report questionnaire on the resilience of children suffering a chronic illness, the Childrearing Behavior Questionnaire to examine parenting practices and the Personal Relationship Measurement to evaluate relationships with friends and teachers. Descriptive, Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to analyse the data. There was statistically significant relationship between resilience and duration of illness (r = -0·312, p children with atopic dermatitis who reported a shorter duration of illness, lower severity score and better relationships with parents, friends and teachers showed a higher resilience score than their counterparts. A comprehensive intervention programme for children with atopic dermatitis to promote the development of positive relationships with parents, friends and teachers is recommended. The careful nursing intervention to build a positive relationship with parents, friends and teachers would be helpful to enhance the resilience of school-aged children having atopic dermatitis. Considering social context of school-aged children having chronic skin condition should be enclosed to set a nursing plan. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Health-related Quality of Life and Mental Health of Adults With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeunhee; Kim, Yoonjung

    2017-10-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the association between the prevalence of atopic dermatitis in Korean adults and their health-related quality of life and mental health. Data from a nationally representative sample of 11,913 adults who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010-2012) were analyzed by using SAS version 9.3. The adults with atopic dermatitis had significantly lower quality of life and higher stress than did those without it. Moreover, the health-related quality of life of the adults with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than those without the disease, after adjusting for all covariates. The adjusted odds ratios of the adults with atopic dermatitis were 1.74 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.65) for stress, 1.69 (95% CI: 1.00-2.84) for depression, and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.02-2.69) for suicidal ideation. Improving our understanding of atopic dermatitis should help nurses and patients manage the stress, depression, suicidal ideation, and reduced quality of life associated with this chronic disease. There is a need to develop and conduct intervention of programs for improving mental health as well as clinical aspects of adult atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interleukin-31 pathway and its role in atopic dermatitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammed D; Oussedik, Elias; D'Amber, Veronica; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory disease, has a lifetime prevalence of 10-20%. Atopic dermatitis reduces quality of life, primarily due to pruritus. Interleukin-31 and its target receptor are newly discovered entities that are involved in pruritus. To summarize the current understanding of interleukin-31 and its role in atopic dermatitis, potential therapeutic interventions and future prospects. A systematic review was designed to identify articles related to interleukin-31 and its role in pruritus. Predefined queries containing interleukin-31 and related key terms were searched with no past date restriction, through 31 August 2016, using MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal database. Of 151 identified articles, 61 met eligibility criteria. Interleukin-31 receptors are expressed constitutively on the surface of keratinocytes, eosinophils and small diameter neurons. Overexpression of interleukin-31, independent of mast cells and lymphocytes, induces clinical and histological features consistent with atopic dermatitis. In addition, overexpression of interleukin-31 causes reversible alopecia. Human monoclonal interleukin-31 antagonist, CIM331, decreased pruritus in phase-I and phase-II clinical trials. Interleukin-31 plays an important role in atopic dermatitis and alopecia. Inhibiting this pathway may provide an alternative to antihistamines for the pruritus of atopic dermatitis.

  11. Barrier-Restoring Therapies in Atopic Dermatitis: Current Approaches and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Valdman-Grinshpoun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a multifactorial, chronic relapsing, inflammatory disease, characterized by xerosis, eczematous lesions, and pruritus. The latter usually leads to an “itch-scratch” cycle that may compromise the epidermal barrier. Skin barrier abnormalities in atopic dermatitis may result from mutations in the gene encoding for filaggrin, which plays an important role in the formation of cornified cytosol. Barrier abnormalities render the skin more permeable to irritants, allergens, and microorganisms. Treatment of atopic dermatitis must be directed to control the itching, suppress the inflammation, and restore the skin barrier. Emollients, both creams and ointments, improve the barrier function of stratum corneum by providing it with water and lipids. Studies on atopic dermatitis and barrier repair treatment show that adequate lipid replacement therapy reduces the inflammation and restores epidermal function. Efforts directed to develop immunomodulators that interfere with cytokine-induced skin barrier dysfunction, provide a promising strategy for treatment of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, an impressive proliferation of more than 80 clinical studies focusing on topical treatments in atopic dermatitis led to growing expectations for better therapies.

  12. GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS INCIDENCE IN THE CHILD POPULATION OF THE GRODNO REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokha R. N.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Research objective. To estimate a geographical variation of the indicator of the incidence of atopic dermatitis among the child population of the Grodno region. Material and methods. The data of the official statistical reports of the Grodno Regional Department of Statistics, the annual report forms «Form 1 – children» of the medical statistics office of the Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital for the period of 1999-2016 years were analyzed. Territorial differentiation of the indicator of disease incidence was carried out by the method of cluster analysis (k-means clustering. Results. The geographical characteristic of the indicator of the incidence of atopic dermatitis among the child population of the Grodno region aged 0–14 years during 1999-2016 years has been given. Low, below the average, above the average, average and high values of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence have been established. The cartogram of territorial distribution of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence among the child population has been made. Conclusion. The established features, various intensity of the degree of a geographical variation of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence reflect the influence of a set of various factors determining an indicator of diseases incidence in various territories of the region and confirm the need to analyze the cause-and-effect relationships in the system «medium-indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence among the child population».

  13. Childhood atopic dermatitis: a cross-sectional study of relationships between child and parent factors, atopic dermatitis management, and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amy E; Fraser, Jennifer A; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Morawska, Alina; Yates, Patsy

    2015-01-01

    Successful management of atopic dermatitis poses a significant and ongoing challenge to parents of affected children. Despite frequent reports of child behaviour problems and parenting difficulties, there is a paucity of literature examining relationships between child behaviour and parents' confidence and competence with treatment. To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parents' self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, self-reported performance of management tasks, observed competence with providing treatment, and atopic dermatitis severity. Cross-sectional study design. Participants A sample of 64 parent-child dyads was recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Parents completed self-report questionnaires examining child behaviour, parents' adjustment, parenting conflict, parents' relationship satisfaction, and parents' self-efficacy and self-reported performance of key management tasks. Severity of atopic dermatitis was assessed using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index. A routine home treatment session was observed, and parents' competence in carrying out the child's treatment assessed. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified significant relationships (prelationship satisfaction. There were also significant relationships between each of these variables and parents' self-reported performance of management tasks. More profound child behaviour difficulties were associated with more severe atopic dermatitis and greater parent stress. Using multiple linear regressions, significant proportions of variation in parents' self-efficacy and self-reported task performance were explained by child behaviour difficulties and parents' formal education. Self-efficacy emerged as a likely mediator for relationships between both child behaviour and parents' education, and self-reported task performance. Direct observation of treatment sessions revealed strong relationships

  14. Homeopathy in paediatric atopic diseases: long-term results in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Bartoli, Paola; Bianchi, Alba; Da Frè, Monica

    2012-01-01

    To study the socio-demographic features, the prescribed remedies and the outcome of atopic diseases in children treated with homeopathy at the Homeopathic Clinic of Lucca (Italy), and the long-term outcome of children suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) after an approximate 8-year period (range 5-10 years). Our data derive from an observational longitudinal study carried out on 213 children (38.6%) with atopic diseases out of 551 children consecutively examined from September 1998 to December 2008. We used the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Outcome Score to evaluate the results that were classified on the basis of a Likert scale. Eighty-three (39%) children were affected by asthma, 51 (24%) by allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, 76 (36%) by AD and 3 (1%) by food intolerance. Follow-up patients were 104 (48.8%), and 65 (62.5%) of them reported a major improvement or resolution. The parents of paediatric patients suffering from AD, who had started homeopathic treatment at children (mean age 12.9) were examined; 28/40 (70%) had a complete disappearance of AD, 12/40 children (30.0%) were still affected by AD; 8/40 (20%) had asthma and 8/40 patients had, or developed, allergic rhinitis. These preliminary results seem to confirm a positive therapeutic effect of homeopathy in atopic children. Furthermore, according to the data from the literature paediatric patients treated with homeopathy seem to show a reduced tendency to maintain AD and develop asthma (and allergic rhinitis) in adult age. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neonatal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L; Halkjaer, L B; Agner, T

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in atopic skin has been associated with exacerbation of eczema. Objectives To investigate a possible association between neonatal colonization with S. aureus and the risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study...

  16. No effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis in infancy : a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, ML; Wolt-Plompen, SAA; Dubois, AEJ; van der Heide, S; Jansen, DF; Hoijer, MA; Kauffman, HF; Duiverman, EJ

    Studies have been performed suggesting that administration of probiotics may have therapeutic and/or preventive benefits in the development of sensitization and atopic disease, particularly in infants with atopic dermatitis (AD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and

  17. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy: the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M.; Koopman, L. P.; van Strien, R. T.; Wijga, A.; Smit, H. A.; Aalberse, R. C.; Neijens, H. J.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D. S.; Gerritsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. Seventy-six children

  18. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy : the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M; Koopman, LP; van Strien, RT; Wijga, A; Smit, HA; Aalberse, RC; Neijens, HJ; Brunekreef, B; Postma, DS; Gerritsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. Objective We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life.

  19. Study of urinary leukotriene E4 in atopic dermatitis: relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease prevalent in patients with a personal or family history of atopy. Cysteinyl leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory mediators which play a role in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. Urinary leukotriene E4 (LTE4) has been used as an index of ...

  20. Intragenic Copy Number Variation within Filaggrin Contributes to the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis with a Dose-Dependent Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Sara J; Kroboth, Karin; Sandilands, Aileen; Campbell, Linda E; Pohler, Elizabeth; Kezic, Sanja; Cordell, Heather J; McLean, W H Irwin; Irvine, Alan D

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Loss-of-function variants within the filaggrin gene (FLG) increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. FLG also demonstrates intragenic copy number variation (CNV), with alleles encoding 10, 11, or 12 filaggrin monomers; hence, CNV may affect the amount of filaggrin expressed in the epidermis. A total of 876 Irish pediatric atopic dermatitis cases were compared with 928 population controls to test the hypothesis that CNV within FLG affects the risk of atopic dermatitis independently o...

  1. 7,3?,4?-Trihydroxyisoflavone Ameliorates the Development of Dermatophagoides farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bo-Bae; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Ah; Park, Jun Seong; Yeom, Myeong-Hun; Joo Lee, Hyong; Lee, Ki Won; Kang, Nam Joo

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory and chronically relapsing skin disorder that commonly occurs in children; the number of atopic dermatitis patients is increasing. The cause and mechanism of atopic dermatitis have not been defined clearly, although many studies are ongoing. Epidemiological studies suggest that soybean and its isoflavones have immunoregulatory activities. Here, we report that 7,3?,4?-trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3?,4?-THIF), a major metabolite of daidzin, effectively inhibited l...

  2. Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis Associated with Malassezia sympodialis by Green Tea Extracts Bath Therapy: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun Kyu; Chang, Hui Kyoung; Baek, Seok Yun; Chung, Jin Oh; Rha, Chan Su; Kim, So Young; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2012-01-01

    Multiple treatment modalities, including topical and systemic corticosteroid and phototherapy, have been used in treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, long-term corticosteroid therapy may have various adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of bath therapy using green tea extracts for treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis. A total of four patients with atopic dermatitis were enrolled in this study. A Malassezia ...

  3. The multiple factors affecting the association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2014-01-01

    , fragrances and other ingredients in emollients. Moreover, the prevalence of metal allergy seems to be increased, probably due to compromised chelation of the metals in the stratum corneum of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, conversely, the T-helper cell 2 bias that characterizes immune responses......Atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis are both common skin diseases having an immune pathogenesis. There has been considerable interest about their inter-relationships with regard to altered susceptibility. Recent investigations have shed new light on this important question...

  4. THE CASE OF HERPETIC ECZEMA IN A CHILD WITH CONGENITAL ICHTHYOSIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Stadnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of the development of herpetic eczema (Kaposi's eczema is presented against the background of congenital ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. It has been shown that the presence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and pollinosis, sensitization to many common allergens, and a positive family history of atopic dermatitis are factors of a more severe course of Kaposi's eczema. The presented clinical observation of the child with Kaposi's eczema showed that early diagnosis and timely initiated complex  therapy are the determining factors of a favorable prognosis of the disease.

  5. ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN — MODERN CLINICAL AND PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS OF DISEASES AND APPROACH TO THE TOPICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Toropova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis in children is widespread disease and difficult medical and social problem. The article presents a literature data and authors’ own experience on scientific studies and treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis during 50 years. The analysis of pathogenesis and treatment of children with atopic dermatitis was performed, and data on safety of modern medications for topical use, containing glucocorticoids, in children from early age were presented in this article.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, perinatal pathology, serum IgE, external treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:98-105

  6. Quantitative determination of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids by chiral liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in a murine atopic dermatitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Han, Ji Eun; Ko, Ji-Seung; Do, Sun Hee; Lee, Eung Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis, one of the most important skin diseases, is characterized by both skin barrier impairment and immunological abnormalities. Although several studies have demonstrated the significant relationship between atopic dermatitis and immunological abnormalities, the role of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) in atopic dermatitis remains unknown. To develop chiral methods for characterization of 12-HETE enantiomers in a 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis mouse model and evaluate the effects of 12-HETE on atopic dermatitis, BALB/c mice were treated with either DNCB or acetone/olive oil (AOO) to induce atopic dermatitis, after which 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs in the plasma, skin, spleen, and lymph nodes were quantified by chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs in biological samples of DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis mice increased significantly compared with the AOO group, reflecting the involvement of 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs could be a useful guide for understanding the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  7. Canine atopic dermatitis / Dermatite atópica canina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita da Costa Teles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Canine Atopic Dermatitis is a skin disease of genetic origin. The affected dog becomes sensible to antigens presents in the environment, developing a severe alergic, pruriginous reaction, which intervenes in the quality of life of the patient. Because of the genetic character, that is an illness that in most of the times has no cure, just control. The treatment in general is lifetime. Thus, some used drugs, for example the corticosteroides, might cause collateral effects when used for a long time, and might decrease the lifetime of the animals. By this way, the owner of the dog with atopia, must know about the complications of the disease, and occasional return of the clinical signs during the period of treatment. Therefore, this article has an objective of a review about Canine Atopic Dermatitis that is an increasing problem in the small animal practice.A Dermatite Atópica Canina é uma dermatopatia de origem genética. Os cães acometidos tornam-se sensíveis aos antígenos presentes no meio ambiente, desenvolvendo grave reação alérgica, pruriginosa, que interferem na qualidade de vida do paciente. Devido ao seu caráter genético, esta é uma doença que na maioria das vezes não tem cura, apenas controle. O tratamento em geral é vitalício. Assim sendo, algumas drogas utilizadas, a exemplo dos corticosteróides, podem causar efeitos colaterais que em longo prazo, são capazes de diminuir o período de vida do animal. Desta maneira, o proprietário do cão portador de atopia, precisa ser esclarecido em relação às complicações e provável recidiva dos sinais clínicos, durante o período de tratamento. Portanto, presente artigo tem como objetivo uma revisão sobre Dermatite Atópica Canina, que está se tornando um problema crescente na clínica de pequenos animais.

  8. An update on the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsella R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosanna MarsellaDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Remarkable progress has been made in recent years concerning our understanding of the pathogenesis of canine atopic dermatitis (AD. As our understanding improves, the therapeutic approach evolves. Of utmost importance is the documentation of skin barrier impairment in canine AD: ceramides deficiency leads to increased permeability and increased allergen penetration and sensitization. It is currently unknown whether this dysfunction is primary and genetically inherited or secondary to inflammation but it is accepted that skin barrier deficiency plays an important role in either starting or minimally exacerbating canine AD. Thus, the therapeutic approach has changed from focusing on the control of the inflammation to a combined approach that includes therapies aimed at skin barrier repair. The issue of skin barrier repair has been addressed both with oral administration of essential fatty acids and the topical application of products containing a combination of ceramides and fatty acids. These strategies are most helpful as adjunctive treatments and would be best used in young patients that have not developed chronic skin changes. Importantly, treatment for canine AD is multimodal and tailored to the individual patient, the age, and the duration of the disease. Client education plays an important role in explaining the importance of a long-term approach to minimize flare-ups and, in this context, topical therapy to correct skin barrier can be of great benefit. This is an area still in infancy and much work is needed to identify the best formulation. In human medicine, long-term use of moisturizers can have a profound effect on skin barrier and gene expression of proteins involved in skin barrier. This effect is variable depending on the formulation used. It is reasonable to speculate that the same may be

  9. Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry Data on Contact Allergy in Children With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; McGowan, Maria; Silverberg, Nanette B; Pelletier, Janice L; Fonacier, Luz; Mousdicas, Nico; Powell, Doug; Scheman, Andrew; Goldenberg, Alina

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have a dynamic relationship not yet fully understood. Investigation has been limited thus far by a paucity of data on the overlap of these disorders in pediatric patients. To use data from the Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry to elucidate the associations and sensitizations among patients with concomitant AD and ACD. This retrospective case review examined 1142 patch test cases of children younger than 18 years, who were registered between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015, by 84 health care providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) from across the United States. Data were gathered electronically from multidisciplinary providers within outpatient clinics throughout the United States on pediatric patients (ages 0-18 years). All participants were patch-tested to assess sensitizations to various allergens; history of AD was noted by the patch-testing providers. Primary outcomes were sensitization rates to various patch-tested allergens. A total of 1142 patients were evaluated: 189 boys (34.2%) and 363 girls (65.8%) in the AD group and 198 boys (36.1%) and 350 girls (63.9%) in the non-AD group (data on gender identification were missing for 17 patients). Compared with those without AD, patch-tested patients with AD were 1.3 years younger (10.5 vs 11.8 years; P dermatitis (3.5 vs 1.8 years; P Children with AD showed significant reaction patterns to allergens notable for their use in skin care preparations. This study adds to the current understanding of AD in ACD, and the continued need to investigate the interplay between these disease processes to optimize care for pediatric patients with these conditions.

  10. IL-31 significantly correlates with disease activity and Th2 cytokine levels in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Ulrike; Weißmantel, Sigo; Gehring, Manuela; Eisenberg, Anna M; Kapp, Alexander; Fölster-Holst, Regina

    2012-05-01

    Recently, we could show that IL-31 serum levels are significantly increased in adult patients with atopic dermatitis compared with skin healthy controls. However, the regulation of IL-31 in children with atopic dermatitis so far is not clear. Thus, we analyzed IL-31 serum levels together with IL-4, IL-13, ECP, and total IgE levels in 60 children with extrinsic, in five children with intrinsic atopic dermatitis, and 20 non-atopic healthy children. Further, we determined the SCORAD score, sleeplessness, and pruritus severity in all children with atopic dermatitis. IL-31 was significantly increased in children with the intrinsic and extrinsic type of atopic dermatitis compared with non-atopic healthy children (p children with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. There was no correlation of IL-31 with pruritus, total IgE Ab, and ECP levels, whereas ECP levels significantly correlated with the SCORAD score in children with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. Together, IL-31 represents an interesting cytokine especially with regard to the severity of the inflammatory process indicated by the correlation of IL-31 with SCORAD score and Th2 cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13 in children with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. The role of food allergy in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhawt, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) affects ∼10% of children. Food allergy is a known provoking cause of AD in a subset of affected children. A literature search of PubMed and Medline was conducted to review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of AD, with special focus on the role of food allergy in the development of AD, its management, and its long-term preventive strategies. A literature search of PubMed and Medline was conducted. Food allergens readily provoke AD in ∼35% of patients, as proven through double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge studies. Milk, egg, wheat, soy, and peanut account for 75% of the cases of food-induced AD. However, the positive predictive values of the parental history, skin-prick tests, or serum tests for detecting food-specific IgE are low, making these unsuitable for use as single diagnostic modalities. Therefore, the use of a food challenge test is very helpful in objectively confirming the history or positive tests. Elimination diets are often helpful in challenge-proven cases, but care must be taken to evaluate the nutritional status of the child. There are few effective long-term strategies to prevent the development of food allergen-induced AD. Early onset of AD has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of other allergic diseases, including other food allergy/sensitization, as part of the atopic march. Treatment of other causes of AD, such as barrier dysfunction and cutaneous infection, are of equal importance to food allergen avoidance. Food allergy is an important provoking cause of AD, but it is only relevant in ∼35% of affected individuals.

  12. [Analysis of selected constitutional and environmental factors in patients with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myłek, D; Kaczmarski, M

    In 156 children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis retrospective analysis was carried out for establishing the effect of constitutional and environmental factors on the process of development and clinical course of this disease. It was demonstrated that the type of feeding during infancy was related to the beginning of the first symptoms. The onset of atopic dermatitis was earliest and most frequent in children with a history of only brief breast-feeding (up to 2 months) or fed with cow milk formulas since birth. Breast-feeding during 2-6 months delayed the onset of atopic dermatitis by about 2 months in relation to the former group. The effect of environmental factors manifested itself also as exacerbation of skin changes after contact with house dust, animal hairs, feathers and other antigens (fish food, contact with plants). At the same time positive results were observed of point tests with these allergens. A significant effect of the constitutional factor on the development of atopic dermatitis included familial occurrence of atopic diseases (mostly atopic dermatitis). Only 12.8% of the studied children had no family history of atopy.

  13. Domestic dog exposure at birth reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, S; Thyssen, J P; Stokholm, J

    2016-01-01

    affected the risk of atopic dermatitis in children during the first 3 years of life. METHODS: Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) are ongoing prospective clinical birth cohort studies. Data from 411 children born to mothers with asthma (COPSAC2000 ) and 700 unselected children...... serum IgE against eight inhalant allergens was sampled after the children's birth and at pregnancy week 24 in the COPSAC2010 cohort. Associations between dog exposure and atopic dermatitis were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression models and adjusted for lifestyle confounders. RESULTS.......42). CONCLUSION: Neonatal domestic dog exposure was associated with a strongly reduced risk of atopic dermatitis in two independent birth cohorts and in a dose-dependent manner. While the mechanisms involved are unclear, our findings raise the question of whether in utero exposures may affect the risk of atopic...

  14. Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Marsella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies.

  15. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. OBJECTIVE: Using...... national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. METHODS: Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross...... similar trends, with stable incidence rates of atopic dermatitis in both Danish and Swedish children, an increase and then stabilization in asthma incidence rates in Denmark and an increase in Sweden, and a decrease in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis incidence rates. At age 5 years, one third of all children...

  16. Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Rosanna; De Benedetto, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies. PMID:29056696

  17. Relationships among plasma granzyme B level, pruritus and dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Yayoi; Kimura, Utako; Matsuda, Hironori; Tengara, Suhandy; Kamo, Atsuko; Umehara, Yoshie; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Suga, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hideoki; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Takamori, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by skin barrier dysfunction, allergic inflammation and intractable pruritus resistant to conventional antipruritic treatments, including H 1 -antihistamines. Granzymes (Gzms) are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells that have been shown to modulate inflammation. However, the relationship between Gzms and pathology in AD remains unclear. This study assessed the correlation between plasma GzmB levels and severity of pruritus and dermatitis, in AD patients. Plasma was collected from 46 patients with AD, 24 patients with psoriasis, and 30 healthy controls. AD severity was assessed with the scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index, psoriasis severity with the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI), and degree of pruritus by visual analogue scale (VAS) score. GzmA, GzmB and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Plasma GzmB concentrations were significantly higher in patients with AD and psoriasis than in healthy controls. Correlation analyses showed that plasma GzmB concentrations positively correlated with SCORAD and serum levels of severity markers such as thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, and lactate dehydrogenase in AD patients. Moreover, plasma levels of GRP, an itch-related peptide, were higher in patients with AD, positively correlating with VAS score and plasma GzmB level. In addition, plasma GzmB concentration was significantly lower in the treatment group than the untreated group with AD. Meanwhile, there were no correlations among GzmB levels, VAS score and PASI score in patients with psoriasis. In contrast to the results of plasma GzmB, plasma GzmA levels were unchanged among AD, psoriasis and healthy groups, and showed no correlations with VAS score and SCORAD index in patients with AD. Plasma GzmB levels may reflect the degree of pruritus and dermatitis in

  18. Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, or Atopic Eczema: Analysis of Global Search Engine Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Thyssen, Jacob P; Paller, Amy S; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates challenges for scientific communication, patient education, and advocacy. We sought to determine the relative popularity of the terms eczema, AD, and atopic eczema (AE) using global search engine volumes. A retrospective analysis of average monthly search volumes from 2014 to 2016 of Google, Bing/Yahoo, and Baidu was performed for eczema, AD, and AE in English and 37 other languages. Google Trends was used to determine the relative search popularity of each term from 2006 to 2016 in English and the top foreign languages, German, Turkish, Russian, and Japanese. Overall, eczema accounted for 1.5 million monthly searches (84%) compared with 247 000 searches for AD (14%) and 44 000 searches for AE (2%). For English language, eczema accounted for 93% of searches compared with 6% for AD and 1% for AE. Search popularity for eczema increased from 2006 to 2016 but remained stable for AD and AE. Given the ambiguity of the term eczema, we recommend the universal use of the next most popular term, AD.

  19. Magnitude and associated factors of Atopic dermatitis among children in Ayder referral hospital, Mekelle, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbore, Abraham Getachew; Alemu, Workalemahu; Shumye, Ashenafi; Getachew, Sefonias

    2015-08-25

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is now a day's increasing in prevalence globally. A Prevalence of 5-25 % have been reported in different country. Even if its prevalence is known in most countries especially in developing countries there is scarcity with regard to prevalence and associated risk factors of AD among children in Ethiopia settings. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude and associated factors of atopic dermatitis among children in Ayder referral hospital, Mekelle, Ethiopia. A facility-based cross-sectional study design was conducted among 477 children aged from 3 months to 14 years in Ayder referral hospital from July to September, 2014. A systematic random sampling technique was used to identify study subjects. Descriptive analysis was done to characterize the study population. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with AD. The OR with 95 % CI was used to show the strength of the association and a P value atopic dermatitis was found to be 9.6 % (95 % CI: 7.2, 12.5). In multivariate logistic regression model, those who had maternal asthma (AOR: 11.5, 95 % CI:3.3-40.5), maternal hay fever history (AOR: 23.5, 95 % CI: 4.6-118.9) and atopic dermatitis history (AOR: 6.0, 95 % CI:1.0-35.6), Paternal asthma (AOR: 14.4, 95 % CI:4.0-51.7), Paternal hay fever history (AOR: 13.8, 95 % CI: 2.4-78.9) and personal asthma (AOR: 10.5, 95 % CI:1.3-85.6), and hay fever history (AOR: 12.9, 95 % CI:2.7-63.4), age at 3 months to 1 year (OR: 6.8, 95 % CI: 1.1-46.0) and weaning at 4 to 6 months age (AOR: 3.9, 95 % CI:1.2-13.3) were a significant predictors of atopic dermatitis. In this study the magnitude of atopic dermatitis was high in relation to other studies conducted so far in the country. Maternal, paternal, personal asthma, hay fever histories, maternal atopic dermatitis history, age of child and age of weaning were independent predicators of atopic dermatitis. Hence, the finding alert a needs of

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Liza; Coffin, Susan; Leckerman, Kateri Heydon; Gelfand, Joel M; Honig, Paul J; Yan, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis are more frequently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus than children without atopic dermatitis. However, little epidemiological data exist regarding the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus among children with atopic dermatitis. Recent studies have revealed an increasing prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus among patients presenting to hospitals with serious bacterial infections, particularly those with cutaneous and soft tissue infections. As many atopic dermatitis patients are treated empirically with antibiotics for secondary skin infections, an understanding of the epidemiology of bacterial colonization and superinfection is essential for directing proper treatment in the atopic patient population. This study investigates the prevalence of risk factors for community-associated, methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization among pediatric atopic dermatitis patients encountered at an academic pediatric dermatology clinic. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in which 54 patients previously diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were enrolled. A detailed patient questionnaire, a complete cutaneous examination, and an evaluation of eczema severity according to the Eczema Area and Severity Index were completed at the time of enrollment. Bacterial cultures from the skin and nares were obtained to determine the frequency of colonization with either methicillin-sensitive S. aureus or methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Although most atopic dermatitis patients studied were colonized with S. aureus (43/54 [80%]), methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from only seven atopic dermatitis patients (7/43 [16%]). Patients colonized with S. aureus were more likely to be male, to have been previously hospitalized, to have used a topical calcineurin inhibitor in combination with a topical steroid, and less likely to have used topical antibiotics

  1. Efficacy of Kampo Medicine in Treating Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview

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    Tadamichi Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory skin disease with recurring episodes of itching and a chronic relapsing course. Current treatment options for AD include topical agents, such as topical corticosteroids and oral antiallergic drugs. Providing effective long-term treatment is sometimes difficult due to the chronic, relapsing nature of AD; therefore, there is a need to identify better therapeutic options with minimal side effects that are well tolerated over the variable course of the disease. Traditional herbal medicine, also known as Kampo medicine in Japan, has a long history and plays a role in the prevention and treatment of various diseases, including AD. Some Kampo medicines are useful for treating inflammatory skin diseases, and there has been increased interest in using Kampo medicine to develop new therapeutic agents for AD. Standard Kampo formulas for AD are effective in removing the symptoms of “Netsu Sho,” “Ketsu-Kyo,” “Ki-Kyo,” and “O-Ketsu.” This paper discusses the efficacy of Kampo medicines in treating AD. Knowledge of the mechanisms of action of Kampo medicines will result in greater choices of pharmacotherapeutic agents for AD.

  2. What do child daycare center teachers know about atopic dermatitis?

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    Akcay, Ahmet; Tamay, Zeynep; Ones, Ulker; Guler, Nermin

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common childhood inflammatory skin disorder. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the knowledge level of daycare center teachers about AD and related factors. Study subjects were 297 teachers (287 female, 10 male) from 20 randomly selected daycare centers in Istanbul. The knowledge level of teachers was assessed using a questionnaire with 21 questions about AD. The teachers were asked nine additional questions about demographic and other characteristics of the child care centers and about themselves. The mean age of the teachers was 26.4 ± 8.1 years (range 20-53 yrs). The mean score for the 21 questions was 71.4 ± 12.1 (68%) from a maximum of 105 points. The response rate of teachers rate for each question ranged from 54% to 90%. The completely true response rate for each question ranged from 3.0% to 66.7%. The knowledge level of the teachers was related to the number of children in the daycare center, but not to sex, age, education level, family history of atopy, teacher's monthly salary, location, or whether the daycare center was public or private. Although teachers in daycare centers have some knowledge about AD, widespread educational programs for teachers about AD may help to improve the understanding of the disease and the quality of life of affected children in daycare centers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Factors contributing to poor treatment outcomes in childhood atopic dermatitis.

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    Sokolova, Anna; Smith, Saxon D

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the skin and is the most common paediatric dermatological condition. While no cure is available, it can be treated effectively if adherence to a therapeutic plan is maintained. Poor adherence to treatment is common in AD and can lead to treatment failure, which has significant impacts on the patient, family and society. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify factors that contribute to poor treatment adherence in childhood AD and to identify possible strategies to remedy these. Identified factors leading to poor treatment adherence include: complexity of treatment regimen, lack of knowledge, impaired quality of life, dissatisfaction with treatment strategies, infrequent follow up, corticosteroid phobia and the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Effective strategies to increase treatment adherence include: caregiver education and utilisation of education adjuncts, optimisation of the patient/caregiver-clinician relationship, early and frequent follow up and improvement of patient and caregiver quality of life. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  4. Dietary modifications in atopic dermatitis: patient-reported outcomes.

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    Nosrati, Adi; Afifi, Ladan; Danesh, Melissa J; Lee, Kristina; Yan, Di; Beroukhim, Kourosh; Ahn, Richard; Liao, Wilson

    2017-09-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) commonly turn to dietary modifications to manage their skin condition. To investigate patient-reported outcomes and perceptions regarding the role of diet in AD. One hundred and sixty nine AD patients were surveyed in this cross-sectional study. The 61-question survey asked about dietary modifications, perceptions and outcomes. Eighty seven percent of participants reported a trial of dietary exclusion. The most common were junk foods (68%), dairy (49.7%) and gluten (49%). The best improvement in skin was reported when removing white flour products (37 of 69, 53.6%), gluten (37 of 72, 51.4%) and nightshades (18 of 35, 51.4%). 79.9% of participants reported adding items to their diet. The most common were vegetables (62.2%), fish oil (59.3%) and fruits (57.8%). The best improvement in skin was noted when adding vegetables (40 of 84, 47.6%), organic foods (17 of 43, 39.5%) and fish oil (28 of 80, 35%). Although 93.5% of patients believed it was important that physicians discuss with them the role of diet in managing skin disease, only 32.5% had consulted their dermatologist. Since dietary modifications are extremely common, the role of diet in AD and potential nutritional benefits and risks need to be properly discussed with patients.

  5. A Review of Multidisciplinary Interventions in Atopic Dermatitis

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    Sara C. Spielman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary interventions have been developed for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and their families, with the aim of improving outcomes such as disease control, adherence, and quality of life. We reviewed the content of different multidisciplinary approaches to intervention for AD and evidence for their impact on key outcome measures. We also provided data from our multidisciplinary outpatient program for pediatric AD. Studies included in the review suggest benefits of multidisciplinary interventions as models of treatment or adjuncts to standard medical care, with a positive impact on outcomes including disease severity and itching/scratching. There were limitations to existing studies, including heterogeneous methods used to assess quality of life outcomes across studies and lack of controlled studies assessing the outcome of clinical care programs. Further research will be useful in assessing the impact of multidisciplinary interventions on important outcomes such as treatment adherence and sleep, identifying the elements of multidisciplinary interventions that are most critical for improved outcomes, and identifying the best candidates for multidisciplinary intervention approaches.

  6. Lack of antinuclear antibody in children with atopic dermatitis

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    Dhar Sandipan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antinuclear antibody (ANA was assayed in 76 children with atopic dermatitis (AD of which 46 were males and 30 females. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 12 years (mean 3.4 years. Age at onset of AD ranged from 2 months to 5.5 years (mean 1.9 years and its duration ranged from 4 months to 4 years (mean 1.2 years. While facial lesions were present in 56 (73.3% patients, 49 (64.5% patients had predominant involvement of extensors. As per severity score designed by Rajka and Langerland, 31 (40.8%, 42 (55.3% and 3 (3.9% patients had mild, moderate and severe diseases respectively. History of photosensitivity was present in 6 (7.9% patients. Serum samples were positive for ANA in a very low titre (1:20 in 2/6 patients with facial lesions. However LE cell, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive proteins were negative and serum complement levels were within normal limits.

  7. The role of air pollutants in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kangmo

    2014-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease and a growing health concern, especially in children, because of its high prevalence and associated low quality of life. Genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, or interactions between them contribute to the pathophysiology of AD. Therefore, it is very important to identify and control risk factors from the environment in susceptible subjects for successful treatment and prevention. Both indoor and outdoor air pollution, which are of increasing concern with urbanization, are well-known environmental risk factors for asthma, whereas there is relatively little evidence in AD. This review highlights epidemiologic and experimental data on the role of air pollution in patients with AD. Recent evidence suggests that a variety of air pollutants, such as environmental tobacco smoke, volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde, toluene, nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter, act as risk factors for the development or aggravation of AD. These air pollutants probably induce oxidative stress in the skin, leading to skin barrier dysfunction or immune dysregulation. However, these results are still controversial because of the low number of studies, limitations in study design, inaccurate assessment of exposure and absorption, and many other issues. Further research about the adverse effects of air pollution on AD will help to expand our understanding and to establish a better strategy for the prevention and management of AD. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Atopic dermatitis (AD) management in an Italian pediatric clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, G; Gelmetti, C; Adamo, M C; Baldessarri, D; Bonfanti, R; Brero, P; Calzaretti, R; Candelori, G; Danesi, R; D'Amanti, V; Golinelli, L; Guttuso, D; La Vecchia di Tocco, A; Sapia, M G; Sarra, E; Zinna, M; Ferrara, M; Russomando, M; Mele, G

    2012-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease characterized by dry skin and variable pruritus sometimes associated with allergic disease in other organs as asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis. AD affects deeply the Quality of Life, thus can be extremely disabling and may cause psychological problems for both affected children and their families. In order to investigate the estimated prevalence of the disease and the beliefs of the Italian pediatricians, a group of 437 Italian family pediatricians covering a population of almost 380000 children participated in a study based on a questionnaire of 38 items. According to answers of the participants, the incidence of AD has been estimated around 10% of the population and food allergy is believed to be the trigger of the acute phase of the disease in infants. As a second opinion, dermatologists are consulted more frequently than allergologists. The use of emollients is advised in general whilst topical corticosteroids treatment is prescribed only in selected cases; more than 50% of pediatricians do not prescribe topical calcineurin inhibitors.

  9. Food allergy in South African children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Claudia L; Levin, Michael E; Zar, Heather J; Potter, Paul C; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P; Volkwyn, Lucia; Fenemore, Bartha; du Toit, George

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of food allergy in South Africa is unknown, but previously thought to be rare in black South Africans. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, IgE-mediated food allergy in South African children with atopic dermatitis (AD). This was a prospective, observational study in a paediatric university hospital in Cape Town. Children with AD, aged 6 months to 10 yrs, were randomly recruited from the dermatology clinic. They were assessed for sensitization and allergy by questionnaire, skin prick tests, Immuno Solid Phase Allergen Chip (ISAC) test and incremental food challenges. 100 participants (59 black Africans and 41 of mixed race) were enrolled, median age 42 months. There were high overall rates of food sensitization (66%) and food allergy (40%). Egg (25%) and peanut (24%) were the most common allergies. Black participants had comparable sensitization (69% vs. 61%) but lower allergy rates (34% vs. 46%) than mixed race participants. This was especially evident for peanut allergy (15% Blacks vs. 37% mixed race allergic to peanut, p = 0.01). Early-onset AD (children with AD, and comparable with food allergy rates in patients with AD in developed countries. There are ethnic differences, with significantly lower peanut allergy rates in Blacks compared to mixed race patients. These results are not generalizable to an unselected South African population, which requires further study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Atopic dermatitis and prolonged exclusive breast-feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, M; Elhani, I; Doussari, S; Amir, A

    2012-04-01

    We sought to compare the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding throughout at least the first 6 months of life in patients presenting atopic dermatitis (AD) with a control group, and to check for a correlation between the duration of exclusive breastfeeding and the severity of AD. We conducted a case-control study with prospective inclusion over a period of 3 years. The study group consisted of 114 patients aged less than 15 years, from an urban area, presenting AD but with no personal or family history of atopy. Each patient was compared with two controls from the same town, matched for age and gender, with no personal or family history of atopy, and free of AD. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS software package, version 15.0. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first 6 months of life in the patient group was significantly lower than in the control group (P=0.0413). On the other hand, AD was significantly less severe in patients exclusively breastfed for longer than 9 months (P=0.0079). The correlations recorded in our study do not allow us to draw any definite conclusions about a protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding with regard to AD. However, other benefits of extended exclusive breastfeeding justify supporting breastfeeding in a community with an existing sociocultural predisposition for this feeding method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Salvia plebeia suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Salvia plebeia R. Br. (Lamiaceae) has been used for folk medicines in Asian countries, including Korea and China, to treat skin inflammatory diseases and asthma. In this study, we investigated the effects of S. plebeia extract (SPE) on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We established an AD model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like skin lesions. The oral administration of SPE decreased AD symptoms based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. SPE suppressed mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. SPE inhibited Th1/Th2/Th17 phenotype CD4(+) T lymphocytes expansion in the lymph node and the expression of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in the ear tissue. To define the underlying mechanisms of action, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ activated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) model was used. SPE significantly suppressed the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB, and STAT1 in HaCaT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SPE might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  12. Effects of probiotics on the prevention of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Yeun Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is an immune disorder that is becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the world. The exact etiology of AD remains unknown, and a cure for AD is not currently available. The hypothesis that appropriate early microbial stimulation contributes to the establishment of a balanced immune system in terms of T helper type Th1, Th2, and regulatory T cell (Treg responses has led to the use of probiotics for the prevention and treatment of AD in light of various human clinical studies and animal experiments. Meta-analysis data suggests that probiotics can alleviate the symptoms of AD in infants. The effects of balancing Th1/Th2 immunity and enhancing Treg activity via the interaction of probiotics with dendritic cells have been described &lt;em&gt;in vitro&lt;/em&gt; and in animal models, although such an effect has not been demonstrated in human studies. In this review, we present some highlights of the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics in humans and animal studies with regard to their effects on the prevention of AD.

  13. [Skin microbiota and atopic dermatitis: toward new therapeutic options?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, J-Ph

    2015-01-01

    The skin in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is constantly colonized by S. aureus, in part due to a deficit in epidermal antimicrobial peptides. S. aureus can cause secondary infections but is also involved in the occurrence and severity of the inflammatory flares of AD. Thus, the diversity of skin microbiota is abnormal in AD. Dynamic studies of the microbiota showed that the prevalence of staphylococcae sp. is further increased during flares of AD. This dysbiosis leads to an increase in inflammatory reactions in which staphylococcal toxins play an important role. Changes in the gut microbiota also play a role in the early maturation of the immune system and the occurrence of allergic reactions. Attempts in the modulation of skin microbiota have recently been made showing that a cream containing a lysate of a non pathogenic Gram negative bacteria, V. filiformis, is capable of improving the manifestations of AD. These effects may be driven by a regulation of skin innate immunity through Toll like receptors (TLR-2), the secretion of IL-10 and the induction of regulatory T cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. T cell phenotype in allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis.

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    Wohlfahrt, Jan G; Kunzmann, Steffen; Menz, Günther; Kneist, Werner; Akdis, Cezmi A; Blaser, Kurt; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B

    2003-08-01

    T cells are key regulators of immunologic disease parameters. However, their contribution to the process of tissue remodeling is ill defined. In the present study, we investigated gene expression of allergy-characteristic, IL-4-rich T cell cDNAs to monitor expression of genes that might participate in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. cDNAs of freshly isolated and restimulated CD4+ T cells from patients with allergic asthma (AA) or atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy subjects were analyzed on Nylon membrane-based DNA arrays. Three patients were selected for an allergy-characteristic T cell phenotype with high IL-4 expression (AA) or IL-13 expression (AD). Several gene families such as the TGF-beta family, chemokines and chemokine receptors were found to be upregulated. Matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors were also found to be expressed in an enhanced manner. Furthermore, factors regulating tissue turnover such as fibroblast growth factors and neurotrophic as well as vasoactive factors were found be expressed at a higher level in allergic patient compared to healthy donors. The present study reveals and confirms genes relevant for allergy and highlights an approach to applying a DNA array technique for diagnostic discrimination of allergic diseases. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Filaggrin Mutation in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Song Ee; Hong, Won Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Nomura, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shotaro; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kim, Soo Chan

    2017-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing eczematous inflammatory skin disease. Mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are major predisposing factors for AD. Ethnic differences exist between Asian and European populations in the frequency and spectrum of FLG mutations. Moreover, a distinct set of FLG mutations has been reported in Asian populations. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of FLG mutations in Koreans with AD. We also investigated the association of FLG mutations and clinical features of AD and compared the Korean FLG landscape with that of other East Asian countries. Seventy Korean patients with AD were enrolled in this study. Fourteen FLG mutations previously detected in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese patients were screened by genotyping. Four FLG null mutations (3321delA, K4022X, S3296X, and S2889X) were identified in eleven patients (15.7%). The most commonly detected mutations in Korean patients with AD were 3321delA (n=6, 9.1%) and K4022X (n=3, 4.5%). FLG mutations were significantly associated with elevated IgE (≥200 KIU/L and/or MAST-CLA >3+, p=0.005), palmar hyperlinearity (pKoreans and revealed an association between FLG mutations and AD phenotype.

  16. Food allergy and atopic dermatitis: how are they connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heratizadeh, Annice; Wichmann, Katja; Werfel, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Food allergy predominantly affects children rather than adults with atopic dermatitis (AD). Early food sensitization has been found to be significantly associated with AD. Three different patterns of clinical reactions to food allergens in AD patients have been identified: 1) immediate-type symptoms, 2) isolated eczematous late-type reactions, and 3) combined reactions. Whereas in children, allergens from cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat, fish, peanut, or tree nuts are primarily responsible for allergic reactions, birch pollen-related food allergens seem to play a major role in adolescent and adults with AD in Central and Northern Europe. Defects in the epidermal barrier function seem to facilitate the development of sensitization to allergens following epicutaneous exposure. The relevance of defects in the gut barrier as well as genetic characteristics associated with an increased risk of food allergy remain to be further investigated. Many studies focus on sufficient strategies of prevention, which actually include breastfeeding or feeding with hydrolyzed formula during the first 4 months of life.

  17. Evaluation of food allergy in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Marcel M; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Boguniewicz, Mark; Eigenmann, Philippe A

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease characterized by inflammatory, chronically relapsing and pruritic eczematous flares. Its estimated incidence is 10% to 30% in children. Food allergy has been well documented in approximately one-third of children with a moderate-to-severe AD. Cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, wheat, soy, nuts, and fish are responsible for >90% of food allergy in children with AD. The incidence and type of food can vary with age. In infants, cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, and soy and, in older children, wheat, fish, tree nuts, and shellfish are the most common food allergens. Birch-associated foods have also been described as potential triggers of AD in children as well as in adults. The diagnosis of food allergy in AD is currently based on the clinical history, skin prick tests, or blood test screening, followed by an elimination diet and/or standardized oral food challenge. Once an underlying food allergy is confirmed, the avoidance of the incriminated food is generally recommended and usually leads to an improvement of the AD. Follow-up clinical evaluation with a detailed history and tracking of the level of specific IgE to implicated foods are typically used to evaluate the development of clinical tolerance, further confirmed by an oral food challenge. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New therapies for atopic dermatitis: Additional treatment classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakharia, Paras P; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    A wide array of miscellaneous agents is being studied for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), including targeted topical, oral systemic, and biologic agents. To review the known efficacy and safety to date for such agents being studied for the treatment of AD. A nonsystematic review of the literature was performed. PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for studies assessing agents not described previously for the treatment of AD. Randomized controlled trials were primarily sought, but other study types were also included if they contained pertinent data. Agents are presented by mechanism of action, with analysis of mechanism of action and data regarding efficacy and safety in patients with AD. Data regarding the following agents are presented: omiganan (an antimicrobial peptide), tapinarof (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), PR022 (hypochlorous acid), asimadoline (a κ-opioid agonist), DS107 (dihomo-γ-linolenic acid), ZPL-389 (a histamine H4 receptor antagonist), secukinumab (an interleukin 17A inhibitor), and fezakinumab (interleukin 22 inhibitor). Limited clinical data exist for many of the described agents. As recent research has improved our understanding of AD pathogenesis, various agents with unique mechanisms of action have been studied for the treatment of AD. Many of these hold great therapeutic promise for AD, and continued research and development is warranted. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel atopic dermatitis model induced by topical application with dermatophagoides farinae extract in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mina; Haruna, Takayo; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Iduhara, Miho; Takaki, Shigeki; Deguchi, Masashi; Arimura, Akinori

    2007-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Animal models induced by relevant allergens play a very important role in the elucidation of the disease. The patients with atopic dermatitis are highly sensitized with mite allergens such as Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Therefore, in the present study, we tried to develop a novel model for atopic dermatitis by repeated application with Df extract ointment. Df extract ointment was repeatedly applied to the back of NC/Nga mice together with barrier disruption. Atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions were evaluated by dermatitis scores, skin histology and immunological parameters. The effect of corticosteroid and calcineurin inhibitor was also examined. Repeated application of Df extract ointment caused rapid increase in dermatitis scores. Clinical (skin dryness, erythema, edema and erosion) and histological symptoms (dermal and epidermal thickening, hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis and inflammatory cell infiltration) in this model were very similar to those in human atopic dermatitis. Serum total and Df-specific IgE levels were elevated in this model compared with normal mice, and draining lymph node cells isolated from the mice that exhibited dermatitis produced significant amounts of interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and interferon-gamma after re-stimulation with Df. Furthermore, current first-line drugs for the treatment of human atopic dermatitis, corticosteroid and tacrolimus ointments, were effective against the clinical and histological symptoms in this model. These results suggest that the model we have established is useful for not only elucidating the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis but also for evaluating therapeutic agents.

  20. Atopic dermatitis in children in the United States, 1997-2004: visit trends, patient and provider characteristics, and prescribing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Kimberly A; Simon, Stephen D; Liu, Deede Y; Sharma, Vidya

    2007-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease of childhood and is increasing in prevalence throughout the world. Morbidity and resource use for atopic dermatitis are comparable to other chronic diseases. Topical corticosteroids are first-line therapeutic agents for atopic dermatitis; topical calcineurin inhibitors are considered second-line agents for patients who are older than 2 years. The aims of this study were to examine trends in visits for atopic dermatitis in children in the United States between 1997 and 2004, identify factors that were associated with a pediatric visit for atopic dermatitis, and assess changes in the treatment of atopic dermatitis over time. Visits for atopic dermatitis by children (0-18 years) to office-based physicians and hospital outpatient departments using 1997-2004 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey databases were analyzed. Medication prescribing rates during 2 time periods (1997-2000 and 2001-2004) were also analyzed. There were an estimated 7.4 million visits for atopic dermatitis. Statistically significant differences in patients with atopic dermatitis included age 2 to 5 years, black race, Asian race, and specialist or hospital outpatient clinic evaluation. The increase in atopic dermatitis visits per year was statistically significant. No statistical differences in prescribing rates were identified between the 2 time periods. Between 1997 and 2000, topical corticosteroids were prescribed in 34% of visits, decreasing to 25% between 2001 and 2004. Between 2001 and 2004, topical calcineurin inhibitors were prescribed in 23% of visits. In the same period, topical corticosteroids were prescribed in 24% of visits by children who were younger than 2 years; topical calcineurin inhibitors were prescribed in 22% of visits. Visits for atopic dermatitis in children are increasing. A recommended first-line treatment was prescribed in a minority of the visits.

  1. Association between obesity and atopic dermatitis in childhood: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Kleiman, Edward; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Silverberg, Nanette B; Durkin, Helen G; Joks, Rauno; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in children is associated with increased asthma and atopy. We sought to determine whether obesity in childhood or adolescence increases the risk of atopic dermatitis. This retrospective, practice-based, case-control study randomly sampled 414 children and adolescents (age, 1-21 years) with atopic dermatitis between January 2000 and December 2007 and 828 randomly sampled healthy control subjects. Information was obtained from an electronic medical record. Observations were made before the a priori hypothesis. Obesity in children is associated with increased atopic dermatitis (conditional logistic regression: odds ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.22-3.26; P = .006). These atopic dermatitis-predisposing effects are found when obesity started by less than 2 years of age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 15.10; 95% CI, 1.51-151.21; P = .02) and 2 to 5 years (aOR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.24-5.41; P = .01) but not greater than 5 years (aOR, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.66-2.64; P = .43) and when obesity was prolonged for 2.5 to 5 years (aOR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.13-6.18; P = .03) and greater than 5 years (aOR, 3.40; 95% CI, 1.34-8.63; P = 0.01). Obesity is associated with more severe atopic dermatitis (ordinal logistic regression: aOR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.24-5.37; P = .01). Obese children who eventually have atopic dermatitis require more frequent pediatrician visits for the management of atopic dermatitis (ordinal logistic regression: aOR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.12-4.50; P = .03). Prolonged obesity in early childhood is a risk factor for atopic dermatitis. Weight loss might be an important approach for the prevention and treatment of atopic dermatitis in children. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RESTORATION OF MICROBIOCENOSIS OF THE INTESTINES WITHIN THE COMPLEX THERAPY FOR ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Mel'nikova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a wide spread disease in the practices of the pediatrician. Quite often, the development of atopic dermatitis among children is accompanied by dysbacteriosis of the intestines, whose correction assisted by the probiotics is not always efficient. The purpose of the present research was to study the «Primadophilus for children» dietary supplement efficacy and safety to restore microbiocenosis of the intestines among children with atopic dermatitis. 102 patients aged between 6 months and 6 years took a part in the open research. It was discovered that most children, who received the dietary supplement along with the basic therapy, showed restoration of the normal intestinal microflora. The positive dynamics of the skin process evaluated according to SCORAD scale was marked among 76% of children from the main group and among 68% of children from the screening group. The most drastic reduction of the SCORAD index (by 16–20 points was noted among 52% of children from the main group and only among 30% of children from the screening group (p < 0,05. No side effects were reported during the treatment. Thus, the researchers proved that «Primadophilus for children» was an efficient and safe means for the complex therapy for atopic dermatitis among children.Key words: microbiocenosis of the intestines, probiotics, atopic dermatitis, children.

  3. Dupilumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Magdalena; Worm, Margitta

    2017-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an increasing prevalence. Treatment of patients suffering from mild or moderate disease includes the use of emollients and topical glucocorticoids or topical calcineurin inhibitors. Patients with chronic and severe atopic dermatitis where topical therapy is usually insufficient require the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs, which is often limited due to toxicity and severe adverse effects. Areas covered: This review summarizes the literature on the mechanism of action, clinical efficacy and safety of dupilumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the α-subunit of the interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4Rα) leading to the inhibition of both the IL-4 and IL-13 pathways. A literature search was performed on Pubmed and ClinicalTrials.gov using key words 'dupilumab', 'REGN668', 'IL-4'/'IL-13' and 'atopic dermatitis'. Expert commentary: Dupilumab offers an innovative therapeutic approach for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. It is not approved for clinical use in any country yet; however, due to its excellent clinical efficacy and a favorable safety profile, dupilumab may revolutionize the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in the next upcoming years.

  4. Current insights into the role of human β-defensins in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieosilapatham, P; Ogawa, H; Niyonsaba, F

    2017-11-01

    Anti-microbial peptides or host defence peptides are small molecules that display both anti-microbial activities and complex immunomodulatory functions to protect against various diseases. Among these peptides, the human β-defensins (hBDs) are localized primarily in epithelial surfaces, including those of the skin, where they contribute to protective barriers. In atopic dermatitis skin lesions, altered skin barrier and immune dysregulation are believed to be responsible for reduced hBD synthesis. Impaired hBD expression in the skin is reportedly the leading cause of increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infection in patients with atopic dermatitis. Although hBDs have considerable beneficial effects as anti-microbial agents and immunomodulators and may ameliorate atopic dermatitis clinically, recent evidence has also suggested the negative effects of hBDs in atopic dermatitis development. In the current review, we provide an overview of the regulation of hBDs and their role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The efforts to utilize these molecules in clinical applications are also described. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Polypodium leucotomos extract in atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Bosca, A; Zapater, P; Betlloch, I; Albero, F; Martínez, A; Díaz-Alperi, J; Horga, J F

    2012-09-01

    Topical corticosteroids are used to treat inflammation and relieve itching in atopic dermatitis, but their use is limited by adverse reactions. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether daily treatment with Polypodium leucotomos extract would reduce the use of topical corticosteroids in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. We also analyzed oral antihistamine use and changes in disease severity. We performed a phase IV randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial involving 105 patients aged between 2 and 17 years who were receiving topical corticosteroids to treat moderate atopic dermatitis. The patients were randomized to receive, in addition to their standard treatment, Polypodium leucotomos extract or placebo (both in capsule form) for 6 months. The percentage of days on which topical corticosteroids and other atopic dermatitis treatments were used was calculated. Use of Polypodium leucotomos extract did not significantly reduce the mean (SD) percentage of days on which topical corticosteroids were used (11% [12%] vs 12% [11%] for placebo). A significant reduction was, however, observed for oral histamine use (median percentage of days, 4.5% in the Polypodium leucotomos group and 13.6% in the placebo group [P= .038]). The percentage of patients who used oral antihistamines was also lower in the Polypodium leucotomos group. Long-term treatment with Polypodium leucotomos extract has benefits for children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis who require pharmacologic treatment to reduce inflammation and relieve itching. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of electroacupuncture on capsaicin-induced model of atopic dermatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dal-Lim; Lee, Seung-Deok; Choi, In-Hwa; Na, Heung-Sik; Hong, Seung-Ug

    2014-04-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is used as a prescription to treat pruritus and atopic dermatitis. Whether EA affects experimental itch in rat models of immunologic or neuronal damages, however, is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the therapeutic effects of high-frequency EA on atopic dermatitis-like lesions in rats. Capsaicin (50mg/kg) was subcutaneously administered rat pups within 48h after birth. Rats then underwent 30min of EA at six acupoints (bilateral BL13, and unilateral LI11, ST36, SP10, SP6) every other day (EA group) for 3 weeks. Measurements of IgE, mast cells, scratching behavior, dynorphin release, skin thickness and dermatitis score were obtained. Only the dermatitis score and dynorphin expression were decreased in the EA group compared with the control non-EA group. We suggest that high-frequency EA alleviates pruritus of atopic dermatitis-like lesions in rats induced by capsaicin injection, via the release of dynorphin. These findings indicate a new potential therapeutic approach for the amelioration of symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emollient enhancement of the skin barrier from birth offers effective atopic dermatitis prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Chalmers, Joanne R; Hanifin, Jon M; Thomas, Kim S; Cork, Michael J; McLean, W H Irwin; Brown, Sara J; Chen, Zunqiu; Chen, Yiyi; Williams, Hywel C

    2014-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached epidemic proportions in children worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Because of the significant socioeconomic effect of atopic dermatitis and its effect on the quality of life of children and families, there have been decades of research focused on disease prevention, with limited success. Recent advances in cutaneous biology suggest skin barrier defects might be key initiators of atopic dermatitis and possibly allergic sensitization. Our objective was to test whether skin barrier enhancement from birth represents a feasible strategy for reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in high-risk neonates. We performed a randomized controlled trial in the United States and United Kingdom of 124 neonates at high risk for atopic dermatitis. Parents in the intervention arm were instructed to apply full-body emollient therapy at least once per day starting within 3 weeks of birth. Parents in the control arm were asked to use no emollients. The primary feasibility outcome was the percentage of families willing to be randomized. The primary clinical outcome was the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at 6 months, as assessed by a trained investigator. Forty-two percent of eligible families agreed to be randomized into the trial. All participating families in the intervention arm found the intervention acceptable. A statistically significant protective effect was found with the use of daily emollient on the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis with a relative risk reduction of 50% (relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = .017). There were no emollient-related adverse events and no differences in adverse events between groups. The results of this trial demonstrate that emollient therapy from birth represents a feasible, safe, and effective approach for atopic dermatitis prevention. If confirmed in larger trials, emollient therapy from birth would be a simple and low

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Duijts, Liesbeth; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Albrecht, Eva; Baurecht, Hansjoerg; Feenstra, Bjarke; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Hysi, Pirro; Warrington, Nicole M.; Curjuric, Ivan; Myhre, Ronny; Curtin, John A.; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Saaf, Annika; Franke, Andre; Ellinghaus, David; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Prokisch, Holger; Heim, Katharina; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Pekkanen, Juha; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Kaakinen, Marika; Duffy, David L.; Madden, Pamela A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Thompson, Philip J.; Matheson, Melanie C.; Le Souef, Peter; St Pourcain, Beate; Smith, George Davey; Henderson, John; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Deloukas, Panos; Ring, Susan M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Novak, Natalija; Klopp, Norman; Rodriguez, Elke; McArdle, Wendy; Linneberg, Allan; Menne, Torkil; Nohr, Ellen A.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijin, Cornelia M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; de Jongste, Johan C.; van der Valk, Ralf J. P.; Wjst, Matthias; Jogi, Rain; Geller, Frank; Boyd, Heather A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Kim, Cecilia; Mentch, Frank; March, Michael; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Bataille, Veronique; Pennell, Craig E.; Holt, Patrick G.; Sly, Peter; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Illig, Thomas; Imboden, Medea; Nystad, Wenche; Simpson, Angela; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Postma, Dirkje; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Smit, Henriette A.; Soderhall, Cilla; Chawes, Bo; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Melen, Erik; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Custovic, Adnan; Jacobsson, Bo; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Glass, Daniel; Hakonarson, Hakon; Melbye, Mads; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Gieger, Christian; Strachan, David P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M.; Weidinger, Stephan

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16

  9. Low birth weight and preterm delivery as risk factors for asthma and atopic dermatitis in young adult males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, F.H.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Gillman, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gestational factors have been hypothesized to play a role in the susceptibility to asthma and atopic dermatitis. We examined whether fetal growth was associated with asthma and atopic dermatitis separately in a population of 4,795 male conscripts born between 1973 and 1975 in Denmark. The prevale...

  10. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  11. An Improved Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis and Suppression of Skin Lesions by an Inhibitor of Tec Family Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kawakami

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: We established a highly efficient, highly reproducible protocol to induce skin lesions in NC/Nga mice and successfully applied it to show the efficacy of terreic acid in treating skin lesions. This mouse model of atopic dermatitis will be useful to study the pathogenetic processes of atopic dermatitis and to evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates.

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 popul...

  13. Prevalence and severity of allergic rhinitis in house dust mite-allergic patients with bronchial asthma or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, I.; Oosting, A. J.; Tempels-Pavlica, Z.; de Monchy, J. G. R.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A. F. M.; Hak, E.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis are closely associated. Although population-based studies report a high prevalence of rhinitis among asthma patients, less is known of the association between rhinitis and atopic dermatitis and the severity of concomitant rhinitis.

  14. Serum Creatinine Levels During and After Long-term Treatment with Cyclosporine A in Patients with Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Jorien; van Zuilen, Arjan D.; Deinum, Joukje; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S

    2015-01-01

    Safety data with respect to kidney function during long-term treatment with cyclosporine A (CsA) in patients with atopic dermatitis is limited. Data on serum creatinine levels before, during and after CsA treatment were collected in a retrospective cohort of adult patients with atopic dermatitis.

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, L.; Standl, M.; Chen, C.M.; Ramasamy, A.; Bønnelykke, K.; Duijts, L.; Ferreira, M.A.; Couto Alves, A.; Thyssen, J.P.; Albrecht, E.; Baurecht, H.; Feenstra, B.; Sleiman, P.M.A.; Hysi, P.; Warrington, N.M.; Curjuric, I.; Myhre, R.; Curtin, J.A.; Groen-Blokhuis, M.M.; Kerkhof, M.; Sääf, A.; Franke, A.; Ellinghaus, D.; Fölster-Holst, R.; Dermitzakis, E.; Montgomery, S.B.; Prokisch, H.; Heim, K.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Pouta, A.; Pekkanen, J.; Blakemore, A.I.F.; Buxton, J.L.; Kaakinen, M.; Duffy, DL; Madden, P.A.F.; Heath, A.C.; Montgomery, G.W.; Thompson, P.J.; Matheson, M.C.; Le Souëf, P.; St Pourcain, B.; Davey Smith, G.; Henderson, J.; Kemp, J.P.; Timpson, N.J.; Deloukas, P.; Ring, S.M.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Müller-Nurasyid, M.; Novak, N.; Klopp, N.; Rodríguez, E.; McArdle, W.; Linneberg, A.; Menné, T.; Nohr, E.A.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; van Duijn, C.M.; Rivadeneira, F.; de Jongste, J.C.; van der Valk, R.J.P.; Wjst, M.; Jogi, R.; Geller, F.; Boyd, H.A.; Murray, J.C.; Kim, C.; Mentch, F.; March, M.; Mangino, M.; Spector, T.D.; Bataille, V.; Pennell, C.E.; Holt, P.G.; Sly, P.; Tiesler, C.M.T.; Hottenga, J.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Hakonarson, H.; Melbye, M.; Ljarvis, D.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Gieger, C.; Strachan, D.P.; Martin, N.G.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Heinrich, J.; Evans, D.M.; Weidinger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16

  16. Prevalence and severity of allergic rhinitis in house dust mite-allergic patients with bronchial asthma or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, [No Value; Oosting, AJ; Tempels-Pavlica, Z; de Monchy, JGR; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, CAFM; Hak, E; van Wijk, R.

    Background Allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis are closely associated. Although population-based studies report a high prevalence of rhinitis among asthma patients, less is known of the association between rhinitis and atopic dermatitis and the severity of concomitant rhinitis.

  17. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Adults With Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter R; Gislason, Gunnar H; Skov, Lone; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-03-01

    Patients with psoriasis have increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but data on atopic dermatitis (AD) are less clear-cut. However, it is well-established that erectile dysfunction (ED) can serve as a risk marker for coronary disease. To investigate the incidence, prevalence, and risk of ED in men with psoriasis and AD. The sample included all Danish men at least 30 years old. In patients with AD and psoriasis, we determined disease severity based on use of systemic therapy. We performed a cross-sectional study (January 1, 2008) using logistic regression to estimate the prevalence and odds ratio of ED. Moreover, in a cohort study design, patients were followed from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012, and Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios of new-onset ED. Models were adjusted for potential confounding factors, including age, socioeconomic status, health care consumption, smoking, alcohol abuse, diabetes, and cholesterol-lowering drug use. The outcome was initiation of pharmacotherapy used for treatment of ED. The sample consisted of 1,756,679 Danish men (age range = 30-100 years), of which 2,373 and 26,536 had adult AD (mild = 1,072; severe = 1,301) and psoriasis (mild = 21,775; severe = 4,761), respectively. Mean ages (SDs) were 53.0 (14.6), 46.7 (12.0), and 56.3 (13.8) years for the general population, patients with AD, and patients with psoriasis, respectively. Prevalences of ED were 8.7%, 6.7%, and 12.8% for the general population, patients with AD, and patients with psoriasis, respectively. Adjusted odds ratios (logistic regression) of ED were decreased in patients with AD (0.68; 0.57-0.80) but increased in those with psoriasis (1.15; 1.11-1.20). Adjusted odds ratios for mild and severe AD were 0.63 (0.48-0.82) and 0.72 (0.58-0.88), respectively, and those for psoriasis these were 1.16 (1.11-1.21) and 1.13 (1.03-1.23). Adjusted hazard ratios (Cox regression) were 0.92 (0.76-1.11) for AD and 1.14 (1.08-1.20) for

  18. Improvement of atopic dermatitis severity after reducing indoor air pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye One; Kim, Jin Hye; Cho, Soo Ick; Chung, Bo Young; Ahn, In Su; Lee, Cheol Heon; Park, Chun Wook

    2013-08-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that environmental contaminants such as air pollution and tobacco smoke play an important role in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the severity of AD and indoor air pollution. The study population consisted of 425 children from 9 kindergartens, Korea. The authors surveyed the prevalence of AD and evaluated disease severity by the eczema area and severity index (EASI) score and investigator's global assessment (IGA). After measuring indoor air pollution, a program to improve indoor air quality was conducted in 9 kindergartens. Seven months later, the prevalence and disease severity were evaluated. The initial prevalence of AD was 8% and the mean EASI score was 2.37. The levels of particulate material 10 (PM10) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were higher in some kindergartens compared to the normal values. Subsequent to the completion of the indoor air quality improvement program, the mean PM10 level was significantly decreased from 182.7 to 73.4 µg/m(3). After the completion of the program, the prevalence of AD and the mean EASI were decreased, and the changes were both statistically significant. The mean number of hospital visits decreased from 1.3 per month during the first survey to 0.7 per month during the second survey, which was statistically significant. Indoor air pollution could be related to AD. The reduction of PM10 through improving indoor air quality should be considered in kindergartens and schools in order to prevent and relieve AD in children.

  19. Role of behavioral health in management of pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinnert, Mary D; Booster, Genery; Copeland, Mandy; Darr, Jennifer Moyer; Meltzer, Lisa J; Miller, Michael; Oland, Alyssa; Perry, Shauna; Wise, Brian K; Bender, Bruce G

    2018-01-01

    To describe the behavioral components and complications in treating pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and the critical role of behavioral health professionals in addressing disease impact and behavioral aspects of disease management for these patients and families. Studies and review articles were selected from medical and psychology databases for relevance to pertinent topics. AD has significant negative effects in affected individuals and their families on quality of life, behavioral, emotional, and sleep disturbances, and family functioning. Effective treatment strategies for AD are available, but the challenges for children and parents in coping with disease-related concerns and in following through with the multiple aspects of treatment are considerable. A biopsychosocial model, which incorporates the interplay among biological, psychological, and social dimensions of medical care, can be implemented in various treatment settings to achieve an integrated medical and behavioral health care approach. By sharing a family orientation, using a stress and coping model, and taking into account children's developmental capabilities and concerns, medical and behavioral health care providers are equipped to bring an in-depth understanding and different evidence-based therapeutic tools to address emotional, behavioral, and interpersonal challenges imposed by moderate to severe AD in children and families. Behavioral health and medical providers working together to provide integrated care play a critical role in helping children and families cope with the burdens imposed by AD, successfully manage the disease, and achieve optimal quality of life for affected children and their families. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Helicobacter pylori immunization and atopic dermatitis in South Italian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Del Tufo, Ester; Alfano, Rossella; Triassi, Maria; Perrone, Laura

    2014-08-01

    The epidemiological decrease of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection has been recently associated to the increase of several extra-intestinal allergic disorders. We investigated the role of specific Hp IgG production in the development of IgE or not IgE mediated food allergy (FA) in children affected by atopic dermatitis (AD). From January 2010 to July 2013, 290 South Italian children, aged between 26 and 142 months, were consecutively referred to the Pediatric Clinic of the Pediatric Department at Second University of Naples and were diagnosed as affected by AD. The patients were classified in two groups on the basis of diagnosis of food allergy (88 FA affected and 202 not FA affected) and further divided on the basis of the diagnosis of atopy (63 IgE mediated and 23 not IgE mediated). Hp serum IgG was detected using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit (Wampole® Helicobactor pylori IgG ELISA II, Wampole Laboratories, Cranbury, NJ) and Hp stool antigens using enzyme immunoassay (Premier Platinum HpSa plus, Cincinnati OH). We found a statistically significant higher prevalence of Hp serology positivity in not FA vs. FA AD-affected children (p = 0.032) and a significant inverse association between FA and Hp immunization (1/OR 0.32 95% CI 0.11-0.95). Further, we identified an absolute prevalence Hp serology positivity in not-IgE-mediated rather than in IgE-mediated FA AD-affected patients (p = 0.0006). We hypothesize that specific Hp IgG production could protect against the development of both FA and atopy in AD-affected children.

  1. Chrysin attenuates atopic dermatitis by suppressing inflammation of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choi, Young-Ae; Jin, Meiling; Choi, Jung Ho; Park, Jee Hun; Park, Pil-Hoon; Choi, Hyukjae; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-12-01

    We previously reported the inhibitory effect of chrysin, a natural flavonoid plentifully contained in propolis, vegetables and fruits, on the mast cell-mediated allergic reaction. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chrysin on atopic dermatitis (AD) and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We used an AD model in BALB/c mice by the repeated local exposure of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DNCB/DFE caused AD-like skin lesions. Oral administration of chrysin diminished AD symptoms such as ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. Chrysin decreased infiltration of mast cells, and reduced serum histamine level. Chrysin also suppressed AD by inhibiting the inflammatory responses of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in mouse lymph node and ear. Interestingly, chrysin significantly inhibited the production of cytokines, Th2 chemokines, CCL17 and CCL22 by the down-regulation of p38 MAPK, NF-κB, and STAT1 in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α/interferon (IFN)-γ-stimulated human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Chrysin also inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-stimulated IL-33 expression in HaCaT cells and mouse primary keratinocytes. Taken together, the results indicate that chrysin suppressed AD symptoms, suggesting that chrysin might be a candidate for the treatment of AD and skin allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Indoor air pollution aggravates symptoms of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jihyun; Han, Youngshin; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Gyo-Boong; Jung, Kweon; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ahn, Kangmo

    2015-01-01

    Most of researches on the impact of indoor air pollutants on atopic dermatitis (AD) have been based upon animal models, in vitro experiments and case-control studies. However, human data to elucidate the role of indoor air pollution on worsening symptoms of pre-existing AD from a longitudinal study are scarce. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of indoor air pollution on AD symptoms in children. We surveyed 30 children with AD in a day-care centre, which moved to a new building during the study. These children stayed there for 8 hours a day Monday through Friday, and their daily symptom scores were recorded. Indoor and outdoor air pollutant levels were continuously measured 24 hours a day for 12 months (Period 1 to 4). Data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Compared to the period before moving (Period 1), concentrations of indoor air pollutants mostly increased after moving (Period 2) and decreased by natural ventilation and bake-out (Periods 3 and 4). The rate of positive AD symptom increased from 32.8% (Period 1) up to 43.8% (Period 2) and 50.5% (Period 3), then decreased to 35.4% in Period 4 (P indoor air pollutants on AD symptoms 2 days later were evaluated, AD symptoms significantly increased by 12.7% (95% CI: -0.01 to 27.1) as toluene levels increased by 1 ppb (P = 0.05). In conclusion, indoor air pollutants increase the risk of AD aggravation in children and toluene in the indoor environment might act as an aggravating factor.

  3. Bacterial and Viral Infections in Atopic Dermatitis: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Peck Y; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common allergic skin disease in the general population. It is a chronic inflammatory skin disease complicated by recurrent bacterial and viral infections that, when left untreated, can lead to significant complications. The current article will review immunologic and molecular mechanisms underlying the propensity of AD patients to microbial infections. These infections include Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin infections, eczema herpeticum, eczema vaccinatum, and eczema coxsackium. Previous studies have shown that skin barrier defects, a decrease in antimicrobial peptides, increased skin pH, or Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 are potential contributing factors for the increased risk of skin infections in AD. In addition, bacterial virulence such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) produces significantly higher number of superantigens that increase their potential in causing infection and more severe cutaneous inflammation in AD patients. More recent studies suggest that skin microbiome including Staphylococcus epidermidis or other coagulase-negative staphylococci may play an important role in controlling S. aureus skin infections in AD. Other studies also suggest that genetic variants in the innate immune response may predispose AD patients to increased risk of viral skin infections. These genetic variants include thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), type I interferon (α, ß, ω), type II interferon (γ), and molecular pathways that lead to the production of interferons (interferon regulatory factor 2). A common staphylococcal toxin, α-toxin, may also play a role in enhancing herpes simplex virus skin infections in AD. Further understanding of these disease processes may have important clinical implications for the prevention and treatment of skin infections in this common skin disease.

  4. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis--own observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotsztejn, Helena; Frankowska, Joanna; Kamer, Barbara; Trznadel-Grodzka, Ewa

    2012-02-24

    The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor. The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of disease among children born in 2005-2008 treated in Outpatient Clinic of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz. Children suffering from atopic dermatitis are more prone to develop infectious diseases. Infectious diseases in children with atopic dermatitis are of more chronic nature and more often require antibiotic therapy. Such children often manifest chronic diarrhea and their stool contains Staphylococcus aureus. They are more often hospitalized because of difficulty in setting a diagnosis and applying treatment in outpatient clinics.

  5. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis – own observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Rotsztejn

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor.Material/Methods:The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of disease among children born in 2005–2008 treated in Outpatient Clinic of the Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital in Lodz.Results:Children suffering from atopic dermatitis are more prone to develop infectious diseases.Conclusions:Infectious diseases in children with atopic dermatitis are of more chronic nature and more often require antibiotic therapy. Such children often manifest chronic diarrhea and their stool contains Staphylococcus aureus. They are more often hospitalized because of difficulty in setting a diagnosis and applying treatment in outpatient clinics.

  6. Atopic dermatitis in children: Epidemiological and clinical aspects in Côte d'Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouadio Celestin Ahogo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have been devoted to atopic dermatitis in children in sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore make this study in Côte d’Ivoire in order to contribute to a better knowledge of atopic dermatitis in children on black skin. In our study the prevalence was 9.2%. The duration of the disease before the consultation ranged from 3-45 days. Atopic dermatitis occurs more frequently in children from2 to 5 years old. More than half of the patients had a history of atopy and the lesions generally were localized in the folds. 60% of the lesions were dry and were trigged by dust. The pruritus was often insomnia and the scratching leads to hyperpigmentation of the lower eyelid; a characteristic sign on black skin not often reported in the literature.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...... SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr...

  8. Filaggrin genotype and skin diseases independent of atopic dermatitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted DNA...... and information on skin diseases from the Danish National Birth Cohort and Health Register, with 18 years follow-up during years 1996-2013. Odds ratios (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively, and adjusted for physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis...... of atopic dermatitis (OR 3.3, CI 2.1-5.3), dermatology consultations for allergy or rash (HR 2.2, CI 1.4-3.5), basic dermatology consultations at age

  9. Aero-allergens in canine atopic dermatitis in southeastern Australia based on 1000 intradermal skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Bettenay, S V; Tideman, L

    2000-06-01

    To determine the most relevant aero-allergens involved in canine atopic dermatitis in southeastern Australia and provide information about these aero-allergens to the general practitioner. Dogs presented to the Animal Skin & Allergy Clinic with history and clinical signs of atopic dermatitis were injected intradermally with 38 different allergens and negative and positive control. Intradermal skin tests in 1000 dogs were retrospectively evaluated. One third of all patients reacted to the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. Allergens reacting in more than 15% of the patients were wheat (Triticum aestivum), sweet vernal (Anthoxanthum odoratum), English couch (Agropyron repens), yellow dock (Rumex crispus), Mexican tea (Chenopodium ambrosioides), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), melaleuca (Melaleuca quinquenervia) and peppercorn (Schimus spp). House dust mites are the most common allergens in canine atopic dermatitis in southeastern Australia and D farinae is involved most frequently. However, a number of grass, weed and tree pollens also are involved regularly.

  10. Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis From the Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine: Presentation of a Novel Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choopani, Rasool; Mehrbani, Mehrzad; Fekri, Alireza; Mehrabani, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    There is a strong current trend for using complementary and alternative medications to treat atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a common, chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory skin disease. It can have a profound, negative effect on patients' quality of life. Mild cases of atopic dermatitis can be controlled by the application of moisturizers and topical corticosteroids. However, in severe cases, application of immunosuppressive medication is unavoidable but it can have adverse effects. In traditional Persian medicine, diseases similar to resistant atopic dermatitis are treated with whey in combination with decoction of field dodder. Both whey and field dodder have anti-inflammatory properties. Consumption of whey can also aid skin repair, mitigate pruritus, and help combat the high level of stress experienced by patients. Therefore, it is hypothesized that consumption of traditional medicinal treatment of whey with decoction of field dodder can be applied as a complementary treatment for atopic dermatitis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Cesarean section delivery and development of food allergy and atopic dermatitis in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathoma, Evangelia; Triga, Maria; Fouzas, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Delivery by Cesarean section (CS) may predispose to allergic disorders, presumably due to alterations in the establishment of normal gut microbiota in early infancy. In this study, we sought to investigate the association between CS and physician-diagnosed food allergy and atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life, using data from a homogeneous, population-based, birth cohort. A total of 459 children born and cared for in the same tertiary maternity unit were examined at birth and followed up at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months of age. Participants with symptoms suggestive of food allergy or atopic dermatitis were evaluated by a pediatric allergy specialist to confirm the diagnosis based on well-defined criteria. The rate of CS was 50.8% (n = 233). Food allergy was diagnosed in 24 participants (5.2%) while atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 62 children (13.5%). Cesarean section (OR 3.15; 95% CI 1.14-8.70), atopic dermatitis of the child (OR 3.01; 95% CI 1.18-7.80), parental atopy (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.73-12.1), and gestational age (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.07-2.37) were significant and independent predictors of food allergy. Children with at least one allergic parent delivered by CS had higher probability of developing food allergy compared with vaginally delivered children of non-allergic parents (OR 10.0; 95% CI 3.06-32.7). Conversely, the effect of CS on atopic dermatitis was not significant (OR 1.35; 95% CI 0.74-2.47). Delivery by CS predisposes to the development of food allergy but not atopic dermatitis in early childhood. Cesarean section delivery seems to upregulate the immune response to food allergens, especially in children with allergic predisposition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Does food allergy cause atopic dermatitis? Food challenge testing to dissociate eczematous from immediate reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Debra; Tofte, Susan J; Hanifin, Jon M

    2006-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate and diagnose, in a controlled setting, suspected food allergy causation in patients hospitalized for management of severe, unremitting atopic dermatitis (AD). Nineteen children were hospitalized at Oregon Health and Science University with atopic dermatitis from 1986 to 2003 for food restriction, then challenge, following standard recommendations. Challenges were prioritized by categories of (a) critical foods (e.g., milk, wheat, egg, soy); (b) important foods; and (c) other suspected foods. Patients were closely observed for evidence of pruritus, eczematous responses, or IgE-mediated reactions. If results were inconsistent, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge was performed. A total of 17 children with atopic dermatitis were assessed. Two could not be fully evaluated, thus were excluded from data tabulations. Only one positive eczematous food response was observed of 58 challenges. Three children had well-documented histories of food-induced IgE-mediated anaphylactoid or urticaria reactions to seafood and/or nuts and were not challenged with those foods. Atopic dermatitis, even in the highest-risk patients, is rarely induced by foods. Undocumented assumptions of food causation detract from proper anti-inflammatory management and should be discouraged. Immediate IgE-mediated food reactions are common in atopic dermatitis patients; such reactions are rapid onset, typically detected outside the clinic, and must be distinguished from eczematous reactions. Diagnosis of food-induced eczema cannot be made without food challenge testing. Such tests can be practical and useful for dispelling unrealistic assumptions about food allergy causation of atopic dermatitis.

  13. A mixed longitudinal study of physical growth in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palit Aparna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing disorder associated with significant morbidity. Growth retardation is known to occur in children affected with atopic dermatitis. However, there is not enough Indian data for this disorder. Aims: We conducted a longitudinal study to look for the effect of atopic dermatitis on growth attainment of Indian preschool children. Methods: The growth patterns of 62 children, aged 3-5 years and suffering from atopic dermatitis were studied in terms of body weight, height and head circumference. Sixty-eight normal healthy children matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status were taken as controls. Every child was followed up at intervals of three months following a mixed longitudinal study design for the duration of one year. Severity of the disease was determined by the scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD index. Results: Growth velocities were lower in patients than in controls. Mean changes in body weight of patients of both sexes showed close similarity to controls. Mean values for height and head circumference were found to be significantly lower in girls than in the girls of the control group at majority of the age levels. In contrast, in boys, these values for the patients remained comparable or higher than in the boys of the control group at some of the ages. Girls had comparatively more severe disease than boys and they had lower values than boys for all the growth parameters assessed. Conclusion: Growth retardation was observed among children with a more severe form of the disease. Height of the affected children was compromised mostly, though a tendency for catch-up growth was observed. Severe forms of atopic dermatitis may impair a child′s linear growth temporarily.

  14. [What environmental measures should be taken for the treatment of atopic dermatitis in children and the prevention of other atopic manifestations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinmann, P; Paty, E; de Blic, J

    2005-01-01

    The association of atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergy is frequent. Hence, it is logical to imagine that eviction of the main indoor allergens (dust mites, animal danders) would have a preventive effect on the onset and progression of atopic dermatitis and the risk of asthma. Recent epidemiological studies are generally negative with regard to primary and also secondary and tertiary prevention. Only one study appeared positive; it combined eviction of food allergens and of indoor allergens during the first year of life. Other studies are warranted to assess the interest and efficacy of eviction of inhalant allergens in atopic dermatitis.

  15. Antipruritic application of ovocystatin in atopic dermatitis in dogs - preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popiel Jarosław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was an attempt to determine the possibilities of using ovocystatin, a component of a new generation product of natural origin, in local therapy of atopic dermatitis in dogs by suppressing pruritus during illness. Chicken egg cystatin was used locally in the interdigital spaces of forelimbs of dogs used in the experiment. The degree of pruritus and clinical changes in the animals were defined using CADESI-03 scale before and after the beginning of the experiment. The results obtained proved that ovocystatin may be used as a substance suppressing pruritus in atopic dermatitis.

  16. Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt; Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life and identify the localization of the early skin lesions that predicts the development of AD. DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of children born to mothers with a history of asthma...... predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention of AD....

  17. Passage of food antigens into circulation of breast-fed infants with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagni, G; Paganelli, R; Caffarelli, C; D'Offizi, G P; Bertolini, P; Aiuti, F; Giovannelli, G

    1988-11-01

    We have selected 13 babies presenting with atopic dermatitis during exclusive breast feeding. After evaluation of reaginic reaction, we detected beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) in breast milk and babies sera before and after maternal elimination diet and after maternal challenge. beta-Lactoglobulin was present only in the sera of infants ingesting breast milk containing BLG. We have seen reaginic reactions to cow's milk in seven babies. The maternal elimination diet improved eczema in 11/13 infants, maternal challenge worsened atopic dermatitis in 9/9 children. We demonstrated the transport of food antigen via breast milk into infants' circulation.

  18. CORRECTION OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOCENOSIS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND RELATED FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS OF DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Arshba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the relevance of the correction of bacterial overgrowth syndrome in children with atopic dermatitis and concomitant diseases of digestive system. The main functions of the microflora, the influence of various factors on the colonization resistance of the body of the child have been identified. The results of our own observations are cited. On their basis we proposed approaches to the treatment of children with atopy and concomitant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, microbiota, bacterial overgrowth syndrome. (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 114–117.

  19. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF USING MOMETASONE FUROATE IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Tomilova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the therapy for atopic dermatitis with topical glucocorticosteroids. Parameters of the «ideal» topical cortico steroid are provided: strong anti-inflammatory effect, low systemic bioavailability, quick action onset, minimal side effects, multiplicity of pharmaceutical forms. It describes results of a number of clinical trials for efficacy and safety of using mometasone furoate in children, a pharmaceutical product close enough to the «ideal» characteristics of a topical corticosteroid.Key words: atopic dermatitis, topical glucocorticosteroids, mometasone furoate, children, safety.

  20. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Current Clinical Guidelines for Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic multifactorial skin disease that is common enough in childhood. The article presents the current data on epidemiology and dynamics of incidence of pathological symptoms, pathogenesis basics, and key factors of the disease development, shows the current classification of the disease. The authors consider in detail the key principles of the diagnosis and peculiarities of a clinical aspect depending on age. Algorithms of a therapeutic approach, as well as basics of an individual hypoallergenic diet are proposed. General recommendations and possible prognosis for pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis are given.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF PIMECROLIMUS IN TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Monakhov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment of 57 patients with atopic dermatitis (ATD in age 7–18 years old with elidel cream are described. Cream was drifted on facial skin 2 times daily. Apparent effect was marked on 7–14 day. There was no any case of serious adverse events. Thus, taking to account safety and effectiveness profile, pimecrolimus can be used as a medication of first line of therapy in treatment of ATD, while lesion is located on sensitive sectors of skin.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, pimecrolimus.

  2. Contact sensitization to common haptens is associated with atopic dermatitis: new insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Engkilde, K

    2012-01-01

    -analysis in non-pierced women, a positive association was also found for nickel sensitization. Nickel and thimerosal sensitization may introduce bias in data analysis since these allergies often develop following skin piercing where the skin compartments are bypassed. Discussion: We suspect that individuals...... with self-reported atopic dermatitis from this study mainly suffered from mild disease. However, clinicians should be aware of increased levels of contact sensitization in individuals with atopic dermatitis. Patch testing should therefore be considered at an early point in individuals with a history...

  3. COMPARISON OF CLINICAL ACTIVITY OF PIMECROLIMUS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH MILD AND MODERATE ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Deeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (ad is prevalent disease in younger children. Calcium inhibitor pimecrolimus (elidel, cream 1% is the latest anti-inflammatory drug offered for management of ad. The activity of pimecrolimus was evaluated in open, prospective, randomized, comparison trial, on 60 children (age from 3 months to 7 years with mild and moderate ad. Pimecrolimus was more effective in management of mild ad on the assumption of regular use of drug (TIS < 17, and topical corticosteroids were effective in patients with moderate ad.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, pimecrolimus, topical corticosteroids, management.

  4. Risk assessment of bronchial asthma development in children with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vуsotska, Olena V.; Klymenko, Viktoriia A.; Trubitcin, Alexei A.; Pecherska, Anna I.; Savchuk, Tamara O.; Kolimoldayev, Maksat; Wójcik, Waldemar; Szatkowska, Małgorzata; Burlibay, Aron

    2017-08-01

    This article offers a risk assessment of bronchial asthma development in children with atopic dermatitis by applying fuzzy-set theory to accumulated statistical data. It is shown that with a view to executing the said task one should exercise a complex approach involving factors such as "IgE level", "existence of obstructions" and "burdened bronchial asthma heredity of immediate relatives". The obtained results will assist in making adequate and well-informed medical decisions as well as facilitate the decrease of the risk of developing bronchial asthma in children with atopic dermatitis.

  5. Heritability of hand eczema is not explained by comorbidity with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Mortensen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Genetic factors have been shown to influence the risk of hand eczema, and may theoretically influence the frequency of eruptions as well as age at onset of the disease. However, the result may be confounded by atopic dermatitis, which is a major risk factor for development of hand eczema...... and is known to be influenced by genetic factors. In this study, the importance of genetic and environmental risk factors in the etiology of hand eczema, independent of atopic dermatitis, was investigated in a population-based twin cohort. In addition, any possible genetic influence on frequency of hand eczema...

  6. EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF HYPOALLERGENIC COMPOUND, ENRICHED WITH PREBIOTICS, FOR THE PROPHYLACTICS OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Dzhumagaziyev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a study of prophylactic effectiveness of hypoallergenic compound «Nutrilon Hypoallergenic 1», fortified with prebiotics «IMMUNOFORTIS», in children from group of risk of development of atopic dermatitis. Anthropometric rates of children after 8 weeks of observation corresponded with average age rates; their physical development was estimated as harmonious. The compound was well-tolerated. Its use resulted in increase of bifido- and lactobacteria of intestinal micro flora and decrease of acute respiratory infections in infants.Key words: infants, alimentary allergy, atopic dermatitis, artificial feeding, prebiotics, hypoallergenic compound.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:37-43

  7. Predictive factors of persistent infantile atopic dermatitis up to 6 years old in Taiwan: a prospective birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M M-H; Tseng, W-N; Ou, C-Y; Hsu, T-Y; Kuo, H-C; Yang, K D

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis affects 15-30% of children worldwide. Onset of disease usually occurs within the first year of life, over half of which regress by 6 years of age. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors related to the persistence of infantile atopic dermatitis. In this birth cohort study, patients were enrolled prenatally and followed until 6 years of age; 246 patients had infantile atopic dermatitis at 6 months of age. Family history, maternal and paternal total and specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, and cord blood IgE were recorded. Clinical examination, questionnaire survey, and blood samples for total and specific IgE of the children were collected at each follow-up visit. Of the 246 patients with infantile atopic dermatitis at 6 months of age, 48 patients had persisted atopic dermatitis at 6 years of age (19.5%). Risk factors associated with persistent infantile atopic dermatitis included egg white sensitization (odds ratio: 3.801, P = 0.020), and atopic dermatitis involving two or more areas at 6 months old (odds ratio: 2.921, P = 0.018) after multivariate analysis with logistic regression. Patients with persistent infantile atopic dermatitis had a higher risk of asthma before 6 years old (39.6% vs 24.2%, P = 0.032). Egg white sensitization and the initial involvement of two or more areas at 6 months of age were associated with the persistent infantile atopic dermatitis. Patients with persistent infantile atopic dermatitis are more likely to develop asthma by 6 years of age. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prenatal antibiotics and atopic dermatitis among 18-month-old children in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, S; Schlünssen, V; Olsen, J; Ramlau-Hansen, C H

    2017-07-01

    Despite extensive research, the aetiology of atopic dermatitis remains largely unknown, but reduced intestinal microbiota diversity in neonates has been linked to subsequent atopic dermatitis. Consequently, postnatal antibiotics have been proposed as a risk factor, but a potential association between prenatal antibiotics and atopic dermatitis is not well studied. Overall, the current evidence suggests a positive association between exposure to prenatal antibiotics and atopic dermatitis. To investigate the association between prenatal antibiotics and atopic dermatitis among 18-month-old children. This study conducted within the Danish National Birth Cohort included 62 560 mother-child pairs. Data on maternal prenatal antibiotics were collected in the 30th gestation week and 6 months post-partum, and offspring atopic dermatitis 18 months post-partum through telephone interviews. Antibiotic use was categorized by the timing of exposure as 1st-2nd trimester (gestation week 0-29), 3rd trimester (gestation week 30-birth), all three trimesters or none. Data were analysed by logistic regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders. Exposure to antibiotics prenatally was associated with increased odds of atopic dermatitis among children born by atopic mothers but only when used in both 1st-2nd and 3rd trimester (OR adj 1.45, 95% CI: 1.19-1.76). The findings were consistent using different definitions of atopic dermatitis. Prenatal exposure to antibiotics throughout pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of atopic dermatitis but only within the first 18 months of life among children born by atopic mothers. The clinical usefulness of this finding must rest on corroboration in independent data sources. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Adjuvant treatment with the bacterial lysate (OM-85) improves management of atopic dermatitis: A randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Bodemer, C; Guillet, G.; Cambazard, F.; Boralevi, F; Ballarini, S.; Milliet, C.; Bertuccio, P.; La Vecchia, C.; Bach, J.; De Prost, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background Environmental factors play a major role on atopic dermatitis (AD) which shows a constant rise in prevalence in western countries over the last decades. The Hygiene Hypothesis suggesting an inverse relationship between incidence of infections and the increase in atopic diseases in these countries, is one of the working hypothesis proposed to explain this trend. Objective This study tested the efficacy and safety of oral administration of the bacterial lysate OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom?, B...

  10. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Jin-Woo; Khang, Dongwoo; Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, Woo Song; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are common allergic and inflammatory skin diseases caused by a combination of eczema, scratching, pruritus, and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. This paper examines whether oleanolic acid acetate (OAA) modulates AD and ACD symptoms by using an existing AD model based on the repeated local exposure of mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to the ears of BALB/c mice. In addition, the paper uses a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-sensitized local lymph node assay (LLNA) for the ACD model. The oral administration of OAA over a four-week period attenuated AD symptoms in terms of decreased skin lesions, epidermal thickness, the infiltration of immune cells (CD4⁺ cells, eosinophils, and mast cells), and serum IgE, IgG2a, and histamine levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th22 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the lymph node and ear tissue, and the LLNA verified that OAA suppressed ACD. The oral administration of OAA over a three-day period attenuated ACD symptoms in terms of ear thickness, lymphocyte proliferation, and serum IgG2a levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the thymus and ear tissue. Finally, to define the underlying mechanism, this paper uses a TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) model. OAA inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the downregulation of NF-κB and MAPKs in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results indicate that OAA inhibited AD and ACD symptoms, suggesting that OAA may be effective in treating allergic skin disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neonatal BCG vaccination and atopic dermatitis before 13 months of age: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøstesen, L M; Kjaergaard, J; Pihl, G T; Birk, N M; Nissen, T N; Aaby, P; Jensen, A K G; Olesen, A W; Stensballe, L G; Jeppesen, D L; Benn, C S; Kofoed, P-E

    2017-09-20

    Studies have suggested that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. The Danish Calmette Study was conducted 2012-2015. Within 7 days of birth new-borns were randomised 1:1 to BCG or no BCG. Exclusion criteria were gestational age clinical examinations until 13 months. Clinical atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 466/2,052 (22.7%) children in the BCG group and 495/1,952 (25.4%) children in the control group (RR = 0.90 [95% confidence intervals 0.80-1.00]). The effect of neonatal BCG vaccination differed significantly between children with atopic predisposition (RR 0.84 (0.74-0.95)) and children without atopic predisposition (RR 1.09 [0.88-1.37]) (test of no interaction, P = .04). Among children with atopic predisposition, the number-needed-to-treat with BCG to prevent one case of atopic dermatitis was 21 (12-76). © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  12. Efficient introduction of complementary foods for children with atopic dermatitis and predisposition to allergic reactions for prevention of atopic march

    OpenAIRE

    Kamaev, A.

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of allergic diseases grows constantly. Realization of genetic defects to the disease depends of impact of environment and contacts with different allergens. Prophylactic dietary avoidance is important to prevent debut of the atopic dermatitis and secondary exacerbations of the disease. Terms and preferable sequence of complementary food introduction are discussed for breast-fed and formula-fed infants; advantages of ready-made industrial products of infant meals are proved. The gra...

  13. Cost of care of atopic dermatitis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common dermatologic condition with a prevalence varying from 5% to 15%, and it has been rising over time. Several studies from developed countries have revealed the substantial economic burden of AD on health care budgets. There has been no research however on the cost of care of AD from India a country where health care is self-funded with no health insurance or social security provided by the government. Aim: The aim of our study was to assess prospectively the cost of care of AD in children in an outpatient hospital setting in India. Methods: A total of 40 children with AD, <10 years of age, registered in the pediatric dermatology clinic at our institute were enrolled for the study. All patients were followed-up for 6 months. Demographic information, clinical profile, severity, and the extent of AD were recorded in predesigned performa. Caregivers were asked to fill up a cost assessment questionnaire specially designed for the study. It had a provision for measuring direct, indirect, and provider costs. Results: Of the 40 patients, 37 completed the study. Mean total cost for AD was Rs. 6235.00 ± 3514.00. Direct caregiver cost was Rs. 3022.00 ± 1620.00 of which treatment cost constituted 77.2 ± 11.1%. The total provider cost (cost of consultation, nursing/paramedical staff and infrastructure was Rs. 948.00, which was 15.2% of the total cost of care and the mean indirect cost calculated by adding loss of earnings of parents due to hospital visits was Rs. 2264.00 ± 2392.00 (range: 0-13,332. The mean total cost depending on the severity of AD was Rs. 3579.00 ± 948.00, Rs. 6806.00 ± 3676.00 and Rs. 8991.00 ± 3129.00 for mild, moderate and severe disease, respectively. Conclusions: AD causes a considerable drain on the financial resources of families in India since the treatment is mostly self-funded. Cost of care of AD is high and comparable to those of chronic physical illness, such as diabetes

  14. Parental knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reljić, Vesna; Gazibara, Tatjana; Nikolić, Miloš; Zarić, Milica; Maksimović, Nataša

    2017-03-01

    Successful control of atopic dermatitis (AD) in children depends on parents' knowledge on the disease and attitude toward ill child, but there is a lack studies exploring parental knowledge, attitude, and behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate parents' knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward AD. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, between February 2015 and March 2016. Parents of children with AD were invited to complete the questionnaire, which was comprised of five parts: parental sociodemographic characteristics, demographic and clinical characteristics of children, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. To assess factors associated with a higher knowledge level on AD, stronger positive attitude, and more supportive behavior, we performed two multiple linear regression models. The average parental knowledge score was 9.5 ± 1.9 out of 12. The level of knowledge did not correlate with parental conviction that they were well-informed on AD (ρ = -0.121; P = 0.319). Older (β = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00-0.16, P = 0.040), married/partnered parents (β = -2.14, 95% CI -3.55 to 0.72, P = 0.004), and those who have had AD themselves were more likely to be more knowledgeable on AD. Older (β = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01-0.34, P = 0.036) and employed (β = 3.99, 95% CI 1.59-6.38, P = 0.002) parents had stronger positive attitudes toward their children with AD. More supportive behavior of parents of children with AD was associated with being older (β = 0.24, 95% CI 0.04-0.45, P = 0.020) and less educated (β = -0.76, 95% CI -1.24 to 0.28, P = 0.003). The importance of understanding AD and accounting for attitudes by family members is obvious for successful control of the disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Respiratory comorbidity in South African children with atopic dermatitis

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    C L Gray

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atopic dermatitis (AD is an early and important step in the propagation of the allergic march, enhancing food and respiratory allergies via epicutaneous sensitisation to allergens. Objectives. To determine the prevalence and patterns of aeroallergen sensitisation, asthma and allergic rhinitis in South African (SA children with AD. Methods. This was a prospective, observational study in a paediatric university hospital in Cape Town, SA. Children with moderate to severe AD, aged 6 months - 10 years, were recruited randomly and investigated for food sensitisation and allergy. They were assessed for sensitisation to aeroallergens by the immuno solid-phase allergen chip test. House-dust mite DerP and DerF, dust mite Eur m, Timothy grass, Bermuda grass, tree pollen, mould (Alternaria, cat and dog sensitisation patterns were analysed. Symptoms of asthma and allergic rhinitis were elicited using a questionnaire modified from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study questions. Results. One hundred participants (59 black Africans and 41 of mixed ethnicity were enrolled (median age 42 months. Of the participants, 39% had symptoms of asthma and 53% symptoms of allergic rhinitis; 89% tested positive to at least one aeroallergen, most commonly house-dust mite DerP or DerF (81%, dust mite Eur m (51%, Timothy grass (36% and cat (35%. Asthma, allergic rhinitis and aeroallergen sensitisation all increased with increasing age, while food allergy decreased with age. Food allergy was not an independent risk factor for respiratory allergies. Children were sensitised to indoor allergens (house-dust mite, pets from an early age, while pollen allergies increased with age. Conclusions. In this cohort of SA children with moderate to severe AD, comorbidity with respiratory allergies was high. The prevalence of respiratory allergies increased with age while food allergy decreased with age, in keeping with the pattern of the allergic

  16. A Pragmatic Approach to Patch Testing Atopic Dermatitis Patients: Clinical Recommendations Based on Expert Consensus Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer K; Jacob, Sharon E; Nedorost, Susan T; Hanifin, Jon M; Simpson, Eric L; Boguniewicz, Mark; Watsky, Kalman L; Lugo-Somolinos, Aida; Hamann, Carsten R; Eberting, Cheryl Lee; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may complicate the clinical course of atopic dermatitis (AD), and patch testing remains the criterion standard for diagnosing ACD. To date, there have been no guidelines or consensus recommendations on when and how to patch test individuals with AD. Failure to patch test when appropriate may result in overlooking an important and potentially curable complicating comorbidity. In this article, we present consensus recommendations regarding when to perform patch testing in the AD patient, best practices, and common pitfalls. Patch testing should be considered in AD patients with dermatitis that fails to improve with topical therapy; with atypical/changing distribution of dermatitis, or pattern suggestive of ACD; with therapy-resistant hand eczema in the working population; with adult- or adolescent-onset AD; and/or before initiating systemic immunosuppressants for the treatment of dermatitis. A suggested patch testing algorithm for AD patients is provided.

  17. EFFICIENT INTRODUCTION OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND PREDISPOSITION TO ALLERGIC REACTIONS FOR PREVENTION OF ATOPIC MARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kamaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of allergic diseases grows constantly. Realization of genetic defects to the disease depends of impact of environment and contacts with different allergens. Prophylactic dietary avoidance is important to prevent debut of the atopic dermatitis and secondary exacerbations of the disease. Terms and preferable sequence of complementary food introduction are discussed for breast-fed and formula-fed infants; advantages of ready-made industrial products of infant meals are proved. The gradual outreach of infant’s taste spectrum and increasing step by step of load on infant’s intestine can become serious hedge for the atopic march and important measure of prevention of allergic rhinitis and asthma.Key words: atopic march, dietetics, complementary foods, prevention of allergies, children.

  18. Atopic dermatitis is more severe in children over the age of two who have an increased body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroulis, Ioannis; Magnelli, Laura; Gaughan, John; Weiner, Evan; Kratimenos, Panagiotis

    2015-07-01

    Childhood obesity increases the risk of developing atopic dermatitis, but no objective measuring tool has been used to determine whether it also affects the severity. Our aim was to determine whether an association existed between increased body mass index (BMI) or weight for length and severity of atopic dermatitis, as measured by the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. Children with atopic dermatitis who presented to the emergency department at an urban children's hospital (n = 104) were assessed using the SCORAD index. We assessed the relationship between BMI percentile or weight for length percentile, based on age, and atopic dermatitis severity, using single-variable multinomial logistic regression with odds ratios. A significant association was found between BMI >24 and atopic dermatitis severity for children older than 2 years. When analysed separately, a significant association between BMI percentile and SCORAD severity was found in boys but not in girls. These data suggest that the severity of atopic dermatitis is associated with increased BMI percentile in children older than 2 years, although this association was not apparent in younger ages using weight for length. Our results indicate the need for new avenues in the prevention and treatment of these entities. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Human skin equivalents for atopic dermatitis : investigating the role of filaggrin in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen, Vincent van

    2014-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a frequent occurring inflammatory skin disease causing physical discomfort, social embarrassment and stress. This skin disease is characterized by decreased skin barrier function and various other epidermal changes, as well as immunological changes. A decreased skin barrier

  20. Stereological quantification of lymphocytes in skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, A R; Sørensen, F B; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2001-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is histologically characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the skin and quantitative assessment is required. This study introduces stereological techniques to quantify the number of lymphocytes in skin biopsies. Four-millimetre punch biopsies were taken from skin with a...

  1. Filaggrin breakdown products determine corneocyte conformation in patients with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riethmuller, Christoph; McAleer, Maeve A.; Koppes, Sjors A.; Abdayem, Rawad; Franz, Jonas; Haftek, Marek; Campbell, Linda E.; MacCallum, Stephanie F.; McLean, W. H. Irwin; Irvine, Alan D.; Kezic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are a well-replicated risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD) and are known to cause an epidermal barrier defect. The nature of this barrier defect is not fully understood. Patients with AD with FLG LOF mutations are known to have more

  2. Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms and Quality of Life in mothers of Children With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, S; Usak, E; Ozen, S; Gorpelioglu, C

    2017-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children and it can negatively affect both children and their families. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of atopic dermatitis on quality of life related to maternal health and maternal obsessive compulsive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the pediatric and dermatology polyclinics. The SCORAD index was used for determining the severity of disease, and the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (MOCI) and SF-36 form were applied to the participants' mothers. A total of 120 children and their mothers participated the study. Comparing the atopic dermatitis group and the healthy control group, no statistically significant differences were seen in terms of MOCI and SF-36 scores, except for the physical functioning subscore. The results showed that having a child with atopic dermatitis and the severity of the disease do not influence their mothers in terms of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and health-related quality of life, except for physical functioning scores. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary nucleotide and nucleoside exposure in infancy and atopic dermatitis, recurrent wheeze, and allergic sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, M.J.C.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Theunisz, E.H.; Ewalds, D.; Thijs, C.; Mommers, M.; Arts, I.C.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that early life exposure to nucleotides and nucleosides lowers the risk of recurrent wheeze, atopic dermatitis, and allergic sensitization among n = 429 children. Concentrations in breast milk were established by high-performance liquid chromatography; concentrations in formula milks

  4. Contact allergy in children with and without atopic dermatitis; which are the frequent allergens?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbes, S.; Rustemeyer, T.; Schuttelaar, M.L.A.; Sillevis Smitt, J.H.; Middelkamp-Hup, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on contact allergies in children are conflicting. This study aims to identify frequent contact allergens and their relevance in children with and without atopic dermatitis (AD). This will allow better identification of potential sensitizers and improve patients' care in children.

  5. Atopy as a risk factor for thyroid autoimmunity in children affected with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullá, M; Fierro, V; Papacciuolo, V; Alfano, R; Ruocco, E

    2014-08-01

    As a result of several clinical reports addressing coincidence or coprevalence of atopy and autoimmune disease such as multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus, there has been considerable interest in defining the relationship between the expression of allergic and autoimmune disease in populations of patients. Although thyroid autoimmunity has been regularly associated with chronic urticaria in children, the cofrequency of thyroid autoimmunity and atopic dermatitis has not yet been investigated. The aim of the study was to describe our experience with children affected by atopic dermatitis and associated thyroid autoimmunity. From January 2010 to December 2012, 147 children affected by atopic dermatitis were consecutively referred to the Pediatric Clinic of the Pediatric Department at the Second University of Naples. Seventy healthy children of comparable ages, unaffected by atopic dermatitis, atopy or thyroid disease, served as a control group. On the basis of skin prick test results we selected 54 IgE-mediated (36.7%) and 93 non-IgE-mediated AD (63.3%) children. Fourteen of 147 patients (9.52%) showed increased levels of antithyroid antibodies. Our results therefore suggest that atopy, especially food allergy, and autoimmunity are two potential outcomes of dysregulated immunity. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Stealth monitoring of adherence to topical medication: adherence is very poor in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci-Manwaring, Jennifer; Tusa, Mark G; Carroll, Christie; Camacho, Fabian; Kaur, Mandeep; Carr, David; Fleischer, Alan B; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Feldman, Steven R

    2007-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common problem for which topical agents are the primary treatment. When topical medications fail, further therapy may include systemic agents with the potential for greater toxicity. Adherence to topical treatment of atopic dermatitis has not been well characterized. Poor adherence to topical medication could account for failure of topical therapy. To determine adherence to topical treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. Thirty-seven children were given 0.1% triamcinolone ointment and were counseled to use it twice daily. They were told to return in 4 weeks, at which time they were told to continue treatment for another 4 weeks. Electronic monitors were used to measure adherence over the entire 8 week study. Patients were not informed of the compliance monitoring until the end of the study. Twenty-six patients completed 8 weeks of treatment. Mean adherence from the baseline to the end of the study was 32%. Adherence was higher on or near office visit days and subsequently decreased rapidly. This study was limited by the large number of subjects who failed to return for follow-up appointments or withdrew from the study. Adherence to topical medications is very poor in a clinic population of children with atopic dermatitis. Office visits are one means to increase adherence. If adherence to topical treatment can be improved, exposure to more costly and potentially toxic systemic agents may be avoidable.

  7. Role of foods in irregular aggravation of skin lesions in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Uehara, Masami

    2008-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease that especially affects children and adolescents. Many environmental factors have been recognized as relevant in aggravating skin lesions of the disease. However, it remains to be determined whether foods play a role in worsening of skin lesions in children with atopic dermatitis. In the present study, we investigated whether foods play a role in irregular aggravation of skin lesions in children with the disease. The study population consisted of 69 patients aged 3-15 years with atopic dermatitis. They were hospitalized and open challenge tests were performed with suspected foods. Photographs of representative skin lesion sites were taken at baseline and before and after the challenge. We determined challenge-positive foods by evaluating the comparable before/after challenge photographs. One to three (average, 1.9) challenge-positive foods were confirmed in 52 (75%) of the 69 patients examined. Predominant offending foods were chocolate, cheese and yogurt. Specific immunoglobulin E values to offending foods were mostly negative. We asked patients to exclude challenge-positive foods from their diets. They were then discharged and followed up for 3 months at our outpatient clinic. Exclusion of the offending foods for 3 months brought about a remarkable improvement in the disease. These results suggest that foods play an important role in irregular aggravation of skin lesions in children with atopic dermatitis.

  8. Study of urinary leukotriene E4 in atopic dermatitis: relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Smith CM, Christie PE, Hawksworth RI, Thien F,. Lee TH. Urinary leukotriene E4 levels after allergen and exercise challenge in bronchial asthma. Am Rev. Respir Dis 1991; 143: 1322. 16. Clendenning WE, Clack WE, Ogawa M , Ishizaka. K. Serum IgE studies in atopic dermatitis. J Invest. Dermatol 1973; 61: 233. 17. Custer ...

  9. Effect of Bronchial Asthama on Porphyrin Levels in Patients of Atopic Dermatitis - a Spectrophotometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R L Singh

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative assay of porphyrins in blood, urine and stool of 30 patients with atopic dermatitis, 17 without and 13 with bronchial asthma was done. Rimington′s technique for the estimation of porphyrins was employed. No statistically significant difference in porphyrin levels was observed between patients without and with bronchial asthma.

  10. Effect of Bronchial Asthama on Porphyrin Levels in Patients of Atopic Dermatitis - a Spectrophotometric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R L; Handa, F; Sidhu, K S

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative assay of porphyrins in blood, urine and stool of 30 patients with atopic dermatitis, 17 without and 13 with bronchial asthma was done. Rimington's technique for the estimation of porphyrins was employed. No statistically significant difference in porphyrin levels was observed between patients without and with bronchial asthma.

  11. Educational Programs for the Management of Childhood Atopic Dermatitis: An Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunmi Lee, PhD, RN

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: This review indicates the challenges that health professionals face in improving symptoms of atopic dermatitis. The identified strategies can be used in the development of more effective evidence-based programs. Future studies should focus on the development and evaluation of educational programs that include these themes.

  12. Immunoglobulin free light chains in adult atopic dermatitis patients do not correlate with disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J. L.; Knipping, K.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A F; Garssen, J.; De Bruin-Weller, M. S.; Hijnen, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although total IgE levels have been proposed as a biomarker for disease severity in atopic dermatitis (AD) and are increased in the majority of AD patients, they do not correlate with disease severity during short-term follow-up. During the synthesis of immunoglobulins, free light chains

  13. Food hypersensitivity in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis

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    Jarmila Čelakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5 years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%, no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%. Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients, tomatoes (in 20%, and kiwi (in 17, 5%, apples and spices (in 16%, tangerines and oranges (in 15%, capsicum (in 13%, fishes (in 12%, celery (in 9%, and chocolate (in 7%. Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen-associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  14. Oral immunosuppressive drugs in the treatment of atopic dermatitis : improving performance and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, F.M.

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) by the use of oral immunosuppressive drugs is discussed in order to improve the performance and safety. In the first part of this thesis we evaluated the qualitative and quantitative prescribing of oral immunosuppressive drugs in the

  15. Expression density of receptors to IL-1β in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshevskaya, Alina A; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Krugleeva, Olga L; Nepomnyschih, Vera M; Lukinov, Vitaliy L; Karaulov, Aleksander V; Sennikov, Sergey V

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1 β) and the system for regulation of its biological effects play an important role in the development and behavior of inflammatory processes in atopic dermatitis. Notably, cells that are actively involved in the pathological process have altered expression of cytokine receptors. However, standard evaluation of cells by flow cytometry measures only the percentage of cells expressing the appropriate marker, which is not enough for a full assessment of these changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the expression of IL-1β cytokine receptors in patients with atopic dermatitis by both percentage of cells with receptors in various subsets and the absolute number of membrane-bound receptors themselves. It was found that an increase or decrease in the percentage of cells expressing the receptors in subsets of immune cells in patients with atopic dermatitis was not associated with a change in the number of receptors on the cell surface. Moreover, the changes in the percentage of cells and the number of receptors may occur in different directions, as shown for IL-1R2 expression on B cells and IL-1R1 expression for monocytes. Changes in the parameters of IL-1β receptor expressions are associated with disease severity index SCORAD in atopic dermatitis. These findings underline the importance of studying the density of cytokine receptor expression in the pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. APPLICATION EXPERIENCE OF GOAT'S MILK BASED PRODUCTS AMONG CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.G. Malanicheva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to study the efficiency of the diet therapy against atopic dermatitis by means of the goat's milk based products among children at different age. The researchers observed 188 children aged between 3 months and 18 years, suffering from atopic dermatitis aggravated by the mycotic infection. Patients of the main group (102 children under 3 received goat's milk based products within the hypo allergic diet — «Nanny» and «Nanny — Zolotaya Kozochka» adapted milk formulas, while children over 3 received «Amal Tea» instant goat's milk. The research findings have showed that the introduction of the goat's milk based products into the food ration leads not only to the positive short term results — achievement of the clinical remission on 12th–20th day from the moment the therapy starts, but also to the positive long term effect — remission extension, reduction of the disease recurrences, reduction of the general IgE level in blood serum and offending IgE allergens to the cow milk proteins and casein. Thus, the replacement of the cow milk based products within the ration of patients for «Nanny» and «Nanny — Zolotaya Kozochka» adapted milk formulas and «Amal Tea» instant goat's milk allows for optimization of the atopic dermatitis diet therapy among children at different age.Key words: atopic dermatitis, diet therapy, goat's milk.

  17. Intensive patient education and treatment program for young adults with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Span, L; Jaspers, JPC; Fidler, [No Value

    Background and Objective. By means of a 2-week intensive multidisciplinary training & treatment course in small groups (ISBP), young adults with atopic dermatitis may be able to achieve better self-management of their disease and reduce their number of doctor visits. Methods. Patients aged 18-35

  18. Linkage of atopic dermatitis to chromosomes 4q22, 3p24 and 3q21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Møller-Larsen, Steffen; Nyegaard, Mette

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, itchy skin disease of complex inheritance characterized by dermal and epidermal inflammation. The heritability is considerable and well documented. To date, four genome scans have examined the AD phenotype, showing replicated linkage at 3p26-22, 3q13-21 and 18q11...

  19. Modern aspects of external anti'inflammatory therapy of atopic dermatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhotnikova O.M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of combined use of creams Prednicarbum and synthetic tannin (phenol-methanal-of urea-polycondensate in the treatment of exacerbation of atopic dermatitis in children. Material and methods: 50 children, 1 to 12 years, with atopic dermatitis with the exacerbation of the skin process different degrees of severity. Results: In children with mild localized form of atopic dermatitis after the monotherapy whith cream synthetic tannin, noted a marked clinical improvement up to 7 days of treatment. The noted expressive positive dynamics of the skin process and reduction of objective symptoms during the first days after of combination treatment with Prednicarbatet cream and synthetic tannin, also after combination therapy Prednicarbate and moisturizing cream in mode of step therapy. Conclusions: The combined application of Prednicarbate cream and phenol-methanal-of urea-polycondensate increases the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory treatment of atopic dermatitis, which can reduce the duration of use of topical corticosteroids and reduce the risk of adverse reactions in children with moderate and severe course skin process.

  20. Clinical significance of FLG gene mutations in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Varlamov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin barrier dysfunction due to deficiency of the skin protein filaggrin is one of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Objective: to determine the clinical significance of 2282 del CAGT, R501X, R2447X, and S3247X mutations in the FLG gene in children with atopic dermatitis. The investigation included 58 children with atopic dermatitis. A molecular genetic analysis of the four mutations in the FLG gene was done in all the children. In the patients with FLG gene mutations, there was a tendency towards a higher frequency of sensitization to house dust allergens, significantly more often sensitization to cat epidermal allergen, and significantly higher levels of specific IgE to the cat epidermis. Conclusion. Mutations in the FLG gene encoding the protein filaggrin raise the risk for sensitization to domestic and epidermal allergens and, in case of already existing sensitization to the cat epidermis, the patients are found with a high degree of probability to have the high concentration of specific IgE to this allergen. The above fact justifies the need to place special emphasis on measures to eliminate house dust allergens, and cat epidermis allergen in particular, and to personalize approaches to therapy and prevention of atopic dermatitis in children. 

  1. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin gene...

  2. Serum OX40 ligand: a potential marker of atopic dermatitis disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: OX40 ligand (OX40L) and OX40 are members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor (TNFR) super families respectively. Recent studies have indicated the critical involvement of OX40/OX40L interaction in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. To our knowledge, no data could be cited in literature ...

  3. New-onset inflammatory bowel disease in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Wienholtz, Nita; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic and remitting inflammatory skin disease that affects children and adults. While some studies have reported an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis (UC), others have associated both conditions with AD. Notably, most studies...

  4. How do personality systems interact in patients with psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and urticaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Judith A; Kuhl, Julius; Bahmer, Friedrich A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate characteristic personality system interaction in patients with psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and urticaria. The differences between these three disease groups were examined with respect to various psychological variables and deviations from a group of healthy controls. A total of 56 patients with atopic dermatitis (n=21), psoriasis (n=20) and urticaria (n=15) were tested with the "Assessment of Personality Functioning in Therapy" Inventory, which consists of psychometric scales for basic needs (affiliation, achievement, power), enactment of needs-related behaviour, stress, emotional dispositions, cognitive styles and various self-regulation functions. Significant differences with respect to needs and motivational goals, cognitive styles and self-regulation competence were found between the three disease groups, showing considerable overlap between atopic dermatitis and urticaria, but only a little overlap with psoriasis. From a psychological viewpoint, patients with psoriasis seem to carry a higher risk of developing mental disorders. Based on our results, existing prevention programmes for patients with atopic dermatitis seem appropriate, whereas such programmes for patients with psoriasis should focus on self-motivation, prevention of addictive behaviour, and strengthening of self-efficacy.

  5. Cyclosporine and Extracorporeal Photopheresis are Equipotent in Treating Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Poulsen, Johan; Grunnet, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent and debilitating disease often requiring systemic immunosuppressive treatment. The efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) is well proven but potential side effects are concerning. Several reports point at extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) as an ...

  6. Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary itch-coping training programme in adults with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.W.M.; Duller, P.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Kooijmans-Otero, M.E.; Verhaak, C.M.; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2009-01-01

    The short- and longer-term effectiveness of a brief, multidisciplinary itch-coping group training scheme in adults with atopic dermatitis was evaluated. Clinical severity scores (Eczema Area and Severity Index) and validated self-report measures were obtained in a waiting-list control condition

  7. Tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash in atopic dermatitis-prone subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Staci; Meckfessel, Matthew H; Lio, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease characterized by eczematous eruptions and impaired skin barrier function. Patients, as well as their families, frequently report reductions in quality of life. Pruritus, lack of sleep, and impaired social functioning all contribute to this reduction. A skincare regimen of gentle cleansing and daily moisturization is integral to managing atopic dermatitis. While there are a multitude of reports supporting the use of moisturizers, there is a paucity regarding the use of cleansers, especially cleansers formulated with ingredients known to improve skin hydration. A clinical study was conducted to assess the tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash formulated with the filaggrin break-down products arginine and pyrrolidone carboxylic acid in subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin (Cetaphil® RestoraDerm® Body Wash). The results of this study indicate that Cetaphil RestoraDerm Body Wash was well tolerated, reduced itch, improved quality of life, and was well-liked by subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin.

  8. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. While many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood, and a compari...

  9. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models, as determined by using global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David A.; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. Although many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood,...

  10. Risk for hand eczema in employees with past or present atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Diepgen, TL

    Persons with atopic dermatitis run a considerable risk of developing hand eczema when exposed to occupational agents that are a burden to the skin. This also pertains to those with a history of skin atopy in childhood. This review presents estimates of the risk of developing hand eczema and examines

  11. Effectiveness of regionally-specific immunotherapy for the management of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Jon D; Neradilek, Moni B

    2017-01-05

    Canine atopic dermatitis is a common pruritic skin disease often treated with allergen immunotherapy (AIT). AIT in dogs traditionally begins with attempting to identify clinically relevant environmental allergens. Current allergen testing methodologies and immunotherapy techniques in dogs are not standardized. Immunotherapy with a mixture of allergenic extracts selected based on regional aerobiology rather than intradermal tests or serum IgE assays has been described. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of regionally-specific immunotherapy in dogs with atopic dermatitis. The medical records of a veterinary dermatology referral clinic were searched for dogs with atopic dermatitis that began regionally-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy from June, 2010 to May, 2013. An overall assessment of treatment effectiveness (excellent, good, fair, or poor) was assigned based upon changes in pruritus severity, lesion severity, and the reduction in concurrent medication(s) during a follow-up period of at least 270 days. Baseline characteristics that might predict treatment success were analyzed with the Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis tests. Of the 286 dogs that began regionally-specific immunotherapy (RESPIT) during a 3 year period, 103 met the inclusion criteria. The overall response to RESPIT was classified as excellent in 19%, good in 38%, fair in 25%, and poor in 18% of dogs. The response classification correlated significantly with a reduction in pruritus severity (r = 0.72, p atopic dermatitis in dogs.

  12. Hospital-diagnosed atopic dermatitis and long-term risk of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jette Lindorff; Vestergaard, Christian; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disorder with a childhood prevalence reaching 20%. An estimated 50% of patients have a life-long chronic course. The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of first-time myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with AD compared...

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies Against IL-13 and IL-31RA in Development for Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    The IL-13 and IL-31 cytokines and inflammatory pathways have been identified as important for atopic dermatitis (AD) pathophysiology. Monoclonal antibodies against IL-13 have been studied for the treatment of asthma since 2011. More recently, two phase two trials have been completed with these an...

  14. Incidence, prevalence, and risk of selected ocular disease in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Toft, Peter B; Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ocular comorbidities are common in atopic dermatitis (AD) as the result of the disease itself or the use of medication. No large-scale epidemiologic data exist on the prevalence of ocular comorbidities in adults with AD. OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine the prevalence and risk of sele...

  15. Assessment of major comorbidities in adults with atopic dermatitis using the Charlson comorbidity index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Skov, Lone; Hamann, Carsten R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in comorbidities of adults with atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVES: To examine the burden of comorbidities in adult patients with AD using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) in nationwide registries. METHODS: All Danish patients ≥18 years on January 1, 20...

  16. Variations in risk of asthma and seasonal allergies between early- and late-onset pediatric atopic dermatitis: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Joy; Mitra, Nandita; Hoffstad, Ole J; Gelfand, Joel M; Yan, Albert C; Margolis, David J

    2017-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is associated with other allergic conditions, but variations in this "atopic march" are poorly understood. To determine the impact of the age of atopic dermatitis onset on the risk for asthma and seasonal allergies. A cohort study was performed using the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry, which is an observational cohort of subjects with pediatric onset atopic dermatitis. In total, 3966 children were included, and 73% reported atopic dermatitis onset before age 2 years. At baseline, subjects with atopic dermatitis onset at ages 3 to 7 or 8 to 17 years had significantly lower rates of seasonal allergies and asthma than those with onset before age 2. During follow-up, the adjusted relative risks for incident seasonal allergies were 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.91) and 0.64 (95% CI confidence interval, 0.47-0.83) in the 3- to 7- and 8- to 17-years-old at onset groups compared with the age 2 years or younger at onset group. The adjusted risk for incident asthma was not significantly different between the older onset groups and the earliest onset group. Misclassification bias may arise from using self-reported onset age data. The timing of atopic dermatitis onset may explain part of the variation in the atopic march. These findings may improve future risk stratification of patients for treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma and Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Stokholm, Lonny; Linder, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. It is prescribed to children at high risk for severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus. However, little is known about the risk of the immune-mediated dise.......94-1.48) or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (HR 1.14; 95% CI 0.92-1.42) were observed. CONCLUSION: Exposure to palivizumab neither increased the risk of atopic disease nor protected against asthma.......BACKGROUND: Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. It is prescribed to children at high risk for severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus. However, little is known about the risk of the immune......-mediated diseases atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis after palivizumab exposure. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in childhood. METHODS: This was a cross-national population...

  18. Clinical and immunological effects of a forest trip in children with asthma and atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sung Chul; Park, Su Jin; Park, Chan-Woo; Yoon, Won Suck; Choung, Ji Tae; Yoo, Young

    2015-02-01

    Asthma and atopic dermatitis are common allergic diseases, and their prevalence has increased in urban children. Recently, it is becoming understood that forest environment has favorable health effects in patients with chronic diseases. To investigate favorable clinical and immunologic effects of forest, we examined changes in clinical symptoms, indirect airway inflammatory marker, and serum chemokines before and after a short-term forest trip. The forest trips were performed with 21 children with asthma and 27 children with atopic dermatitis. All participating children were living in air polluted urban inner-city. We measured spirometry and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in children with asthma and measured scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index and Thymus and Activation-Regulated Chemokine (TARC)/CCL17 and Macrophage-Derived Chemokine (MDC)/CCL22 levels in children with atopic dermatitis before and after the forest trip. Indoor air pollutants such as indoor mold, particulate matter 10 (PM10) and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) of each child's home and the accommodations within forest were measured. A significant increase in forced vital capacity (FVC) and a significant decrease in FeNO were observed after the forest trip in children with asthma. SCORAD indices and MDC/CCL22 levels were significantly decreased after the forest trip in children with atopic dermatitis. Airborne mold and PM10 levels in indoor were significantly lower in the forest accommodations than those of children's homes; however, TVOC levels were not different between the two measured sites. Short-term exposure to forest environment may have clinical and immunological effects in children with allergic diseases who were living in the urban community.

  19. Asthma and atopic dermatitis in children born moderately and late preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haataja, Paula; Korhonen, Päivi; Ojala, Riitta; Hirvonen, Mikko; Paassilta, Marita; Gissler, Mika; Luukkaala, Tiina; Tammela, Outi

    2016-06-01

    This national register study aimed to evaluate the need of asthma medication reimbursement and hospitalization due to asthma and atopic dermatitis up to 7 years of age in moderately preterm (MP) (32-33 weeks) and late preterm (LP) (34-36 weeks) children compared to very preterm (VP) (children. Altogether, 1,018,302 children born in Finland between 1991 and 2008 were assessed. The MP and LP groups received asthma medication reimbursement more frequently than term controls (8.0 and 5.7 vs. 3.8 %), but less frequently than VP children (15.4 %). Hospitalization due to asthma was more common among MP (10.6 %) and LP (7.3 %) children than term children (4.8 %) but less common than in VP children (20.1 %). Hospitalization due to atopic dermatitis was more frequent among term (5.2 %) compared to MP (4.2 %) and LP (4.7 %) children. Male sex, maternal smoking, maternal diabetes, and ventilator therapy predicted asthma medication in the MP and/or LP children. MP and LP children seem to need medication and hospitalization for asthma more often than term controls but less frequently than VP children followed by 7 years of age. Hospitalization due to atopic dermatitis becomes more common with increasing gestational age. • MP and LP infants have an increased risk for early respiratory morbidity and to asthma. • Less is known on the occurrence of atopic dermatitis in this patient group. What is New: • Medication and hospital care due to asthma were more frequent in school-aged MP and LP than in term infants. Male sex, maternal smoking, maternal diabetes and ventilator therapy predicted asthma. • Hospitalization due to atopic dermatitis became more common with increasing gestational age.

  20. [The estimation of atopic dermatitis in infants and small children in general practitioner's practice--own observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowska, Joanna; Kamer, Barbara; Trznadel-Budźko, Ewa; Rotsztejn, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of atopic dermatitis in general practitioner's practice. The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of individual history of disease among children born in 2005-2008 treated in an outpatient clinic of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. Infants and small children suffering from atopic dermatitis are abig group (31.8%) in own observations. Many of them have dissemination skin lesions. Atopic dermatitis becomes a more frequent problem in infants and small children in general practitioner's practice. We observe more and more children with disseminated allergic skin lesions.

  1. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: section 3. Management and treatment with phototherapy and systemic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidbury, Robert; Davis, Dawn M; Cohen, David E; Cordoro, Kelly M; Berger, Timothy G; Bergman, James N; Chamlin, Sarah L; Cooper, Kevin D; Feldman, Steven R; Hanifin, Jon M; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J; Paller, Amy S; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A; Simpson, Eric L; Tom, Wynnis L; Williams, Hywel C; Elmets, Craig A; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2014-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2% to 3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in atopic dermatitis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. In this third of 4 sections, treatment of atopic dermatitis with phototherapy and systemic immunomodulators, antimicrobials, and antihistamines is reviewed, including indications for use and the risk-benefit profile of each treatment option. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. INFLUENCE OF THE BRONCHIAL ASTHMA, ALLERGIC RHINITIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS ON THE QUALITY OF THE CHILDREN'S LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Dzhumagaziev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the study of the life quality of the children, suffering from bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The authors identified that children with atopic dermatitis have the lowest level of the life quality, while children, suffering from allergic rhinitis, have the highest values of the given property. It is typical that children and their parents evaluate the life at school extremely low against rather high figures of the physical and emotional functioning.Key words: bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, children, life quality.

  3. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis in a murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hyun-Mee [Bio-Materials Research Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soyoung [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Woo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412 (Korea, Republic of); Khang, Dongwoo [School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, Woo Song [Bio-Materials Research Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Mun-Chual, E-mail: rho-m@kribb.re.kr [Bio-Materials Research Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Hyun, E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are common allergic and inflammatory skin diseases caused by a combination of eczema, scratching, pruritus, and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. This paper examines whether oleanolic acid acetate (OAA) modulates AD and ACD symptoms by using an existing AD model based on the repeated local exposure of mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to the ears of BALB/c mice. In addition, the paper uses a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-sensitized local lymph node assay (LLNA) for the ACD model. The oral administration of OAA over a four-week period attenuated AD symptoms in terms of decreased skin lesions, epidermal thickness, the infiltration of immune cells (CD4{sup +} cells, eosinophils, and mast cells), and serum IgE, IgG2a, and histamine levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th22 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the lymph node and ear tissue, and the LLNA verified that OAA suppressed ACD. The oral administration of OAA over a three-day period attenuated ACD symptoms in terms of ear thickness, lymphocyte proliferation, and serum IgG2a levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the thymus and ear tissue. Finally, to define the underlying mechanism, this paper uses a TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) model. OAA inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the downregulation of NF-κB and MAPKs in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results indicate that OAA inhibited AD and ACD symptoms, suggesting that OAA may be effective in treating allergic skin disorders. - Highlights: • OAA reduced both acute and chronic AD symptoms. • OAA had a controlling effect on the immune reaction for ACD. • The effect of OAA on allergic skin disorders was comparable to the cyclosporine A. • OAA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic skin disorders.

  4. Spontaneous atopic dermatitis is mediated by innate immunity, with the secondary lung inflammation of the atopic march requiring adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Sean P; Moran, Tara; Floudas, Achilleas; Wurlod, Felicity; Kaszlikowska, Agnieszka; Salimi, Maryam; Quinn, Emma M; Oliphant, Christopher J; Núñez, Gabriel; McManus, Ross; Hams, Emily; Irvine, Alan D; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Ogg, Graham S; Fallon, Padraic G

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin condition that can occur in early life, predisposing to asthma development in a phenomenon known as the atopic march. Although genetic and environmental factors are known to contribute to AD and asthma, the mechanisms underlying the atopic march remain poorly understood. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations are a major genetic predisposer for the development of AD and progression to AD-associated asthma. We sought to experimentally address whether filaggrin mutations in mice lead to the development of spontaneous eczematous inflammation and address the aberrant immunologic milieu arising in a mouse model of filaggrin deficiency. Filaggrin mutant mice were generated on the proallergic BALB/c background, creating a novel model for the assessment of spontaneous AD-like inflammation. Independently recruited AD case collections were analyzed to define associations between filaggrin mutations and immunologic phenotypes. Filaggrin-deficient mice on a BALB/c background had profound spontaneous AD-like inflammation with progression to compromised pulmonary function with age, reflecting the atopic march in patients with AD. Strikingly, skin inflammation occurs independently of adaptive immunity and is associated with cutaneous expansion of IL-5-producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells. Furthermore, subjects with filaggrin mutations have an increased frequency of type 2 innate lymphoid cells in the skin in comparison with control subjects. This study provides new insights into our understanding of the atopic march, with innate immunity initiating dermatitis and the adaptive immunity required for subsequent development of compromised lung function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Common loss-of-function variants of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin are a major predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Colin N A; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Atopic disease, including atopic dermatitis (eczema), allergy and asthma, has increased in frequency in recent decades and now affects approximately 20% of the population in the developed world. Twin and family studies have shown that predisposition to atopic disease is highly heritable. Although...... dermatitis. This work establishes a key role for impaired skin barrier function in the development of atopic disease....... most genetic studies have focused on immunological mechanisms, a primary epithelial barrier defect has been anticipated. Filaggrin is a key protein that facilitates terminal differentiation of the epidermis and formation of the skin barrier. Here we show that two independent loss-of-function genetic...

  6. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes: a registry-based study assessing risk of disability pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heede, Nina G; Thuesen, Betina H; Thyssen, Jacob P; Linneberg, Allan; Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis and hand eczema often impair the ability of people to work. Only a few studies have investigated whether individuals with loss-of-function filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, who often have severe and early onset of dermatitis, experience occupational consequences. To investigate the personal consequences of having atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema and FLG mutations. Adult Danes from the general population (n = 3247) and patients with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 496) were genotyped for common FLG mutations, and completed a questionnaire about skin symptoms and hand eczema. Socioeconomic variables, including disability pension, and information on work in risk occupations were retrieved from national registries. The reasons for granting disability pension were unknown. Disability pension was associated with hand eczema in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-14.11; and OR 6.01 and 95%CI: 2.37-15.34, respectively]. Furthermore, 60% of the FLG mutation carriers with atopic dermatitis who developed hand eczema had experienced symptoms before adulthood. In the general population, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis, particularly in individuals with a genetically impaired skin barrier, were associated with disability pension, suggesting that FLG mutations carriers with a history of atopic dermatitis and hand eczema could benefit from early attention with respect to choice of occupation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Sensitization to turnip rape and oilseed rape in children with atopic dermatitis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poikonen, Sanna; Puumalainen, Tuija J; Kautiainen, Hannu; Palosuo, Timo; Reunala, Timo; Turjanmaa, Kristiina

    2008-08-01

    Turnip rape and oilseed rape 2S albumins are new allergens in children with atopic dermatitis suspected for food allergy. We recently found that 11% (206/1887) of these children had a positive skin prick test to seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and/or turnip rape (Brassica rapa). In the present case-control study we examined how the children with atopic dermatitis sensitized to turnip rape and oilseed rape had been breast-fed and whether they had some common sensitization pattern to certain foods or pollens. A total of 64 children with atopic dermatitis and a positive skin prick test to turnip rape and/or oilseed rape (>or=5 mm) were examined. Sixty-four age- and sex-matched children with atopic dermatitis but negative skin prick tests to turnip rape and oilseed rape served as case controls. The turnip rape and/or oilseed rape sensitized children with atopic dermatitis had significantly more often positive skin prick tests reactions and IgE antibodies to various foods (cow's milk, egg, wheat, mustard; p children. They had been exclusively breast-fed for a longer period (median 4 months; p Children with atopic dermatitis sensitized to oilseed rape and turnip rape had high frequency of associated sensitizations to all foods and pollens tested showing that oilseed plant sensitization affects especially atopic children who have been sensitized to multiple allergens.

  8. Skin microbiome before development of atopic dermatitis: Early colonization with commensal staphylococci at 2 months is associated with a lower risk of atopic dermatitis at 1 year.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Disease flares of established atopic dermatitis (AD) are generally associated with a low-diversity skin microbiota and Staphylococcus aureus dominance. The temporal transition of the skin microbiome between early infancy and the dysbiosis of established AD is unknown.

  9. Diagnosis and management of common dermatoses in children: atopic, seborrheic, and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Alan B

    2008-05-01

    Atopic, seborrheic, and contact dermatitis can significantly reduce the quality of life of patients and their families. Although differing in specific aspects of their epidemiology, etiology, and pathobiology, all 3 dermatoses are common in the pediatric population, and they share a common treatment approach. Although effective and widely used to manage exacerbations of pediatric dermatitis, the use of topical corticosteroid remains a concern for some physicians and parents because of its potential for systemic absorption and adverse events associated with prolonged use. Newer additions to the dermatitis treatment algorithm, such as the topical calcineurin inhibitors, may provide an effective steroid-sparing treatment option. Adjuvant treatments, such as antihistamines, antifungals, and antibiotics, also can provide benefit in appropriate circumstances. As there is no cure for dermatitis, a comprehensive, multipronged management strategy of preventive measures, such as trigger avoidance and periodic pharmacologic treatment, will provide patients and caregivers with the best opportunity to successfully control the disease.

  10. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis: a New Zealand experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah E; Yung, Anthony; Rademaker, Marius

    2011-02-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis often have infective exacerbations which are treated with antibiotics and/or antiseptics. The most common infective cause is Staphylococcus aureus with a worldwide trend towards antibiotic resistance. This prospective observational audit aimed primarily to establish the prevalence of S. aureus colonisation in New Zealand children with atopic dermatitis attending a specialised paediatric dermatology clinic. Secondary aims were to assess whether S. aureus colonisation correlated to clinical severity, the sensitivity patterns to antibiotics (in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and to identify any demographic or management risk factors. Subjects were children aged 18 years or younger attending a tertiary public hospital dermatology clinic with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. Demographic and social data, as well as current and previous systemic and topical treatments, were recorded. Patients were examined and the extent of atopic dermatitis determined using a standardised scale (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD)). Two skin swabs were taken for culture and standard sensitivities; one from the left antecubital fossa and one from the worst area of atopic dermatitis. Microbiological cultures and density of S. aureus colonisation were recorded. SCORAD and density of S. aureus culture were correlated. Demographic and clinical data from children with S. aureus was analysed. One hundred children were recruited from March 2007 to May 2008. S. aureus was isolated from 68 patients. There was a positive correlation between the density of S. aureus culture and severity of SCORAD (Spearman r = 0.55, P children generally having more severe atopic dermatitis (r = 0.22, P = 0.028). Although a greater proportion of Māori or Pacific Island children were colonised by S. aureus than other ethnic groups this did not reach statistical significance (78% and 60%, respectively, P = 0.0842). There was no significant correlation between either S

  11. IMPACT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF PEDIATRIC PATIENTS AND THEIR GUARDIANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Amanda Letícia Bezerra; de Araújo, Filipe Moreira; dos Santos, Maria Amélia Lopes; dos Santos, Alex de Assis Santos; Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the impact of atopic dermatitis on the quality of life of pediatric patients in the age group of 5-16 years, and their parents, assisted at the Dermatology Department of Universidade do Estado do Pará in 2015. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 51 patients and their guardians, to whom two questionnaires about the quality of life were applied, the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) and the Dermatitis Family Impact (DFI). To evaluate the severity of the disease, the researchers applied the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. The Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient (PPMCC) evaluated the correlation between CDLQI, DFI, SCORAD, and the contingency coefficient C evaluated the association between the qualitative variables, considering p<0.05 significant. Results: Of the patients, 55% were female. The average age was 9.5±3.2 years, and 41% had family income up ≤1 minimum wage. The average score was 5.4±5.1 for CDLQI, 6.6±4.5 for DFI, and 28.3±19.8 for SCORAD. The correlation among the scores CDLQI, DFI, and SCORAD was significant by the PPMCC (p<0,001). Conclusions: Atopic dermatitis affects the quality of life of both children and their guardians, and indicates the importance of including the study of quality of life as a complement to clinical evaluation. PMID:28977306

  12. Forsythia suspensa Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Jang, Seol; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Forsythia suspensa (F. suspensa) is a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of an ethanol extract from F. suspensa fruits on atopic dermatitis both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the inhibitory effects of F. suspensa extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model exposed to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract. Topical application of F. suspensa extract to the mice attenuated the atopic dermatitis symptoms, including increased dermatitis severity score, ear thickness, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the skin lesions, serum levels of IgE, TNF-α, and histamine, and expression of chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules in ear tissue. In addition, F. suspensa extract inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of FSE revealed the presence of four chemical constituents (forsythiaside, phillyrin, pinoresinol, and phylligenin). These compounds inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. These results suggest that the F. suspensa might be a useful candidate for treating allergic skin inflammatory disorders.

  13. Inhibitory effects of cultured Dendrobium tosaense on atopic dermatitis murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Tung; Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chang; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Chen, Chung-Li; Lo, Shu-Fang; Hsieh, Chang-Chi; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng

    2014-03-25

    Dendrobium tosaense is one of the most valuable Chinese medicines and well developed health food. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic skin disease that occurs mainly in childhood. The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis had been studied in BALB/c mice modeling by skin-inoculated ovalbumin (OVA) with 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chrolobenzene (TNCB). These mice exhibit features of chronic dermatitis, including skin rash, mast cells infiltration, and elevated serum anti-OVA specific IgE and cytokines modulation. In this study, a standardized ethyl acetate extract of D. tosaense (DtE) was used to protect these mice from the OVA/TNCB-induced skin lesions of atopic dermatitis. The results indicated an increased population of natural T regulatory cell was accompanied by immunosuppression in cytokine profiles and anti-OVA IgE level to significantly reduce Th2 polarization. Finally, toluidine blue staining indicated mast cell infiltration and degranulation was reduced in skin lesion. Our results were shed light on the usage of D. tosaense in AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Forsythia suspensa Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Young Sung

    Full Text Available Forsythia suspensa (F. suspensa is a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of an ethanol extract from F. suspensa fruits on atopic dermatitis both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the inhibitory effects of F. suspensa extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model exposed to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract. Topical application of F. suspensa extract to the mice attenuated the atopic dermatitis symptoms, including increased dermatitis severity score, ear thickness, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the skin lesions, serum levels of IgE, TNF-α, and histamine, and expression of chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules in ear tissue. In addition, F. suspensa extract inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of FSE revealed the presence of four chemical constituents (forsythiaside, phillyrin, pinoresinol, and phylligenin. These compounds inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. These results suggest that the F. suspensa might be a useful candidate for treating allergic skin inflammatory disorders.

  15. Documentation of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) among children with atopic dermatitis in the Qassim region, Saudi Arabia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alzolibani, Abdullateef A; Al Robaee, Ahmad A; Al Shobaili, Hani A; Bilal, Jalal A; Issa Ahmad, Mohammad; Bin Saif, Ghada

    2012-01-01

    .... Swabs were collected from atopic dermatitis skin lesions of 80 children being treated at dermatology clinics whose ages ranged from 6 months to 15 years in the period from March 2009 to February 2010...

  16. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy? Recommendations from an expert panel of the International Eczema Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, E.L.; Bruin-Weller, M. de; Flohr, C.; Ardern-Jones, M.R.; Barbarot, S.; Deleuran, M.; Bieber, T.; Vestergaard, C.; Brown, S.J.; Cork, M.J.; Drucker, A.M.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Foelster-Holst, R.; Guttman-Yassky, E.; Nosbaum, A.; Reynolds, N.J.; Silverberg, J.I.; Schmitt, J.; Seyger, M.M.B.; Spuls, P.I.; Stalder, J.F.; Su, J.C.; Takaoka, R.; Traidl-Hoffmann, C.; Thyssen, J.P.; Schaft, J. van der; Wollenberg, A.; Irvine, A.D.; Paller, A.S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic

  17. Risk factors for the development of atopic dermatitis and early wheeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Iwona; Bobrowska-Korzeniowska, Monika; Smejda, Katarzyna; Majak, Paweł; Jerzynska, Joanna; Stelmach, Wlodzimierz; Polańska, Kinga; Sobala, Wojciech; Krysicka, Jolanta; Hanke, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    A global assessment of allergic diseases and prenatal and postnatal exposure to various environmental risk factors is needed to enable early prevention of allergic diseases. This study was designed to evaluate an inner-city urban birth cohort to identify early environmental factors associated with atopic dermatitis and food allergy, as well as the incidence of wheezing during the 1st year of life. We evaluated 501 children from the Polish Mother and Child Cohort Study (2007-2011). The children's health, socioeconomic status, and housing conditions were assessed using a questionnaire. Exposure to tobacco was assessed based on questionnaire data and cotinine measurements. Multiple regression analysis showed that parental atopy, higher paternal education, and more frequent house cleaning significantly predicted atopic dermatitis in the 1st year of life; odds ratio (OR) for the variables was 2.7 (95% CI, 1.3-1.57), 2.8 (95% CI, 1.5-5.0), and 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-2.9), respectively. Keeping a pet at home during pregnancy increased the risk of food allergy (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.02-2.16). Longer breast-feeding decreased the risk of both food allergy (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.82-0.95) and atopic dermatitis (OR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.8-0.95) in the 1st year of life. Positive association between maternal exposure to increased concentrations of particulate matter 10 and atopic dermatitis in univariate analyses was found. Atopic dermatitis/food allergy and wheezing/inhaled corticosteroid use had distinct risk factors. The risk factor profile of atopic dermatitis/food allergy in early childhood that is defined in this study support the following recommendations: (i) longer breast-feeding, (ii) avoid pets during gestation, (iii) avoid too frequent house cleaning, and (iv) living in an area with decreased traffic density. This study was a part of the clinical trial NCT01861548 registered in www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  18. Characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine users and prescription analysis for pediatric atopic dermatitis: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Hu, Sindy; Chen, Hsing-Yu

    2016-06-08

    Atopic dermatitis among children is an important issue due to relapses and skin manifestations. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is commonly used to treat children with atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics and TCM prescriptions of patients with atopic dermatitis using a nationwide database. Children younger than 12 years of age diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, defined as ICD-9-CM codes 691.8 and 692.x, were identified from the database. Data on age, diagnosis codes, area of residence and use of corticosteroids of the TCM users were recorded. Association rule mining was used to analyze the prescriptions used for atopic dermatitis. We identified 13,646 children with atopic dermatitis using TCM in 2007. Female gender (OR: 0.83 for male gender), adolescence (OR: 10.0, 95 % CI: 8.88-11.15) and allergic rhinitis (OR: 2.44, 95 % CI: 2.10-2.85) were associated with the use of TCM. Fewer of the TCM users were prescribed with corticosteroids (35.8 % of all TCM users), but the TCM users had a higher rate of long-term topical corticosteroid therapy (10.6 % for TCM users versus 2.0 % for those who did not use TCM). Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was used by 93.7 % of all TCM users in 36,398 prescriptions. On average, 5.6 kinds of CHM were used in combination. The relationship between the CHMs constituted a network, in which Xiao-Feng-San was the core treatment for atopic dermatitis. In this study, we described the characteristics of children with atopic dermatitis who use TCM in Taiwan. and identified the core CHM treatment. Further research on the safety and efficacy of this treatment are still needed.

  19. Correlation of the severity of atopic dermatitis with absolute eosinophil counts in peripheral blood and serum IgE levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar Sandipan; Malakar Rajib; Chattopadhyay Soumen; Banerjee Raghubir; Ghosh Apurba

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although a number of epidemiological studies, showing incidence and prevalence of atopic dermatitis, were available, scant attention has been paid to the correlation between the parameters of the disease like severity, absolute eosinophil count and IgE level, which has been known to be associated inconsistently. Hence this study was undertaken. METHODS: A total of 102 patients of atopic dermatitis, both children and adults, and 107 age matched controls were studied at the Pedia...

  20. Patient-Oriented SCORAD (PO-SCORAD): a new self-assessment scale in atopic dermatitis validated in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stalder, J-F; Barbarot, S; Wollenberg, A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROund: Patient-oriented medicine is an emerging concept, encouraged by the World Health Organization, to greater involvement of the patient in the management of chronic diseases. The Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD) index is a self-assessment score allowing the patient...... to comprehensively evaluate the actual course of atopic dermatitis (AD), using subjective and objective criteria derived mainly from the SCORAD, a validated AD severity clinical assessment tool....

  1. Gender Differences in Self-assessed Health-related Quality of Life in Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Pavel V; Ho, Roger C; Monti, Fiorella; Jirakova, Anna; Velitchko, Svitlana S; Hercogova, Jana; Neri, Erica

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis has a significant impact on quality of life of children and families. It is important to assess gender differences in health-related quality of life in children with atopic dermatitis in order to effectively use health-related quality of life results. Children 5- to 16-years of age with atopic dermatitis from Italy, Singapore, Czech Republic, and Ukraine were divided into two groups (boys and girls). Each child in the group of boys was matched to a corresponding child in the group of girls from the same country whose age and scoring atopic dermatitis value were almost identical. Self-assessed health-related quality of life was measured by the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index. The difference in overall Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index between boys and girls was not significant (P=0.33). Girls with atopic dermatitis assessed Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index item on embarrassment significantly higher (0.78±0.93 for boys and 1.14±0.93 for girls, Pgirls significantly correlated with atopic dermatitis severity. The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index item on affected sleep significantly correlated with the age of boys (r=0.38, P=0.02) and another Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index item on school work/holiday with the age of girls (r=0.59, Pgirls were more embarrassed, self-conscious, upset, and sad because of atopic dermatitis. The authors' results may influence the educational part of consultations of children with atopic dermatitis.

  2. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas; Haerskjold, Ann; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Simonsen, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions. Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital contacts and/or filled prescriptions of disease-specific medication. Confirmative answers to questions about physician-diagnosed atopic disease were used as the gold standard for the comparison with the algorithms, resulting in sensitivities and specificities and 95% confidence intervals. The interviews with the caretaker of the included 454 Danish children born 1997-2003 were carried out May-September 2015; the mean age of the children at the time of the interview being 15.2 years (standard deviation 1.3 years). For the algorithm capturing children with atopic dermatitis, the sensitivity was 74.1% (95% confidence interval: 66.9%-80.2%) and the specificity 73.0% (67.3%-78.0%). For the algorithm capturing children with asthma, both the sensitivity of 84.1% (78.0%-88.8%) and the specificity of 81.6% (76.5%-85.8%) were high compared with physician-diagnosed asthmatic bronchitis (recurrent wheezing). The sensitivity remained high when capturing physician-diagnosed asthma: 83.3% (74.3%-89.6%); however, the specificity declined to 66.0% (60.9%-70.8%). For allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, the sensitivity

  3. Immunoproteomic characterization of a Dermatophagoides farinae extract used in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Raquel; Carnés, Jerónimo; Sinovas, Nuria; Ramió, Laura; Brazis, Pilar; Puigdemont, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis is a pruritic allergic skin disease. House dust mites have been identified as the main non-seasonal responsible agent. Unlike in human allergic patients, groups 1 and 2 antigens have been described as minor allergens in dogs, while groups 15 and 18 are considered the major allergens. Despite these differences, allergic dogs have traditionally been treated using extracts intended for human immunotherapy. To investigate the immunological characteristics and the allergen reactivity of dogs with atopic dermatitis using a Dermatophagoides farinae commercial extract. Eighteen dogs diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and 3 healthy control dogs from the Iberian Peninsula were included in the study. All the animals were older than 12 months, from both sexes and different breeds and showed positive specific IgE against D. farinae (>2500 ELISA Absorbance Units). The D. farinae allergenic extract used in this study was manufactured and characterized. The allergenic profile of the dogs was investigated by immunoblot and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 measured by direct ELISA. Allergen identity was confirmed by immunoblot inhibition and mass spectrometry analyses. The results confirmed the relevance of groups 15 and 18 antigens, but also groups 1, 2 and other medium molecular weight allergens in the sensitization of dogs with atopic dermatitis. Immunoblot inhibition and mass spectrometry assays confirmed these results. Relevant allergens were quantified by scanning densitometry (Der f 1: 17μg/mg, Der f 2: 20.3μg/mg, Der f 15: 18.1μg/mg and Der f 18: 9.4μg/mg). Concerning immunoglobulins profile, differences in IgE and IgG1 levels were observed between non-atopic and atopic dogs. The commercial D. farinae extract characterized in this study contains the major allergens involved in the sensitization of dogs with atopic dermatitis, representing a suitable candidate for its use in the diagnosis and immunotherapy of mite allergic dogs. Copyright © 2016

  4. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis – own observations

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Rotsztejn; Joanna Frankowska; Barbara Kamer; Ewa Trznadel-Grodzka

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor.Material/Methods:The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of disease among children born in 2005–2008 treated in Outpatient Clinic of the Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital in Lodz.Results:Children suffering from atopic de...

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF CETIRIZINE ON THE CONCENTRATION OF sCD14 IN BLOOD OF THE CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Nisheva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available 66 children with atopic dermatitis aged 1B2 years and 21 children as A control group were examined in an effort to study the impact of cetirizine on the concentration of scd14 in case of allergic disbeases in children. 33 children with atopic dermatitis had referbences in anamnesis on obstructive bronchitis. Children with atopic dermatitis were divided into 3 approximately equal groups — the first group took cetirizine during 2 weeks, the second group — during 4 months, for the third group cetirizine was not given. The level of sCD14 was determined in children's blood by immuneb enzyme analysis method before treatment, directly after treatment with cetirizine and in 2 months after it. In children with allergic diseases the level of sCD14 was 50% lower than in children with out allergy. The short course of cetirizine treatment transiently reduced clinical presentations of atopic dermatitis, but didn't have effect on sCD14 content. Prolonged therapy with cetirizine not only improved the condition of children with atopic dermatitis and decrease the occurrence of obstructive bronchitis in these cases, but also resulted in considerable increase in the concentration of sCD 14 in blood of these patients. We presume the therapeutic and prophylactic effects of cetirizine in allergic diseases in many respects are conditioned by its capacity to improve functions of macrophages in response to infectious and allergic stimuli.Key words: sCD 14, atopic dermatitis, cetirizine, children, treatment.

  6. Malassezia spp.-specific immunoglobulin E level is a marker for severity of atopic dermatitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Martin; Buchner, Matthias; von Bartenwerffer, Wibke; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Worm, Margitta; Hedderich, Jürgen; Fölster-Holst, Regina

    2015-02-01

    The significance of allergen-specific IgE as marker for severity of atopic dermatitis is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of IgE-mediated sensitisation to food and environmental allergens in 132 children and 67 adults with atopic dermatitis, and its correlation to severity of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Total IgE was elevated (> 100 kU/l) in 79.7% of adults and 46.8% of children. Sensitisation frequencies to allergens, particularly microbial allergens, were up to 10-fold higher in adults compared to children. Severity of atopic dermatitis correlated with elevated total IgE in adults (r = 0.549, p children (r = 0.344, p = 0.005) and with Malassezia spp.-specific IgE in adults (r = 0.429, p = 0.007). Total IgE is a marker for severe atopic dermatitis in both age groups. Malassezia spp.-specific IgE is an important allergen-specific marker for severity of atopic dermatitis in adults.

  7. Does Stress Increase the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescents? Results of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey (KYRBWS-VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeoung A.; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Minjee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Park, Sohee

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between level of stress in middle and high school students aged 12–18 and risk of atopic dermatitis. Data from the Sixth Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-VI), a cross-sectional study among 74,980 students in 800 middle schools and high schools with a response rate of 97.7%, were analyzed. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between stress and atopic dermatitis with severity. A total of 5,550 boys and 6,964 girls reported having been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis. Younger students were more likely to have atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, the educational level of parents was found to be associated with having atopic dermatitis and having more severe condition. In particular, girls with mothers with at least college education had a 41% higher risk of having atopic dermatitis and severe atopic condition (odds ratio (OR)) = 1.41, 95% CI, 1.22–1.63; Patopic dermatitis. Compared to boys with who reported “no stress”, boys with “very high” stress had 46% higher the risk of having more severe atopic dermatitis (OR = 1.46, 95% CI, 1.20–1.78; Patopic dermatitis in girls. This study suggests that stress and parents' education level were associated with atopic dermatitis. Specifically, degree of stress is positively correlated with likelihood of being diagnosed with this condition and increasing the severity. PMID:23940513

  8. Psychological evaluation of children atopic dermatitis by Düss test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Polo Gascon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Atopic Dermatitis is a skin inflammatory disease, chronic and recurrent, characterized by intense itching and skin lesions with typical distribution. Besides the hereditary character, this disease can be influenced by environmental and psychological factors. The objective of this study was to discuss the use of the Fable of Duss test as a projective and psychodiagnostic instrument for children with AD, in order to understand the psychodinamic aspects. We evaluated 33 patients with atopic dermatitis on regular attendance at the Allergic Clinic of Dermatology Department of University Hospital, between 5 and 10 years of both sexes. Based on the results, it was possible to verify that the Fable of Duss test technique for expression emotional conflicts and discovery of the psychic functioning of these patients.

  9. Apheresis in the treatment of recalcitrant atopic dermatitis: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricozzi, Andrea; Faleri, Sara; Lanti, Alessandro; Adorno, Gaspare; Lorè, Bruno; Chimenti, Sergio; Saraceno, Rosita

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic disabling inflammatory skin disorder, typically characterized by intensely itching, oozing, crusted, eroded vesicles or papules developing on erythematous plaques. Conventional treatments, both topical and systemic, may produce unsuccessful and unsatisfactory results. we aimed to assess the efficacy of apheretic treatments in patients with severe, recalcitrant AD, in particular, the pruritic component. four patients affected by recalcitrant and debilitating atopic dermatitis, who had previously received conventional topical and systemic therapies with poor clinical improvement, were treated with extracorporeal photopheresis or therapeutic plasma exchange. a satisfactory response to apheresis was observed with a reduction of pruritus and skin lesions. In our experience, apheretic therapies might be used as monotherapy but, more effectively, in combination with topical and/or systemic treatments. Indeed, they proved to be a safe "enhancer" for increasing the efficacy of conventional therapeutics.

  10. EFFICACY AND FINANCIAL VIABILITY OF PRIMARY PREVENTION OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS: PROTEIN-HYDROLYSATE-BASED FORMULAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Ogorodova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary prevention of allergy is an attractive aim due to high social, economic burden and increasing prevalence of allergic diseases. The up-to-date data strongly support the use of partially hydrolyzed whey formula for primary prevention of atopic dermatitis. This approach is effective and cost-saving both from societal and governmental health service perspectives. Pediatricians as well as parents of high risk children should be strictly aware of these data. Because of cost-saving effect of partially hydrolyzed whey formula governmental health service administrations should develop programs for primary prevention of atopic dermatitis with free supply of high risk children with this nutrition for first months of life.

  11. Preparation of hydrogels for atopic dermatitis containing natural herbal extracts by gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; An, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hae-Kyoung [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Hye [AMOTECH Co., Ltd., Kimpo-City, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Min-Ho; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Shin, Junhwa [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Young-Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ycnho@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a familial and chronic inflammatory pruritic skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults in industrialized countries. It is known that one of the prominent features of AD and chronic pruritus is partially due to the histamine released from mast cell. In this work, hydrogel patches with natural herbal extracts were prepared by 'freezing and thawing', and a gamma irradiation. It showed eminent healing results as a consequence of long-term moisturizing effects and natural herbal extracts on atopic wounds. Besides its non-toxicity and human harmlessness, it can be easily attached to or detached from the skin without any trace and help patients to feel refreshment when attached. Based on this work, the hydrogel patches we made can be potentially used as an alternative remedy for not only pruritus in AD, but other dermatitis.

  12. Preparation of hydrogels for atopic dermatitis containing natural herbal extracts by gamma-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; An, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Kim, Yun-Hye; Youn, Min-Ho; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Shin, Junhwa; Nho, Young-Chang

    2009-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a familial and chronic inflammatory pruritic skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults in industrialized countries. It is known that one of the prominent features of AD and chronic pruritus is partially due to the histamine released from mast cell. In this work, hydrogel patches with natural herbal extracts were prepared by "freezing and thawing", and a gamma irradiation. It showed eminent healing results as a consequence of long-term moisturizing effects and natural herbal extracts on atopic wounds. Besides its non-toxicity and human harmlessness, it can be easily attached to or detached from the skin without any trace and help patients to feel refreshment when attached. Based on this work, the hydrogel patches we made can be potentially used as an alternative remedy for not only pruritus in AD, but other dermatitis.

  13. Clinico-immunological profile and their correlation with severity of atopic dermatitis in Eastern Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mani Kant; Singh, Punit Kumar; Patel, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    To study the clinical features, absolute eosinophil count, and total immunoglobulin E (IgE) level and their association with severity of atopic dermatitis in Eastern Indian children (Bihar). Prospective hospital-based study. Pediatrics out-patient Department (OPD) and Dermatology OPD of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital located in Rohtas District of Bihar. The study was carried out over a period of 2 years during January 2010 to December 2011. One hundred and thirty two children aged 0 month to 15 years were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis. Demographic profile, common clinical features, absolute eosinophil count, and total IgE level and their correlation with severity of atopic dermatitis in Eastern Indian children. Out of a total 1829 pediatric patients aged 0 month to 15 years with some pediatric dermatoses, 132 (7.21%) had atopic dermatitis. Of 132 patients, 57 (43.2%) were boys and 75 (56.8%) were girls, with a male to female ratio 1:1.3. Of these 29 were infants and 103 were children. Two (62.1%) patients belonged to rural area whereas 50 (37.9%) belonged to urban area. Personal history, family history (up to third degree relatives), and both personal and family history of atopy were present in 43.18%, 33.34%, and 12.1% of the subjects respectively. Majority (89.4%) of patients had onset before 5 years of age. In infantile Atopic dermatitis (AD), mean age ± SD at onset was 5.2 months ± 3.01 months. In infantile group, 8 (27.6%) had mild, 14 (48.3%) moderate, and 7 (24.1%) had severe atopic dermatitis. Infantile AD had statistically significant higher SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index score in all three grades of severity of the disease. One hundred and three patients had childhood AD, out of which 40 (38.8%) were boys and 63 (61.2%) were girls, with a male to female ratio 1:1.57. In childhood AD, mean age ± SD at onset of the disease was 3.47 years ± 3.02 years. Sixty three (61.1%) belonged to rural area whereas 40 (38.9%) were from urban area. One

  14. Xerosis is associated with asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Linneberg, Allan René; Thuesen, B H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidermal filaggrin deficiency due to common filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations causes xerosis and strongly increases the risk of atopic dermatitis and even asthma. However, it is unknown whether xerosis independent of FLG mutations could also increase the risk of asthma. OBJECTIVE......: To evaluate whether generalized xerosis was associated with asthma, independent of atopic dermatitis and common FLG mutations in a cross-sectional study on adult Danes. METHODS: A total of 3396 adults from the general population participated in a health examination. Lung function and serum-specific IgE levels...... that asthma (either current or at some point in life) was significantly associated with reporting generalized xerosis (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.02-1.72). The association was stronger in men (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.13-2.84) when compared to women (OR 1.18; 95% CI 0.86-1.62). Furthermore, a significant association...

  15. Genetically programmed differences in epidermal host defense between psoriasis and atopic dermatitis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L J M Zeeuwen

    Full Text Available In the past decades, chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, asthma, Crohn's disease and celiac disease were generally regarded as immune-mediated conditions involving activated T-cells and proinflammatory cytokines produced by these cells. This paradigm has recently been challenged by the finding that mutations and polymorphisms in epithelium-expressed genes involved in physical barrier function or innate immunity, are risk factors of these conditions. We used a functional genomics approach to analyze cultured keratinocytes from patients with psoriasis or atopic dermatitis and healthy controls. First passage primary cells derived from non-lesional skin were stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines, and expression of a panel of 55 genes associated with epidermal differentiation and cutaneous inflammation was measured by quantitative PCR. A subset of these genes was analyzed at the protein level. Using cluster analysis and multivariate analysis of variance we identified groups of genes that were differentially expressed, and could, depending on the stimulus, provide a disease-specific gene expression signature. We found particularly large differences in expression levels of innate immunity genes between keratinocytes from psoriasis patients and atopic dermatitis patients. Our findings indicate that cell-autonomous differences exist between cultured keratinocytes of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis patients, which we interpret to be genetically determined. We hypothesize that polymorphisms of innate immunity genes both with signaling and effector functions are coadapted, each with balancing advantages and disadvantages. In the case of psoriasis, high expression levels of antimicrobial proteins genes putatively confer increased protection against microbial infection, but the biological cost could be a beneficial system gone awry, leading to overt inflammatory disease.

  16. Human Breast Milk miRNA, Maternal Probiotic Supplementation and Atopic Dermatitis in Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie Rae Simpson; Gaute Brede; Jostein Johansen; Roar Johnsen; Ola Storrø; Pål Sætrom; Torbjørn Øien

    2015-01-01

    Background Perinatal probiotic ingestion has been shown to prevent atopic dermatitis (AD) in infancy in a number of randomised trials. The Probiotics in the Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim (ProPACT) trial involved a probiotic supplementation regime given solely to mothers in the perinatal period and demonstrated a ~40% relative risk reduction in the cumulative incidence of AD at 2 years of age. However, the mechanisms behind this effect are incompletely understood. Micro-RNA...

  17. Effect of breast-feeding on the development of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Reza; Makhmalbaf, Zahra

    2005-09-01

    Atopy can be defined as the genetically determined risk to develop allergic disease. Avoidance of one specific allergen may decrease the risk for sensitization against this allergen, but it will not affect atopy. Our aim was to investigate if exclusive breast-feeding is associated with atopic dermatitis during the first 5 years of life. Data on 200 children were taken from parental-administered questionnaires from a case control study in Birjand - Iran (recruited 2003) comprised of a case (100 children with atopic dermatitis) and a control (100 normal children) subgroup. Outcomes were physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis (AD) and itchy rash. Data were analyzed by using SPSS package, Chi square and Exact Fisher tests.Thirty-four of the case and 50 of control group were exclusively breast-fed, whereas 6 of the case and 2 of control group were exclusively cow milk-fed. These differences were statistically significant. (P less than 0.05). Duration of breast-feeding in case and control group was different. These differences were statistically significant (P less than 0.001). Duration of cow's milk formula feeding in case and control group was different, but these differences were not statistically significant. (P=0.6) Positive family history of allergy in case and control group was 63% and 23% respectively and this difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). These findings support the hypothesis that exclusive breast-feeding is a protective factor for development of atopic dermatitis if compared with conventional cow's milk formula.

  18. Effect of Breast-Feeding on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Ghaderi Zahra Makhmalbaf

    2005-01-01

    Atopy can be defined as the genetically determined risk to develop allergic disease. Avoidance of one specific allergen may decrease the risk for sensitization against this allergen, but it will not affect atopy. Our aim was to investigate if exclusive breast-feeding is associated with atopic dermatitis during the first 5 years of life. Data on 200 children were taken from parental-administered questionnaires from a case control study in Birjand - Iran (recruited 2003) comprised of a case...

  19. Human Breast Milk miRNA, Maternal Probiotic Supplementation and Atopic Dermatitis in Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Melanie Rae; Brede, Gaute; Johansen, Jostein; Johnsen, Roar; Storrø, Ola; Sætrom, Pål; Øien, Torbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perinatal probiotic ingestion has been shown to prevent atopic dermatitis (AD) in infancy in a number of randomised trials. The Probiotics in the Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim (ProPACT) trial involved a probiotic supplementation regime given solely to mothers in the perinatal period and demonstrated a ~40% relative risk reduction in the cumulative incidence of AD at 2 years of age. However, the mechanisms behind this effect are incompletely understood. Micro-RN...

  20. Efficacy of Pimecrolimus 1% Cream in Various Clinical Forms of Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru İkizler

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis shows some different clinical appearances.The main aim of this experimental study is to compare the efficacy of pimecrolimus among these clinical subgoups of atopic dermatitis. Material and Method: A total of 70 patients, 50 male and 20 female, aged between 2-38 years were included in the study. Twenty-two patients (%31.4 were pediatric (2-10 years. Patients were investigated in regard to high levels of total IgE, airway allergy, positive skin prick test and triggering allergens. Patients were classified as: mixed, pure intrinsic and pure extrinsic according to Wüthrich classification. Pimecrolimus 1% cream was applied to the patients twice daily for 6 weeks and patients were evaluated with SCORAD index before and after treatment. Results: FAs a result, 58.6% of the patients (n=41 had a successful therapy with pimecrolimus while 4.3% (n=3 had partially successful. Thirty-five patients achieved full remission. The difference between the SCORADs before and after the treatment was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001.Conclusion: In this study, efficacy of pimecrolimus was compared to mixed, pure intrinsic and pure extrinsic types of atopic dermatitis. Although pimecrolimus was more effective in the pure intrinsic type, it was not statistically significant (p=0,75. There was also an insignificant difference between the mild and moderate atopic dermatitis for the efficacy of pimecrolimus (p=0,107. In addition, it is concluded in this study that the optimum treatment period with pimecrolimus should be approximately 4 weeks for children and 6 weeks for adults and adolescents.