WorldWideScience

Sample records for atopic dermatitis

  1. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood...... may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural history, clinical features, and treatment of atopic dermatitis....

  2. Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Chinese 中國 ) What Is Atopic Dermatitis? (in Korean 한국어) What Is Atopic Dermatitis? (in Vietnamese bằng ... Phototherapy: Use of ultraviolet A or B light waves, alone or combined, can be an effective treatment ...

  3. Atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Armando José Vásquez Lobo

    2002-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a good prognosis,multietiologic inflammatory, cornice, skin disease. Itsdiagnosis is clinically done. Atopic dermatitis’ prevalence hasgrown in last decades. It may affect children and adults.Attention primary physicians could do the treatment foratopice dermatitis. Specialists are required for severe andcomplicated cases.

  4. Atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Wade

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic skin disorder that can significantly impact the quality of life of affected individuals as well as their families. Although the pathogenesis of the disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. There are no specific diagnostic tests for AD; therefore, the diagnosis is based on specific clinical criteria that take into account the patient’s history and clinical manifestations. Successful management of the disorder requires a multifaceted approach that involves education, optimal skin care practices, anti-inflammatory treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs, the use of first-generation antihistamines to help manage sleep disturbances, and the treatment of skin infections. Systemic corticosteroids may also be used, but are generally reserved for the acute treatment of severe flare-ups. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line pharmacologic treatments for AD, and evidence suggests that these agents may also be beneficial for the prophylaxis of disease flare-ups. Although the prognosis for patients with AD is generally favourable, those patients with severe, widespread disease and concomitant atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, are likely to experience poorer outcomes.

  5. What Is Atopic Dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it healthy Protection from allergens. Atopic Dermatitis and Vaccination Against Smallpox People with atopic dermatitis should not ... Genetics Biochemical changes in skin and white blood cells Immune factors Light ... Phone: 301-495-4484 Toll free: 877-22-NIAMS ( ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions atopic dermatitis atopic dermatitis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a disorder ...

  7. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) A parent's guide for infants and babies A ... scaling, red, slightly elevated lesions typical of atopic dermatitis (eczema). Overview Eczema, formally known as atopic dermatitis, ...

  8. Phototherapy for atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Dogra; Rahul Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of these guidelines is to review the available published literature regarding the effectiveness of phototherapy and photochemotherapy in atopic dermatitis and put forward recommendations regarding their use in atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed to collect data from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library published till March 2014. Keywords used were "phototherapy", "photochemotherapy", "NB-UVB", "BBUVB", "PUVA", "UVA1", "atopic der...

  9. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan;

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed...... opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor...... atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis...

  10. Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra ingredients. A good, cheap moisturizer is plain petroleum jelly (such as Vaseline). Use moisturizers that are ... a flare-up? SourceSome information taken from: National Institutes of Health. Handout on Health: Atopic Dermatitis. Accessed ...

  11. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) A parent's guide to condition and treatment information ... and inflamed areas of skin typical of atopic dermatitis (eczema) on a person with darker skin. Overview ...

  12. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) Information for adults A A A This image displays extensive atopic dermatitis (eczema); note the skin is dry and scaly, ...

  13. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a ... in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type ...

  14. Microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Claire E; McShane, Diana B; Gilligan, Peter H; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with drastic impacts on pediatric health. The pathogenesis of this common disease is not well understood, and the complex role of the skin microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of atopic dermatitis is being elucidated. Skin commensal organisms promote normal immune system functions and prevent the colonization of pathogens. Alterations in the skin microbiome may lead to increased Staphylococcus aureus colonization and atopic dermatitis progression. Despite the evidence for their important role, probiotics have not been deemed efficacious for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, although studies suggest that probiotics may be effective at preventing the development of atopic dermatitis when given to young infants. This review will cover the most recent published work on the microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis. PMID:26388516

  15. Phototherapy for atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Dogra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of these guidelines is to review the available published literature regarding the effectiveness of phototherapy and photochemotherapy in atopic dermatitis and put forward recommendations regarding their use in atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed to collect data from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library published till March 2014. Keywords used were "phototherapy", "photochemotherapy", "NB-UVB", "BBUVB", "PUVA", "UVA1", "atopic dermatitis", and "atopic eczema". Systematic reviews, meta-analysis, national guidelines, randomized controlled trials, prospective open label studies, and retrospective case series in English literature mentioning use of above-mentioned keywords were reviewed. Results: Six hundred and eighty eight studies were evaluated, 38 of which fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in the guidelines. Conclusions and Recommendations: Both UV1 and narrow-band UVB are effective in significantly decreasing the eczema severity although UV1 may be preferred in acute flares and narrow-band UVB in chronic eczema, especially in adults (Level of evidence 1+, Grade of recommendation A. Among various doses of UVA1, medium dose UVA1 may be preferred over others as its efficacy is similar to high dose and better than low dose UVA1 phototherapy. Narrow-band UVB is preferred to broad-band UVB (Level of evidence 1+, Grade of recommendation A. Medium-dose UVA1 is similar in efficacy to narrow-band UVB (Level of evidence 1+, Grade of recommendation A. In children, despite its efficacy, narrow-band UVB phototherapy should be used only as a second line therapy due to its potential for long-term adverse effects (Level of evidence 2+, Grade of recommendation B.

  16. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Ricci; Federica Bellini; Arianna Dondi; Annalisa Patrizi; Andrea Pession

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated aro...

  17. New treatments for atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Hywel

    2002-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis now affects 15% to 20% of chil­ dren in developed countries, and prevalence in cities in developing countries undergoing rapid demographic changes is quickly following suit.1 Most cases of atopic dermatitis in a given community are mild, but children with moderate to severe disease can have continuous itching and associated loss of sleep. The social stigma of a visible skin disease can also be soul destroying for both patient and family. A few stud...

  18. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Ricci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated around 5-15% in European countries. AD persists from childhood through adolescence in around 40% of cases and some risk factors have been identified: female sex, sensitization to inhalant and food allergens, allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, the practice of certain jobs. During adolescence, AD mainly appears on the face and neck, often associated with overinfection by Malassezia, and on the palms and soles. AD persistence during adolescence is correlated with psychological diseases such as anxiety; moreover, adolescents affected by AD might have problems in the relationship with their peers. Stress and the psychological problems represent a serious burden for adolescents with AD and cause a significant worsening of the patients’ quality of life (QoL. The pharmacological treatment is similar to other age groups. Educational and psychological approaches should be considered in the most severe cases.

  19. Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grant Request DONATE Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis Frequently Asked Questions Eczema Living with Eczema Get ... News Research Donate Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis Frequently Asked Questions What is the traditional smallpox ...

  20. Atopic Dermatitis: Natural History, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Francis Thomsen

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural histor...

  1. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Darsow, U.; Wollenberg, A.; Simon, D; A. Taïeb; Werfel, T.; A. Oranje; C. Gelmetti; Svensson, A; Deleuran, M.; A. Calza; Giusti, F.; Lübbe, J; Seidenari, S; Ring, J.

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred...

  2. Photo(chemotherapy for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahide Onsun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with a chronic relapsing course. The benefical effects of ultraviolet light on atopic dermatitis has been appreciated for many years. Along with topical and systemic treatment,photo(chemotherapy is one of the three fundamental alternatives for managing atopic dermatitis. While broadband UVB and psoralen UVA (PUVA have been the mainstay of phototherapy more new modalities including UVA-1 and narrow-band UVB have been used succesfully in recent years.

  3. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2014-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  4. Atopic Dermatitis - A Clinical Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Pramod; Pai Ganesh S

    1998-01-01

    A total of 80 atopic dermatitis cases were studied. The incidence was 4.2 per 1000 among OPD patients. The overall crude M : F ratio was 1.4:1 which after standardization was 0.9:1, 32.5% had the disease for the first time, 48.75% of patients had observed itching preceding rash, 26% of patients gave history of food allergy. The incidence of personal history of atopy and family history of atopy was 56.25% and 63.75% respectively. Facial involvement was common...

  5. OCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xi; XU Ge-zhi; JIAO Qin; LI Xia; SHI Ruo-fei

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the ocular complications of 62 patients with active atopic dermatitis( AD) during the period of 2003 2006. Methods Routine ophthalmic examinations, including slit-lamp microscope, indirect ophthalmoscope or Goldmann three-mirror lens, A-scan and B-scan ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) and corneal topography, as well as tear film break-up time (BUT) and Schirmer tests were carried out. Results Cataract (28 eyes), keratoconjunctivitis (42 eyes), superficial punctate keratopathy (45 eyes) and tear function abnormality ( 76 eyes) were major ocular complications in AD patients. Retinal detachment (6 eyes) was the most severe ocular complication in the AD patients. Conclusion Ocular complications are common in AD patients and a very careful examination of eyes is essential in treating AD patients. If the eyes can be examed carefully and in time, some operations and severe complications can be avoidable, especially for the patients with retinal breaks or retinal detachment.

  6. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsow, Ulf; Wollenberg, Andreas; Simon, Dagmar; Taïeb, Alain; Werfel, Thomas; Oranje, Arnold; Gelmetti, Carlo; Svensson, Ake; Deleuran, Mette; Calza, Anne-Marie; Giusti, Francesca; Lübbe, Jann; Seidenari, Stefania; Ring, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection contribute to disease exacerbation and thus justify additional antimicrobial / antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) may relieve pruritus but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength. "Eczema school" educational programs have been proven to be helpful. PMID:23663504

  7. [New treatments of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taïeb, A; Boralevi, F

    2005-04-01

    Topical steroids are still used suboptimally, but remain the mainstay of atopic dermatitis treatment. Topical steroid phobia is rampant in many countries, a real advantage for the entry on the market of topical immunomodulators (TIMs), which inhibit both antigen specific and non-specific T cell activation in the skin, by blockade of gene transcription of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL2 and TNF alpha. Topical tacrolimus and pimecrolimus have the most advanced clinical development. Tacrolimus, already used orally in transplantation medicine, is already available in France since 2003 as a 0.03% ointment for children (Protopic, Fujisawa). Its introduction on the market has substantially changed prescription habits in atopic dermatitis. Recalcitrant adolescent and adult head and neck lesions are the major target, but the drug is is also widely used in children, with a good safety profile. The risk of herpes virus superinfections did not increase significantly in clinical trials but needs further monitoring. Long-term prescription will need a closer look at a still much debated increased skin cancer risk. The marked efficacy on thin skin sites and absence of atrophogenic properties of the drug balance its side effects at the first applications on inflamed skin (pruritus, burning sensation). Clinical studies using pimecrolimus (Elidel, Novartis), marketed as a 1% cream, show a satisfactorily efficacy profile in adults and children including infants. The drug is better tolerated and is already widely introduced on the international market since 2002 with a pediatric positioning, but is nor available yet in 2004 in France. Besides phototherapy, systemic immunosuppressants remain useful drugs in severe disease especially in older children and adolescents, cyclosporin remaining the leading drug. Preventive immunomodulation modifying the intestinal microflora is very promising approach which deserves a large-scale assessment. PMID:15808446

  8. [Atopic dermatitis of the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hello, M; Aubert, H; Bernier, C; Néel, A; Barbarot, S

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) of the adult is a common skin disease. Its prevalence has greatly increased during the past decades. AD is commonly associated with other atopic disorders. Its impact on quality of life is often underestimated. Various immunopathologic mechanisms are involved in AD: innate epidermal barrier dysfunction due to filaggrin gene mutations, innate and adaptative abnormalities of the immune system (an initial Th2 phase precedes a chronic Th1 phase), intestinal and cutaneous microbiomes dysbiosis, and environmental factors. Diagnosis of AD is clinical and there is no predictive biomarker of future severity. The main differential diagnoses are: scabies, psoriasis, cutaneous adverse reaction, cutaneous T cell lymphoma, primary immunodeficiency, and Netherton's syndrome. Therapeutic management is challenging and should integrate a therapeutic education program. Topical corticosteroids are the first line treatment, including a preliminary assessment of possible topical corticosteroids phobia. Systemic treatments are recommended in severe, chronic and resistant AD, after careful evaluation in a reference centre. Dupilumab, an IL4/IL13 inhibitor, might be the first effective targeted therapy in AD, whereas therapies that specifically target the mechanisms of pruritus represent an exciting perspective. PMID:26617291

  9. Modern Aspects of Phototherapy for Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Alexandra Grundmann; Stefan Beissert

    2012-01-01

    Phototherapy has still great importance in the treatment of atopic dermatitis, though costs, compliance, and long-term risks narrow its relevance. In spite of its long history, up to now, the therapeutic regimes are mostly empirical. Narrowband UVB und UVA1 are the most frequently applied regimens in atopic dermatitis with proven efficacy. However, even for these modalities randomized prospective and controlled studies are still pending. Advances in photoimmunology and molecular biology had d...

  10. Diagnostic clinical features of atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Lata

    2001-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common disease which varies widely in clinical presentation at different ages and places. Although authors working in western countries on white races have suggested many criteria, there is no uniform set which can be used in large population studies in this part of the world. Hence keeping in mind differences in environment and ethnicity of population, the present study was carried out. Seventy- three patients of atopic dermatitis and 71 age matched controls were studi...

  11. Modern Aspects of Phototherapy for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Alexandra Grundmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phototherapy has still great importance in the treatment of atopic dermatitis, though costs, compliance, and long-term risks narrow its relevance. In spite of its long history, up to now, the therapeutic regimes are mostly empirical. Narrowband UVB und UVA1 are the most frequently applied regimens in atopic dermatitis with proven efficacy. However, even for these modalities randomized prospective and controlled studies are still pending. Advances in photoimmunology and molecular biology had demonstrated that phototherapy targets inflammatory cells, alters cytokine production, and has a significant antimicrobial effect within atopic skin. This paper summarizes the current literature on the different regimes of phototherapy and also discusses therapeutic modalities like photochemotherapy and extracorporeal photopheresis. These more complex regimes should be restricted to severe cases of atopic dermatitis, which are refractory to topical treatment.

  12. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease which usually starts during the first years of life. In the management of AD, the correct approach requires a combination of multiple treatments to identify and eliminate trigger factors, and to improve the alteration of the skin barrier. In this article we try to explain the importance of skin care in the management of AD in relation to the use of textiles: they may be useful to improve disrupted skin but they are also a possible cause of triggering or worsening the lesions. Garments are in direct contact with the skin all day long, and for this reason it is important to carefully choose suitable fabrics in atopic subjects who have disrupted skin. Owing to their hygienic properties fabrics produced from natural fibres are preferential. Wool fibres are frequently used in human clothes but are irritant in direct contact with the skin. Wool fibre has frequently been shown to be irritant to the skin of atopic patients, and for this reason wool intolerance was included as a minor criterion in the diagnostic criteria of AD by Hanifin and Rajka in 1980. Cotton is the most commonly used textile for patients with AD; it has wide acceptability as clothing material because of its natural abundance and inherent properties like good folding endurance, better conduction of heat, easy dyeability and excellent moisture absorption. Silk fabrics help to maintain the body temperature by reducing the excessive sweating and moisture loss that can worsen xerosis. However, the type of silk fabric generally used for clothes is not particularly useful in the care and dressing of children with AD since it reduces transpiration and may cause discomfort when in direct contact with the skin. A new type of silk fabric made of transpiring and slightly elastic woven silk is now commercially available (Microair Dermasilk) and may be used for the skin care of children with AD. The presence of increased bacterial colonization

  13. Adult atopic dermatitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Patruno, Cataldo; Gisondi, Paolo; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic, inflammatory skin disease which predominantly affects children usually clearing up during or after childhood. However, AD may persist with a chronic recurrent course until adulthood, being recalcitrant to any treatment strategy. Moreover, in some patients AD is not present during childhood but starts later in life (i.e. after 16 years of age) being defined late-onset AD. Even if AD incidence is increasing worldwide with cases in which clinical manifestations first appeared or persisted during adolescence and adulthood raising, especially in industrialized countries, studies on adult AD are still scant. Since this subgroup of AD patients often has a nonflexural rash distribution, and atypical morphologic variants and validated diagnostic criteria are lacking, there is no clear consensus on the diagnostic work-up that should be performed when evaluating adult patients with AD. In this review the many aspects of work-up in adult patients with AD, such as diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, quality of life and pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:25658440

  14. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. METHODS......: The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34.......1%), and a considerable number of adults still suffered from atopic dermatitis evaluated both by questionnaire (17.1%) and clinical examination (10.0%). Persistent atopic dermatitis was found in 50% of those diagnosed in school age, and persistent atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with early...

  15. Immune response to Varicella vaccine in children with atopic dermatitis compared to non-atopic controls

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Lynda; Weinberg, Adriana; Boguniewicz, Mark; Taylor, Patricia; Oettgen, Hans; Heughan, Lisa; Zaccaro, Daniel; Armstrong, Brian; Holliday, Aaron; Leung, Donald Y. M.

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis subjects and controls had similar cellular immune responses to Varicella vaccine. Atopic dermatitis subjects with a history of eczema herpeticum made high levels of Varicella specific IgE.

  16. Breastfeeding and maternal diet in atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, Tina Y.; Goldman, Ran D.

    2011-01-01

    Question Many children are affected by atopic dermatitis (AD) at a very young age. I often consider whether nonpharmacologic interventions could prevent or mitigate the development of AD. Do breastfeeding or changes to the maternal diet help prevent the development of childhood AD?

  17. Diagnostic clinical features of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Lata

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common disease which varies widely in clinical presentation at different ages and places. Although authors working in western countries on white races have suggested many criteria, there is no uniform set which can be used in large population studies in this part of the world. Hence keeping in mind differences in environment and ethnicity of population, the present study was carried out. Seventy- three patients of atopic dermatitis and 71 age matched controls were studied. All the subjects were examined using a set of 34 potentially useful clinical features selected from different studies, including features for evaluation of photosensitivity. Multiple regression technique was used for analysing the data. It was found that 6 clinical features were diagnostic, 1. presence of itch, 2. history of flexural involvement, 3. history of dry skin, 4. family history of atopy, 5. personal history of diagnosed asthma and 6, visible flexural dermatitis. Photosensitivity was not a significant feature.

  18. Recalcitrant atopic dermatitis due to allergy to Compositae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, M.; Donker, AS; Zuuren, van EJ

    2003-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is often complicated by allergic contact dermatitis, although patch testing may reveal positive reactions of uncertain relevance. We report a case of a 35-year-old woman with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis, with a positive patch-test reaction to Compositae mix (CM). Initially, sens

  19. Twin Studies of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmose, Camilla; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    about filaggrin and its role in the atopic march and provide suggestions for future research in this area. Methods. We identified all twin studies (published after 1970) that have calculated the concordance rate and/or the heritability of AD, or the genetic and environmental correlations between AD and...... around 85% explained by genetic pleiotropy. Conclusions. Genetic factors account for most of the variability in AD susceptibility and for the association between AD and asthma. Controversy remains as to whether the atopic diseases are causally related or whether they are diverse clinical manifestations...

  20. Food Allergies in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ersin Aydin; Ercan Karabacak; Ali Kutlu; Bilal Dogan

    2013-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory skin disease, associated with food and inhalant allergies. The relationship between food and AD is controversial. Greater than 90% parents and 60 % of primary care providers considers that food allergies as the cause for AD. However, it is difficult to reveal that food aggravating AD. In this article the relationship between AD and food allergy was reviewed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(1.000): 105-110

  1. Atopic dermatitis : Aspects of defence defects

    OpenAIRE

    Hagströmer, Lena

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease, typically with a chronic relapsing course and a defective skin barrier function. Recently, mutations of the skin barrier gene encoding filaggrin have been reported in a portion of the patients. In this thesis some aspects of defence defects in AD were studied. In paper I, the risk of developing any cancer was increased by 13%. Excess risks were observed for cancers of the esophagus, pancreas, brain, and lung and for...

  2. Current status of atopic dermatitis in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Furue, Masutaka; Chiba, Takahito; Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic or chronically relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. AD is the second most frequently observed skin disease in dermatology clinics in Japan. Prevalence of childhood AD is 12-13% in mainland Japan; however, it is only half that (about 6%) in children from Ishigaki Island, Okinawa. Topical steroids and tacrolimus are the mainstay of treatment. However, the adverse effects and emotional fear of long-term use of topical steroids have in...

  3. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Rather, Irfan A.; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Kumar, Sanjay; Lim, Jeongheui; Paek, Woon K.; Park, Yong-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, recurrent, chronic inflammatory skin disease that is a cause of considerable economic and social burden. Its prevalence varies substantially among different countries with an incidence rate proclaimed to reach up to 20% of children in developed countries and continues to escalate in developing nations. This increased rate of incidence has changed the focus of research on AD toward epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. The effects of probiotics in the pre...

  4. Allergic contact dermatitis: A comparison between atopic and non-atopic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of ACD in atopics in comparison to non-atopics in our community. Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Departments of Dermatology, King Edward Medical College/Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 1998 to July 1999. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients, 34 with past or present atopic dermatitis (Group I), 88 with personal or familial atopy (Group II) and 128 non-atopic with contact dermatitis (Group III) were subjected to patch testing with European standard series. The results were interpreted according to International Contact Dermatitis Research Group guidelines. Results: Positive reactions were seen in 50%, 70.4% and 67.8% of patients in the respective groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our results suggest that atopics are equally affected with contact dermatitis as compared with non-atopics and recalcitrant cases of atopic dermatitis should be patch tested to find out aggravating factors. (author)

  5. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2003-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our findi

  6. Atopic dermatitis-like pre-Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Baranska-Rybak, Wioletta; Cegielska, Agnieszka;

    2011-01-01

    We describe here 4 patients with Sézary syndrome masquerading as adult-onset atopic dermatitis. The patients presented with a clinical picture compatible with wide-spread atopic dermatitis and did not fulfil the criteria for Sézary syndrome (lack of lymphoadenopathy and blood involvement, skin...

  7. The course of life of patients with Childhood Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.A. Brenninkmeijer; C.M. Legierse; J.H. Sillevis Smitt; B.F. Last; M.A. Grootenhuis; J.D. Bos

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis mainly covers the period of infancy to adulthood, an important period in the development of an individual. The impairment of quality of life and the psychological wellbeing of children with atopic dermatitis have been well documented but so far no data exist about the impact of ato

  8. Current status of atopic dermatitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Masutaka; Chiba, Takahito; Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic or chronically relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. AD is the second most frequently observed skin disease in dermatology clinics in Japan. Prevalence of childhood AD is 12-13% in mainland Japan; however, it is only half that (about 6%) in children from Ishigaki Island, Okinawa. Topical steroids and tacrolimus are the mainstay of treatment. However, the adverse effects and emotional fear of long-term use of topical steroids have induced a "topical steroid phobia" in patients throughout the world. Undertreatment can exacerbate facial/periocular lesions and lead to the development of atopic cataract and retinal detachment due to repeated scratching/rubbing/patting. Overcoming topical steroid phobia is a key issue for the successful treatment of AD through education, understanding and cooperation of patients and their guardians. PMID:22053299

  9. Risk Factors for Developing Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    developing AD at 3 years of age. Our data suggested a strong heredity of AD and confirmed the risk associated with the non-functional FLG allele mutations after adjustments for confounders. Besides this mother's dermatitis and father's allergic rhinitis were found to increase the risk of AD. Perinatal...... 7 years follow-up period (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.99, p=0.024). The increased risk was still significant after confounder adjustment for mother's education, AD and smoking habits during the 3rd trimester. There was no association between alcohol intake during pregnancy and other atopic endpoints...

  10. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Gelbard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Gelbard1, Adelaide A Hebert1,21Departments of Dermatology; 2Pediatrics, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IFN-γ

  11. Development of atopic dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Esben; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Høst, Arne;

    2009-01-01

    Eller E, Kjaer HF, Høst A, Andersen KE, Bindslev-Jensen C. Development of Atopic Dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2009. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/SThe aim was to describe the relapsing pattern, sensitization and prognosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) in the first 6 yr in....... Severity of AD was measured by objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). Point-prevalence of AD peaked at 18 months of age (10%) and decreased at 36 and 72 months to slightly below 7%. The 6-yr cumulative incidence was 22.8% and sensitization was found in 43% of children with AD. It was predominately...

  12. Vitamin D and Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelangelo Vestita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D features immunomodulatory effects on both the innate and adaptive immune systems, which may explain the growing evidence connecting vitamin D to allergic diseases. A wealth of studies describing a beneficial effect of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis (AD prevalence and severity are known. However, observations linking high vitamin D levels to an increased risk of developing AD have also been published, effectively creating a controversy. In this paper, we review the existing literature on the association between AD and vitamin D levels, focusing on childhood. As of today, the role of vitamin D in AD is far from clear; additional studies are particularly needed in order to confirm the promising therapeutic role of vitamin D supplementation in childhood AD.

  13. Vitamin D and Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestita, Michelangelo; Filoni, Angela; Congedo, Maurizio; Foti, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D features immunomodulatory effects on both the innate and adaptive immune systems, which may explain the growing evidence connecting vitamin D to allergic diseases. A wealth of studies describing a beneficial effect of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis (AD) prevalence and severity are known. However, observations linking high vitamin D levels to an increased risk of developing AD have also been published, effectively creating a controversy. In this paper, we review the existing literature on the association between AD and vitamin D levels, focusing on childhood. As of today, the role of vitamin D in AD is far from clear; additional studies are particularly needed in order to confirm the promising therapeutic role of vitamin D supplementation in childhood AD. PMID:25973433

  14. Soy Allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celakovská Jarmila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Materials and Methods: Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. Results : The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sensitization to soy was found in another 27.2% patients with no clinical manifestation after soy ingestion. The correlation between the positive results of examinations to soy and between the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy was confirmed in statistics. Conclusion: Almost one third of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis are sensitized to soy without clinical symptoms. The early allergic reaction to soy occur in minority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  15. Apgar score is related to development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3-9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis....... We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit) = 1.23 (1.06-1.44), P = 0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06-1.61), P...... = 0.012, were risk factors for atopic dermatitis in cotwin control analysis, whereas birth anthropometric factors were not significantly related to disease development. Risk estimates in monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different for the identified risk factors. Conclusions. In...

  16. Soy Allergy in Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Celakovská Jarmila; Ettlerová Kvetuše; Ettler Karel; Vanecková Jaroslava; Bukac Josef

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Materials and Methods: Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. Results : The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sen...

  17. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results of the...... determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out at the...... yielded the following results: (1) in atopic dermatitis lesional skin an increased number of mast cell profiles was found as compared with nonlesional skin, (2) comparing atopic dermatitis skin with normal skin, a significantly increased number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared was found in...

  18. In vivo evaluation of therapeutic options in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldhoff, Jantje Maria

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD, or atopic eczema) is an inflammatory itchy skin disease. AD patients often have high serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, T-cell activation and eosinophilia in peripheral blood. The dermal infiltrate of AD contains mainly T-cells, eosinophils and dendritic cells. Epicutaneous

  19. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: section 2. Management and treatment of atopic dermatitis with topical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Tom, Wynnis L; Berger, Timothy G; Krol, Alfons; Paller, Amy S; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Bergman, James N; Chamlin, Sarah L; Cohen, David E; Cooper, Kevin D; Cordoro, Kelly M; Davis, Dawn M; Feldman, Steven R; Hanifin, Jon M; Margolis, David J; Silverman, Robert A; Simpson, Eric L; Williams, Hywel C; Elmets, Craig A; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G; Smith Begolka, Wendy; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common and chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin condition that can affect all age groups. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. In this second of 4 sections, treatment of atopic dermatitis with nonpharmacologic interventions and pharmacologic topical therapies are reviewed. Where possible, suggestions on dosing and monitoring are given based on available evidence. PMID:24813302

  20. Contact sensitization to common haptens is associated with atopic dermatitis: new insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Engkilde, K;

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It has been much debated whether atopic dermatitis is associated with contact sensitization since past findings have conflicted. A positive association might change our clinical practice. Objective: To investigate the association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization...... self-reported atopic dermatitis from this study mainly suffered from mild disease. However, clinicians should be aware of increased levels of contact sensitization in individuals with atopic dermatitis. Patch testing should therefore be considered at an early point in individuals with a history of...... atopic dermatitis and active disease. The fundamental relationship between atopic disease and environmental chemical exposure may be of a more complex and intimate nature than previously supposed....

  1. Is pimecrolimus cream (1%) an appropriate therapeutic agent for the treatment of external ear atopic dermatitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Beriat, Güçlü Kaan; Akmansu, Şefik Halit; Doğan, Cem; Taştan, Eren; Topal, Ferda; Sabuncuoğlu, Bizden

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In recent years, pimecrolimus 1% cream has been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of atopic dermatitis in patients when applied topically. Material/Methods In our study we compared the therapeutic effects of local 1% pimecrolimus to 1% hydrocortisone, and to a control group in a mouse model with atopic dermatitis in the external ear canals. Atopic dermatitis was created by application of Dinitrochlorobenzene in the external ear canals of mice. The development of atopic dermat...

  2. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Christina M Gelbard; Hebert, Adelaide A.

    2008-01-01

    Christina M Gelbard1, Adelaide A Hebert1,21Departments of Dermatology; 2Pediatrics, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids ar...

  3. [Severe atopic dermatitis caused by rare immunodeficiency in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolsk, Helene Mygind; Marquart, Hanne V; Laub, Bodil; Gniadecki, Robert; Nysom, Karsten; Ifversen, Marianne

    2015-12-14

    Two children are presented with autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by a mutation in the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 gene (DOCK8). The manifestations are typically severe atopic dermatitis, food allergies, elevated serum IgE concentration, viral skin infections and risk of malignancies. DOCK8 deficiency was first reported in 2009, following the death of the oldest sibling. The youngest sibling was cured after allogenic stem cell transplantation. This case report illustrates the need of awareness of primary immunodeficiency in children with atypical manifestation of atopic dermatitis in combination with recurrent infections. PMID:26692033

  4. The effect of nematode administration on canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Specht, L; Helmer, M; Epe, C; Wolken, S; Denk, D; Majzoub, M; Sauter-Luis, C

    2011-09-27

    Canine atopic dermatitis is a common disease and is considered as an animal model of the human disease. Immunomodulation by helminths is reported in several species. The aim of this study was to determine whether nematodes have an immunomodulatory effect on atopic dermatitis in dogs. In the pilot study, 12 atopic dogs were infected with either embryonated eggs of Trichuris vulpis (500 and 2500 eggs in 3 dogs each) or L3 larvae of Uncinaria stenocephala (100, 500 and 2500 eggs in 2 dogs each), respectively, for 3 months. Pruritus was evaluated with visual analogue scales and clinical lesions with the canine atopic dermatitis extent and severity index (CADESI). Skin biopsies were obtained for histopathology at the beginning and end of the study. In the subsequent placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomised study, 21 dogs received either 2500 embryonated T. vulpis eggs or placebo and were evaluated similarly. In addition, allergen-specific serum IgE concentrations were determined. All dogs in the pilot study improved in their lesion scores, most in their pruritus scores. The cutaneous inflammatory infiltrate did not change significantly. In the subsequent randomised study, there was no significant difference between placebo and Trichuris administration in regard to pruritus or CADESI. IgE concentrations also did not change significantly. Infection with T. vulpis did not significantly change clinical signs of canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:21621922

  5. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Antioxidants in Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaranjani, N.; Rao, S. Venkata; Rajeev, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In humans, oxidative stress is involved in many diseases such as atherosclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, heart failure, myocardial infarction, Alzheimer’s disease, Fragile X syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome. Atopic dermatitis (AD), also known as atopic eczema, is a non-contagious, relapsing inflammatory skin disease which is characterized by eczema and pruritus. The skin reacts abnormally to irritants, food and environmental allergens and it becomes very itchy, which leads to s...

  6. Atopic dermatitis and vitamin D: facts and controversies*

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Kleyton de Carvalho; Igreja, Ana Carolina de Souza Machado; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have genetically determined risk factors that affect the barrier function of the skin and immune responses that interact with environmental factors. Clinically, this results in an intensely pruriginous and inflamed skin that allows the penetration of irritants and allergens and predisposes patients to colonization and infection by microorganisms. Among the various etiological factors responsible for the increased prevalence of atopic diseases over the past few ...

  7. Is frictional lichenoid dermatitis a minor variant of atopic dermatitis or a photodermatosis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Context: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis. Background: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis (FLE) is an entity that is probably under diagnosed and has been variably associated with either friction and/or atopy with a distinctive seasonal variation. Aims and Objectives : To study correlation of FLE with UV index and to assess its association with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional analysis of children with FLE was done, over a period of 6 years in two tertiary hospitals. A ...

  8. Prevalence of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, J M; Bindslev-Jensen, C;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are common in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological knowledge is sparse for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis in this age group. Furthermore, no population-based studies have evaluated the prevalence of atopic diseases and hand and contact...... dermatitis in the same group of adolescents. OBJECTIVES: To assess prevalence measures of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents in Odense municipality, Denmark. METHODS: The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study among 1501 eighth grade...... associated. A considerable number of adolescents still suffers from AD, and a considerable sex difference was noted for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis. Nickel allergy and perfume allergy were the major contact allergies. In the future this cohort of eighth grade school children will be followed...

  9. Clinical Features of Adult/Adolescent Atopic Dermatitis and Chinese Criteria for Atopic Dermatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Liu; Yan Zhao; Zhang-Lei Mu; Qian-Jin Lu; Li Zhang; Xu Yao; Min Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background:Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by chronic recurrent dermatitis with profound itching.Most patients have personal and/or family history of atopic diseases.Several criteria have been proposed for the diagnosis of AD.Although the clinical features of childhood AD have been widely studied,there has been less large-scale study on adult/adolescent AD.The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of adult/adolescent patients with chronic symmetrical eczema/AD and to propose Chinese diagnostic criteria for adult/adolescent AD.Methods:A hospital-based study was performed.Forty-two dermatological centers participated in this study.Adult and adolescent patients (12 years and over) with chronic symmetrical eczema or AD were included in this study.Questionnaires were completed by both patients and investigators.The valid questionnaires were analyzed using EpiData 3.1 and SPSS 17.0 software.Results:A total of 2662 valid questionnaires were collected (1369 male and 1293 female).Of all 2662 patients,2062 (77.5%) patients had the disease after 12 years old,while only 600 (22.5%) patients had the disease before 12 years old,suggesting late-onset eczema/AD is common.Two thousand one hundred and thirty-nine (80.4%) patients had the disease for more than 6 months.One thousand one hundred and forty-four (43.0%) patients had a personal and/or family history of atopic diseases.One thousand five hundred and forty-eight (58.2%) patients had an elevated total serum IgE and/or eosinophilia and/or positive allergen-specific IgE.Based on these clinical and laboratory features,we proposed Chinese criteria for adult/adolescent AD.Of all 2662 patients,60.3% were satisfied with our criteria,while only 48.2% satisfied with Hanifin Rajka criteria and 32.7% satisfied with Williams criteria,suggesting a good sensitivity of our criteria in adult/adolescent AD patients.Conclusion:Late-onset of eczema or AD is common

  10. Hypoallergenic diet can influence the severity of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate with SCORAD system the contribution of the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet on the severity of atopic dermatitis and especially on the the intensity criteria and subjective parametersin patients over 14 years of age. Materials and Methods: The diagnostichypoallergenic diet was recommended for the period of 3 weeks. Severity of eczema was scored in agreement with SCORAD score, and especially the intensity criteria (erythema, edema, crusting, excoriations, lichenifications, dryness and subjective parameters (pruritus, sleeplessness were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of this diet. Results: One hundred and forty-eight patients suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: 107 women and 41 men with the average age of 26.03 (s.d. 9.6 years, min. 14 max. 63 years. In the end of 3 weeks diagnostic hypoallergenic diet there was a statistically significant reduction in severity of sleepless and pruritus and in all of the intensity criteria except of lichenification. Conclusion: The diagnostic hypoallergenic diet can improve the intensity criteria and subjective parameters of atopic dermatitis evaluated in SCORAD, but not the lichenification. We recommend to introduce this diet before a challenge tests and as a temporary medical arrangement in patients suffering from moderate or severe form of atopic dermatitis.

  11. Colloidal oatmeal formulations as adjunct treatments in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F; Nebus, Judith; Wallo, Warren; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2012-07-01

    Colloidal oatmeal has been used for decades to soothe and ameliorate atopic dermatitis and other pruritic and/or xerotic dermatoses. In-vitro and/or in-vivo studies have confirmed the anti-inflammatory, barrier repair, and moisturizing properties of this compound. A broad set of studies has been conducted in recent years to assess the effects of colloidal oatmeal as adjunct treatment in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). This paper will review these studies. In these investigations, patients in all age groups (3 months to 60 years) with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis were included and allowed to continue their prescribed topical medications. These studies found that the daily use of moisturizers and/or cleansers containing colloidal oatmeal significantly improved many clinical outcomes of atopic dermatitis from baseline: investigator's assessment (IGA), eczema area and severity index (EASI), itch, dryness, and quality of life indices. Safety results showed that the formulations were well tolerated in babies, children, and adults with AD. PMID:22777219

  12. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...

  13. Adalimumab in Recalcitrant Severe Psoriasis Associated with Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Yayli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors may induce various cutaneous side effects including eczematous-like lesions. The management of such side effects can be challenging. Herein, we report a case of a 55-year-old man who had a flare-up and subsequent improvement of atopic dermatitis during treatment of severe psoriasis with adalimumab.

  14. Atopic dermatitis and vitamin D: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Kleyton de Carvalho; Igreja, Ana Carolina de Souza Machado; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have genetically determined risk factors that affect the barrier function of the skin and immune responses that interact with environmental factors. Clinically, this results in an intensely pruriginous and inflamed skin that allows the penetration of irritants and allergens and predisposes patients to colonization and infection by microorganisms. Among the various etiological factors responsible for the increased prevalence of atopic diseases over the past few decades, the role of vitamin D has been emphasized. As the pathogenesis of AD involves a complex interplay of epidermal barrier dysfunction and dysregulated immune response, and vitamin D is involved in both processes, it is reasonable to expect that vitamin D's status could be associated with atopic dermatitis' risk or severity. Such association is suggested by epidemiological and experimental data. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for and against this controversial relationship, emphasizing the possible etiopathogenic mechanisms involved. PMID:24474104

  15. Impact of adult atopic dermatitis on topical drug penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Ortiz, Patricia; Hansen, Steen H; Shah, Vinod P;

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate methodologies for the determination of drug penetration in diseased skin have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a metronidazole cream formulation in atopic dermatitis, employing dermal microdialysis and tape strip sampling...... atopic dermatitis compared with uninvolved skin (p<0.001). Tape stripping methodology did not disclose this difference in penetration. Thus, the skin layer of interest and the integrity of the skin barrier should be considered when selecting sampling methodology. Microdialysis sampling is the method of...... techniques. Non-invasive measuring methods were used for the quantification of the severity of the dermatitis. Skin thickness and the depth of the microdialysis probes in the skin were measured by 20 MHz ultrasound scanning. Metronidazole concentration, sampled by microdialysis, was 2.4-fold higher in the...

  16. Acute Pustular Dermatosis, Following Topical Treatment With Pimecrolimus, in a Child Affected With Atopic and Contact Hand Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Brazzelli, Valeria; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is considered an important risk factor for chronic hand dermatitis, which can be seen in children too. Pimecrolimus cream 1% is approved to treat atopic dermatitis in children aged 2 years or older. In adults, this drug has been used for some clinical indications other than atopic dermatitis, such as chronic hand dermatitis. Here, we describe an adverse drug reaction in a 2-year-old child affected with atopic dermatitis, who was treated with topical pimecrolimus in order to ...

  17. Treating atopic dermatitis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of a ceramide hyaluronic acid emollient foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacha O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Pacha, Adelaide A HebertDepartment of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Advances in current understanding of the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis have led to improved targeting of the structural deficiencies in atopic skin. Ceramide deficiency appears to be one of the major alterations in atopic dermatitis and the replenishment of this epidermal component through topically applied ceramide based emollients appears to be safe, well tolerated, and effective. Recently a ceramide hyaluronic acid foam has become commercially available and increasing evidence supports its safety and efficacy in patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, ceramide, Hylatopic, eczema, non-steroidal, dermatology

  18. Reduced occurrence of early atopic dermatitis because of immunoactive prebiotics among low-atopy-risk infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grueber, Christoph; van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Mosca, Fabio; Moro, Guido; Chirico, Gaetano; Braegger, Christian P.; Riedler, Josef; Boehm, Guenther; Wahn, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most infants developing atopic dermatitis have a low risk for atopy. Primary prevention of atopic dermatitis is difficult. Objective: To assess the effect of supplementation of an infant and follow-on formula with prebiotic and immunoactive oligosaccharides on the occurrence of atopic de

  19. Allergic skin diseases : Studies on mechanisms in experimental atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    LehtimÀki, Sari

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an allergic skin disease, characterized by relapsing eczema, dry skin and chronic skin inflammation. A large proportion of AD patients develop other allergies or asthma later in life. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in turn, is one of the leading occupational diseases worldwide. Therefore, allergic skin diseases not only impair the quality of life of patients but also cause a great economical burden for the society. This thesis investigates some of the mechanisms b...

  20. In vivo evaluation of therapeutic options in atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Oldhoff, Jantje Maria

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD, or atopic eczema) is an inflammatory itchy skin disease. AD patients often have high serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, T-cell activation and eosinophilia in peripheral blood. The dermal infiltrate of AD contains mainly T-cells, eosinophils and dendritic cells. Epicutaneous patch tests with aeroallergen application for 24-48 h can induce eczematous lesions in sensitized patients with AD. This is named the atopy patch test (APT). The APT is used as in vivo research mod...

  1. [Hypnotherapy of atopic dermatitis in an adult. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczel, Kristóf; Gál, János

    2016-01-17

    Hypnosis is well known for its modulatory effects on immune and inflammatory processes, and it is a therapeutic option for certain diseases of such pathogenesis. The authors report treatment of an adult patient with extensive atopic dermatitis, who was only minimally responsive to conservative treatment. In a 15 session hypnotherapy the authors combined the use of direct, symptom-oriented suggestive techniques with hypnotic procedures to identify and modify comorbid psychological issues. To monitor the effect of the treatment, patient diaries (quality and quantity of sleep, intensity of pain and itch) and repeated psychometric tests were used. At the end of treatment there were improvements in all measured dimensions (itch, pain, insomnia, activity, anxiety and emotional state) both clinically and psychometrically. The authors conclude, that hypnosis can be an effective adjunctive therapy in atopic dermatitis, and in certain severe cases may constitute a salvage therapy. PMID:26929974

  2. Psychological Distress in Young Adult Males with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Si-Heon; Hur, Jae; Jang, Jae-Yeon; Park, Hae-Sim; Hong, Chang Hyung; Son, Sang Joon; Chang, Ki Jung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between atopic dermatitis (AD) and psychological distress has been well established for children and adolescents. However, it is unclear whether this relationship exists in young adults. This study aimed to assess the relationship between AD and psychological distress in young male adults in South Korea. A cross-sectional study was conducted using regional conscription data from 2008 to 2012. A dermatologist diagnosed AD based on historical and clinical features, and...

  3. Hypoallergenic Diet Can Influence the Severity of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jarmila Celakovska; Josef Bukac

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate with SCORAD system the contribution of the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet on the severity of atopic dermatitis and especially on the the intensity criteria and subjective parametersin patients over 14 years of age. Materials and Methods: The diagnostichypoallergenic diet was recommended for the period of 3 weeks. Severity of eczema was scored in agreement with SCORAD score, and especially the intensity criteria (erythema, edema, crusting, excoriations, lichenifications, dryne...

  4. Atopic Dermatitis and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R.  Tehrani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Atopic diseases, including asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis, are characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction mediated by T helper 2 cells, while type 1 diabetes mellitus is mediated by T helper 1 cells. Approach: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of atopic dermatitis between children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and age-matched controls. We conducted a case-control study enrolling 150 cases with type 1 diabetes mellitus between 2-20 years from pediatric endocrine out patient clinic and 450 controls randomly selected from the general population matched on sex and age. The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis was determined for patients and controls by the Hanifin and Rajka’s diagnostic criteria. Results: From 150 cases, 75 (50% were male and 75 (50% were female, with the age between 2 and 20 and among the 450 controls, 228 were male (50. 66% and 222 were female (49.33% the age was as the case. Dermatitis past or present, was identified in 1.3% of cases and 3.1% of controls, a difference which was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Conclusion: In present study, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis was comparable in diabetic children and the controls which may be due to difference between races and geographic areas and lack of support for an inverse relationship between the Th2-mediated atopy and th1-mediated autoimmune disorder. Further studies are needed to show the difference in serum IgE and cytokine profiles between the groups.

  5. Management of atopic dermatitis: safety and efficacy of phototherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizi A; Raone B; Ravaioli GM

    2015-01-01

    Annalisa Patrizi, Beatrice Raone, Giulia Maria RavaioliDepartment of Specialized, Diagnostic and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that can affect all age groups. It is characterized by a relapsing course and a dramatic impact on quality of life for patients. Environmental interventions together with topical devices represent the mainstay of treatment for AD, in pa...

  6. Recent Improvements in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşegül Akan; Emine Dibek Mısırlıoğlu; Can Naci Kocabaş

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial skin disease manifested by the interaction between environmental factors, immune system and the genes predisposing to the disease. It affects the quality of life of patients and their family considerably. The prevelance for children is 10-20% in developed countries, while frequency of AD is considered as rising all over the world. According to the studies conducted in our country, the frequency is about 4.9% to 8.1%. Currently, there a...

  7. Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors for Atopic Dermatitis: Review and Treatment Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Warner W

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease commonly affecting children and managed by pediatricians, primary care physicians, allergists, and dermatologists alike. For many years, the only available topical pharmacological treatment was topical corticosteroids. This changed in 2000–2001, when topical formulations of two calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus) were approved for short-term or chronic intermittent treatment of AD in patients ≥2 years of age, in whom othe...

  8. Effect of Probiotics on the Treatment of Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yeşilova, Yavuz; Çalka, Ömer; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Berktaş, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis, a chronic recurrent disease, is frequently encountered in clinical practice. In the last 30 years, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis has rapidly increased due to industrialization. Therefore, there have been attempts in recent years to find new ways of treating and preventing atopic dermatitis. Objective In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, a combination of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lacto...

  9. The Economics of Topical Immunomodulators for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    William Abramovits; Mark Boguniewicz; Paller, Amy S.; Diane L. Whitaker-Worth; Mary M. Prendergast; Michael Tokar; Tong, Kuo B

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common, chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin disease frequently affecting infants and children. The worldwide prevalence of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be 5-20% of the paediatric population. First-line therapy has generally consisted of dry skin care, avoidance of triggers, application of topical corticosteroids, and administration of antihistamines and oral antibacterials. Topical corticosteroids improve the lesions of atopic dermatitis; however, concern on the p...

  10. Systemic exposure, tolerability, and efficacy of pimecrolimus cream 1% in atopic dermatitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, B; Lakhanpaul, M.; Morris, A.(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom); Lateo, S; Davies, T.; Scott, G.; Cardno, M; Ebelin, M; Burtin, P.; Stephenson, T

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To measure pimecrolimus blood concentrations and to evaluate tolerability and efficacy in children and infants treated topically for atopic dermatitis with pimecrolimus cream 1% for three weeks.

  11. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O;

    2007-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were......?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared with a...... dermatitis both in male and female patients (p = 0.98). The estimates were adjusted for age. The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis is attributable to mainly genetic differences between people. However, differences in environmental exposures also are of importance....

  12. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O;

    2007-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were......?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared with a...... dermatitis both in male and female patients (p = 0.98). The estimates were adjusted for age. The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis is attributable to mainly genetic differences between people. However, differences in environmental exposures also are of importance...

  13. Using family atopy scores to identify the risk of atopic dermatitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Anggraeni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Atopic dermatitis is the first manifestation of allergic disease in early life. Early interventions may prevent the development of allergy disease. Allergy trace cards have been used to identify the level of allergic risk, based on family atopy scores. Because environmental factors may also influence the development of atopic dermatitis, the usefulness of the allergy trace card needs to be reevaluated. Objective To compare the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants aged 0-4 months with total family atopy scores of > 0 to those with scores of 0. Methods We conducted this cohort study from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Family atopy score was tabulated from all pregnant woman in the Obstetric Outpatient Clinic and the Maternity Room. Subjects were divided into two groups based on their total family atopy score: those with scores > 0 and those with scores of 0. The appearance of atopic dermatitis symptoms in the infants were evaluated until they reached 4 months of age. The incidence of atopic dermatitis in two groups was compared using Chi-square test. Results The incidence of atopic dermatitis in this study was 10.9%. The group with total family atopy scores of 0 had a significantly higher incidence of atopic dermatitis than the group with scores > 0 (adjusted RR 22.5; 95%CI 8.8 to 57.0; P = 0.001. Conclusion The incidence of atopic dermatitis is higher in infants with total family atopy score > 0 and this group has a 22.5 times higher risk of atopic dermatitis compared to infants with total family atopy score of 0. Allergy trace cards are relevant in differentiating the risk of atopy with regards to development of atopic dermatitis. We suggest that family atopy scores be evaluated during antenatal care in order to limit the development of atopic dermatitis in infants. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:330-7.].

  14. Atopic dermatitis in adults: clinical and epidemiological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Leão Orfali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory disease causing intense pruritus, and with typical clinical features. There are few epidemiological studies concerning AD in adults, as well as little information about its prognostic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological course of adults with AD. METHODS: 80 patients aged above 18 years (mean age = 29 years were selected (30 males and 50 females and interviewed about hospitalization, systemic corticoid usage, age of AD onset, and personal and/or familial history of atopy. Disease severity was evaluated through the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD tool. Laboratory examination included IgE serum levels and eosinophil blood count. RESULTS: 71 out of 80 patients referred association with respiratory symptoms (18 had asthma, 17 had rhinitis, and 36 had both conditions; nine out of 80 patients denied any respiratory disease. AD patients were divided in mild (n = 25, moderate (n = 30, and severe (n = 25; 56% had one or more hospitalizations due to AD. A positive association was found between IgE serum levels, eosinophil blood count, and disease severity. CONCLUSION: Adult AD represents a clinical challenge that needs to be better characterized, since it can be misdiagnosed and interferes with the patient's social and personal life. The association of skin and respiratory atopic disease is frequent, and laboratory parameters such as circulating IgE levels and eosinophil blood count may be helpful to assess disease severity.

  15. Psychoneuroimmunology of Psychological Stress and Atopic Dermatitis: Pathophysiologic and Therapeutic Updates

    OpenAIRE

    SUÁREZ, Andrea L.; Feramisco, Jamison D.; Koo, John; Steinhoff, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by impaired epidermal barrier function, inflammatory infiltration, extensive pruritus and a clinical course defined by symptomatic flares and remissions. The mechanisms of disease exacerbation are still poorly understood. Clinical occurrence of atopic dermatitis is often associated with psychological stress. In response to stress, upregulation of neuropeptide mediators in the brain, endocrine organs, and peripheral nervous...

  16. Atopic dermatitis in dogs_novel insights into mechanisms of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlotter, Y.M.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis in dogs Novel insights into mechanisms of disease Atopic dermatitis in dogs is the most important canine pruritic disorder, described for the first time in 1971. It is defined as a genetically-predisposed inflammatory and pruritic allergic skin disease with characteristic clinical

  17. Analysis of food allergy in atopic dermatitis patients - association with concomitant allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few reports demonstrate the comorbidity of food allergy and allergic march in adult patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate, if there is some relation in atopic dermatitis patients at the age 14 years and older who suffer from food allergy to common food allergens to other allergic diseases and parameters as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed; these parameters were examined: food allergy (to wheat flour, cow milk, egg, peanuts and soy, the occurrence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. The statistical evaluation of the relations among individual parameters monitored was performed. Results: Food allergy was altogether confirmed in 65 patients (29% and these patients suffer significantly more often from bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Persistent atopic dermatitis lesions and positive data in family history about atopy are recorded significantly more often in patients with confirmed food allergy to examined foods as well. On the other hand, the onset of atopic dermatitis under 5 year of age is not recorded significantly more often in patients suffering from allergy to examined foods. Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis patients suffering from food allergy suffer significantly more often from allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, persistent eczematous lesions and have positive data about atopy in their family history.

  18. Thymus is enlarged in children with current atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Braae; Andersen, G.; Jeppesen, D.L.;

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder of unknown aetiology with peak incidence in early childhood. The disease is associated with peripheral T-cell accumulation in the skin. The thymus is a key organ of the cellular immune response early in life. We hypothesized that atopic dermatitis is...... associated with an unbalanced establishment of the peripheral T-lymphocyte system. This cross-sectional study was performed to compare thymus sizes in patients with atopic dermatitis and healthy controls. Thirty-seven children with current atopic dermatitis were enrolled and compared with 29 healthy controls....... An interview and medical examination were performed by one doctor, an ultrasound scan was performed within 3 days of the examination, and the thymus index, a marker of thymus size, was measured. The thymus index was on average 32% higher (95% CI 3%-67%) in children with active atopic dermatitis...

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner-Nielsen, Jane; Vestergaard, Christian; Thestrup-Pedersen, K.;

    2006-01-01

    exhibit a condition in their skin resembling atopic dermatitis. GITR also exists in a soluble form, and increased levels of this lead to decreased levels of GITRL and thereby increased Treg activity. We have measured the levels of GITR and GITRL in plasma from atopic dermatitis patients and found it not...... pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and the migration of Tregs and skin-homing T-cells. Immunohistochemistry showed GITR and GITRL were present in few dermal cells of both patients with atopic dermatitis, and normal healthy volunteers, and often locali zed in close proximity to each other. Since regulatory T......-cells are localized in the vicinity of GITRL-expressing cells in atopic dermatitis skin, the GITR/GITRL interaction may serve to perpetuate the inflammation locally....

  20. Skin pH, Atopic Dermatitis, and Filaggrin Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acidic pH of the skin plays a role in antimicrobial defense by regulating the bacterial skin flora and aspects of barrier. Filaggrin is a co-factor in maintaining a low skin pH because of its degradation into acidic amino acids. Accordingly, lack of filaggrin due to filaggrin...... mutations may influence skin pH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the epidermal pH in different groups stratified by filaggrin mutations and atopic dermatitis. Further, we investigated the changes in pH according to severity of mutational status among patients with dermatitis, irrespective of skin condition....... METHODS: pH was measured with a multiprobe system pH probe (PH 905), and the study population was composed of 67 individuals, who had all been genotyped for 3 filaggrin mutations (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X). RESULTS: We found no clear pattern in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status. Individuals...

  1. Grounding psychological help for adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Uskov, O.; Markova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Uskov O., Markova M. Grounding psychological help for adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2015;5(5):138-150. ISSN 2391-8306. DOI 10.5281/zenodo.17465 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/2015%3B5%285%29%3A138-150 https://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/works/559212 http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.17465 Formerly Journal of Health Sciences. ISSN 1429-9623 / 2300-665X. Archives 2011 – 2014 http://journal.rsw.edu.pl/index.php/JHS/issue/...

  2. Evaluation Of Prick Test In Atopic Dermatitis And Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available “Prick test” was carried out in 15 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and 10 patients with chronic urticaria (CU. Of the various aeroallergens tested, house dust mite (HDM, pollens, aspergillus furnigatus and insects were found to be most commonly positive. The common food allergens showing prick test positivity were egg white, fish, milk, brinjal, dal, groundnut and banana. Use of nasal filters showed 10-20% improvement in AD and 5 â€" 10% improvement in urticaria. Withdrawal of the responsible food article(s showed 20-30% improvement in patients with AD and urticaria.

  3. Update on Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Disease Course of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F

    2016-06-01

    Studies of the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) have provided insights into associated environmental risk factors, demonstrating the complex interactions between the presence of filaggrin (FLG) gene defects and environment. Among other important findings is that elevated transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in newborns is a strong predictor of AD, regardless of FLG status. Recently recognized predictors of disease course and severity include onset of AD signs and symptoms before 12 months of age and the presence of an FLG mutation and concomitant immunoglobulin E sensitization early in life. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S84-S88. PMID:27525380

  4. The multiple factors affecting the association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis are both common skin diseases having an immune pathogenesis. There has been considerable interest about their inter-relationships with regard to altered susceptibility. Recent investigations have shed new light on this important question, and in...... this article, we explore whether there is evidence that atopic dermatitis affects the risk of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis. The use of topical products to treat xerotic and inflamed skin in atopic dermatitis often results in a higher prevalence of sensitization to, for example......, fragrances and other ingredients in emollients. Moreover, the prevalence of metal allergy seems to be increased, probably due to compromised chelation of the metals in the stratum corneum of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, conversely, the T-helper cell 2 bias that characterizes immune responses in...

  5. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İjlal Erturan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore, we aimed to investigate self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with atopic dermatitis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. The Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI were used for determining self-esteem and quality of life. The Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD Index was used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. Results: It was found that patient group had lower self-esteem than healthy controls according to the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale. A statistically significant difference was observed in happiness/satisfaction and anxiety subscale scores between the patients and healthy controls while there was no significant difference between the other sub-scale scores. Mean value of dermatological quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in healthy controls. A moderate negative correlation was found between self-esteem and CDLQI scores among adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Discussion: This study results have shown that self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were adversely affected in adolescents with atopic dermatitis irrespective of gender. These patients should be examined psychiatrically besides dermatological examination and treatment. We suggest that improvement will be observed in self-esteem and quality of

  6. Is frictional lichenoid dermatitis a minor variant of atopic dermatitis or a photodermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Sardana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis. Background: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis (FLE is an entity that is probably under diagnosed and has been variably associated with either friction and/or atopy with a distinctive seasonal variation. Aims and Objectives : To study correlation of FLE with UV index and to assess its association with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional analysis of children with FLE was done, over a period of 6 years in two tertiary hospitals. A detailed history and examination was done to assess the features of atopic dermatitis. The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index. Two-tailed significance tests using Pearson′s coefficient of correlation and T-test were used to interpret the data. (P < 0.05. Results: One hundred seventy-four patients were studied using the UKC criterion 17.2% of the patients had AD while xerosis (40.3% was the predominant cutaneous finding. The number of patients seen in summer was more than in winter (P < 0.05 but there was no statistical difference between the cases in winter and spring. There was a significant correlation of the number of cases per month with UV index (P = 0.019. Almost 42% of patients gave a history of recurrence. Conclusions : FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion. Statistical Analysis Used: The Pearson′s coefficient of correlation was used for comparing the cases per month with the UV index. The tests of hypothesis used included the paired T-tests. F-test of variance, Welch test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test. P < 0.05 was considered significant.

  7. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: section 1. Diagnosis and assessment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Tom, Wynnis L; Chamlin, Sarah L; Feldman, Steven R; Hanifin, Jon M; Simpson, Eric L; Berger, Timothy G; Bergman, James N; Cohen, David E; Cooper, Kevin D; Cordoro, Kelly M; Davis, Dawn M; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J; Paller, Amy S; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A; Williams, Hywel C; Elmets, Craig A; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G; Smith Begolka, Wendy; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic, inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2% to 3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in the management and care of AD, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of 4 sections, methods for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment, and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. PMID:24290431

  8. Children with Atopic Dermatitis Should Always be Patch-tested if They Have Hand or Foot Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Olhardt, Sanna; Rådehed, Jeanette; Svensson, Åke

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease among children in industrialised countries. Many factors influence this disease in a negative way and contact allergy is one such factor. The aim of the study was to examine the frequency of contact allergy among children with the diagnosis atopic dermatitis. Contact allergy was found in 22/82 children (26.8%), the most common from Amerchol L101 (11.0%), potassium dichromate (7.3%), and nickel sulfate (4.9%). A statistically significant difference in contact allergy frequency was demonstrated for those with hand and/or foot eczema compared to those without. Children with atopic dermatitis who suffer from hand and/or foot dermatitis should always be patch-tested to evaluate whether they have a relevant contact allergy and thus allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:25367826

  9. Development of atopic dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Esben; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Høst, Arne; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The aim was to describe the relapsing pattern, sensitization and prognosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) in the first 6 yr in a population-based, prospective birth cohort. The DARC cohort includes 562 children with clinical examinations, specific-IgE and skin prick test at all follow-ups. All children were examined for the development of AD using Hanifin-Rajka criteria and for food hypersensitivity by oral challenges. Severity of AD was measured by objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). Point-prevalence of AD peaked at 18 months of age (10%) and decreased at 36 and 72 months to slightly below 7%. The 6-yr cumulative incidence was 22.8% and sensitization was found in 43% of children with AD. It was predominately sensitization to foods, however shifting toward inhalant allergens with age. Sensitization at >or=2 follow-ups affected severity, whereas short-term sensitization at one follow-up does not. Children with early, non-IgE mediated (intrinsic) AD outgrew more often their eczema; however if they develop persistent AD, they remain intrinsic. Early long-term sensitization worsens the prognosis, but 38% of all children have a debut later than 18 months of age. Boys had earlier onset of AD than girls. The large number of follow-ups gives a detailed picture of the relapsing pattern and shows that the relapses occur independently of time of onset. We could not establish any clear correlation between elimination diets and AD duration nor severity. PMID:19788539

  10. Sensitization patterns in Compositae-allergic patients with current or past atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2013-01-01

    Background. An association between Compositae sensitization and atopic dermatitis has been suggested on the basis of case reports and clinical studies. Objectives. To describe the characteristics of sensitization in Compositae-allergic patients with current and/or past atopic dermatitis. Patients....../materials/methods. Consecutive Compositae-sensitive patients were selected for analysis if they had a history of (i) present and/or past atopic dermatitis or (ii) childhood flexural eczema or (iii) childhood eczema of any kind and a positive prick test result. Results. Fifty-one persons (35 females and 16 males) were included...... of non-atopics, except that dandelion was an important allergen in children. Cobalt allergy was the most frequent other contact allergy, occurring in 37%. Conclusions. Persons with current or past atopic dermatitis may become sensitized to Compositae at any age, both occupationally and non...

  11. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Cha, Hae-Sim; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Seo Ho; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM) on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE)/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA-) induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC-) γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK). These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:26981139

  12. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Joong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA- induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC- γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK. These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  13. Approach to atopic dermatitis in children by the Family Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysson Quitério Guilherme

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic and inflammatory disease that affects the skin of children in their early stages of life. Its aetiology remains little understood, but it is known that there is a dysfunction of the skin barrier, which facilitates the penetration of allergens/irritants into the epidermis, causing an inflammatory response with a predominance of Th2 response relative to Th1. The diagnosis is clinical and may be associated with previous and family medical history of atopies such as rhinitis and asthma. AD manifests itself through eczematous, pruritic injuries with the presence of erythema, papules, vesicles, and scales. The main differential diagnoses of AD are seborrheic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, psoriasis and scabies. The treatment is based on the education of patients and their families, plus the control of pruritus with antihistamines and of inflammation with corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Given the high prevalence and impact of AD on the quality of life of paediatric patients, early diagnosis and an individualized approach are paramount.

  14. Contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis in adolescents: prevalence measures and associations. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis (TOACS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, Jens Martin; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten;

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this cross-sectional study were to establish the prevalence measures of contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis in 8th grade schoolchildren (aged 12-16 years) in Odense, Denmark, and to examine the associations with atopic dermatitis, inhalant allergy and hand eczema. Contact ...... the course and development of atopic diseases, hand eczema and contact dermatitis. Key words: school-...

  15. Skin barrier and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis: an evolving story with important clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnowicki, Tali; Krueger, James G; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease. Its pathogenesis combines barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections; however, the relative contribution of each of these components is yet to be determined. Uninvolved atopic dermatitis skin also displays broad immune and barrier abnormalities, which highlights a role for proactive treatment strategy. The residual disease genomic profile that accompanies clinical resolution provides further support for proactive treatment approaches. Although intrinsic and extrinsic atopic dermatitis subtypes share a common clinical phenotype, they show some important differences in their Th22/Th17 cytokine profile, which opens the door for personalized specific therapeutics for each disease category. PMID:25017523

  16. Skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis using enzyme-containing detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Hundevadt; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Mosbech, H;

    1998-01-01

    Detergent enzymes may cause skin irritation and occasionally hypersensitivity reactions. The potential hazards of these enzymes have led some physicians to advise atopic dermatitis patients against the use of enzyme-enriched detergents. A three-phased randomised, double-blind, cross-over experiment...... statistical differences in any of the primary or secondary parameters comparing treatment and placebo periods. Our data therefore seem to exclude that atopic dermatitis may exacerbate during 1 month's exposure to enzyme-enriched detergents. Since no significant irritant capacity was detected in atopic...... dermatitis patients, it is unlikely that consumers with "normal skin" will experience any skin discomfort when enzyme-enriched detergents are used....

  17. Useful tools for the management of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Giampaolo; Dondi, Arianna; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2009-01-01

    Eczema, frequently named atopic dermatitis, is the most frequent chronic skin disease of early childhood, with a high prevalence in industrialized countries and a relapsing-remitting course that is responsible for a serious burden on affected children and their families. Even though most facets of this disease are nowadays well known and numerous guidelines are available, some confusion still exists regarding certain aspects. First, several names have been proposed for the disorder. We suggest that the name and definition adopted by the World Allergy Organization should be used: 'eczema,' divided into 'atopic,' when an allergic sensitization can be demonstrated, and 'non-atopic,' in the absence of sensitization. Several diagnostic criteria have been proposed, but at present the two most reliable are the 2003 revision by the American Academy of Dermatology of the Hanifin-Rajka criteria, and those by Williams revised in 2005. To date, 20 different clinical scores have been published to assess the severity; however, only the EASI (Eczema Area and Severity Index), the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis), and the POEM (Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure) seem to have been adequately validated and are recommended for use in clinical practice and trials. The diagnostic tests to identify associated allergy or sensitization include skin-prick tests, determination of the specific IgE in serum using different assays, and atopy patch tests; in the case of suspected food allergy, a food challenge may be necessary to define the diagnosis. To evaluate quality of life, tools exist that allow both the child's and family's impairment to be considered. In addition, several algorithms exist to help decide therapy on a step-wise basis. However, such guidelines and algorithms represent only an aid to the physician and not an obligatory directive, since the ultimate judgment regarding any therapy must be performed by the physician and tailored to individual needs. A clear and validated

  18. Colloidal oatmeal formulations and the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    Colloidal oatmeal suspensions are currently available in bath soaps, shampoos, shaving gels, and moisturizing creams, and several studies have been conducted that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of colloidal oatmeal for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions. The diverse chemical polymorphism of oats translates into numerous clinical utilities for atopic dermatitis (AD) and eczema. Avenanthramides are the principle polyphenolic antioxidants in oats, and they have been shown to assuage inflammation in murine models of contact hypersensitivity and neurogenic inflammation and also reduce pruritogen-induced scratching in a murine itch model. Moreover, avenanthramides are a potent antioxidant. This paper will discuss various studies that have found colloidal oatmeal compounds to be beneficial in the treatment of AD and also as adjunctive treatments for AD. PMID:25607551

  19. Atopic dermatitis: therapeutic concepts evolving from new pathophysiologic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Thomas; Stingl, Georg

    2008-12-01

    Recent insights into the relevance of the epidermal barrier function and its interaction with components of the innate and adaptive immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) give rise to a number of novel potential treatment options. In particular, the identification of loss-of-function mutations in the barrier protein filaggrin and of a diminished expression of certain antimicrobial peptides in AD skin stimulates new concepts to think beyond the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm. This review will focus on these most recent discoveries and will discuss new and corresponding proof-of-concept trials in patients with AD. It will further speculate on novel ways to restore the homeostasis among the 3 major components in AD skin suspected to be clinically relevant. PMID:18992925

  20. Factors contributing to poor treatment outcomes in childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Anna; Smith, Saxon D

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the skin and is the most common paediatric dermatological condition. While no cure is available, it can be treated effectively if adherence to a therapeutic plan is maintained. Poor adherence to treatment is common in AD and can lead to treatment failure, which has significant impacts on the patient, family and society. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify factors that contribute to poor treatment adherence in childhood AD and to identify possible strategies to remedy these. Identified factors leading to poor treatment adherence include: complexity of treatment regimen, lack of knowledge, impaired quality of life, dissatisfaction with treatment strategies, infrequent follow up, corticosteroid phobia and the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Effective strategies to increase treatment adherence include: caregiver education and utilisation of education adjuncts, optimisation of the patient/caregiver-clinician relationship, early and frequent follow up and improvement of patient and caregiver quality of life. PMID:25817780

  1. Disseminated coxsackievirus A6 affecting children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M D; Sears, A; Cookson, H; Lew, T; Laftah, Z; Orrin, L; Zuckerman, M; Creamer, D; Higgins, E

    2015-07-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) is an emerging pathogen that has in recent years been associated with atypical hand, foot and mouth disease. This manifests as a generalized papular or vesicular eruption, which may be associated with fever and systemic disturbance. We report a series of six children presenting to a single centre in the UK with disseminated CV-A6 infection on a background of atopic dermatitis (AD). Our patients exhibited a widespread papular or vesicular eruption in association with exacerbation of AD. Several of our cases mimicked eczema herpeticum, but the extent was more generalized, and individual lesions were discrete rather than clustered and were less circumscribed in character. This series highlights that CV-A6 infection may be encountered in the UK, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an acute exacerbation of AD, particularly in children. PMID:25677678

  2. The role of the skin microbiome in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael R; Gallo, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease that affects a large proportion of the population worldwide. The incidence of AD has increased over the last several decades along with AD's burden on the physical and psychological health of the patient and family. However, current advances in understanding the mechanisms behind the pathophysiology of AD are leading to a hopeful outlook for the future. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization on AD skin has been directly correlated to disease severity but the functions of other members of the skin bacterial community may be equally important. Applying knowledge gained from understanding the role of the skin microbiome in maintaining normal skin immune function, and addressing the detrimental consequences of microbial dysbiosis in driving inflammation, is a promising direction for development of new treatments. This review discusses current preclinical and clinical research focused on determining how the skin microbiome may influence the development of AD. PMID:26404536

  3. Alcohol during pregnacu and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, a; Petersen, Janne; Grønbæk, M;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...... days) of age. RESULTS: Alcohol during pregnancy was associated with a significant and dose-dependent increased risk of AD in early infancy. This effect was mainly seen in high-risk infants (two parents with allergic disease). Thus, the highest risk of AD in early infancy was seen in high-risk infants...

  4. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...... days) of age. RESULTS: Alcohol during pregnancy was associated with a significant and dose-dependent increased risk of AD in early infancy. This effect was mainly seen in high-risk infants (two parents with allergic disease). Thus, the highest risk of AD in early infancy was seen in high-risk infants...

  5. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov PV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pavel V Chernyshov Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children’s development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child’s problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother–child attachment. The child’s AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, stigmatization, self-perception, quality of life, children, pediatric dermatology, skin disease

  6. Vitamin D in atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria and allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Shannon K; Rainwater, Ellecia; Shure, Anna K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin D influences allergen-induced pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, and its potential immunomodulatory role in allergic skin disorders has been explored. This comprehensive review article provides an overview of the role of vitamin D in three common dermatologic conditions: atopic dermatitis (AD), chronic urticaria, and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Whereas the literature regarding vitamin D and AD has resulted in mixed findings, several studies have described an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and AD severity, and improvement in AD with vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, several studies report an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of chronic urticaria. Although current research in humans remains limited, an increased likelihood of ACD has been demonstrated in vitamin D-deficient mice. Additional well-designed clinical trials will be necessary to determine whether vitamin D supplementation should be recommended for prevention or adjuvant treatment of these common dermatologic conditions. PMID:27014952

  7. Kaposi’s Varicelliform Eruption During Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis with Pimecrolimus Cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Canpolat

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption is a widespread viral infection frequently caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, and less frequently Coxsackie A-16 and vaccinia virus superimposed on a pre-existing dermatosis. It is often associated with atopic dermatitis. The topical immunomodulator pimecrolimus have proven effective in managing atopic dermatitis. Reported adverse effects are infrequent; however, cutaneous infections are potential complications of its application. Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption is the most important problem in treating patients with atopic dermatitis with pimecrolimus. Even though the causative effect of this topical immunomodulator remains unclear, patients should be thought to recognise herpes simplex virus infection and stop application to prevent the spreading of the infection. Herein we report a child with atopic dermatitis who developed Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption during treatment with pimecrolimus because of its rare occurence

  8. Domestic Dog Exposure at birth reduces the Incidence of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sunna; Thyssen, Jacob P; Stokholm, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis is complex and poorly understood, neonatal exposures are important for disease occurrence. However, the effect of dog exposure on the risk of atopic dermatitis is unresolved. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether domestic dog exposure...... affected the risk of atopic dermatitis in children during the first 3 years of life. METHODS: Copenhagen prospective studies on asthma in childhood (COPSAC) are ongoing prospective clinical birth cohort studies. Data from 411 children born to mothers with asthma (COPSAC2000 ), and 700 unselected children...... (COPSAC2010 ) were analyzed following the same protocols at the same research site. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed prospectively according to the Hanifin-Rajka criteria. Parental history of asthma, eczema or rhinitis was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis. In COPSAC2000, maternal specific serum...

  9. Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt; Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life and identify the localization of the early skin lesions that predicts the development of AD. DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of children born to mothers with a history of asthma....... PARTICIPANTS: A total of 411 infants were enrolled in the cohort; 55 had incomplete follow-up and were excluded from certain analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Atopic dermatitis was defined based on the criteria of Hanifin and Rajka, and severity was assessed by the SCORAD (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) index...... best predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention...

  10. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    İjlal Erturan; Evrim Aktepe; Didem Didar Balcı; Mehmet Yıldırım; Yonca Sönmez; Ali Murat Ceyhan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore,...

  11. Corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Leopold, Christine; Arts, Danielle; Fröschl, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Health political background: In developed countries 2.5% of the population - mainly children - are affected by atopic dermatitis. During the past few years its prevalence amongst school children has risen decisively and now lies between 8% to 16%. It is the most frequent chronic skin disease amongst school-aged children. Scientific background: Current methods of treating atopic dermatitis among children focus on containing and preventing the illness’s further progression. Preventing dry skin,...

  12. Food Hypersensitivity in Patients Over 14 Years of Age Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jarmila Čelakovská; Ettler, K; K Ettlerová; J Vaněčková

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hype...

  13. Efficacy and tolerance of tacrolimus and pimecrolimus for atopic dermatitis: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, Jiali; Luo, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Tacrolimus ointment and pimecrolimus cream have proved to be suitable for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. We conducted a meta-analysis of the efficacy, adverse events/withdrawal of tacrolimus versus pimecrolimus in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. According to our meta-analysis, 0.1% tacrolimus was more effective than 1% pimecrolimus in the treatment of adult patients and moderate to very severe pediatric patients, and more 0.1% mild pediatric patients treatal with pimecrolimus withdre...

  14. Kaposi’s Varicelliform Eruption During Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis with Pimecrolimus Cream

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz Canpolat; Hatice Akpınar; Fatma Eskioğlu

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption is a widespread viral infection frequently caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, and less frequently Coxsackie A-16 and vaccinia virus superimposed on a pre-existing dermatosis. It is often associated with atopic dermatitis. The topical immunomodulator pimecrolimus have proven effective in managing atopic dermatitis. Reported adverse effects are infrequent; however, cutaneous infections are potential complications of its application. Kaposi’s varicellif...

  15. Association between filaggrin null mutations and concomitant atopic dermatitis and contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, B C; Thyssen, J P; Menné, T;

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic traits of people with the filaggrin mutation (FLG) genotype and atopic dermatitis (AD) are still under elucidation, and the association with concomitant AD and contact allergy (CA) has not previously been examined.......The phenotypic traits of people with the filaggrin mutation (FLG) genotype and atopic dermatitis (AD) are still under elucidation, and the association with concomitant AD and contact allergy (CA) has not previously been examined....

  16. Relevance of inhalant and food allergens to the etiology and management of patients with atopic dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platts-Mills, T.A.; Mitchell, E.B.; Rowntree, S.; Heymann, P.W.; Chapman, M.D.

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have IgE antibodies to common environmental antigens, both foods and inhalants. Such antibodies are probably relevant and exposure to the corresponding antigens can give rise to eczema. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved and the role of other etiologies, e.g. contact reactions, remain to be elucidated. Patients with atopic dermatitis should have comprehensive evaluations to determine the role of environmental antigens.

  17. Management of atopic dermatitis: safety and efficacy of phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizi A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Patrizi, Beatrice Raone, Giulia Maria RavaioliDepartment of Specialized, Diagnostic and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that can affect all age groups. It is characterized by a relapsing course and a dramatic impact on quality of life for patients. Environmental interventions together with topical devices represent the mainstay of treatment for AD, in particular emollients, corticosteroids, and calcineurin inhibitors. Systemic treatments are reserved for severe cases. Phototherapy represents a valid second-line intervention in those cases where non-pharmacological and topical measures have failed. Different forms of light therapy are available, and have showed varying degrees of beneficial effect against AD: natural sunlight, narrowband (NB-UVB, broadband (BB-UVB, UVA, UVA1, cold-light UVA1, UVA and UVB (UVAB, full-spectrum light (including UVA, infrared and visible light, saltwater bath plus UVB (balneophototherapy, Goeckerman therapy (coal tar plus UVB radiation, psoralen plus UVA (PUVA, and other forms of phototherapy. In particular, UVA1 and NB-UVB have gained importance in recent years. This review illustrates the main trials comparing the efficacy and safety of the different forms of phototherapy. No sufficiently large randomized controlled studies have been performed as yet, and no light modality has been defined as superior to all. Parameters and dosing protocols may vary, although clinicians mainly refer to the indications included in the American Academy of Dermatology psoriasis guidelines devised by Menter et al in 2010. The efficacy of phototherapy (considering all forms in AD has been established in adults and children, as well as for acute (UVA1 and chronic (NB-UVB cases. Its use is suggested with strength of recommendation B and level of evidence II. Home phototherapy can also be performed

  18. 黄膏治疗特应性皮炎患者的效果%Herbal Ointment Improves Troubles in Atopic Dermatitis in Not Only NC/Nga Mice Also Atopic Dermatitis Patients.- Which impressions of the ointments stimulate patients? -

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    日置智津子

    2010-01-01

    @@ Background:A subset of common chronic skin condition demonstrates severe atopic dermatitis that is refractory to conventional treatment with topical steroids.The patients on atopic dermatitis (AD)using the Ou-kou (黄膏;a novel herbal ointment)has been shown improved skin condition and better quality of life (QOL).Objective and Methods:This study aimed to show the effect, in mental and skin conditions, of the administration of Ou- kou on atopic dermatitis patients.

  19. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. OBJECTIVE: Using...

  20. Atopic Manifestations: Dermatitis, Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma in Patients With Hypogammaglobulinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Minoo Dadkhah; Asghar Aghamohammadi; Masoud Movahedi; Mohammad Gharagozlou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most of the hypogammaglobulinemic patients have a clinical history in favor of allergic respiratory disease. Nevertheless, in these patients the importance and prevalence of atopic disorders have not been completely explained. Objectives: This study was aimed to evaluate atopic manifestations (dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma) and pulmonary function in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. ...

  1. Diagnostic Work-up and Treatment of Severe and/or Refractory Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.A. Devillers (Arjan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAtopic dermatitis (AD) or atopic eczema , is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by dry skin, itching and recurrent red and scaly skin lesions. It is a relatively common skin disease with an estimated prevalence of 10-20%. The majority of patients show their first clinical

  2. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy : the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M; Koopman, LP; van Strien, RT; Wijga, A; Smit, HA; Aalberse, RC; Neijens, HJ; Brunekreef, B; Postma, DS; Gerritsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. Objective We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life.

  3. Exposure to cow’s milk as a prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis during the first three months of life

    OpenAIRE

    Putu Ayu Widyanti; Endy P. Prawirohartono; Ketut Dewi Kumara Wati

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of atopic dermatitis has increased in the early life of children. Cow’s milk, the first foreign protein to which infants are exposed, is predicted to be a prognostic factor of atopic dermatitis. Objective To determine if exposure to cow’s milk is a prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis during the first three months of life. Methods We performed a cohort study involving 136 newborns from families with and without histories of atopy in Sanglah Hospital, Denpas...

  4. Lactobacillus reuteri modulates cytokines production in exhaled breath condensate of children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniello, Vito Leonardo; Brunetti, Luigia; Tesse, Riccardina; Natile, Miria; Armenio, Lucio; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2010-05-01

    We measured the concentration of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in the exhaled breath condensate of children with atopic and nonallergic dermatitis receiving a probiotic supplementation (Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730) or placebo for 8 weeks. We demonstrated that the levels of these cytokines increased and decreased respectively only in atopic subjects receiving active treatment. Our data suggest that the oral administration of a specific probiotic strain in patients with atopic dermatitis can modulate in vivo the cytokine pattern at a different site from intestine. PMID:20639717

  5. Canine atopic dermatitis / Dermatite atópica canina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita da Costa Teles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Canine Atopic Dermatitis is a skin disease of genetic origin. The affected dog becomes sensible to antigens presents in the environment, developing a severe alergic, pruriginous reaction, which intervenes in the quality of life of the patient. Because of the genetic character, that is an illness that in most of the times has no cure, just control. The treatment in general is lifetime. Thus, some used drugs, for example the corticosteroides, might cause collateral effects when used for a long time, and might decrease the lifetime of the animals. By this way, the owner of the dog with atopia, must know about the complications of the disease, and occasional return of the clinical signs during the period of treatment. Therefore, this article has an objective of a review about Canine Atopic Dermatitis that is an increasing problem in the small animal practice.A Dermatite Atópica Canina é uma dermatopatia de origem genética. Os cães acometidos tornam-se sensíveis aos antígenos presentes no meio ambiente, desenvolvendo grave reação alérgica, pruriginosa, que interferem na qualidade de vida do paciente. Devido ao seu caráter genético, esta é uma doença que na maioria das vezes não tem cura, apenas controle. O tratamento em geral é vitalício. Assim sendo, algumas drogas utilizadas, a exemplo dos corticosteróides, podem causar efeitos colaterais que em longo prazo, são capazes de diminuir o período de vida do animal. Desta maneira, o proprietário do cão portador de atopia, precisa ser esclarecido em relação às complicações e provável recidiva dos sinais clínicos, durante o período de tratamento. Portanto, presente artigo tem como objetivo uma revisão sobre Dermatite Atópica Canina, que está se tornando um problema crescente na clínica de pequenos animais.

  6. Transplantation of human skin microbiota in models of atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Ian A.; Williams, Kelli W; Reckhow, Jensen D; Jammeh, Momodou L; Pincus, Nathan B; Sastalla, Inka; Saleem, Danial; Stone, Kelly D; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by reduced barrier function, reduced innate immune activation, and susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus. Host susceptibility factors are suggested by monogenic disorders associated with AD-like phenotypes and can be medically modulated. S. aureus contributes to AD pathogenesis and can be mitigated by antibiotics and bleach baths. Recent work has revealed that the skin microbiome differs significantly between healthy controls and patients with AD, including decreased Gram-negative bacteria in AD. However, little is known about the potential therapeutic benefit of microbiome modulation. To evaluate whether parameters of AD pathogenesis are altered after exposure to different culturable Gram-negative bacteria (CGN) collected from human skin, CGN were collected from healthy controls and patients with AD. Then, effects on cellular and culture-based models of immune, epithelial, and bacterial function were evaluated. Representative strains were evaluated in the MC903 mouse model of AD. We found that CGN taken from healthy volunteers but not from patients with AD were associated with enhanced barrier function, innate immunity activation, and control of S. aureus. Treatment with CGN from healthy controls improved outcomes in a mouse model of AD. These findings suggest that a live-biotherapeutic approach may hold promise for treatment of patients with AD.

  7. Recent Improvements in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Akan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a multifactorial skin disease manifested by the interaction between environmental factors, immune system and the genes predisposing to the disease. It affects the quality of life of patients and their family considerably. The prevelance for children is 10-20% in developed countries, while frequency of AD is considered as rising all over the world. According to the studies conducted in our country, the frequency is about 4.9% to 8.1%. Currently, there are two main hypothesis accepted to explain disease pathogenesis; inside-outside and outsideinside hypotheses. However, these are even not able to define the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying AD in all details. In the recent years, genetic studies have revealed significant role of filaggrin gene in the pathogenesis of AD. Further, epidermal barier dysfunction is found to play an important role in the pathogenesis by causing dryness and pruritus in skin and cause predisposition to infections with some viruses and bacteria. In this review, recent data about genetic, immunologic mechanisms and the dysfunction of epidermal barier complex underlying the pathogenesis of AD will be discussed.

  8. The Relationship between Infantile Atopic Dermatitis and Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Farajzadeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common infantile diseases. Immunological dysfunctions in AD patients may predispose them to infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between infantile AD and urinary tract infection (UTI.In this cross sectional study, we enrolled 57 patients with AD aged 1 to 24 months that referred to dermatology clinic, and 57 healthy controls who were referred to pediatric clinic. The groups were matched according to age and gender. Urine samples were collected by clean-voided bag method. If a single organism was cultured at concentration of ≥105 organisms per millimeter and the existence of white blood cells more than 10 per microscopic field was seen the patients underwent suprapubic aspiration. The presence of one organism in suprapubic aspiration sample was regarded as positive culture. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 15 software. P value Infants with AD showed a higher frequency of UTI in this study. So, we suggest screening all AD infants for urinary tract infection.

  9. Acetylation phenotype variation in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi A Majeed Al-Razzuqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been done on the relation between acetylator status and allergic diseases. Aim: To determine any possible association between acetylating phenotype in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and the disease prognosis. Patients and Methods: Thirty-six pediatric patients and forty two healthy children as a control group were participated in the study. All participants received a single oral dose of dapsone of 1.54 mg/kg body weight, after an overnight fast. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, plasma concentrations of dapsone and its metabolite (monoacetyldapsone were estimated to phenotype the participants as slow and rapid acetylators according to their acetylation ratio (ratio of monoacetyldapsone to dapsone. Results: 72.2% of pediatric patients with AD showed slow acetylating status as compared to 69.4% of control individuals. Also, 73% of AD patients with slow acetylating phenotype had familial history of allergy. The severity of AD occurred only in slow acetylator patients. The eczematous lesions in slow acetylators presented mainly in the limbs, while in rapid acetylators, they were found mostly in face and neck. Conclusion: This study shows an association between the N-acetylation phenotype variation and clinical aspects of AD.

  10. Tryptanthrin ameliorates atopic dermatitis through down-regulation of TSLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Moon, Phil-Dong; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-01-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease that greatly worsens quality of life. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a decisive role in the development of AD. The purpose of this study is to examine whether tryptanthrin (TR) would suppress AD through the regulation of TSLP. We analyzed the effect of TR on the level of TSLP from phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells, in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced AD-like skin lesions of NC/Nga mice, and in anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated splenocytes. TR significantly suppressed the level of intracellular calcium and the production and mRNA expression of TSLP through the blockade of receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/nuclear factor-κB pathway in the activated HMC-1 cells. TR also significantly suppressed the levels of histidine decarboxylase and IL-1β. Furthermore, TR ameliorated clinical symptoms in the AD model. TR significantly reduced the levels of TSLP, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-6, TNF-α, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, and caspase-1 in AD skin lesions. Also, TR significantly reduced the serum levels of histamine and IL-4 in the AD model. Finally, TR significantly inhibited the production of IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α from the stimulated splenocytes. Taken together, TR exhibits the potential to be a therapeutic agent for AD through down-regulation of TSLP. PMID:24295961

  11. Multidisciplinary interventions in the management of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBovidge, Jennifer S; Elverson, Wendy; Timmons, Karol G; Hawryluk, Elena B; Rea, Corinna; Lee, Margaret; Schneider, Lynda C

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common pediatric skin disease. AD has a significant effect on patient and family quality of life caused by intense pruritus, sleep disruption, dietary and nutritional concerns, and psychological stress associated with the disease and its management. Multidisciplinary approaches to AD care have been developed in appreciation of the complex interplay among biological, psychological, behavioral, and dietary factors that affect disease control and the wide range of knowledge, skills, and support that patients and families require to effectively manage and cope with this condition. Common components of multidisciplinary treatment approaches include medical evaluation and management by an AD specialist, education and nursing care, psychological and behavioral support, and nutritional assessment and guidance. Models of care include both clinical programs and structured educational groups provided as adjuncts to standard clinical care. Available evidence suggests beneficial effects of multidisciplinary interventions in improving disease severity and quality of life, particularly for patients with moderate-to-severe disease. Additional research is needed to identify the best candidates for the various multidisciplinary approaches and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of these programs. PMID:27497275

  12. [Examination of effectiveness of olopatadine hydrochloride in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tadamichi; Mashiko, Maki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Subjective/objective symptoms (itching, papula, erythema, lichenification, desquamation, scratching, erosion) and the levels of IgE, LDH, interleukin (IL) -6, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) were compared before and after administering olopatadine hydrochloride (ALLELOCK tablets) to 17 atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Subject/objective symptoms improved significantly after administering the agent, and the total dosage of the combined topical steroids was also significantly decreased after administration (p<0.05), although IgE, IL-6 and LDH levels did not change, TARC was significantly decreased (p<0.05). The correlation between the levels of IgE, IL-6, LDH and TARC before and after the administration was examined. There was a positive correlation between IgE and TARC (r=0.62, p<0.01) and between IL-6 and TARC (r=0.78, p<0.01). Olopatadine hydrochloride is therefore useful in improving the symptoms in AD, and TARC may be used as an indicator of the symptom improvement. PMID:15864020

  13. A review on the role of moisturizers for atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Adelaide Ann; Dizon, Maria Victoria; Van Bever, Hugo; Tiongco-Recto, Marysia; Kim, Kyu-Han; Soebono, Hardyanto; Munasir, Zakiudin; Diana, Inne Arline; Luk, David Chi Kang

    2016-01-01

    Effective management of atopic dermatitis (AD) involves the treatment of a defective skin barrier. Patients with AD are therefore advised to use moisturizers regularly. To date, there are few comparative studies involving moisturizers in patients with AD, and no classification system exists to objectively determine which types of moisturizers are best suited to specific AD phenotypes. With this in mind, a group of experts from allergy and immunology, adult and pediatric dermatology, and pediatrics centers within Southeast Asia met to review current data and practice, and to develop recommendations regarding the use of moisturizers in patients with AD within the Asia-Pacific region. Chronicity and severity of AD, along with patient age, treatment compliance, and economic background should all be taken into account when selecting an appropriate moisturizer for AD patients. Other considerations include adjuvant properties of the product, cosmetic acceptability, and availability over the counter. Well-defined clinical phenotypes of AD could optimally benefit from specific moisturizers. It is hoped that future studies may identify such differences by means of filaggrin mutation subtypes, confocal microscopic evaluation, pH, transepidermal water loss or presence of allergy specific IgE. Recommendations to improve the regular use of moisturizers among AD patients include measures that focus on treatment compliance, patient and caregiver education, appropriate treatment goals, avoidance of sensitizing agents, and collaboration with other relevant specialists. PMID:27141486

  14. Serum levels of soluble CD30 in adult patients affected by atopic dermatitis and its relation to age, duration of disease and Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Di Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The value of CD30 and the soluble circulating fragment of CD30 (sCD30 for atopic dermatitis (AD remains unclear. In particular, little is known about the effects of age, duration of disease and Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index (SCORAD on the levels of serum sCD30 in patients affected by AD. In the present study, we have analysed serum sCD30 levels of adult patients affected by AD. The study's population includes 18 non-smoking outpatients, with a diagnosis of AD. As a control group we studied 18 non-atopic subjects from laboratory staff, matched for sex and age. These subjects had no history of AD, urticaria or seasonal or perennial rhinitis or asthma, and had negative skin prick test to a panel of allergens.

  15. Acute Pustular Dermatosis, Following Topical Treatment With Pimecrolimus, in a Child Affected With Atopic and Contact Hand Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Brazzelli, Valeria; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is considered an important risk factor for chronic hand dermatitis, which can be seen in children too. Pimecrolimus cream 1% is approved to treat atopic dermatitis in children aged 2 years or older. In adults, this drug has been used for some clinical indications other than atopic dermatitis, such as chronic hand dermatitis. Here, we describe an adverse drug reaction in a 2-year-old child affected with atopic dermatitis, who was treated with topical pimecrolimus in order to ameliorate her concomitant hand dermatitis. The use of topical pimecrolimus led to a previously undescribed hand pustular dermatosis, being consistent with a form of pustular leukocytoclastic vasculitis, which required the permanent discontinuation of topical pimecrolimus. PMID:26997932

  16. Interventions to Increase Treatment Adherence in Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria M. Bass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor adherence to treatment is a major factor limiting treatment outcomes in patients with atopic dermatitis. The purpose of our systematic review is to identify techniques that have been tested to increase treatment adherence in atopic dermatitis. A MEDLINE search was performed for clinical trials focusing on interventions used to increase adherence in atopic dermatitis. Four articles were retrieved. References of these studies were analyzed yielding three more trials. The seven results were evaluated by comparing the intervention used to improve adherence, how adherence was assessed, and the outcome of the intervention tested. Different approaches to increase adherence such as written eczema action plans, educational workshops, extra office visits, and use of an atopic dermatitis educator were evaluated. All interventions increased adherence rates or decreased severity in patients, except for two. The MEDLINE search yielded limited results due to a lack of studies conducted specifically for atopic dermatitis and adherence was measured using different methods making the studies difficult to compare. Interventions including patient education, eczema action plans, and a quick return for a follow-up visit improve adherence, but based on the lack of clinical trials, developing new techniques to improve adherence could be as valuable as developing new treatments.

  17. Topical calcineurin inhibitors in the treatment of atopic dermatitis - an update on safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin disorder whose management is complex. Topical corticosteroids have been the mainstay of atopic dermatitis treatment for more than 50 years but have multiple side effects. Topical calcineurin inhibitors including tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are safe and efficacious in atopic dermatitis. In 2005 the FDA issued "black box" warnings for pimecrolimus cream and tacrolimus ointment because of potential safety risks, including skin cancers and lymphomas. However, these concerns are not supported by current data. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are particularly indicated for treating patients with atopic dermatitis in whom topical corticosteroid therapy cannot be employed or may cause irreversible side effects. They can be used advantageously in problem zones. A novel regimen of proactive treatment has been shown to prevent, delay and reduce exacerbations of atopic dermatitis. Therapy with topical calcineurin inhibitors should be managed by an experienced specialist and each patient should receive proper education on how to use them and what possible unwanted effects may be expected. PMID:21974750

  18. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  19. Pattern of contact sensitization in patients with and without atopic dermatitis in a hospital-based clinical database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Agner, Tove

    2014-01-01

    patch test reactions in patients with and without atopic dermatitis in a patch test cohort, and explored the influence of disease severity. PATIENTS/MATERIALS/METHODS: Patch test results, information on atopic dermatitis and demographic variables were taken from a database, including all patients patch...

  20. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Skin Microbiome and Association with Microenvironment and Treatment in Canine Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Charles W; Morris, Daniel O; Rankin, Shelley C; Cain, Christine L; Misic, Ana M; Houser, Timothy; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Host-microbe interactions may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by universal colonization with Staphylococcus species. To examine the relationship between epidermal barrier function and the cutaneous microbiota in atopic dermatitis, this study used a spontaneous model of canine atopic dermatitis. In a cohort of 14 dogs with canine atopic dermatitis, the skin microbiota were longitudinally evaluated with parallel assessment of skin barrier function at disease flare, during antimicrobial therapy, and post-therapy. Sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene showed decreased bacterial diversity and increased proportions of Staphylococcus (S. pseudintermedius in particular) and Corynebacterium species compared with a cohort of healthy control dogs (n = 16). Treatment restored bacterial diversity with decreased proportions of Staphylococcus species, concurrent with decreased canine atopic dermatitis severity. Skin barrier function, as measured by corneometry, pH, and transepidermal water loss also normalized with treatment. Bacterial diversity correlated with transepidermal water loss and pH level but not with corneometry results. These findings provide insights into the relationship between the cutaneous microbiome and skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis, show the impact of antimicrobial therapy on the skin microbiome, and highlight the utility of canine atopic dermatitis as a spontaneous nonrodent model of atopic dermatitis. PMID:26854488

  1. Which plant for which skin disease? Part 1: Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condyloma and herpes simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Juliane; Wölfle, Ute; Weckesser, Steffi; Schempp, Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Plant extracts and isolated compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics and food supplements to improve skin conditions. We first introduce the positive plant monographs with dermatological relevance of the former German Commission E. Subsequently clinical studies with botanicals for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condylomata acuminata and herpes simplex are discussed. The best studies have been conducted with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Mahonia aquifolium, Hypericum perforatum, Glycyrrhiza glabra and certain traditional Chinese therapies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Mahonia aquifolium, Indigo naturalis and Capsicum frutescens are effective treatments for psoriasis. Green tea extract and tea tree oil have been investigated in the treatment of acne. Podophyllin and green tea extract are effective treatments for condylomata acuminata. Balm mint and a combination of sage and rhubarb have been shown to be effective in the treatment of herpes simplex in proof of concept studies. PMID:20707875

  2. Xerosis is associated with asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Linneberg, Allan René; Thuesen, B H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidermal filaggrin deficiency due to common filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations causes xerosis and strongly increases the risk of atopic dermatitis and even asthma. However, it is unknown whether xerosis independent of FLG mutations could also increase the risk of asthma. OBJECTIVE: To...... evaluate whether generalized xerosis was associated with asthma, independent of atopic dermatitis and common FLG mutations in a cross-sectional study on adult Danes. METHODS: A total of 3396 adults from the general population participated in a health examination. Lung function and serum-specific IgE levels...... association was observed between xerosis and 'allergic asthma' in men (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.08-4.19). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between xerosis and asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations. Both facilitated allergen sensitization and secondary degradation of...

  3. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...... SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr...

  4. The importance of vehicle properties to patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trookman, Nathan S; Rizer, Ronald L; Ho, Elizabeth T; Ford, Rosanne O; Gotz, Vincent

    2011-07-01

    The properties of vehicle formulations may influence drug delivery, efficacy, and tolerance profiles of topical medications. Patient preferences vary and the importance of certain aesthetic attributes depend on the disease state, the site of application, and the length and extent of treatment, among other factors. Formulations that offer aesthetic advantages over traditional vehicles may improve patients' willingness to apply therapy as directed and therefore may affect the outcome of treatment. A participant preference study was conducted to determine if an aqueous gel (hydrogel) formulation of desonide would appeal to patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Before treatment adult participants with AD completed a questionnaire to assess their AD history and prior topical treatments and to rate the importance of topical vehicle attributes. Each participant then applied desonide hydrogel 0.05% to affected areas twice daily for 4 weeks. At the end of the treatment, participants were queried on the attributes of desonide hydrogel and how it compared with other vehicles previously used. Twenty-two participants with mild to moderate AD completed the study; 100% (22/22) of participants found desonide hydrogel to be easy to apply/use/spread, easy to use on hair-bearing skin, comfortable to use under makeup and/or cosmetics, suitable for use on multiple body areas, and stain free. Most participants reported that the product was soothing (82% [18/22]), did not dry the skin (96% [21/22]), disappeared quickly (82% [18/22]), was comfortable to wear under clothes (91% [20/22]), and was not greasy or shiny on skin (96% [21/22]). PMID:21919229

  5. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children’s development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child’s problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother–child attachment. The child’s AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. PMID:27499642

  6. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children's development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child's problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother-child attachment. The child's AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. PMID:27499642

  7. Topical calcineurin inhibitors for atopic dermatitis: review and treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Warner W

    2013-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease commonly affecting children and managed by pediatricians, primary care physicians, allergists, and dermatologists alike. For many years, the only available topical pharmacological treatment was topical corticosteroids. This changed in 2000-2001, when topical formulations of two calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus) were approved for short-term or chronic intermittent treatment of AD in patients ≥ 2 years of age, in whom other treatments have been ineffective or contraindicated. These topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) quickly became a popular treatment option due at least in part to concerns over adverse events associated with prolonged topical corticosteroid use, especially in children. However, based on theoretical concerns about a possible risk of lymphoma associated with TCI use, a Boxed Warning was placed on both products in 2006. Since then, despite an extensive body of evidence, no causal relationship has been demonstrated between TCI use and an increased risk of lymphoma; however, the US FDA has concluded that a link cannot be ruled out. In fact, based on post-marketing surveillance of spontaneous, literature, and solicited reports, we report here that the lymphoma incidence in the topical pimecrolimus-exposed population is up to approximately 54-fold less than that seen in the general US population. This review summarizes the mechanism of action of TCIs, the factors that prompted the Boxed Warning, and recent TCI safety and efficacy data. Based on these data, both topical corticosteroids and TCIs should have defined roles in AD management, with TCIs favored for sensitive skin areas (e.g., face) and instances where topical corticosteroids have proven ineffective, thereby minimizing the risk of adverse effects with both drug classes. PMID:23549982

  8. Atopic Dermatitis: Clinical Connotations, Especially a Focus on Concomitant Atopic Undertones in Immunocompromised/Susceptible Genetic and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Chatterjee, Kingshuk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an intriguing clinical entity. Its clinical connotations are varied, the updates of which are required to be done periodically. An attempt to bring its various facets have been made highlighting its clinical features keeping in view the major and the minor criteria to facilitate the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, complications, and associated dermatoses. The benefit of the current dissertation may percolate to the trainees in dermatology, in addition to revelations that atopic undertones in genetic susceptibility and metabolic disorder may provide substantive insight for the future in the understanding of thus far enigmatic etiopathogenesis of AD. PMID:27293243

  9. Severity of atopic dermatitis and Ascaris lumbricoides infection: an evaluation of CCR4+ and CXCR3+ helper T cell frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Nascimento Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ascaris lumbricoides-infected patients present lower prevalence of severe atopic dermatitis. METHODS: Peripheral blood of infected children with atopic dermatitis was assessed by flow cytometry of the frequency of Th1 and Th2 cells through the expression of CXCR3 and CCR4 chemokine receptors, respectively. RESULTS: Helminth-free patients with atopic dermatitis presented a high frequency of CCR4+Th2 cells. Parasitized patients with atopic dermatitis showed a lower frequency of CXCR3+Th1 cells compared to infected individuals only. CONCLUSIONS: Ascariasis modifies the blood traffic of Th2 cells in atopic dermatitis patients, while the allergic disease down-regulates the traffic of Th1 cells in parasitized patients.

  10. Evaluation of Candida Colonization and Specific Humoral Responses against Candida albicans in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaffari Javad; Mehdi Taheri Sarvtin; Mohammad Taghi Hedayati; Zohreh Hajheydari; Jamshid Yazdani; Tahereh Shokohi 2

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the candidal colonization and specific humoral responses against Candida albicans in patients with atopic dermatitis. One hundred patients with atopic dermatitis and 50 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Skin and oral specimens from all participants were cultured on CHROMagar Candida medium. Isolated yeasts were identified by using the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. ELISA was used for detection of IgM, IgA, and IgG antibodie...

  11. Efficacy of Pimecrolimus 1% Cream in Various Clinical Forms of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru İkizler; Ercan Karabacak; Özlem Karabudak; Bilal Doğan

    2010-01-01

    Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis shows some different clinical appearances.The main aim of this experimental study is to compare the efficacy of pimecrolimus among these clinical subgoups of atopic dermatitis. Material and Method: A total of 70 patients, 50 male and 20 female, aged between 2-38 years were included in the study. Twenty-two patients (%31.4) were pediatric (2-10 years). Patients were investigated in regard to high levels of total IgE, airway allergy, positive skin prick ...

  12. Antipruritic application of ovocystatin in atopic dermatitis in dogs - preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popiel Jarosław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was an attempt to determine the possibilities of using ovocystatin, a component of a new generation product of natural origin, in local therapy of atopic dermatitis in dogs by suppressing pruritus during illness. Chicken egg cystatin was used locally in the interdigital spaces of forelimbs of dogs used in the experiment. The degree of pruritus and clinical changes in the animals were defined using CADESI-03 scale before and after the beginning of the experiment. The results obtained proved that ovocystatin may be used as a substance suppressing pruritus in atopic dermatitis.

  13. Effects of oral vitamin E on treatment of atopic dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Jaffary; Gita Faghihi; Arghavan Mokhtarian; Sayed Mohsen Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) remains to be determined; recently a possible change in the immune system with production of immunoglobulins is proposed. As vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, with the ability to decrease the serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in atopic patients, we aimed to evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E on treatment of AD. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised seventy participants with mild-...

  14. Update on Atopic Dermatitis%异位性皮炎研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘小钢; 毛舒和

    2002-01-01

    @@ 异位性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,AD)又名异位性湿疹(atopic eczama),特征为具有遗传过敏性湿疹临床表现,常伴哮喘、枯草热、过敏性皮炎湿疹的家族倾向,对异种蛋白质过敏,血清中IgE值高,血液中嗜酸性粒细胞增多.

  15. Canine and Human Atopic Dermatitis: Two Faces of the Same Host-Microbe Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Domenico; Rodrigues Hoffmann, Aline

    2016-06-01

    Host-microbe interaction has been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The dog has been shown to be the best model to study both pathogenesis and microbiome modifications in atopic dermatitis. Bradley et al. show a significant correlation between microbiome diversity, clinical signs, and skin barrier function in atopic dogs before, during, and after antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27212648

  16. Common loss-of-function variants of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin are a major predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Colin N A; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana;

    2006-01-01

    Atopic disease, including atopic dermatitis (eczema), allergy and asthma, has increased in frequency in recent decades and now affects approximately 20% of the population in the developed world. Twin and family studies have shown that predisposition to atopic disease is highly heritable. Although...

  17. Cost of care of atopic dermatitis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common dermatologic condition with a prevalence varying from 5% to 15%, and it has been rising over time. Several studies from developed countries have revealed the substantial economic burden of AD on health care budgets. There has been no research however on the cost of care of AD from India a country where health care is self-funded with no health insurance or social security provided by the government. Aim: The aim of our study was to assess prospectively the cost of care of AD in children in an outpatient hospital setting in India. Methods: A total of 40 children with AD, <10 years of age, registered in the pediatric dermatology clinic at our institute were enrolled for the study. All patients were followed-up for 6 months. Demographic information, clinical profile, severity, and the extent of AD were recorded in predesigned performa. Caregivers were asked to fill up a cost assessment questionnaire specially designed for the study. It had a provision for measuring direct, indirect, and provider costs. Results: Of the 40 patients, 37 completed the study. Mean total cost for AD was Rs. 6235.00 ± 3514.00. Direct caregiver cost was Rs. 3022.00 ± 1620.00 of which treatment cost constituted 77.2 ± 11.1%. The total provider cost (cost of consultation, nursing/paramedical staff and infrastructure was Rs. 948.00, which was 15.2% of the total cost of care and the mean indirect cost calculated by adding loss of earnings of parents due to hospital visits was Rs. 2264.00 ± 2392.00 (range: 0-13,332. The mean total cost depending on the severity of AD was Rs. 3579.00 ± 948.00, Rs. 6806.00 ± 3676.00 and Rs. 8991.00 ± 3129.00 for mild, moderate and severe disease, respectively. Conclusions: AD causes a considerable drain on the financial resources of families in India since the treatment is mostly self-funded. Cost of care of AD is high and comparable to those of chronic physical illness, such as diabetes

  18. Differential effects of risk factors on infant wheeze and atopic dermatitis emphasize a different etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Jacob B; Petersen, Janne;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) often develops in infancy as the first manifestation of the atopic phenotype. Wheezing is also common in infancy, but it is less clear whether infant wheezing should be considered as an atopic phenotype. If infant wheeze and AD share a common aetiology, this would...... indicate that infant wheezing is an atopic phenotype. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether potential risk factors for infant wheeze and AD have similar effects on these 2 phenotypes, indicating a common etiology. METHODS: A total of 34.793 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were......-feeding, number of older siblings, day care attendance, and pets in the home. CONCLUSION: The majority of risk factors had differential effects on infant wheeze and AD indicative of a different etiology. Infant wheezing does not seem to be etiologically linked to the epidemic of atopic disease, and infant...

  19. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Gives Insight into Opposing Genetic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D.; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A.E.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Morris, Derek W.; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M.; Novak, Natalija; O’Regan, Grainne M.; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E.; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C.; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T.; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J.; Brown, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21–22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features. PMID:25574825

  20. RNA sequencing atopic dermatitis transcriptome profiling provides insights into novel disease mechanisms with potential therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Ewald, David Adrian; Rozenblit, Mariya; Gonzalez, Juana; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Peng, Xiangyu; Estrada, Yeriel D.; Dillon, Stacey; Krueger, James G.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes. These li...

  1. Dietary nucleotide and nucleoside exposure in infancy and atopic dermatitis, recurrent wheeze, and allergic sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, M.J.C.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Theunisz, E.H.; Ewalds, D.; Thijs, C.; Mommers, M.; Arts, I.C.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that early life exposure to nucleotides and nucleosides lowers the risk of recurrent wheeze, atopic dermatitis, and allergic sensitization among n = 429 children. Concentrations in breast milk were established by high-performance liquid chromatography; concentrations in formula milks

  2. Food hypersensitivity in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Čelakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5 years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%, no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%. Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients, tomatoes (in 20%, and kiwi (in 17, 5%, apples and spices (in 16%, tangerines and oranges (in 15%, capsicum (in 13%, fishes (in 12%, celery (in 9%, and chocolate (in 7%. Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen-associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  3. Neonatal risk factors of atopic dermatitis in Denmark - results from a nationwide register based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Andersen, Yuki Maria Fukuda; Gislason, Gunnar;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Studies have suggested that several perinatal factors may influence the risk of AD in early childhood. We investigated possible neonatal risk factors such as jaundice, blue light...

  4. Intensive patient education and treatment program for young adults with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Span, L; Jaspers, JPC; Fidler, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Background and Objective. By means of a 2-week intensive multidisciplinary training & treatment course in small groups (ISBP), young adults with atopic dermatitis may be able to achieve better self-management of their disease and reduce their number of doctor visits. Methods. Patients aged 18-35 wit

  5. Linkage of atopic dermatitis to chromosomes 4q22, 3p24 and 3q21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Møller-Larsen, Steffen; Nyegaard, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, itchy skin disease of complex inheritance characterized by dermal and epidermal inflammation. The heritability is considerable and well documented. To date, four genome scans have examined the AD phenotype, showing replicated linkage at 3p26-22, 3q13-21 and 18q11...

  6. Systemic sensitization with the protein allergen ovalbumin augments local sensitization in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Yoo,1 Anne M Manicone,2 John K McGuire,3 Ying Wang,2 William C Parks2 1Center for Lung Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Mouse models of atopic dermatitis based on epicutaneous sensitization have shed light on the role of epicutaneous allergen entry in the development of respiratory and gastrointestinal allergy. However, the contribution of non-cutaneous modes of sensitization to skin diseases has not been evaluated. We assessed if systemic ovalbumin administration, in conjunction with local sensitization, could prime for a robust inflammatory response. Furthermore, we attempted to elucidate important aspects of disease pathogenesis previously unaddressed in mouse models. Mice that underwent intraperitoneal ovalbumin sensitization prior to epicutaneous challenge demonstrated an acute (Th2-polarized atopic dermatitis-like phenotype upon local challenge. The inflammatory response was strikingly more robust than in mice that underwent epicutaneous sensitization alone. The lesional infiltrate contained a dendritic cell population that corresponded phenotypically with inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells of significance in human disease. Finally, in accordance with observations in human atopic dermatitis, there was an increase in cluster of differentiation (CD 103 (αE subunit-expressing CD4+ T lymphocytes. However, the absence of CD103 on approximately 50% of infiltrating cells argues against a primary role for the αEβ7 integrin in tissue homing. In conclusion, we present a mouse model of atopic dermatitis that reveals novel insights into the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, mouse model, ovalbumin, sensitization, Th2, dendritic cells

  7. Clinical and immunological effects of a forest trip in children with asthma and atopic dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Chul Seo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma and atopic dermatitis are common allergic diseases, and their prevalence has increased in urban children. Recently, it is becoming understood that forest environment has favorable health effects in patients with chronic diseases. To investigate favorable clinical and immunologic effects of forest, we examined changes in clinical symptoms, indirect airway inflammatory marker, and serum chemokines before and after a short-term forest trip. The forest trips were performed with 21 children with asthma and 27 children with atopic dermatitis. All participating children were living in air polluted urban inner-city. We measured spirometry and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO in children with asthma and measured scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD index and Thymus and Activation-Regulated Chemokine (TARC/CCL17 and Macrophage-Derived Chemokine (MDC/CCL22 levels in children with atopic dermatitis before and after the forest trip. Indoor air pollutants such as indoor mold, particulate matter 10 (PM10 and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs of each child's home and the accommodations within forest were measured. A significant increase in forced vital capacity (FVC and a significant decrease in FeNO were observed after the forest trip in children with asthma. SCORAD indices and MDC/CCL22 levels were significantly decreased after the forest trip in children with atopic dermatitis. Airborne mold and PM10 levels in indoor were significantly lower in the forest accommodations than those of children's homes; however, TVOC levels were not different between the two measured sites. Short-term exposure to forest environment may have clinical and immunological effects in children with allergic diseases who were living in the urban community.

  8. Effect of standard medication on quality of life of patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Makoto; Harada, Shotaro

    2007-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis present with debilitating symptoms, including pruritus and subsequent excoriation, which significantly reduces their quality of life (QOL). At present, the standard therapy for atopic dermatitis constitutes a topical steroid and/or a topical immunomodulator, an emollient and an oral antihistamine, although few studies have reported the effect of this treatment regimen on QOL. The current study aimed to verify the efficacy of the standard therapy for both clinical symptom severity and patient QOL, assessed using the validated Skindex-16 questionnaire. Atopic dermatitis patients receiving the standard therapy (n=771) were enrolled in the current phase IV, multicenter, 12-week, open-label study. The Rajka and Langeland scale (used to rate the severity of atopic dermatitis symptoms) and the Skindex-16 QOL questionnaire were completed at weeks 0 (baseline), 4 and 12. Of 415 patients completing the questionnaire at all time points (per-protocol population), 95.2% were prescribed the antihistamine fexofenadine HCl 60 mg. There were significant improvements in symptoms, emotions and functioning scale scores at weeks 4 and 12 compared with baseline (PSkindex-16, improved over the treatment period (score decreased by >or=1 and >or=2 in 75.2% and 50.9% of patients, respectively). Significant (P<0.005) improvements from baseline in global scores were also observed at weeks 4 and 12, and for week 12 compared with week 4. Severity scores improved significantly (P<0.005) from weeks 0-4 and from weeks 4-12. The standard therapy was generally well tolerated with only mild adverse events reported (0.5%). These data suggest that patients with atopic dermatitis and associated pruritus experience significant improvements in both symptom severity and QOL when receiving standard therapy. PMID:17204095

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei;

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16......(-8)). We also replicated association with the FLG locus and with two recently identified association signals at 11q13.5 (rs7927894; P = 0.008) and 20q13.33 (rs6010620; P = 0.002). Our results underline the importance of both epidermal barrier function and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis...

  10. Evaluation of severity and therapy in children with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolkerstorfer, Albert

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAtopic dennatitis (AD) is a conUllon chronically relapsing skin disorder affecting 9-20% of those born after 1970 [Schultz Larsen 1993]. TI,e aetiology is still not entirely elucidated and research is complicated by the multifactorial nature of the disease. Both genetical and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of AD. The prevalence of atopic dennatitis seems to have increased along with astluna and allergic rhinitis during the past three decades [Williams 1992,...

  11. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis in a murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hyun-Mee [Bio-Materials Research Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soyoung [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Woo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412 (Korea, Republic of); Khang, Dongwoo [School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, Woo Song [Bio-Materials Research Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Mun-Chual, E-mail: rho-m@kribb.re.kr [Bio-Materials Research Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Hyun, E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are common allergic and inflammatory skin diseases caused by a combination of eczema, scratching, pruritus, and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. This paper examines whether oleanolic acid acetate (OAA) modulates AD and ACD symptoms by using an existing AD model based on the repeated local exposure of mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to the ears of BALB/c mice. In addition, the paper uses a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-sensitized local lymph node assay (LLNA) for the ACD model. The oral administration of OAA over a four-week period attenuated AD symptoms in terms of decreased skin lesions, epidermal thickness, the infiltration of immune cells (CD4{sup +} cells, eosinophils, and mast cells), and serum IgE, IgG2a, and histamine levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th22 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the lymph node and ear tissue, and the LLNA verified that OAA suppressed ACD. The oral administration of OAA over a three-day period attenuated ACD symptoms in terms of ear thickness, lymphocyte proliferation, and serum IgG2a levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the thymus and ear tissue. Finally, to define the underlying mechanism, this paper uses a TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) model. OAA inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the downregulation of NF-κB and MAPKs in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results indicate that OAA inhibited AD and ACD symptoms, suggesting that OAA may be effective in treating allergic skin disorders. - Highlights: • OAA reduced both acute and chronic AD symptoms. • OAA had a controlling effect on the immune reaction for ACD. • The effect of OAA on allergic skin disorders was comparable to the cyclosporine A. • OAA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic skin disorders.

  12. Catecholamines levels and parotid secretion in children with chronic atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, H; Armando, I; Tumilasci, O; Levin, G; Massimo, J; Barontini, M; Perec, C

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo state of both branches of the autonomic nervous system in children with chronic atopic dermatitis. In 15 patients, age 4 to 11, the following parameters were analyzed: (1) basal plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine; (2) poststimulation (standing and i.v. furosemide administration); (3) basal urinary excretion of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vainillin mandelic acid; (4) 30 min postfurosemide administration; (5) parotid secretory response to intraoral 0.1 m citric acid: flow rate, saliva pH, and concentrations of bicarbonate, chlorides, inorganic phosphates, total protein, and amylase activity. No differences in plasma and urinary basal levels of the catecholamines were observed. In response to standing, plasma norepinephrine from atopic children showed a greater increase than that seen in normal healthy children. From the salivary factors studied, no differences were found in parotid flow-rate, bicarbonates, chlorides, and inorganic phosphates. Protein concentration as well as amylase activity were significantly decreased in children with atopic dermatitis. These findings suggest that in atopic dermatitis, the beta-sympathetic mediated responses are impaired; on the other hand, parasympathetic mediated responses remain preserved. PMID:7086169

  13. Exposure to cow’s milk as a prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis during the first three months of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Ayu Widyanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of atopic dermatitis has increased in the early life of children. Cow’s milk, the first foreign protein to which infants are exposed, is predicted to be a prognostic factor of atopic dermatitis. Objective To determine if exposure to cow’s milk is a prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis during the first three months of life. Methods We performed a cohort study involving 136 newborns from families with and without histories of atopy in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, between April to August 2012. Subjects were allocated into 2 groups, those who were exposed to cow’s milk (n=68 and not exposed to cow’s milk (n=68. We analyzed the impact of several possible prognostic variables on atopic dermatitis at 3 months of age including exposure to cow’s milk, birth weight, sex, gestational age, exposure to cigarette smoke, early solid feeding, and history of atopy in the mother, the father, or both, as well as maternal consumption of chicken eggs when nursing. Data were analyzed with Cox’s proportional hazard function. The cumulative incidence and incidence rate in each group were calculated. Results Exposure to cow’s milk in the first 3 months of life resulted in a cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis of 17.6%, with an incidence rate of atopic dermatitis of 54.5%. However, multivariate analysis showed that cow’s milk exposure was not a significant prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis (HR 1.37; 95%CI 0.22 to 8.43. Conclusion Cow’s milk exposure is not a prognostic factor of atopic dermatitis during the first three months of life.[Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:28-34.].

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study from South India

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Jagadeesan; George Kurien; Manjula Velikkakathu Divakaran; Sadeep Melethil Sadanandan; K Sobhanakumari; Sarin, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in atopic dermatitis is little studied but has therapeutic implications. It may have a role in disease severity given the additional virulence factors associated. Aims: Our aims were to record the proportion of patients with MRSA colonization in atopic dermatitis and to ascertain if any association exists between MRSA colonization and disease severity. Methods: An observational cross-sectional study involving child...

  15. Patient-Oriented SCORAD (PO-SCORAD): a new self-assessment scale in atopic dermatitis validated in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stalder, J-F; Barbarot, S; Wollenberg, A;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROund: Patient-oriented medicine is an emerging concept, encouraged by the World Health Organization, to greater involvement of the patient in the management of chronic diseases. The Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD) index is a self-assessment score allowing the patient to...... comprehensively evaluate the actual course of atopic dermatitis (AD), using subjective and objective criteria derived mainly from the SCORAD, a validated AD severity clinical assessment tool....

  16. Quality of life measures in Italian children with atopic dermatitis and their families

    OpenAIRE

    Monti Fiorella; Agostini Francesca; Gobbi Francesca; Neri Erica; Schianchi Sandra; Arcangeli Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The impact of atopic dermatitis (AD) on children's quality of life (QoL) in US and European countries is relatively well known, though rarely evaluated in the Italian population. Moreover, the association between child age and QoL has not been enough investigated, even though few studies detected a worse QoL in youngest AD children. The aim of the study was to evaluate the QoL in an Italian sample of atopic children and their families, also exploring a possible association...

  17. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile And Factors Affecting Severity Of Atopic Dermatitis In North Indian Chilldren

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar Rashmi; Kanwar Amrinder J

    2004-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing dermatitis commonly affecting children. Various epidemiologic factors and clinical patterns of the same were evaluated in 125 patients out of 418 attending the pediatric dermatology clinic over a period of 11/2 years. Of these, 26 were infants (upto 1 year of age) and 99 were children. Mean duration of the disease in the infantile group was 3 months while in the childhood group it was 6 years. In the infantile group, family history of atopy was f...

  18. Evaluation of severity and therapy in children with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wolkerstorfer (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAtopic dennatitis (AD) is a conUllon chronically relapsing skin disorder affecting 9-20% of those born after 1970 [Schultz Larsen 1993]. TI,e aetiology is still not entirely elucidated and research is complicated by the multifactorial nature of the disease. Both genetical and environment

  19. Diet in dermatology: Part I. Atopic dermatitis, acne, and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsnick, Tara; Murzaku, Era Caterina; Rao, Babar K

    2014-12-01

    Patients commonly inquire about dietary modifications as a means to prevent or manage skin disease. Answering these questions is often challenging, given the vast and conflicting evidence that exists on this topic. This 2-part continuing medical education article summarizes the evidence to date to enable physicians to answer patients' questions in an evidence-based manner. Part I includes atopic dermatitis, acne, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. The role of dietary supplementation, dietary exclusion, food allergy, maternal diet, and breastfeeding in the development and/or prevention of atopic dermatitis is summarized. The dermatoendocrinologic mechanism for the effects of glycemic index/glycemic load and milk on acne is described, as well as related clinical evidence for dietary modifications. Finally, evidence and recommendations for restriction or supplementation of dietary factors in the prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancer, including fat, vitamins A, C, D, and E, and selenium, are reported. PMID:25454036

  20. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens......, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...... SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr...

  1. Preparation of hydrogels for atopic dermatitis containing natural herbal extracts by gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; An, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hae-Kyoung [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Hye [AMOTECH Co., Ltd., Kimpo-City, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Min-Ho; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Shin, Junhwa [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Young-Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ycnho@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a familial and chronic inflammatory pruritic skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults in industrialized countries. It is known that one of the prominent features of AD and chronic pruritus is partially due to the histamine released from mast cell. In this work, hydrogel patches with natural herbal extracts were prepared by 'freezing and thawing', and a gamma irradiation. It showed eminent healing results as a consequence of long-term moisturizing effects and natural herbal extracts on atopic wounds. Besides its non-toxicity and human harmlessness, it can be easily attached to or detached from the skin without any trace and help patients to feel refreshment when attached. Based on this work, the hydrogel patches we made can be potentially used as an alternative remedy for not only pruritus in AD, but other dermatitis.

  2. Topical Tacrolimus versus Hydrocortisone on Atopic Dermatitis in Paediatric Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M F; Nandi, A K; Kabir, S; Kamal, M; Basher, M S; Banu, L A

    2015-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease in early childhood. Atopic dermatitis is familial disease, often coexists with other atopic diseases with multiple risk factors associated with atopic eczema. The disease is more frequent in urban areas compared with rural areas. Changes in nutrition and a decrease in infant breast-feeding and respiratory allergies are contributory factors for the condition. A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was carried to compare the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus ointment with a topical corticosteroid reference therapy. A total 60 patients aged between 2 to 10 years, having atopic dermatitis for at least one year and comply Hanifin-Rajka criteria were selected using random number table and allocated into study and control groups through randomization. Study group was treated with topical Tacrolimus 0.03% twice daily for three weeks, while the control group was treated with 1% Hydrocortisone acetate for the same period. Both groups had a washed out phase for 2 weeks with a follow up period of 6 weeks. Eczema Area and Severity lndex (EASI) was assessed at baseline and three weeks after treatment. Efficacy was evaluated at each visit by six clinical signs of atopic dermatitis through measurement of the affected surface area and the EASI score in each of four body regions. Before intervention, in study group mean EASI score was 11.29 with a SD of 2.14, while in control group it was 11.05 with a SD of 2.46. Difference was statistically insignificant (p>0.05). At the end of the treatment, in study group mean EASI score was 4.86 with a SD of 1.01, while in control group it was 7.97 with a SD of 1.80. Statistically high significant difference was observed between EASI scores of two groups before and after the treatment (pHydrocortisone, median reduction of EASI score was 27.16. Difference was highly significant (p<0.001). It is evidenced that Tacrolimus ointment (0.03%) acts as an effective as well as safe non

  3. An Educational Program That Contributes to Improved Patient and Parental Understanding of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Ji Yeon; Kim, Do Won; Park, Chun Wook; Seo, Seong Jun; Park, Young Lip; Lee, Jong Rok; Kim, Moon Bum; Kim, Kyu Han; Ro, Young Suck; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing an educational program as part of a health care program for the management of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients has rapidly become popular. AD educational programs can be of benefit in measured outcomes for both dermatology specialists and patients. Objective To determine the effects of programmed education delivered by dermatology specialists on the management and knowledge of AD, we assessed the effectiveness of patient/parental education at improving AD knowledge, and de...

  4. Clinical use of a ceramide-based moisturizer for treating dogs with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Ji-Young; Nam, Eui-Hwa; Park, Seol-hee; Han, Seung-Hee; HWANG, Cheol-Yong

    2013-01-01

    In humans, skin barrier dysfunction is thought to be responsible for enhanced penetration of allergens. Similar to conditions seen in humans, canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is characterized by derangement of corneocytes and disorganization of intercellular lipids in the stratum corenum (SC) with decreased ceramide levels. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a moisturizer containing ceramide on dogs with CAD. Dogs (n = 20, 3~8 years old) with mild to moderate clinical signs were...

  5. Use of ustekinumab for severe refractory atopic dermatitis in a young teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, C; Hewitt, H; Kennedy, C T

    2016-08-01

    When conventional systemic immunosuppressive treatments fail in the setting of severe eczema, unlike in psoriasis, there are limited treatment options and only anecdotal evidence to help guide clinicians. There is a growing body of evidence for the use of certain biologic agents for moderate to severe eczema. We report the youngest case to date successfully and safely treated with ustekinumab for severe refractory atopic dermatitis. PMID:27079289

  6. Common allergens of atopic dermatitis in dogs: comparative findings based on intradermal tests

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Kang, Min-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal tests were performed on 58 dogs diagnosed with atopic dermatitis from 2004~2008 at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of Konkuk University, Korea. To compare the allergen distribution observed in the present investigation to the results from other studies conducted in Korea and elsewhere, the allergens were grouped according to their kinds. There was no significant difference in gender distribution among the dogs. The most common breeds among the 58 dogs were Maltese (n = 11...

  7. The effeciency of combined laser therapy in complex treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis

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    Moskvin S.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to access the effectiveness of treatment methods in patients with atopic dermatitis, including every alternate day intravenous blood exposure of a low-intensity laser (LIL with a wavelength of 365 nm (LUFOK and 525 nm (green spectrum. Materials and methods. We observed 37 patients with atopic dermatitis (10 females and 27 males with age ranging from 18 to 56 years (mean age 36.2 with duration of disease ranging from 17 to 54 years. In the main group in the complex therapeutic measures has been included traditional method of laser therapy with Laser therapeutic apparatus "Lazmik-VLOK" (registration certificate number RZN 2014/1410 of 02.06.2014 laser emitting heads VLOK CL-365-2 (for LUFOK and CL-525-2 VLOK intravenous blood laser flash coverage. For VLOK we used disposable sterile radiation emitters KIVL-01 TU 9444-005-72085060-2008 Production Research Centre "Matrix" (Moscow, Russia. Results. It is shown that the combined intravenous laser LLLT treatment of blood with a wavelength of 365 nm (or 365-VLOK LUFOK and LLLT with a wavelength of 525 nm (green spectrum VLOK-525 through 10 sessions per day in treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis allows you to get full regression of acute inflamatory symptoms of the disease like — erythema, papules, scaling, excoriations in 87.5% of patients with moderate-severe course of the disease (average index SCORAD 57,5±4,0 and reduce 3.4 times the average index SCORAD (up 21,3±4,0 in patients with severe disease course (original value 72,8±3,0 with an overall positive trend. Conclusion. The use of combined methods of physiotherapy in atopic dermatitis is justified and effective.

  8. Involuntary autonomy: patients' perceptions of physicians, conventional medicines and risks in the management of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noerreslet, Mikkel; Jemec, Gregor B E; Traulsen, Janine M

    2009-11-01

    Consumerism is a major force in western health care. It defines the process in which patients should or do play a more active and central role in making informed choices about health and illness. The talk of patients as consumers is closely linked, and is especially pertinent for patients managing a chronic illness. This article presents findings from a Danish qualitative study that set out to broaden the sociological debate on patients as consumers by including patients' perceptions of conventional medicines. In-depth interviews were carried out with 24 people who medically managed their own or their child's atopic dermatitis. The informants were recruited via the Division of Dermatology in a Danish Hospital which was planning an Information Day on atopic dermatitis (AD). The findings reveal how many of the informants who on the surface appear to match the profile of the so called 'consumer', by being active, critical, informed etc., in fact prefer to consult a patient-centred medical expert (a dermatologist) with good communication skills, who is able to inform, advise and support on issues of managing atopic dermatitis. These people are not seeking more independence but rather a partnership where responsibility for treatment (medicines) is shared. This preference appears to be closely linked with a sense of insecurity about what an outbreak of atopic dermatitis may lead to and insecurity about the medicines. Ultimately, the findings stress that health care politicians and professionals need to reflect upon patient's wants and needs when designing future health care. Turning health care into self-care may not be an appropriate strategy. PMID:19762137

  9. Bee venom acupuncture alleviates trimellitic anhydride-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sur, Bongjun; Lee, Bombi; Yeom, Mijung; Hong, Ju-Hee; Kwon, Sunoh; Kim, Seung-Tae; Lee, Hyang Sook; Park, Hi-Joon; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Bee venom acupuncture (BVA), a novel type of acupuncture therapy in which purified bee venom is injected into the specific acupuncture point on the diseased part of the body, is used primarily for relieving pain and other musculoskeletal symptoms. In the present study, therapeutic potential of BVA to improve atopic dermatitis, a representative allergic dysfunction, was evaluated in the mouse model of trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced skin impairment. Methods Mice were treated wit...

  10. Evaluation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nutan; A J Kanwar; A Bhansali; D Parsad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Most of the research on atopic dermatitis (AD) has focused on the pathophysiological role of the immune system in AD, and the role of endocrine signals in the pathology of AD has not been explored. Current research has shown a link between the neuroendocrine and immune functions. Aim: The aim was to measure the serum basal cortisol levels and cortisol levels following a low-dose ACTH stimulation test in patients with AD before and after treatment with corticosteroids. Methods: Thr...

  11. Harmful Effects of Synthetic Surface-Active Detergents against Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hajime Deguchi; Riho Aoyama; Hideaki Takahashi; Yoshinari Isobe; Yutaka Tsutsumi

    2015-01-01

    We report herein two cases of intractable atopic dermatitis successfully treated by simply avoiding the contact with surface-active detergents in the daily life and living. The detergents were closely related to the exacerbation and remission of the disease. Steroid ointment was no longer used. We discuss that the removal of horny layer lipids by surface-active detergents accelerates the transepidermal water loss and disturbs the barrier function of the epidermis and thus is intimately involv...

  12. The evidence-based guideline of nursing consultation session for children with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Siu-leung; 黃兆良

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common chronic dermatological diseases. It has affected up to a fifth of schoolchildren and their caregivers. It will alter not only children’s physical health, but also worsen the quality of life among children and their family. This global public health problem also increased the financial and social burden to healthcare system in the past decades. Educational intervention has been proved to be an adjunct to current treatment to restore the alte...

  13. Stress Evaluation in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Using Salivary Cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Megumi Mizawa; Masaki Yamaguchi; Chieko Ueda; Teruhiko Makino; Tadamichi Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    The symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD) are often aggravated by stress, and AD can also lead to psychological stress due to social isolation and discrimination. The salivary cortisol level reflects psychological stress, and it is a good index to assess chronic stress. In this study, we measured the salivary cortisol levels in patients with AD (n = 30) and compared them with those of healthy control subjects (n = 42). AD patients were also evaluated for general disease severity using the Scorin...

  14. Epidemiological Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Children with Eczematous Atopic Dermatitis Lesions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Hee-Jung; Jeon, Hong-Seon; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the rate of colonization of skin of children with atopic dermatitis (AD) by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and characterized the isolates. Active skin lesions in pediatric AD patients were cultured with Rodac Staph (Komed, Korea). S. aureus isolates were examined for drug susceptibilities, analyzed for the eta, etb, tst, and pvl genes, and typed using agr polymorphism, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SmaI-restricted chromosomal DNA, and s...

  15. A study of Atopic dermatitis in elementary school children in Hirosaki city, Aomori prefecture, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yuko; Kanazawa, Yoshinori; Kida, Kazuyuki; Mita, Reizo; Nishizawa, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Isao

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between residential environments and atopic dermatitis (AD). Subjects were 1378 elementary school children from 4 elementary schools in Hirosaki City, Aomori Prefecture located in die northeastern of Japan. Physical examinations, which adhered to the diagnostic criteria set by die Japanese Dermatological Association, were given by dermatological specialists in October 1994 (first series) and April 1995 (second series). Half of die ...

  16. Dose-Dependent Effects of Evening Primrose Oil in Children and Adolescents with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Bo Young; Kim, Jin Hye; Cho, Soo Ick; Ahn, In Su; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Cheol Heon

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials with evening primrose oil in atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment have shown different results. In addition, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with evening primrose oil have not yet been determined. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-response treatment effects of evening primrose oil on clinical symptoms of AD and serum concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Methods Forty AD patients were enrolled for the study and rando...

  17. Efficacy of Pimecrolimus 1% Cream in Various Clinical Forms of Atopic Dermatitis

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    Ebru İkizler

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis shows some different clinical appearances.The main aim of this experimental study is to compare the efficacy of pimecrolimus among these clinical subgoups of atopic dermatitis. Material and Method: A total of 70 patients, 50 male and 20 female, aged between 2-38 years were included in the study. Twenty-two patients (%31.4 were pediatric (2-10 years. Patients were investigated in regard to high levels of total IgE, airway allergy, positive skin prick test and triggering allergens. Patients were classified as: mixed, pure intrinsic and pure extrinsic according to Wüthrich classification. Pimecrolimus 1% cream was applied to the patients twice daily for 6 weeks and patients were evaluated with SCORAD index before and after treatment. Results: FAs a result, 58.6% of the patients (n=41 had a successful therapy with pimecrolimus while 4.3% (n=3 had partially successful. Thirty-five patients achieved full remission. The difference between the SCORADs before and after the treatment was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001.Conclusion: In this study, efficacy of pimecrolimus was compared to mixed, pure intrinsic and pure extrinsic types of atopic dermatitis. Although pimecrolimus was more effective in the pure intrinsic type, it was not statistically significant (p=0,75. There was also an insignificant difference between the mild and moderate atopic dermatitis for the efficacy of pimecrolimus (p=0,107. In addition, it is concluded in this study that the optimum treatment period with pimecrolimus should be approximately 4 weeks for children and 6 weeks for adults and adolescents.

  18. Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Pimecrolimus Cream 1% in Adults with Moderate Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Meurer, Michael; Fartasch, Manige; Albrecht , Gisela; Vogt, Thomas; Worm, Margitta; Ruzicka, Thomas; Altmeyer, Peter Josef; Schneider, Dirk; Weidinger, Gottfried; Bräutigam, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pimecrolimus cream 1% is a non-steroid, selective inflammatory cytokine inhibitor indicated for atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective: To compare the safety and efficacy of pimecrolimus cream 1%-based treatment versus conventional therapy in adults with moderate AD. Methods: Patients were randomized to receive pimecrolimus cream 1% (n = 62) or vehicle (n = 68) at the first signs/symptoms of AD, for 24 weeks as required. A moderately potent topical corticosteroid (prednicarbate 0.25% c...

  19. Treatment of atopic dermatitis with pimecrolimus – impact on quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hae-Hyuk; Zuberbier, Torsten; Worm, Margitta

    2007-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial chronic remittent skin disease which requires long-term treatment. Pimecrolimus cream 1% is a nonsteroid selective inhibitor of inflammatory cytokines and effective in the treatment of AD. Various clinical trials have shown its long-term safety and efficacy in pediatric and adult patients suffering from mild to moderate AD. In this article we discuss data which has assessed the impact of AD on the patient’s quality of life, and the consequent role of...

  20. Pimecrolimus in atopic dermatitis: Consensus on safety and the need to allow use in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Luger, Thomas; Boguniewicz, Mark; Carr, Warner; Cork, Michael; Deleuran, M.; Eichenfield, Lawrence; Eigenmann, Philippe; Fölster-Holst, R.; C. Gelmetti; Gollnick, Harald; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hebert, Adelaide A; Murarol, Antonella; Oranje, Arnold; Paller, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a distressing dermatological disease, which is highly prevalent during infancy, can persist into later life and requires long-term management with anti-inflammatory compounds. The introduction of the topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs), tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, more than 10 yr ago was a major breakthrough for the topical anti-inflammatory treatment of AD. Pimecrolimus 1% is approved for second-line use in children (≥2 yr old) and adults with mild-to-moderate AD...

  1. The effects of elimination diet on nutritional status in subjects with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jungyun; Kwon, Jaryoung; Noh, Geunwoong; Lee, Sang Sun

    2013-01-01

    A food allergy is an adverse health effect arising from a specific immune response that occurs reproducibly upon exposure to a given food. In those with food allergies that are thought to cause aggravation of eczema, food avoidance is important. The objective of this study was to research the nutritional status of patients with food allergies. A total of 225 subjects diagnosed with atopic dermatitis underwent a skin prick test as well as measurement of serum immunoglobulin E. Food challenge t...

  2. SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN WITH THE USE OF SCARIFICATION METHOD

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    Shmulich OV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work there are presented the results of allergy testings of 186 children suffering from atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was the specification of casually significant allergen depending on sex and age. Results of testing are processed by a method of the mathematiical analysis, raised in nomograms according to which, considering the nosological entity of disease, sex and age of a patient, it is possible to define causally significant allergen.

  3. Children with Atopic Dermatitis Should Always be Patch-tested if They Have Hand or Foot Dermatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksson, Marléne; Olhardt, Sanna; Rådehed, Jeanette; Svensson, Åke

    2015-01-01

    In industrialised countries atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease among children. Many factors influence this disease in a negative way and contact allergy is one such factor. The aim of the study was to examine the frequency of contact allergy among children with the diagnosis AD in Malmö, Sweden and to evaluate if a significant degree of contact allergies in these children is missed when not patch testing them. Contact allergy was found in 22/82 children (26...

  4. Atopic dermatitis guideline. Position paper from the Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías, A; Olmos, C; de Falco, A

    2014-01-01

    As in other regions, the incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America has been increasing in recent years. Although there are several clinical guidelines, many of their recommendations cannot be universal since they depend on the characteristics of each region. Thus, we decided to create a consensus guideline on atopic dermatitis applicable in Latin America and other tropical regions, taking into account socio-economic, geographical, cultural and health care system characteristics. The Latin American Society of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (SLAAI) conducted a systematic search for articles related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of dermatitis using various electronic resources such as Google, Pubmed, EMBASE (Ovid) and Cochrane data base. We have also looked for all published articles in Latin America on the subject using LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) database. Each section was reviewed by at least two members of the committee, and the final version was subsequently approved by all of them, using the Delphi methodology for consensus building. Afterward, the final document was shared for external evaluation with physicians, specialists (allergists, dermatologists and pediatricians), patients and academic institutions such as universities and scientific societies related to the topic. All recommendations made by these groups were taken into account for the final drafting of the document. There are few original studies conducted in Latin America about dermatitis; however, we were able to create a practical guideline for Latin America taking into account the particularities of the region. Moreover, the integral management was highlighted including many of the recommendations from different participants in the health care of this disease (patients, families, primary care physicians and specialists). This practical guide presents a concise approach to the diagnosis and management of atopic dermatitis that can be

  5. Corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

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    Leopold, Christine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: In developed countries 2.5% of the population - mainly children - are affected by atopic dermatitis. During the past few years its prevalence amongst school children has risen decisively and now lies between 8% to 16%. It is the most frequent chronic skin disease amongst school-aged children. Scientific background: Current methods of treating atopic dermatitis among children focus on containing and preventing the illness’s further progression. Preventing dry skin, relieving symptoms (such as pruritis and inflammation of the skin and identifying and avoiding provocating factors are elementary goals of treatment. Successful treatment can substantially increase the children’s quality of life. Possible therapies of children affected by atopic dermatitis include both topically and systemically applied pharmaceuticals. During the past ten years the use of corticosteroids has been the standard topical anti-inflammatory therapy in case of aggravating inflammations. In 2002 a new group of pharmaceutical substances (topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus was authorised in Germany for topical anti-inflammatory treatment of patients. Because of its high prevalence atopic dermatitis represents a major expense factor to the German health care system. In 1999 the costs of the treatment of atopic dermatitis with corticosteroids in Germany amounted to 230 million Euro. If other direct costs for the treatment are included, for example hospitalisation or doctor appointments, the total costs amount to 3.57 billion Euro. Research question: How effective and efficient are topical anti-inflammatory treatments of children with atopic dermatitis? Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in 35 international databases which yielded 1335 articles. Following a two-part selection process according to predefined criteria 24 publications were included in the assessment. Results: Of 19 randomised controlled

  6. The precipitation of symptoms by common foods in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, H A; Potter, P C

    1994-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and disabling condition that has a major impact on financial and social resources of the individual and the community. Its incidence is increasing dramatically, and no cure is available. Pharmacological treatment is only partially effective. The evidence that diet plays a role in children with atopic dermatitis is now irrefutable. Prophylactic measures can prevent or limit the development of AD, and partially restricted diets can modify the disease's course or severity. This study reports the reactions to various foods as perceived by parents of 112 children affected by AD. It demonstrates that many foods exacerbate AD and that reactions are caused by two distinct groups of food. The commonest triggers of cutaneous symptoms are tomatoes, oranges, sweets, pineapple, chocolate, and softdrinks preserved with sulfur dioxide. These foods result in symptoms in 30% to 49% of the children. The traditional IgE reaction type foods, namely egg, fish, milk, and peanut, resulted in reactions in 14% to 25% of the children, and with many non-cutaneous symptoms. The study further shows that allergen avoidance measures are not practiced in our community, and that sound advice is not often proffered. Practical advice on prophylactic dietary preventative measures and dietary management of children with atopic dermatitis is presented. PMID:7806078

  7. Filaggrin genotype and skin diseases independent of atopic dermatitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted DNA...... risk of atopic dermatitis (OR 3.3, CI 2.1-5.3), dermatology consultations for allergy or rash (HR 2.2, CI 1.4-3.5), basic dermatology consultations at age <5 years (HR 2.2, CI 1.7-2.9), urticaria at age <18 months (OR 2.9, CI 1.0-7.9), and other rash at age <18 months (OR 2.1, CI 1.2-3.8). CONCLUSIONS......: FLG mutations may predispose to skin disease in young children including urticaria, and rash not recognized as atopic dermatitis although equally frequent. In clinical practice, FLG genotyping may help indicate the use of moisturizers to reduce skin problems....

  8. Synbiotics could not Reduce the Scoring of Childhood Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD: A Randomized Double Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial

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    Alireza Shafiei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite preliminary evidence, the role of probiotic and synbiotic in treatment of the atopic dermatitis has shown varying results. We aimed to evaluate whether synbiotic supplementation decrease severity of atopic dermatitis (AD in childhood. In a randomized double blind-placebo controlled trial, we evaluated the synbiotic supplementation efficiency on the treatment of atopic dermatitis.Infants aged 1–36 months with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis were randomized (n=41 and received either synbiotic (probiotic plus prebiotic (n=20 or placebo (n=21 daily as  a  powder  for  two  months.  Emollient  (Eucerin  and  topical  corticosteroid (Hydrocortisone were permitted.Children were scored for severity of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD. Also allergen Skin Prick Tests (SPT, IgE blood level and eosinophil count were measured at first visit. Patients’ SCORAD were reevaluated at the end of intervention.  We followed 36 out of 41 subjects for two months (drop out rate = 9%.In the whole group, the mean Total SCORAD (at base line 40.93 decreased by 56% (p=0.00. The mean Objective SCORAD (at base line 31.29 decreased by 53% (p=0.00. There was no significant difference in the mean decrease of total SCORAD between placebo (22.3 and synbiotic groups (24.2. There was also no difference between two intervention groups in the mean decrease of total SCORAD regarding to different demographic, clinical and para clinical subgroups.This study could not confirm synbiotic as an effective treatment for childhood atopic dermatitis and further studies are needed. These findings challenge the role of synbiotics in the treatment of childhood atopic dermatitis.

  9. Topical application of a vitamin D analogue exacerbates atopic dermatitis and induces the atopic dermatitis-like phenotype in Stat6VT mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew J; Dasilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Yi, Qiaofang; Mehrotra, Purvi; Kaplan, Mark H; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    Calcipotriene is a topical vitamin D3 analogue approved for the treatment of plaque and scalp psoriasis. We report the case of a 2-year-old boy whose atopic dermatitis (AD) flared in response to application of calcipotriene 0.005% cream and solution for a mistaken diagnosis of plaque and scalp psoriasis. We investigated whether the patient's eruption was secondary to an allergic contact dermatitis. In the Stat6VT mouse model of AD we tested whether calcipotriene could induce the otherwise-spontaneous AD-like phenotype. Closed patch testing was done on the patient with calcipotriene solution and cream, moisturizing cream, and 51% isopropanol. Stat6VT and wild-type (WT) mice were treated for 7 days with calcipotriene solution or vehicle (isopropanol) applied to the right and left upper back skin, respectively, after which mice were followed longitudinally for 10 weeks. Biopsy specimens from prior treatment sites were then collected for histology and RNA isolation. RNA was analyzed for interleukin (IL-4) expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patch testing was negative. Stat6VT mice, in contrast to WT mice, developed a persistent eczematous dermatitis at sites of calcipotriene application. Clinical and histologic features and high IL-4 transcript levels were consistent with the spontaneous AD-like phenotype seen in Stat6VT mice. At sites of active disease, calcipotriene can worsen a flare of AD. In Stat6VT mice, calcipotriene can induce the AD-like phenotype. PMID:23889122

  10. Strong exercise stress exacerbates dermatitis in atopic model mice, NC/Nga mice, while proper exercise reduces it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Kumi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Inoue, Risa; Sato, Eisuke F; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is well known to exacerbate by stress. How the influence of exercise stress on the skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis has not been clarified. The purpose of our research is to investigate how different strength of exercise stress acts on atopic dermatitis. Specific pathogen-free (SPF) and conventional NC/Nga male mice were used for the experiments. Conventional mice but not SPF group spontaneously develop dermal symptom similar to that of patients with atopic dermatitis at their age of 7 weeks. They were given two types of stress, mild (20 m/min for 60 min) or strong exercise (25 m/min for 90 min), using a treadmill four times per day. The dermal symptom of the conventional group was strongly exacerbated by strong exercise but ameliorated by mild exercise. Under the standard experimental conditions, plasma concentrations of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and substance P in conventional mice increased markedly with concomitant exacerbation of the symptom. The plasma concentrations of these proteins elevated after strong exercise but decreased after mild exercise. Under the conventional conditions, plasma levels of β-endorphin increased with time by some mechanisms enhanced by the mild exercise. These observations suggested that exercise-induced stress significantly affect the symptom of atopic dermatitis in a pivotal manner depending on the plasma levels of TGF-β, α-MSH, substance P and β-endorphin. PMID:21087324

  11. Family functioning and illness perception of parents of children with atopic dermatitis, living without skin symptoms, but with psychosomatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Kanán-Cedeño, E G; Guillén Martínez, E; Campos Garibay, M J

    2011-03-01

    Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease. This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents' perceptions of their child's disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale) and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child's atopic dermatitis. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, pparents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child's atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child's daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context. PMID:21358017

  12. Correlation of the severity of atopic dermatitis with absolute eosinophil counts in peripheral blood and serum IgE levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of epidemiological studies, showing incidence and prevalence of atopic dermatitis, were available, scant attention has been paid to the correlation between the parameters of the disease like severity, absolute eosinophil count and IgE level, which has been known to be associated inconsistently. Hence this study was undertaken. METHODS: A total of 102 patients of atopic dermatitis, both children and adults, and 107 age matched controls were studied at the Pediatric Dermatology clinic, Institute of Child Health and department of Dermatology, AMRI-Apollo hospitals, Kolkata. RESULTS: The average age of onset of atopic dermatitis was observed to be 4.55 years. Both the average absolute eosinophil count and IgE levels in patients of atopic dermatitis were significantly higher than that of the controls. Each of these parameters showed significant correlation with severity of the disease and showed a nonhomogeneous distribution reflected by significant association with personal history of bronchial asthma and family history of atopy, when both parents were atopic. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that clinical activity of the disease as recorded by the "SCORAD" index can be used as an indicator of the hematological abnormalities as well as to some extent as a prognostic indicator. Family history of atopy correlates with the hematological abnormalities only if both parents are involved and bronchial asthma is the only associated atopic condition which correlates with the parameters of the disease .

  13. Circulating allergen-reactive T cells from patients with atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis express the skin-selective homing receptor, the cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) is the major T cell ligand for the vascular adhesion molecule E-selectin, and it has been proposed to be involved in the selective targeting of memory T cells reactive with skin-associated Ag to cutaneous inflammatory sites. To further investigate the relation of CLA and cutaneous T cell responses, we analyzed the CLA phenotype of circulating memory T cells in patients with allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis (AD) alone vs in pat...

  14. Atopic Manifestations: Dermatitis, Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma in Patients With Hypogammaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Dadkhah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the hypogammaglobulinemic patients have a clinical history in favor of allergic respiratory disease. Nevertheless, in these patients the importance and prevalence of atopic disorders have not been completely explained. Objectives: This study was aimed to evaluate atopic manifestations (dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma and pulmonary function in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. Patients and Methods: We used the international study of asthma and allergies in childhood (ISAAC questionnaire in forty-five patients diagnosed with hypogammaglobulinemia and spirometry was done in 41 patients older than 5 years. Results: Spirometry results were normal in 21 (51%, and showed obstructive in 15 (37% and restrictive pattern in 5 (12% of the 41 patients who were evaluated. By the end of the study, asthma was diagnosed in nine (20% patients and other atopies (rhinitis and dermatitis identified in 10 (22%, and four (9%, respectively. Conclusions: Atopic conditions should be investigated in the hypogammaglobulinemic patients and the prevalence in these patients may be higher than in normal population. Also, it is recommended to perform a pulmonary function test as a routine procedure in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and atopy should be assessed in these patients.

  15. A Case of IFAP Syndrome with Severe Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Catarina; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Resende, Cristina; Vieira, Ana Paula; Brito, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The IFAP syndrome is a rare X-linked genetic disorder characterized by the triad of follicular ichthyosis, atrichia, and photophobia. Case Report. A three-month-old Caucasian, male patient was observed with noncicatricial universal alopecia and persistent eczema from birth. He had dystrophic nails, spiky follicular hyperkeratosis, and photophobia which became apparent at the first year of life. Short stature and psychomotor developmental delay were also noticed. Histopathological examination of skin biopsy on left thigh showed epidermis with irregular acanthosis, lamellar orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and hair follicles fulfilled by parakeratotic hyperkeratosis. The chromosomal study showed a karyotype 46, XY. Total IgE was 374 IU/mL. One missense mutation c.1360G>C (p.Ala454Pro) in hemizygosity was detected on the MBTPS2 gene thus confirming the diagnosis of IFAP syndrome. Conclusions. We describe a boy with a typical clinical presentation of IFAP syndrome and severe atopic manifestations. A novel missense mutation c.1360G>C (p.Ala454Pro) in MBTPS2 gene was observed. The phenotypic expression of disease is quantitatively related to a reduced function of a key cellular regulatory system affecting cholesterol and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. It can cause epithelial disturbance with failure in differentiation of epidermal structures and abnormal skin permeability barrier. However, no correlation phenotype/genotype could be established. PMID:25685152

  16. Neonatal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L; Halkjaer, L B; Agner, T;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in atopic skin has been associated with exacerbation of eczema. Objectives To investigate a possible association between neonatal colonization with S. aureus and the risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study...... monitored prospectively. RESULTS: Of the neonates, 5.3% had positive swabs for S. aureus cultured from the vestibulum nasi (51.3%) and/or the perineum (11.3%). Forty-two per cent developed AD, but without association between colonization with S. aureus at 1 month of age and risk of developing AD at 3 years...... of age. There was a 70% concordance for S. aureus carriage between neonates and parents. At 1 year of age 11.3% children had swabs positive for S. aureus. Fourteen per cent of children tested at the 1-year visit developed AD after the visit but before 3 years of age, but again, there was no association...

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Jagadeesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in atopic dermatitis is little studied but has therapeutic implications. It may have a role in disease severity given the additional virulence factors associated. Aims: Our aims were to record the proportion of patients with MRSA colonization in atopic dermatitis and to ascertain if any association exists between MRSA colonization and disease severity. Methods: An observational cross-sectional study involving children aged≤12 years with atopic dermatitis attending the outpatient department of Government Medical College, Kottayam was conducted. Socio-demographic data, exacerbating factors and risk factors for hospital care-associated MRSA were documented. Extent of atopic dermatitis was recorded using a standardized scale (Eczema Area Severity Index, EASI. Skin swabs were taken from anterior nares and the worst affected atopic dermatitis sites for culture and sensitivity. Results: Of the 119 subjects recruited during the study period (November 2009-April 2011, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 110 (92.4% patients and MRSA from 30 (25.21% patients. A total of 18 patients with MRSA had risk factors for healthcare associated-MRSA. The patients whose cultures grew MRSA were found to have significantly higher EASI score when compared to those patients colonized with methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (P < 0.01. Presence of Staphylococcus aureus, early age of onset, presence of food allergies, seasonal exacerbation and inadequate breastfeeding did not seem to influence disease severity. Conclusions: There is a high degree of prevalence of MRSA (25.2% in atopic dermatitis and presence of MRSA is associated with increased disease severity. Further studies are needed to validate these findings.

  18. Identification of novel immune and barrier genes in atopic dermatitis by laser capture micro-dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esaki, H.; Ewald, David Adrian; Ungar, B.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular signature of atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions is associated with TH2 and TH22 activation and epidermal alterations. However, the epidermal and dermal AD transcriptomes and their respective contributions to abnormalities in respective immune and barrier phenotypes are unknown...... normal skin from healthy volunteers, followed by gene expression (microarrays and real-time PCR) and immunostaining studies. RESULTS: Our study identified novel immune and barrier genes, including the IL-34 cytokine and claudins 4 and 8, and showed increased detection of key AD genes usually undetectable...... immune molecules and enabling detection of gene products usually not detected on arrays....

  19. Identification of novel immune and barrier genes in atopic dermatitis by means of laser capture microdissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esaki, Hitokazu; Ewald, David Adrian; Ungar, Benjamin;

    2015-01-01

    Background : The molecular signature of atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions is associated with T(H)2 and T(H)22 activation and epidermal alterations. However, the epidermal and dermal AD transcriptomes and their respective contributions to abnormalities in respective immune and barrier phenotypes are...... with AD and normal skin from healthy volunteers, followed by gene expression (microarrays and real-time PCR) and immunostaining studies. Results : Our study identified novel immune and barrier genes, including the IL-34 cytokine and claudins 4 and 8, and showed increased detection of key AD genes...... key barrier or immune molecules and enabling detection of gene products usually not detected on arrays....

  20. Natural Course of Cow's Milk Allergy in Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Jungmin; Lee, Hyeonyoung; Lee, Jung Hyun; Cho, Joongbum; Yu, Jung-Seok; Kim, Jihyun; Han, Youngshin; Ahn, Kangmo; Lee, Sang-Il

    2011-01-01

    Cow's milk is one of the most common food allergens in children with atopic dermatitis (AD). This study was conducted to describe the natural course of cow's milk allergy in children with AD, and to identify factors predictive of outcome. To accomplish this, we reviewed the medical records of 115 children who were diagnosed with AD and cow's milk allergy before 24 months of age to evaluate their clinical characteristics and prognostic factors. During a follow-up period of 24 to114 months, the...

  1. Causes of epidermal filaggrin reduction and their role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Kezic, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis protects human subjects from exogenous stressors and helps to maintain internal fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Filaggrin is a crucial epidermal protein that is important for the formation of the corneocyte, as well as the generation of its intracellular metabolites, which...... contribute to stratum corneum hydration and pH. The levels of filaggrin and its degradation products are influenced not only by the filaggrin genotype but also by inflammation and exogenous stressors. Pertinently, filaggrin deficiency is observed in patients with atopic dermatitis regardless of filaggrin...

  2. Patterns of sensitization in infants and its relation to atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøhnke, Hanne; Norberg, Lene Annette; Vach, Werner;

    2006-01-01

    this prospective birth cohort study were to investigate: (i) the prevalence, the cumulative incidence and the pattern of transient and persistent sensitization to common food- and aeroallergens in unselected infants, (ii) the association between sensitization and the development of atopic dermatitis...... persistent sensitization in 17%, 10% and 3%, respectively. Sensitization to environmental allergens was frequently observed in infancy when testing with HR and IgE. Results of SPT gave much lower frequencies. Reactivity to foods was more frequent than to aeroallergens. The dominant pattern was low...

  3. Serum immunoglobulin E concentrations and radioallergosorbent tests in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, J A; Kleban, D G; Bellanti, J A

    1976-02-01

    Serum IgE concentrations and the presence of allergen-specific IgE were determined in a series of 23 children with atopic dermatitis. In this group 83% had significantly elevated serum levels of IgE, 91% had coexistent respiratory allergy, 70% had radioallergosorbent test (RAST) evidence of pollen hypersensitivity, and 43% gave a history and demonstrated a RAST score consistent with milk or egg hypersensitivity. In patients with eczema a significant proportion of the elevated serum IgE appears to be antigen specific. PMID:54897

  4. Is food allergy testing reliable in pediatric atopic dermatitis? A population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Keck, Laura E.; Simpson, Eric L.; Berry, Trista M.; Hanifin, Jon M.

    2012-01-01

    We sought to assess the value and reliability of serologic testing for predicting clinical food allergy in a population-based cohort of infants with atopic dermatitis (AD). Infants 3–18 months of age, recruited from the general population, were followed quarterly for three years and carefully evaluated for evidence of immediate reactions to foods. Specific serum IgE levels for six foods were assayed at 3–5 years. Parents were interviewed at each visit regarding past and current immediate food...

  5. An Appropriate Response to the Black-Box Warning: Corrective, Barrier Repair Therapy in Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Due to years of sophisticated research on T cell function, many dermatologists have viewed atopic dermatitis (AD) largely as an inflammatory disorder of TH1/TH2 imbalance. Hence, therapy has largely consisted of topical immunomodulators and/or steroids. The imposition of “black box” warnings about the potential toxicity associated with prolonged use of the immunosuppressive drugs, tacrolimus 0.1% or 0.3% ointment (Protopic®, Astellas Pharma U.S., Inc., Deerfield, IL) and pimecrolimus 1% cream...

  6. Impact of Atopic Dermatitis on the Psychological State and Social Adaptation of Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Girnyk, G. Ye.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of the impact of atopic dermatitis (AD) on the psychological state and social adaptation of patients.  Different ways of AD treatment were discussed. Modern data on AD clinical course and its manifestations were presented. The objective of the research        was to study the impact of AD on the quality of life in patients. The dermatology life quality index, assessment of situational and personal anxiety levels and degree of stress resistance...

  7. Telomerase activity is increased and telomere length shortened in T cells from blood of patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Higashi, N; Hansen, E R;

    2000-01-01

    We studied telomerase activity and telomere length in PBMC and purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from blood obtained from a total of 32 patients with atopic dermatitis, 16 patients with psoriasis, and 30 normal controls. The telomerase activity was significantly increased in PBMC from the patients......(+) T cell subsets from normal donors. In conclusion, the increased telomerase activity and shortened telomere length indicates that T lymphocytes in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are chronically stimulated and have an increased cellular turnover in vivo....

  8. Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) rs22114085 Associated with Canine Atopic Dermatitis by PCR-RFLP Method

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Miluchová; Michal Gábor; Anna Trakovická; Jana Hanusová

    2012-01-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema). The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs22114085 in different dog breeds. The material involved 52 dogs from 5 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA) carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used ...

  9. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) RS23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis by ACRS-PCR method

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Miluchová; Michal Gábor; Anna Trakovická; Jana Hanusova; Radovan Kasarda

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis (cAD). cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema). The material involved 60 dogs from 6 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA) carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in...

  10. Formulation and clinical evaluation of silymarin pluronic-lecithin organogels for treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mady FM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fatma M Mady,1,2 Hanaa Essa,2 Tarek El-Ammawi,3 Hamdy Abdelkader,2 Amal K Hussein2 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Minia, Egypt; 3Department of Dermatology, STDs, and Andrology, Minia University Hospital, Minia, Egypt Abstract: Silymarin is a naturally occurring flavonoid drug; evidence from recent research has highlighted its use as a potential treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD. Both poor water solubility and drug permeability have hindered the percutaneous absorption of silymarin. Formulation of silymarin into pluronic-lecithin organogel (PLO basis for topical skin delivery is the main aim of this work. Six different PLO formulations were prepared containing various pluronic to lecithin ratios using two cosolvent systems of ethyl alcohol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Formulation 2 (20% pluronic and 3% lecithin was found to be the optimal base for topical delivery of silymarin as it showed optimum pH, viscosity, drug content, and satisfactory in vitro silymarin permeation. The silymarin PLO formulation significantly relieved inflammatory symptoms of AD such as redness, swelling, and inflammation. These findings warrant the ability for application of these novel silymarin PLO formulations as a novel treatment for AD. Keywords: silymarin, pluronic lecithin organogel, atopic dermatitis, skin penetration 

  11. Stress Evaluation in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Using Salivary Cortisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Mizawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD are often aggravated by stress, and AD can also lead to psychological stress due to social isolation and discrimination. The salivary cortisol level reflects psychological stress, and it is a good index to assess chronic stress. In this study, we measured the salivary cortisol levels in patients with AD (. AD patients were also evaluated for general disease severity using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD index. The serum levels of TARC, total IgE, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and peripheral blood eosinophil counts were measured by laboratory tests. The Skindex-16 was used as a skin disease-specific, quality of life measure, instrument. The results showed that the saliva cortisol level was significantly higher in AD patients compared to healthy subjects ( while the serum TARC and LDH levels were positively correlated with the SCORAD index. However, no statistically significant correlations were observed between the salivary cortisol level and Skindex-16. These results suggest that the saliva cortisol level is therefore a useful biomarker to evaluate the stress in AD patients.

  12. Stress evaluation in adult patients with atopic dermatitis using salivary cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizawa, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ueda, Chieko; Makino, Teruhiko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-01-01

    The symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD) are often aggravated by stress, and AD can also lead to psychological stress due to social isolation and discrimination. The salivary cortisol level reflects psychological stress, and it is a good index to assess chronic stress. In this study, we measured the salivary cortisol levels in patients with AD (n = 30) and compared them with those of healthy control subjects (n = 42). AD patients were also evaluated for general disease severity using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. The serum levels of TARC, total IgE, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and peripheral blood eosinophil counts were measured by laboratory tests. The Skindex-16 was used as a skin disease-specific, quality of life measure, instrument. The results showed that the saliva cortisol level was significantly higher in AD patients compared to healthy subjects (P Skindex-16. These results suggest that the saliva cortisol level is therefore a useful biomarker to evaluate the stress in AD patients. PMID:23971022

  13. Psychodermatologic Effects of Atopic Dermatitis and Acne: A Review on Self-Esteem and Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Catherine M; Koo, John; Cordoro, Kelly M

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and acne vulgaris are among the most-prevalent skin diseases in children. Both have been well documented in the literature to have significant negative effects on quality of life. Herein, we discuss the results of a comprehensive literature review aimed at assessing the impact of acne and AD on self-esteem and identity. We highlight clinical tools for their assessment and offer coping strategies for patients and families. Multiple factors including relationships with parents and classmates, sports participation, and the sex of the patient contribute to the development of self-esteem and identity in individuals with AD and acne. Atopic dermatitis was found to have significant behavioral effects on children, ultimately resulting in a lack of opportunity to develop proper coping. AD had a more-prominent role in identity formation and gender roles in girls. Acne vulgaris was found to have a more direct effect on self-esteem, self-confidence and identity, especially in girls. The Cutaneous Body Image Scale is reviewed and offered as an easy and reliable tool to evaluate a patient's mental perception of the appearance of their skin. Coping strategies that may be offered to patients and families include empowerment and cognitive adaptation. PMID:27001316

  14. Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis Among Children Under 19 in an East-Hungarian Agricultural County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Kuhnyar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atopic dermatitis has significantly increased in developed countries during the past several decades. Surveys performed in Hungary also show a growing number of atopic dermatitis (AD cases, although, a carefully designed case-controlled studies have not been performed. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of AD in individuals under 19 years of age within the agricultural area of East-Hungary. Combined data obtained with Schultz-Larsen questionnaire on 1158 children were analyzed, and 25% of the index persons were examined by dermatologist. The mean prevalence of AD determined by questionnaires appeared to be 17.5% in the entire study population. Result of dermatological examination verified the validity and sensitivity of the questionnaire. A negative correlation was found between the severity of the disease and the length of breast feeding period. (Spearman's correlation coefficient = − 0.2247, p = 0.034. The prevalence of AD in an East-Hungarian agricultural area is nearly as high as that reported for populations residing in industrially developed countries, with a higher prevalence during childhood. Data suggest that premature abruption of breast feeding maybe one of the major factors among other environmental factors that is contributing to the development of AD.

  15. Vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia due to excessive self-restrictions for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikino, Kiyoshi; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Yamashita, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    A 34-year-old Japanese woman presented with a 2-year history of generalised bone pain, muscle weakness and gait disturbance. The patient had been following a restricted diet (without fish or dairy products) and avoiding ultraviolet exposure for 8 years to manage her worsening atopic dermatitis. Physical examination revealed generalised bone tenderness and bilateral symmetric proximal muscle weakness. Vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia was diagnosed based on the laboratory examination findings, which indicated high serum alkaline phosphatase, high intact parathyroid hormone, and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Her symptoms improved after oral active vitamin D and calcium administration. To the best our knowledge, this case is the first report of vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia in an adult patient due to excessive dietary restriction for managing atopic dermatitis. We emphasise the importance of increasing awareness of vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for the development of osteomalacia, and caution against excessive avoidance of sun exposure and dietary restriction. PMID:25100811

  16. Vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia due to excessive self-restrictions for atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikino, Kiyoshi; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Yamashita, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    A 34-year-old Japanese woman presented with a 2-year history of generalised bone pain, muscle weakness and gait disturbance. The patient had been following a restricted diet (without fish or dairy products) and avoiding ultraviolet exposure for 8 years to manage her worsening atopic dermatitis. Physical examination revealed generalised bone tenderness and bilateral symmetric proximal muscle weakness. Vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia was diagnosed based on the laboratory examination findings, which indicated high serum alkaline phosphatase, high intact parathyroid hormone, and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Her symptoms improved after oral active vitamin D and calcium administration. To the best our knowledge, this case is the first report of vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia in an adult patient due to excessive dietary restriction for managing atopic dermatitis. We emphasise the importance of increasing awareness of vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for the development of osteomalacia, and caution against excessive avoidance of sun exposure and dietary restriction. PMID:25100811

  17. Effects of Acupuncture on 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeun Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though the effects of acupuncture in atopic dermatitis have been proven in clinical studies, its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of action for acupuncture treatment on the LI11 meridian point for treatment of allergic contact dermatitis. BALB/c mice received 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB application to induce skin inflammation. Acupuncture treatment on LI11 significantly inhibited cutaneous hyperplasia, serum IgE levels, and expression of proinflammatory cytokine (IL-4, IL-8, and TNF-α mRNA and NF-κB, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 proteins. Acupuncture treatment of local points also inhibited cutaneous hyperplasia and serum IgE levels; however, it was not effective in regulating proinflammatory cytokines and proteins. In addition, LI11 treatment is more effective at reducing serum IgE levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins than local point treatment. These results suggest that acupuncture treatment is effective in alleviating allergic contact dermatitis by reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins.

  18. Phthalate exposure through different pathways and allergic sensitization in preschool children with asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Callesen, Michael; Weschler, Charles J.;

    2015-01-01

    exposure and allergic sensitization in a large group of 3-5 year old children: 300 random controls and 200 cases with asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic dermatitis as reported in questionnaires. The children were clinically examined to confirm their health status. Blood samples were analyzed for Ig...

  19. Percutaneous penetration of sodium lauryl sulphate is increased in uninvolved skin of patients with atopic dermatitis compared with control subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Jakasa; C.M. de Jongh; M.M. Verberk; J.D. Bos; S. Kezic

    2006-01-01

    Background Involved regions of the skin in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have been shown to have higher transepidermal water loss (TEWL), indicating a compromised skin barrier. Whether uninvolved skin also has diminished barrier characteristics is controversial. Objectives To study the penetr

  20. Telomerase activity is increased and telomere length shortened in T cells from blood of patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Higashi, H; Hansen, E R;

    2000-01-01

    subsets from both atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients compared with normal individuals. Furthermore, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in CD4(+) memory T cells compared with the CD4(+) naive T cells, and both of the cell subsets from diseases were shown to be of significantly...

  1. Low birth weight and preterm delivery as risk factors for asthma and atopic dermatitis in young adult males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, F.H.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Gillman, M.W.; Rothman, K.J.; Sabroe, Svend; Fischer, P.; Olsen, Jørn

    2000-01-01

    Gestational factors have been hypothesized to play a role in the susceptibility to asthma and atopic dermatitis. We examined whether fetal growth was associated with asthma and atopic dermatitis separately in a population of 4,795 male conscripts born between 1973 and 1975 in Denmark. The...... of male infants is the main gestational factor underlying the associations but does not explain the apparent increase over time of asthma or atopic diseases....... prevalence of asthma was 4.7%. The prevalence odds ratio of asthma in conscripts with a birth weight below 2,501 g was 1.5 (95% confidence interval = 0.7–3.1) compared with conscripts with a birth weight of 3,001–3,500 g, adjusted for gestational age and potential confounders. The adjusted prevalence odds...

  2. Family Functioning and Illness Perception of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis, Living without Skin Symptoms, but with Psychosomatic Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain. R. Rodríguez-Orozco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease.This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents’ perceptions of their child’s disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child’s atopic dermatitis. Pearson’s correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, p<.001; disruptive conduct and communication, r=0.798, p<.001; and support and communication, r=0.731, p<.001. Of the parents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child’s atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child’s daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context.

  3. Atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is infected Drugs that suppress the immune system Phototherapy, a medical treatment in which your skin is carefully exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light Short-term use of systemic steroids (steroids given by mouth ...

  4. Unlike in Children with Allergic Asthma, IgE Transcripts from Preschool Children with Atopic Dermatitis Display Signs of Superantigen-Driven Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzel, Sebastian; Rogosch, Tobias; Struecker, Benjamin; Maier, Rolf F; Kabesch, Michael; Zemlin, Michael

    2016-06-15

    The IgE repertoire in children with asthma reflects an adaptive B cell response, indicative of Ag-driven selection. However, the same might not apply to atopic dermatitis, which is often the first manifestation of atopy. The objective of our present study was to characterize the IgE repertoire of preschool children with atopic dermatitis with regard to signs of superantigen-like activation, clonal relationship, and indications of Ag selection. Total RNA was isolated from PBMCs of five children with atopic dermatitis. IgE transcripts were amplified, cloned, and sequenced using RT-PCR. We obtained 200 functional IgE sequences, which were compared with 1140 sequences from 11 children with asthma. Whereas variable gene segment of the H Ig chain (VH) gene usage in asthma reflected germline distribution, IgE transcripts from children with atopic dermatitis displayed a dominance of the otherwise scarcely expressed VH2 and VH4 family. Whereas IgE transcripts from children with asthma were highly mutated (7.2%), somatic mutation rate in atopic dermatitis was less than half as high (3.4%). Moreover, the proportion of transcripts that were indicative of Ag selection was reduced to 11% in atopic dermatitis (24% in asthma). In summary, IgE repertoires vary significantly between children with different atopic diseases. Compared with children with asthma, IgE transcripts from preschool children with atopic dermatitis are significantly less mutated, clonally less focused, and less indicative of Ag selection. We consider our data reconcilable with the hypothesis that a superantigen-like activation contributes to the maturation and selection of the IgE repertoire in atopic dermatitis. PMID:27183570

  5. Canine atopic dermatitis diagnostic criteria: evaluation of four sets of published criteria among veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Lucile; Le Poder, Sophie; Desquilbet, Loïc; Perrot, Sebastien; Cavana, Paola; Marignac, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD) is a major teaching point as its diagnosis and treatment are difficult. During 11 weeks, 140 dogs and students (third, fourth, and fifth years) were recruited and paired. One of the four lists of diagnostic criteria was randomly attributed to each student. Concordance results, calculated with Cohen's kappa, ranged from slight (κ=0.07) to moderate (κ=0.53). Favrot's diagnostic criteria received the best results. It has been observed that results are improved with clinical experience. We observed that students often forgot that Favrot's criteria apply only to pruritic dogs and that the fulfillment of the criteria allows only a suspicion, not a diagnosis, of cAD. Primary pruritus and corticosteroid-responsive pruritus were often misunderstood. PMID:25588943

  6. S2k guideline on diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis--short version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Thomas; Heratizadeh, Annice; Aberer, Werner; Ahrens, Frank; Augustin, Matthias; Biedermann, Tilo; Diepgen, Thomas; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Gieler, Uwe; Kahle, Julia; Kapp, Alexander; Nast, Alexander; Nemat, Katja; Ott, Hagen; Przybilla, Bernhard; Roecken, Martin; Schlaeger, Martin; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schmitt, Jochen; Schwennesen, Thomas; Staab, Doris; Worm, Margitta

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) represents a pruritic, non-contagious, chronic or chronically relapsing, inflammatory skin disease. The course of the disease may be complicated by bacterial or viral superinfections. The first manifestation of the disease and further flare-ups are due to genetic predisposition and also to a variety of further trigger factors. The therapy regimen should be adapted to disease symptoms that are actually present and consider individual features of the disease as reported by the patients or their parents. This short version of the German guideline on AD provides an overview of evidence-based diagnostic and treatment options. All recommendations made here are the result of a consensus of the scientific medical societies, working groups and support groups based on scientific data published to date. Abstracts and details of the studies cited are provided in the long version of this guideline (see: www.awmf.org). PMID:26713654

  7. Formulation and clinical evaluation of silymarin pluronic-lecithin organogels for treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Fatma M; Essa, Hanaa; El-Ammawi, Tarek; Abdelkader, Hamdy; Hussein, Amal K

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin is a naturally occurring flavonoid drug; evidence from recent research has highlighted its use as a potential treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD). Both poor water solubility and drug permeability have hindered the percutaneous absorption of silymarin. Formulation of silymarin into pluronic-lecithin organogel (PLO) basis for topical skin delivery is the main aim of this work. Six different PLO formulations were prepared containing various pluronic to lecithin ratios using two cosolvent systems of ethyl alcohol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Formulation 2 (20% pluronic and 3% lecithin) was found to be the optimal base for topical delivery of silymarin as it showed optimum pH, viscosity, drug content, and satisfactory in vitro silymarin permeation. The silymarin PLO formulation significantly relieved inflammatory symptoms of AD such as redness, swelling, and inflammation. These findings warrant the ability for application of these novel silymarin PLO formulations as a novel treatment for AD. PMID:27022248

  8. Curative effect of BCG-polysaccharide nuceic acid on atopic dermatitis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Hui; Wang; Ying; Ye; Yi-Qun; Zhang; Tao; Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bacilli Galmette-Gurin(BCG)-polysaccharide nuceic acid on atopic dermatitis in mice and its mechanism.Methods:Forty NC/Nga mice were selected and randomly divided into Group A(model group),Group B(dexamethasone treatment group),Group C(BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid treatment group) and Group D(control group) with 10 mice in each group.Atopic dermatitis model were constructed by applying 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on the skin of the mice.Mice in Group D were treated with acetone solution(100 μ L) on the foot pad and abdomen after hair removal at the age of 7 weeks.then on ear skin at the age of 8-13 weeks.For mice in A,B and C groups,100 μL of acetone solution containing 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene was applied to the foot pad and the abdomen at the age of 7 weeks,then on ear skins at the age of8 to 13 weeks.At the age of 7-13 weeks,mice in Group A and Group D were treated with 100 μL saline(i.p.);mice were given dexamethasone(0.1 mL/kg,i.p.) every other day for 7 weeks in Group B;mice were treated with BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid(0.5 mg/kg,i.p.) every other day for7 weeks in Group C.The ear thickness was measured every week and the scratching frequency was recorded 1 times for 10 min a week.The mice were sacrificed after the last administration of drugs,IgE,IL-4,IL-10,IL-I2 and IFN- γ in the plasma were detected using ELISA,and RT-PCR method was employed to detect the concentrations of IL-4,IL-10,IL-12 and IFN- γ proteins.After IIK staining,the lesion degree of inflammation in ear tissue was observed microscopically.Results:The ear thickness and scratching frequency of Group A were significantly higher than those in group B,C and D(P<0.05),and there was no significant difference between Group B and C(P>0.05);the concentrations of IgE,IL-4 and IL-10 in the plasma and the expression of IL-4,IL-10 mRNA in the spleen tissues of Group A,B and C were all significantly higher than those of Group D(P<0.05);the concentrations of

  9. Curative effect of BCG-polysaccharide nuceic acid on atopic dermatitis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Hui Wang; Ying Ye; Yi-Qun Zhang; Tao Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bacilli Galmette-Gurin (BCG)-polysaccharide nuceic acid on atopic dermatitis in mice and its mechanism. Methods: Forty NC/Nga mice were selected and randomly divided into Group A (model group), Group B (dexamethasone treatment group), Group C (BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid treatment group) and Group D (control group) with 10 mice in each group. Atopic dermatitis model were constructed by applying 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene on the skin of the mice. Mice in Group D were treated with acetone solution (100μL) on the foot pad and abdomen after hair removal at the age of 7 weeks, then on ear skin at the age of 8-13 weeks. For mice in A, B and C groups, 100μL of acetone solution containing 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene was applied to the foot pad and the abdomen at the age of 7 weeks, then on ear skins at the age of 8 to 13 weeks. At the age of 7-13 weeks, mice in Group A and Group D were treated with 100μL saline (i.p.);mice were given dexamethasone (0.1 mL/kg, i.p.) every other day for 7 weeks in Group B;mice were treated with BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day for 7 weeks in Group C. The ear thickness was measured every week and the scratching frequency was recorded 1 times for 10 min a week. The mice were sacrificed after the last administration of drugs. IgE, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γin the plasma were detected using ELISA, and RT-PCR method was employed to detect the concentrations of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γproteins. After HE staining, the lesion degree of inflammation in ear tissue was observed microscopically. Results:The ear thickness and scratching frequency of Group A were significantly higher than those in group B, C and D (P0.05);the concentrations of IgE, IL-4 and IL-10 in the plasma and the expression of IL-4, IL-10 mRNA in the spleen tissues of Group A, B and C were all significantly higher than those of Group D (P<0.05);the concentrations of plasma IL-12 and IFN-γ, and spleen

  10. A prospective study of atopic dermatitis managed without topical corticosteroids for a 6-month period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Mototsugu; Sato, Kenji; Yamada, Takahiro; Sato, Mitsuko; Fujisawa, Shigeki; Minaguchi, Satoko; Kimata, Hajime; Dozono, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are regarded as the mainstay treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD). As AD has a tendency to heal naturally, the long-term efficacy of TCS in AD management should be compared with the outcomes seen in patients with AD not using TCS. However, there are few long-term studies that consider patients with AD not using TCS. We designed a prospective multicenter cohort study to assess the clinical outcomes in patients with AD who did not use TCS for 6 months and then compared our results with an earlier study by Furue et al which considered AD patients using TCS over 6 months. Our patients’ clinical improvement was comparable with the patients described in Furue’s research. In light of this, it is reasonable for physicians to manage AD patients who decline TCS, as the expected long-term prognosis is similar whether they use TCS or not. PMID:27445501

  11. Sensitization study of dogs with atopic dermatitis in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD is a common dermatosis, defined as a genetic-related disease which predisposes to skin inflammation and pruritus, associated to a IgE-specific response in most of cases. Clinical diagnosis may be later complemented by skin allergy and/or serological tests. The aim of these tests is to identify possible allergens in order to enable the clinicians to select candidate antigens for allergen specific immunotherapy. In the present study 58 CAD positive animals were tested. All were submitted to the intradermal test (IDT and screened for the presence of antibodies against different antigens using ELISA. The obtained results show a high prevalence of sensitization among the tested dogs to house dust mites and to pollen ofC. dactylon. With this work it was possible to identify the main allergens involved in immunological response of dogs with CAD living in central area of Rio Grande do Sul.

  12. Griscelli syndrome: A case report of Reye′s syndrome and atopic dermatitis history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirzioglu Z

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in pigmentary dilution of the skin and the hair (silver hair, with the presence of large clumps of pigment in hair shafts, and an accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. Sixty cases of GS have been reported in the literature, but we could find no description of its oro-dental symptoms. Reye′s syndrome (RS is characterized by acute noninflammatory encephalopathy and renal and hepatic failure, while atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disorder with an immunologic basis. The aim of this paper is to describe the oro-dental and physical findings in a girl who had been diagnosed with GS at 3.5 years of age; she also had AD as well as a history of RS at infancy. We discuss the possible relationship between the three syndromes.

  13. Topical Herbal Application in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: A Review of Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghee Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbs are widely used in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD in Eastern Asian countries, and certain herbs regarded have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with AD. With the goal of developing a topical herbal agent for AD, we conducted a systematic review of in vivo studies of AD-like skin models for screening potential herbs. Searches were conducted from PubMed and EMBASE. After all, 22 studies were included for this review. We judged most of the domains of all studies to be at unclear risk of bias. Among 22 included studies, 21 herbs have been reported to reduce AD-like skin lesions in mouse models by suppressing Th2 cell response. Our findings may offer potential herbs for the topical application treatment of AD.

  14. Variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins in atopic dermatitis patients from Germany

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    Epplen Jörg T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. A main feature of AD as well as other allergic disorders is serum and tissue eosinophilia. Human eosinophils contain high amounts of cationic granule proteins, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein (MBP. Recently, variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We therefore genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ECP, EDN, EPO and MBP genes in a cohort of 361 German AD patients and 325 healthy controls. Results Genotype and allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for all polymorphisms investigated in this study. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any additional information. Conclusion We did not find evidence to support an influence of variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins for AD pathogenesis in this German cohort.

  15. IL-4 Gene Polymorphism May Contribute to an Increased Risk of Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hong; Cao, Xiu-Li; Wan, Yu-Jie; Meng, Jin; Guo, Lu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the associations between interleukin-4 (IL-4) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 590C/T and 589C/T, serum IL-4 levels, and atopic dermatitis (AD) in children. Methods. A total of 82 children with AD were randomly selected as the case group and divided into mild group (15 cases), moderate group (46 cases), and severe group (21 cases). Additionally, 100 healthy children were selected as the control group. Genotype frequencies of IL-4 SNPs were detected by PCR-RFLP. Serum IL-4 levels were measured by ELISA. Results. Significant differences were shown in genotype distributions and allele frequencies of 589C/T and allele frequencies of 590C/T (all P children.

  16. The cerebral SPECT in the psychiatric dysfunctions in severe atopic dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Severe atopic dermatitis (AD) usually has a psychiatric component that may influence the course of the cutaneous symptoms. Functional neuroimaging could evidence brain dysfunctions in this kind of patients. Objective: Evaluate the presence and characteristics of cerebral perfusion changes in severe AD patients using SPECT. Materials and methods: 11 severe AD patients were subjected to clinical psychiatric evaluation and 99mTc-ECD SPECT. Results: 90.3% of the patients presented a generalized anxiety disorder, 63.6% an obsessive compulsive disorder and 63.6% a depression. The 11 patients presented perfusion changes that prevailed at the prefrontal cortex. The alterations were concordant with the patterns described in those patients in which anxiety disorders and depression coexist. Conclusions: We demonstrate the frequent presence of perfusion changes in severe AD patients with psychiatric symptoms (au)

  17. The adaptive immune system in atopic dermatitis and implications on therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesner, Lennart M; Werfel, Thomas; Heratizadeh, Annice

    2016-07-01

    In atopic dermatitis (AD), the skin inflammation is believed to occur due to a misdirected immune reaction against harmless antigens on the one hand, and to a disturbed skin barrier on the other. In recent years, vast efforts have been made to investigate the relevance and details of the immune response to allergens. Clinically, it was demonstrated for the first time that aeroallergen exposure leads to worsening of AD symptoms. An overexpression of Th2 cytokines has been observed in acute and subacute lesions of AD. The clinical impact of the key Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 on atopic dermatitis has recently been shown in clinical studies with dupilumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks the IL-4/IL-13 receptor. In vitro data indicate, however, that the T cell response is not solely Th2-polarized but may lead to heterogeneous cytokine production involving IFN-γ and IL-17 in an allergen-dependent manner. Classical thymus-derived Foxp3 T cells have interestingly been detected in elevated numbers in the circulation of AD patients. Therapeutic approaches with allergen specific immunotherapy aim to induce regulatory T cells of the Tr1 type. The strikingly altered microbiome of AD skin with diminished diversity of bacteria on lesional skin but increases of S. aureus colonization and the sensitization against microbial allergens and homologue self-proteins deserve special attention. For the treatment of itch symptoms, which still represent a challenge in daily practice, promising data have been published on the relevance of the H(histamine)4-receptor and on mediators such as IL-31, TSLP. PMID:26967382

  18. Effect of a New Synbiotic Mixture on Atopic Dermatitis in Children: a Randomized-Controlled Trial

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    Reza Farid

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Atopic dermatitis (AD is the most common chronic relapsing skin disease seen in infancy and childhood. The intestinal microbiota play an important role in immune development and may play a role in the development of allergic disorders. Manipulation of the intestinal microbiota by synbiotics may therefore offer an approach to the prevention or treatment of AD and allergic diseases. We studied the clinical and immunologic effects of a new symbiotic (a mixture of seven probiotic strains of bacteria and Fructooligosaccharide in infants and children with AD.Methods:In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 40 infants and children aged 3 months to 6 years with AD received either a synbiotic or placebo for 8 weeks. The Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD index was recorded at baseline and also at 4 and 8 weeks of treatment.Findings:There was no significant difference between the probiotic and placebo group in baseline characteristics including sex, age, family history, corticosteroid usage and prick testing. Mean age was 23 months. The synbiotic group showed a significantly greater reduction in SCORAD than did the placebo group (P=0.001. No specific effect was demonstrated of the probiotics employed on cytokine profile (P=0.4, P=0.6. Egg white was the most common (45% allergen followed by peanut and cow's milk.Conclusion:This study provides evidence that a mixture of seven strains of probiotics and Fructooligosaccharide can clinically improve the severity of AD in young children. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on underlying immune responses and the potential long term benefits for patients with AD.

  19. Transcriptional Analysis of Hair Follicle-Derived Keratinocytes from Donors with Atopic Dermatitis Reveals Enhanced Induction of IL32 Gene by IFN-γ

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    Yoshie Yoshikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We cultured human hair follicle-derived keratinocytes (FDKs from plucked hairs. To gain insight into gene expression signatures that can distinguish atopic dermatitis from non-atopic controls without skin biopsies, we undertook a comparative study of gene expression in FDKs from adult donors with atopic dermatitis and non-atopic donors. FDK primary cultures (atopic dermatitis, n = 11; non-atopic controls, n = 7 before and after interferon gamma (IFN-γ treatment were used for microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. Comparison of FDKs from atopic and non-atopic donors indicated that the former showed activated pathways with innate immunity and decreased pathways of cell growth, as indicated by increased NLRP2 expression and decreased DKK1 expression, respectively. Treatment with IFN-γ induced the enhanced expression of IL32, IL1B, IL8, and CXCL1 in the cells from atopic donors compared to that in cells from non-atopic donors at 24 h after treatment. IL1B expression in FDKs after IFN-γ treatment correlated with IL32 expression. We hypothesized that overexpression of IL32 in hair follicle keratinocytes of patients with atopic dermatitis would lead to the excessive production of pro-IL1β and that the activation of IL1β from pro-IL1β by inflammasome complex, in which NLRP2 protein might be involved, would be augmented. This is the first report to show enhanced induction of cytokine/chemokine genes by IFN-γ in atopic dermatitis using cultured FDKs.

  20. MiR-155 is overexpressed in patients with atopic dermatitis and modulates T-cell proliferative responses by targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonkoly, Enikö; Janson, Peter; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Savinko, Terhi; Fyhrquist, Nanna; Eidsmo, Liv; Xu, Ning; Meisgen, Florian; Wei, Tianling; Bradley, Maria; Stenvang, Jan; Kauppinen, Sakari; Alenius, Harri; Lauerma, Antti; Homey, Bernhard; Winqvist, Ola; Ståhle, Mona; Pivarcsi, Andor

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that suppress gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of activated T cells within the skin....

  1. Twice weekly fluticasone propionate added to emollient maintenance treatment to reduce risk of relapse in atopic dermatitis: randomised, double blind, parallel group study

    OpenAIRE

    Berth-Jones, John; Damstra, Robert J; Golsch, Stefan; Livden, John K; Van Hooteghem, Oliver; Allegra, Fulvio; Parker, Christine A

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate, cream and ointment, applied twice weekly in addition to maintenance treatment with emollients, in reducing the risk of relapse of chronic recurrent atopic dermatitis.

  2. The study of microbial-intestinal tissue complex in patients with atopic dermatitis in different periods of clinical course of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Babkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was examined 40 patients with atopic dermatitis in various stages of the clinical course of dermatosis. It has revealed typical endoscopic changes of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with atopic dermatitis in quiescent and acute stages. It has studied the cellular composition of infiltrates and histomorphology of mucous coat of stomach and distal part of sigmoid colon. It has found the generic dysbiotic malfunctions of intestinal microflora in different periods of the clinical course of dermatosis. It is suggested an assumption about the relations between morphological changes of mucous coat of stomach and distal part of sigmoid colon in patients with atopic dermatitis with symtomatic dysbiotic disorders of the intestine and the severity of skin lesions in atopic dermatitis.

  3. Maintenance of an acidic stratum corneum prevents emergence of murine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yutaka; Man, Mao-Qiang; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Crumrine, Debra; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Kim, Esther G; Mauro, Theodora M; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M; Holleran, Walter M

    2009-07-01

    Neutralization of stratum corneum (SC) adversely impacts key epidermal functions, including permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity. Conversely, acidification of SC improves these functions in developmentally impaired (neonatal or aged) skin, and enhances function in normal skin. Hence, we hypothesized that acidification could alter the course of inflammatory dermatoses, which invariably exhibit an increased SC pH. Maintenance of a low pH by topical applications of the polyhydroxyl acid, lactobionic acid, during the repeated-challenge phase inhibited the development of oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis (AD). Neither gross/histological dermatitis nor altered barrier function developed, and emergence of epidermal hyperplasia was prevented; however, cytokine generation decreased. Acidification also largely normalized the development of hapten-induced changes in eosinophil/mast cell densities, density of chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2-positive lymphocytes, and serum IgE levels. The pH-induced improvement in barrier function most likely accounts for the anti-inflammatory activity, which could be further attributed to normalization of both lamellar body secretion and lamellar bilayer formation. Acidification of SC alone substantially prevents development of barrier abnormalities and downstream immune abnormalities during the elicitation phase of murine AD. These results provide direct evidence for the "outside-inside" pathogenesis of AD and further suggest that maintenance of an acidic SC pH could prevent the emergence of AD in humans. PMID:19177139

  4. Psychosocial Impacts And Quality of Life of Children With Atopic Dermatitis

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    M. M. Abu-Sekkien, A. M. Ebrahim*, H. M. Hassan** Y. A. Baraka

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on 100 children with atopic dermatitis (AD attending Dermatology Clinic, Al-Hussein University Hospital and an equal number of children as controls. The aim of the study was to determine the psychosocial impacts of AD on children and their families, to define quality of life (QOL of children and their families and to determine the relationship between these items and AD severity. A cross-section, analytical, clinic based study design was chosen to perform this research. Criteria for diagnosis of depression and anxiety were according to DSM IV. Also, we used The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index and The Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire to assess the impact of AD on the children's quality of life and to assess the impact of AD on the quality of family life, respectively. The most common behavioural and psychiatric impacts in children were dependence (33.0% and anger (26.0%. Also, AD interfered with children's' social life and recreation in 73.0% and 29.0% of them, respectively. While, mothers' psychiatric impacts and family disturbances were more in AD families; 43.0% and 70.0%, respectively. The impacts of AD were more in children and families with severe AD with statistically significant differences. Also, 86.0% of children with AD and 62.0% of their mothers had poor QOL.

  5. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile And Factors Affecting Severity Of Atopic Dermatitis In North Indian Chilldren

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    Sarkar Rashmi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, relapsing dermatitis commonly affecting children. Various epidemiologic factors and clinical patterns of the same were evaluated in 125 patients out of 418 attending the pediatric dermatology clinic over a period of 11/2 years. Of these, 26 were infants (upto 1 year of age and 99 were children. Mean duration of the disease in the infantile group was 3 months while in the childhood group it was 6 years. In the infantile group, family history of atopy was found in 11 patients (42.3%, while in the childhood group 35 (35.35% had family history of atopy, 7 (7.07% had personal history of atopy and 2 (2.02% had both personal and family history of atopy. The infantile group had more frequent facial involvement and acute type of eczema, while in the childhood type, site involvement was less specific and chronic type of eczema was more frequent. Most of the patients had mild to moderate degree of severity of the disease.

  6. 紫外线治疗特应性皮炎的进展%Advances in the treatment of atopic dermatitis with ultraviolet rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周飞红; 喻雅也; 李东升

    2013-01-01

    特应性皮炎是一种慢性复发性炎症性疾病,紫外线通过调节T细胞功能及相关炎症介质而取得良好疗效.不同波段紫外线因其特性而应用于不同类型的特应性皮炎:窄谱中波紫外线治疗儿童期特应性皮炎显示出良好疗效及安全性,认为是慢性患者的首选治疗;急性患者首选长波紫外线照射;局限性皮损选择308 nm准分子激光为佳.紫外线治疗特应性皮炎临床尚处于初级阶段,在照射剂量和照射疗程方面,各家报道不一.%Atopic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease.By regulating the function of T cells and related inflammation factors,ultraviolet rays (UV) exert a satisfactory therapeutic effect on atopic dermatitis.Because of distinct characteristics,different spectrum of UV is applicable to specific types of atopic dermatitis.Narrow-band UVB shows good efficacy and safety in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in childhood,and is considered to be the best choice for patients with chronic atopic dermatitis; UVA is the preferred choice for patients with acute atopic dermatitis,and 308-nm excimer laser is suitable for local lesions of atopic dermatitis.However,there has been no uniform standard for the dose and duration of UV irradiation in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  7. Alcohol intake in pregnancy increases the child's risk of atopic dermatitis. the COPSAC prospective birth cohort study of a high risk population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Giwercman Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis has increased four-fold over the recent decades in developed countries, indicating that changes in environmental factors associated with lifestyle may play an important role in this epidemic. It has been proposed that alcohol consumption may be one contributing risk factor in this development. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of alcohol intake during pregnancy on the development of atopic dermatitis during the first 7 years of life. METHOD: The COPSAC cohort is a prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of 411 children born to mothers with a history of asthma, followed up for 7 years with scheduled visits every 6 months as well as visits for acute exacerbations of atopic dermatitis. Risk of atopic dermatitis from any alcohol consumption during pregnancy was analyzed as time-to-diagnosis and adjusted for known risk factors. RESULTS: 177 of 411 children developed atopic dermatitis before age 7 years. We found a significant effect of alcohol intake during pregnancy on atopic dermatitis development (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.99 p=0.024. This conclusion was unaffected after adjustment for smoking, mother's education and mother's atopic dermatitis. LIMITATIONS: The selection of a high-risk cohort, with all mothers suffering from asthma, and all children having a gestational age above 35 weeks with no congenital abnormality, systemic illness, or history of mechanical ventilation or lower airway infection. CONCLUSION: Alcohol intake by pregnant women with a history of asthma, is significantly associated with an increased risk for the child for developing atopic dermatitis during the first 7 years of life.

  8. Efficacy of Astaxanthin for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihisa, Yoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Matsunaga, Kenji; Rehman, Mati Ur; Maoka, Takashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with various factors, including immunological abnormalities and exposure to allergens. Astaxanthin (AST) is a xanthophyll carotenoid that has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects and to regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, we investigated whether AST could improve the dermatitis and pruritus in a murine model of AD using NC/Nga mice. In addition to a behavioral evaluation, the effects of AST on the AD were determined by the clinical skin severity score, serum IgE level, histological analyses of skin, and by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting analyses for the expression of inflammation-related factors. AST (100 mg/kg) or vehicle (olive oil) was orally administered once day and three times a week for 26 days. When compared with vehicle-treated group, the administration of AST significantly reduced the clinical skin severity score. In addition, the spontaneous scratching in AD model mice was reduced by AST administration. Moreover, the serum IgE level was markedly decreased by the oral administration of AST compared to that in vehicle-treated mice. The number of eosinophils, total and degranulated mast cells all significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. The mRNA and protein levels of eotaxin, MIF, IL-4, IL-5 and L-histidine decarboxylase were significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that AST improves the dermatitis and pruritus in AD via the regulation of the inflammatory effects and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27023003

  9. Lower Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis and Allergic Sensitization among Children and Adolescents with a Two-Sided Migrant Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Sinja Alexandra; Schmitz, Roma; Thamm, Michael; Ellert, Ute

    2016-03-01

    In industrialized countries atopic diseases have been reported to be less likely in children and adolescents with a migrant background compared to non-migrants. This paper aimed at both examining and comparing prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis and allergic sensitization to specific IgE antibodies in children and adolescents with and without a migrant background. Using data of the population-based German Health Interview and Examination Survey for children and adolescents (KiGGS;n = 17,450; 0-17 years), lifetime and 12-month prevalence of atopic diseases and point prevalence of 20 common allergic sensitizations were investigated among migrants compared to non-migrants. Multiple regression models were used to estimate the association of atopic disease and allergic sensitization with migrant background. In multivariate analyses with substantial adjustment we found atopic dermatitis about one-third less often (OR 0.73, 0.57-0.93) in participants with a two-sided migrant background. Statistically significant associations between allergic sensitizations and a two-sided migrant background remained for birch (OR 0.73, 0.58-0.90), soybean (OR 0.72, 0.54-0.96), peanut (OR 0.69, 0.53-0.90), rice (OR 0.64, 0.48-0.87), potato (OR 0.64, 0.48-0.85), and horse dander (OR 0.58, 0.40-0.85). Environmental factors and living conditions might be responsible for the observed differences. PMID:26927147

  10. Potential role of reduced environmental UV exposure as a driver of the current epidemic of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Zirwas, Matthew J; Elias, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The basis for the sudden and dramatic increase in atopic dermatitis (AD) and related atopic diseases in the second half of the 20th century is unclear. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that the transition from rural to urban living leads to reduced childhood exposure to pathogenic microorganisms...... review the salubrious effects of suberythemogenic doses of UVB irradiation for the skin barrier. We then discuss how the lack of sufficient UVB exposure could have contributed to the rapid increase in the incidence of AD in developed countries. This hypothesis offers a separate but not competing partial...

  11. Chemical Composition and Inhibitory Effect of Lentinula edodes Ethanolic Extract on Experimentally Induced Atopic Dermatitis in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ju Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ethanolic extract of Lentinula edodes was partially analyzed and then characterized for its efficacy in treating atopic dermatitis. Polyphenols were determined to be the major antioxidant component in the extract (6.12 mg/g, followed by flavonoids (1.76 mg/g, β-carotene (28.75 μg/g, and lycopene (5.25 μg/g. An atopic dermatitis (AD model was established and epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured after oral administration of the L. edodes extract for 4 weeks. L. edodes extract decreased Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE and 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB-induced expression of several inflammatory cytokines in the ears, cervical lymph nodes, and splenocytes. Consequently, L. edodes extract may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD attributable to its immunomodulatory effects.

  12. External Application of Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone, Isolated from Sargassum muticum, Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Chul; Kang, Na-Jin; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Kim, Sejin; Na, Min-Chull; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Lee, Nam-Ho; Ko, Mi-Hee; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Allergic skin inflammation such as atopic dermatitis is characterized by skin barrier dysfunction, edema, and infiltration with various inflammatory cells. The anti-inflammatory effects of Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone, isolated from Sargassum muticum, have been described in many diseases, but the mechanism by which it modulates the immune system is poorly understood. In this study, the ability of Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone to suppress allergic reactions was investigated using a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. The Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone-treated group showed significantly decreased immunoglobulin E in serum. Also, Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone treatment resulted in a smaller lymph node size with reduced the thickness and length compared to the induction group. In addition, Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone inhibited the expression of interleukin-4, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin-stimulated lymphocytes. These results suggest that Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27123161

  13. Immunomodulating and Anti-Relapse Effects of Ozone Therapy in Atopic Dermatitis in Preschool and Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illek Y.Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study the state of immunologic responsiveness, immunomodulating and anti-relapse effects of ozone therapy in children with severe extended atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods. We examined 64 children (38 boys and 26 girls aged 5–10 years with severe extended atopic dermatitis. Group 1 patients (n=33 received complex standard treatment, Group 2 (n=31 — complex therapy in combination with ozone therapy. Results. Complex standard therapy resulted in complete, though short, clinical remission; and in remission the patients preserved the changed parameters of cellular and humoral components of immune system, nonspecific resistance and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in blood serum; while the patients receiving complex therapy combined with ozone therapy were found to have more rapid improvement of clinical indices, normalization of the most parameters of immunologic responsiveness and a long clinical remission.

  14. The effect of antibacterial soap with 1.5% triclocarban on Staphylococcus aureus in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, D L; Hanifin, J M; Berge, C A; Keswick, B H; Neumann, P B

    2000-10-01

    This double-blind study determined whether daily bathing with an antibacterial soap would reduce the number of Staphylococcus aureus on the skin and result in clinical improvement of atopic dermatitis. For 9 weeks, 50 patients with moderately severe atopic dermatitis bathed daily with either an antimicrobial soap containing 1.5% triclocarban or the placebo soap. They also used a nonmedicated moisturizer and 0.025% triamcinolone acetonide cream as needed, but the availability of the corticosteroid cream was discontinued after 6 weeks. The antimicrobial soap regimen caused significantly greater improvement in the severity and extent of skin lesions than the placebo soap regimen, which correlated with reductions both in S aureus in patients with positive cultures at baseline and in total aerobic organisms. Outcome measures included reductions in S aureus, total aerobic organisms, and dermatologic assessments. Overall, daily bathing with an antibacterial soap was well tolerated, provided clinical improvement, and reduced levels of skin microorganisms. PMID:11109156

  15. Skin-protective effects of a zinc oxide-functionalized textile and its relevance for atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Cornelia Wiegand,1 Uta-Christina Hipler,1 Sebastian Boldt,2 Joachim Strehle,2 Uwe Wollina21Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Jena, Jena, Germany; 2Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, GermanyAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the impairment of the skin-barrier function, increased oxidative cellular stress, and bacterial colonization. Hence, medical therapies of...

  16. Skin-protective effects of a zinc oxide-functionalized textile and its relevance for atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Boldt, Sebastian; Strehle, Joachim; Wollina, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the impairment of the skin-barrier function, increased oxidative cellular stress, and bacterial colonization. Hence, medical therapies of AD aim to control infection, reduce inflammation, and restore skin-barrier function by use of topical and systemic antibacterial drugs, topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and moisturizers. Textiles have the longest and most intense contact with the human skin, an...

  17. Sensitization rates of causative allergens for dogs with atopic dermatitis: detection of canine allergen-specific IgE

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Ha-Jung; Jang, Hye-Jin; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE serology tests became commercially available in the 1980s. Since then these tests have been widely used to diagnose and treat allergic skin diseases. However, the relationship between a positive reaction and disease occurrence has been controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate allergens using a serologic allergy test in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). Dogs clinically diagnosed with AD (n=101) were tested using an allergen-specific IgE immunoassay. Among ...

  18. 342 Epidemiology of Atopic Dermatitis in the Allergy Service of a Third Level Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Gallardo, Luis Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background The creation of an Allergy service was required because of the high frequency of allergic diseases among paediatric population in the general consultation of a third level medical centre. Objective The purpose of this study is to report the cases of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) in the Allergy service from a Third level medical centre since its creation in July 2005. Methods This is a descriptive, retrospective, transversal study from July 2005 to February 2011. Selected medical records o...

  19. CSACI position statement: safety of topical calcineurin inhibitors in the management of atopic dermatitis in children and adults

    OpenAIRE

    Segal, Audrey O; Ellis, Anne K; Kim, Harold L.

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a condition frequently encountered in medical practices across the country. Arming ourselves with appropriate and safe treatment modalities to provide relief for this chronic and relapsing inflammatory condition is of utmost importance to our patients and their families. Utilizing topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) for the treatment of AD not responsive to high-potency corticosteroids, or low-potency corticosteroids and localized to the face, eyelids, and skin fol...

  20. A Comparison of Mental Health Problems among Children with Alopecia Areata or Atopic Dermatitis and Their Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Karambetsos, Charilaos; Kouskoukis, Constantinos; Giannakopoulos, George; Agapidaki, Eirini; Mihas, Constantinos; Katsarou, Alexandra; Miridakis, Constantinos; Vatakis, Argiro; Kolaitis, Gerasimos

    2012-01-01

    Aims: There is an increased interest in the psychosocial impact of pediatric skin diseases on children and their families. The present study tried to examine possible differences regarding mental health problems among children with alopecia areata (AA) or atopic dermatitis (AD), and their parents. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Dermatology, “Penteli” Children’s Hospital and Department of Dermatology, Athens University Medical ...

  1. T-cell Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell Subpopulations in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Show Major Differences in the Emission of Recent Thymic Emigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Helle; Deleuran, Mette; Vestergaard, Christian; Deleuran, Bent; Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    We used T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) to evaluate thymic function in adult patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. We observed that men, but not women, with atopic dermatitis had a significantly faster decline in TREC content with increasing age compared with healthy men. In cont...... indicates that atopic dermatitis patients can have compensatory emissions of thymic emigrants, whereas psoriatic patients do not, thus supporting different thymic function in these two diseases....

  2. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Bodnár, E.; Borbíró, I.; Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.; Hunyadi, J.

    2011-10-01

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: “Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles” European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  3. Differential Features between Chronic Skin Inflammatory Diseases Revealed in Skin-Humanized Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, Marta; Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; Illera, Nuria; Galvez, Victoria; Navarro, Manuel; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are chronic and relapsing inflammatory diseases of the skin affecting a large number of patients worldwide. Psoriasis is characterized by a T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 immunological response, whereas acute atopic dermatitis lesions exhibit T helper type 2-dominant inflammation. Current single gene and signaling pathways-based models of inflammatory skin diseases are incomplete. Previous work allowed us to model psoriasis in skin-humanized mice through proper combinations of inflammatory cell components and disruption of barrier function. Herein, we describe and characterize an animal model for atopic dermatitis using similar bioengineered-based approaches, by intradermal injection of human T helper type 2 lymphocytes in regenerated human skin after partial removal of stratum corneum. In this work, we have extensively compared this model with the previous and an improved version of the psoriasis model, in which T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 lymphocytes replace exogenous cytokines. Comparative expression analyses revealed marked differences in specific epidermal proliferation and differentiation markers and immune-related molecules, including antimicrobial peptides. Likewise, the composition of the dermal inflammatory infiltrate presented important differences. The availability of accurate and reliable animal models for these diseases will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis and provide valuable tools for drug development and testing. PMID:26763433

  4. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: 'Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles' European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  5. Desoximetasone 0.25% and tacrolimus 0.1% ointments versus tacrolimus alone in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Adelaide A; Koo, John; Fowler, Joseph; Berman, Brian; Rosenberg, Carl; Levitt, Jacob

    2006-11-01

    Long-term in vitro compatibility of desoximetasone and tacrolimus ointments prompted the current trial in humans. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of twice-daily simultaneous application of desoximetasone and tacrolimus in the treatment of atopic dermatitis versus tacrolimus monotherapy. Eighty-two subjects were treated in this multicenter, single-group, double-blinded, paired, 3-week follow-up clinical study of desoximetasone 0.25% and tacrolimus 0. 1% ointments versus tacrolimus 0.1% ointment and vehicle. Subjects were treated twice daily for 21 days or until clearing. Safety and efficacy were assessed at days 3, 7, 14, and 21. The combination of desoximetasone and tacrolimus ointment was superior to tacrolimus alone (P=.0002) in treating atopic dermatitis as measured by the summary of the scores for erythema, lichenification, pruritus, scaling/dryness, and oozing/crusting. Of note, pruritus at the application site was diminished in subjects treated with desoximetasone and tacrolimus together compared with tacrolimus alone (P=.04). Combination treatment with desoximetasone and tacrolimus offered increased efficacy and tolerability over tacrolimus alone in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:17186796

  6. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szikszai, Z., E-mail: szikszai@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Kertesz, Zs. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Bodnar, E. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary); Borbiro, I. [Abiol Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Hunyadi, J. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-10-15

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: 'Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles' European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  7. Effects of oral vitamin E on treatment of atopic dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Jaffary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD remains to be determined; recently a possible change in the immune system with production of immunoglobulins is proposed. As vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, with the ability to decrease the serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE in atopic patients, we aimed to evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E on treatment of AD. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised seventy participants with mild-to-moderate AD, based on the Hanifin and Rajka diagnostic criteria. The patients were randomly selected from teaching skin clinics in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number, receiving vitamin E (400 IU/day and placebo for four 4 months. Each month, the extent, severity, and subjective symptoms including itch and sleeplessness were measured by SCORAD index. Three months after the end of intervention, the recurrence rate was assessed. Results: The improvement in all symptoms, except sleeplessness, was significantly higher in the group receiving vitamin E than in controls (-1.5 vs. 0.218 in itching, -10.85 vs. -3.54 in extent of lesion, and -11.12 vs. -3.89 in SCORAD index, respectively, P 0.05. Conclusion: This study suggests that vitamin E can improve the symptoms and the quality of life in patients with AD. As vitamin E has no side effects with a dosage of 400 IU/day, it can be recommended for the treatment of AD.

  8. Quality of life measures in Italian children with atopic dermatitis and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monti Fiorella

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of atopic dermatitis (AD on children's quality of life (QoL in US and European countries is relatively well known, though rarely evaluated in the Italian population. Moreover, the association between child age and QoL has not been enough investigated, even though few studies detected a worse QoL in youngest AD children. The aim of the study was to evaluate the QoL in an Italian sample of atopic children and their families, also exploring a possible association with child age. Methods 60 AD children aged between 1-12 years and their mothers completed specific QoL questionnaires (IDQoL/CDLQI, DFI and a clinician completed a measure of AD severity (SCORAD. Results AD severity (Objective SCORAD significantly correlated with QoL measures. Severe AD children showed higher IDQoL/CDLQI and DFI scores compared to mild and moderate AD groups (P = 0.006 and P P = 0.014. DFI scores negatively correlated with children's age (P = 0.046, but did not differ when considering child age ranges. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed a significant association between Objective SCORAD and QoL measures. Conclusions A strong association between severe AD and poor QoL, both in children and mothers, was found in the Italian sample, in line with the international literature. Family's QoL scores were sensitively related to AD severity, more than the child's QoL, emphasising that the disease has a deep impact on the family. A significant association between age and QoL was only partially found and needs further investigation.

  9. The association between phthalate exposure and atopic dermatitis with a discussion of phthalate induced secretion of interleukin-1β and thymic stromal lymphopoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Line E K; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Frederiksen, Hanne; Main, Katharina M; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-06-01

    Phthalate diesters are widely used as emollients in plastic and cosmetics as well as in food packaging and perfumes, potentially leading to prolonged and repeated dermal, oral and airborne exposure. We here review published articles that have evaluated the putative role of phthalate diesters in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and discuss possible pathogenic pathways. A literature search resulted in 563 articles in Embase and 263 articles in Pubmed. After identification of relevant articles based on screening of titles, abstracts and reference lists, a total of 39 articles were selected and included. While no clear association has been shown between systemic phthalate levels and atopic dermatitis in human studies, animal data suggests that phthalates may worsen dermatitis and in vitro data suggests that interleukin-4 could be upregulated. Moreover, both loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and atopic dermatitis have been associated with elevated systemic phthalate levels. There is a need for prospective studies to clarify the possible pathogenic role of phthalate diesters in atopic dermatitis and the associated health risk, especially with the general trend towards barrier restoration with emollients in infants at risk of developing atopic dermatitis. In summary, we conclude that the results from published studies are controversial and inconclusive. PMID:26894419

  10. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Ran Kim

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD. Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  11. [What additional measures should be recommended in atopic dermatitis in children?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boralevi, F

    2005-01-01

    The so-called 'adjuvant' measures are an important part of atopic dermatitis (AD) consultations. The practitioner is the 'expert' in the patients' eyes in prescribing, proposing, counselling and replying to the questions concerning moisturizers, thermal spring water cures, the resort to alternative medical, and vaccinations. Moisturizers are aimed at rapidly restoring water in the epidermis, decreasing the sensitivity to irritants and improving the patients' comfort. The available products are usually composed of water, occlusive agents, humidifiers, varyingly combined with tensioactive agents, preservatives and perfumes... Their short term efficacy has been demonstrated, but no study has shown superiority of one product over another. The recommended treatment is 1 to 2 daily applications of a cream or lotion, selected among the products having demonstrated their efficacy, contained the least amount of irritant or sensitizers, the presentation and cost of which is acceptable to the patient. There are no arguments to recommend moisturizers in the absence of xerosis, nor for prolonged periods of clinical remission. Spring water thermal cures. In France there are many cure centres and the spring waters used are distinguished by their clinical or physical features. Although there are no studies that clearly establish their efficacy in AD, the craze and satisfaction of many patients for spring water thermal cures must be taken into consideration, as well as the educational dimension, in the hopes that a consensus will be reached and that regular assessments be made. Alternative medical practices, such as homeopathy or acupuncture, represent a therapeutic alternative chosen by more than one third of patients with AD. However, no study has sufficiently demonstrated the interest of these alternatives and they cannot therefore be integrated in the validated arsenal of treatments. Used in various oriental countries, Chinese herbs have been the subject of controlled studies

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of cathepsin L in atopic dermatitis and lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A El Ashmawy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cathepsin L is a member of papain superfamily. It seems to promote T-cell survival, selection maturation in the thymus and enhance the antigen presentation. Cathepsin L plays an important role in tumor necrosis factors (TNF-α induced cell death. Also it degrades the tight junction between cornedesomses in the epidermis. Elevated expression of cathepsin L has been found in many inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine immunohistochemical expression of cathepsin L in atopic dermatitis (AD and lichen planus (LP patients in order to evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of both diseases. Materials and Methods: This study included 15 patients with AD (Group I, 15 patients with LP (Group II, in addition to 10 healthy skin specimens served as controls (Group III. Punch biopsies were taken from lesional skin of the patients and controls for immunohistochemical detection of cathepsin L expression. Results: Highly significant increase was found in cathepsin L expression in AD and LP patients compared to controls [P = 0.001]. Conclusion: Cathepsin L could be implicated as an important protease in the pathogenesis of AD and LP. It could be a useful marker for assessing AD severity.

  13. Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis in Chinese Children aged 1–7 ys

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    Guo, Yifeng; Li, Ping; Tang, Jianping; Han, Xiuping; Zou, Xiaoyan; Xu, Gang; Xu, Zigang; Wei, Fenglei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Min; Xiao, Fengli; Zong, Wenkai; Shen, Chunping; Li, Jianhong; Liu, Jianzhong; Luo, Yongqi; Chang, Jing; Sheng, Nan; Dong, Chun; Zhang, Duo; Dai, Xing; Zhou, Jinjie; Meng, Chi; Niu, Hongxi; Shi, Xuemei; Zhang, Xinglian; Xiang, Juan; Xu, Haitao; Ran, Qin; Zhou, Yi; Li, Ming; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Ruhong; Gao, Xinghua; Wang, Hua; Gu, Heng; Ma, Lin; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) is increasing worldwide. Up to date, there has been no face-to-face nation-wide study in China. We aim to explore the prevalence of clinical diagnosed AD in children aged 1–7 ys in China. Twelve metropolises were chosen from different areas of China. In each region, we selected 4–10 kindergartens and 2–5 vaccination clinics randomly. A complete history-taking and skin examination were performed by dermatologists. The definite diagnosis of AD and the severity were determined by two or three dermatologists. All criteria concerned in UK diagnosis criteria, characteristic presentation of AD and atypical manifestations were recorded in detail. A total of 13998 children from 84 kindergartens and 40 vaccination clinics were included. The prevalence of AD was 12.94% by clinical diagnosis of dermatologists overall, with 74.6% of mild AD. Comparatively, prevalence of AD based on UK diagnostic criteria was 4.76%. This is the first face-to-face nation-wide study in Chinese children aged 1–7 ys, revealing that the prevalence of AD in children is closer to that of wealthier nations. PMID:27432148

  14. The role of filaggrin mutations during pregnancy and postpartum: atopic dermatitis and genital skin diseases.

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    Bager, P; Wohlfahrt, J; Boyd, H; Thyssen, J P; Melbye, M

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the epidermal filaggrin gene (FLG) are associated with skin barrier dysfunction (dry skin, less acidic skin, and fissured skin), and atopic dermatitis (AD) with a severe and persistent course. Because pregnancy and delivery further impairs normal skin barrier functions (immune suppression, mechanical stress), we studied the possible role of FLG mutations on the risk of AD flares, genital infections, and postpartum problems related to perineal trauma. FLG-genotyping was performed in a population-based sample of 1837 women interviewed in the 12th and 30th weeks of pregnancy and 6 months postpartum as part of the Danish National Birth Cohort study 1996-2002. We found that FLG mutations also influence pregnancy-related skin disease; thus, women with FLG mutations had an increased risk of AD flares during pregnancy (OR 10.5, 95% CI 3.6-30.5) and of enduring postpartum physical problems linked to perineal trauma during delivery (OR 11.1, 95% CI 1.1-107.7). PMID:26835886

  15. Heat-Killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model

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    Eun-Ju Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown the immunomodulatory effect of heat-killed lactic acid bacteria. Atopic dermatitis (AD is an allergic skin disease, caused by immune dysregulation among other factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 (EF-2001 on AD. We established an in vivo AD model by repeated local exposure of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE; house dust mite extract and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB to the ears of mice. After oral administration of EF-2001 for four weeks, the epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured. In addition, the gene expression levels of pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes were assayed. EF-2001 attenuated AD symptoms based on the ear thickness, histopathological analysis, and serum immunoglobulin levels. Moreover, EF-2001 decreased the DFE/DNCB-induced expression of various pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes. These results suggest that EF-2001 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD owing to its immunomodulatory effects.

  16. Characteristics of scratching behavior in ADJM mice (atopic dermatitis from Japanese mice).

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    Nakasone, Tasuku; Sato, Takumi; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Inoue, Toshio; Kamei, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of scratching behavior in atopic dermatitis from Japanese mice (ADJM) mice, the effects of some antagonists of pruritogens on this behavior were studied. Both male and female ADJM mice showed frequent scratching behavior around the face, abdomen and back. The number of scratching behavior around the face was greater than on the abdomen and back, and scratching behavior in female mice was significantly more frequent than in male mice. Histamine H1 antagonist, chlorpheniramine, p.o., inhibited this behavior potently and dose-dependently. Histamine H1 antagonist with serotonin 5-TH(5-hydroxytryptamine)2 antagonist, cyproheptadine, also inhibited this behavior. However, NK1 antagonist, aprepitant, p.o., had no significant inhibitory effect even at a dose of 100 mg/kg, p.o., Mu antagonist, naloxone, and kappa agonist, nalfurafine, significantly inhibited this behavior at doses of 0.3 mg/kg, s.c., and 0.01 mg/kg, p.o., respectively. Histamine contents in the skin of ADJM mice were significantly higher than in BALB/c mice. These results strongly indicate that scratching behavior in ADJM mice is related with histamine H1, opioid mu and opioid kappa receptors. PMID:25578901

  17. Evaluation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with atopic dermatitis

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    Nutan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the research on atopic dermatitis (AD has focused on the pathophysiological role of the immune system in AD, and the role of endocrine signals in the pathology of AD has not been explored. Current research has shown a link between the neuroendocrine and immune functions. Aim: The aim was to measure the serum basal cortisol levels and cortisol levels following a low-dose ACTH stimulation test in patients with AD before and after treatment with corticosteroids. Methods: Three groups of patients with AD were evaluated: mild, moderate, and severe. Basal cortisol levels following an ACTH stimulation test were measured before and after treatment with topical steroids when an improvement in the disease activity by 75% as determined by the SCORAD index was observed. Results: Eighteen patients of the severe group at baseline showed an impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis with cortisol levels <250 nmol/l during their first visit. A total of 13 of 18 patients regained their HPA axis activity when the baseline cortisol was measured after using topical corticosteroids which resulted in 75% improvement in the disease activity. Conclusions: The disease activity rather than the use of topical costicosteroids is responsible for the low basal levels in patients with severe AD.

  18. Modulation of cathepsin G expression in severe atopic dermatitis following medium-dose UVA1 phototherapy

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    Altmeyer Peter

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decade, medium-dose UVA1 phototherapy (50 J/cm2 has achieved great value within the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis (AD. The purpose of our study was to investigate to what extent UVA1 irradiation is able to modulate the status of protease activity by the use of a monoclonal antibody labeling cathepsin G. Methods In order to further elucidate the mechanisms by which medium-dose UVA1 irradiation leads to an improvement of skin status in patients with AD, biopsy specimens from 15 patients before and after treatment were analyzed immunohistochemically for proteolytic activation. Results Compared to lesional skin of patients with AD before UVA1 irradiation, the number of cells positive for cathepsin G within the dermal infiltrate decreased significantly after treatment. The decrease of cathepsin G+ cells was closely linked to a substantial clinical improvement in skin condition. Conclusions In summary, our findings demonstrated that medium-dose UVA1 irradiation leads to a modulation of the expression of cathepsin G in the dermal inflammatory infiltrate in patients with severe AD. Cathepsin G may attack laminin, proteoglycans, collagen I and insoluble fibronectin, to provoke proinflammatory events, to degrade the basement membrane, to destroy the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases and to increase the endothelial permeability. Therefore, its down-regulation by UVA1 phototherapy may induce the reduction of skin inflammation as well as improvement of the skin condition.

  19. Comparison of Corneal Topographical and Biomechanical Properties in Cases with Atopic Dermatitis and Healthy Subjects

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    Yusuf Yıldırım

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To compare the topographic, biomechanical, and thickness properties of corneas of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and of healthy individuals. Ma te ri al and Met hod: In this prospective, cross-sectional, and comparative study, 28 healthy individuals (control group and 28 patients with AD (study group were enrolled. Corneal topographical measurements using Scheimpflug camera with a Placido disc topographer (Sirius, corneal biomechanical properties using Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, and central corneal thickness (CCT using ultrasonic pachymeter were obtained for each participant. Re sults: Topographic parameters were not significantly different between both groups (p>0.05. Corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF were found same in both groups. CCT measured with ultrasonic pachymeter was significantly lower in patients with AD compared to health controls (p<0.05. Dis cus si on: No significant difference was found between patients with AD and age-matched healthy individuals regarding the corneal topographic findings and corneal biomechanical parameters. CCT was found to be lower in cases with AD than in healthy controls. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 140-4

  20. A Probiotic Preparation Alleviates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Murine Models.

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    Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jin-Eung; Yoon, Yeo-Sang; Seo, Jae-Gu; Chung, Myung-Jun; Yum, Do-Young

    2016-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex etiology that encompasses immunologic responses. AD is frequently associated with elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and common environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. Several recent studies have documented the role of specific lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of AD in humans and mice. In this study, the efficacy of Duolac ATP, a probiotic preparation, was determined in a mouse model with AD-like skin lesions. Alterations in the cytokine levels and histological staining suggested the alleviation of AD. The in vivo test showed that T helper (Th)2 cytokines, IgE, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-5, were significantly downregulated, whereas Th1 cytokines, IL-12p40 and interferon (IFN)-γ, were upregulated in all groups of mice treated with Duolac ATP compared to that observed in the group of mice treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) alone. Moreover, the scratch score decreased in all mice treated with Duolac ATP. Staining of the dorsal area of the mice in each group with hematoxylin and eosin and toluidine blue further confirmed the alleviation of AD in mice orally treated with Duolac ATP. These results suggest that Duolac ATP inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice by suppressing the Th2 cell response and increasing the Th1 cell response. Thus, Duolac ATP is beneficial and effective for the treatment of AD-like skin lesions. PMID:27123166

  1. A Pilot Study of Emollient Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Atopic Dermatitis

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    Simpson, Eric L.; Berry, Trista M.; Brown, Peter A.; Hanifin, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prevention strategies in atopic dermatitis (AD) using allergen avoidance have not been consistently effective. New research reveals the importance of the skin barrier in the development of AD and possibly food allergy and asthma. Correcting skin barrier defects from birth may prevent AD onset or moderate disease severity. Objective We sought to determine the feasibility of skin barrier protection as a novel AD prevention strategy. Methods We enrolled 22 neonates at high risk for developing AD in a feasibility pilot study using emollient therapy from birth. Results No intervention-related adverse events occurred in our cohort followed up for a mean time of 547 days. Of the 20 subjects who remained in the study, 3 (15.0%) developed AD, suggesting a protective effect when compared with historical controls. Skin barrier measurements remained within ranges seen in normal-appearing skin. Limitations No conclusions regarding efficacy can be made without a control group. Conclusions Skin barrier repair from birth represents a novel and feasible approach to AD prevention. Further studies are warranted to determine the efficacy of this approach. PMID:20692725

  2. Prevalence of childhood atopic dermatitis: an urban and rural community-based study in Shanghai, China.

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    Feng Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory and chronically relapsing disorder with increasing prevalence. However, little is known about its prevalence in Shanghai, the top metropolitan of China. This study will estimate and compare the prevalence of AD in urban and rural areas in representative samples of 3 to 6-year-old children in Shanghai. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed. Pre-school children were obtained by cluster sampling from 8 communities in different districts in Shanghai. The main instrument was the core questionnaire module for AD used in the U.K. Working Party's study. All the data were statistically analyzed by EpiData 3.1 and SPSS16.0. A total of 10,436 children completed the study satisfactorily, with a response rate of 95.8%. The prevalence of AD in 3 to 6-year-old children was 8.3% (Male: 8.5%, Female: 8.2%. The prevalence in urban areas of Shanghai was gradiently and significantly higher than that in rural areas. The highest prevalence was in the core urban area (10.2% in Xuhui Tianping vs. the lowest far from the urban areas (4.6% in Chongming Baozhen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The prevalence of AD was 8.3% (95%CI: 7.6%-9.1% in children aged 3 to 6 in Shanghai. The prevalence of AD decreased from the center to the rural areas in Shanghai.

  3. A Probiotic Preparation Alleviates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Murine Models

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    Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jin-Eung; Yoon, Yeo-Sang; Seo, Jae-Gu; Chung, Myung-Jun; Yum, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex etiology that encompasses immunologic responses. AD is frequently associated with elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and common environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. Several recent studies have documented the role of specific lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of AD in humans and mice. In this study, the efficacy of Duolac ATP, a probiotic preparation, was determined in a mouse model with AD-like skin lesions. Alterations in the cytokine levels and histological staining suggested the alleviation of AD. The in vivo test showed that T helper (Th)2 cytokines, IgE, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-5, were significantly downregulated, whereas Th1 cytokines, IL-12p40 and interferon (IFN)-γ, were upregulated in all groups of mice treated with Duolac ATP compared to that observed in the group of mice treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) alone. Moreover, the scratch score decreased in all mice treated with Duolac ATP. Staining of the dorsal area of the mice in each group with hematoxylin and eosin and toluidine blue further confirmed the alleviation of AD in mice orally treated with Duolac ATP. These results suggest that Duolac ATP inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice by suppressing the Th2 cell response and increasing the Th1 cell response. Thus, Duolac ATP is beneficial and effective for the treatment of AD-like skin lesions. PMID:27123166

  4. Test epicutáneos con inhalantes en el estudio de la dermatitis atópica Epicutaneous test with inhalers in the study of atopic dermatitis

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    S. Echechipía

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En un 80% de pacientes con dermatitis atópica se demuestra la presencia de IgE específica frente a alergenos alimentarios o ambientales. También se ha demostrado la exacerbación de las lesiones de la dermatitis tras ingestión o inhalación de alergenos y su mejoría al reducir la exposición alergénica en un subgrupo de pacientes con dermatitis atópica. Aunque el prick y la determinación de IgE específica en suero son técnicas muy sensibles, las pruebas epicutáneas aplicando el alergeno directamente en la piel podrían ser el método diagnóstico ideal ya que reproducen la respuesta inflamatoria característica de la enfermedad en el propio órgano de choque que es la piel. Sin embargo, existe gran variabilidad en los resultados obtenidos mediante pruebas epicutáneas con aeroalergenos, debido fundamentalmente a diferencias metodológicas, que se revisan en este trabajo. Por último, presentamos los resultados de realizar pruebas epicutáneas con alergenos inhalantes a nuestros pacientes con dermatitis atópica y controles, obteniendo un 27% de parches positivos, fundamentalmente con ácaros y en aquellos pacientes con dermatitis más grave sin que exista una completa concordancia con la técnica del prick. Por ello, las pruebas epicutáneas parecen un método de diagnóstico alergológico que puede ser útil y complementario a las técnicas de rutina como el prick o la determinación de IgE específica en suero, pero queda pendiente su adecuada estandarización.In some 80% of patients with atopic dermatitis, the presence of specific IgE is found when facing food or environmental allergens. It has also been demonstrated in a sub-group of patients with atopic dermatitis that the dermatitis lesions are exacerbated following the ingestion or inhalation of allergens, and that they improve with reduction of exposure to allergens. Although the prick method and the determination of specific IgE in serum are highly sensitive techniques

  5. Lengua geográfica y dermatitis atópica: una asociación frecuente Geographic tongue and atopic dermatitis: A frequently association

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    MA Bascones-Martínez

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available El interés de esta comunicación es llamar la atención sobre una enfermedad de gran prevalencia conocida como Dermatitis atópica y su relación con la manifestación en la mucosa bucal bajo la forma de un criterio menor denominado lengua geográfica. Se considera importante hacer un adecuado diagnóstico diferencial entre este concepto como patología lingual primaria o asociada a otras enfermedades.The interest of this communication is to call the attention on one illness of great predominance called Atopic Dermatitis and its relation with the signs in the oral mucous of a minor criteria called Geographic tongue. It is considered the importance of making an appropriate differential diagnostic between this concept as a primary tongue pathology or associated to other illnesses.

  6. [Atopic dermatitis in children and food allergy: combination or causality? Should avoidance diets be initiated?].

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    Kanny, G

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the first manifestations of the atopic march. The natural history of food allergies (FA) is closely related to AD. Sensitivity to food is demonstrated with cutaneous tests (prick-tests and atopy patch-tests) or the presence of IgE specific to food. A true allergy to a foodstuff is revealed by oral provocation tests (OPT) or by improvement during an avoidance diet. Ingestion of the food allergen during OPT can provoke an onset of eczema, an immediate reaction (urticaria, oedema) or involve other target organs (digestive disorders, rhinitis, asthma or anaphylactic shock). Seven allergens are responsible for around 90 p. 100 of FA: milk, eggs, wheat, peanuts, nuts, soy and fish. The fundamental knowledge acquired demonstrates the implication of food allergens in the physiopathogenesis of AD. The assessment of the efficacy of avoidance diets is difficult to demonstrate in standardised double-blind studies. Their efficacy is demonstrated compared with the natural history of AD. A diagnostic algorythm of FA during AD is proposed. An avoidance diet can be prescribed on 3 levels: primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. Diagnostic dietetics are aimed at initiating a hypoallergenic diet over a short period of 15 to 21 days when AD is severe and does not permit an allergy assessment. This diet is followed by an allergy assessment and OPT to determine the foodstuff responsible. Therapeutic dietetics consists in initiating an avoidance diet based on the results of the allergy assessment: positive predictive value of specific IgE, positivity of oral provocation tests or the re-introduction of the foodstuff for one week. Preventive dietetics is aimed at preventing the onset of AD: a consensus has been established by the American and European Academies of Paediatrics. In conclusion, present knowledge demonstrates that FA is a triggering factor for AD and that the avoidance diets based on allergy assessments are an essential tool in the

  7. Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine as a clinical biomarker in atopic dermatitis.

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    Kataoka, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) is a member of the T-helper 2 chemokine family. In Japan, serum TARC level has been commercially measured since 2008. After years of experience, we realized that TARC is an extremely useful clinical biomarker for atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment. Usually, physicians conduct a visual examination to determine whether their treatment has been successful; however, the visual examination results may not always be accurate; in such cases, serum TARC levels should be measured to eliminate any ambiguity regarding the treatment outcome. When the waning and waxing of eczema and fluctuations in the serum TARC levels were considered, we frequently found that AD does not follow a natural course but follows non-regulated inflammatory floating caused by insufficient intermittent topical treatment. Serum TARC is a promising biomarker for remission and can be used for accurately monitoring proactive treatment for long-term control. Abnormally high serum TARC levels indicate accelerated pathogenesis of cutaneous inflammation. Rapid normalization and maintaining normal serum TARC levels using appropriate topical treatment is a reasonable strategy for alleviating inflammation without upregulating cytokine expression. Observing serum TARC levels during early intervention for severe infantile AD is worthwhile to determine initial disease activity and evaluate treatment efficacy. Appropriate control of severe early-onset infantile AD is important for improving prognosis of eczema and for preventing food allergies. Additionally, this biomarker is useful for improving patient adherence. Dermatologists will be able to make great progress in treating AD by adopting biomarkers such as TARC for accurately assessing non-visible subclinical disorders. PMID:24628072

  8. Filaggrin breakdown products determine corneocyte conformation in patients with atopic dermatitis

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    Riethmuller, Christoph; McAleer, Maeve A.; Koppes, Sjors A.; Abdayem, Rawad; Franz, Jonas; Haftek, Marek; Campbell, Linda E.; MacCallum, Stephanie F.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Irvine, Alan D.; Kezic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are a well-replicated risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD) and are known to cause an epidermal barrier defect. The nature of this barrier defect is not fully understood. Patients with AD with FLG LOF mutations are known to have more persistent disease, more severe disease, and greater risk of food allergies and eczema herpeticum. Abnormalities in corneocyte morphology have been observed in patients with AD, including prominent villus-like projections (VP); however, these ultrastructural features have not been systematically studied in patients with AD in relation to FLG genotype and acute and convalescent status. Objective We sought to quantitatively explore the relationship between FLG genotype, filaggrin breakdown products (natural moisturizing factor [NMF]), and corneocyte morphology in patients with AD. Methods We studied 15 children at first presentation of AD and after 6 weeks of standard therapy. We applied atomic force microscopy to study corneocyte conformation in patients with AD stratified by FLG status and NMF level. By using a new quantitative methodology, the number of VPs per investigated corneocyte area was assessed and expressed as the Dermal Texture Index score. Corneocytes were also labeled with an anti-corneodesmosin antibody and visualized with scanning electron microscopy. Results We found a strong correlation between NMF levels and Dermal Texture Index scores in both acute and convalescent states (respective r = −0.80 and −0.75, P < .001 and P = .002). Most, but not all, VPs showed the presence of corneodesmosin abundantly all over the cell surface in homozygous/compound heterozygous FLG patients and, to a lesser extent, in heterozygous and wild-type patients. Conclusions NMF levels are highly correlated with corneocyte morphology in patients with AD. These corneocyte conformational changes shed further insight into the filaggrin-deficient phenotype and help

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea and the risk of atopic dermatitis: a population-based case control study.

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    Kai-Jen Tien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with systemic inflammation and induces various comorbid medical diseases. To date, no study has explored the relationship between OSA and atopic dermatitis (AD, an inflammatory and autoimmune skin disorder. This study investigated the longitudinal risk for AD in patients with OSA. METHODS: A random sample of 1,000,000 individuals from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database was collected. From this sample, 1222 patients with newly-diagnosed OSA between 2000 and 2005 were identified and compared with a matched cohort of 18330 patients without OSA. All patients were tracked for 5.5 years from the index date in order to identify which patients subsequently developed AD. RESULTS: During the 5.5-year follow-up period, the incidence rates of AD in the OSA cohort and comparison groups were 9.81 and 6.21 per 1000 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, allergy, allergic rhinitis, asthma, monthly income, and geographic location, patients with OSA were 1.5-times more likely to develop AD than patients without OSA (95% CI = 1.15-1.95, p = 0.0025. The hazard risk for AD was greater in male OSA patients and young OSA patients (0-18 and 19-34 years, adjusted HRs being 1.53 (95% CI = 1.14-2.06, p = 0.005, 4.01(95% CI = 1.57-10.26, p = 0.0038 and 1.75(95% CI = 1.00-3.04, p = 0.0483, respectively. The log-rank test indicated that OSA patients <35-years-old had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of AD than those patient of the same age in the comparison group (p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Patients with OSA, especially male patients and younger patients, are at an increased risk for AD later in life.

  10. Association of toll-interacting protein gene polymorphisms with atopic dermatitis

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    Nothnagel Michael

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory skin disorder, affecting up to 15% of children in industrialized countries. Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP is an inhibitory adaptor protein within the toll-like receptor (TLR pathway, a part of the innate immune system that recognizes structurally conserved molecular patterns of microbial pathogens, leading to an inflammatory immune response. Methods In order to detect a possible role of TOLLIP variation in the pathogenesis of AD, we screened the entire coding sequence of the TOLLIP gene by SSCP in 50 AD patients. We identified an amino acid exchange in exon 6 (Ala222Ser and a synonymous variation in exon 4 (Pro139Pro. Subsequently, these two variations and four additional non-coding polymorphisms (-526 C/G, two polymorphisms in intron 1 and one in the 3'UTR were genotyped in 317 AD patients and 224 healthy controls. Results The -526G allele showed borderline association with AD in our cohort (p = 0.012; significance level after correction for multiple testing 0.0102. Haplotype analysis did not yield additional information. Evaluation of mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in six probands with the CC and six with the GG genotype at the -526 C/G locus did not reveal significant differences between genotypes. Conclusion Variation in the TOLLIP gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Yet, replication studies in other cohorts and populations are warranted to confirm these association results.

  11. Pimecrolimus in atopic dermatitis: consensus on safety and the need to allow use in infants.

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    Luger, Thomas; Boguniewicz, Mark; Carr, Warner; Cork, Michael; Deleuran, Mette; Eichenfield, Lawrence; Eigenmann, Philippe; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Gelmetti, Carlo; Gollnick, Harald; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hebert, Adelaide A; Muraro, Antonella; Oranje, Arnold P; Paller, Amy S; Paul, Carle; Puig, Luis; Ring, Johannes; Siegfried, Elaine; Spergel, Jonathan M; Stingl, Georg; Taieb, Alain; Torrelo, Antonio; Werfel, Thomas; Wahn, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a distressing dermatological disease, which is highly prevalent during infancy, can persist into later life and requires long-term management with anti-inflammatory compounds. The introduction of the topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs), tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, more than 10 yr ago was a major breakthrough for the topical anti-inflammatory treatment of AD. Pimecrolimus 1% is approved for second-line use in children (≥2 yr old) and adults with mild-to-moderate AD. The age restriction was emphasized in a boxed warning added by the FDA in January 2006, which also highlights the lack of long-term safety data and the theoretical risk of skin malignancy and lymphoma. Since then, pimecrolimus has been extensively investigated in short- and long-term studies including over 4000 infants (pimecrolimus effectively treats AD in infants, with sustained improvement with long-term intermittent use. Unlike topical corticosteroids, long-term TCI use does not carry the risks of skin atrophy, impaired epidermal barrier function or enhanced percutaneous absorption, and so is suitable for AD treatment especially in sensitive skin areas. Most importantly, the studies of pimecrolimus in infants provided no evidence for systemic immunosuppression, and a comprehensive body of evidence from clinical studies, post-marketing surveillance and epidemiological investigations does not support potential safety concerns. In conclusion, the authors consider that the labelling restrictions regarding the use of pimecrolimus in infants are no longer justified and recommend that the validity of the boxed warning for TCIs should be reconsidered. PMID:25557211

  12. Comparative effectiveness of topical calcineurin inhibitors in adult patients with atopic dermatitis.

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    Frankel, Hillary C; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2012-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by extreme pruritis and lichenified papules and plaques that may begin in or persist into adulthood. Topical corticosteroids are first-line prescription therapy for AD; they are efficacious and have a well established safety profile. The topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus were approved by the US FDA in 2000 and 2001, respectively, as second-line topical therapy for AD. This review evaluates the available studies on the comparative effectiveness, safety, cost, and impact on quality of life of topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors for the treatment of adult AD. Tacrolimus was found to be as effective as class III-V topical corticosteroids for AD of the trunk and extremities, and more effective than low-potency class VI or VII corticosteroids for AD of the face or neck. Pimecrolimus was less effective than both tacrolimus and low-potency topical corticosteroids for moderate to severe AD. The short-term safety studies found that, compared with topical corticosteroid-treated adults, patients treated with topical calcineurin inhibitors had an increased frequency of application-site reactions, an equivalent infection risk, and a decreased risk of skin atrophy. The long-term safety of topical calcineurin inhibitors remains under investigation. Currently published studies that evaluated the comparative cost and quality-of-life effects compared tacrolimus with less potent topical corticosteroids despite the availability of equivalent potency corticosteroids. Further cost and quality-of-life studies are needed that compare topical calcineurin inhibitors with stronger classes of topical corticosteroids over longer time periods. The available clinical trials data do not suggest an efficacy advantage for topical calcineurin inhibitors over topical corticosteroids in adults with AD of the trunk and extremities, and there is not yet adequate evidence to support

  13. Multiple Transcriptome Data Analysis Reveals Biologically Relevant Atopic Dermatitis Signature Genes and Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debajyoti; Ding, Lili; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Geh, Esmond; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Mersha, Tesfaye B.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have identified genes that are differentially expressed in atopic dermatitis (AD) compared to normal skin. However, there is also considerable variation in the list of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) reported by different groups and the exact cause of AD is still not fully understood. Using a rank-based approach, we analyzed gene expression data from five different microarray studies, comprising a total of 127 samples and more than 250,000 transcripts. A total of 89 AD gene expression signatures ‘89ADGES’, including FLG gene, were identified to show dysregulation consistently across these studies. Using a Support Vector Machine, we showed that the ‘89ADGES’ discriminates AD from normal skin with 98% predictive accuracy. Functional annotation of these genes implicated their roles in immune responses (e.g., betadefensin, microseminoprotein), keratinocyte differentiation/epidermal development (e.g., FLG, CORIN, AQP, LOR, KRT16), inflammation (e.g., IL37, IL27RA, CCL18) and lipid metabolism (e.g., AKR1B10, FAD7, FAR2). Subsequently, we validated a subset of signature genes using quantitative PCR in a mouse model. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified keratinocyte pathway over-represented (P = genes. Keratinocytes are known to play a major role in barrier function due to their location in the epidermis. Our result suggests that besides immune- mediated pathway, skin barrier pathways such as the keratinocyte differentiation pathway play a key role in AD pathogenesis. A better understanding of the role of keratinocytes in AD will be important for developing novel “barrier therapy” for this disease. PMID:26717000

  14. Functional polysaccharides from Grifola frondosa aqueous extract inhibit atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeon Soo; Hwang, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Mun Ki; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Yumnam, Silvia; Kim, Eun Hee; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Won, Chung Kil; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-01-01

    Grifola frondosa (GF), distributed widely in far east Asia including Korea, is popularly used as traditional medicines and health supplementary foods, especially for enhancing the immune functions of the body. To extend the application of GF polysaccharides (GFP) for atopic dermatitis (AD), we investigated the effects of GFP on the 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced AD-like skin lesion in NC/Nga mice. GFP treatment significantly reduced the dorsa skin dermatitis score and combination treatment with GFP, and dexamethasone has a synergistic effect in AD-like skin lesion by reduced Serum IgE, mast cells infiltration, and cytokines expression. These results indicate that GFP suppressed the AD-like skin lesions by controlling the Th-1/Th-2-type cytokines in NC/Nga mice. These findings strongly suggest that GFP can be useful for AD patients as a novel therapeutic agent and might be used for corticosteroids replacement or supplement agent. PMID:25248662

  15. Protective effect of diet supplemented with rice prolamin extract against DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in BALB/c mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Song, Dong-Up; Nam, Kwang-Il; Bae, Choon-Sang; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Seung-Rock; Ku, Chang-Sub; Jang, Dong-Il; Ahn, Bong-Whan

    2015-01-01

    Background Rice prolamin has been reported to possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and immune-promoting properties. This study is aimed to examine the protective effects of dietary rice prolamin extract (RPE) against dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in mice. Methods BALB/c mice were fed diet supplemented with 0–0.1 % RPE for 6 weeks. For the last 2 weeks, 1 % or 0.2 % DNCB was applied repeatedly to the back skin of mice to induce AD-like lesions...

  16. The pH of water from various sources: an overview for recommendation for patients with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Nuchkull, Piyavadee; Varothai, Supenya

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have increased susceptibility to irritants. Some patients have questions about types of water for bathing or skin cleansing. Objective We studied the pH of water from various sources to give an overview for physicians to recommend patients with AD. Methods Water from various sources was collected for measurement of the pH using a pH meter and pH-indicator strips. Results Bottled drinking still water had pH between 6.9 and 7.5 while the sparkling...

  17. Efficacy and Tolerability of Steroid-Free, Over-the-Counter Treatment Formulations in Infants and Children With Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Teresa M.; Herndon, James H; Ewer, Melissa; Stephens, Thomas J; Flick, Iris; Filbry, Alexander; Neufang, Gitta; Schoelermann, Andrea M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Two steroid-free, over-the-counter skin protectant products have been developed for the care and treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD)—Eucerin Eczema Relief Body Crème (Body Cream) for daily skin moisturization and Eucerin Eczema Relief Instant Therapy cream (Instant Therapy) for treatment of AD flare-ups. We tested the efficacy and tolerability of these formulations in infants and children with AD. Methods Study 1: Body Cream was applied twice daily to the lower legs of 64 ...

  18. Pimecrolimus Cream in the Long-Term Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Adults: A Six-Month Study

    OpenAIRE

    Meurer, Michael; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Wozel, Gottfried; Weidinger, Gottfried; Jünger, Michael; Bräutigam, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pimecrolimus cream (Elidel®, SDZ ASM 981), a non-steroid inhibitor of inflammatory cytokines, is effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). We assessed whether early treatment of AD signs/symptoms reduces the need for topical corticosteroids. Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of pimecrolimus cream 1% in the long-term management of adult AD. Methods: 192 adults with moderate to severe AD were randomised (1:1) for twice daily (b.i.d.) treatment of early si...

  19. Measurement of the impact of atopic dermatitis on patients' quality of life: a cross-sectional and longitudinal questionnaire study using the Japanese version of Skindex-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Yuko; Kawamoto, Kyoko; Kamo, Toshiko; Ueda, Shu; Arikawa, Junko; Kawashima, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    The impact of atopic dermatitis on patients' quality of life was measured using the Japanese version of Skindex-16 in a cross-sectional and longitudinal questionnaire study. One hundred sixty-two adult patients completed Skindex-16 and were followed-up with a standard medical therapy. Three to six months after the initial testing, 135 (83.3%) of the patients again completed Skindex-16 and also answered a general question about whether their skin condition had improved, remained the same, or become worse. The scores of Skindex-16 of 162 patients with atopic dermatitis were significantly higher than those of patients with isolated lesions, particularly in the Symptoms and Emotions scales. Patients with severe atopic dermatitis showed significantly higher scores in the three scales (Symptoms, Emotions, and Functioning), and there was a significant positive correlation between the severity and the 3-scale scores. After the follow-up period, 78 of 135 patients (57.8%) reported that their skin condition had improved. Forty-six patients (34.1%) reported that their skin condition had remained the same, and 11 (8.1%) became worse. Among the patients who said their dermatitis had improved, the scores of Skindex-16 significantly decreased. On the other hand, patients who reported their dermatitis worse showed an increase in the scores. These findings suggest that Skindex-16 responsively measures the disease severity and clinical change in the estimation of the effects of atopic dermatitis on patients' quality of life. This practical and sensitive, skin-disease specific, quality-of-life instrument is valuable for assessing patients' outcomes, especially their response to therapy, and is useful to understanding and improving the quality of life of patients suffering with atopic dermatitis. PMID:15801261

  20. The association between phthalate exposure and atopic dermatitis with a discussion of phthalate induced secretion of interleukin-1β and thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Line E. K.; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Frederiksen, Hanne;

    2016-01-01

    Phthalate diesters are widely used as emollients in plastic and cosmetics as well as in food packaging and perfumes, potentially leading to prolonged and repeated dermal, oral and airborne exposure. We here review published articles that have evaluated the putative role of phthalate diesters...... gene and atopic dermatitis have been associated with elevated systemic phthalate levels. There is a need for prospective studies to clarify the possible pathogenic role of phthalate diesters in atopic dermatitis and the associated health risk, especially with the general trend towards barrier...

  1. 解读英国2012年特应性皮炎诊疗指南%Interpretation on 2012 British guidance on atopic dermatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凡; 邹先彪

    2013-01-01

    This paper interprets British guidance on the diagnosis and clinical management of atopic dermatitis. Overviews are based on atopic dermatitis diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and preventive measures, emphasizing the principle of grading treatment and preventive measures.%特应性皮炎是一种常见的慢性、复发性、炎症性疾病.该文通过解读《2012年英国特应性皮炎指南》,详细概述特应性皮炎诊断、鉴别诊断、治疗及预防措施.

  2. Spot-On Skin Lipid Complex as an Adjunct Therapy in Dogs with Atopic Dermatitis: An Open Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Fujimura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of topical skin lipid complex (SLC in canine atopic dermatitis (AD. Eight dogs with chronic AD and no improvement of main therapy in symptoms, erythema, lichenification, excoriation, and alopecia in the previous month were treated with SLC topically as adjunct therapy at lesion sites twice weekly for 12 weeks. A statistically significant reduction (26.0%, <0.05 in the third version of the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI-03 modification from baseline was recorded 6 weeks after treatment, with marked reduction in the erythema subscore (36.2%, <0.005. A significant reduction in excoriation and alopecia subscores was observed 6 weeks after treatment (39.9%, <0.05 and 19.9%, <0.05, resp.. However, the lichenification subscore was not reduced significantly at 6 or 12 weeks. These findings suggest that topical SLC may have therapeutic and clinical benefits in dogs with AD.

  3. Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP rs22114085 Associated with Canine Atopic Dermatitis by PCR-RFLP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Miluchová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema. The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs22114085 in different dog breeds. The material involved 52 dogs from 5 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in order to estimate rs22114085 SNP genotypes by PCR-RFLP method. The PCR products were digested with DdeI restriction enzyme. The C allele was distributed in Czech Pointer, Chihuahua, German Wirehaired Pointer with an allele frequency ranging from 0.4545 to 1.00. In the population of Czech Pointer we detected all genotypes CC, CT and TT with frequency in male 0.25, 0.5833 and 0.1667, and in female 0.2728, 0.3636 and 0.3636, subsequently. In German Wirehaired Pointer was detected homozygote genotype CC in male and heterozygote genotype CT in female with frequency 1 and 1. In Chihuahua was observed homozygote genotype CC and heterozygote genotype CT with frequency 0.3333 and 0.6667, subsequently. In Golden retriever and Pincher we detected genotype TT with frequency 1.

  4. From consumerism to active dependence: Patterns of medicines use and treatment decisions among patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørreslet, M; Bissell, P; Traulsen, J M

    2010-01-01

    In this article, findings from in-depth interviews with 12 people diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD) are described. The findings describe the range of strategies used to manage atopic dermatitis, including use of conventional medicines. A strong theme identified in informants' accounts centred on concerns about the risks of illness and long-term use of conventional medicines, which acted as a strong incentive for patients to seek alternatives to conventional treatments. However, despite their significant efforts to do so, patients were eventually forced to return to and rely on conventional medicines because of their efficacy in alleviating and treating symptoms. These findings are discussed in relation to the sociological literature on consumerism, risk and reflexivity in health. We argue that our findings exemplify how living with and managing a chronic illness may not be straightforward and the choices of treatment at hand may be limited. Consequently, this may limit the potential opportunities accruing from adopting a reflexive or consumerist approach to managing illness. PMID:20051432

  5. Serum mucosa-associated epithelial chemokine in atopic dermatitis : A specific marker for severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat MHM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucosa-associated epithelial chemokine (MEC; CCL28 is considered pivotal in mediating migration of CCR3 and CCR10-expressing skin-homing memory CLA + T cells. CCL28 is selectively and continuously expressed by epidermal keratinocytes, but highly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD. Aims: This controlled longitudinal study was designed to evaluate the expression of CCL28 serum levels in childhood AD and bronchial asthma (BA and its possible relations to disease severity and activity. Methods: Serum CCL28 levels were measured in 36 children with AD, 23 children with BA, and 14 children who had both conditions as well as in 21 healthy age and gender-matched subjects serving as controls. Sixteen patients in the AD group were followed-up and re-sampled for serum CCL28 after clinical remission. Serum CCL28 levels were correlated with some AD disease activity and severity variables. Results: Serum CCL28 levels in patients with AD whether during flare (median = 1530; mean ± SD = 1590.4 ± 724.3 pg/ml or quiescence (median = 1477; mean ± SD = 1575.2 ± 522.1 pg/ml were significantly higher than the values in healthy children (median = 301; mean ± SD = 189.6 ± 92.8 pg/ml. However, the levels during flare and quiescence were statistically comparable. The serum levels in BA (median = 340; mean ± SD = 201.6 ± 109.5 pg/ml were significantly lower than the AD group and comparable with the healthy control values. Serum CCL28 levels in severe AD were significantly higher as compared with mild and moderate cases and correlated positively to the calculated severity scores (LSS and SCORAD. CCL28 levels during exacerbation of AD could be positively correlated to the corresponding values during remission, the peripheral absolute eosinophil counts, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase levels. Serum CCL28 did not vary with the serum total IgE values in AD. Conclusion: Our data reinforce the concept that CCL28 might

  6. An international multicenter study on quality of life and family quality of life in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V Chernyshov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD has severe impact on the quality of life (QoL of children suffering from the disease and their families. The infant′s dermatitis quality of life index (IDQoL and the dermatitis family impact questionnaire (DFI were designed to study this impact. Aims: To compare the impact of AD on children and their families in different countries. Methods: 419 children with AD from six countries representing three continents under the age of 4 years were included into the study. English, Ukrainian, Czech, Portuguese, and Korean versions of the IDQoL and the DFI and Dutch version of the IDQoL questionnaires were used. Results: The highest scored items for the IDQoL and the DFI were rather similar. The IDQoL and the DFI results were well correlated with parental assessment of disease severity and between each other in all countries. Some differences mostly in the IDQoL assessment were found. Conclusion: Despite some reported peculiarities, parents in different counties assessed QoL and family QoL of their AD children in a similar way. The IDQoL and the DFI may be reliable initial measures for international studies. International study on the influence of the same treatment methods on the IDQoL and the DFI assessments is important.

  7. The effect of encasings on quality of life in adult house dust mite allergic patients with rhinitis, asthma and/or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, [No Value; Duivenvoorden, HJ; Tempels-Pavlica, Z; Oosting, AJ; de Monchy, JGR; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, CAFM; van Wijk, R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Environmental control has been put forward as an integral part of the management of house dust mite (HDM) allergy in sensitized patients. To validate this statement allergic disorders involved in HDM allergy - allergic asthma, rhinitis and atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) - shoul

  8. Meta-analysis derived atopic dermatitis (MADAD) transcriptome defines a robust AD signature highlighting the involvement of atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Malajian, Dana; Krueger, James G.; Workman, Christopher T; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Suyan; Litman, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with limited treatment options. Several microarray experiments have been conducted on lesional/LS and non-lesional/NL AD skin to develop a genomic disease phenotype. Although these experiments have shed light on disease pathology, inter...

  9. Extracellular superoxide dismutase ameliorates house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation and inhibits mast cell activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Sang; Choi, Jung-Hye; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Han-Woong; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Woo Taek; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an enzyme that catalyses the dismutation of superoxide anions. It has multiple functions, such as reactive oxygen species scavenging, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, antichemotatic and antitumor activities. Recently, we demonstrated that EC-SOD inhibits ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice. However, the anti-allergic effect of EC-SOD on skin tissue and the role of EC-SOD in mast cells, which are important for allergic responses, have not been well studied. In this study, we investigated whether EC-SOD can alleviate atopic dermatitis in mice and inhibit mast cell activation. Treatment with human recombinant EC-SOD ameliorated house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Furthermore, the levels of pro-allergic cytokine gene expression and histamine release increased in EC-SOD KO mast cells and decreased in EC-SOD overexpressing mast cells, suggesting that EC-SOD inhibits mast cell activation. Consistently, a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis experiment showed more blood leakage from EC-SOD KO mouse ear skin, implying that the lack of EC-SOD increases allergic responses. These results suggest that EC-SOD inhibits mast cell activation and atopic dermatitis and that the loss of EC-SOD causes more severe allergic responses, implying that EC-SOD might be a good drug candidate for treatment of allergic disorders, such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:27061078

  10. Alcohol intake in pregnancy increases the child's risk of atopic dermatitis. the COPSAC prospective birth cohort study of a high risk population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carson, Charlotte Giwercman; Halkjaer, Liselotte Brydensholt; Jensen, Signe Marie; Bisgaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis has increased four-fold over the recent decades in developed countries, indicating that changes in environmental factors associated with lifestyle may play an important role in this epidemic. It has been proposed that alcohol consumption may be one contributing risk factor in th...

  11. Proactive disease management with 0.03% tacrolimus ointment for children with atopic dermatitis : results of a randomized, multicentre, comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thaçi, D; Reitamo, S; Gonzalez Ensenat, M A; Moss, C; Boccaletti, V; Cainelli, T; van der Valk, P; Buckova, H; Sebastian, M; Schuttelaar, M L; Ruzicka, T

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD) using low-dose, intermittent, topical anti-inflammatory agents may control acute disease and prevent exacerbations. OBJECTIVES: This 12-month, European, multicentre, randomized study investigated if proactive, twice-weekly application of 0.0

  12. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes;

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases...

  13. Keratinocytes under Fire of Proinflammatory Cytokines: Bona Fide Innate Immune Cells Involved in the Physiopathology of Chronic Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous homeostasis and defenses are maintained by permanent cross-talk among particular epidermal keratinocytes and immune cells residing or recruited in the skin, through the production of cytokines. If required, a coordinated inflammatory response is triggered, relayed by specific cytokines. Due to numerous reasons, troubles in the resolution of this phenomenon could generate a cytokine-mediated vicious circle, promoting skin chronic inflammation, the most common being atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. In this paper, we discuss the biological effects of cytokine on keratinocytes, more particularly on specific or shared cytokines involved in atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. We report and discuss monolayer or 3D in vitro models of keratinocytes stimulated by specific sets of cytokines to mimic atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. IL-22, TNFa, IL-4, and IL-13 combination is able to mimic an “atopic dermatitis like” state. In psoriasis lesions, over expression of IL-17 is observed whereas IL-4 and IL-13 were not detected; the replacement of IL-4 and IL-13 by IL-17 from this mix is able to mimic in vitro a “psoriasis like” status on keratinocytes. We conclude that specific cytokine environment deregulation plays a central role on skin morphology and innate immunity, moving towards specific pathologies and opening the way to new therapeutic strategies.

  14. The effect of long-term feeding of skin barrier-fortified diets on the owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beeck, Frank Looringh; Watson, Adrian; Bos, Margriet; Biourge, Vincent; Willemse, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding a skin barrier function-augmenting diet early in dogs' lives on the appearance of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Pregnant bitches (starting 5 weeks after mating) and their subsequent litters (up to 1 year of age) were fed either supplemented or unsupplemented diets. Nutrients supplemented were nicotinamide, pantothenate, histidine, inositol and choline. Circulating IgE levels to dust mute allergens Der f and Der p were measured when the puppies were 6 and 12 months old. Two owner questionnaires were used to assess the occurrence of typical signs associated with atopic dermatitis when dogs were between the ages of 22 and 36, and 34 and 48 months. Using linear mixed models we observed higher levels of circulating anti-Der f (P = 0·021) and -Der p IgE (P = 0·01) during the first year in the dogs fed the unsupplemented than in those fed the supplemented diet. The owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis signs amongst the dogs was significantly greater in the unsupplemented group at the time of the second follow-up questionnaire (10/33 dogs v. 2/24 dogs). These outcomes suggest that a nutritionally derived improvement to barrier function early in life may reduce the frequency of signs associated with atopic dermatitis. The effect is possibly the result of making the epidermis, now thought to be a major route of environmental allergen exposure, more resistant to penetration. PMID:26097705

  15. The effect of long-term feeding of skin barrier-fortified diets on the owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in Labrador retrievers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beeck, Frank Looringh; Watson, Adrian; Bos, Margriet; Biourge, Vincent; Willemse, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding a skin barrier function-augmenting diet early in dogs' lives on the appearance of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Pregnant bitches (starting 5 weeks after mating) and their subsequent litters (up to 1 year of age) were fed either supplem

  16. Detection of R576 interleukin-4 receptor αn allele gene, serum interleukin-4, and eosinophilic cationic protein in atopic dermatitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Mawla M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic pruritic skin disease. It results from a complex interplay between strong genetic and environmental factors. The aim of this work was to study some biochemical markers of the dermatosis. This included detection of R576 interleukin-4 receptor alpha allele gene. Twenty five patients with AD and 25 controls participated in this study.

  17. A newly recognized 13q12.3 microdeletion syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, microcephaly, and eczema/atopic dermatitis encompassing the HMGB1 and KATNAL1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdi, Deborah; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Azzarello-Burri, Silvia;

    2014-01-01

    microcephaly, and eczema/atopic dermatitis as the predominant symptoms. In addition, they had pronounced feeding difficulties in early infancy. They displayed similar facial features such as malar flattening, a prominent nose with underdeveloped alae nasi, a smooth philtrum, and a thin vermillion of the upper...

  18. Impact of heat-inactivated Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei strains on cytokine responses in whole blood cell cultures of children with atopic dermatitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cukrowska, B.; Rosiak, I.; Klewicka, E.; Motyl, I.; Schwarzer, Martin; Libudzisz, Z.; Kozáková, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2010), s. 277-280. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/09/0449 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : lactobacillus casei * atopic dermatitis * allergy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.977, year: 2010

  19. Atopy patch tests in young adult patients with atopic dermatitis and controls: dose-response relationship, objective reading, reproducibility and clinical interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2003-01-01

    The clinical interpretation and reproducibility of atopy patch tests was studied in 23 selected young adult patients with atopic dermatitis and 25 healthy controls using standard inhalant allergens. Non-invasive measurements were used for objective assessment of test reactions and the participants...... were retested after 6 weeks. Ten of 19 (53%) evaluable patients with atopic dermatitis had at least one positive atopy patch test. However, there was no clear clinical relevance of the atopy patch test results when related to patient history and distribution of dermatitis. Reproducible and dose......-dependent results were obtained with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, grass and cat with a reproducibility rate of 0.69 to 0.81 in patients and 0.60-0.96 in controls. A unique finding was a significant positive correlation between a positive atopy patch test, allergen dose and increase in transepidermal water loss...

  20. Hubungan Dermatitis Atopik dengan Kejadian Dermatitis Kontak Alergi

    OpenAIRE

    Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Background :Allergic contact dermatitis is an acquired sensitivity to various sub-stances that produce inflammatory reactions in those, and only those, who have been previously sensitized to the allergen. Atopic dermatitis is known as risk factor in the development of allergic contact dermatitis. Some studies in association between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis incidence have found variety results. Objective :To investigate the association between atopic dermatitis and ...

  1. Barreira cutânea na dermatite atópica Skin barrier in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna Addor

    2010-04-01

    dynamically with the underlying epidermal layers. The skin barrier also plays a role in the inflammatory response through melanocyte activation, angiogenesis, and fibroplasia. The intensity of this response will essentially depend on the severity of the injury. Skin barrier abnormalities in atopic dermatitis are clinically observed by the presence of dry skin, a common and significant symptom which constitutes a diagnostic and monitoring parameter. The stratum corneum hydration level and transepidermal water loss are associated with the level of damage to the barrier, representing biophysical parameters. These parameters help doctors monitor patients in a less invasive and more sensitive manner.

  2. Chitin nanofibrils suppress skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Ryotaro; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Nagashima, Masaaki; Osaki, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of chitin nanofibril (CNF) application via skin swabs on an experimental atopic dermatitis (AD) model. AD scores were lower, and hypertrophy and hyperkeratosis of the epidermis were suppressed after CNF treatment. Furthermore, inflammatory cell infiltration in both the epidermis and dermis was inhibited. CNFs also attenuated histological scores. The suppressive effects of CNFs were equal to those of corticosteroid application; however, chitin did not show these effects. CNF application might have anti-infllammatory effects via suppression of the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In an early-stage model of experimental AD, CNFs suppressed AD progression to the same extent as corticosteroids. They also suppressed skin inflammation and IgE serum levels. Our findings indicate that CNF application could aid in the prevention or treatment of AD skin lesions. PMID:27112880

  3. Telomerase activity is spontaneously increased in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis and correlates with cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Volke, Anne Rehné; Lund, Marianne;

    1999-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme involved with cellular proliferation and cellular senescence. The aim of the present study was to investigate telomerase activity in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to observe its regulation of cellular proliferation. Peripheral...... staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) (0.1 microg/ml). Telomerase activity was measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol-based telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 and 72 h of incubation. In addition, DNA synthesis of the cells was assayed using 3H......-thymidine incorporation. We found that telomerase activity in non-stimulated PBMC from patients with AD was significantly up-regulated without any stimulation during the 72 h of in vitro incubation. The most potent stimulator of telomerase activity was SEA, followed by anti-CD3 plus IL-2, anti-CD3 alone, and PPD. IL-2...

  4. Different cytokine profiles of skin-derived T cell cultures from patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta C; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Skov, Lone;

    2015-01-01

    biopsies from patients with extrinsic AD (n = 6), intrinsic AD (n = 9) and psoriasis (n = 9). METHODS: Skin-derived T cell cultures were analyzed for expression of six surface markers, 11 intracellular cytokines, and three T cell subtype signature transcription factors by flow cytometry, and secreted......OBJECTIVES: To investigate differences in expression of surface markers, cytokine profiles, and presence of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells in skin-derived T cell cultures from patients with extrinsic atopic dermatitis (AD), intrinsic AD, and psoriasis expanded in the presence of IL-2 and IL-4. MATERIAL: Skin...... cytokines by multiplex. RESULTS: A different IFN-γ profile emerged between the extrinsic AD and psoriatic T cell cultures; however, there was no difference in IL-17 profile. No differences with regard to cytokine expression were found between extrinsic AD and intrinsic AD cultures; however, cutaneous...

  5. Mechanism of Sleep Disturbance in Children with Atopic Dermatitis and the Role of the Circadian Rhythm and Melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Sen; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in children with atopic dermatitis (AD). It is a major factor leading to impaired quality of life in these patients and could have negative effects on neurocognitive function and behavior. However, the pathophysiology of sleep disturbance in children with AD is poorly understood, and there is no consensus on how to manage sleep problems in these patients. Pruritus and scratching could lead to sleep disruption but is unlikely the sole etiology. The circadian rhythm of cytokines, the immune system, and skin physiology such as transcutaneous water loss and skin blood flow might also play a role. Recent studies have suggested that melatonin could also be involved due to its multiple effects on sleep, immunomodulation, and anti-oxidant ability. Environmental factors should also be considered. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology of sleep disturbance in children with AD, and discuss possible therapeutic implications. PMID:27043528

  6. Coping as mediator of the relationship between stress and itch in patients with atopic dermatitis: a regression and mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Christina; Weik, Ulrike; Tews, Natalia; Gieler, Uwe; Deinzer, Renate; Kupfer, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Even though it has been shown that stress and itch are associated in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), it remains unclear whether this relationship occurs due to certain coping strategies being activated under stress. Therefore, this study investigates the role of coping as possible mediating factor between stress and itch in 31 patients with AD. Coping and itch were assessed by self-reported measures, while stress was measured both by a validated questionnaire and by a physiological stress marker, the postawakening cortisol. Using a regression and a mediation analysis, this study showed a relationship between perceived stress and itch (corrected R2 = 0.21), which was fully mediated by negative itch-related cognitions. 62.3% of the variance of itch intensity could be explained by negative itch-related cognitions. This finding helps to explain the positive effects of cognitive restructuring in the treatment of chronic itch. PMID:25363422

  7. Skin-protective effects of a zinc oxide-functionalized textile and its relevance for atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia Wiegand,1 Uta-Christina Hipler,1 Sebastian Boldt,2 Joachim Strehle,2 Uwe Wollina21Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Jena, Jena, Germany; 2Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, GermanyAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the impairment of the skin-barrier function, increased oxidative cellular stress, and bacterial colonization. Hence, medical therapies of AD aim to control infection, reduce inflammation, and restore skin-barrier function by use of topical and systemic antibacterial drugs, topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and moisturizers. Textiles have the longest and most intense contact with the human skin, and functional textiles with intrinsic properties such as antioxidative capacity and antibacterial activity have been gaining in importance in medical applications. Specially designed textiles may support AD treatment and improve quality of life of AD. Here, we investigated the role of ZnO-functionalized textile fibers in the control of oxidative stress in AD in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the antibacterial effect and biocompatibility of the Zn textile was evaluated in vitro. We observed a rapid improvement of AD severity, pruritus, and subjective sleep quality when AD patients wore the ZnO textiles overnight on 3 consecutive days. This is possibly due to the high antioxidative capacity of the ZnO textile, as well as the allocation of strong antibacterial activity. Moreover, it was shown that the ZnO textiles possess very good biocompatibility and were well tolerated by AD patients.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, antibacterial activity, biocompatibility, functionalized textiles, oxidative stress

  8. Chitosan Coated Textiles May Improve Atopic Dermatitis Severity by Modulating Skin Staphylococcal Profile: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Cristina; Soares, Jose; Tavaria, Freni; Duarte, Ana; Correia, Osvaldo; Sokhatska, Oksana; Severo, Milton; Silva, Diana; Pintado, Manuela; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) patients may benefit from using textiles coated with skin microbiome–modulating compounds. Chitosan, a natural biopolymer with immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties, has been considered potentially useful. Objective This randomized controlled trial assessed the clinical utility of chitosan-coated garment use in AD. Methods Of the 102 patients screened, 78 adult and adolescents were randomly allocated to overnight use of chitosan-coated or uncoated cotton long-sleeved pyjama tops and pants for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was change in disease severity assessed by Scoring Atopic dermatitis index (SCORAD). Other outcomes were changes in quality of life, pruritus and sleep loss, days with need for rescue medication, number of flares and controlled weeks, and adverse events. Changes in total staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus skin counts were also assessed. Comparisons were made using analysis of variance supplemented by repeated measures analysis for the primary outcome. Interaction term between time and intervention was used to compare time trends between groups. Results Chitosan group improved SCORAD from baseline in 43.8%, (95%CI: 30.9 to 55.9), P = 0.01, placebo group in 16.5% (-21.6 to 54.6); P = 0.02 with no significant differences between groups; Dermatology Quality of life Index Score significantly improved in chitosan group (P = 0.02) and a significant increase of skin Coagulase negative Staphylococci (P = 0.02) was seen. Conclusions Chitosan coated textiles may impact on disease severity by modulating skin staphylococcal profile. Moreover, a potential effect in quality of life may be considered. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01597817 PMID:26618557

  9. Regulation of T cell immunity in atopic dermatitis by microbes: The Yin and Yang of cutaneous inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo eBiedermann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease predominantly mediated by T helper cells. While numerous adaptive immune mechanisms in AD pathophysiology have been elucidated in detail, deciphering the impact of innate immunity in AD pathogenesis has made substantial progress in recent years and is currently a fast evolving field. As innate and adaptive immunity are intimately linked cross-talks between these two branches of the immune system are critically influencing the resulting immune response and disease. Innate immune recognition of the cutaneous microbiota was identified to substantially contribute to immune homeostasis and shaping of protective adaptive immunity in the absence of inflammation. Disturbances in the composition of the skin microbiome with reduced microbial diversity and overabundance of Staphylococcus spp. have been shown to be associated with AD inflammation. Distinct S. aureus associated microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs binding to TLR2 heterodimers could be identified to initiate long lasting cutaneous inflammation driven by T helper cells and consecutively local immune suppression by induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC further favoring secondary skin infections as often seen in AD patients. Moreover dissecting cellular and molecular mechanisms in cutaneous innate immune sensing in AD pathogenesis paved the way for exploiting regulatory and anti-inflammatory pathways to attenuate skin inflammation. Activation of the innate immune system by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria on AD skin alleviated cutaneous inflammation. The induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells, Interleukin-10 expression and regulatory Tr1 cells were shown to mediate this beneficial effect. Thus, activation of innate immunity by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria for induction of regulatory T cell phenotypes seems to be a promising strategy for treatment of inflammatory skin disorders as atopic dermatitis. These

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Valencene on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valencene (VAL isolated from Cyperus rotundus possesses various biological effects such as antiallergic and antimelanogenesis activity. We investigated the effect of VAL on atopic dermatitis (AD skin lesions and their molecular mechanisms. We topically applied VAL to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB sensitized NC/Nga mice. Modified scoring atopic dermatitis index, scratching behavior, and histological/immunohistochemical staining were used to monitor disease severity. RT-PCR, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the level of IgE, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines production, and skin barrier proteins expression. Topical application of VAL significantly reduced AD-like symptoms and recovered decreased expression of filaggrin in DNCB-sensitized NC/Nga mice. The levels of serum IgE, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-13 in skin/splenic tissue were reduced. In vitro studies using TNF-α and IFN-γ treated HaCaT cells revealed that VAL inhibited the exaggerated expression of Th2 chemokines including TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22, and proinflammatory chemokines such as CXCL8, GM-CSF, and I-CAM through blockade of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, expression of the skin barrier protein, involucrin, was also increased by VAL treatment. VAL inhibited the production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that VAL may serve as a potential therapeutic option for AD.

  11. Atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis in general practice and the open population: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, D. H. J.; Wartna, J. B.; Moed, H.; van Alphen, E. I.; Bohnen, A. M.; Bindels, P. J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether significant differences exist between the self-reported prevalence of atopic disorders in the open population compared with physician diagnosed prevalence of atopic disorders in general practice. Methods Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Publisher, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register databases were systematically reviewed for articles providing data on the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema in a GP setting. Studies were only included when they had a cross-sectional or cohort design and included more than 100 children (aged 0-18 years) in a general practice setting. All ISAAC studies (i.e. the open population) that geographically matched a study selected from the first search, were also included. A quality assessment was conducted. The primary outcome measures were prevalence of eczema, asthma and allergic rhinitis in children aged 0-18 years. Results The overall quality of the included studies was good. The annual and lifetime prevalences of the atopic disorders varied greatly in both general practice and the open population. On average, the prevalence of atopic disorders was higher in the open population. Conclusion There are significant differences between the self-reported prevalence of atopic disorders in the open population compared with physician diagnosed prevalence of atopic disorders in general practice. Data obtained in the open population cannot simply be extrapolated to the general practice setting. This should be taken into account when considering a research topic or requirements for policy development. GPs should be aware of the possible misclassification of allergic disorders in their practice. Key PointsEpidemiological data on atopic disorders in children can be obtained from various sources, each having its own advantages and limitations.On average, the prevalence of atopic disorders is higher in the open population.GPs should take into account the possible

  12. 特应性皮炎的环境影响因素%Environmental factors affecting atopic dermatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴延延; 肖风丽

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic hereditary atopic allergic skin disease of unclear origin.This article states the roles of environmental factors related to the initiation and progression of AD,such as living environment,pet exposure,and diets.Protective factors such as early breastfeeding,daily cleaning and intestinal flora,as well as risk factors such as infection,obesity,work in pregnancy,stress,and physical and chemical stimuli like cigarettes and drastic temperature changes,are also reviewed.%特应性皮炎是临床常见的慢性遗传性过敏性皮肤病,病因尚不完全清楚.主要概述特应性皮炎发生发展的相关环境影响因素,如:居住环境、接触宠物在不同时期的不同影响;不同饮食在不同时期的不同作用;早期母乳喂养、日常清洁、肠道菌群等因素的保护作用;感染、肥胖、孕期工作、压力等因素,以及香烟、温度剧变等物理化学刺激的不利影响.这些因素均会影响特应性皮炎的发病或发展.

  13. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heerim Kang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE. CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD.

  14. The role of histamine H1 and H4 receptors in atopic dermatitis: from basic research to clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2014-12-01

    Histamine plays important roles in inflammation and nervous irritability in allergic disorders, including atopic dermatitis (AD). It has been shown to regulate the expression of pruritic factors, such as nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A, in skin keratinocytes via histamine H1 receptor (H1R). Furthermore, H1R antagonist reduced the level of IL-31, a cytokine involving the skin barrier and pruritus, in chronic dermatitis lesions in NC/Nga mice and patients with AD. Histamine plays roles in the induction of allergic inflammation by activating eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and Th2 cells via histamine H4 receptor (H4R). H4R, in addition to H1R, is expressed on sensory neurons, and a decrease in scratching behaviors was observed in H4R-deficient mice and mice treated with a H4R antagonist. We found that the combined administration of H1R and H4R antagonists inhibited the itch response and chronic allergic inflammation, and had a pharmacological effect similar to that of prednisolone. Although the oral administration of H1R antagonists is widely used to treat AD, it is not very effective. In contrast, JNJ39758979, a novel H4R antagonist, had marked effects against pruritus in Japanese patients with AD in a phase II clinical trial. Next generation antihistaminic agents possessing H1R and H4R antagonistic actions may be a potent therapeutic drug for AD. PMID:25249063

  15. The Drinking Effect of Hydrogen Water on Atopic Dermatitis Induced by Dermatophagoides farinae Allergen in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mistica C. Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen water (HW produced by electrolysis of water has characteristics of extremely low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP value and high dissolved hydrogen (DH. It has been proved to have various beneficial effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects; however, HW effect on atopic dermatitis (AD, an inflammatory skin disorder, is poorly documented. In the present study, we examined the immunological effect of drinking HW on Dermatophagoides farinae-induced AD-like skin in NC/Nga mice. Mice were administered with HW and purified water (PW for 25 days. We evaluated the serum concentration of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-12p70, Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, and cytokine expressed by both subsets (GM-CSF to assess their possible relationship to the severity of AD. The serum levels of cytokines such as IL-10, TNF-α, IL-12p70, and GM-CSF of mice administered with HW was significantly reduced as compared to PW group. The results suggest that HW affects allergic contact dermatitis through modulation of Th1 and Th2 responses in NC/Nga mice. This is the first note on the drinking effect of HW on AD, clinically implying a promising potential remedy for treatment of AD.

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pentaherbs Formula, Berberine, Gallic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Miranda S M; Jiao, Delong; Chan, Ben C L; Hon, Kam-Lun; Leung, Ping C; Lau, Clara B S; Wong, Eric C W; Cheng, Ling; Chan, Carmen K M; Lam, Christopher W K; Wong, Chun K

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common allergic skin disease, characterized by dryness, itchiness, thickening and inflammation of the skin. Infiltration of eosinophils into the dermal layer and presence of edema are typical characteristics in the skin biopsy of AD patients. Previous in vitro and clinical studies showed that the Pentaherbs formula (PHF) consisting of five traditional Chinese herbal medicines, Flos Lonicerae, Herba Menthae, Cortex Phellodendri, Cortex Moutan and Rhizoma Atractylodis at w/w ratio of 2:1:2:2:2 exhibited therapeutic potential in treating AD. In this study, an in vivo murine model with oxazolone (OXA)-mediated dermatitis was used to elucidate the efficacy of PHF. Active ingredients of PHF water extract were also identified and quantified, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities on pruritogenic cytokine IL-31- and alarmin IL-33-activated human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts were evaluated. Ear swelling, epidermis thickening and eosinophils infiltration in epidermal and dermal layers, and the release of serum IL-12 of the murine OXA-mediated dermatitis were significantly reduced upon oral or topical treatment with PHF (all p < 0.05). Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and berberine contents (w/w) in PHF were found to be 0.479%, 1.201% and 0.022%, respectively. Gallic acid and chlorogenic acid could suppress the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokine CCL7 and CXCL8, respectively, in IL-31- and IL-33-treated eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture; while berberine could suppress the release of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL7 in the eosinophil culture and eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture (all p < 0.05). These findings suggest that PHF can ameliorate allergic inflammation and attenuate the activation of eosinophils. PMID:27104513

  17. A Role of Staphyococcus aureus, Interleukin-18, Nerve Growth Factor and Semaphorin 3A, an Axon Guidance Molecule, in Pathogenesis and Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikezawa, Zenro; Komori, Junko; Ikezawa, Yuko; Inoue, Yusuke; Kirino, Mio; Katsuyama, Masako; Aihara, Michiko

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is usually present not only in the skin lesions of atopic dermatitis (AD) but also in the atopic dry skin. SA discharges various toxins and enzymes that injure the skin, results in activation of epidermal keratinocytes, which produce and release IL-18. IL-18 that induces the super Th1 cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-13 is supposed to be involved in development of AD and its pathogenesis. Indeed, the number of SA colonies on the skin surface and the serum IL-18 levels i...

  18. Atopic dermatitis: current treatment guidelines. Statement of the experts of the Dermatological Section, Polish Society of Allergology, and the Allergology Section, Polish Society of Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Magdalena; Wilkowska, Aleksandra; Sokołowska-Wojdyło, Małgorzata; Ługowska-Umer, Hanna; Barańska-Rybak, Wioletta; Kaczmarski, Maciej; Kowalewski, Cezary; Kruszewski, Jerzy; Maj, Joanna; Silny, Wojciech; Śpiewak, Radosław; Petranyuk, Andriy

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a condition frequently encountered in medical practices across the country. More than 60% of children with AD are at risk to develop allergic rhinitis or asthma (the atopic march). Patients with AD have a unique predisposition to colonization or infection by Staphylococcus aureus. Treatments for AD need to rapidly control symptoms of the disease, improve quality of life and prevent exacerbations. Given the chronic and relapsing nature of the disease, therapies need to encourage good compliance and be well tolerated. PMID:26366146

  19. Análise psicométrica inicial da versão brasileira do DISABKIDS Atopic Dermatitis Module Análisis psicométrico inicial de la versión brasileña del DISABKIDS Atopic Dermatitis Module Preliminary psycometric assessment of the Brazilian version of the DISABKIDS Atopic Dermatitis Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Cristiane Deon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as propriedades psicométricas iniciais da versão brasileira de instrumento de avaliação da qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde de crianças e adolescentes com dermatite atópica. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal realizado com amostra de 52 crianças e adolescentes, com idades entre oito e 18 anos, diagnosticados com dermatite atópica, e seus responsáveis, recrutados em serviço de dermatologia de hospital universitário na cidade de São Paulo, SP, em 2009. Foram avaliadas a validade de construto, a confiabilidade de consistência interna e a correlação entre as respostas de crianças e adolescentes e seus responsáveis da versão brasileira do Atopic Dermatitis Module (DISABKIDS-ADM. RESULTADOS: A confiabilidade de consistência interna foi satisfatória, com coeficiente alfa de Cronbach aceitável para as dimensões constantes no instrumento (0,7024/0,8124 e 0,7239/0,8604. A análise multitraço-multimétodo para validade convergente mostrou valores maiores que 0,30 para todos os itens. Quanto à validade discriminante, a análise revelou resultados satisfatórios. A concordância entre as versões self e proxy foi avaliada pelo coeficiente de correlação intra-classe, com valores de 0,8173 para impacto e 0,7629 para estigma. CONCLUSÕES: Diante dos resultados encontrados, considera-se que o instrumento DISABKIDS-ADM pode ser utilizado por pesquisadores brasileiros depois de finalizado seu processo de validação, por seus resultados iniciais apontarem propriedades psicométricas satisfatórias, que permitem considerá-lo um instrumento válido e confiável.OBJETIVO: Analizar las propiedades psicométricas iniciales de la versión brasileña de instrumento de evaluación de cualidad de vida relacionada con la salud de niños y adolescentes con dermatitis atópica. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal realizado con muestra de 52 niños y adolescentes, con edades entre ocho y 18 años, diagnosticados con dermatitis at

  20. An efficient new formulation of fusidic acid and betamethasone 17-valerate (fucicort lipid cream) for treatment of clinically infected atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Schultz; Simonsen, Lene; Melgaard, Anita;

    2007-01-01

    To relieve the dryness of atopic dermatitis skin, a lipid formulation of fusidic acid and betamethasone 17-valerate (Fucicort Lipid cream) was developed as an additional treatment option to the established Fucicort cream. The two formulations were compared in patients with clinically infected...... atopic dermatitis. A total of 629 patients were randomized to twice daily double-blind treatment for 2 weeks with either Fucicort Lipid cream, Fucicort cream, or the new lipid cream vehicle. Clinical assessment was based on a Total Severity Score of the eczematous lesions. Bacteriological samples were...... taken at inclusion and at subsequent visit(s) if clinically infected lesions persisted. At the end of treatment, the mean reduction in Total Severity score was 82.9% in the lipid cream group, 82.7% in the cream group, and 33.0% in the vehicle group. The percentage of patients with a successful...

  1. Exposure to psychosocial job strain during pregnancy and odds of asthma and atopic dermatitis among 7-year old children – a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann Dyreborg; Schlünssen, Vivi; Christensen, Berit Hvass;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Few epidemiological studies have studied maternal stress exposure during pregnancy and odds of asthma and atopic dermatitis (AD) among offspring, and none have extended the focus to psychosocial job strain. The aim of this study was to assess the association between maternal job strain...... participants into four job strain categories: low strain (low demands, high control), active (high demands, high control), passive (low demands, low control), and high strain (high demands, low control). Information on asthma and AD until age seven was collected using maternal self-report. Multinomial logistic...... regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) adjusted for several covariates. RESULTS: Maternal exposure to self-reported high strain during pregnancy was associated with 15% higher odds of atopic dermatitis among 7-year-old children (OR adj1.15, 95% CI 1...

  2. Aggravation of atopic dermatitis in breast-fed infants by tree nut-related foods and fermented foods in breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Uehara, Masami

    2011-02-01

    Ninety-two exclusively breast-fed Japanese infants with atopic dermatitis were studied to see whether tree nut-related foods (chocolate and coffee) and fermented foods (cheese, yogurt, bread, soy sauce, miso soup and fermented soy beans) eaten by their mothers affected their skin condition. Of the 92 infants, 67 (73%) showed improvement of skin lesions when their mothers avoided these foods and showed aggravation of skin lesions when these foods were reintroduced. The predominant offending foods were chocolate, yogurt, soy sauce and miso soup. A long-term maternal exclusion of the trigger foods brought about progressive improvement of skin lesions in the majority of the infants. These findings suggest that tree nut-related foods and fermented foods are important offending foods of atopic dermatitis in breast-fed infants. PMID:21269309

  3. Cost-effectiveness of Maintenance Treatment with a Barrier-strengthening Moisturizing Cream in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis in Finland, Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrlid, Hanna; Hjalte, Frida; Lundqvist, Adam; Svensson, Åke; Tennvall, Gunnel Ragnarson

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin disorder with high prevalence, especially in the Nordic countries. Effective maintenance therapy during symptom-free episodes may prolong the time to eczema relapse according to a previously published clinical trial. The present study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of a barrier-strengthening moisturizer containing 5% urea, compared with a moisturizer with no active ingredients during eczema-free periods. A health economic microsimulation model, based on efficacy data from the randomized clinical trial, analysed the cost-effectiveness of the barrier-strengthening treatment in Finland, Norway and Sweden. The barrier-strengthening moisturizer was cost-saving compared with the moisturizer with no active ingredients in all 3 countries. The result was confirmed in all but one sensitivity analysis. In conclusion, the barrier-strengthening moisturizer is cost-effective as maintenance therapy for patients with atopic dermatitis compared with a moisturizer with no active ingredients. PMID:26304099

  4. Skin Barrier Dysfunction and the Atopic March

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Agner, Tove; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    The atopic diseases: atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are frequent diseases in the population occurring sequentially in the young (the atopic march).The discovery of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations and impairments in the skin barrier as predisposing factors for atopic......—with atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations being a prerequisite for the development of the other atopic diseases, particularly asthma. This review discusses the role of the skin barrier function, particularly the role of FLG mutations, in the atopic march....

  5. The effect of long-term feeding of skin barrier-fortified diets on the owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in Labrador retrievers

    OpenAIRE

    van Beeck, Frank Looringh; Watson, Adrian; Bos, Margriet; Biourge, Vincent; Willemse, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding a skin barrier function-augmenting diet early in dogs' lives on the appearance of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Pregnant bitches (starting 5 weeks after mating) and their subsequent litters (up to 1 year of age) were fed either supplemented or unsupplemented diets. Nutrients supplemented were nicotinamide, pantothenate, histidine, inositol and choline. Circulating IgE levels to dust mute allergens Der f and Der p were measured w...

  6. Diagnosis of atopic dermatitis in children and its treatment%小儿特应性皮炎的诊断与治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申春平; 马琳

    2009-01-01

    @@ 特应性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,AD)是儿童常见皮肤病,多于婴幼儿时期发病.近三四十年,随着环境变化和全球工业化的快速发展,AD的患病率呈逐年上升趋势,在发达国家影响了20%~30%的儿童.

  7. Association of variation in the LAMA3 gene, encoding the alpha-chain of laminin 5, with atopic dermatitis in a German case-control cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Stemmler, Susanne; Parwez, Qumar; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Epplen, Jörg T; Hoffjan, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder caused by complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Besides mutations in the filaggrin gene, leading to impaired skin barrier function, variation in genes encoding additional skin proteins has been suggested to contribute to disease risk. Laminin 5, playing an important role in skin integrity, is composed of three subunits encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes in which biallelic mutations cause epi...

  8. TWO TOPICAL CALCINEURIN INHIBITORS FOR THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS: A META-ANALYSIS OF RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIALS (ENGLISH)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Sheng-li; Yan, J; Wang, F.

    2011-01-01

    Two new topical immunomodulators, pimecrolimus cream and tacrolimus ointment for atopic dermatitis (AD) in pediatric patients, have provided alternatives to topical corticosteroids without the associated adverse events. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of tacrolimus ointment and pimecrolimus cream for the treatment of AD in pediatric patients. Methods: MEDLINE, Embase, the CNKI and Cochrane Library databases were searched up to December 2008. Additional data sources were manual ...

  9. Meta-analysis derived atopic dermatitis (MADAD) transcriptome defines a robust AD signature highlighting the involvement of atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, David A.; Malajian, Dana; Krueger, James G.; Workman, Christopher T.; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Suyan; Litman, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with limited treatment options. Several microarray experiments have been conducted on lesional/LS and non-lesional/NL AD skin to develop a genomic disease phenotype. Although these experiments have shed light on disease pathology, inter-study comparisons reveal large differences in resulting sets of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), limiting the utility of direct comparisons across studies. Methods We carried out a m...

  10. Meta-analysis derived atopic dermatitis (MADAD) transcriptome defines a robust AD signature highlighting the involvement of atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, David Adrian; Malajian, Dana; Krueger, James G.; Workman, Christopher T.; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Suyan; Litman, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with limited treatment options. Several microarray experiments have been conducted on lesional/LS and non-lesional/NL AD skin to develop a genomic disease phenotype. Although these experiments have shed light on disease pathology, inter-study comparisons reveal large differences in resulting sets of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), limiting the utility of direct comparisons across studies. We carried out a meta-analysis combin...

  11. Purified Der p1 and p2 patch tests in patients with atopic dermatitis: evidence for both allergenicity and proteolytic irritancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuran, M; Ellingsen, A R; Paludan, K; Schou, C; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1998-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis has many similarities with allergic contact dermatitis. Previous studies have revealed delayed-type allergic reactions indicating specific cell-mediated immune reactions in subgroups of patients. It has recently been recognized that purified house dust mite major allergens, Der p1 and Der p2 from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, exhibit a proteolytic enzyme activity similar to papain and maybe serine proteases (e.g. trypsin), respectively. This opens the possibility that house dust mites apart from an allergic epitope could elicit irritant reactions in atopic skin. We examined cutaneous reactivity to the purified proteins of house dust mite antigens, Der p1 and Der p2, in 36 consecutive patients with atopic dermatitis. We also patch-tested with trypsin and papain, in order to see if these proteolytic enzymes could induce irritant reactions. Twelve patients had type 1 allergy to Der p1 and two of these had type IV reactivity to D. pteronyssinus extract. Positive reactions were observed in another four patients, but they had also irritant reactions to papain and trypsin, indicating that the enzymatic activity may have elicited the reactions. The cutaneous reactivity was not linked to total serum IgE, but the patients with specific allergic patch tests had type I reactions to D. pteronyssinus extract. Our observations indicate that allergic patch tests towards Der p1 and p2 are rare and that irritant reactions from D. pteronyssinus proteolytic activity may be a more common phenomenon when patch-testing atopic dermatitis patients with house dust mite antigen extract. PMID:9689288

  12. 343 Gene-environment Interactions on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis in Preschool Children: Mold is the Main Environmental Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyung Young; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic factor and environmental exposure are recognized risk factors for atopic dermatitis (AD) in children. It is known that fungus is the representative environmental factor of AD. However, the relative and the overall contributions of fungal exposure remain unexplored. Methods During July to August 2010 population-based cross-sectional survey, we investigate 986 preschool children from 16 kindergartens of Seoul and Gyeonggi-do province in Korea using a modified International St...

  13. Beneficial effects of citrus juice fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum YIT 0132 on atopic dermatitis: results of daily intake by adult patients in two open trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harima-Mizusawa, Naomi; Kamachi, Keiko; Kano, Mitsuyoshi; Nozaki, Daisuke; Uetake, Tatsuo; Yokomizo, Yuji; Nagino, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Miyazaki, Kouji; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether daily intake of citrus juice containing heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum YIT 0132 (LP0132-fermented juice) alleviates symptoms of atopic dermatitis. This was a natural extension of our previous study in which LP0132 was shown to enhance IL-10 production in vitro and LP0132-fermented juice was found to alleviate symptoms and enhance quality of life (QOL) in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis. In two open trials, Trial 1 and Trial 2, 32 and 18 adult patients with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis consumed LP0132-fermented juice for 8 weeks. Skin conditions and QOL were subjectively evaluated using Skindex-16 before intake of the juice (Pre-treatment), 8 weeks after starting intake (Treatment) and 8 weeks after termination of intake (Post-treatment). Blood parameters were also analyzed. Comparison of the Treatment and Post-treatment time points with the Pre-treatment time point revealed significant reductions in the Skindex-16 overall score and the 3 domain subscores (symptoms, emotions, and functioning domains) in both trials. Moreover, blood levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific IgEs for Japanese cedar and cypress pollen were significantly attenuated in Trial 2. The findings suggest that daily intake of citrus fermented juice containing heat-killed LP0132 has beneficial effects on symptoms and QOL in patients with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis due to an immunomodulatory effect via attenuation of IgE and ECP. PMID:26858928

  14. TRPA1-Dependent Pruritus in IL-13-Induced Chronic Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Min-Hee; Oh, Sun Young; Lu, Jingning; Lou, Hongfei; Myers, Allen; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Chronic debilitating pruritus is a cardinal feature of a topic dermatitis (AD). Little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Antihistamines lack efficacy in treating itch in AD, suggesting the existence of histamine-independent itch pathways in AD. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is essential in the signaling pathways that promote histamine-independent itch. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that TRPA1-dependent neural pathways play a key role in chronic itch i...

  15. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP RS23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis by ACRS-PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Miluchová

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis (cAD. cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema. The material involved 60 dogs from 6 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in order to estimate rs23472497 SNP genotypes by ACRS-PCR method. The PCR products were digested with NlaIII restriction enzyme. In the population of Czech Pointer and Slovak Wirehaired Pointer we detected all genotypes AA, AG and GG with frequency 0.0732, 0.5122 and 0.4146 for Czech Pointer and 0.1818, 0.5455 and 0.2727 for Slovak Wirehaired Pointer. In Border Collie was observed heterozygote genotype AG and homozygote genotype GG with frequency 0.6667 and 0.3333, subsequently. In German Wirehaired Pointer, Australian Shepherd dog and American Staffordshire terrier we detected only genotype AG with frequency 1. The A allele was distributed with an allele frequency ranging from 0.3293 to 0.5. The G allele was distributed with an allele frequency ranging from 0.5 to 0.6707. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Normální tabulka"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  16. What is the discrepancy between drug permeation into/across intact and diseased skins? Atopic dermatitis as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Sien-Hung; Lee, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Kao, Hsiao-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2016-01-30

    The discrepancy in drug absorption between healthy and diseased skins is an issue that needs to be elucidated. The present study attempted to explore the percutaneous absorption of drugs via lesional skin by using atopic dermatitis (AD) as a model. Tape-stripping and ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization induced AD-like skin. The lesions were evaluated by physiological parameters, histology, cytokines, and differentiation proteins. The permeants of tacrolimus, 8-methoxypsoralen, methotrexate, and dextran were used to examine in vitro and in vivo cutaneous permeation. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increased from 5.2 to 27.4 g/m(2)/h by OVA treatment. AD-like lesions were characterized by hyperplasia, skin redness, desquamation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Repeated OVA challenge produced a T-helper 2 (Th2) hypersensitivity accompanied by downregulation of filaggrin, involucrin, and integrin β. Tacrolimus, the most lipophilic permeant, revealed an increase of cutaneous deposition by 2.7-fold in AD-like skin compared to intact skin. The transdermal flux of methotrexate and dextran, the hydrophilic permeants, across AD-like skin increased about 18 times compared to the control skin. Surprisingly, AD-like skin showed less skin deposition of 8-methoxypsoralen than intact skin. This may be because the deficient lipids in the atopic-affected stratum corneum (SC) diminished drug partitioning into the superficial skin layer. The fluorescence and confocal microscopic images demonstrated a broad and deep passage of small-molecular and macromolecular dyes into AD-like skin. The results obtained from this report were advantageous for showing how the lesional skin influenced percutaneous absorption. PMID:26657274

  17. The effect of pimecrolimus on expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzanka, Alicja; Zebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rachowska, Regina; Bozek, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Jarzab, Jerzy

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of action of pimecrolimus (PIM) on atopic lesions is still under consideration. Thus far, we have evidence of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity, and recent papers focus on its effect on epidermal barrier function. This study analysed changes in the expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions after 2 weeks of exposure to PIM 1% cream. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected epidermal differentiation complex genes and three alternative pathway keratins was performed in skin biopsies from 11 individuals with AD before and after PIM exposure. The real-time quantitative PCR analysis was compared to non-lesional skin in the same patients. Involucrin, a small proline-rich region (SPRR) 2C gene, and alternative pathway keratin 16 showed significant over-expression in lesional skin followed by significant decrease after PIM therapy. The SPRR1A gene, S100A9, and keratin 6A were also increased; however, the decrease after PIM treatment was not significant. The changes in S100 A2, A7 and A8 followed a similar course with borderline significance. SPRR4 had a significant decrease in expression in lesional versus non-lesional skin, which persisted after PIM treatment. No significant changes were detected in mRNA expression levels of filaggrin and loricrin. Our results suggest that PIM can be effective in restoring the epidermal barrier in patients with AD at least in part by its impact on expression of genes, which are important for the normal barrier function of skin. PMID:22142393

  18. Total and specific serum IgE decreases with age in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma and insect allergy but not in patients with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuber Karsten

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concerning allergic diseases, the incidence of allergic symptoms, as well as their severity, seems to decrease with age. The decline of onset of allergic symptoms observed in ageing might result from a decrease of serum total and specific IgE. Atopic disorders are complex diseases that involve interactions among several physiological systems, e.g. skin, lung, mucosae, and the immune system. It was the aim of this study to compare the effects of age on total and specific IgE in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD, allergic rhinitis or asthma, and insect allergy, respectively. The study population consisted of 559 individuals (male: 229 and female: 330. Total and allergen specific IgE was measured in every individual. From the whole study population, 113 patients suffered from atopic dermatitis (AD, 132 had allergic rhinitis or asthma, and 314 were tested because of insect allergy. Total and specific serum IgE was significantly decreased as a function of age in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and with insect allergy. In contrast, no significant decrease of total and specific serum IgE in old individuals with AD was observed. Additionally, in the group of patients with a total IgE 300 kU/l showed no correlation with age. Immunosenescence does not affect increased IgE levels in atopic patients with AD and/or high serum IgE levels indicating that in these subgroups of patients the atopic propensity remains into advanced age. One may hypothesize that either onset of allergic sensitization during life or the kind of atopic disease influences the correlation between age and IgE synthesis.

  19. Angelicae Dahuricae Radix Inhibits Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyoung Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether Angelicae Dahuricae Radix (AR suppresses the development of atopic dermatitis (AD-like skin lesions induced by Dermatophagoides farinae in NC/Nga mice. To investigate the effect of AR, we measured the AD severity score, measured plasma levels of IgE and histamine, and performed histological analysis in NC/Nga mice. We also confirmed the anti-inflammatory effects of AR by measuring TARC/CCL17 production from LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells and mRNA levels of TARC and MDC/CCL22 in TNF-α/IFN-γ-treated HaCaT cells. 10 mg/day of AR extract was applied for 4 weeks to NC/Nga mice. Both the AR extract and 0.1% tacrolimus suppressed the development of AD-like skin lesions and reduced dermatitis scores of the back and ear skin. AR extracts caused an inhibition of histological changes induced by repeated application of D. farinae and a reduction of IgE and histamine levels in plasma (P<0.05. Furthermore, NO production in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells was diminished in a dose-dependent manner, and hTARC production and TARC and MDC mRNA levels in TNF-α/IFN-γ-treated HaCaT cells were diminished by AR. The inhibitory effect of AR on NO, TARC and MDC production may be associated with the suppression of AD-like skin lesions in D. farinae-induced NC/Nga mice.

  20. Topical Tetracycline Improves MC903-induced Atopic Dermatitis in Mice through Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokines and Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Mu, Zhang-Lei; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tetracycline (TET) has been found to have both antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-inflammatory effect of topical TET on atopic dermatitis (AD) has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential role of topical TET and its anti-inflammatory effects in a mouse model of AD. Methods: The 2% TET was applied topically to ears of MC903-induced AD-like BALB/c mice once a day. AD-like symptoms and severity were evaluated by assessing skin scoring of dermatitis, ear thickness, and frequency of scratching. Serum IgE and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was used for analyzing the expressions of TSLP, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in skin lesions. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to assess the mRNA levels of TSLP and inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-1β in skin lesions. Results: Scoring of dermatitis (9.00 ± 0.63 vs. 6.67 ± 1.03, P = 0.001), ear thickness (0.44 ± 0.02 mm vs. 0.40 ± 0.03 mm, P = 0.018), and serum IgE level (421.06 ± 212.13 pg/ml vs. 244.15 ± 121.39 pg/ml, P = 0.047) were all improved in the 2% TET treatment group compared with AD group. Topical TET significantly reduced the serum level of TSLP (119.04 ± 38.92 pg/ml vs. 65.95 ± 54.61 pg/ml, P = 0.011) and both mRNA and protein expressions of TSLP in skin lesions compared with AD group (P = 0.003 and 0.011, respectively), and NF-κB and PAR2 expression in skin lesions were also suppressed (P = 0.016 and 0.040, respectively). Furthermore, expressions of inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α in skin lesions were down-regulated in 2% TET group compared with AD group (P = 0.035, 0.008, and 0.044, respectively). Conclusions: Topical TET exerted anti-inflammatory effects through suppression of TSLP and inflammatory cytokines in AD mouse model

  1. Atopic dermatitis induces the expansion of thymus-derived regulatory T cells exhibiting a Th2-like phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosbrugger-Martinz, Verena; Tripp, Christoph H; Clausen, Björn E; Schmuth, Matthias; Dubrac, Sandrine

    2016-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a widespread inflammatory skin disease with an early onset, characterized by pruritus, eczematous lesions and skin dryness. This chronic relapsing disease is believed to be primarily a result of a defective epidermal barrier function associated with genetic susceptibility, immune hyper-responsiveness of the skin and environmental factors. Although the important role of abnormal immune reactivity in the pathogenesis of AD is widely accepted, the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) remains elusive. We found that the Treg population is expanded in a mouse model of AD, i.e. mice topically treated with vitamin D3 (VitD). Moreover, mice with AD-like symptoms exhibit increased inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS)-, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)- and Glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant receptor (GARP)-expressing Tregs in skin-draining lymph nodes. Importantly, the differentiation of Tregs into thymus-derived Tregs is favoured in our mouse model of AD. Emigrated skin-derived dendritic cells are required for Treg induction and Langerhans cells are responsible for the biased expansion of thymus-derived Tregs . Intriguingly, thymus-derived Tregs isolated from mice with AD-like symptoms exhibit a Th2 cytokine profile. Thus, AD might favour the expansion of pathogenic Tregs able to produce Th2 cytokines and to promote the disease instead of alleviating symptoms. PMID:26931745

  2. Text Messages as a Reminder Aid and Educational Tool in Adults and Adolescents with Atopic Dermatitis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venessa Pena-Robichaux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal management of atopic dermatitis (AD requires patients to adhere to self-care behaviors. Technologies, such as cell phones, have been widely adopted in the USA and have potential to reinforce positive health behaviors. We conducted a pilot study with 25 adolescents and adults age 14 years and older [mean 30.5 yrs, SD 13.4] with AD. Daily text messages (TMs that provided medication reminders and AD education were sent for six weeks to participants. Our goals were to (1 measure changes in pre- and posttest scores in treatment adherence, self-care behaviors, disease severity, and quality of life and (2 assess the usability and satisfaction of the TM system. Significant improvements in treatment adherence, self-care behaviors, skin severity, and quality of life ( ≤ .001, .002, <.001, and .014, resp. were noted postintervention. User feedback on the TM system was positive with 88% and 92% of participants reporting that the reminder TMs and educational TMs were helpful, respectively. In conclusion, study participants were receptive to using TMs as a reminder aid and educational tool. The positive trends observed are promising and lay the ground work for further studies needed to elucidate the full potential of this simple and cost-effective intervention.

  3. Dual-functional transdermal drug delivery system with controllable drug loading based on thermosensitive poloxamer hydrogel for atopic dermatitis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyi; Wat, Elaine; Hui, Patrick C. L.; Chan, Ben; Ng, Frency S. F.; Kan, Chi-Wai; Wang, Xiaowen; Hu, Huawen; Wong, Eric C. W.; Lau, Clara B. S.; Leung, Ping-Chung

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) has long been viewed as a problematic issue by the medical profession. Although a wide variety of complementary therapies have been introduced, they fail to combine the skin moisturizing and drug supply for AD patients. This study reports the development of a thermo-sensitive Poloxamer 407/Carboxymethyl cellulose sodium (P407/CMCs) composite hydrogel formulation with twin functions of moisture and drug supply for AD treatment. It was found that the presence of CMCs can appreciably improve the physical properties of P407 hydrogel, which makes it more suitable for tailored drug loading. The fabricated P407/CMCs composite hydrogel was also characterized in terms of surface morphology by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), rheological properties by a rheometer, release profile in vitro by dialysis method and cytotoxicity test. More importantly, the findings from transdermal drug delivery behavior revealed that P407/CMCs showed desirable percutaneous performance. Additionally, analysis of cytotoxicity test suggested that P407/CMCs composite hydrogel is a high-security therapy for clinical trials and thus exhibits a promising way to treat AD with skin moisturizing and medication.

  4. Can we rely on the Dermatology Life Quality Index as a measure of the impact of psoriasis or atopic dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, James; Meads, David M; Preston, Elizabeth P; Crawford, Sigrid R; McKenna, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) is a widely used health-related quality of life measure. However, little research has been conducted on its dimensionality. The objectives of the current study were to apply Rasch analysis to DLQI data to determine whether the scale is unidimensional, to assess its measurement properties, test the response format, and determine whether the measure exhibits differential item functioning (DIF) by disease (atopic dermatitis versus psoriasis), gender, or age group. The results show that there were several problems with the scale, including misfitting items, DIF by disease, age, and gender, disordered response thresholds, and inadequate measurement of patients with mild illness. As the DLQI did not benefit from the application of Rasch analysis in its development, it is argued that a new measure of disability related to dermatological disease is required. Such a measure should use a coherent measurement model and ensure that items are relevant to all potential respondents. The current use of the DLQI as a guide to treatment selection is of concern, given its inadequate measurement properties. PMID:21881588

  5. A Herbal Formula, Atofreellage, Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in an NC/Nga Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Lee, Jin-Seok; Im, Hwi-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Seon; Lee, Sung-Bae; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the anti-atopic dermatitis (AD) effect of Atofreellage (AF), a herbal formula composed of 10 medicinal plants. AD was induced on the dorsal skin areas of NC/Nga mice (male, seven weeks old) by daily application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) for five weeks. After three weeks of DNCB application, 200 μL of AF (0, 25, 50 or 100 mg/mL) was applied to the skin lesions. Histological findings, blood cell populations, serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), histamine, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory signaling in the skin tissue, and T-helper cell type 2 (Th₂)-related cytokines in splenocytes were analyzed. Histopathological findings showed AF treatment notably attenuated the thickness of dorsal skin, and eosinophil infiltration. AF treatment (especially 100 mg/mL) also demonstrably ameliorated the blood cell population abnormalities, as the notable elevation of serum concentrations of IgE, histamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were remarkably normalized by AF treatment. Western blot analysis evidenced the apparent normalization of inflammatory signals (ERK, p38 MAP kinase, JNK, and NF-κB) in the skin tissue. Additionally, AF treatment notably attenuated the activation of Th₂-dominant cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, and IL-5) in Con A-treated splenocytes in an ex vivo assay. In conclusion, this study provides experimental evidence for the clinical relevance of Atofreellage. PMID:26712731

  6. Der p 11 is a major allergen for house dust mite-allergic patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Srinita; Resch, Yvonne; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Swoboda, Ines; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Blatt, Katharina; Novak, Natalija; Wickman, Magnus; van Hage, Marianne; Ferrara, Rosetta; Mari, Adriano; Purohit, Ashok; Pauli, Gabrielle; Sibanda, Elopy N; Ndlovu, Portia; Thomas, Wayne R; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Tacke, Sebastian; Malkus, Ursula; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Vrtala, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    House dust mites (HDMs) belong to the most potent indoor allergen sources worldwide and are associated with allergic manifestations in the respiratory tract and the skin. Here we studied the importance of the high-molecular-weight group 11 allergen from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 11) in HDM allergy. Sequence analysis showed that Der p 11 has high homology to paramyosins from mites, ticks, and other invertebrates. A synthetic gene coding for Der p 11 was expressed in Escherichia coli and rDer p 11 purified to homogeneity as folded, alpha-helical protein as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Using antibodies raised against rDer p 11 and immunogold electron microscopy, the allergen was localized in the muscle beneath the skin of mite bodies but not in feces. IgE reactivity of rDer p 11 was tested with sera from HDM-allergic patients from Europe and Africa in radioallergosorbent test-based dot-blot assays. Interestingly, we found that Der p 11 is a major allergen for patients suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD), whereas it is only a minor allergen for patients suffering from respiratory forms of HDM allergy. Thus, rDer p 11 might be a useful serological marker allergen for the identification of a subgroup of HDM-allergic patients suffering from HDM-associated AD. PMID:24999597

  7. Regulatory T Cell Induced by Poria cocos Bark Exert Therapeutic Effects in Murine Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Min-Jung; See, Hye-Jeong; Choi, Gyeyoung; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Hee Soon

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD) and food allergy (FA) has increased dramatically in pediatric populations, but there is no effective drug available for their management. Therefore, trials are required for the development of safe therapeutic agents such as herbal medicines. We determined whether orally administered Poria cocos bark (PCB) extract could exert immunosuppressive effects on allergic and inflammatory symptoms of AD and FA. For both AD, which was induced using house dust mite extract, and FA, which was induced by exposure to ovalbumin, model mice were orally treated with PCB extract for 62 days and 18 days, respectively. We also investigated the inductive effect of PCB extract on the generation and maintenance of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). The symptoms of AD and FA were ameliorated by the administration of PCB extract. Furthermore, PCB extract inhibited the Th2-related cytokines and increased the population of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) Tregs in both AD and FA models. In ex vivo experiments, PCB extract promoted the functional differentiation of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) Tregs, which is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation. Thus, PCB extract has potential as an oral immune suppressor for the treatment of AD and FA through the generation of Tregs. PMID:27445434

  8. Aspartame Attenuates 2, 4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Clinical Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Jeong-Je; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common multifactorial chronic skin disease that has a multiple and complex pathogenesis. AD is gradually increasing in prevalence globally. In NC/Nga mice, repetitive applications of 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) evoke AD-like clinical symptoms similar to human AD. Aspartame (N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester) is a methyl ester of a dipeptide, which is used as an artificial non-nutritive sweetener. Aspartame has analgesic and anti-inflammatory functions that are similar to the function of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. We investigated whether aspartame can relieve AD-like clinical symptoms induced by DNFB treatment in NC/Nga mice. Sucrose did not relieve AD-like symptoms, whereas aspartame at doses of 0.5 μg kg(-1) and 0.5 mg kg(-1) inhibited ear swelling and relieved AD-like clinical symptoms. Aspartame inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, mast cells, and CD4(+) T cells, and suppressed the expression of cytokines including IL-4 and IFN-γ, and total serum IgE levels. Aspartame may have therapeutic value in the treatment of AD. PMID:26099025

  9. Early exposure to probiotics in a canine model of atopic dermatitis has long-term clinical and immunological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Rosanna; Santoro, Domenico; Ahrens, Kim

    2012-04-15

    Probiotics modulate the immune response and may have protective effects against atopic dermatitis (AD). Clinical trials using dogs with spontaneous disease are limited by confounding factors such as different diets, environments and sensitizations while a more controlled evaluation is possible using experimental models. A validated model of canine AD showed that early exposure to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) significantly decreases allergen-specific IgE and partially prevents AD in the first 6 months of life. This study is a follow-up three years after discontinuation of LGG. Clinical signs were evaluated after allergen challenge with ragweed, timothy, Dermatophagoides farinae. Allergen-specific IgE, IL-10 and TGF-β were measured on the 1st day of challenge, before allergen exposure. Normal dogs were included as controls. Analyses included seven dogs in the non-probiotic and nine in the probiotic litter. For clinical scores, a 2-Group × 9-Time Analysis of Variance showed significant effects of group (p=0.0003, probioticallergens was significantly higher in the control group than probiotics-exposed dogs. Allergen-specific IgE and TGF-β did not differ between litters. Early exposure to probiotics has long-term clinical and immunological effects in this model and larger studies using dogs with spontaneous disease are needed. PMID:22436376

  10. Increased Risk of Atopic Dermatitis in Preschool Children with Kawasaki Disease: A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

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    Peng Yeong Woon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and has been reported to be associated with allergic disease. The risk of atopic dermatitis (AD in preschool children with KD has not been investigated. The study was to determine the longitudinal risk of the development of AD in preschool children with KD. A nationwide 5-year population-based study was performed using data from the National Health Insurance Database in Taiwan between 1999 and 2003. The risk factors for AD were compared between the 2 study groups during the follow-up period using the Cox proportional hazards model. In addition, plasma interleukin (IL-5 levels were analyzed in normal subjects and KD patients. Among the 1440 subjects included, 21.6% developed AD during the 5-year follow-up period, of which 30.3% and 18.7% belonged to the study cohort and the comparison group, respectively. Children with KD were 1.25 times more likely to have AD than those in controls (P=0.04. Levels of IL-5 and IgE were significantly higher in KD patients. Children with KD had a higher risk of developing AD during the 5-year follow-up period than the control group. Increased IL-5 and IgE levels may be key factors contributing to the risk of AD.

  11. Regulatory T Cell Induced by Poria cocos Bark Exert Therapeutic Effects in Murine Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy

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    Min-Jung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD and food allergy (FA has increased dramatically in pediatric populations, but there is no effective drug available for their management. Therefore, trials are required for the development of safe therapeutic agents such as herbal medicines. We determined whether orally administered Poria cocos bark (PCB extract could exert immunosuppressive effects on allergic and inflammatory symptoms of AD and FA. For both AD, which was induced using house dust mite extract, and FA, which was induced by exposure to ovalbumin, model mice were orally treated with PCB extract for 62 days and 18 days, respectively. We also investigated the inductive effect of PCB extract on the generation and maintenance of Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. The symptoms of AD and FA were ameliorated by the administration of PCB extract. Furthermore, PCB extract inhibited the Th2-related cytokines and increased the population of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs in both AD and FA models. In ex vivo experiments, PCB extract promoted the functional differentiation of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs, which is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation. Thus, PCB extract has potential as an oral immune suppressor for the treatment of AD and FA through the generation of Tregs.

  12. A Herbal Formula, Atofreellage, Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in an NC/Nga Mouse Model

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    Won-Yong Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the anti-atopic dermatitis (AD effect of Atofreellage (AF, a herbal formula composed of 10 medicinal plants. AD was induced on the dorsal skin areas of NC/Nga mice (male, seven weeks old by daily application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB for five weeks. After three weeks of DNCB application, 200 μL of AF (0, 25, 50 or 100 mg/mL was applied to the skin lesions. Histological findings, blood cell populations, serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE, histamine, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory signaling in the skin tissue, and T-helper cell type 2 (Th2-related cytokines in splenocytes were analyzed. Histopathological findings showed AF treatment notably attenuated the thickness of dorsal skin, and eosinophil infiltration. AF treatment (especially 100 mg/mL also demonstrably ameliorated the blood cell population abnormalities, as the notable elevation of serum concentrations of IgE, histamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were remarkably normalized by AF treatment. Western blot analysis evidenced the apparent normalization of inflammatory signals (ERK, p38 MAP kinase, JNK, and NF-κB in the skin tissue. Additionally, AF treatment notably attenuated the activation of Th2-dominant cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, and IL-5 in Con A-treated splenocytes in an ex vivo assay. In conclusion, this study provides experimental evidence for the clinical relevance of Atofreellage.

  13. Predominant genera of fecal microbiota in children with atopic dermatitis are not altered by intake of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn K; Gøbel, Rikke; Michaelsen, Kim F; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars H; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2011-03-01

    The effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the composition of the Lactobacillus group, Bifidobacterium and the total bacterial population in feces from young children with atopic dermatitis was investigated. The study included 50 children randomized to intake of one of the probiotic strain or placebo. Microbial composition was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR and, in a subset of subjects, by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The core population of the Lactobacillus group was identified as Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus oris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, while the bifidobacterial community included Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium catenulatum. The fecal numbers of L. acidophilus and B. lactis increased significantly after intervention, indicating survival of the ingested bacteria. The levels of Bifidobacterium correlated positively (P=0.03), while the levels of the Lactobacillus group negatively (P=0.01) with improvement of atopic eczema evaluated by the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis index. This correlation was observed across the whole study cohort and not attributed to the probiotic intake. The main conclusion of the study is that administration of L. acidophilus NCFM and B. lactis Bi-07 does not affect the composition and diversity of the main bacterial populations in feces. PMID:21204871

  14. Mental stress in atopic dermatitis--neuronal plasticity and the cholinergic system are affected in atopic dermatitis and in response to acute experimental mental stress in a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Milena Johanne Peters

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: In mouse models for atopic dermatitis (AD hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis (HPA dysfunction and neuropeptide-dependent neurogenic inflammation explain stress-aggravated flares to some extent. Lately, cholinergic signaling has emerged as a link between innate and adaptive immunity as well as stress responses in chronic inflammatory diseases. Here we aim to determine in humans the impact of acute stress on neuro-immune interaction as well as on the non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS. METHODS: Skin biopsies were obtained from 22 individuals (AD patients and matched healthy control subjects before and after the Trier social stress test (TSST. To assess neuro-immune interaction, nerve fiber (NF-density, NF-mast cell contacts and mast cell activation were determined by immunohistomorphometry. To evaluate NNCS effects, expression of secreted mammal Ly-6/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor-related protein (SLURP 1 and 2 (endogenous nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands and their main corresponding receptors were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: With respect to neuro-immune interaction we found higher numbers of NGF+ dermal NF in lesional compared to non-lesional AD but lower numbers of Gap43+ growing NF at baseline. Mast cell-NF contacts correlated with SCORAD and itch in lesional skin. With respect to the NNCS, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (α7nAChR mRNA was significantly lower in lesional AD skin at baseline. After TSST, PGP 9.5+ NF numbers dropped in lesional AD as did their contacts with mast cells. NGF+ NF now correlated with SCORAD and mast cell-NF contacts with itch in non-lesional skin. At the same time, SLURP-2 levels increased in lesional AD skin. CONCLUSIONS: In humans chronic inflammatory and highly acute psycho-emotional stress interact to modulate cutaneous neuro-immune communication and NNCS marker expression. These findings may have consequences for understanding and treatment of chronic

  15. Association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms at five loci: comparison between atopic dermatitis and asthma in the Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Yang Tang

    Full Text Available Atopic diseases, such as atopic dermatitis (AD and asthma, are closely related to clinical phenotypes with hypersensitivity, and often share some similar genetic and pathogenic bases. Our recent GWAS identified three susceptibility gene/loci FLG (rs11204971 and rs3126085, 5q22.1 (rs10067777, rs7701890, rs13360927 and rs13361382 and 20q13.33 (rs6010620 to AD. The effect of these AD associated polymorphisms in asthma is so far unknown. To investigate whether AD relevant genetic variants is identical to asthma and reveal the differences in genetic factors between AD and asthma in Chinese Han population, seven AD associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as well as 3 other SNPs (rs7936562 and rs7124842 at 11q13.5 and rs4982958 at 14q11.2 from our previous AD GWAS were genotyped in 463 asthma patients and 985 controls using Sequenom MassArray system. We found rs4982958 at 14q11.2 was significantly associated with asthma (P = 3.04×10(-4, OR = 0.73. We also detected one significant risk haplotype GGGA from the 4 SNPs (rs10067777, rs7701890, rs13360927 and rs13361382 at 5q22.1 in AD cases (P(correction = 3.60×10(-10, OR = 1.26, and the haplotype was suggestive of risk in asthma cases in this study (P = 0.014, P(correction = 0.084, OR = 1.38. These SNPs (rs11204971, rs3126085, rs7936562, rs712484 and rs6010620 at AD susceptibility genes/loci FLG, 11q13.5 and 20q13.33 were not associated with asthma in this study. Our results further comfirmed that 14q11.2 was an important candidate locus for asthma and demonstrated that 5q22.1 might be shared by AD and asthma in Chinese Han population.

  16. Feasibility Exploration of Treating Atopic Dermatitis in Children from Spleen%从“脾”论治儿童异位性皮炎的可行性探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗瑞静; 柴维汉

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in children from the perspective of integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine,and suggests the feasibility of treating atopic dermatitis in children from spleen,as insufficiency of spleen is believed to be the fundamental reason for infantile atopic dermatitis after analysis and summarization of ancient and modern literature.%从中西医结合角度探讨儿童异位性皮炎的发病机制,通过对古今文献的分析、归纳,认为由“脾不足”所引起的功能失调是导致儿童异位性皮炎发生的根本原因,提出从“脾”论治儿童异位性皮炎具有一定可行性.

  17. Autologous Immunoglobulin Therapy in Patients With Severe Recalcitrant Atopic Dermatitis: Long-Term Changes of Clinical Severity and Laboratory Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Dong Ho; Ahn, Areum; Kim, Myoung Eun; Cho, Su Mi; Park, Mi Jung

    2016-07-01

    This report evaluated long-term changes in clinical severity and laboratory parameters in 3 adult patients with severe recalcitrant atopic dermatitis (AD) who were treated with intramuscular injections of 50 mg of autologous immunoglobulin G (IgG) twice a week for 4 weeks (autologous immunoglobulin therapy, AIGT) and followed up for more than 2 years after the treatment. We observed the following 4 major findings in these 3 patients during the long-term follow-up after AIGT. (1) Two of the 3 patients showed a long-term clinical improvement for more than 36 weeks after AIGT with a maximum decrease in clinical severity score greater than 80% from baseline. (2) These 2 patients also showed long-term decreases in serum total IgE concentrations and peripheral blood eosinophil count for more than 36 weeks after AIGT with a maximum decrease in the two laboratory parameters of allergic inflammatory greater than 70% from baseline. (3) No significant side effect was observed during the 2 years of follow-up period after the AIGT in all 3 patients. (4) Serum levels of IgG anti-idiotype antibodies to the F(ab')₂ fragment of autologous IgG administered for the treatment were not significantly changed after AIGT in all 3 patients. These findings suggest that AIGT has long-term favorable effects on both clinical severity and laboratory parameters in selected patients with severe recalcitrant AD. Further studies are required to evaluate the clinical usefulness and therapeutic mechanism of AIGT for AD. PMID:27126731

  18. Improvement of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions by Platycodon grandiflorum fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Wan-Gi; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Park, Byoung-Woo; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Kim, Jeong-Jin; Bae, Hyunsu

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized as a multi-factorial inflammatory skin disease that has been increasing worldwide. Previously, we demonstrated that FPG, which is Platycodon grandiflorum (PG) fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum (LP), increases the level of interferon (IFN)-gamma in mouse splenocytes in vitro. In this study, we investigated the effects of FPG in an animal model of AD, with a particular emphasis on its effects on T helper (Th)1 and Th2 immune responses. To assess the potential use of FPG for the inhibition of AD, we established a model of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Immunoglobulin isotypes (Igs) and Th1/Th2 cytokines in the sera and spleens of AD-like mice were examined. In addition, histological examination was also performed. AD symptoms in skin lesions improved following oral administration of FPG. IgE secretion was significantly down-regulated, and this was accompanied by decreased levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IgG1 and increased serum levels of IL-12p40 and IgG2a in FPG-treated animals. In splenocytes, the production of the Th1 cytokines IL-12p40 and IFN-gamma was up-regulated, while the levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and 5 were down-regulated by FPG treatment. These results suggest that FPG inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice by suppressing the Th2 cell response and increasing the Th1 cell responses. Our results indicate that FPG is safe and effective for the prevention of AD-like skin lesions. PMID:22863917

  19. Does improvement management of atopic dermatitis influence the appearance of respiratory allergic diseases? A follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dondi Arianna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is often the prelude to allergic diseases. The aim of this study was 1 to evaluate if an integrated management regime could bring about a change in the evolution of the disease in comparison to the results of a previous study; 2 to determine whether the refinement of allergic investigations allowed to identify more promptly the risk factors of evolution into respiratory allergic diseases. Methods The study included 176 children affected by AD and previously evaluated between 1993 and 2002 at the age of 9-16 months, who underwent a telephonic interview by means of a semi-structured, pre-formed questionnaire after a mean follow-up time of 8 years. According to the SCORAD, at first evaluation children had mild AD in 23% of cases, moderate in 62%, severe in 15%. Results AD disappeared in 92 cases (52%, asthma appeared in 30 (17% and rhinoconjunctivitis in 48 (27%. The factors significantly related to the appearance of asthma were: sensitization to food allergens with sIgE > 2 KU/L (cow's milk and hen's egg; P 0.35 KU/L (P P = 0.002, and the incidence of rhinoconjunctivitis from 35% to 24% (P = 0.02. Conclusion Comparing the results with those of the previous study, integrated management of AD does not seem to influence its natural course. Nevertheless, the decrease in the percentage of children evolving towards respiratory allergic disease stresses the importance of early diagnosis and improvement management carried out by specialist centers. The presence of allergic sensitization at one year of age might predict the development of respiratory allergy.

  20. Oral administration of royal jelly inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Kohno, Keizo; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Koya-Miyata, Satomi; Okamoto, Iwao; Arai, Norie; Iwaki, Kanso; Ikeda, Masao; Kurimoto, Masashi

    2003-09-01

    We have shown previously that in addition to IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10, antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by spleen cells from ovalbumin (OVA)/Alum-immunized mice is inhibited by the administration of royal jelly (RJ). Since it has been shown that both Th1 and Th2 cytokines play pathogenic roles in the generation of atopic dermatitis (AD), we have examined whether RJ suppresses the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice induced by repeated application of picryl chloride (PiCl) under specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. Oral administration of RJ to the PiCl-treated NC/Nga mice inhibited the development of AD-like skin lesions in these mice as exemplified by the significant decrease in the total skin severity scores and the decrease in hypertrophy, hyperkeratosis, and infiltration of the epidermis and corium by inflammatory cells. IFN-gamma production by spleen cells from PiCl-treated NC/Nga mice in response to TNP-KLH was partially but significantly inhibited by the oral administration of RJ, while IFN-gamma production by Con A-stimulated spleen cells was not affected. Since inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS)-derived NO has been suggested as an important immunoregulatory mediator in inflammatory autoimmune diseases, we have also examined the expression of iNOS in the dorsal skin lesions of PiCl-treated NC/Nga mice. Interestingly, the expression of iNOS was significantly increased in the skin lesions of RJ-administered mice compared with those of control PBS-administered mice. Thus, our results suggest that RJ suppresses the development of AD-like skin lesions in PiCl-treated NC/Nga mice, possibly by a combination of down-regulating TNP-specific IFN-gamma production and up-regulating iNOS expression. PMID:12890429

  1. A Study on Specific IgE Against Candida Albicans in Atopic Dermatitis Patients Referred to Boali Hospital, Sari- Iran

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    R.A. Mohammadpour, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and purpose: Candida albicans (C. albicans as a micro flora of the human could be responsible for a continuous release of allergen and may be responsible for chronic atopic dermatitis (AD in sensitive patients. Thus, in this study, we analyzed AD patients for total IgE and specific IgE, against C. albicans.Materials and Methods: A total of 120 AD patients (male 52 and female 68 were introduced in this study. The age range varied from 4 months to 60 years (mean about 12.9 years. Serum total IgE was assayed by ELISA kit (RADIM. Solid phase was captured by sandwich ELISA assay, using a micro well format for the determination of serum specific IgE to C. Albicans was used according to the manufacturer’s instructions, (ALerCHEK Allergen specific human IgE.Results: Of the 120 AD patients, 37 subjects (30.8% had total IgE higher than 100 IU/mL, 44 subjects (63.7 % 20-100IU/mL and 39 subjects (32.5% less than 20 IU/mL. 9 (7.5% of the patients had specific IgE against C. albicans. Among the patients who were positive for specific IgE to C. albicans, 6 (66.7% were women.Conclusion: The result of our study on serum total IgE in AD patients is concordant with other studies from different countries. In comparison to other studies, our AD patients showed less frequency of specific IgE against Candida albicans. The explanations for the variation in the results obtained in various studies could be due to the age of patients, severity of disease, difference in the antigen preparation, different methods for IgE analysis and total IgE level.

  2. Application of concentrated deep sea water inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice

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    Bak Jong-Phil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mineral water from deep-sea bedrock, formed over thousands of years, is rich in minerals such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe and others. Our present study was to investigate the preventive effects of natural deep-sea water on developing atopic dermatitis (AD. Methods We elicited AD by application of DNCB (2,4-dinitro-chlorobezene in Nc/Nga mouse dorsal skin. Deep Sea water (DSW was filtered and concentrated by a nanofiltration process and reverse osmosis. We applied concentrated DSW (CDSW to lesions five times per week for six weeks, followed by evaluation. 1% pimecrolimus ointment was used as positive control. The severity of skin lesions was assessed macroscopically and histologically. Levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in the serum were detected by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ spleen lymphocytes were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Results DNCB-treated mice showed atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions. Treatment of mice with CDSW reduced the severity of symptoms in the skin lesions, including edema, erythema, dryness, itching, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL. Histological analyses demonstrated that epidermal thickness and infiltration of inflammatory cells were decreased after CDSW treatment. Given these interesting observations, we further evaluated the effect of CDSW on immune responses in this AD model. Treatment AD mice with CDSW inhibited up-regulation of IgE, histamine, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum. Also, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in spleen lymphocyte was down-regulated after treatment with CDSW. Finally, cytokines, especially IL-4 and IL-10 which are important for Th2 cell development, were reduced. Conclusions Our data suggests that topical application of CDSW could be useful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis.

  3. Nickel sensitization in adolescents and association with ear piercing, use of dental braces and hand eczema. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis (TOACS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, Jens Martin; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten;

    2002-01-01

    cases. Nickel allergy was found most frequently in girls and the association with ear piercing was confirmed. Application of dental braces (oral nickel exposure) prior to ear piercing (cutaneous nickel exposure) was associated with a significantly reduced prevalence of nickel allergy. In adolescents a...... significant association was found between hand eczema and nickel allergy. A follow-up study of this population is planned in order to assess the course and development of contact dermatitis, hand eczema and atopic diseases in adulthood and after choice of occupation....

  4. Evaluation of the effect of a 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray on clinical signs and skin barrier function in dogs with atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Eui-Hwa; Park, Seol-hee; Jung, Ji-Young; Han, Seung-Hee; Youn, Hwa-Young; Chae, Jun-Seok; HWANG, Cheol-Yong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a topical spray containing 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate (HCA) on canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) and to evaluate the skin barrier function during the treatment of CAD. Twenty-one dogs that fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CAD were included in this study. The HCA spray was applied once a day to the lesions of all dogs for 7 or 14 days. Clinical assessment was performed before (day 0) and after treatment (day 14), and clinical res...

  5. Beneficial effects of citrus juice fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum YIT 0132 on atopic dermatitis: results of daily intake by adult patients in two open trials

    OpenAIRE

    HARIMA-MIZUSAWA, Naomi; Kamachi, Keiko; Kano, Mitsuyoshi; NOZAKI, Daisuke; UETAKE, Tatsuo; YOKOMIZO, Yuji; Nagino, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; MIYAZAKI, Kouji; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether daily intake of citrus juice containing heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum YIT 0132 (LP0132-fermented juice) alleviates symptoms of atopic dermatitis. This was a natural extension of our previous study in which LP0132 was shown to enhance IL-10 production in vitro and LP0132-fermented juice was found to alleviate symptoms and enhance quality of life (QOL) in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis. In two open trials, Trial 1 and Trial 2, 32 and 18 adult p...

  6. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Takanori Kanazawa; Yuki Shizawa; Mayu Takeuchi; Kuniko Tamano; Hisako Ibaraki; Yasuo Seta; Yuki Takashima; Hiroaki Okada

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA...

  7. Increased plasma concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor in patients with atopic dermatitis and its relation to disease severity and platelet activation

    OpenAIRE

    Koczy-Baron, E.; Jochem, J; Kasperska-Zajac, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Overproduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions has previously been observed. It is also known that platelet is an important source of VEGF and platelet factor 4 (PF-4), a potential marker of AD severity. Aim To evaluate concentrations of VEGF and its soluble receptors (sVEGF-R1 and sVEGF-R2) in the plasma of AD patients and to examine its possible correlation with disease severity and plasma concentrations of PF-4, a platelet activatio...

  8. Residential Risk Factors for Atopic Dermatitis in 3- to 6-Year Old Children: A Cross-Sectional Study in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Yan, Shuxian; Zheng, Qile; Li, Fei; Chai, Weihan; Wu, Minmin; Kan, Haidong; Norback, Dan; Xu, Jinhua; Zhao, Zhuohui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is common among pre-school children in Shanghai. This study aimed to identify the risk factors for childhood AD from the perspectives of home environment, demographics and parents-grandparents’ atopic disease. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shanghai in April–June, 2010. Preschool children’s parents or guardians were invited to participate a questionnaire survey in six districts (two urban and four suburban/rural) and 6624 children were finally recruited (51.3% boys). AD diagnosis was based on the U.K. Working Party’s (UKWP) criteria. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated by multiple logistic regression. Results: A total of 8.5% of children ever had AD. Around 10.2% of the mothers had lived in newly renovated/decorated homes (NRDH) during the prenatal period (one year before or during pregnancy) and 9.5% got new home furniture (NHF) during the same period. AD was more common in children when mothers had lived in NRDH homes during the prenatal period (AOR = 1.41; 95% CI 1.03–1.93), the current home had indoor mold (2.00, 1.48–2.70), parents-grandparents’ had atopic diseases (3.85, 3.05–4.87), the children had food allergy (3.40, 2.63–4.40) or children lived in urban area (1.52, 1.18–1.96). Associations between AD and NRDH, NHF and indoor molds were only significant in children without parents-grandparents’ atopic diseases. There was an interaction effect between parents-grandparents’ atopic diseases and NRDH (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Home renovation/ redecoration, new furniture and indoor mold, urban residency, heredity disposition and food allergy can be risk factors for childhood AD in Shanghai. PMID:27240388

  9. Theory of traditional Chinese medicine on etiology and mechanism of atopic dermatitis%儿童特应性皮炎中医病因病机探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟青; 常燕群

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis ( AD ) is an inherited allergic skin disease commonly seen among children.While Western medicine can not explain the pathogenesis of the disorder clearly and has no specific treatment,traditional Chinese therapies have their own advantages. Through statistical analysis and summary of ancient and modern literatures on traditional Chinese medicine on the etiology and mechanism of AD, we provide support for treatment based on syndrome differentiation.%特应性皮炎(Atopic Dermatitis,AD)是一种儿童常见的具有遗传倾向的变态反应性皮肤病,西医发病机制未完全阐释清楚且无特效治疗方法.中医治疗具有独特优势,通过统计分析古籍及现代文献关于特应性皮炎中医病因病机文献,总结归纳特应性皮炎的中医病因病机,为辩证论治提供依据.

  10. Inhibition of inflammatory reactions in 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene induced Nc/Nga atopic dermatitis mice by non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hae; Song, Yeon-Suk; Lee, Hae-June; Hong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    2016-06-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has recently been introduced and reported as a novel tool with a range of medicinal and biological roles. Although many studies using NTP have been performed, none has investigated the direct relationship between NTP and immune responses yet. Especially, the effects of NTP on atopic dermatitis (AD) were not been explored. Here, NTP was tested whether it controls immune reactions of AD. NTP treatment was administered to pro-inflammatory cytokine-stimulated keratinocytes and DNCB (2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene)-induced atopic dermatitis mice, then the immune reactions of cells and skin tissues were monitored. Cells treated with NTP showed decreased expression levels of CCL11, CCL13, and CCL17 along with down-regulation of NF-κB activity. Repeated administration of NTP to AD-induced mice reduced the numbers of mast cells and eosinophils, IgE, CCL17, IFNγ levels, and inhibited NF-κB activity in the skin lesion. Furthermore, combined treatment with NTP and 1% hydrocortisone cream significantly decreased the immune responses of AD than that with either of these two treatments individually. Overall, this study revealed that NTP significantly inhibits several immune reactions of AD by regulating NF-κB activity. Therefore, NTP could be useful to suppress the exaggerated immune reactions in severe skin inflammatory diseases such as AD.

  11. External Application of Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone, Isolated from Sargassum muticum, Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Chul; Kang, Na-Jin; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Kim, Sejin; Na, Min-Chull; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Lee, Nam-Ho; Ko, Mi-Hee; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Allergic skin inflammation such as atopic dermatitis is characterized by skin barrier dysfunction, edema, and infiltration with various inflammatory cells. The anti-inflammatory effects of Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone, isolated from Sargassum muticum, have been described in many diseases, but the mechanism by which it modulates the immune system is poorly understood. In this study, the ability of Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone to suppress allergic reactions was investigated using a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. The Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone-treated group showed significantly decreased immunoglobulin E in serum. Also, Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone treatment resulted in a smaller lymph node size with reduced the thickness and length compared to the induction group. In addition, Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone inhibited the expression of interleukin-4, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin-stimulated lymphocytes. These results suggest that Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating chronic inflammatory diseases.

  12. Gene transcription changes in asthmatic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and comparison to those in atopic dermatitis.

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    Douglas A Plager

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthmatic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (aCRSwNP is a common disruptive eosinophilic disease without effective medical treatment. Therefore, we sought to identify gene expression changes, particularly those occurring early, in aCRSwNP. To highlight expression changes associated with eosinophilic epithelial inflammation, we further compared the changes in aCRSwNP with those in a second eosinophilic epithelial disease, atopic dermatitis (AD, which is also closely related to asthma. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genome-wide mRNA levels measured by exon array in both nasosinus inflamed mucosa and adjacent polyp from 11 aCRSwNP patients were compared to those in nasosinus tissue from 17 normal or rhinitis subjects without polyps. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR or immunoassay, and transcription changes common to AD were identified. Comparison of aCRSwNP inflamed mucosa and polyp to normal/rhinitis tissue identified 447 differentially transcribed genes at > or = 2 fold-change and adjusted p-value < 0.05. These included increased transcription of chemokines localized to chromosome 17q11.2 (CCL13, CCL2, CCL8, and CCL11 that favor eosinophil and monocyte chemotaxis and chemokines (CCL18, CCL22, and CXCL13 that alternatively-activated monocyte-derived cells have been shown to produce. Additional transcription changes likely associated with Th2-like eosinophilic inflammation were prominent and included increased IL1RL1 (IL33 receptor and EMR1&3 and decreased CRISP2&3. A down-regulated PDGFB-centric network involving several smooth muscle-associated genes was also implicated. Genes at 17q11.2, genes associated with alternative activation or smooth muscle, and the IL1RL1 gene were also differentially transcribed in AD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data implicate several genes or gene sets in aCRSwNP and eosinophilic epithelial inflammation, some that likely act in the earlier stages of inflammation

  13. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY AND A STATE OF THE COLON MICROFLORA IN PATIENTS WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS WHICH IS ASSOCIATED WITH GIARDIASIS

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    Shkilna MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Colon microbiocenoses in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis are investigated. The decrease of Bifidumbacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., E. coli and increase of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococus spp., Bacillus spp., Candida spp. have been shown. It means disbacteriosis has been occurred in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis. Antibiotic susceptibility of gut microflora in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis has been studied. There has been shown that isolated strains were sensitive to ftorchinolons and I and III generation of cephalosporines.

  14. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY AND A STATE OF THE COLON MICROFLORA IN PATIENTS WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS WHICH IS ASSOCIATED WITH GIARDIASIS

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    Shkilna MI; Pokryshko OV

    2012-01-01

    Colon microbiocenoses in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis are investigated. The decrease of Bifidumbacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., E. coli and increase of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococus spp., Bacillus spp., Candida spp. have been shown. It means disbacteriosis has been occurred in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis. Antibiotic susceptibility of gut microflora in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis has been studied. There has been shown that is...

  15. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin-related allergic inflammatory mechanism in an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Min young; Kim, Dong Hye; Lee, Hae Jin; Choi, Eung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Congenitally or early impaired skin barrier as the first event starting the 'atopic march' in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients can increase allergen penetration that results in sensitization, even in the airways, followed by asthma and allergic rhinitis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine existing in high levels in AD skin and is considered as a novel therapeutic target for atopic disease. We generated oxazolone (Ox)-induced AD-like (Ox-AD) hairless mice and divided them into four groups according to the therapeutic challenges: topical glucocorticoid, pimecrolimus, emollient, and control (acetone-only treated). We assessed the functional studies of skin barrier, epidermal expressions of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), TSLP and antimicrobial peptides (AMP), and serum IgE in each group. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment improved AD-like skin lesions and barrier functions, and restored the epidermal expression of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, PAR-2, and TSLP, in Ox-AD mice. The improvement was relatively better with the glucocorticoid than pimecrolimus. Epidermal AMP expression was restored by topical glucocorticoid, but not pimecrolimus. Our result showed that topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus improved the AD-like skin lesions and barrier impairment by suppressing TSLP-related allergic inflammation. PMID:25786383

  16. Downregulation of immunological mediators in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions by hydrocortisone-loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Z

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Zahid Hussain,1 Haliza Katas,1 Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin,1 Endang Kumolosasi,1 Shariza Sahudin2 1Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Puncak Alam Campus, Bandar Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, noncontiguous, and exudative disorder accompanied by perivascular infiltration of immune mediators, including T-helper (Type 1 helper/Type 2 helper cells, mast cells, and immunoglobulin E. The current study explores the immunomodulatory and histological effects of nanoparticle (NP-based transcutaneous delivery of hydrocortisone (HC. Methods: In this study, HC, the least potent topical glucocorticoid, was administered transcutaneously as chitosan NPs. The pharmacological and immunological effects of the NP-based HC delivery on the alleviation of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis (AD-like skin lesions were evaluated using the NC/Nga mouse model. Results: In vivo Dino-Lite® microscopic assessment revealed that the NP-based formulation displayed a remarkable ability to reduce the severity of the pathological features of AD (dermatitis index, 3.0. The AD suppressive activity of the NP-based topical formulation was expected owing to the interruption of a series of immunopathological events, including the production of immunoglobulin E, release of histamine, and expression of prostaglandin-E2 and vascular endothelial growth factor-α in the sera and skin of the tested animals. Analysis of the cytokine expression in AD-like skin lesions further revealed that the NP-based formulation inhibited the pathological expression of interleukin (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, IL-12p70, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in serum and skin homogenates of NC/Nga mice. Further, our histological findings indicated that the NP-based formulation inhibited fibroblast infiltration and

  17. A Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled-Trial of a Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus sakei Probio-65 for the Prevention of Canine Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Rather, Irfan A; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Taeeun; Jang, Jaeyoung; Seo, Jimin; Lim, Jeongheui; Park, Yong-Ha

    2015-11-28

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a ubiquitous, chronic inflammatory skin disorder prevalent in dogs, which results in production of abnormal levels of IgE antibodies in reciprocation to an allergen challenge. In this study, administration of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus sakei probio-65 for 2 months significantly reduced the disease severity index in experimental dogs diagnosed with CAD. In addition, one month pre-medication of L. sakei probio-65 revealed significant difference in the PVAS score in experimental dogs for both probio-65 and placebo groups. However, post 2 months treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the CASESI score values in the probio-65-treated group (p < .0.06). PMID:26282691

  18. Right-sided infective endocarditis with a ruptured sinus of Valsalva and multiple septic pulmonary emboli in a patient with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Koshin; Kubo, Toshihiko; Matsusaka, Hidenori; Baba, Hironori; Umesue, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of 34-year-old woman with acute tricuspid valve infective endocarditis (IE) associated with a ruptured sinus of Valsalva and multiple septic pulmonary emboli. She had no history of medical problems, except for atopic dermatitis (AD). Blood cultures identified methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Despite the administration of two months of antibiotic therapy, the patient experienced recurrent pulmonary emboli and developed heart failure due to a left-to-right shunt, whereas the area of vegetation did not change in size. She subsequently underwent surgery for shunt closure and tricuspid valve replacement. The AD was thought to be the cause of the patient's bacteremia, which consequently resulted in aggressive right-sided IE. PMID:25832944

  19. Peanut allergy as a trigger for the deterioration of atopic dermatitis and precursor of staphylococcal and herpetic associated infections - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Dennis; Abad, Eliane Dios; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Dos Santos, Fabiana Monteiro; Saintive, Simone; Goudoris, Ekaterini; do Prado, Evandro Alves; Ribeiro, Marcia; Soares Rosado, Alexandre; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial and chronic disease, with genetic, environmental, immunological and nutritional origins. AD may be aggravated by allergies associated with infections. This study aims to describe a paediatric case of AD in which the peanut allergy was the triggering factor to aggravate the disease, and was also the concomitant precursor of staphylococcal (methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, carrier of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL) genes) and herpetic (Herpes Simplex - HSV) infections. The clinical management approach and nursing strategies promoted a favourable evolution during the hospitalization period, besides the family approach, which was essential to control any flare-up of the disease. Adherence to a recommended diet and the use of strategies to prevent any recurrent infections were important to ensure the patient's quality of life. PMID:26403117

  20. Use of a Canine Model of Atopic Dermatitis to Investigate the Efficacy of a CCR4 Antagonist in Allergen-Induced Skin Inflammation in a Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clare; Ahrens, Kim; Devalaraja, Matt; Dymond, Mike; Fagura, Malbinder; Hargreaves, Adam; Holt, Alison; Peers, Ian; Price, Sally; Reens, Jaimini; Riley, Rob; Marsella, Rosanna

    2016-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of skin homing lymphocytes into the dermis. Most of these lymphocytes express the chemokine receptor CCR4, and the frequency of blood CCR4(+) lymphocytes correlates with AD disease severity. Canine AD is a pruritic inflammatory condition that shows many features of the human disease, including CCR4 overexpression. Therefore, we tested a potent selective CCR4 antagonist in an allergen challenge model of canine AD, both clinically and histologically, to investigate whether this chemokine pathway plays a role in the inflammatory response. Using a four-period randomized cross-over study design, 14 beagles were challenged with allergen and clinically monitored. Biopsy samples were taken before and after allergen challenge. A clear reduction of clinical scores was observed with oral prednisolone (P testing new therapeutic agents. PMID:26876716

  1. Functional interpretation of metabolomics data as a new method for predicting long-term side effects: treatment of atopic dermatitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Ji; Woo, Sung-il; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Lim, Dong Kyu; Hong, Ji Yeon; Park, Jeong Hill; Lim, Johan; Kim, Mi-kyeong; Kwon, Sung Won

    2014-01-01

    Topical steroids are used for the treatment of primary atopic dermatitis (AD); however, their associated risk of serious complications is great due to the presence of vulnerable lesions in young children with AD. Topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) are steroid-free, anti-inflammatory agents used for topical AD therapy. However, their use is prohibited in infants pimecrolimus cream with 0.05% desonide cream. We performed urinary metabolomics to predict long-term side effects. The 1% pimecrolimus cream displayed similar efficacy and exceptional safety compared with the 0.05% desonide cream. Metabolomics-based long-term toxicity tests effectively predicted long-term side effects using short-term clinical models. This applicable method for the functional interpretation of metabolomics data sets the foundation for future studies involving the prediction of the toxicity and systemic reactions caused by long-term medication administration. PMID:25491116

  2. Peanut allergy as a trigger for the deterioration of atopic dermatitis and precursor of staphylococcal and herpetic associated infections – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a multifactorial and chronic disease, with genetic, environmental, immunological and nutritional origins. AD may be aggravated by allergies associated with infections. This study aims to describe a paediatric case of AD in which the peanut allergy was the triggering factor to aggravate the disease, and was also the concomitant precursor of staphylococcal (methicillin-sensitive [i]Staphylococcus aureus[/i], carrier of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL genes and herpetic (Herpes Simplex – HSV infections. The clinical management approach and nursing strategies promoted a favourable evolution during the hospitalization period, besides the family approach, which was essential to control any flare-up of the disease. Adherence to a recommended diet and the use of strategies to prevent any recurrent infections were important to ensure the patient’s quality of life.

  3. Zinc-carnosine and vitamin E supplementation does not ameliorate gastrointestinal side effects associated with ciclosporin therapy of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laura S; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S; Roycroft, Linda M

    2011-02-01

    Chelated zinc-carnosine and vitamin E [GastriCalm(®) (GCM); Teva Animal Health] is marketed as an anti-emetic supplement for dogs to assist the repair of damaged stomach and intestinal mucosa. The purpose of this prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to determine whether GCM reduced the frequency of vomiting, diarrhoea and appetite changes during initiation of ciclosporin (Atopica(®); Novartis Animal Health) therapy for the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis. Sixty privately owned dogs diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were randomly assigned to GCM (n=30) or placebo (n=30) groups. All dogs received ∼ 5 mg/kg ciclosporin (range, 3.5-5.8 mg/kg) once daily. Dogs <13.6 kg received half a tablet of GCM or placebo; dogs ≥ 13.6 kg received one tablet once daily. GastriCalm(®) or placebo was administered 30 min prior to eating, and the ciclosporin was administered 2 h after feeding. Owners recorded episodes of vomiting, diarrhoea and appetite changes. Dogs were examined on days 0 and 14. Forty-one of 60 dogs (68.3%) had at least one episode of vomiting, diarrhoea or appetite change, leaving nine placebo dogs (30%) and ten GCM dogs (33.3%) free of adverse events (AE). Twenty-seven of 60 dogs (45%) vomited, and 15 of 60 (25%) had diarrhoea. There was no significant difference in episodes of individual AEs, but the placebo group had a significantly lower total AE score (summation of episodes of appetite change, vomiting and diarrhoea; P=0.022). Small dogs (<6.82 kg) had significantly fewer total AEs in both treatment groups and tolerated ciclosporin better than larger dogs (P<0.05). PMID:20586994

  4. High prevalence of methicillin resistance and PVL genes amongStaphylococcus aureus isolates from the nares and skin lesions of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

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    Cavalcante, F.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia Médica, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Abad, E.D. [Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lyra, Y.C. [Departamento de Microbiologia Médica, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Saintive, S.B.; Ribeiro, M. [Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, D.C. [Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies (Microbial Ecology), Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Programa de Pós Graduação em Odontologia, Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, K.R.N. dos [Departamento de Microbiologia Médica, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-08

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly prevalent among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), and this pathogen may trigger and aggravate AD lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus in the nares of pediatric subjects and verify the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the isolates in pediatric patients with AD. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmectyping, and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes. Lineages were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). AD severity was assessed with the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. Among 106 patients, 90 (85%) presented S. aureus isolates in their nares, and 8 also presented the pathogen in their skin infections. Two patients had two positive lesions, making a total of 10 S. aureusisolates from skin infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus(MRSA) was detected in 24 (26.6%) patients, and PVL genes were identified in 21 (23.3%), including 6 (75%) of the 8 patients with skin lesions but mainly in patients with severe and moderate SCORAD values (P=0.0095). All 24 MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while 8 isolates had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to mupirocin >1024 μg/mL. High lineage diversity was found among the isolates including USA1100/ST30, USA400/ST1, USA800/ST5, ST83, ST188, ST718, ST1635, and ST2791. There was a high prevalence of MRSA and PVL genes among the isolates recovered in this study. PVL genes were found mostly among patients with severe and moderate SCORAD values. These findings can help clinicians improve the therapies and strategies for the management of pediatric patients with AD.

  5. Breaking the cycle: how I manage difficult atopic dermatitis Romper o ciclo: minha conduta em casos difíceis de dermatite atópica

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    Jon M. Hanifin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the general approach and philosophy of managing difficult atopic dermatitis. There are as many regimens as there are physicians, but too many fail to provide patients with adequate relief. This leads to the wasteful alternative - an allergy-seeking behavior that makes caring for these patients even more complicated. If we, as dermatologists, provide rational counseling on prevention and skin care along with effective, stable, anti-inflammatory therapy, our patients may stop seeking irrational approaches. The new flood of information relating to epidermal barrier provides a basis for seeking and treating xerotic conditions earlier during infancy with the hope that the increasing problems with atopic dermatitis and asthma may be lessened with simple and safe measures.Esta revisão resume a abordagem geral e a filosofia na conduta de casos difíceis de dermatite atópica. Existe uma variedade de tratamentos, assim como de médicos, mas muitos falham e não propiciam um alívio adequado aos pacientes, o que leva a uma alternativa dispendiosa, ou seja, um atitude que visa procurar alergias e complica ainda mais o tratamento desses pacientes. Se nós, como dermatologistas, oferecermos um aconselhamento racional sobre prevenção e cuidados com a pele, junto com uma terapia antiinflamatória eficaz e estável, nossos pacientes irão parar de procurar abordagens irracionais. O novo fluxo de informações sobre a barreira epidérmica propicia uma base para investigar e tratar as doenças xeróticas em uma fase mais precoce durante o primeiro ano de vida, com a esperança de que os problemas crescentes relacionados à dermatite atópica e asma possam ser atenuados com medidas simples e seguras.

  6. High prevalence of methicillin resistance and PVL genes amongStaphylococcus aureus isolates from the nares and skin lesions of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly prevalent among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), and this pathogen may trigger and aggravate AD lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus in the nares of pediatric subjects and verify the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the isolates in pediatric patients with AD. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmectyping, and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes. Lineages were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). AD severity was assessed with the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. Among 106 patients, 90 (85%) presented S. aureus isolates in their nares, and 8 also presented the pathogen in their skin infections. Two patients had two positive lesions, making a total of 10 S. aureusisolates from skin infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus(MRSA) was detected in 24 (26.6%) patients, and PVL genes were identified in 21 (23.3%), including 6 (75%) of the 8 patients with skin lesions but mainly in patients with severe and moderate SCORAD values (P=0.0095). All 24 MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while 8 isolates had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to mupirocin >1024 μg/mL. High lineage diversity was found among the isolates including USA1100/ST30, USA400/ST1, USA800/ST5, ST83, ST188, ST718, ST1635, and ST2791. There was a high prevalence of MRSA and PVL genes among the isolates recovered in this study. PVL genes were found mostly among patients with severe and moderate SCORAD values. These findings can help clinicians improve the therapies and strategies for the management of pediatric patients with AD

  7. Estimation of the environmental effect of natural volatile organic compounds from Chamaecyparis obtusa and their effect on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun; Ahn, Changhwan; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Won-Sil; Park, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sung-Suk; Choi, Don-Ha; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-07-01

    Aromatherapy has been suggested as an alternative therapeutic method for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), eczema and other skin diseases. In the current study, the anti-atopic properties of the volatile organic compounds of Chamaecyparis obtusa (VOCCo) were examined to determine whether they are amenable for use as a pharmaceutical candidate. The alterations in histological features, serum IgE levels and mast cell infiltration following exposure to VOCCo were determined in a 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD-like mouse model. The results of these experiments demonstrated that VOCCo inhibited the development of AD-like skin lesions by reducing the serum IgE level and mast cell infiltration into the dermal and subcutaneous layers. This was supported by screening of immune cytokine mRNAs, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 from the skin of DNCB-treated mice. The expression of IL-1β and IL-6 in the skin lesions of mice was dose-dependently inhibited by treatment with VOCCo. Furthermore, treatment with VOCCo resulted in the recovery of histopathological features in AD-like skin lesions. These results suggest that VOCCo may have therapeutic and preventive effects for the development of AD. PMID:25760811

  8. The Relationship Between Serum Levels of Total IgE, IL-18, IL-12, IFN- γ and Disease Severity in Children With Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies about the role of cytokines on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD are generally based on in vitro observations and this role has not been completely clarified yet. Serum levels of total IgE, IL-18, IL-12, IFN- γ and the relationship between these parameters and disease severity, determined using the SCORAD index, in a group of atopic patients were investigated in this study. Serum levels of total IgE were measured by the nephelometric method and serum levels of IL-18, IL-12/p40 and IFN- γ were measured by ELISA method. Serum levels of total IgE and IL-18 were found significantly higher in study group than in controls ( p<.001 . There was no statistically significant difference between patients and controls in respect of serum levels of IL-12/p40 ( p=.227 . A statistically significant relationship between SCORAD values and serum levels of total IgE ( p<.001 , IL-18 ( p<.001 , and IL-12/p40 ( p<.001 was determined. These results show that serum levels of IL-18 can be a sensitive parameter that importantly correlates with clinical severity of AD, can play a role in the immunopathogenesis of AD, and furthermore may be used in the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease in addition to other parameters.

  9. The immunostimulatory effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy dogs and dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassies-van der Lee, Annette; Rutten, Victor; Spiering, Rachel; van Kooten, Peter; Willemse, Ton; Broere, Femke

    2014-04-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing cytosine phosphatidyl guanine-rich DNA sequences (CpG ODN) can promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) responses, reduce T-helper type 2 (Th2) responses and/or favour regulatory T cell (Treg) responses in vitro and in vivo in humans and animals, by acting via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Since CpG ODN can be used as immune-modulators for canine atopic dermatitis (AD), the aim of the current study was to investigate their immunostimulatory potential on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their subsets, from AD and healthy dogs. Expression of TLR9 and cytokine mRNA in CpG ODN-stimulated and unstimulated cells was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Stimulation of PBMC with CpG class C ODN upregulated mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-12p40 in AD dogs (PPBMC of atopic and healthy dogs as measured by ELISA. In healthy dogs only, CpG class C ODN stimulated IFN-α mRNA production by CD21(+) cells, and IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ mRNA production by CD3(+) cells. Increased expression of TLR9 mRNA was only observed in CD3(+) cells from AD dogs. No significantly increased gene expression was found in the CD11c(+) subset upon stimulation, for those genes evaluated. The results indicate that PBMC of healthy and atopic dogs are sensitive to stimulation with CpG ODN class C, with a resulting Th1 cytokine response in AD dogs and a mixed Th1/Th2/Treg cytokine response in healthy dogs. From this study, little evidence was found to support the use of CpG ODN class C for therapeutic purposes in dogs affected with AD. PMID:24461202

  10. Therapy of atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Major objective is the evaluation of the medical effectiveness of different therapeutical approaches and the cost effectiveness with relevance for Germany. Methods: This health technology assessment (HTA evaluates systemically randomized controlled studies (RCT on the therapy of atopic dermatitis which were published between 1999 and 2004. Further it includes some important clinical studies which have been published after 2004 and other updates the English HTA report by Hoare et al. [1]. Results: Topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin-inhibitors are the principal substances which are currently used for anti-inflammatory therapy in atopic dermatitis. These substances have shown a significant therapeutic efficacy in controlled studies. In newer controlled studies no difference was observable when corticosteroids were applied once or more than once daily onto the skin. Moreover, there is now one controlled study available which points to the fact that an interval therapy with a stronger topical corticosteroid over a limited time (some weeks may lower the risk of recurrent flares of atopic dermatitis. Both topical calcineurin-inhibitors pimecrolimus and tacrolimus have shown a significant therapeutical efficacy in a number of placebo-controlled prospective studies. The wealth of data is high for these substances. Both substances have been shown to be efficient in infants, children and adult patients with atopic dermatitis. The importance of a so-called basic therapy with emollients which have to be adapted to the current status of skin is generally accepted in clinical practice. Controlled studies show the efficacy of ”basic therapy” - although the level of evidence is quite low for this approach. The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis is colonized in the majority with Staphylococcus aureus, a gram-positive bacterium. Therefore, a therapeutical approach for the treatment of atopic dermatitis is the anti-bacterial or

  11. The Clinical Relevance of Various Hypersensitivity Tests in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis as Assessed by Their History, SCORAD Changes, and Number of Days with Need of Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Liska, Martin; Gutova, Vaclava; Panzner, Petr; Brodska, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions can play a role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). We tested 71 patients (median age 5 years) with AD for hypersensitivity to grass and birch pollen, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and Dermatophagoides farinae using atopy patch test (APT), skin prick test (SPT), and specific IgE measurement. The sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) of the tests were calculated on the basis of personal history of AD exacerbation, clinical AD score ...

  12. Andrographolide suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin in phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated mast cells and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like mice model

    OpenAIRE

    Li CX; Li HG; Zhang H; Cheng RH; Li M; Liang JY; Gu Y; Ling B; Yao ZR; Yu H

    2016-01-01

    Chun-xiao Li,* Hua-guo Li,* Hui Zhang,* Ru-hong Cheng, Ming Li, Jian-ying Liang, Yan Gu, Bo Ling, Zhi-rong Yao, Hong Yu Department of Dermatology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has been demonstrated to be an important immunologic fa...

  13. Precision medicine in patients with allergic diseases: Airway diseases and atopic dermatitis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Antonella; Lemanske, Robert F; Hellings, Peter W; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bieber, Thomas; Casale, Thomas B; Jutel, Marek; Ong, Peck Y; Poulsen, Lars K; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Seys, Sven F; Agache, Ioana

    2016-05-01

    In this consensus document we summarize the current knowledge on major asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis endotypes under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is an initiative of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology aiming to harmonize the European and American approaches to best allergy practice and science. Precision medicine is of broad relevance for the management of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in the context of a better selection of treatment responders, risk prediction, and design of disease-modifying strategies. Progress has been made in profiling the type 2 immune response-driven asthma. The endotype driven approach for non-type 2 immune response asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is lagging behind. Validation and qualification of biomarkers are needed to facilitate their translation into pathway-specific diagnostic tests. Wide consensus between academia, governmental regulators, and industry for further development and application of precision medicine in management of allergic diseases is of utmost importance. Improved knowledge of disease pathogenesis together with defining validated and qualified biomarkers are key approaches to precision medicine. PMID:27155030

  14. 氨基酸配方营养粉辅助治疗婴儿特应性皮炎的临床研究%Amino acid nutrient powder auxiliary treatment of infantile atopic dermatitis of clinical research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕南; 何雯; 李碧桃; 张丽

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价氨基酸配方营养粉辅助治疗婴儿特应性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,ad)的效果。方法特应性皮炎选取我院儿童保健科门诊根据 Williams 标准诊断为特应性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,ad)、年龄小于6月龄的人工喂养婴儿。通过连续给予氨基酸配方营养粉替代喂养7~14天,同时回避鸡蛋、奶制品等易引起过敏的食物。观察婴儿特应性皮炎的改善情况,采用 scorad 评分对特应性皮炎 ad 的严重程度进行评估。结果入组受试者150例,平均年龄(109±72)(15~181)天,其中轻中度 ad 122例,平均 scorad 评分为28.2±6.3(16.5~38.5),重度 ad 28例,平均 scorad 评分为48.7±9.2(40.5~69.7),纳入疗效可评估受试者共142例。采用氨基酸配方营养粉替代喂养7天和14天的总有效率分别为36.8%和72.5%,具有显著的统计学差异( P <0.0001)。轻中度 ad 组和重度 ad 组,氨基酸配方营养粉替代喂养2周的总有效率均优于1周的总有效率(P <0.001 Vs P <0.05)。合并用药的受试者总有效率显著优于无合并用药的受试者( P =0.034)。研究过程中未出现严重不良反应。结论通过氨基酸配方营养粉辅助治疗婴儿特应性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,ad)7~14天,对于改善6月龄内婴儿轻中度和重度 ad 具有一定效果,联合应用保湿剂和外用药物治疗等疗效更为显著。%Objective to evaluate the formula of amino acid nutrition powder in adjuvant treatment of infantile atopic dermatitis (atopic dermatitis, ad) effect. Method of atopic dermatitis in children health care department of our hospital were selected according to the Williams criteria for diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (atopic dermatitis, ad), younger than June age artificial infant feeding. through the continuous administration of amino acid nutrition powder feeding 7 to 14 days, while avoiding egg, dairy products, easy to cause food

  15. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (Pskin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  16. The immunoglobulin G response to Malassezia pachydermatis extracts in atopic and non-atopic dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ha J.; Kim, Eun T.; Lim, Chae Y.; Park, Chul; Kang, Byeong T.; Kim, Ju W.; Yoo, Jong H.; Park, Hee M.

    2010-01-01

    IgG immunoreactivity to Malassezia pachydermatis was compared in atopic and non-atopic dogs. Malassezia pachydermatis proteins with a molecular weight of 98 kDa were recognized at a significantly higher frequency in the sera of atopic dogs. Most of the atopic dogs with Malassezia dermatitis had a greater IgG response than did normal dogs.

  17. Quality of life in infants and children with atopic dermatitis: Addressing issues of differential item functioning across countries in multinational clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennant Alan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous study had identified 45 items assessing the impact of atopic dermatitis (AD on the whole family. From these it was intended to develop two separate scales, one assessing impact on carers and the other determining the effect on the child. Methods The 45 items were included in three clinical trials designed to test the efficacy of a new topical treatment (pimecrolimus, Elidel cream 1% in the treatment of AD in infants and children and in validation studies in the UK, US, Germany, France and the Netherlands. Rasch analyses were undertaken to determine whether an internationally valid, unidimensional scale could be developed that would inform on the direct impact of AD on the child. Results Rasch analyses applied to the data from the trials indicated that the draft measure consisted of two scales, one assessing the QoL of the carer and the other (consisting of 12 items measuring the impact of AD on the child. Three of the 12 potential items failed to fit the measurement model in Europe and five in the US. In addition, four items exhibiting differential item functioning (DIF by country were identified. After removing the misfitting items and controlling for DIF it was possible to derive a scale; The Childhood Impact of Atopic Dermatitis (CIAD with good item fit for each trial analysis. Analysis of the validation data from each of the different countries confirmed that the CIAD had adequate internal consistency, reproducibility and construct validity. The CIAD demonstrated the benefits of treatment with Elidel over placebo in the European trial. A similar (non-significant trend was found for the US trials. Conclusion The study represents a novel method of dealing with the problem of DIF associated with different cultures. Such problems are likely to arise in any multinational study involving patient-reported outcome measures, as items in the scales are likely to be valued differently in different cultures. However, where

  18. ETFAD/EADV Eczema task force 2015 position paper on diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis in adult and paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, A; Oranje, A; Deleuran, M; Simon, D; Szalai, Z; Kunz, B; Svensson, A; Barbarot, S; von Kobyletzki, L; Taieb, A; de Bruin-Weller, M; Werfel, T; Trzeciak, M; Vestergard, C; Ring, J; Darsow, U

    2016-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a clinically defined, highly pruritic, chronic inflammatory skin disease of children and adults. The diagnosis is made using evaluated clinical criteria. Disease activity is best measured with a composite score assessing both objective signs and subjective symptoms, such as SCORAD. The management of AD must consider the clinical and pathogenic variabilities of the disease and also target flare prevention. Basic therapy includes hydrating topical treatment, as well as avoidance of specific and unspecific provocation factors. Anti-inflammatory treatment of visible skin lesions is based on topical glucocorticosteroids and the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are preferred in sensitive locations. Tacrolimus and mid-potent steroids are proven for proactive therapy, which is long-term intermittent anti-inflammatory therapy of the frequently relapsing skin areas. Systemic anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment is indicated for severe refractory cases. Biologicals targeting key mechanisms of the atopic immune response are promising emerging treatment options. Microbial colonization and superinfection may induce disease exacerbation and can justify additional antimicrobial treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1R-blockers) may diminish pruritus, but do not have sufficient effect on lesions. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation, preferably UVA1 or narrow-band UVB 311 nm. Dietary recommendations should be patient specific and elimination diets should only be advised in case of proven food allergy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy to aeroallergens may be useful in selected cases. Psychosomatic counselling is recommended to address stress-induced exacerbations. 'Eczema school' educational programmes have been proven to be helpful for children and adults. PMID:27004560

  19. An Overlook to the Characteristics and Roles Played by Eotaxin Network in the Pathophysiology of Food Allergies: Allergic Asthma and Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Zahra; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Koochakzadeh, Leila

    2016-06-01

    Investigations revealed substantial parts accomplished by chemokines specifically eotaxins and their specific receptors. They are functionally involved in the modulation of the pathologic state of tissue inflammation which is as a result of allergic reactions. Chemokines as small proteins with approximately 8-10 kDa molecular weight are considered and fit in the bigger family of cytokines, containing basic heparin-binding polypeptide mediators. Chemokines actively interfere in the processes of selective, oriented leukocyte (including eosinophil) recruitment. As eminent from their name, more specifically, eotaxins are specialized for eosinophils' oriented locomotion toward allergic inflamed regions. To date, three members are defined for eotaxin subfamily as follows: eotaxin-1 (CCL11), eotaxin-2 (CCL24), and eotaxin-3 (CCL26), all of them bind to and activate CCR3 but have a low level of homology and appear to exhibit different physiological potentials. Allergy is described as a clinical state in which a pathologic hypersensitivity reaction is always initiated throughout an immunologic mechanism; similar to other immunologic reactions, an allergic reaction could also either be antibody or cell mediated. This type of allergic reactions occurs in all age groups and damages several different organs, having a significant impact on the emotional and social health of patients and their families and relatives. Concerning introductory comments introduced above, the authors of the present review attempted to collect and provide the latest evidences and information regarding the correlation between expression of eotaxin family members and allergy, in a wider extent, in two important allergic disorders: atopic asthma (AA) and atopic dermatitis (AD). Overall, concerning the most recent articles published within the database in the life sciences literature regarding the fundamental role(s) played by eotaxins in the pathogenesis of AA and AD, the authors of the current article

  20. Patient-reported outcomes after discontinuation of long-term topical corticosteroid treatment for atopic dermatitis: a targeted cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi-Ando N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Naoko Takahashi-Ando,1 Mark A Jones,2 Shigeki Fujisawa,3 Rokuro Hama4 1Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Toyo University, Saitama, Japan; 2School of Population Health, The University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia; 3Fujisawa Dermatology Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 4Japan Institute of Pharmacovigilance, Osaka, Japan Background: Topical corticosteroid (TCS treatment is widely prescribed for atopic dermatitis (AD. However, TCS treatment is associated with tachyphylaxis, and discontinuation after long-term use may cause exacerbation of symptoms. Some AD patients are reluctant to use TCS. Objective: To evaluate patient-reported short- and long-term outcomes after discontinuation of TCS treatment for AD. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to adult AD patients (n=1,812 of doctors who did not recommend TCS as first-line therapy for patients who preferred to avoid TCS. Data collected included current TCS use, duration of TCS use, past discontinuation of TCS use, exacerbation of symptoms after discontinuation of TCS use, and limitations to daily activities because of AD. Results: Of 918 respondents, 97.7% had used TCS, of whom 92.3% had experienced discontinuation of TCS use. After discontinuation, 63.9% experienced their most severe AD symptoms ever. The severity of exacerbation of symptoms was significantly correlated with the length of TCS use (P<0.001. Although most respondents who experienced severe exacerbation after TCS discontinuation were not current TCS users, they generally had fewer current limitations to activities than when AD symptoms were at their worst. Conclusion: Adult Japanese AD patients who experience severe exacerbation of symptoms immediately after discontinuation of TCS use generally improve over time. We suggest caution regarding long-term TCS treatment in AD patients.Keywords: adverse effects of corticosteroids, symptom exacerbation, rosacea-like dermatitis 

  1. Atopijski dermatitis - sodobno zdravljenje:

    OpenAIRE

    Dragoš, Vlasta

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is very common skin disorder in well developed countries. Pruritic skin lesions appear on different sites of predilection in different age groups. The appearance of skin leisons are changed by superinfectons casedby bacteria or viruses. Topical steroids have been the conventional therapy for atopic dermatitis for 50 years. They act on broad spectrum of immune cells but also interfere with other skin cells. Tacrolimus ointment andpimecrolimus cream are new topically effective...

  2. Increased leukotriene B(4) production, complement C3 conversion and acid hydrolase enzyme concentrations in different leucocyte sub-populations of dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breathnach, R; Donahy, C; Jones, B R; Bloomfield, F J

    2006-01-01

    Various markers of the inflammatory response were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from 31 dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). The variables assayed included chemiluminescence, acid hydrolase enzyme concentrations, leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) production and complement C3 conversion. The results were compared to those derived from a population of clinically healthy dogs. Dogs with AD exhibited a significant increase in median LTB(4) production in PMNs compared to controls (0.94 versus 0.00 ng/10(6) cells; PPBMC fraction - 0.42 versus 0.25 mU/10(6) cells; PPBMC fraction - 0.52 versus 0.27 mU/10(6) cells; P0.05). However, the median time taken to reach maximum chemiluminescence was significantly shorter in the PMN fraction of dogs with AD (7.00 versus 10.00 min; Pdogs had a significant increase in the median percentage conversion of complement C3 to C3b (66.0 versus 57.3%; Pdogs with AD. The role of LTB(4) in the pathogenesis of canine AD and the potential efficacy of leukotriene antagonists in the treatment of this disorder warrant further investigation. PMID:16427587

  3. Comparing the Effect of a Twice-weekly Tacrolimus and Betamethasone Valerate Dose on the Subclinical Epidermal Barrier Defect in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon G

    2015-07-01

    The proactive use of topical anti-inflammatory (TAI) therapy to address subclinical inflammation is an effective, contemporary clinical strategy for the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). The interaction of a proactive TAI dose with the subclinical epidermal barrier defect in AD is yet to be determined. A randomised, observer-blind, functional mechanistic study in 17 subjects with quiescent AD was performed to compare the effect of a twice-weekly dose of betamethasone valerate (0.1%) cream (BMVc), against tacrolimus (0.1%) ointment (TACo) on the biophysical and biological properties of the epidermal barrier. Application of BMVc preserved epidermal barrier function and stratum corneum (SC) integrity, but significantly elevated skin-surface pH with concomitant loss of SC cohesion. By contrast, TACo improved SC integrity, exerted an overall hydrating action, and significantly reduced caseinolytic and trypsin-like protease activity. The differential effects reported support the proactive use of TACo to promote reparation of the subclinical barrier defect in AD. PMID:25594610

  4. Change in Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Skin-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis during Ten-Year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Min; Jo, Ju-Hyun; Jin, Hyunju; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Jung-Min; Kim, Do-Won; Jang, Ho-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Background A small subset of adolescents atopic dermatitis (AD) tends to persist. This also leads to get more antibiotics exposure with advancing years. Antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a serious problem during Staphylococcus aureus treatment, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Objective It was investigated the S. aureus colonization frequency in the skin lesions and anterior nares of adolescent AD patients and evaluated the changes in S. aureus antimicrobial susceptibility for years. Methods Patients who visited our clinic from September 2003 to August 2005 were classified into group A, and patients who visited from August 2010 to March 2012 were classified into group B. To investigate the differences with regard to patients' age and disease duration, the patients were subdivided into groups according to age. Lesional and nasal specimens were examined. Results Among the 295 AD patients, the total S. aureus colonization rate in skin lesions was 66.9% (95/142) for group A and 78.4% (120/153) for group B. No significant changes in the systemic antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus strains isolated from adolescent AD patients were observed during about 10-year period. The increased trend of MRSA isolation in recent adolescent AD outpatients suggest that the community including school could be the source of S. aureus antibiotic resistance and higher fusidic acid resistance rates provides evidence of imprudent topical use. Conclusion Relatively high MRSA isolation and fusidic acid resistance rates in recent AD patients suggest that the community harbors antibiotic-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27489430

  5. Chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol)/bovine bone powder biocomposites: A potential biomaterial for the treatment of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Nátali O; da Silva, Gabriela T; Weber, Douglas M; Luchese, Cristiane; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Fajardo, André R

    2016-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects a large percent of the world́s population. This long-lasting skin disease has been treated by different approaches according to its causative agent and severity. Nonetheless, the use of advanced biomaterials to treat AD is poorly explored. The present study assessed the protective effectiveness of biocomposites films based on chitosan (Cs), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and bovine bone powder (BBP) on AD-like skin lesions. These original biocomposites were fully characterized and in vivo biological assays concerning the AD treatment were performed using a mouse model induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB). The dorsal skin and ear of Balb/c female mice were challenging cutaneously with DNCB. Our findings demonstrate BBP-based biocomposite attenuated and treated considerably the DNCB-induced skin lesions in an AD-like model. In this sense, this study suggests that this original biocomposite may be applied as an active biomaterial for AD treatment. PMID:27185122

  6. Ethanol Extract of Sanguisorbae Radix Inhibits Mast Cell Degranulation and Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hye Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanguisorbae Radix (SR is well known as herbal medicine named “Zi-Yu” in Korea, which is the dried roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. (Rosacease. We investigated the underlying mechanism on the inhibition of atopic dermatitis (AD of an ethanol extract of SR (ESR using 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced AD mice model. Oral administration of ESR significantly suppressed DNCB-induced AD-like symptoms such as scratching behavior, ear thickness, epidermal thickness, and IgE levels. To investigate the effects of ESR treatment on degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs, we measured the release of β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX, degranulation marker. ESR decreased the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells into the AD skin lesions. Furthermore, ESR significantly inhibited degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated BMMCs. We have demonstrated that ESR decreased AD symptoms in mice and inhibits degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mast cells. Our study suggests that ESR may serve as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD symptoms.

  7. Oral Administration of p-Hydroxycinnamic Acid Attenuates Atopic Dermatitis by Downregulating Th1 and Th2 Cytokine Production and Keratinocyte Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Choi, Eun-Ju; Lee, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Hye-Ran; Na, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Min-Sung; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Eun Young; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex disease that is caused by various factors, including environmental change, genetic defects, and immune imbalance. We previously showed that p-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) isolated from the roots of Curcuma longa inhibits T-cell activation without inducing cell death. Here, we demonstrated that oral administration of HCA in a mouse model of ear AD attenuates the following local and systemic AD manifestations: ear thickening, immune-cell infiltration, production of AD-promoting immunoregulatory cytokines in ear tissues, increased spleen and draining lymph node size and weight, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production by draining lymph nodes, and elevated serum immunoglobulin production. HCA treatment of CD4+ T cells in vitro suppressed their proliferation and differentiation into Th1 or Th2 and their Th1 and Th2 cytokine production. HCA treatment of keratinocytes lowered their production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines that drive either Th1 or Th2 responses in AD. Thus, HCA may be of therapeutic potential for AD as it acts by suppressing keratinocyte activation and downregulating T-cell differentiation and cytokine production. PMID:26959360

  8. Oral Administration of p-Hydroxycinnamic Acid Attenuates Atopic Dermatitis by Downregulating Th1 and Th2 Cytokine Production and Keratinocyte Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Su Lee

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a complex disease that is caused by various factors, including environmental change, genetic defects, and immune imbalance. We previously showed that p-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA isolated from the roots of Curcuma longa inhibits T-cell activation without inducing cell death. Here, we demonstrated that oral administration of HCA in a mouse model of ear AD attenuates the following local and systemic AD manifestations: ear thickening, immune-cell infiltration, production of AD-promoting immunoregulatory cytokines in ear tissues, increased spleen and draining lymph node size and weight, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production by draining lymph nodes, and elevated serum immunoglobulin production. HCA treatment of CD4+ T cells in vitro suppressed their proliferation and differentiation into Th1 or Th2 and their Th1 and Th2 cytokine production. HCA treatment of keratinocytes lowered their production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines that drive either Th1 or Th2 responses in AD. Thus, HCA may be of therapeutic potential for AD as it acts by suppressing keratinocyte activation and downregulating T-cell differentiation and cytokine production.

  9. Thermodynamic Insights and Conceptual Design of Skin-Sensitive Chitosan Coated Ceramide/PLGA Nanodrug for Regeneration of Stratum Corneum on Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Myung; Yoon, Gwang Heum; Lee, Hoo Chul; Jung, Moon Hee; Yu, Sun Il; Yeon, Seung Ju; Min, Seul Ki; Kwon, Yeo Seon; Hwang, Jin Ha; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex skin disease primarily characterized by psoriasis of the stratum corneum. AD drugs have usually been used in acidic and hydrophilic solvents to supply moisture and prevent lipid defects. Ceramide is a typical treatment agent to regenerate the stratum corneum and relieve symptoms of AD. However, ceramide has limitation on direct use for skin because of its low dispersion properties in hydrophilic phase and side effects at excessive treatment. In this study, ceramide imbedded PLGA nanoparticles were developed with chitosan coating (Chi-PLGA/Cer) to overcome this problem. The chitosan coating enhanced initial adherence to the skin and prevented the initial burst of ceramide, but was degraded by the weakly acidic nature of skin, resulting in controlled release of ceramide with additional driving force of the squeezed PLGA nanoparticles. Additionally, the coating kinetics of chitosan were controlled by manipulating the reaction conditions and then mathematically modeled. The Chi-PLGA/Cer was not found to be cytotoxic and ceramide release was controlled by pH, temperature, and chitosan coating. Finally, Chi-PLGA/Cer was demonstrated to be effective at stratum corneum regeneration in a rat AD model. Overall, the results presented herein indicated that Chi-PLGA/Cer is a novel nanodrug for treatment of AD. PMID:26666701

  10. Oral administration of poly-γ-glutamate ameliorates atopic dermatitis in Nc/Nga mice by suppressing Th2-biased immune response and production of IL-17A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Young; Kim, Doo-Jin; Won, Ji-Na; Lee, Il-Han; Sung, Moon-Hee; Poo, Haryoung

    2014-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is closely related to dysregulation of the T helper type 1 and 2 (Th1)/Th2 balance. A previous study showed that high molecular mass poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) isolated from Bacillus subtilis sp. Chungkookjang induces the production of IL-12 from dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we investigated the effect of γ-PGA on AD-like skin disease using an Nc/Nga mouse model. In vitro, γ-PGA activated DCs and induced IL-12 production in mice. In vivo, oral administration of γ-PGA markedly reduced the AD symptoms, similar to the response seen in the dexamethasone (Dex)-treated group. Treatment with γ-PGA also decreased the serum levels of IgG1, the skin levels of Th2 cytokines, the extent of skin inflammation, and the accumulation of mast cells. Furthermore, γ-PGA was effective against established AD, significantly decreasing serum IgE and Th2 cytokines in the inflamed tissue. Interestingly, the production of IL-17A in splenocytes was also suppressed by γ-PGA, indicating that it inhibits both Th2 and Th17 immune responses. Collectively, these results suggest that oral administration of γ-PGA could be a therapeutic strategy for treating AD via the modulation of Th2-biased immune responses in an Nc/Nga mouse model. PMID:24025551

  11. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Kanazawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The small interfering RNA (siRNA is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC, which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA.

  12. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Shizawa, Yuki; Takeuchi, Mayu; Tamano, Kuniko; Ibaraki, Hisako; Seta, Yasuo; Takashima, Yuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC), which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA. PMID:26371030

  13. The Hot-Water Extract of Smilacis Chinae Rhizome Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene and House Dust Mite-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Nam Yong; Park, Eun-Ji; Sung, In Sung; Ju, Seul A; Kim, Kyoung Un; Kim, Mi Rae; Song, Do Yeon; Lee, Min-Ju; Kim, Hak-Soo; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Chung, Hun-Jong; Choi, Eun-Ju; Yoon, Ki-Hun; Lee, Min Won; Yun, Seongho; Min, Bokkee; Kwon, Suk Hyung; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2016-04-01

    Smilacis Chinae Rhizome (SCR) has been used as an oriental folk medicine for various biological activities. However, its effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) remains undetermined to date. We assessed the effect of orally administered hot-water extract of SCR on AD-like skin lesions in mice and its underlying mechanisms. AD-like murine model was prepared by repeated alternate application of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) extract (DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) for 4 weeks, topically to the ears. Daily oral administration of SCR for 3 and 4 weeks significantly reduced inflammatory ear thickening, with the effect being enhanced at the earlier start and longer period of administration. This effect was accompanied by a significant decrease in both Th2 and Th1 serum antibodies (total IgE, DFE-specific IgE, and IgG2a). Histological analysis showed that SCR markedly decreased the epidermal/dermal ear thickening and the dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, SCR suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of IL-4, IL-13, IL-17, IL-18, TSLP, and IFN-γ genes in the ear tissue. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SCR exerts beneficial effect in mouse AD model, suggesting that SCR has the therapeutic potential as an orally active treatment of AD by modulating both Th1 and Th2 responses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26840656

  14. Effects of pimecrolimus compared with triamcinolone acetonide cream on skin barrier structure in atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind, right-left arm trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jens-Michael; Weppner, Merle; Dähnhardt-Pfeiffer, Stephan; Neumann, Claudia; Bräutigam, Matthias; Schwarz, Thomas; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Proksch, Ehrhardt

    2013-09-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have an epidermal barrier dysfunction, which allows invasion of allergens to occur. Stratum corneum skin barrier is formed by corneocytes and extracellular lipids extruded from the epidermal lamellar bodies. In a controlled, randomized, double-blinded, right-left comparison study we investigated the effect of pimecrolimus (PIM) cream compared with triamcinolone acetonide cream (TA) on the skin barrier in 15 patients with symmetrical elbow lesions of AD. In punch biopsies, before and after treatment, skin lipid bilayer and lamellar body structure were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Partial Eczema Area and Severity Index (pEASi), stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were monitored on days 1, 8 and 22. The pEASi was significantly more improved with TA compared with PIM, whereas stratum corneum hydration was slightly more improved after treatment with PIM. The TEM revealed a strong reduction in lamellar bodies in lesional skin of AD; only 32% of the lamellar bodies were normal. A significantly higher number of normal lamellar bodies was found after 3 weeks of treatment with PIM (58%; p < 0.005). An increase in lamellar bodies also occurred with TA treatment (46%; p < 0.05); however, significantly less than with PIM (p < 0.05). Clinical score and TEWL were more improved after treatment with TA, whereas the lamellar bodies were more normal after treatment with PIM. PMID:23571785

  15. Psychological Stress and the Cutaneous Immune Response: Roles of the HPA Axis and the Sympathetic Nervous System in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. F. Hall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological stress, an evolutionary adaptation to the fight-or-flight response, triggers a number of physiological responses that can be deleterious under some circumstances. Stress signals activate the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Elements derived from those systems (e.g., cortisol, catecholamines and neuropeptides can impact the immune system and possible disease states. Skin provides a first line of defense against many environmental insults. A number of investigations have indicated that the skin is especially sensitive to psychological stress, and experimental evidence shows that the cutaneous innate and adaptive immune systems are affected by stressors. For example, psychological stress has been shown to reduce recovery time of the stratum corneum barrier after its removal (innate immunity and alters antigen presentation by epidermal Langerhans cells (adaptive immunity. Moreover, psychological stress may trigger or exacerbate immune mediated dermatological disorders. Understanding how the activity of the psyche-nervous -immune system axis impinges on skin diseases may facilitate coordinated treatment strategies between dermatologists and psychiatrists. Herein, we will review the roles of the HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system on the cutaneous immune response. We will selectively highlight how the interplay between psychological stress and the immune system affects atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

  16. Study of the role of serum folic acid in atopic dermatitis: A correlation with serum IgE and disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha A Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Most atopic dermatitis (AD patients have elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE. Impaired folic acid (FA metabolism was found to reduce the intracellular methyl donor pool, associated with a higher prevalence of atopy. Aim : To assess serum IgE and FA in AD patients and to correlate their levels with the disease severity, and with each other. Materials and Methods : Twenty patients with AD were assessed for serum FA and IgE, compared with 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were classified into three groups (mild, moderate, and severe AD based on clinical severity according to Nottingham index. In both patients and controls, serum IgE was measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique and serum FA was measured using Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay technique. Results : Serum FA levels were lower in AD patients compared with controls, but the difference was not statistically significant. FA levels did not show statistically significant difference among disease severity groups and did not correlate with serum IgE levels. On the other hand, serum IgE levels were significantly elevated in AD patients compared with controls, and among AD patients, its levels were significantly elevated in severe AD compared with mild and moderate disease. Conclusion : Serum IgE is useful in assessment of AD severity and activity. FA contribution to AD needs further investigations.

  17. The Imbalance in Serum Concentration of Th-1- and Th-2-Derived Chemokines as One of the Factors Involved in Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Narbutt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is an inflammatory skin disease in which pathogenesis chemokines are partially involved. The aim of the paper was to assess the serum level of CXCL-9, CXCL-10, CXCL-11, CXCL-12, CCL-17, CCL-20, CCL-21, CCL-22, CCL-27, and IL-18 chosen in AD patients by ELISA assay. Forty patients (mean age 11.4 years old with AD and 50 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The patients and controls were divided into two age categories: under 10 years old (Group 1 and Control 1 and over 10 years old (Group 2 and Control 2. Significantly lower serum concentration of CXCL-9, CXCL-10, CCL-17, and IL-18 and higher concentration of CXCL-12 and CCL-27 were found in Group 1 when compared to Control 1. In Group 2 serum concentration of CXCL-12, CCL-17, CCL-22 was higher than in Control 2. The obtained results indicate the imbalance in chemokine serum levels in AD what suggests their role in the disease pathogenesis.

  18. A comparison of the leaf gel extracts of Aloe ferox and Aloe vera in the topical treatment of atopic dermatitis in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finberg, M J; Muntingh, G L; van Rensburg, C E J

    2015-12-01

    Aloe vera gel is widely used in the treatment of an array of disturbances, especially skin disorders. The wound-healing effects have been attributed to its moisturizing and anti-inflammatory effects as well as its beneficial effect on the maturation of collagen. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of topically applied extracts of Aloe ferox with that of Aloe vera on the symptoms as well as IgE levels of a mouse model of atopic dermatitis (AD). Mice were sensitized and challenged with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and treated afterwards for 10 consecutive days with the gels of either A. ferox or A. vera applied topically to the affected areas. A placebo gel was used for the control mice. Blood was collected at the beginning and end of the treatment period to measure serum IgE levels. Although the gels of both the Aloe species inhibited the cutaneous inflammatory response as well as serum IgE levels in the rats, the extracts of A. ferox were superior to that of A. vera in reducing IgE levels. The gels of A. ferox and A. vera, applied topically, may be a safe and useful alternative to antihistamines and topical corticosteroids, for the treatment of patients suffering from recurring chronic AD. PMID:26510768

  19. Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Children Based on Data From the 2008-2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Kyung Do; Kim, Kyung Min; Park, Yong Gyu; Lee, Jun Young; Park, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Population-based studies of atopic dermatitis (AD) in Korean children are lacking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, geographic distribution, and risk factors of AD in the Korean pediatric population. We examined AD prevalence using data from the 2008-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), which was a cross-sectional survey of 8,947 children up to age 18 throughout the country. Overall, 13.50% of children reported a diagnosis of AD. The age-standardized prevalence ranged from 9.13% to 17.67% between cities and provinces, with the highest prevalence-observed in many of the larger cities at low latitudes, as well as Jeju-do. After adjusting for confounders, high economic status was found to be a significant factor for predicting increased prevalence of AD, with an odds ratio of 1.35 (95% confidence interval of 1.02-1.79, P=0.0034). Urban living (odds ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval of 1.00-1.53, P=0.0526) was also associated with a higher prevalence of AD. In this first large scale, nationwide study in Korean children, we found that the overall prevalence of AD depends on age, household income, and geographic distribution. PMID:26540505

  20. Psychological Stress and the Cutaneous Immune Response: Roles of the HPA Axis and the Sympathetic Nervous System in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica M F; Cruser, Desanges; Podawiltz, Alan; Mummert, Diana I; Jones, Harlan; Mummert, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Psychological stress, an evolutionary adaptation to the fight-or-flight response, triggers a number of physiological responses that can be deleterious under some circumstances. Stress signals activate the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Elements derived from those systems (e.g., cortisol, catecholamines and neuropeptides) can impact the immune system and possible disease states. Skin provides a first line of defense against many environmental insults. A number of investigations have indicated that the skin is especially sensitive to psychological stress, and experimental evidence shows that the cutaneous innate and adaptive immune systems are affected by stressors. For example, psychological stress has been shown to reduce recovery time of the stratum corneum barrier after its removal (innate immunity) and alters antigen presentation by epidermal Langerhans cells (adaptive immunity). Moreover, psychological stress may trigger or exacerbate immune mediated dermatological disorders. Understanding how the activity of the psyche-nervous -immune system axis impinges on skin diseases may facilitate coordinated treatment strategies between dermatologists and psychiatrists. Herein, we will review the roles of the HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system on the cutaneous immune response. We will selectively highlight how the interplay between psychological stress and the immune system affects atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. PMID:22969795

  1. 特应性皮炎的光化学疗法%The photochemotherapy of atopic dermatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 郝飞

    2008-01-01

    特应性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,AD)是一种具有家族遗传倾向的慢性炎症性皮肤病,临床上以剧烈瘙痒、皮疹多形为特点,常伴过敏性鼻炎、哮喘等疾病。由于此病慢性反复,严重影响患者身心健康和生活质量,欧洲变态反应及临床免疫学会和美国过敏哮喘免疫学会提出了AD的阶梯式治疗原则,

  2. Fermented food intake is associated with a reduced likelihood of atopic dermatitis in an adult population (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2012-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Bae, Ji-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) has continuously increased throughout the world in every age group, and the recent increase in AD in Korean adults may be related to changes in nutrient intakes due to westernization of dietary patterns. We hypothesized that the prevalence of AD is associated with the different dietary patterns and fermented food intakes of the Korean adult population. We examined the hypothesis using 9763 adults 19 years or older using the 2012-2013 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We identified 4 dietary patterns in addition to that including fermented foods using principal component analysis on data obtained from a 116-item validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire: meat and processed foods; vegetables, fruits, legumes, seafood, and seaweed; rice and grains; and coffee, chocolate, and ice cream. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for AD were calculated according to dietary patterns after adjusting for potential confounders. High levels of consumption (>92 times/month) of fermented foods such as doenjang, chungkookjang, kimchi, fermented seafood, makgeolli, and beer were associated with a lower prevalence of AD (OR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.84). In contrast, high levels of consumption of meat and processed foods were strongly associated with the prevalence of AD (OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.48-3.94). Interestingly, the consumption of coffee, chocolate, and ice cream was significantly negatively associated with the prevalence of AD (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.34-0.82). In conclusion, the hypothesis was accepted. The results can be applied to nutrition education programs for the general population to decrease risk factors for AD. PMID:26826428

  3. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  5. NOD2 and TLR2 ligands trigger the activation of basophils and eosinophils by interacting with dermal fibroblasts in atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Delong; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Qiu, Huai-Na; Dong, Jie; Cai, Zhe; Chu, Man; Hon, Kam-Lun; Tsang, Miranda Sin-Man; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei

    2016-01-01

    The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) has a unique predisposition for colonization by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), which contributes to the inflammation and grim prognosis of AD. Although the mechanism underlying the S. aureus-induced exacerbation of AD remains unclear, recent studies have found a pivotal role for pattern recognition receptors in regulating the inflammatory responses in S. aureus infection. In the present study, we used a typical mouse model of AD-like skin inflammation and found that S. aureus-associated nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligands exacerbated AD-like symptoms, which were further deteriorated by the in vivo expansion of basophils and eosinophils. Subsequent histological analyses revealed that dermal fibroblasts were pervasive in the AD-like skin lesions. Co-culture of human dermal fibroblasts with basophils and eosinophils resulted in a vigorous cytokine/chemokine response to the NOD2/TLR2 ligands and the enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on the dermal fibroblasts. Basophils and eosinophils were primarily responsible for the AD-related cytokine/chemokine expression in the co-cultures. Direct intercellular contact was necessary for the crosstalk between basophils and dermal fibroblasts, while soluble mediators were sufficient to mediate the eosinophil–fibroblast interactions. Moreover, the intracellular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathways were essential for NOD2/TLR2 ligand-mediated activation of basophils, eosinophils, and dermal fibroblasts in AD-related inflammation. This study provides the evidence of NOD2/TLR2-mediated exacerbation of AD through activation of innate immune cells and therefore sheds light on a novel mechanistic pathway by which S. aureus contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. PMID:26388234

  6. Health-related quality of life assessed by the effect of bepotastine besilate in patients with pruritus: importance of emotions score in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kimura, Satoko; Haga, Tsuneo; Doi, Risako; Kyoya, Mikiko; Nakagawa, Keiko; Soma, Yoshinao

    2012-06-01

    The Skindex-16 questionnaire was recently developed as a measure of dermatological health-related quality of life (HRQoL), including symptoms, emotions and functional aspects. Bepotastine besilate is a selective histamine H(1) -receptor antagonist and a second-generation non-sedating antihistamine to treat various dermatological disorders. We assessed changes of the HRQoL instrument (Skindex-16) on patients with pruritus, including those with atopic dermatitis (AD) over bepotastine treatment period. The patients' personal assessment of the intensity of pruritus was determined using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pruritus. Patients answered the Skindex-16 at baseline and at week 4. Forty-eight of 51 enrolled dermatological patients completed the Skindex-16. Of the 48 patients, 11 had AD and 37 had other conditions. Improvement in the clinical evaluation and VAS score was significant in all patients, the AD group and the other disorders group between baseline and week 4. Skindex-16 showed significantly lower scores for each of the three scales (symptoms, emotions and functioning) and the global score at baseline compared to that at week 4 in all patients and the other disorders. In contrast, there was a significant reduction in the emotions and global score among the AD patients. We found a significant correlation between falls in emotions score of Skindex-16 and falls in VAS scores for pruritus in the AD group. Bepotastine could be effective in the management of patients' HRQoL and useful in patients suffering with pruritus. We suggested that pruritus of AD patients could exert a stronger emotional effect due to the skin condition compared to the symptomatic or functional effects. PMID:22035542

  7. Recommendations for pimecrolimus 1% cream in the treatment of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis: from medical needs to a new treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Thomas; De Raeve, Linda; Gelmetti, Carlo; Kakourou, Talia; Katsarou, Alexandra; Lambert, Julien; Morren, Marie-Anne; Oranje, Arnold; Ruer, Mireille; Serdaroglu, Server; Torrelo, Antonio; Werfel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Pimecrolimus 1% cream is an effective, non-corticosteroid, topical anti-inflammatory treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this article was to review published clinical data that have examined how pimecrolimus can address the medical needs of AD patients. Clinical studies have demonstrated that early treatment with pimecrolimus decreases the progression to disease flares, rapidly improves pruritus and significantly enhances quality of life. Patients find the formulation easy to apply, which may result in improved adherence with the treatment regimen. Pimecrolimus, in contrast to topical corticosteroids (TCSs), does not induce skin atrophy or epidermal barrier dysfunction and is highly effective for the treatment of AD in sensitive skin areas. Furthermore, pimecrolimus reduces the incidence of skin infections compared with TCSs and is not associated with other TCS-related side effects such as striae, telangiectasia and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression. An additional benefit of pimecrolimus is its substantial steroid sparing effect. On the basis of these data, a new treatment algorithm for patients with mild-to-moderate AD is proposed in which pimecrolimus is recommended as a first line therapy for patients with established mild AD at the first signs and symptoms of disease. Pimecrolimus is also recommended for mild-to-moderate AD after initial treatment with a TCS. After resolution of lesions, maintenance treatment with pimecrolimus may effectively prevent subsequent disease flares. In conclusion, the clinical profile of pimecrolimus suggests that it may be considered the drug of choice for the treatment of mild-to-moderate AD in children as well as adults and particularly in sensitive skin areas. PMID:24185493

  8. Clinical correlations of recent developments in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis Dermatite atópica: implicações clínicas de avanços recentes na patogênese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Sehra

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a steadily increasing prevalence affecting 10-20 of infants and 1-3 of adults globally. It is often the first clinical manifestation of atopic disease preceding asthma and allergic rhinitis. Probably half of the children with atopic dermatitis develop some other form of atopic disease later in life. The pathogenesis involves a complex interplay of factors including genetic predisposition due to altered immune or skin barrier function, interactions with the environment such as food and allergen exposures, and infectious triggers of inflammation. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the contribution of different factors in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis and how insights provide new therapeutic potential for its treatment.A dermatite atópica é uma doença cutânea inflamatória crônica cuja prevalência tem aumentado de forma constante, afetando 10-20% dos lactentes e 1-3% dos adultos em todo o mundo. Ela é freqüentemente a primeira manifestação clínica de doença atópica, precedendo a asma e a rinite alérgica. Provavelmente metade das crianças com dermatite atópica desenvolvem alguma outra forma de doença atópica em outras fases da vida. A patogenia envolve uma interação complexa entre fatores que incluem predisposição genética devido a uma função alterada da barreira cutânea ou imunológica, interações com o ambiente, tais como exposição a alimentos e alergenos, e desencadeadores infecciosos de inflamação. Nesta revisão, resumimos os avanços recentes na compreensão da contribuição de diferentes fatores à fisiopatologia da dermatite atópica e como os novos conhecimentos proporcionam novo potencial terapêutico.

  9. Contact dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  10. Contact dermatitis in Alstroemeria workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mei, I A; de Boer, E M; Bruynzeel, D P

    1998-09-01

    Hand dermatitis is common in workers in the horticultural industry. This study determined the prevalence of hand dermatitis in workers of Alstroemeria cultivation, investigated how many workers had been sensitized by tulipalin A (the allergen in Alstroemeria) and took stock of a wide range of determinants of hand dermatitis. The 12-month period prevalence of major hand dermatitis amounted to 29.5% whereas 7.4% had minor dermatitis. Of these workers, 52.1% were sensitized for tulipalin A. Several personal and work-related determinants played a role in the multifactorial aetiology of hand dermatitis. Factors which showed a significant relationship with major hand dermatitis were: female sex, atopic dermatitis, chapped hands and the frequency of washing hands. It may be concluded that the Alstroemeria workers are a population at risk of developing contact dermatitis and it might be useful to carry out an educational campaign to lower the high prevalence. PMID:10024736

  11. Treatment of moderate and severe adult chronic atopic dermatitis with narrow-band UVB and the combination of narrow-band UVB/UVA phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Guarino, Montserrat; Aboin-Gonzalez, Sonsoles; Barchino, Lucia; Velazquez, Diana; Arsuaga, Carmen; Lázaro, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The phototherapy is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The treatment of chronic forms of the disease is most often done with narrow-band UVB (NB-UVB). There also exist effective phototherapy options against the AD. The aim of this study was to asses if the combination of NB-UVB with UVA was more effective than the treatment with only NB-UVB against adult chronic AD. We carried out a prospective and observational study. Adult patients with chronic AD with more than 50% of the total body surface area affected (TBSA) were included. The affected TBSA was calculated using the so-called "rule of nines." Patients with a clearance rate >75% of the initial affected TBSA or complete clearance rate were considered as complete response (CR). An analogue scale from 0 to 10 was used to measure the improvement grade of the pruritus. The treatments were repeated three times a week. The initial doses of NB-UVB and UVA were determined by patient's phototype. The treatments were performed using a phototherapy booth (UV7002, Walmann, Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany(®) ) with TL01 and UVA fluorescent lamps. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS(®) (IBM, New York, NY) for Windows 21.0. A total of 26 patients with adult chronic AD were included in the study, 16 patients were treated with UVB-BE and 10 patients with the combined treatment option NB-UVB/UVA. The mean value of cumulative doses and the mean number of performed treatments were similar between both groups of patients (p > 0.05). The mean value of duration of response was significantly higher in the patients treated only with NB-UVB, 101 versus 6.8 months (p ≥ 0.05). No differences were observed for the patients that showed complete response (p = 0.42) and in the analogue scale of pruritus (p > 0.005). In our study, the patients treated with the combination of NB-UVB and UVA were similar to the patient that were only treated with NB-UVB e

  12. Atopic dermatitis patients carrying G allele in –1082 G/A IL-10 polymorphism are predisposed to higher serum concentration of IL-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Marcin; Przybyłowska, Karolina; Rogowski-Tylman, Michał; Wozniacka, Anna; Narbutt, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic skin inflammatory disease in which Th2-derived cytokines play an essential role. Aim of the study was to assess interleukin 4, 10 and 13 (IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13) serum concentrations in AD patients and to correlate the values with the occurrence of genotypes of selected polymorphisms in genes encoding these cytokines. Material and methods Seventy-six AD patients (mean age 11.4 years) and 60 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were analyzed for IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 concentrations with ELISA assay and genotyping for –590C/T IL-4, –1082A/G IL-10 and –1055C/T IL-13 polymorphisms with PCR-RFLP. Results The obtained results revealed statistically higher serum concentration of IL-10 and IL-13 in AD patients when compared to healthy controls (10.30 pg/ml vs. 8.51 pg/ml for IL-10 and 5.67 pg/ml vs. 4.98 pg/ml for IL-13). There were no significant differences between AD patients and controls in regard to IL-4 serum level (5.10 pg/ml vs. 7.1 pg/ml). Analyzing the association between level of the examined cytokines and genotype polymorphisms –590 C/T for the IL-4 gene, –1082 A/G for the IL-10 gene and –1055 C/T for the IL-13 gene, we found a statistically higher IL-10 serum level among carriers of the G allele in the –1082 G/A IL-10 polymorphism both in AD and control groups. We did not find any significant differences between serum level of IL-4 and IL-13 in regard to genotype occurrence in examined polymorphisms: –590 C/T for the IL-4 gene and –1055 C/T for the IL-13 gene. Conclusions The obtained results confirm the genetic background of IL-10 synthesis in the Polish population. PMID:25624864

  13. Differential expression of inflammation-related genes in IL-4 transgenic mice before and after the onset of atopic dermatitis skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lei; Zhang, Huayi; Mohan, Girish C; Shen, Kui; Chan, Lawrence S

    2016-02-01

    IL-4 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD), a common chronic inflammatory skin disease. We have generated IL-4 transgenic (Tg) mice by over-expressing IL-4 in the epidermis. These mice spontaneously develop chronic pruritic inflammatory skin lesions, which meet the clinical and histological diagnostic criteria for human AD. Systemic survey of immune-related genes in this mouse model, however, has not been performed. In this study, we utilize PCR array technique to examine hundreds of inflammation-related genes in the IL-4 Tg mice before and after the onset of skin lesions as well as in their wild type (WT) littermates. Only those genes with at least 2-fold up-regulation or down-regulation and with a P-value of less than 0.05 in comparison to WT controls were identified and analyzed. In the skin lesions, many chemokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and other AD-related factors are dysregulated compared to the wild type mice. Particularly, CXCL5, IL-1β, IL-24, IL-6, oncostatin M, PTGS2, FPR1 and REG3γ are up-regulated several hundred-fold. In the pre-lesional group that shows no obvious skin abnormality on clinical observation, 30 dysregulated genes are nevertheless identified though the fold changes are much less than that of the lesional group, including CCL6, CCL8, CCL11, CCL17, CXCL13, CXCL14, CXCR3 and IL-12Rβ2. Finally using ELISA, we demonstrate that 4 most dramatically up-regulated factors in the skin are also elevated in the peripheral blood of the IL-4 Tg mice. Taken together, our data have identified hundreds of dysregulated factors in the IL-4 Tg mice before and after the onset of skin lesions. Future detailed examination of these factors will shed light on our understanding of the development and progression of AD and help to discover important biomarkers for clinical AD diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26585782

  14. Solanum tuberosum L. cv Jayoung Epidermis Extract Inhibits Mite Antigen-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice by Regulating the Th1/Th2 Balance and Expression of Filaggrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gabsik; Cheon, Se-Yun; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Lee, Sung-Jin; Hong, Chul-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Jang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Jin-Cheol; Kwon, Oh-Keun; Nam, Jung-Hwan; An, Hyo-Jin

    2015-09-01

    Solanum tuberosum L. cv Jayoung (JY) is a potato with dark purple flesh and contains substantial amounts of polyphenols. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of S. tuberosum L. cv JY in a mouse model of Dermatophagoides farinae body (Dfb)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD). The ethanol extract of the peel of JY (EPJ) ameliorated Dfb-induced dermatitis severity, serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine. Histological analysis of the skin also revealed that EPJ treatment significantly decreased mast cell infiltration. The suppression of dermatitis by EPJ treatment was accompanied by a decrease in the skin levels of type 2 helper T-cell cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13. The induction of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which leads to a systemic Th2 response, was also decreased in the skin by EPJ. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 was decreased by EPJ in Dfb-induced NC/Nga mice. The protein expression of filaggrin in the AD-like skin lesions was restored by EPJ treatment. These results suggested that EPJ may be a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of AD. PMID:26102094

  15. Atopic dermatitis - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... light gloves if nighttime scratching is a problem. Antihistamines taken by mouth may help with itching if ... you can buy them over-the-counter. Some antihistamines can cause sleepiness. But they may help with ...

  16. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free of alcohol, scents, dyes, fragrances, and other skin-irritating chemicals. A humidifier in the home also can help. Avoid anything that worsens symptoms, including Irritants such as wool and lanolin (an oily substance derived from sheep wool used in some ...

  17. The Antistaphylococcal Activity of Citropin 1.1 and Temporin A against Planktonic Cells and Biofilms Formed by Isolates from Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: An Assessment of Their Potential to Induce Microbial Resistance Compared to Conventional Antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Dawgul

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (SA colonizes the vast majority of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD. Its resistance to antibiotics and ability to form biofilms are the main origins of therapeutic complications. Endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs exhibit strong activity against SA, including antibiotic resistant strains as well as bacteria existing in biofilm form. The purpose of the present work was to determine the antistaphylococcal activity of two amphibian peptides against SA isolated from patients with AD. The AMPs demonstrated permanent activity towards strains exposed to sublethal concentrations of the compounds and significantly stronger antibiofilm activity in comparison to that of conventional antimicrobials. The results suggest the potential application of amphibian AMPs as promising antistaphylococcal agents for the management of skin infections.

  18. Predominant genera of fecal microbiota in children with atopic dermatitis are not altered by intake of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp.lactis Bi-07

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadejda Nikolajevna; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Gøbel, Rikke Juul; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Hansen, Lars H.; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the composition of the Lactobacillus group, Bifidobacterium and the total bacterial population in feces from young children with atopic dermatitis was investigated. The study included 50 children...... Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus oris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, while the bifidobacterial community included Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium catenulatum. The fecal numbers of L. acidophilus and B. lactis increased...... correlation was observed across the whole study cohort and not attributed to the probiotic intake. The main conclusion of the study is that administration of L. acidophilus NCFM and B. lactis Bi-07 does not affect the composition and diversity of the main bacterial populations in feces....

  19. Evaluation of FITC-induced atopic dermatitis-like disease in NC/Nga mice and BALB/c mice using computer-assisted stereological toolbox, a computer-aided morphometric system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Malene; Jensen, Helene Kofoed; Deleuran, Bent; Kemp, Kaare; Andersson, Christina; Deleuran, Mette; Vestergaard, Christian

    2009-01-01

    is mandatory for research animals in many countries. Methods: We evaluated the use of the hapten FITC as an inducer of AD-like disease in NC/Nga and BALB/c mice maintained under SPF conditions. Mice were either untreated or treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone. Using the software Computer......Background: The NC/Nga mouse spontaneously develops eczematous atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions when maintained under conventional conditions, but not when kept under specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. Hence, there is a need for an AD model in mice housed under SPF conditions, as this...... Assisted Stereological Toolbox as a stereological method, the mice were sensitized to FITC and the histological efficiency of disease induction with regard to inflammation and CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, in addition to mast cells, was evaluated. The method was validated by comparison to a conventional...

  20. Andrographolide suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin in phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated mast cells and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like mice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CX

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chun-xiao Li,* Hua-guo Li,* Hui Zhang,* Ru-hong Cheng, Ming Li, Jian-ying Liang, Yan Gu, Bo Ling, Zhi-rong Yao, Hong Yu Department of Dermatology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP has been demonstrated to be an important immunologic factor in the pathogenesis of AD. The production of TSLP can be induced by a high level of intracellular calcium concentration and activation of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway. Andrographolide (ANDRO, a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects in gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders through suppressing the NF-κB pathway. Objective: To explore the effect of ANDRO on the production of TSLP in human mast cells and AD mice model. Methods: We utilized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining assay to investigate the effects of ANDRO on AD. Results: ANDRO ameliorated the increase in the intracellular calcium, protein, and messenger RNA levels of TSLP induced by phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187, through the blocking of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway in human mast cell line 1 cells. ANDRO, via oral or local administration, also attenuated clinical symptoms in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced AD mice model and suppressed the levels of TSLP in lesional skin. Conclusion: Taken together, ANDRO may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD through suppressing the expression of TSLP. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, andrographolide, human mast cell