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Sample records for atopic dermatitis-like disease

  1. Salvia plebeia suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

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    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Salvia plebeia R. Br. (Lamiaceae) has been used for folk medicines in Asian countries, including Korea and China, to treat skin inflammatory diseases and asthma. In this study, we investigated the effects of S. plebeia extract (SPE) on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We established an AD model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like skin lesions. The oral administration of SPE decreased AD symptoms based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. SPE suppressed mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. SPE inhibited Th1/Th2/Th17 phenotype CD4(+) T lymphocytes expansion in the lymph node and the expression of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in the ear tissue. To define the underlying mechanisms of action, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ activated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) model was used. SPE significantly suppressed the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB, and STAT1 in HaCaT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SPE might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  2. Atopic dermatitis-like pre-Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Baranska-Rybak, Wioletta; Cegielska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    We describe here 4 patients with Sézary syndrome masquerading as adult-onset atopic dermatitis. The patients presented with a clinical picture compatible with wide-spread atopic dermatitis and did not fulfil the criteria for Sézary syndrome (lack of lymphoadenopathy and blood involvement, skin...... histology without presence of atypical cells). In our patients, overt Sézary syndrome developed after immunosuppressive treatment (including cyclosporine). These cases support the validity of the concept of pre-Sézary syndrome, which is a long-lasting, pre-malignant condition, and which may develop to true...

  3. [Matricaria chamomilla (aqueous extract) improves atopic dermatitis-like lesions in a murine model].

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    Ortiz-Bautista, Raúl Julián; García-González, Laura Lucelly; Ocádiz-González, Marco Antonio; Flores-Tochihuitl, Julia; García-Villaseñor, Arturo; González-Hernández, Margarita; Muñoz-Hernández, Liliana; Ortiz-Figuero, María Del Consuelo; Ramírez-Anaya, Marisol; Reyna-Téllez, Silvia; Villanueva-Sánchez, Octavio

    2017-01-01

    Matricaria Chamomilla L. (Mch), popularly known as chamomile, has been used for centuries as an herbolary remedy due to its broad clinical spectrum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Mch associated to a vehicle with emollient function in induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like lesions in a murine model. AD was induced with dinitrochlorobenzene on 12 male seven-week old BALB/c mice. Animals were divided in three groups (control, GC; control negative, GCN; and experimental, GE). Liquid petrolatum was applied to the GCN and liquid petrolatum with aqueous extract of Mch at 7% to the GE. Induction and evolution of the lesions were verified by biopsy at 2nd and 6th week. Evaluation of peripheral blood cells to correlate inflammatory cells was made as well at the same weeks. Lesions were clinically evaluated at 2nd, 4th and 6th week. Scratching was monitored according to the observation methodology of Kobayashi et al. Mch aqueous extract associated to a vehicle with emollient function improves atopic dermatitis-like lesions after two weeks.

  4. Diospyros lotus leaf and grapefruit stem extract synergistically ameliorate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion in mice by suppressing infiltration of mast cells in skin lesions.

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    Cho, Byoung Ok; Che, Denis Nchang; Yin, Hong Hua; Shin, Jae Young; Jang, Seon Il

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing and pruritic inflammation of the skin also thought to be involved in, or caused by immune system destruction is an upsetting health problem due to its continuously increasing incidence especially in developed countries. Mast cell infiltration in atopic dermatitis skin lesions and its IgE-mediated activation releases various cytokines and chemokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This study was aimed at investigating synergistic anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic and anti-atopic dermatitis effects of Diospyros lotus leaf extract (DLE) and Muscat bailey A grapefruit stem extract (GFSE) in atopic dermatitis-like induced skin lesions in mice. Combinations of DLE and GFSE inhibited TNF-α and IL-6 production more than DLE or GFSE in PMA plus calcium ionophore A23187-activated HMC-1 cells. DLE and GFSE synergistically inhibited compound 48/80-induced dermal infiltration of mast cells and reduced scratching behavior than DLE or GFSE. Furthermore, DLE and GFSE synergistically showed a stronger ameliorative effect in skin lesions by reducing clinical scores; dermal infiltration of mast cells; ear and dorsal skin thickness; serum IgE and IL-4 production in atopic dermatitis-like mice. Collectively, these results suggest that DLE and GFSE synergistically exhibit anti-atopic dermatitis effects in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Effect of German chamomile oil application on alleviating atopic dermatitis-like immune alterations in mice.

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    Lee, Soon-Hee; Heo, Yong; Kim, Young-Chul

    2010-03-01

    Historically, German chamomile (GC) oil has been used for treatment of skin disorders. BALB/c mice were sensitized twice a week with 100 microL of 1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and challenged twice the following week with 100 microL of 0.2% DNCB for atopic dermatitis induction. Thereafter, 3% GC oil was applied daily (70 microL, 6 times week) on the dorsal skin for 4 weeks. Saline or jojoba oil was used for the control mice. Blood was collected after second DNCB challenge, and at 2 and 4 weeks after initiating oil application. Serum IgE levels were significantly lowered in the GC oil application group at the end of the 4-week application period. The GC oil application for 4 weeks resulted in reduction in serum IgG1 level compared with that after 2-week application. The GC oil application group showed a significantly lower serum histamine level than the control group 2 weeks after oil application. Scratching frequency of the GC oil application group was significantly lower than either control groups. This study is to demonstrate GC oil's immunoregulatory potential for alleviating atopic dermatitis through influencing of Th2 cell activation.

  6. Evaluation of FITC-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Disease in NC/Nga Mice and BALB/c Mice Using Computer-Assisted Stereological Toolbox, a Computer-Aided Morphometric System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Malene; Jensen, Helene; Deleuran, Bent

    2009-01-01

    , as this is mandatory for research animals in many countries. Methods: We evaluated the use of the hapten FITC as an inducer of AD-like disease in NC/Nga and BALB/c mice maintained under SPF conditions. Mice were either untreated or treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone. Using the software Computer Assisted...

  7. Extracellular vesicles derived from Staphylococcus aureus induce atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation.

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    Hong, S-W; Kim, M-R; Lee, E-Y; Kim, J H; Kim, Y-S; Jeon, S G; Yang, J-M; Lee, B-J; Pyun, B-Y; Gho, Y S; Kim, Y-K

    2011-03-01

    Recently, we found that Staphylococcus aureus produces extracellular vesicles (EV) that contain pathogenic proteins. Although S. aureus infection has been linked with atopic dermatitis (AD), the identities of the causative agents from S. aureus are controversial. We evaluated whether S. aureus-derived EV are causally related to the pathogenesis of AD. Extracellular vesicles were isolated by the ultracentrifugation of S. aureus culture media. The EV were applied three times per week to tape-stripped mouse skin. Inflammation and immune dysfunction were evaluated 48 h after the final application in hairless mice. Extracellular vesicles-specific IgE levels were measured by ELISA in AD patients and healthy subjects. The in vitro application of S. aureus EV increased the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-6, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and eotaxin) by dermal fibroblasts. The in vivo application of S. aureus EV after tape stripping caused epidermal thickening with infiltration of the dermis by mast cells and eosinophils in mice. These changes were associated with the enhanced cutaneous production of IL-4, IL-5, IFN-γ, and IL-17. Interestingly, the serum levels of S. aureus EV-specific IgE were significantly increased in AD patients relative to healthy subjects. These results indicate that S. aureus EV induce AD-like inflammation in the skin and that S. aureus-derived EV are a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Inhibitory effects of Cinnamomum cassia extract on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions induced by mite antigen in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Jang, Ja Young; Park, Sang-Joon; Jeong, Gi-Hoon; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2011-01-27

    Cinnamomum cassia (C. cassia) has been traditionally used to treat allergic disease as well as dyspepsia, gastritis, and blood circulation disturbances. However, the antiallergic properties of C. cassia have not been fully verified using scientific tools. This study investigated the effectiveness of C. cassia extract (CCE) as an antiallergic agent in atopic dermatitis model and underlying mechanism. The effect of CCE on mite antigen-treated NC/Nga mice was evaluated by examining skin symptom severity, levels of serum IgE, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and histamine, skin histology, and mRNA expression of cytokines in the skin lesions. Moreover, the effect of CCE on TNF-α-and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced chemokine production in human keratinocytes was investigated using ELISA. CCE treatment of NC/Nga mice reduced the dermatitis score and the levels of serum IgE, histamine, and TNF-α. Histological examination showed inhibition of the thickening of the epidermis/dermis and reduced dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells. In skin lesions, mRNA expression of IL-4, TNF-α, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) was inhibited by CCE treatment. The production of TARC, macrophage-derived chemokine, and RANTES from IFN-γ-and TNF-α-stimulated human keratinocytes was suppressed by CCE treatment in a dose-dependent manner. CCE inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice by suppressing the T-helper 2 cell response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Ameliorates House Dust Mite Extract Induced Atopic Dermatitis Like Skin Lesions in Mice.

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    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Hyunjung; Kang, Manho; Kim, Namsik; Lee, Seung Young; Bae, Hyunsu

    2017-02-18

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a biphasic inflammatory skin disease that is provoked by epidermal barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections. Previously, we have demonstrated that bvPLA2 evoked immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and thus alleviated Th2 dominant allergic asthma in mice. Here, we would like to determine whether treatment with bvPLA2 exacerbates the AD-like allergic inflammations induced by house dust mite extract (DFE) in a murine model. Epidermal thickness, immune cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin, and cytokines were measured. Ear swelling, skin lesions, and the levels of total serum IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokines were elevated in DFE/DNCB-induced AD mice. Topical application of bvPLA2 elicited significant suppression of the increased AD symptoms, including ear thickness, serum IgE concentration, inflammatory cytokines, and histological changes. Furthermore, bvPLA2 treatment inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear. On the other hand, Treg cell depletion abolished the anti-atopic effects of bvPLA2, suggesting that the effects of bvPLA2 depend on the existence of Tregs. Taken together, the results revealed that topical exposure to bvPLA2 aggravated atopic skin inflammation, suggesting that bvPLA2 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  10. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Ameliorates House Dust Mite Extract Induced Atopic Dermatitis Like Skin Lesions in Mice

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    Kyung-Hwa Jung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a biphasic inflammatory skin disease that is provoked by epidermal barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections. Previously, we have demonstrated that bvPLA2 evoked immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg, and thus alleviated Th2 dominant allergic asthma in mice. Here, we would like to determine whether treatment with bvPLA2 exacerbates the AD-like allergic inflammations induced by house dust mite extract (DFE in a murine model. Epidermal thickness, immune cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin, and cytokines were measured. Ear swelling, skin lesions, and the levels of total serum IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokines were elevated in DFE/DNCB-induced AD mice. Topical application of bvPLA2 elicited significant suppression of the increased AD symptoms, including ear thickness, serum IgE concentration, inflammatory cytokines, and histological changes. Furthermore, bvPLA2 treatment inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear. On the other hand, Treg cell depletion abolished the anti-atopic effects of bvPLA2, suggesting that the effects of bvPLA2 depend on the existence of Tregs. Taken together, the results revealed that topical exposure to bvPLA2 aggravated atopic skin inflammation, suggesting that bvPLA2 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  11. Balneotherapeutic effects of high mineral spring water on the atopic dermatitis-like inflammation in hairless mice via immunomodulation and redox balance.

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    Bajgai, Johny; Fadriquela, Ailyn; Ara, Jesmin; Begum, Rahima; Ahmed, Md Faruk; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Shim, Kwang-Yong; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2017-10-13

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing allergic inflammatory skin disease that currently affects millions of children and adults worldwide. Drugs used to treat these inflammatory diseases include anti-histamines, corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors but these drugs have their limitations such as adverse effects with their long-term usage. Thus, researcher's interest in several alternative and complementary therapies are continually growing and balneotherapy is one of these approaches. Therefore, we investigate the bathing effect of high concentration mineral spring water (HMW) on redox balance and immune modulation in 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis like inflammation in hairless mice. We induced AD-like inflammation by application of DNCB on the dorsal skin of female skh-1 hairless mice. The mice were treated with 100% pure HMW (PHMW) and 10% diluted HMW (DHMW) through bathing once a day for 4 weeks. Tacrolimus ointment (0.1%) was used as positive control (PC) and only DNCB treatment as negative control (NeC) group. The severity of skin lesion inflammation was assessed through clinical scoring and observing scratching behavior. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and inflammatory cytokines in serum were detected by ELISA and multiplex bead array system, and the levels of oxidative stress-related biomarkers and antioxidant enzyme were also measured. We found that HMW significantly decreased the scratching behavior in PHMW and DHMW groups at the 2nd week and in PHMW group at 4th week compared to NeC group. Likewise, serum IgE level was significantly decreased in DHMW group as compared to NeC group. In line, the level of inflammatory cytokines in serum such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α were significantly inhibited in PHMW and DHMW groups compared to NeC group. In parallel, total reactive oxygen species (ROS) of serum level was significantly decreased in PHMW treatment groups compared to NeC group

  12. Inhibitory effects of polysaccharide-rich extract of Phragmites rhizoma on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

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    Nam, Yunsung; Chung, Yoon Hee; Chu, Li Ying; Lee, Ho Sung; Park, Eon Sub; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Kim, Dong-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; Je, Hyun Dong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2013-05-02

    Phragmites rhizoma was reported to have anti-oxidative and free radical scavenging activity. It also has been traditionally used to suppress inflammation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the topical effects of the polysaccharide-rich extract of P. rhizoma (PEP) on atopic dermatitis. We induced AD-like skin lesions by an extract of the house-dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Dfb) in NC/Nga mice, and then performed macroscopic analysis, immunohistochemical staining and measurement of total serum IgE and cytokine production by ELISA. Topically applied PEP suppressed dermatitis with a decrease in dermatitis score and scratch number. The histological manifestations of atopic skin lesions including thickened epidermis and increased numbers of mast cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and nerve fibers were significantly attenuated. The activation of IgE and the levels of cytokines such as IFN-γ IL-4 and IL-10 were also decreased. Our results indicated that PEP might have an inhibitory effect on atopic dermatitis-like lesion and be a promising natural resource in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions Reduced by Topical Application and Intraperitoneal Injection of Hirsutenone in NC/Nga Mice

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    Mi Sook Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory skin disease. The increasing prevalence and severity of AD have prompted the developments of safer, more effective drugs. Although topical corticosteroids have been used as first line therapy for AD, their potential side effects limit their clinical applications. To investigate the effect of hirsutenone (HIR, a diarylheptanoid compound, on AD-like skin lesions and other factors related to immune response is the aim of this paper Th2-related cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, eosinophil, IgE inflammatory factors (COX-2, iNOS levels were reduced in blood, lymphocytes, and tissue after HIR treatment. These results suggest that HIR might be an effective treatment for AD.

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Valencene on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

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    In Jun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valencene (VAL isolated from Cyperus rotundus possesses various biological effects such as antiallergic and antimelanogenesis activity. We investigated the effect of VAL on atopic dermatitis (AD skin lesions and their molecular mechanisms. We topically applied VAL to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB sensitized NC/Nga mice. Modified scoring atopic dermatitis index, scratching behavior, and histological/immunohistochemical staining were used to monitor disease severity. RT-PCR, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the level of IgE, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines production, and skin barrier proteins expression. Topical application of VAL significantly reduced AD-like symptoms and recovered decreased expression of filaggrin in DNCB-sensitized NC/Nga mice. The levels of serum IgE, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-13 in skin/splenic tissue were reduced. In vitro studies using TNF-α and IFN-γ treated HaCaT cells revealed that VAL inhibited the exaggerated expression of Th2 chemokines including TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22, and proinflammatory chemokines such as CXCL8, GM-CSF, and I-CAM through blockade of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, expression of the skin barrier protein, involucrin, was also increased by VAL treatment. VAL inhibited the production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that VAL may serve as a potential therapeutic option for AD.

  15. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

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    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD. PMID:26404252

  16. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-09-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD.

  17. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

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    Heerim Kang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE. CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD.

  18. IL-1β induces thymic stromal lymphopoietin and an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype in reconstructed healthy human epidermis.

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    Bernard, Marine; Carrasco, Cédric; Laoubi, Léo; Guiraud, Béatrice; Rozières, Aurore; Goujon, Catherine; Duplan, Hélène; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Nicolas, Jean-François; Vocanson, Marc; Galliano, Marie-Florence

    2017-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin inflammatory disease characterized by the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and marked TH 2 polarization. Recent studies suggest that IL-1β contributes to the development of AD skin inflammation. Here, we have investigated the impact of IL-1β signalling on the epidermal homeostasis of both healthy subjects and AD patients [with functional filaggrin (FLG) alleles], with particular attention to TSLP production and keratinocyte differentiation. In healthy reconstructed human epidermis (RHE), IL-1β promoted (i) robust secretion of TSLP in an NF-κB-dependent manner and (ii) a significant decrease in the expression of filaggrin and other proteins of the epidermal differentiation complex. These effects were prevented by treatment of RHE with the anti-IL-1β mAb canakinumab and by the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra. Interestingly, RHE generated from AD donors behaved like that of healthy individuals and showed comparable responses to IL-1β signals. Collectively, our results suggest that IL-1β may be an early key mediator for the acquisition of an AD phenotype through induction of TSLP and alteration of the epidermal homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pentaherbs Formula, Berberine, Gallic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Inflammation.

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    Tsang, Miranda S M; Jiao, Delong; Chan, Ben C L; Hon, Kam-Lun; Leung, Ping C; Lau, Clara B S; Wong, Eric C W; Cheng, Ling; Chan, Carmen K M; Lam, Christopher W K; Wong, Chun K

    2016-04-20

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common allergic skin disease, characterized by dryness, itchiness, thickening and inflammation of the skin. Infiltration of eosinophils into the dermal layer and presence of edema are typical characteristics in the skin biopsy of AD patients. Previous in vitro and clinical studies showed that the Pentaherbs formula (PHF) consisting of five traditional Chinese herbal medicines, Flos Lonicerae, Herba Menthae, Cortex Phellodendri, Cortex Moutan and Rhizoma Atractylodis at w/w ratio of 2:1:2:2:2 exhibited therapeutic potential in treating AD. In this study, an in vivo murine model with oxazolone (OXA)-mediated dermatitis was used to elucidate the efficacy of PHF. Active ingredients of PHF water extract were also identified and quantified, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities on pruritogenic cytokine IL-31- and alarmin IL-33-activated human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts were evaluated. Ear swelling, epidermis thickening and eosinophils infiltration in epidermal and dermal layers, and the release of serum IL-12 of the murine OXA-mediated dermatitis were significantly reduced upon oral or topical treatment with PHF (all p < 0.05). Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and berberine contents (w/w) in PHF were found to be 0.479%, 1.201% and 0.022%, respectively. Gallic acid and chlorogenic acid could suppress the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokine CCL7 and CXCL8, respectively, in IL-31- and IL-33-treated eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture; while berberine could suppress the release of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL7 in the eosinophil culture and eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture (all p < 0.05). These findings suggest that PHF can ameliorate allergic inflammation and attenuate the activation of eosinophils.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pentaherbs Formula, Berberine, Gallic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Inflammation

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    Miranda S. M. Tsang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common allergic skin disease, characterized by dryness, itchiness, thickening and inflammation of the skin. Infiltration of eosinophils into the dermal layer and presence of edema are typical characteristics in the skin biopsy of AD patients. Previous in vitro and clinical studies showed that the Pentaherbs formula (PHF consisting of five traditional Chinese herbal medicines, Flos Lonicerae, Herba Menthae, Cortex Phellodendri, Cortex Moutan and Rhizoma Atractylodis at w/w ratio of 2:1:2:2:2 exhibited therapeutic potential in treating AD. In this study, an in vivo murine model with oxazolone (OXA-mediated dermatitis was used to elucidate the efficacy of PHF. Active ingredients of PHF water extract were also identified and quantified, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities on pruritogenic cytokine IL-31- and alarmin IL-33-activated human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts were evaluated. Ear swelling, epidermis thickening and eosinophils infiltration in epidermal and dermal layers, and the release of serum IL-12 of the murine OXA-mediated dermatitis were significantly reduced upon oral or topical treatment with PHF (all p < 0.05. Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and berberine contents (w/w in PHF were found to be 0.479%, 1.201% and 0.022%, respectively. Gallic acid and chlorogenic acid could suppress the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokine CCL7 and CXCL8, respectively, in IL-31- and IL-33-treated eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture; while berberine could suppress the release of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL7 in the eosinophil culture and eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture (all p < 0.05. These findings suggest that PHF can ameliorate allergic inflammation and attenuate the activation of eosinophils.

  1. Amorphous silica nanoparticles size-dependently aggravate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions following an intradermal injection

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    Hirai Toshiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the rising use of nanomaterials (NMs, there is concern that NMs induce undesirable biological effects because of their unique physicochemical properties. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs, which are one of the most widely used NMs, can penetrate the skin barrier and induce various biological effects, including an immune-modulating effect. Thus, it should be clarified whether nSPs can be a risk factor for the aggravation of skin immune diseases. Thus, in this study, we investigated the relationship between the size of SPs and adjuvant activity using a model for atopic dermatitis. Results We investigated the effects of nSPs on the AD induced by intradermaly injected-mite antigen Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp in NC/Nga mice. Ear thickness measurements and histopathological analysis revealed that a combined injection of amorphous silica particles (SPs and Dp induced aggravation of AD in an SP size-dependent manner compared to that of Dp alone. In particular, aggravation was observed remarkably in nSP-injected groups. Furthermore, these effects were correlated with the excessive induction of total IgE and a stronger systemic Th2 response. We demonstrated that these results are associated with the induction of IL-18 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in the skin lesions. Conclusions A particle size reduction in silica particles enhanced IL-18 and TSLP production, which leads to systemic Th2 response and aggravation of AD-like skin lesions as induced by Dp antigen treatment. We believe that appropriate regulation of nanoparticle physicochemical properties, including sizes, is a critical determinant for the design of safer forms of NMs.

  2. Application of concentrated deep sea water inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice

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    Bak Jong-Phil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mineral water from deep-sea bedrock, formed over thousands of years, is rich in minerals such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe and others. Our present study was to investigate the preventive effects of natural deep-sea water on developing atopic dermatitis (AD. Methods We elicited AD by application of DNCB (2,4-dinitro-chlorobezene in Nc/Nga mouse dorsal skin. Deep Sea water (DSW was filtered and concentrated by a nanofiltration process and reverse osmosis. We applied concentrated DSW (CDSW to lesions five times per week for six weeks, followed by evaluation. 1% pimecrolimus ointment was used as positive control. The severity of skin lesions was assessed macroscopically and histologically. Levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in the serum were detected by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ spleen lymphocytes were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Results DNCB-treated mice showed atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions. Treatment of mice with CDSW reduced the severity of symptoms in the skin lesions, including edema, erythema, dryness, itching, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL. Histological analyses demonstrated that epidermal thickness and infiltration of inflammatory cells were decreased after CDSW treatment. Given these interesting observations, we further evaluated the effect of CDSW on immune responses in this AD model. Treatment AD mice with CDSW inhibited up-regulation of IgE, histamine, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum. Also, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in spleen lymphocyte was down-regulated after treatment with CDSW. Finally, cytokines, especially IL-4 and IL-10 which are important for Th2 cell development, were reduced. Conclusions Our data suggests that topical application of CDSW could be useful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis.

  3. Application of concentrated deep sea water inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Mineral water from deep-sea bedrock, formed over thousands of years, is rich in minerals such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe and others. Our present study was to investigate the preventive effects of natural deep-sea water on developing atopic dermatitis (AD). Methods We elicited AD by application of DNCB (2,4-dinitro-chlorobezene) in Nc/Nga mouse dorsal skin. Deep Sea water (DSW) was filtered and concentrated by a nanofiltration process and reverse osmosis. We applied concentrated DSW (CDSW) to lesions five times per week for six weeks, followed by evaluation. 1% pimecrolimus ointment was used as positive control. The severity of skin lesions was assessed macroscopically and histologically. Levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in the serum were detected by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ spleen lymphocytes were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Results DNCB-treated mice showed atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions. Treatment of mice with CDSW reduced the severity of symptoms in the skin lesions, including edema, erythema, dryness, itching, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Histological analyses demonstrated that epidermal thickness and infiltration of inflammatory cells were decreased after CDSW treatment. Given these interesting observations, we further evaluated the effect of CDSW on immune responses in this AD model. Treatment AD mice with CDSW inhibited up-regulation of IgE, histamine, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum. Also, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in spleen lymphocyte was down-regulated after treatment with CDSW. Finally, cytokines, especially IL-4 and IL-10 which are important for Th2 cell development, were reduced. Conclusions Our data suggests that topical application of CDSW could be useful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis. PMID:22834904

  4. DA-9601 suppresses 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene and dust mite extract-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

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    Choi, Eun-Ju; Lee, Soyoung; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Jun, Chang-Duk; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2011-09-01

    DA-9601 (Stillen™) is a novel anti-peptic formulation prepared from the ethanol extracts of Artemisia asiatica possessing anti-oxidative, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities. However, their effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) has not been studied yet. In this study, we report that topical application of DA-9601 suppressed house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice model. We established atopic dermatitis model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of DFE/DNCB to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like lesions. DA-9601 reduced AD-like skin lesions based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, and serum IgE levels. DA-9601 inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear and elevation of serum histamine in AD model. In addition, DA-9601 suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of IL-4, IL-13, IL-31, and TNF-α in the ears. Taken together, our results showed that topical application of DA-9601 exerts beneficial effects in animal model of AD, suggesting that DA-9601 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional polysaccharides from Grifola frondosa aqueous extract inhibit atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

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    Park, Hyeon Soo; Hwang, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Mun Ki; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Yumnam, Silvia; Kim, Eun Hee; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Won, Chung Kil; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-01-01

    Grifola frondosa (GF), distributed widely in far east Asia including Korea, is popularly used as traditional medicines and health supplementary foods, especially for enhancing the immune functions of the body. To extend the application of GF polysaccharides (GFP) for atopic dermatitis (AD), we investigated the effects of GFP on the 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced AD-like skin lesion in NC/Nga mice. GFP treatment significantly reduced the dorsa skin dermatitis score and combination treatment with GFP, and dexamethasone has a synergistic effect in AD-like skin lesion by reduced Serum IgE, mast cells infiltration, and cytokines expression. These results indicate that GFP suppressed the AD-like skin lesions by controlling the Th-1/Th-2-type cytokines in NC/Nga mice. These findings strongly suggest that GFP can be useful for AD patients as a novel therapeutic agent and might be used for corticosteroids replacement or supplement agent.

  6. Fluoxetine ameliorates atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory response

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    Yanxi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder, and patients with AD suffer from severe psychological stress, which markedly increases the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety disorders in later life. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has recently been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. However, it is unclear whether fluoxetine is effective in the treatment of AD through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory reaction. Here, we reported that a BALB/c mouse model of AD was induced by application of 2,4‑dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB onto hairless dorsal skin. Chronic fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg per day, i.p. significantly attenuated AD-like symptoms, as reflected by a dramatic decrease in scratching bouts, as well as a decrease in anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Furthermore, these behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in epidermal thickness, the number of mast cells in skin tissue, mRNA levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and IL-13 in the spleen, as well as serum immunoglobulin E (IgE in the DNCB-treated mice by treatment with fluoxetine. Taken together, these results indicate that fluoxetine may suppress psychological stress and inflammatory response during AD development, and subsequently ameliorate AD symptoms, suggesting that fluoxetine may be a potential therapeutic agent against AD in clinic.

  7. Therapeutic application of human leukocyte antigen-G1 improves atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

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    Maeda, Naoyoshi; Yamada, Chisato; Takahashi, Ami; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2017-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is an immune checkpoint molecule that plays critical roles in immune response and in triggering inhibitory signaling to immune cells such as T cells, natural killer cells, and antigen-presenting cells. Thus, the application of HLA-G can be considered for treating immune response-related inflammatory disorders. We have previously reported that treatment with HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 ameliorates the joint swelling associated with collagen-induced arthritis of DBA/1 mice, an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we further investigated the effects of HLA-G1 on atopic dermatitis (AD), the most common inflammatory skin disorder. AD-like lesions were induced with the extract of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae in NC/Nga mice. Continuous administration of HLA-G1 ameliorated the AD-like skin lesions in the mice. Furthermore, production of immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-13, and IL-17A was significantly reduced in HLA-G1-treated mice, suggesting a Th2/Th17-mediated immune-inhibitory function of HLA-G1 in vivo. Our studies shed light on novel therapeutic strategies with recombinant HLA-G proteins for immune reaction-mediated chronic inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Angelicae Dahuricae Radix Inhibits Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

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    Hoyoung Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether Angelicae Dahuricae Radix (AR suppresses the development of atopic dermatitis (AD-like skin lesions induced by Dermatophagoides farinae in NC/Nga mice. To investigate the effect of AR, we measured the AD severity score, measured plasma levels of IgE and histamine, and performed histological analysis in NC/Nga mice. We also confirmed the anti-inflammatory effects of AR by measuring TARC/CCL17 production from LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells and mRNA levels of TARC and MDC/CCL22 in TNF-α/IFN-γ-treated HaCaT cells. 10 mg/day of AR extract was applied for 4 weeks to NC/Nga mice. Both the AR extract and 0.1% tacrolimus suppressed the development of AD-like skin lesions and reduced dermatitis scores of the back and ear skin. AR extracts caused an inhibition of histological changes induced by repeated application of D. farinae and a reduction of IgE and histamine levels in plasma (P<0.05. Furthermore, NO production in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells was diminished in a dose-dependent manner, and hTARC production and TARC and MDC mRNA levels in TNF-α/IFN-γ-treated HaCaT cells were diminished by AR. The inhibitory effect of AR on NO, TARC and MDC production may be associated with the suppression of AD-like skin lesions in D. farinae-induced NC/Nga mice.

  9. Gamma-irradiated black ginseng extract inhibits mast cell degranulation and suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Song, Ha-Yeon; Byun, Eui-Hong; Ahn, Nam-Geun; Kim, Hye-Min; Nam, You Ree; Lee, Gyeong Hee; Jang, Beom-Su; Choi, Dae Seong; Lee, Dong-Eun; Byun, Eui-Baek

    2018-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is able to affect various structural modification and an increase of the biological properties of biomaterials. This study was conducted to investigate the anti-allergenic effect of γ-irradiated black ginseng extract (BGE) using in vitro and in vivo experiments. IgEantigen complex-induced degranulation was measured in RBL-2H3 mast cells. In addition, an anti-atopic dermatitis (AD) test was carried out by spreading γ-irradiated BGE on the dorsal skin of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced BALB/c mice. The content of arginylfructose (AF) of gamma-irradiated BGE was higher than that of BGE. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, γ-irradiated BGE treatments significantly reduced the IgE-antigen complex-induced release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, intracellular ROS, and Ca2+ influx. A western blot analysis showed that γ-irradiated BGE had an inhibitory activity on the FcεRI-mediated signaling in mast cells. In the DNCB-induced AD model, γ-irradiated BGE significantly alleviated the ADlike skin symptoms and clinical signs. The suppression of AD by γ-irradiated BGE was accompanied by a decrease in the serum level of IgE and IL-4, as well as the number of leukocyte. Gamma-irradiated BGE also suppressed IL-4 and increased IFN-γ in splenocytes. Our data suggests that γ-irradiated BGE may be effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The inhibitory effect of Duchesnea chrysantha extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like lesions by regulating IgE and cytokine production in Nc/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, In Sik; Ryu, Ji-Sun; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yun, Chi-Young

    2012-02-01

    Duchesnea chrysantha belongs to the Rosaceae family and has been used traditionally for the treatment of various diseases in Korea and other parts of East Asia. This study examined the antiinflammatory effect of Duchesnea chrysantha extract (DcE) on atopic dermatitis in vitro and in vivo. DcE inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in THP-1 cells and the release of IL-6 and MCP-1 in EoL-1 cells after treatment with house dust mite extract. In the in vivo experiment, Nc/Nga mice were sensitized to DNCB and then orally and dorsally administered DcE (50 mg/kg in PBS) for 3 weeks. The DcE administration significantly reduced the skin severity score when compared with the control group and inhibited the thickening of the epidermis and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the dermis. In addition, the serum IgE levels decreased markedly in the DcE-treated mice when compared with the control group. The synthesis of IL-5, IL-13, MCP-1 and eotaxin was also decreased in splenocytes of the DcE-treated group, while IFN-γ was increased in the Dc-administered group. These results may indicate that DcE attenuates the development of atopic dermatitis-like lesions by lowering the IgE and inflammatory cytokine levels, and that it is useful in drug development for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. IL-23 induces atopic dermatitis-like inflammation instead of psoriasis-like inflammation in CCR2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K Bromley

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and infiltration of leukocytes into the dermis and epidermis. IL-23 is expressed in psoriatic skin, and IL-23 injected into the skin of mice produces IL-22-dependent dermal inflammation and acanthosis. The chemokine receptor CCR2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis. CCR2-positive cells and the CCR2 ligand, CCL2 are abundant in psoriatic lesions. To examine the requirement of CCR2 in the development of IL-23-induced cutaneous inflammation, we injected the ears of wild-type (WT and CCR2-deficient (CCR2(-/- mice with IL-23. CCR2(-/- mice had increased ear swelling and epidermal thickening, which was correlated with increased cutaneous IL-4 levels and increased numbers of eosinophils within the skin. In addition, TSLP, a cytokine known to promote and amplify T helper cell type 2 (Th2 immune responses, was also increased within the inflamed skin of CCR2(-/- mice. Our data suggest that increased levels of TSLP in CCR2(-/- mice may contribute to the propensity of these mice to develop increased Th2-type immune responses.

  12. Effects of topical application of a recombinant staphylococcal enterotoxin A on DNCB and dust mite extract-induced atopic dermatitis-like lesions in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Soo; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Jung, Han Jin; Park, Kyung Hea; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Weon Ju; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Hee Young; Kim, Jung Min; Lim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Do Won

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with biphasic T cell-mediated abnormalities. Staphylococcal superantigens contribute to the exacerbation of inflammation in AD. The underlying immunopathological mechanisms are not fully understood. To determine whether epicutaneous application of recombinant staphylococcal enterotoxin A (rSEA) would exacerbate AD-like allergic inflammation induced by 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) in a murine model. We first established an AD-like model using BALB/c mice exposed to DNCB/DFE on the ear. Next, Staphylococcus (S.) aureus or rSEA were topically applied to the mice. We evaluated the clinical and histopathological features of the animals. Serum immunoglobulin levels were also measured. In addition, real-time PCR analysis of cytokines produced by T cell subsets in the ears was conducted. Mice treated with S. aureus and rSEA had more severe clinical symptoms, including increased mean dermatitis scores and ear thickness, compared to animals with only AD-like lesions. Total IgE, IgG2a and serum histamine levels were increased in all groups except the normal control group. The S. aureus- and rSEA-treated groups showed increased levels of cytokines such as IL-4, IL-13, INF-γ, IL-17, and IL-18. In particular, increased cytokine expression was more conspicuous in the rSEA-treated group than in mice exposed to S. aureus. The results of this study showed that topical exposure to rSEA as well as SEA-producing S. aureus aggravate atopic skin inflammation. This may be associated with the induction of a mixed Th1/Th2 type dermatitis.

  13. Pseudolaric acid B extracted from the Chinese medicinal herb Cortex Pseudolaricis ameliorates DNFB-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice

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    Yi-Teng Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pseudolaric acid B (PB is a newly identified diterpenoid isolated from Tujinpi (Cortex Pseudolaricis. In the present study, we aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of PB on atopic dermatitis (AD, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects. Methods: BALB/c mice treated with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene were orally administered with PB (10 mg∙kg-1∙d-1. After evaluating the AD score, serum levels of IgE and the mRNA expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β were measured by ELISA and qRT-PCR respectively. Results: The results showed that PB treatment significantly ameliorated the development of AD-like clinical symptoms and effectively suppressed the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, PB inhibited the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β in skin lesions, and downregulated serum IgE levels. Conclusion: The anti-inflammatory properties of PB were demonstrated using the 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced mouse model of AD-like skin lesions. Our study highlighted the potential use of PB as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammation-associated skin diseases.

  14. 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol-fortified ginseng extract attenuates the development of atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Rhan; Choi, Jinhwan; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Heejeung; Kang, Heerim; Kim, Eun Hye; Chang, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Yeong-Eun; Choi, Young Jin; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2014-01-01

    Ginseng and ginsenosides are frequently used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, 20-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (GPD), the main metabolite of ginsenosides, was reported to have both anti-allergic and anti-pruritic effects. The immunomodulatory effects of GPD-fortified ginseng extract (GFGE) on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like symptoms in mice were investigated. This study was designed to investigate the preventive effect of GFGE on AD-like symptoms. The effects of orally administered GFGE on Dermatophagoides farinae body extract (DFE)-induced AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice were assessed by analyzing dermatitis score, ear thickness, scratching time, skin histological changes, and serum level of macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC). In addition, splenocytes were isolated from the mice and stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies to produce cytokines. Oral administration of GFGE significantly attenuated DFE-induced increases in dermatitis score, ear thickness, scratching time, and severity of skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. GFGE treatment also reduced level of MDC in serum, infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells in skin, and production of cytokines in splenocytes. These results suggest that GFGE might ameliorate DFE-induced AD-like symptoms and be an alternative therapeutic agent for the prevention of AD. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Topical application of Rosa multiflora root extract improves atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions induced by mite antigen in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan Hee; Jeong, Mi Sook; Park, Kwang Jun; Choi, Young Wook; Seo, Seong Jun; Lee, Min Won

    2014-01-01

    The roots of Rosa multiflora THUNB. (RM) has been used in oriental traditional medicines as remedies for scabies, rheumatic arthralgia and stomatitis which were practicably related with today's inflammatory and allergic diseases. In the present study, we evaluated whether RM root extract (RME) and its major constituent, 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-6-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-8-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2,3-trans-6,7-cis-7,8-trans-3,4,7,8-tetrahydro-2H,6H-pyrano[2,3-f] chromene-3,7,9-triol (RM-3) belongs to condensed tannins, improve atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice induced by mite antigen. Topical application of RME as well as RM-3 improved skin severity and suppressed mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) on skin tissues, in addition, significantly reduced T helper 2 (Th2) immune responses via interleukin 10 (IL-10) up-regulation. Thus, RME, contains lots of condensed tannins such as RM-3 which possesses potent anti-inflammtory and immune-modulatory effects, may be useful for treatment of skin allergies and can be developed as new alternative herbal therapy against AD.

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Nelumbo nucifera (Gaertn. on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

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    Rajendra Karki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease which has a complex etiology that encompasses immunologic responses. The study was carried out to examine the effect of Nelumbo nucifera (Gaertn. leaf (NL on the AD-like skin lesion induced by repeated epicutaneous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB on the dorsal skin of NC/Nga mice. Three different doses of NL (5, 25, and 50 mg/mice/day were administered orally from the day of sensitization with DNCB for 4 weeks. The efficacy of NL was judged by histopathological examination, blood IgE level, measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL, scratching behavior, and skin severity score. NL resulted in the suppression of clinical severity score, TEWL, scratching behavior, and blood IgE level. Histopathologic analyses revealed that thickening of the epidermis and mast cell degranulation was significantly reduced in NL group. These results suggest that NL may be a useful natural resource for the management of AD.

  17. Polysaccharide extracted from Chinese white wax scale ameliorates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in BALB/c mice

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    Lin Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory skin disease with high rates of morbidity and is associated with erythema, pruritus, scaling of affected areas of skin. It is extremely important to introduce a therapeutic agent which has significant anti-inflammatory effect with less side-effect for treatment of AD. This study evaluated the effect of a natural compound from herbal extracts, the crude polysaccharide extracted from the white wax scale (CWPS, on AD-like mice. Repeated applications of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB were performed on ear and dorsal skin of BALB/c mice to induce AD-like symptoms and skin lesions. Oral administration of CWPS decreased serum IgE level and limited the infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils to the dermal tissues in the DNCB-induced AD mice. In addition, CWPS reduced Th1 and Th17 responses, leading to an attenuated cutaneous inflammatory response. Furthermore, in vitro study also demonstrated that CWPS limited T cell activation and cytokines (i.e. IFN-γ and IL-17 production induced by DNCB. We conclude that CWPS attenuates DNCB-induced AD-like skin lesion through modulating T cell-elicited immune responses and CD4+ T cell polarization, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for AD.

  18. Ameliorative effects of Artemisia argyi Folium extract on 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like lesions in BALB/c mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyoung-Min; Kim, Seung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Sik; Kim, Bum Hoi; Lee, Hai Woong; Lee, Yong Tae; Kang, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Artemisia argyi Folium has been used to treat skin diseases, including eczema and dermatitis, in South Korean medicine. The present study investigated the curative effects of Artemisia argyi Folium extract (AAFE) on 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in a BALB/c mouse model. Briefly, the dorsal skin of the BALB/c mice was sensitized three times with DNCB, whereas the ears were challenged twice. Repeated treatment with DNCB induced AD-like lesions. The effects of AAFE on AD-like lesions were evaluated by clinical observation, histopathological analysis, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed. Treatment with AAFE reduced AD-like lesions, as determined by clinical observation, histopathological analysis, and detection of the serum levels of histamine, immunoglobulin E and cytokines. With regards to its mechanism of action, AAFE inhibited the phosphorylation of Lck/yes-related novel tyrosine kinase (Lyn), spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and IκBα, which have essential roles in the production of various cytokines in lymph nodes. The suppressive activity of AAFE may be due to the inhibition of a series of immunopathological events, including the release of proinflammatory cytokines. The results of the present study strongly suggest that AAFE exerts an anti-AD effect by inhibiting the Lyn, Syk, MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and IκBα pathways. Therefore, AAFE may be considered an effective herbal remedy for the treatment of AD. PMID:27571702

  19. Suppressive effect of an aqueous extract of Diospyros kaki calyx on dust mite extract/2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ju-Hee; Jin, Meiling; Choi, Young-Ae; Jeong, Na-Hee; Park, Jeong-Sook; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease, affecting 10-20% of individuals worldwide. Therefore, the discovery of drugs for treating AD is an attractive subject and important to human health. Diospyros kaki and Diospyros kaki (D. kaki) folium exert beneficial effects on allergic inflammation. However, the effect of D. kaki calyx on AD remains elusive. The present study evaluated the effects of an aqueous extract of D. kaki calyx (AEDKC) on AD-like skin lesions using mouse and keratinocyte models. We used a mouse AD model by the repeated skin exposure of house dust mite extract [Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE)] and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. In addition, to determine the underlying mechanism of its operation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-activated keratinocytes (HaCaT) were used. Oral administration of AEDKC decreased AD-like skin lesions, as demonstrated by the reduced ear thickness, serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), DFE-specific IgE, IgG2a, histamine level and inflammatory cell infiltration. AEDKC inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a chemokine via downregulation of nuclear factor-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in HaCaT cells. On examination of the AD-related factors in vivo and in vitro, it was confirmed that AEDKC decreased AD-like skin lesions. Taken together, the results suggest that AEDKC is a potential drug candidate for the treatment of AD.

  20. Effect of the topical application of an ethanol extract of quince seeds on the development of atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice.

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    Kawahara, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Kanako; Nakanishi, Eri; Inoue, Toshifumi; Hamauzu, Yasunori

    2017-01-31

    Quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) is a deciduous shrub belonging to the Rosaceae family. Quince seed extract has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient for its moisturizing effect. However, little is known about whether quince seed extract has therapeutic effects on keratinocyte-associated skin inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the topical application of ethanol extract of quince seeds (QSEtE) on atopic dermatitis (AD) symptoms in NC/Nga mice. The direct effect of QSEtE on keratinocytes was evaluated using the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The preliminary application of QSEtE markedly reduced house dust mite allergen-induced skin lesions. The expression of thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) in dorsal skin was downregulated. QSEtE directly suppressed the expression and production of TARC in HaCaT cells. The results suggest that the topical application of QSEtE is effective in preventing the onset of and ameliorating the atopic symptoms of keratinocyte-associated skin inflammation by suppressing TARC production in keratinocytes.

  1. Inhibitory effect of Pterocarpus indicus Willd water extract on IgE/Ag-induced mast cell and atopic dermatitis-like mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hae-Sim; Kim, Wan-Joong; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Seo Ho; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-05-01

    Pterocarpus indicus Willd has been widely used as a traditional medicine to treat edema, cancer, and hyperlipidemia, but its antiallergic properties and underlying mechanisms have not yet been studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antiallergic activity of Pterocarpus indicus Willd water extract (PIW) using activated mast cells and an atopic dermatitis (AD)-like mouse model. PIW decreased IgE/Ag-induced mast cell degranulation and the phosphorylation of Syk and downstream signaling molecules such as PLC-γ, Akt, Erk 1/2, JNK compared to stimulated mast cells. In DNCB-induced AD-like mice, PIW reduced IgE level in serum, as well as AD-associated scratching behavior and skin severity score. These results indicate that PIW inhibits the allergic response by reducing mast cell activation and may have clinical potential as an antiallergic agent for disorders such as AD.

  2. Bathing Effects of Various Seawaters on Allergic (Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions Induced by 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene in Hairless Mice

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    Choong Gon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the preventive effects of four types of seawater collected in Republic of Korea on hairless mice with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced allergic/atopic dermatitis (AD. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated by measuring tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α and interleukins (ILs. Glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide anion, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS were measured to evaluate the antioxidant effects. Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP were observed to measure the antiapoptotic effects; matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 levels were also evaluated. Mice with AD had markedly higher clinical skin severity scores and scratching behaviors; higher TNF-α and ILs (1β, 10, 4, 5, and 13 levels; higher MDA, superoxide anion, caspase-3, PARP, and MMP-9 levels; and greater iNOS activity. However, the severity of AD was significantly decreased by bathing in seawaters, but it did not influence the dermal collagen depositions and skin tissue antioxidant defense systems. These results suggest that bathing in all four seawaters has protective effects against DNCB-induced AD through their favorable systemic and local immunomodulatory effects, active cytoprotective antiapoptotic effects, inhibitory effects of MMP activity and anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects.

  3. Sea Buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides L.) Oil Improves Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions via Inhibition of NF-κB and STAT1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dian-Dong; Di, Zheng-Hong; Qi, Rui-Qun; Wang, He-Xiao; Zheng, Song; Hong, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Hao; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the topical effects of sea buckthorn (SBT) oil on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like lesions in a mouse model generated by repeated topical administration of DNCB in BALB/c mice. DNCB was applied repeatedly on the dorsal skin of mice to induce AD-like lesions. Following AD induction, SBT oil was applied daily on the dorsal skin for 4 weeks. The severity of skin lesions was examined macroscopically and histologically. We further measured the production of MDC/CCL22 and TARC/CCL17 in IFN-γ/TNF-α activated HaCaT cells. Topically applied SBT oil in DNCB-treated mice ameliorated the severity score of dermatitis, decreased epidermal thickness, reduced spleen and lymph node weights, and prevented mast cell infiltration. In addition, SBT oil suppressed the Th2 chemokines TARC and MDC via dose-dependent inhibition of NF-κB, JAK2/STAT1, and p38-MAPK signaling pathways in IFN-γ/TNF-α-activated HaCaT cells. These results suggest that SBT oil had a beneficial effect on AD-like skin lesions, partially via inhibition of the Th2 chemokines TARC and MDC in inflamed skin. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. External application of NF-κB inhibitor DHMEQ suppresses development of atopic dermatitis-like lesions induced with DNCB/OX in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoxue; Lan, Yi; Wei, Bing; Dai, Cailing; Gu, Yaru; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Umezawa, Kazuo; Zhang, Yuyang

    2017-06-01

    Dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ) which is originally developed as an analog of antibiotic epoxyquinomicin C is a specific and potent inhibitor of NF-κB and has been shown to possess promising potential as an anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. This study examines DHMEQ's effect on therapeutic potential for atopic dermatitis (AD)-like lesions. AD lesions were chronically induced by the repetitive and alternative application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and oxazolone (OX) on ears in BALB/c mice. The mice were then externally treated with DHMEQ ointment. Macroscopic and microscopic changes of the skin lesions were observed and recorded. DHMEQ inhibited ear swelling and relieved clinical symptoms of the AD-like lesions induced by DNCB/OX in BALB/c mice. Histopathology examination illustrated that it significantly decreased DNCB/OX-induced epidermal thickness, the infiltration of inflammatory cells, and the count of mast cell. The elevated level of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum and the mRNA levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-13 in the ear tissues, were also suppressed by DHMEQ. This study indicated that DHMEQ would be useful for the treatment of AD.

  5. Theobroma cacao extract attenuates the development of Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Son, Myoung-Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2017-02-01

    Cacao beans from Theobroma cacao are an abundant source of polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. Previous studies demonstrated that cacao flavanols decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in the alleviation of allergic symptoms. We sought to investigate the effects of cacao extract (CE) on Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like symptoms. CE attenuated DFE-induced AD-like symptoms as assessed by skin lesion analyses, dermatitis score, and skin thickness. Histopathological analysis revealed that CE suppressed DFE-induced immune cell infiltration into the skin. These observations occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of inflammatory markers including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E, chemokine; thymus and activation-regulated chemokine and macrophage-derived chemokine as well as the skin-derived cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and interferon-γ. CE also significantly alleviated transepidermal water loss and increased skin hydration. These results suggest that CE, a natural phytochemical-rich food, has potential therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The Hot-Water Extract of Smilacis Chinae Rhizome Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene and House Dust Mite-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Nam Yong; Park, Eun-Ji; Sung, In sung; Ju, Seul A; Kim, Kyoung Un; Kim, Mi Rae; Song, Do Yeon; Lee, Min-Ju; Kim, Hak-Soo; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Chung, Hun-Jong; Choi, Eun-Ju; Yoon, Ki-Hun; Lee, Min Won; Yun, Seongho; Min, Bokkee; Kwon, Suk Hyung; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2016-04-01

    Smilacis Chinae Rhizome (SCR) has been used as an oriental folk medicine for various biological activities. However, its effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) remains undetermined to date. We assessed the effect of orally administered hot-water extract of SCR on AD-like skin lesions in mice and its underlying mechanisms. AD-like murine model was prepared by repeated alternate application of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) extract (DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) for 4 weeks, topically to the ears. Daily oral administration of SCR for 3 and 4 weeks significantly reduced inflammatory ear thickening, with the effect being enhanced at the earlier start and longer period of administration. This effect was accompanied by a significant decrease in both Th2 and Th1 serum antibodies (total IgE, DFE-specific IgE, and IgG2a). Histological analysis showed that SCR markedly decreased the epidermal/dermal ear thickening and the dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, SCR suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of IL-4, IL-13, IL-17, IL-18, TSLP, and IFN-γ genes in the ear tissue. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SCR exerts beneficial effect in mouse AD model, suggesting that SCR has the therapeutic potential as an orally active treatment of AD by modulating both Th1 and Th2 responses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Ethanol Extract of Sanguisorbae Radix Inhibits Mast Cell Degranulation and Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Hye; Yoo, Jae-Myung; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Sanguisorbae Radix (SR) is well known as herbal medicine named "Zi-Yu" in Korea, which is the dried roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. (Rosacease). We investigated the underlying mechanism on the inhibition of atopic dermatitis (AD) of an ethanol extract of SR (ESR) using 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB-) induced AD mice model. Oral administration of ESR significantly suppressed DNCB-induced AD-like symptoms such as scratching behavior, ear thickness, epidermal thickness, and IgE levels. To investigate the effects of ESR treatment on degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we measured the release of β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX, degranulation marker). ESR decreased the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells into the AD skin lesions. Furthermore, ESR significantly inhibited degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated BMMCs. We have demonstrated that ESR decreased AD symptoms in mice and inhibits degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mast cells. Our study suggests that ESR may serve as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD symptoms.

  8. Ethanol Extract of Sanguisorbae Radix Inhibits Mast Cell Degranulation and Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hye Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanguisorbae Radix (SR is well known as herbal medicine named “Zi-Yu” in Korea, which is the dried roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. (Rosacease. We investigated the underlying mechanism on the inhibition of atopic dermatitis (AD of an ethanol extract of SR (ESR using 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced AD mice model. Oral administration of ESR significantly suppressed DNCB-induced AD-like symptoms such as scratching behavior, ear thickness, epidermal thickness, and IgE levels. To investigate the effects of ESR treatment on degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs, we measured the release of β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX, degranulation marker. ESR decreased the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells into the AD skin lesions. Furthermore, ESR significantly inhibited degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated BMMCs. We have demonstrated that ESR decreased AD symptoms in mice and inhibits degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mast cells. Our study suggests that ESR may serve as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD symptoms.

  9. Substance P restores normal skin architecture and reduces epidermal infiltration of sensory nerve fiber in TNCB-induced atopic dermatitis-like lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeongwon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Nam, Seungwoo; Lim, Sunki; Hwang, Jae-Sung; Park, Ki Sook; Hong, Hyun Sook; Won, Younsun; Shin, Min Kyung; Chung, Eunkyung; Son, Youngsook

    2018-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by intense pruritus and eczematous lesion. Substance P (SP) is an 11-amino-acid endogenous neuropeptide that belongs to the tachykinin family and several reports recently have supported the anti-inflammatory and tissue repairing roles of SP. In this study, we investigated whether SP can improve AD symptoms, especially the impaired skin barrier function, in 2, 4, 6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced chronic dermatitis of NC/Nga mice or not. AD-like dermatitis was induced in NC/Nga mice by repeated sensitization with TNCB for 5 weeks. The experimental group designations and topical treatments were as follows: vehicle group (AD-VE); SP group (AD-SP); and SP with NK1R antagonist CP99994 (AD-SP-A) group. Histological analysis was performed to evaluate epidermal differentiation, dermal integrity, and epidermal nerve innervation in AD-like lesions. The skin barrier functions and pruritus of NC/Nga mice were evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and scratching behavior, respectively. Topical SP treatment resulted in significant down-regulation of Ki67 and the abnormal-type keratins (K) K6, K16, and K17, restoration of filaggrin and claudin-1, marked reduction of TEWL, and restoration of basement membrane and dermal collagen deposition, even under continuous sensitization of low dose TNCB. In addition, SP significantly reduced innervation of itch-evoking nerve fibers, gelatinase activity and nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the epidermis but upregulated semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) expression in the epidermis, along with reduced scratching behavior in TNCB-treated NC/Nga mice. All of these effects were completely reversed by co-treatment with the NK1R antagonist CP99994. In cultured human keratinocytes, SP treatment reduced expression of TGF-α, but upregulated TGF-β and Sema3A. Topically administered SP can restore normal skin barrier function, reduce epidermal infiltration

  10. Epidemiology and natural history of atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    of the atopic diseases now seems to have reached a plateau in many Western countries, they are still on the increase in the developing world. This emphasizes continuing research aimed at identifying the causes, risk factors, and natural history of these diseases. Herein, the fundamental aspects of the natural...... history and epidemiology of the atopic diseases are reviewed.......The atopic diseases - atopic dermatitis, asthma, and hay fever - pose a great burden to the individual and society, not least, since these diseases have reached epidemic proportions during the past decades in industrialized and, more recently, in developing countries. Whereas the prevalence...

  11. Andrographolide suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin in phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated mast cells and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like mice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CX

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chun-xiao Li,* Hua-guo Li,* Hui Zhang,* Ru-hong Cheng, Ming Li, Jian-ying Liang, Yan Gu, Bo Ling, Zhi-rong Yao, Hong Yu Department of Dermatology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP has been demonstrated to be an important immunologic factor in the pathogenesis of AD. The production of TSLP can be induced by a high level of intracellular calcium concentration and activation of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway. Andrographolide (ANDRO, a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects in gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders through suppressing the NF-κB pathway. Objective: To explore the effect of ANDRO on the production of TSLP in human mast cells and AD mice model. Methods: We utilized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining assay to investigate the effects of ANDRO on AD. Results: ANDRO ameliorated the increase in the intracellular calcium, protein, and messenger RNA levels of TSLP induced by phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187, through the blocking of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway in human mast cell line 1 cells. ANDRO, via oral or local administration, also attenuated clinical symptoms in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced AD mice model and suppressed the levels of TSLP in lesional skin. Conclusion: Taken together, ANDRO may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD through suppressing the expression of TSLP. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, andrographolide, human mast cell

  12. A study of atopic diseases in Basrah

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Allergic and Asthma diseases center) under clinician supervision to diagnosis atopic diseases for both sex and various age group depending on minor and major criteria for each disease. (Hollingsworth et al., 2005; Sheikh, 2004; ...

  13. Effects of Hovenia dulcis Thunb. extract and methyl vanillate on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions and TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced chemokines production in HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sue Ji; Kim, Myungsuk; Randy, Ahmad; Nam, Eui Jeong; Nho, Chu Won

    2016-11-01

    Here, we hypothesized that Hovenia dulcis branch extract (HDB) and its active constituents ameliorates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions by modulating the T helper Th1/Th2 balance in NC/Nga mice and TNF-α- and IFN-γ-induced production of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) in HaCaT cells. HaCaT cells were stimulated by TNF-α/IFN-γ in the presence of HDB and its constituents. TARC and MDC were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. For the in-vivo study, oral feeding of HDB was performed for 5 weeks with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) treatment every other day. The efficacy of HDB on parameters of DNCB-induced AD was evaluated morphologically, physiologically and immunologically. In-vitro studies showed that HDB and its constituents suppressed TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced production of TARC and MDC in HaCaT cells by inhibiting MAPK signalling. In-vivo studies showed that HDB regulated immunoglobulin (Ig) E and immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) levels in serum and the expression of mRNA for Th1- and Th2-related mediators in skin lesions. Histopathological analyses revealed reduced epidermal thickness and reduced infiltration of skin lesions by inflammatory cells. These results suggest that HDB inhibits AD-like skin diseases by regulating Th1 and Th2 responses in NC/Nga mice and in HaCaT cells. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. A (S)-(+)-decursin derivative, (S)-(+)-3-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-acrylic acid 2,2-dimethyl-8-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H,8H-pyrano[3,2-g]-chromen-3-yl-ester, attenuates the development of atopic dermatitis-like lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Sik; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yun, Chi-Young; Lee, Ji-Sook

    2013-03-01

    (S)-(+)-decursin is a biological coumarin compound isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai. (S)-(+)-decursin and its analogue have a variety of pharmacological activities. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effect of a (S)-(+)-decursin derivative, (S)-(+)-3-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-acrylic acid 2,2-dimethyl-8-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H,8H-pyrano [3,2-g]-chromen-3-yl-ester (Compound 6, C6), on in vitro and in vivo atopic dermatitis was investigated. C6 suppressed the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increase by the house dust mite extract in the eosinophilic leukemia cell line and THP-1 cells. C6 inhibited the production of TARC, IL-6, and IL-8 increase by IFN-γ and TNF-α in the human keratinocyte cell line. In the in vivo experiment, NC/Nga mice were sensitized to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, and then C6 or dexamethasone (Dex) were orally and dorsally administered for three weeks. C6 treatment reduced the skin severity score compared with that of the control group. C6 inhibited the thickening of the epidermis and inflammatory cell infiltration into the dermis by evaluating the histological examination. The serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) level decreased in the C6-treated group compared with that of the control group. The inhibitory effect of C6 on IgE concentration was similar to that of Dex. The levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin increased after treatment with concanavalin A in mouse splenocytes. The cytokine levels of the C6-treated group were lower than those of the control group. Taken together, C6 may attenuate atopic dermatitis-like lesions through its anti-inflammatory effect, such as inhibition of IgE and inflammatory cytokines, and it may be valuable as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  15. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors....... The causal relationship between these risk factors and atopic diseases may therefore be mediated via mechanisms different from gene-environment interaction....

  16. Effects of orally administered Actinidia arguta (Hardy Kiwi) fruit extract on 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Yun; Lee, In-Ki; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyu-Han

    2009-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by highly pruritic, chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin lesions. Furthermore, therapeutic choices are limited, especially in long-standing cases, despite its increasing prevalence. This study was performed to examine the clinical efficacy and the therapeutic mechanism underlying the effects of Actinidia arguta (hardy kiwi) fruit extract in an animal model of AD. To examine the effects of A. arguta extract on AD, 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene-treated NC/Nga mice were orally administered A. arguta extract (100 mg/kg/day), tacrolimus (1 mg/kg/day), or dexamethasone (3 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Skin severity scores, epidermal thickening, mast cell infiltration and degranulation, total serum immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes (IgE, IgG(1)), and cytokine (interleukin [IL]-4 and interferon [IFN]-gamma) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) (TLR-2, TLR-4, and TLR-9) expressions were examined in each of the study groups. Orally administered A. arguta extract significantly reduced clinical dermatitis severity, epidermal thickness, mast cell dermal infiltration and degranulation, and total levels of serum IgE and IgG(1). Furthermore, this suppression of total serum IgE and IgG(1) levels was accompanied by a decrease in IL-4 and an increase in IFN-gamma expression in skin and splenocytes. Interestingly, TLR-9 expression was increased by oral A. arguta extract. This study confirms that A. arguta extract has potential as a dietary therapeutic agent for the treatment of AD. Furthermore, our findings suggest that its clinical efficacy and mode of action against AD are associated with the modulation of biphasic T-helper (Th) 1/Th2 cytokines, with the inhibition of Th2-mediated IgE overproduction, and possibly with the up-regulation of TLR-9.

  17. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers w...

  18. Probiotic bacteria for prevention of atopic diseases: design and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic diseases such as (atopic) eczema, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis are common diseases. The cumulative incidence during childhood is estimated to be 20 to 30%. In countries with a so called ‘’Western lifestyle’’ an increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases has been observed

  19. Atopic dermatitis-like pre-Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokołowska-Wojdyło, Małgorzata; Barańska-Rybak, Wioletta; Cegielska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    histology without presence of atypical cells). In our patients, overt Sézary syndrome developed after immunosuppressive treatment (including cyclosporine). These cases support the validity of the concept of pre-Sézary syndrome, which is a long-lasting, pre-malignant condition, and which may develop to true...

  20. HSP: bystander antigen in atopic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost A Aalberse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years insight in the complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity in the regulation of an inflammatory response has increased enormously. This has revived the interest in stress proteins; proteins that are expressed during cell stress. As these proteins can attract and trigger an immunological response they can act as important mediators in this interaction. In this respect, of special interest are proteins that may act as modulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are stress proteins that have these, and more, characteristics. More than two decades of studies on HSPs has revealed that they are part of intrinsic, natural mechanisms that steer inflammation. This has provoked comprehensive explorations of the role of HSPs in various human inflammatory diseases.Most studies have focused on classical autoimmune diseases. This has led to the development of clinical studies with HSPs that have shown promise in Phase II/III clinical trials. Remarkably, only very little is yet known of the role of HSPs in atopic diseases. In allergic disease a number of studies have investigated the possibility that allergen-specific regulatory T cell (Treg function is defective in individuals with allergic diseases. This raises the question whether methods can be identified to improve the Treg repertoire. Studies from other inflammatory diseases have suggested HSPs may have such a beneficial effect on the T cell repertoire. Based on the immune mechanisms of atopic diseases, in this review we will argue that, as in other human inflammatory conditions, understanding immunity to HSPs is likely also relevant for atopic diseases. Specifically, we will discuss why certain HSPs such as HSP60 connect the immune response to environmental antigens with regulation of the inflammatory response.Thus they provide a molecular link that may eventually even help to better understand the immune pathological basis of the hygiene

  1. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2012-01-01

    Jäderberg I, Thomsen SF, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, Backer V. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2012; 26: 140-145. We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted...... reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression...... and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0...

  2. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H; Skov, Lone; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-02-01

    An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Nationwide health registers were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. AD was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. This study was limited to adult patients with AD. No information about AD severity or degree of tobacco consumption was available. Results from a hospital population of AD patients cannot be generalized to the general population. Our results suggest a susceptibility of autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD, especially in smokers. While we cannot conclude on causality based on these data, an increased awareness of autoimmune comorbidities in patients with AD may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of atopic diseases in Nigerian children with vernal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically inquired about were asthma, eczema, allergic rhinitis or hay fever, allergic skin rash e.g. scabies, reaction to drugs and others. The children were also examined to confirm or detect the presence of these atopic diseases. The overall prevalence of atopic conditions was 19.8% amongst cases of VKC.

  4. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0.773 respectively) compared with children born after spontaneous conception. Assisted reproduction did not modify the heritability of atopic diseases. This study does not support an association between assisted reproduction and development of atopic diseases. This result must be confirmed in subsequent studies, preferably of singleton populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Parents' reported preference scores for childhood atopic dermatitis disease states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Emmanuel B

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to elicit preference weights from parents for health states corresponding to children with various levels of severity of atopic dermatitis. We also evaluated the hypothesis that parents with children who had been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis would assign different preferences to the health state scenarios compared with parents who did not have a child with atopic dermatitis. Methods Subjects were parents of children aged 3 months to 18 years. The sample was derived from the General Panel, Mommies Sub-Panel, and Chronic Illness Sub-Panel of Harris Interactive. Participants rated health scenarios for atopic dermatitis, asthma, and eyeglasses on a visual analog scale, imagining a child was experiencing the described state. Results A total of 3539 parents completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent had a child with a history of atopic dermatitis. Mean preference scores for atopic dermatitis were as follows: mild, 91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 91.5; mild/moderate, 84 (95%CI, 83.5 to 84.4; moderate, 73 (95%CI, 72.5 to 73.6; moderate/severe, 61 (95%CI, 60.6 to 61.8; severe, 49 (95% CI, 48.7 to 50.1; asthma, 58 (95%CI, 57.4 to 58.8; and eyeglasses, 87(95%CI, 86.3 to 87.4. Conclusions Parents perceive that atopic dermatitis has a negative effect on quality of life that increases with disease severity. Estimates of parents' preferences can provide physicians with insight into the value that parents place on their children's treatment and can be used to evaluate new medical therapies for atopic dermatitis.

  6. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and atopic diseases in children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus and atopic diseases in children. Nancy S. Elbarbary. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Background. Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) is a complex disease resulting from the interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors.1 ...

  7. Homeopathy in paediatric atopic diseases: long-term results in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Bartoli, Paola; Bianchi, Alba; Da Frè, Monica

    2012-01-01

    To study the socio-demographic features, the prescribed remedies and the outcome of atopic diseases in children treated with homeopathy at the Homeopathic Clinic of Lucca (Italy), and the long-term outcome of children suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) after an approximate 8-year period (range 5-10 years). Our data derive from an observational longitudinal study carried out on 213 children (38.6%) with atopic diseases out of 551 children consecutively examined from September 1998 to December 2008. We used the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Outcome Score to evaluate the results that were classified on the basis of a Likert scale. Eighty-three (39%) children were affected by asthma, 51 (24%) by allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, 76 (36%) by AD and 3 (1%) by food intolerance. Follow-up patients were 104 (48.8%), and 65 (62.5%) of them reported a major improvement or resolution. The parents of paediatric patients suffering from AD, who had started homeopathic treatment at children (mean age 12.9) were examined; 28/40 (70%) had a complete disappearance of AD, 12/40 children (30.0%) were still affected by AD; 8/40 (20%) had asthma and 8/40 patients had, or developed, allergic rhinitis. These preliminary results seem to confirm a positive therapeutic effect of homeopathy in atopic children. Furthermore, according to the data from the literature paediatric patients treated with homeopathy seem to show a reduced tendency to maintain AD and develop asthma (and allergic rhinitis) in adult age. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  10. Atopic and Nonatopic Asthma in Children: two Different Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Lentze, PhD²

    2012-09-01

    decreased in children with nonatopic asthma compared with those with the atopic form. Patients from group NA had significantly higher IgG4 subclass levels than patients from group AA. The results of our study show that both atopic and nonatopic asthma are diseases, with similar inflammatory changes, however having probably different pathogenetic immunological mechanisms.

  11. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood...... may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural history, clinical features, and treatment of atopic dermatitis....

  12. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed...... opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor...... atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis...

  13. European birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, T; Kulig, M; Simpson, A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reasons for the rise in asthma and allergies remain unclear. To identify risk or protective factors, it is essential to carry out longitudinal epidemiological studies, preferably birth cohort studies. In Europe, several birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases have been...... initiated over the last two decades. AIM: One of the work packages within the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) project was designed to identify and compare European birth cohorts on asthma and atopic diseases. The present review (part I) describes their objectives, study settings......, recruitment process and follow-up rates. A subsequent review (part II) will compare outcome and exposure parameters. METHODS: For each birth cohort, we collected detailed information regarding recruitment process, study setting, baseline data (pregnancy, birth, parents/siblings) as well as follow-up rates...

  14. The association of the 'additional height index' with atopic diseases, non-atopic asthma, ischaemic heart disease and mortality: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, R V; Vidal, C; Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Husemoen, L L N; Skaaby, T; Aadahl, M; Linneberg, A

    2014-02-28

    Intrauterine growth has been associated with atopic conditions. Growth and adult height have been associated with cardiovascular disease, cancers and mortality but are highly genetic traits. The objectives of the study were as follows: first, to define a height measure indicating an individual's height below or above that which could be expected based on parental height (genetic inheritance) and growth charts. It was named 'the additional height index' (AHI), defined as (attained-expected) height; second, to investigate possible associations of AHI with atopic versus non-atopic health outcomes and with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and IHD mortality. General population-based study. Research centre. A random sample of 2656 men and women living in greater Copenhagen took part in the MONICA10 study (the Danish monitoring trends and determinants of cardiovascular disease). In total, 1900 participants with information of parental height were selected. Atopic sensitisation (serum IgE), questionnaire information of atopic dermatitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma or wheezing, and registry-based diagnoses of IHD/IHD mortality from National Registries. Increasing levels of AHI were inversely associated with non-atopic asthma, non-atopic wheezing, IHD and IHD mortality (IHD-all). For one SD increase of AHI, the OR or HR with CI in adjusted analyses was non-atopic asthma OR=0.52 (0.36 to 0.74), non-atopic wheezing OR=0.67 (0.51 to 0.89), and IHD-all HR=0.89 (0.78 to 1.01). The level of AHI was higher among individuals with atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic sensitisation (all p values height may be at lower risk of non-atopic asthma/wheeze and IHD/IHD mortality but possibly at higher risk of atopic conditions. The measure of tallness below or above the expected height could be a sensitive alternative to normal height in epidemiological analyses.

  15. A study of atopic diseases in Basrah | Alsaimary | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of atopic diseases; allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis were carried out in this investigation. From 174 patients, 39.08% has atopic dermatitis, while 33.90 and 27.01% have bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis, respectively. Males has a greater percentage of bronchial asthma than females ...

  16. OMALIZUMAB: EXPANDED OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE ATOPIC DISEASES TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Kulichenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The review highlights experience and administration perspectives of the immunobiological medication Omalizumab in allergy. Omalizumab is the anti'IgE monoclonal antibody. Growing successful experience of anti'IgE application confirms the assumption that treatment by Omalizumab may modify the course of bronchial asthma, by preventing the remodeling processes in the respiratory tracts and reducing hyperactivity of bronchi. Today, it is widely discussed what other possible areas of anti'IgE therapy there might be. Omalizumab might be very important in treatment of different potentially IgE'dependent diseases, among which there is urticaria and angioneurotic edema, allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis and severe forms of allergic conjunctivitis. Besides, Omalizumab, as part of the allergen specific immunotherapy protocol, may also provide sizable advantages. The author reveals potential role of Omalizumab in treatment of other atopic diseases, such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy.Key words: Omalizumab, anti'IgE therapy, biological agents, IgЕ, bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, idiopathic urticaria fever, treatment, children.

  17. Research statistics in Atopic Eczema: what disease is this?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon Kam-Lun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic eczema is a common and distressing disease. This study aims to review PubMed indexed research statistics on atopic eczema over a-10 year period to investigate the clinical relevance and research interest about this disease. Methods PubMed (a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched for the terms “atopic dermatitis” and “eczema”, with limits activated (Humans, Clinical Trial, Meta-Analysis, Randomized Controlled Trial, English, published in the last 10 years, and editorials, letters, practice guidelines, reviews, and animal studies excluded. Journal impact factor (IF is in accordance with Journal Citation Report (JCR 2009, a product of Thomson ISI (Institute for Scientific Information. Results A total of 890 articles were retrieved. Taking out publications that were irrelevant and those without an impact factor, 729 articles were obtained. These articles were grouped into dermatology (n = 337, mean IF: 3.01, allergy/immunology (n = 215, mean IF: 4.89, pediatrics (n = 118, mean IF: 2.53 and miscellaneous subject categories (n = 142, mean IF: 5.10. The impact factors were highest in the miscellaneous category (p = 0.0001, which includes such prestigious journals as the New England journal of Medicine (n = 1, IF: 47.05, the Lancet (n = 4, IF: 30.76 and BMJ (n = 6, IF: 13.66. There was no publication in any family medicine or general practice journal. The British Journal of Dermatology (n = 78, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (n = 49 and Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (n = 46 had the highest number of publications on the subject. Atopic eczema ranked higher in impact factors in allergy/immunology although more publications appeared in the dermatology category. Conclusions Atopic eczema is a multidisciplinary disease. Its clinical relevance and research interests are definitely beyond that of a mere cutaneous disease. Investigators may

  18. Novel opportunities for tailor-made immunomodulation in atopic diseases - breaking the waves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapitein, B.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment and, ultimately prevention of complex diseases such as atopic diseases, should start with the identification of individuals at risk for developing (an) atopic disease(s). Gene expression profiles, that is, whether a gene is expressed as mRNA, can reflect both genetic and environmental

  19. Serum prolactin levels in atopic dermatitis and the relationship with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugrul Ayanoğlu, Burcu; Muştu Koryürek, Özgül; Yıldırm Başkara, Songül

    2017-10-01

    Prolactin performs as a neuroendocrine modulator of skin epithelial cell proliferation and the skin immune system. The aim was to assess the serum prolactin levels in patients with atopic dermatitis and the relationship with disease severity. The study was performed on 46 patients with atopic dermatitis and 100 healthy controls aged between 0.5 years and 19.5 years. The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis was based on clinical findings and the severity of the disease was documented. Venous blood sampling was performed in order to measure prolactin levels. Prolactin levels in atopic dermatitis were not different from controls and there was no relationship between the severity of atopic dermatitis and serum prolactin levels. Prolactin may not have a role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Further studies with larger sample sizes and measurement of prolactin levels in the skin may help to understand the role of prolactin in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  20. The prevalence of atopic diseases and the patterns of sensitization in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Fomsgaard Kjær, Henrik; Eller, Esben

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are among the most common chronic diseases in adolescents, and it is uncertain whether the prevalence of atopic diseases has reached a plateau or is still increasing. The use of the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood) questionnaire has provided...... with rhinoconjunctivitis only, rhinoconjunctivitis with concomitant asthma or atopic dermatitis or both 62.5%, 81.5%, 70%, and 100%, respectively, were sensitized, whereas it was 7.7% and 33.3% of children with only asthma or atopic dermatitis. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis was high in adolescence...

  1. Recall Bias in Childhood Atopic Diseases Among Adults in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, Charlotte G; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease in childhood and an important risk factor for the later development of other atopic diseases. Many publications on childhood AD use questionnaires based on information obtained in adulthood, which introduce the possibility of recall bias. In a prospectiv...

  2. Atopic dermatitis in dogs_novel insights into mechanisms of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlotter, Y.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311450806

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis in dogs Novel insights into mechanisms of disease Atopic dermatitis in dogs is the most important canine pruritic disorder, described for the first time in 1971. It is defined as a genetically-predisposed inflammatory and pruritic allergic skin disease with characteristic clinical

  3. Deworming is not a risk factor for the development of atopic diseases: a longitudinal study in Cuban schoolchilderen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, S.D.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Wordemann, M.; Campos Ponce, M.; Junco Diaz, R.; Nunez, F.A.; Rojas Rivero, L.; Bonet Gorbea, M.; Polman, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections have been suggested to protect from allergic sensitization and atopic diseases. Consequently, anthelminthic treatment would increase the prevalence of atopic disease in STH endemic populations. Objective: To investigate the effect of deworming

  4. Atopic dermatitis: understanding the disease and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M L

    2007-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic, inflammatory skin disease that can significantly reduce the quality of life of not only patients but also entire families. This review will focus on the currently available non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for the control and management of AD. A review of English-language articles from January 1953 to May 2006 was performed within the MEDLINE database. Search terms included, but were not limited to, atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, and topical calcineurin inhibitors. Studies evaluating the diagnosis, physical and psychological burden, and underlying pathophysiology of AD were included. Particular focus was placed on literature presenting key safety and efficacy data from clinical trials involving AD treatment. Although good skin care and trigger avoidance are fundamental to AD management, most patients also require pharmacologic intervention. Topical therapies comprise the foundation of AD treatment. In particular, topical corticosteroids have been a mainstay in AD treatment for several decades and the newer topical calcineurin inhibitors have become a valuable addition to the therapeutic armamentarium. TCIs are a safe and effective AD treatment; they limit the number of disease flares, extend the time between flares, and provide a steroid-sparing option that may be of particular benefit in the pediatric population. The use of more potent therapies, such as systemic (oral/injected) agents or phototherapy, is typically limited to the treatment of severe, refractory disease. Additionally, owing to the increased risk for bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in patients with AD, topical or systemic antimicrobials are an important component of treatment. Case reports and small-scale studies were typically not included in this analysis and owing to the limited number of trials evaluating TCSs, consensus statements and comprehensive review articles were used to obtain information pertaining to the

  5. Atopic diseases: Risk factor in developing adverse reaction to intravenous N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Gheshlaghi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: N-acetylcysteine (NAC is the choice treatment for acetaminophen overdose. The main side effect of intravenous NAC therapy is anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions. We investigated the prevalence of anaphylactoid or anaphylaxis reactions to IV-NAC therapy in acetaminophen poisoned patients with atopic disease. Methods: A case series antrograde and descriptive–analytic study was done on acetaminophen poisoned patients who treated with IV-NAC from September 2003 to September 2004 in Isfahan, Iran. Results: Of 173 infused IV-NAC patients, 77 patients (44.5% developed an anaphylactoid reaction. Its side effects was nausea and vomiting (n=49, 63.15%, flashing (n=23, 30.26%, bronchospasm (n=20, 26.31%, vertigo (n=18, 23.68%, skin rash (n=25, 32.36% and hypotension (n=12, 15.75%. Also, 71 patients (41% had history of atopic disease. Atopic diseases were asthma (n=12, 6.9%, atopic dermatitis (n=7, 4%, allergic rhinitis (n=5, 2.8% and allergic conjunctivitis (n=1, 0.5%. Among 71 atopic patients, 59 patients (83.13 % developed side effects to NAC. There was a relation between previous history of atopic disease and anaphylactoid reaction to NAC. Conclusions: We report substantially higher incidence of anaphylactoid reactions to IV-NAC than previous studies. Different atopic diseases must be considered as a risk factor in the development of side effects to IV-NAC-therapy. Keywords: Poisoning, Acetaminophen, Anaphylactoid reaction, N-acetylcysteine, Atopic disease

  6. Interleukin-4 and immunoglobulin E levels in newborns at risk of atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frengky Sutanto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The clinical syndrome of atopy is associated v.ith the production of immunoglobulin E (lgE in response to antigenic stimulation as part of a type I hypersensitivity reaction. Since early prevention is regarded as an important cornerstone in the management of atopic diseases, the identification of reliable markers such as IgE and interleukin 4 (IL-4 in detecting individuals at risk are of major interest. Objective To determine whether cord blood IgE and IL-4 levels can be used as an predictor of atopy in newborns with a family history of atopic diseases. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study on healthy-term newborns in the neonatal ward at R.D. Kandou Hospital from June to August 2010. A total of 50 healthy newborns in atopic and non-atopic groups were examined for cord blood IgE and IIA levels. Result The mean cord blood ILA levels in the atopic and non-atopic groups were 0.1 μg/mL (SD 0.08 and 0.1 μg/mL (SD 0.16 (P=0.359, respectively. The mean cord blood IgE levels in the atopic and non-atopic groups were 2.2 IU/mL (SD 1.98 and 0.5 IU/mL (SD 0.29 (P<0.00l, respectively. A point-biserial correlation coefficient analysis showed no significant correlation between ILA levels and family history of atopic disease (rpb=0.098, and a weak correlation between IgE levels and family history of atopic disease (rpb=0.54. Conclusions Cord blood IgE and IL-4 levels should not be used to distinguish newborns with a family history of atopic diseases from those without.

  7. Risk factors for the development of atopic disease in infancy and early childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.P. Koopman (Laurens)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of allergic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, is multifactorial, involving interaction of both genetic and environmental factors [1]. The prevalence of allergic diseases has doubled in the last 3 decades. especially in Western

  8. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Nermes, M.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were

  9. Homeopathic therapy in pediatric atopic diseases: short- and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Picchi, Marco; Bartoli, Paola; Panozzo, Marialessandra; Cervino, Chiara; Nurra, Linda

    2016-08-01

    To study the outcomes of atopic diseases in children treated with homeopathy at the Homeopathic Clinic of Lucca (Italy) and related long-term results after approximately an 8-year period. Our data derive from an observational longitudinal study carried out on 857 pediatric patients who consecutive visited from 1998 to 2014. Children with atopic diseases were 325 (37.9%), 126 (39%) suffered from atopic dermatitis, 72 (22%) from allergic rhinitis, and 127 (39%) from asthma. Moreover, a long-term study was conducted on a subset of 107/165 patients, consecutively visited from 1998 to 2006, and with ≥5 years follow-up. The study also investigated the evolution of overall symptoms in those patients with a complex atopic symptomatology. 75.8% of atopic children had moderate or major improvement (67.1% with asthma as the primary disease; 84.2% rhinitis; 84.2% dermatitis). At re-evaluation after 5-10 years, complete remission of atopic symptoms was obtained in 70.1% of the children: 84.2% in dermatitis; 48.1% in allergic rhinitis; 71.4% in asthma. Children with two or three atopic diseases at the first visit were completely cured in 40% of cases. The results seem to confirm that homeopathic medicine produces positive therapeutic response in atopic children. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atopic diseases by filaggrin mutations and birth year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Johansen, J D

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic disorders has increased in recent years. The pathogenesis is complex with genetic and environmental risk factors. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations are common and associated with atopic disorders. We investigated whether the prevalence of filaggrin mutations increased ...... in different birth cohorts in adults from the general population in Denmark....

  11. Recall Bias in Childhood Atopic Diseases Among Adults in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, Charlotte G; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease in childhood and an important risk factor for the later development of other atopic diseases. Many publications on childhood AD use questionnaires based on information obtained in adulthood, which introduce the possibility of recall bias. In a prospective...... school age and 15 years later, compared with 23.6% including data only from adulthood. The most important factors for remembering having had AD in childhood were: (i) long duration of dermatitis in childhood; (ii) adult hand eczema; and (iii) concomitant atopic disease. Recall bias for childhood AD...

  12. The association of the 'additional height index' with atopic diseases, non-atopic asthma, ischaemic heart disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Vidal, C; Gonzalez-Quintela, A

    2014-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with childhood conditions that led them to attain tallness higher than expected from their parents' height may be at lower risk of non-atopic asthma/wheeze and IHD/IHD mortality but possibly at higher risk of atopic conditions. The measure of tallness below or above the expected...

  13. Respiratory infections in adults with atopic disease and IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis and asthma, are common diseases with a prevalence of 30-40% worldwide and are thus of great global public health importance. Allergic inflammation may influence the immunity against infections, so atopic individuals could be susceptible to respiratory infections. No previous population-based study has addressed the relation between atopy and respiratory infections in adulthood. We assessed the relation between atopic disease, specific IgE antibodies and the occurrence of upper and lower respiratory infections in the past 12 months among working-aged adults. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population-based cross-sectional study of 1008 atopic and non-atopic adults 21-63 years old was conducted. Information on atopic diseases, allergy tests and respiratory infections was collected by a questionnaire. Specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens were measured in serum. Adults with atopic disease had a significantly increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI; including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted risk ratio (RR 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43, 3.52 and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted RR 1.55 (1.14, 2.10. The risk of LRTIs increased with increasing level of specific IgE (linear trend P = 0.059. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new evidence that working-aged adults with atopic disease experience significantly more LRTIs and URTIs than non-atopics. The occurrence of respiratory infections increased with increasing levels of specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens, showing a dose-response pattern with LRTIs. From the clinical point of view it is important to recognize that those with atopies are a risk group for respiratory infections, including more severe LRTIs.

  14. Analysis of food allergy in atopic dermatitis patients - association with concomitant allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few reports demonstrate the comorbidity of food allergy and allergic march in adult patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate, if there is some relation in atopic dermatitis patients at the age 14 years and older who suffer from food allergy to common food allergens to other allergic diseases and parameters as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed; these parameters were examined: food allergy (to wheat flour, cow milk, egg, peanuts and soy, the occurrence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. The statistical evaluation of the relations among individual parameters monitored was performed. Results: Food allergy was altogether confirmed in 65 patients (29% and these patients suffer significantly more often from bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Persistent atopic dermatitis lesions and positive data in family history about atopy are recorded significantly more often in patients with confirmed food allergy to examined foods as well. On the other hand, the onset of atopic dermatitis under 5 year of age is not recorded significantly more often in patients suffering from allergy to examined foods. Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis patients suffering from food allergy suffer significantly more often from allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, persistent eczematous lesions and have positive data about atopy in their family history.

  15. Antenatal risk factors, cytokines and the development of atopic disease in early childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, E K; Miller, R L; Wilson, M T; McGeady, S J; Culhane, J F

    2007-01-01

    Atopic diseases are complex entities influenced by an array of risk factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental allergens, antenatal exposures, infections and psychosocial factors. One proposed mechanism by which these risk factors contribute to the development of atopic disease is through changes in the production of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokines. The objectives of this review are to discuss antenatal exposures that are associated with paedi...

  16. A novel atopic dermatitis model induced by topical application with dermatophagoides farinae extract in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mina; Haruna, Takayo; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Iduhara, Miho; Takaki, Shigeki; Deguchi, Masashi; Arimura, Akinori

    2007-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Animal models induced by relevant allergens play a very important role in the elucidation of the disease. The patients with atopic dermatitis are highly sensitized with mite allergens such as Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Therefore, in the present study, we tried to develop a novel model for atopic dermatitis by repeated application with Df extract ointment. Df extract ointment was repeatedly applied to the back of NC/Nga mice together with barrier disruption. Atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions were evaluated by dermatitis scores, skin histology and immunological parameters. The effect of corticosteroid and calcineurin inhibitor was also examined. Repeated application of Df extract ointment caused rapid increase in dermatitis scores. Clinical (skin dryness, erythema, edema and erosion) and histological symptoms (dermal and epidermal thickening, hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis and inflammatory cell infiltration) in this model were very similar to those in human atopic dermatitis. Serum total and Df-specific IgE levels were elevated in this model compared with normal mice, and draining lymph node cells isolated from the mice that exhibited dermatitis produced significant amounts of interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and interferon-gamma after re-stimulation with Df. Furthermore, current first-line drugs for the treatment of human atopic dermatitis, corticosteroid and tacrolimus ointments, were effective against the clinical and histological symptoms in this model. These results suggest that the model we have established is useful for not only elucidating the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis but also for evaluating therapeutic agents.

  17. Children with atopic dermatitis in Daejeon, Korea: individualized nutrition intervention for disease severity and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hee; Lee, Jae Ho; Ly, Sun Yung

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common pediatric chronic inflammatory skin diseases, and certain food allergens and nutrients are closely related to the development and severity of atopic dermatitis. While avoidance of the causative foods is considered the mainstay of treatment, unverified excessive restriction might induce unnecessary limitations in the food intake, consequently leading to nutritional deficiencies and poor growth. This study aimed to identify the characteristics and nutrient intake status in children with atopic dermatitis and to investigate the effects of individualized nutrition intervention. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records of 77 pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis who received 4 months of individualized nutrition intervention combined with an elimination diet. The patient characteristics, nutrient intake status, and clinical status were examined before and after the intervention. Before the intervention, 5 children had a weight for height z-score below -2.0, and 48.1% had experienced food restriction; these children showed a significantly higher SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis index than those without experiences, with the number of restricted foods before the intervention positively correlating with the disease severity. The intakes of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, calcium, folate, and vitamin D were lower than the recommended nutrient intakes for Koreans. After the intervention, the weight for height z-score of 35 children was significantly increased and their SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis index was significantly reduced (pnutrition intervention appears useful for alleviating the severity of atopic dermatitis and improving the growth status by improving the nutrient intake.

  18. Allergenic food introduction and risk of childhood atopic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J Elbert

    Full Text Available The role of timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction in the development of childhood allergic sensitization and atopic diseases is controversial.To examine whether timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction are associated with allergic sensitization, allergy and eczema in children until age 10 years.This study among 5,202 children was performed in a population-based prospective cohort. Timing (age ≤6 months vs. >6 months and diversity (0, 1, 2 and ≥3 foods of allergenic food (cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy and gluten introduction were assessed by questionnaires at ages 6 and 12 months. At age 10 years, inhalant and food allergic sensitization were measured by skin prick tests, and physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergy by questionnaire. Data on parental-reported physician-diagnosed eczema were obtained from birth until age 10 years.Children introduced to gluten at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of eczema (aOR (95% CI: 0.84 (0.72, 0.99, compared with children introduced to gluten at age >6 months. However, timing of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization or physician-diagnosed allergy. Children introduced to ≥3 allergenic foods at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of physician-diagnosed inhalant allergy (0.64 (0.42, 0.98, compared with children not introduced to any allergenic food at age ≤6 months. However, diversity of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization, physician-diagnosed food allergy or eczema.Neither timing nor diversity of allergenic food introduction was consistently associated with childhood allergic sensitization, allergy or eczema.

  19. Lack of association between the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism and atopic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Betina Heinsbaek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Fenger, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    -tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-gene, a well-known marker of impaired folate metabolism. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism and different outcome variables of asthma and atopic disease. METHODS: This study was a population-based study of 1189...... and symptoms of allergy and asthma. In addition, participants were genotyped for the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism. RESULTS: None of the examined outcomes were significantly associated with the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study using detailed objective markers of atopic disease do...... not support the hypothesis that impaired folate metabolism as reflected by the MTHFR genotype is involved in the development of atopic disease....

  20. Immunoglobulin free light chains in adult atopic dermatitis patients do not correlate with disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J. L.; Knipping, K.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A F; Garssen, J.; De Bruin-Weller, M. S.; Hijnen, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although total IgE levels have been proposed as a biomarker for disease severity in atopic dermatitis (AD) and are increased in the majority of AD patients, they do not correlate with disease severity during short-term follow-up. During the synthesis of immunoglobulins, free light chains

  1. New-onset inflammatory bowel disease in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Wienholtz, Nita; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic and remitting inflammatory skin disease that affects children and adults. While some studies have reported an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis (UC), others have associated both conditions with AD. Notably, most studies...

  2. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Filaggrin genotype and skin diseases independent of atopic dermatitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted DNA...... and information on skin diseases from the Danish National Birth Cohort and Health Register, with 18 years follow-up during years 1996-2013. Odds ratios (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively, and adjusted for physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis...... of atopic dermatitis (OR 3.3, CI 2.1-5.3), dermatology consultations for allergy or rash (HR 2.2, CI 1.4-3.5), basic dermatology consultations at age

  4. Challenging Treatment of Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia in Patients with Atopic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lily; Mercado, Carolina; Galor, Anat; Holland, Edward J; Wang, Gaofeng; Karp, Carol L

    2017-11-30

    Few studies have described ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and its association with atopic diseases and there is no consensus on the course of OSSN in atopic patients. We thereby report three patients with atopy and OSSN. Retrospective case series. Three male patients with mean age of 73 presented with OSSN and history of atopy treated with immunosuppressant therapy. Their histories included atopic dermatitis and keratoconjunctivitis. All patients had treatment complicated by multiple surgeries, recurrences, or advanced disease. The patients initially received medical treatment with topical interferon-alpha-2b (IFNα2b). However, all the patients had recurrences and required modification of treatment including topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We report on three patients with a history of atopy whose OSSN presentation and course was challenging. Overall, our cases responded better to topical 5-fluorouracil compared to topical interferon-alpha-2b, but recurrences were common. These patients may benefit from more aggressive and long-term treatment.

  5. Relationship between type 1 diabetes and atopic diseases in a twin population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Duffy, D L; Kyvik, K O

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between type 1 diabetes and atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: We performed record linkage between questionnaire-defined atopic dermatitis, asthma and hay fever, and hospital discharge diagnoses of type 1 diabetes in 54,530 Danish twins, 3-71 years of age....... RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted risk of atopic dermatitis was decreased in subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic subjects, (2.1%vs 9.9%), odds ratio (OR)= 0.23 (0.07-0.71), P = 0.011, whereas asthma and hay fever were not significantly associated with type 1 diabetes. Within twin...... pairs discordant for type 1 diabetes, the diabetic twin had a lower risk of atopic dermatitis relative to the nondiabetic co-twin. Genetic factors for atopic dermatitis and type 1 diabetes were negatively correlated (r = -0.30), P = 0.0009. CONCLUSIONS: These findings substantiate the Th1 vs Th2 cell...

  6. Prevalence of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, J M; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2001-01-01

    dermatitis in the same group of adolescents. OBJECTIVES: To assess prevalence measures of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents in Odense municipality, Denmark. METHODS: The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study among 1501 eighth grade...... prevalence 3.6% (Hanifin and Rajka criteria). In the interview the lifetime prevalence of inhalant allergy was estimated as 17.7% (6.9% allergic asthma, 15.7% allergic rhinitis). The lifetime prevalence of hand eczema based on the questionnaire was 9.2%, the 1-year period prevalence was 7.3% and the point......BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are common in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological knowledge is sparse for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis in this age group. Furthermore, no population-based studies have evaluated the prevalence of atopic diseases and hand and contact...

  7. Allergic Disease and Atopic Sensitization in Children in Relation to Measles Vaccination and Measles Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenlund, Helen; Bergstrom, Anna; Alm, Johan S.; Swartz, Jackie; Scheynius, Annika; van Hage, Marianne; Johansen, Kari; Brunekreef, Bert; von Mutius, Erika; Ege, Markus J.; Riedler, Josef; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Waser, Marco; Pershagen, Goran

    OBJECTIVE. Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS. A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in

  8. Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenlund, H.; Bergstrom, A.; Alm, J.; Swartz, J.; Scheynius, A.; van Hage, M.; Johansen, K.; Brunekreef, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; von Mutius, E.; Ege, M.; Riedler, J.; Braun-Fahrlander, C.; Waser, M.; Pershagen, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in

  9. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and atopic diseases : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Schans, Jurjen; Pleiter, Janine C; De Vries, Tjalling W.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C.M.; Bos, Jens H.J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hak, Eelko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data on the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and atopic diseases have been inconclusive. We assessed whether children using ADHD medication are more likely to receive drug treatment for asthma, allergic rhinitis, and/or eczema than children not using

  10. Incidence, prevalence, and risk of selected ocular disease in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Toft, Peter B; Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ocular comorbidities are common in atopic dermatitis (AD) as the result of the disease itself or the use of medication. No large-scale epidemiologic data exist on the prevalence of ocular comorbidities in adults with AD. OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine the prevalence and risk of sele...

  11. Season of birth and risk of atopic disease among children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas Bøllingtoft; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Season of birth (SOB) has been regarded as a risk factor for atopy. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between season of birth (SOB) and later development of atopic disease in children and adolescents. METHODS: A total of 1,007 randomly selected subjects, 7 to 17 ye...

  12. ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN — MODERN CLINICAL AND PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS OF DISEASES AND APPROACH TO THE TOPICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Toropova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis in children is widespread disease and difficult medical and social problem. The article presents a literature data and authors’ own experience on scientific studies and treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis during 50 years. The analysis of pathogenesis and treatment of children with atopic dermatitis was performed, and data on safety of modern medications for topical use, containing glucocorticoids, in children from early age were presented in this article.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, perinatal pathology, serum IgE, external treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:98-105

  13. American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations on the effects of early nutritional interventions on the development of atopic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygarajan, Ananth; Burks, Arvil W

    2008-12-01

    To review the American Academy of Pediatrics statement on the effects of early nutritional interventions on the development of atopic disease in infants and children. Recent findings suggest that restriction of maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation does not play a major role in the development of allergic disease. In high-risk infants, exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months prevents or delays atopic dermatitis, cow milk allergy, and wheezing early in life. There is evidence that supplementing breastfeeding with a hydrolyzed formula protects against atopic disease, especially atopic dermatitis in at-risk infants. Finally, there is little evidence that delaying the introduction of complementary foods beyond 4-6 months of age has any protective effect against allergy. There is insufficient data that any dietary intervention beyond 4-6 months of age has any protective effect against developing atopic disease. In high-risk infants, there is evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months, and delaying of complementary foods until 4-6 months, prevent the development of allergy. There is some evidence that supplementing hydrolyzed formulas in high-risk infants may delay or prevent allergic disease. There is no convincing evidence that maternal manipulation of diet during pregnancy or lactation, use of soy products, or infant dietary restrictions beyond 4-6 months has any effect on the development of atopic disease.

  14. Diet Quality throughout Early Life in Relation to Allergic Sensitization and Atopic Diseases in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh N. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Early-life nutrition is an important modifiable determinant in the development of a child’s immune system, and may thereby influence the risk of allergic sensitization and atopic diseases. However, associations between overall dietary patterns and atopic diseases in childhood remain unclear. We examined associations of diet quality in early life with allergic sensitization, self-reported physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergies, eczema, and asthma among 5225 children participating in a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Diet was assessed during pregnancy, infancy, and childhood using validated food-frequency questionnaires. We calculated food-based diet quality scores (0–10 or 0–15, reflecting adherence to dietary guidelines. At age 10 years, allergic sensitization was assessed with skin prick tests. Information on physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergies, eczema, and asthma was obtained with questionnaires. We observed no associations between diet quality during pregnancy and allergic sensitization (odds ratio (OR = 1.05 per point in the diet score, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.99, 1.13, allergies (0.96, 95% CI: 0.88, 1.04, eczema (0.99, 95% CI: 0.93, 1.06, or asthma (0.93, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.03 in childhood. Also, diet quality in infancy or childhood were not associated with atopic outcomes in childhood. Our findings do not support our hypothesis that a healthy dietary pattern in early life is associated with a lower risk of allergic sensitization or atopic diseases in childhood.

  15. Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior with Atopic Disease in United States Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mark A; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    To determine if eczema, asthma, and hay fever are associated with vigorous physical activity, television/video game usage, and sports participation and if sleep disturbance modifies such associations. Data were analyzed from 2 cross-sectional studies including 133 107 children age 6-17 years enrolled in the 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health. Bivariate and multivariate survey logistic regression models were created to calculate the odds of atopic disease and atopic disease severity on vigorous physical activity, television/video game use, and sports participation. In multivariate logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic factors, lifetime history of asthma was associated with decreased odds of ≥1 days of vigorous physical activity (aOR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77-0.99) and decreased odds of sports participation (0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.99). Atopic disease accompanied by sleep disturbance had significantly higher odds of screen time and lower odds of sports participation compared with children with either atopic disease or sleep disturbance alone. Severe eczema (aOR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19-0.78), asthma (aOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.14-0.61), and hay fever (aOR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24-0.97) were all associated with decreased odds of ≥1 days of vigorous physical activity. Moderate (aOR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.57-0.99) and severe eczema (aOR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28-0.73), severe asthma (aOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.25-0.89), and hay fever (aOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.36-0.61) were associated with decreased odds of sports participation in the past year. Children with severe atopic disease, accompanied by sleep disturbance, have higher risk of sedentary behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Itch in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Furue, Masutaka; Ulzii, Dugarmaa; Nakahara, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic itch in inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, markedly diminishes the quality of life of affected individuals. Comprehensive progress has been made in understanding itch signaling and associated mediators in the skin, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and central nervous system, which may amplify or suppress atopic itch. Conventional therapies for atopic dermatitis are capable of reducing atopic itch; however, most patients are not satisfied with the antipruritic capacity of conventional treatments. Exploring itch pathways and mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for atopic itch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergens in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y-S

    2007-12-01

    Allergens play an essential role in atopic dermatitis, either intrinsic or extrinsic. They provoke cutaneous inflammation via IgE-dependent and cell-mediated immune reactions. Food allergens have a well-known contribution to disease activity of atopic dermatitis, especially in infants and young children. However, the importance of inhaled allergens is still under investigation. For clinical implication, identification of individualized allergens is an ideal strategy for better control of atopic dermatitis and avoidance of atopic march. The aim of this article is to discuss the common allergens in atopic dermatitis (AD), the specificity and sensitivity of laboratory tests for allergens, and the clinical effect of various preventions.

  18. Changes in skin test reactivity among adults with atopic disease: a 3-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslund, N.; Thomsen, S.F.; Molgaard, E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Our knowledge about longtudinal predictors of atopy is limited. Objectives: To describe changes in skin test reactivity during a 3-year period in a sample of adolescents and adults with atopic disease and to identify factors of importance for these changes. Methods: From a sample of 1......, 186 candidates, ranging in age from 14 to 44 years, who in a screening questionnaire reported symptoms suggestive of respiratory allergic disease, 344 individuals with a positive skin prick test (SPT) result concomitantly with asthma and/or rhinitis were clinically studied on 2 occasions, 3 years...

  19. Evaluation of lipid oxidative stress status and inflammation in atopic ocular surface disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, Tais H.; Ayako, Igarashi; Takano, Yoji; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Ibrahim, Osama M.A.; Okada, Naoko; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Fukagawa, Kazumi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsubota, Kazuo; Fujishima, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the oxidative stress status in atopic skin disease has been reported to be elevated, there are still no studies related to the status of oxidative stress in atopic ocular surface disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ocular surface lipid oxidative stress status and inflammation in atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) patients and normal subjects. Methods Twenty eight eyes of 14 patients (9 males, 5 females) with AKC and 18 eyes of 9 age and sex matched (4 males and 5 females) normal healthy controls were examined in this prospective study. The severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) was scored by the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. All subjects underwent Schirmer test, tear film break up time (BUT), fluorescein/Rose Bengal stainings, tear collection, and brush cytology from the upper palpebral conjunctiva. The brush cytology samples were stained with Diff-Quik for differentiation of inflammatory cells and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with HEL (hexanoyl-lysine) and 4-HNE (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) to study lipid oxidation. HEL and cytokine (interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-5 (IL-5), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from tear samples of AKC patients and control subjects. Toluidine Blue and IHC staining with HEL, 4-HNE and cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45) were performed on papillary samples of AKC patients. This study was conducted in compliance with the “Declaration of Helsinki.” Results The tear stability and vital staining scores were significantly worse in eyes of AKC patients (ptears of AKC patients compared to controls. Papillary specimens also revealed many CD45 inflammatory cells as well as many cells positively stained with HEL and 4-HNE in IHC. A strong significant linear positive correlation between conjunctival inflammation and epithelial lipid oxidative stress status was observed

  20. Forsythia suspensa Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Jang, Seol; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Forsythia suspensa (F. suspensa) is a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of an ethanol extract from F. suspensa fruits on atopic dermatitis both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the inhibitory effects of F. suspensa extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model exposed to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract. Topical application of F. suspensa extract to the mice attenuated...

  1. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICIENCY OF MURAMYL DIPEPTIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolesnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of allergic diseases worldwide reflects some mangles of the existing pharmacotherapy concept which ignores some etiopathogenetic aspects of clinical atopy. Meanwhile, understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of allergy may create prerequisites for development of new therapeutic areas, in order to effectively influence pathogenesis points of allergic inflammation and, thus, leading to therapeutic success. The review article concerns an antagonism between the two populations of T-helper cells (Th1 and Th2 carried out mainly by the action of IFNγ produced by activated Th1, and IL-4 secreted by activated Th2 which is at the heart of modern concept on the regulation of adaptive immunity. The prospects of immunotherapy of allergic diseases based on the polarization of the immune response are discussed, i.e., an activation of Th1 responses and Th2 suppression. This functional polarization can be mediated by the innate immune receptor agonist, i.e., synthetic and natural minimally-sized biologically active fragments (MBAF with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In this respect, a very promising drug registered in Russia is based on the synthetic MBAF, glucosaminylmuramyldipeptide (GMDP, The liсopid immunomodulator. This is due to the fact that GMDP, being an active substance of Liсopid, is a highly specific ligand for the NOD2 receptor of innate immunity factors; it may cause activation of the NF-kB transcription factor, and production of multiple immunoregulatory cytokines. Clinical and immunological efficacy of Licopid application in conventional therapy of atopic allergic diseases (asthma, atopic dermatitis, atopic variant of acute obstructive bronchitis is presented as an overview of pre-clinical and clinical trials.

  2. Quality of life and disease severity in patients with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, J G; Agner, T; Clausen, M-L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) affects quality of life (QoL) negatively in patients and their families. We examined the relationship between disease severity and QoL in patients with AD. METHODS: Consecutive, newly referred outpatients with AD, 4 years of age or older, were assessed from...... patients reporting facial eczema (9.88 vs. 6.24), P = 0.012. No statistically significant influence on DLQI was found for hand or foot eczema, age, blood eosinophil count, allergic sensitization, asthma, hay fever, FLG mutation status and smoking. FLG null mutation status was not significantly associated...

  3. A novel hypothesis for the gene expression for the control of atopic and other hereditary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Okudaira

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of RNA polymerase proteins and transcription factor proteins for the expression of genetic information in DNA clearly indicates that the process is influenced by certain proteins in the body and/or in the environment, which is totally opposite to the 'central dogma' of Crick. In this article, we present a working hypothesis (helical hypothesis that may explain the programmed nature of various biological events simply and naturally. Future investigations on the factors that regulate the gene transcription of cytokine clusters, including intereukin (IL-4 and IL-5, may provide an answer for controlling atopic as well as other hereditary (genetic diseases.

  4. FADS gene cluster polymorphisms: important modulators of fatty acid levels and their impact on atopic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattka, Eva; Illig, Thomas; Heinrich, Joachim; Koletzko, Berthold

    2009-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) play an important role in several physiological processes and their concentration in phospholipids has been associated with several complex diseases, such as atopic disease. The level and composition of LC-PUFAs in the human body is highly dependent on their intake in the diet or on the intake of fatty acid precursors, which are endogenously elongated and desaturated to physiologically active LC-PUFAs. The most important enzymes in this reaction cascade are the Delta(5) and Delta(6) desaturase. Several studies in the last few years have revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 2 desaturase encoding genes (FADS1 and FADS2) are highly associated with the concentration of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, showing that beside nutrition, genetic factors also play an important role in the regulation of LC-PUFAs. This review focuses on current knowledge of the impact of genetic polymorphisms on LC-PUFA metabolism and on their potential role in the development of atopic diseases. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Probiotics for prevention of atopic diseases in infants: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotti, G; Meneghin, F; Aceti, A; Barone, G; Callegari, M L; Di Mauro, A; Fantini, M P; Gori, D; Indrio, F; Maggio, L; Morelli, L; Corvaglia, L

    2015-11-01

    Growing evidence underlines the pivotal role of infant gut colonization in the development of the immune system. The possibility to modify gut colonization through probiotic supplementation in childhood might prevent atopic diseases. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of probiotic supplementation during pregnancy and early infancy in preventing atopic diseases. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of probiotics during pregnancy or early infancy for prevention of allergic diseases. Fixed-effect models were used, and random-effects models where significant heterogeneity was present. Results were expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Seventeen studies, reporting data from 4755 children (2381 in the probiotic group and 2374 in the control group), were included in the meta-analysis. Infants treated with probiotics had a significantly lower RR for eczema compared to controls (RR 0.78 [95% CI: 0.69-0.89], P = 0.0003), especially those supplemented with a mixture of probiotics (RR 0.54 [95% CI: 0.43-0.68], P probiotic supplementation prevents infantile eczema, thus suggesting a new potential indication for probiotic use in pregnancy and infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. New insights into atopic dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leung, Donald Y M; Boguniewicz, Mark; Howell, Michael D; Nomura, Ichiro; Hamid, Qutayba A

    2004-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with cutaneous hyperreactivity to environmental triggers and is often the first step in the atopic march that results in asthma and allergic rhinitis...

  7. RNA sequencing atopic dermatitis transcriptome profiling provides insights into novel disease mechanisms with potential therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Correa da Rosa, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes. These li......Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes...... (criteria: fold change, ≥2.0; false discovery rate ≤0.05) in lesional versus nonlesional skin from 18 patients with moderate-to-severe AD, with real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry used for validation. Results: Both platforms showed robust disease transcriptomes and correlated well with RT-PCR...... RNA-seq showed somewhat better agreement with RT-PCR (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.57 and 0.70 for microarrays and RNA-seq vs RT-PCR, respectively), bias was not eliminated. Among genes uniquely identified by using RNA-seq were triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1...

  8. The relationship between severity of disease and vitamin D levels in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Su

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder. Vitamin D is a liposoluble vitamin synthesized mainly in the skin. Vitamin D has several effects on the skin. Aim : To assess the serum level of vitamin D in children with AD and determine its relation to AD severity. Material and methods : Sixty patients with AD were enrolled in the study. We evaluated disease severity using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD index. The control group consisted of 37 healthy subjects. Results : The mean serum concentration of 25(OHD3 in patients with AD was not statistically different from control subjects (p = 0.065. The vitamin D level was significantly lower in moderate and severe AD compared with mild AD, and this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004. Vitamin D showed a negative correlation with serum total IgE levels (p = 0.007. There was no significant correlation between total IgE levels and SCORAD scores (p = 0.089. Conclusions : This study suggests that a low serum vitamin D level is inversely associated with severity of AD in children. Vitamin D has not been included in the routine treatment of AD because of the conflicting results of various studies. Thus, there is a need for more detailed and prospective studies.

  9. The relationship between severity of disease and vitamin D levels in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ozlem; Bahalı, Anıl Gülsel; Demir, Ayşegül Doğan; Ozkaya, Dilek Bıyık; Uzuner, Selçuk; Dizman, Didem; Onsun, Nahide

    2017-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder. Vitamin D is a liposoluble vitamin synthesized mainly in the skin. Vitamin D has several effects on the skin. To assess the serum level of vitamin D in children with AD and determine its relation to AD severity. Sixty patients with AD were enrolled in the study. We evaluated disease severity using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. The control group consisted of 37 healthy subjects. The mean serum concentration of 25(OH)D3 in patients with AD was not statistically different from control subjects (p = 0.065). The vitamin D level was significantly lower in moderate and severe AD compared with mild AD, and this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004). Vitamin D showed a negative correlation with serum total IgE levels (p = 0.007). There was no significant correlation between total IgE levels and SCORAD scores (p = 0.089). This study suggests that a low serum vitamin D level is inversely associated with severity of AD in children. Vitamin D has not been included in the routine treatment of AD because of the conflicting results of various studies. Thus, there is a need for more detailed and prospective studies.

  10. Međudjelovanje genskog polimorfizma filagrina i načina života kod atopijskih bolesti u mladoj odrasloj populaciji [Interaction of filaggrin gene polymorphisms and environmental factors with atopic diseases in young adult population

    OpenAIRE

    Sabolić Pipinić, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of atopic disorders such as atopic rhinitis, atopic asthma and atopic dermatitis lies in gene-environment interactions. Hypothesis of this study is that in Croatian population filaggrin gene (FLG) polymorphisms (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X i S3247X) contribue to atopic diseases, and that this contribution is modulated by environmetal factors (settlement type, heating type, animal contact, smoking, physical activity, BMI, nutrition). The study enrolled 439 freshmen students at the Uni...

  11. Topical ROR Inverse Agonists Suppress Inflammation in Mouse Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Acute Irritant Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Choo, Min-Kyung; Park, Jin Mo; Fisher, David E

    2017-12-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors RORα and RORγ are critical for the functions of specific subsets of T cells and innate lymphoid cells, which are key drivers of inflammatory disease in barrier tissues. Here, we investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of SR1001, a synthetic RORα/γ inverse agonist, in mouse models of atopic dermatitis and acute irritant dermatitis. Topical treatment with SR1001 reduces epidermal and dermal features of MC903-induced atopic dermatitis-like disease and suppresses the production of type 2 cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in lesional skin. In the epidermis, SR1001 treatment blocks MC903-induced expression of TSLP and reverses impaired keratinocyte differentiation. SR1001 is also effective in alleviating acute dermatitis triggered by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Overall, our results suggest that RORα/γ are important therapeutic targets for cutaneous inflammation and suggest topical usage of inhibitory ligands as an approach to treating skin diseases of inflammatory etiology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma, and Allergic Rhinitis and the Comorbidity of Allergic Diseases in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soyoung; Son, Dong Koog; Lim, Wan Ryung; Kim, Sun Hang; Kim, Hyunjung; Yum, Hye Yung

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Childhood allergic diseases are a major concern because they lead to a heavy economic burden and poor quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of childhood atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and the comorbidity of allergic diseases in Seoul, Korea. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey between May and October 2010 to evaluate the prevalence of childhood allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis, using a questionnaire from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood group. Each questionnaire was completed by the parent or guardian of a child. Results In the 31,201 children studied, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in the past 12 months was 19.3% in children 0 to 3 years of age, 19.7% in children 4 to 6 years of age, 16.7% in children 7 to 9 years of age, and 14.5% in children 10 to 13 years of age (p for trend asthma in these age groups was 16.5%, 9.8%, 6.5%, and 5.4%, respectively (p for trend asthma, both asthma and allergic rhinitis, or both atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis was 2.5%, 4.7%, and 8.7%, respectively. The prevalence of comorbid allergic diseases decreased with age (p for trend asthma, was relatively high in very young children and that all of the principal allergic diseases in children often co-exist. PMID:22359737

  13. Comorbidities of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review article, we summarize the current evidence about atopic dermatitis (AD)-associated comorbidities, beyond the traditional atopic and allergic conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Patients with AD may have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, certain malignancies...

  14. Season of birth and risk of atopic disease among children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas Bøllingtoft; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2007-01-01

    . RESULTS: The overall risk of atopy, as judged by skin test reactivity and serum total IgE, was the same regardless of SOB. On the contrary, asthma was more common in subjects born in the autumn compared with subjects born during the remaining part of the year (12.4% vs. 5.6%), OR = 2.40, 95% CI (1...... not significantly related to SOB. CONCLUSIONS: Atopy itself is independent of season of birth, whereas asthma is more prevalent among subjects born during the autumn. Regarding asthma, these results suggest that the first months of life enclose a period of particular vulnerability towards environmental risk factors......BACKGROUND: Season of birth (SOB) has been regarded as a risk factor for atopy. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between season of birth (SOB) and later development of atopic disease in children and adolescents. METHODS: A total of 1,007 randomly selected subjects, 7 to 17...

  15. Cord blood IgE. II. Prediction of atopic disease. A follow-up at the age of 18 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L G; Høst, A; Halken, S

    1992-01-01

    .8, 1.1) we did not find an excess of atopic infants among those with elevated cord blood IgE irrespective of the chosen cut-off value. Atopic predisposition or family history of atopic disease was defined as at least one parent or older sibling with atopic disease. Significantly more infants...... size with cord blood IgE less than 0.5 kU/l. A total of 762 infants were clinically evaluated at 18 months of age. A diagnosis of definite atopy, probable atopy or no atopy, including both IgE and non-IgE mediated disease was established. Applying different cord blood IgE cut-off values (0.3, 0.5, 0...... with a family history developed atopy at 18 months. In the 2 series the positive predictive values of cord blood IgE greater than or equal to 0.5 were 43% and 46% and the sensitivities were 17% and 15%. The predictive values of having a family history were 48% and 44% and the sensitivities were 55% and 58%....

  16. Cytokine gene polymorphisms and atopic disease in two European cohorts. (ECRHS-Basel and SAPALDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann-Liebrich U

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopy and allergic phenotypes are biologically characterized by an imbalanced T helper cell response skewed towards a type 2 (TH2 immune response associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE levels. Polymorphisms in cytokine genes might modulate regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance. We thus aimed at reproducing our previous findings from a European study population on the association of various cytokine polymorphisms with self-reported hay fever as well as increased total and specific IgE levels in two comparable study populations. Methods Two prospective Caucasian cohorts were used. In the Basel center of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS, n = 418 ten distinct cytokine polymorphisms of putative functional relevance were genotyped. In the Swiss cohort Study on Air Pollution And Lung Disease In Adults (SAPALDIA, n = 6003 two cytokine polymorphisms were genotyped. The associations of these polymorphisms with atopy were estimated by covariance and logistic regression analysis. Results We confirmed IL4, IL10, IL6 and IL18 as candidate genes for atopic health outcomes. In the large, well-characterized SAPALDIA cohort the IL6(-174G>C and IL18(-137G>C polymorphisms were associated with circulating total IgE concentrations in subjects with hay fever. The IL18(-137G>C polymorphism was also associated with the prevalence of hay fever. Conclusion Comprehensive characterization of genetic variation in extended cytokine candidate gene regions is now needed. Large study networks must follow to investigate the association of risk patterns defined by genetic predisposing and environmental risk factors with specific atopic phenotypes.

  17. Filaggrin gene variants and atopic diseases in early childhood assessed longitudinally from birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Pipper, Christian B; Tavendale, Roger; Palmer, Colin N A; Bisgaard, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) was one of the discovery cohorts of the association between eczema and variants in the filaggrin coding gene (FLG). Here, we study the FLG-associated risk of asthma symptoms in early life and describe the temporal relationship in the development of the different FLG-associated atopic outcomes: asthma, sensitization and eczema, assessed longitudinally from birth. A high-risk cohort of 411 children was assessed in a prospective clinical study from birth to school-age. Asthma, acute severe asthma exacerbations, sensitization and eczema were diagnosed prospectively by the investigators. FLG variants R501X and Del4 were determined in 382 Caucasians. Filaggrin variants increased risk of developing recurrent wheeze, asthma and asthma exacerbations (hazard ratio 1.82 [1.06-3.12], p = 0.03), which was expressed within the first 1.5 yr of life. Children with filaggrin variants had a marked and persistent increase in acute severe asthma exacerbations from 1 yr of age (incidence ratio 2.40 [1.19-4.81], p = 0.01) and increased risk of asthma by age 5 (odds ratio 2.62 [1.12-6.11], p = 0.03). FLG variants increased the risk of eczema, manifesting fully in the first year of life (point prevalence ratio for age 0-5 was 1.75 [1.29-2.37]; p-value = 0.0003) contrasting the increased risk of specific sensitization by age 4 (odds ratio 3.52 [1.72-7.25], p = 0.0007) but not age 1.5. This study describes a FLG-associated pattern of atopic diseases characterized by the early onset of asthma symptoms and eczema and later development of sensitization. The association of filaggrin variants with asthma suggests skin barrier dysfunction as a novel, and potentially modifiable, mechanism driving early childhood asthma. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Association of food allergy with asthma severity and atopic diseases in Jewish and Arab adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graif, Yael; German, Larissa; Livne, Irit; Shohat, Tamy

    2012-10-01

      To investigate the prevalence of reported food allergy and its association with atopic diseases and asthma severity among Jewish and Arab adolescents.   The self-report questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) was administered to adolescents aged 13-14 years from randomly selected junior high schools in Israel. Questions regarding food allergy were added.   A total of 11 171 questionnaires were available for analysis. Food allergy was reported by 3.6% of participants: 1.9% milk, 0.6% egg, 0.6% peanut and 0.4% sesame. On multivariate analysis, food allergy was strongly associated with current asthma (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.8-3.3), atopic eczema (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.4-4.3) and allergic rhinitis (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.8-3.1). Arabs were significantly more allergic to peanut (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5-4.1), egg (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.1-5.9) and sesame (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2-4.5) than Jews, and less allergic to milk (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9). Asthmatic subjects with food allergy had significantly more parameters of severe asthma than those without food allergy (p foods differs between Jews and Arabs. Asthmatic adolescents with food allergy report more severe asthma than those without food allergy. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  19. Cytokine gene polymorphisms and atopic disease in two European cohorts. (ECRHS-Basel and SAPALDIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, M; Nieters, A; Bircher, AJ; Brutsche, M; Becker, N; Wjst, M; Ackermann-Liebrich, U; Berger, W; Probst-Hensch, NM

    2006-01-01

    Background Atopy and allergic phenotypes are biologically characterized by an imbalanced T helper cell response skewed towards a type 2 (TH2) immune response associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. Polymorphisms in cytokine genes might modulate regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance. We thus aimed at reproducing our previous findings from a European study population on the association of various cytokine polymorphisms with self-reported hay fever as well as increased total and specific IgE levels in two comparable study populations. Methods Two prospective Caucasian cohorts were used. In the Basel center of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS, n = 418) ten distinct cytokine polymorphisms of putative functional relevance were genotyped. In the Swiss cohort Study on Air Pollution And Lung Disease In Adults (SAPALDIA, n = 6003) two cytokine polymorphisms were genotyped. The associations of these polymorphisms with atopy were estimated by covariance and logistic regression analysis. Results We confirmed IL4, IL10, IL6 and IL18 as candidate genes for atopic health outcomes. In the large, well-characterized SAPALDIA cohort the IL6(-174G>C) and IL18(-137G>C) polymorphisms were associated with circulating total IgE concentrations in subjects with hay fever. The IL18(-137G>C) polymorphism was also associated with the prevalence of hay fever. Conclusion Comprehensive characterization of genetic variation in extended cytokine candidate gene regions is now needed. Large study networks must follow to investigate the association of risk patterns defined by genetic predisposing and environmental risk factors with specific atopic phenotypes. PMID:16759385

  20. Atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Wade

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic skin disorder that can significantly impact the quality of life of affected individuals as well as their families. Although the pathogenesis of the disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. There are no specific diagnostic tests for AD; therefore, the diagnosis is based on specific clinical criteria that take into account the patient’s history and clinical manifestations. Successful management of the disorder requires a multifaceted approach that involves education, optimal skin care practices, anti-inflammatory treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs, the use of first-generation antihistamines to help manage sleep disturbances, and the treatment of skin infections. Systemic corticosteroids may also be used, but are generally reserved for the acute treatment of severe flare-ups. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line pharmacologic treatments for AD, and evidence suggests that these agents may also be beneficial for the prophylaxis of disease flare-ups. Although the prognosis for patients with AD is generally favourable, those patients with severe, widespread disease and concomitant atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, are likely to experience poorer outcomes.

  1. Neonatal, atopic and infectious disease outcomes among children born to mothers with latent tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dosanjh A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Amrita Dosanjh,1 Jamie Eridon,2 James Koziol31Department of Pediatrics, Scripps Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA; 2University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Exposure to microbes may result in maternal immune responses that can affect fetal immune development. Several lines of evidence have shown that mycobacterial antigens can change the onset of atopic disease. We hypothesized that infants born to mothers with a positive tuberculosis (TB test and a negative chest radiograph, may exhibit differential development of atopic disease during early childhood. The study was designed as a case control study. Birth records for infants born to untreated mothers with a positive TB skin test (TST, as defined by ≥10 mm induration were reviewed (n = 145 cases and compared to a randomly selected unmatched control cohort of 46 women with a negative TST who delivered during the same time period at Scripps Hospital in San Diego, CA, USA. Childhood outcome parameters reviewed were: (1 the onset of physician diagnosed asthma; (2 lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI with wheezing, latent tuberculosis infection/wheezing diagnosed on physical examination; (3 nonsurgical hospitalization; (4 atopic disease (eye/skin/nasal-sinus disease; (5 infections: ear, LRTI, sinus. LRTI was defined as an infection of the lower airways, eg, pneumonia. Outcomes at the end of years 1, 2, and 3–5 years combined were analyzed. Fisher exact test, Chi-square analysis or Poisson regression analysis were used as appropriate and a P-value of <0.05 was defined as significant. The cases and controls had similar birth weights, gestational ages, maternal ages: 3.34 versus 3.35 kg; 38.3 versus 39.2 weeks, 27.4 versus 26 years (P = non-significant. The childhood outcome parameters of the new onset of asthma was significantly higher than

  2. Improvement of atopic dermatitis with topical application of Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Ji; Kim, Mi Hye; Choi, You Yeon; Kim, Eun Hye; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Kyuseok; Yang, Woong Mo

    2016-03-02

    Spirodela polyrhiza has been used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of urticarial, acute nephritis, inflammation, as well as skin disease. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized hyperplasia of skin lesion and increase of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) level. In this study, the topical effects of S. polyrhiza (SP) on 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD mice model were investigated by several experiments. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups as NOR, CON, DEX, SP 1, and SP 100 groups (n=5, respectively). To induce atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, DNCB had been applied on shaved dorsal skin. SP was topically treated to DNCB-induced mice as 1 and 100mg/mL concentrations. Histological changes were showed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and the infiltration of mast cells was detected by toluidine blue staining. In addition, the level of IgE and each cytokines were measured and expressions of inflammatory signaling factors were analyzed by western blotting assay. SP treatment improved a hyperplasia of epidermis and dermis in DNCB-induced AD-like skin lesion. The infiltration of mast cells was also decreased by treatment of SP. In addition, SP reduced the level of IgE in serum and attenuated the secretion of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Treatment of SP also inhibited the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), phosphor-IκB-α, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)s. From these data, we propose that SP ameliorates AD via modulation of pro-inflammatory mediators. SP may have the potential to be used as an alternative for treatment of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. THE ROLE OF Th1 AND Th2 CELLS IN ATOPIC AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Cekić

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available –helper cells can be divided into two distinct subtypes of effector cells based on the profile of cytokines they produce. Th1 cells produce interferon– γ (IFN– γ and tumor necrosis factor β (TNF– β, and are associated with cell– mediated responses, particularly with resistance to intracellular pathogens (bacteria, parasites, yeasts and viruses. In contrast, Th2 . cells produce IL– 4, IL– 5, IL– 9 and IL– 13. Th2 cells are involved in antibody responses and IgE production, as well as tissue fibrosis, and eosinophilia. Th2 responses are important in the resistance to infection with helminth parasites. Although both Th responses are protective against certain infectious pathogens, they can themselves be pathogenic: Th1 cell responses can mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas dysregulation of Th2 responses is implicated inatopic diseases (allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic eczema, food allergy and anaphylaxis. The recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism of initiation and control of Th1 and Th2 cell responses will eventually lead to new therapeutic strategies.

  4. Breastfeeding and allergic disease: a multidisciplinary review of the literature (1966-2001) on the mode of early feeding in infancy and its impact on later atopic manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odijk, J.; Kull, I.; Borres, M.

    2003-01-01

    feeding mode in relation to allergy has not been published previously. Here, the objective is to review the scientific literature regarding the impact of early feeding (breast milk and/or cow's milk and/or formula) on development of atopic disease. The work was performed by a multidisciplinary group...... concluded that breastfeeding seems to protect from the development of atopic disease. The effect appears even stronger in children with atopic heredity. If breast milk is unavailable or insufficient, extensively hydrolysed formulas are preferable to unhydrolysed or partially hydrolysed formulas in terms...

  5. [Association of xenobiotic-metabolizing gene polymorphisms with childhood atopic diseases in Russian patients from the Republic of Bashkortostan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Iu Iu; Gra, O A; Karunas, A S; Khuzina, A Kh; Ramazanova, N N; Iuldasheva, A A; Biktasheva, A R; Etkina, E I; Nasedkina, T V; Goldenkova-Pavlova, I V; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes of biotransformation system involved in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds are effective mechanism of protection from negative environmental factors. Decreasing activity or insufficient synthesis of biotransformation system enzymes caused by genetic polymorphism form the risk of various complex diseases, including atopic. Using allele-specific hybridization on the biochip the frequencies of xenobiotic-metabolizing gene polymorphisms in Russian children with bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitisand healthy donors from the Republic of Bashkortostan have been determined. The analysis of polymorphisms in CYP1A1, GSTT1, GSTM1, NAT2, MTHFR, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes didn't reveal any association with atopic diseases. The frequencies of CYP2D6*1934G/G genotype and CYP2D6*1934G allele were significantly higher among boys with rhinitis symptoms than in control group.

  6. Retrospective Study: Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Sihaloho, Kristina; Indramaya, Diah Mira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronically and relapsing inflammatory skin disease affecting individuals with atopic history or their families. Atopic dermatitis affects all ageswith percentage 15-30% in children and 1-2% in adults. Chronic pruritus, skin infection, sleep disorder, and growth disorder are signs and symptomps commonly found in childhood atopic dermatitis. Evaluation of the profile and management of DA were needed to improve the management of atopic dermatitis. Purpose:To e...

  7. Prenatal maternal stress and atopic diseases in the child: a systematic review of observational human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, N W; Hansen, M V; Larsen, A D; Hougaard, K S; Kolstad, H A; Schlünssen, V

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that maternal stress during pregnancy promotes atopic disorders in the offspring. This is the first systematic review to address prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) and the subsequent risk of atopy-related outcomes in the child. The review was performed in accordance to the PRISMA criteria. We searched and selected studies in PubMed, Scopus, Embase and PsychINFO until November 2014. Sixteen (with 25 analyses) of 426 identified articles met the review criteria. Five main PNMS exposures (negative life events, anxiety/depression, bereavement, distress and job strain) and five main atopic outcomes (asthma, wheeze, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and IgE) were assessed across the studies. Overall, 21 of the 25 analyses suggested a positive association between PNMS and atopic outcomes. Of the 11 exposure-response analyses reported, six found statistically significant trends. This systematic review suggests a relationship between maternal stress during pregnancy and atopic disorders in the child. However, the existing studies are of diverse quality. The wide definitions of often self-reported stress exposures imply a substantial risk for information bias and false-positive results. Research comparing objective and subjective measures of PNMS exposure as well as objective measures for atopic outcome is needed. © 2015 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Discordance Between Physician- and Patient-Reported Disease Severity in Adults with Atopic Dermatitis: A US Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenhui; Anderson, Peter; Gadkari, Abhijit; Blackburn, Stuart; Moon, Rachel; Piercy, James; Shinde, Shashank; Gomez, Jorge; Ghorayeb, Eric

    2017-12-01

    There is limited understanding of severity rating of atopic dermatitis in clinical practice. To evaluate the agreement between physician- and patient-rated severity of atopic dermatitis. Data were collected from the 2014 Adelphi US Atopic Dermatitis Disease Specific Programme, a cross-sectional survey of physicians and their patients with a history of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis; patients voluntarily completed a questionnaire. Current disease severity (mild/moderate/severe), based on personal judgment, was rated independently by patients and their physicians. The weighted kappa statistic identified level of agreement between physicians and patients. Bivariate analyses characterized agreement; multi-nomial logistic regression identified factors associated with discordance. Overall, 678 patients were included (369 [54.4%] were women, 525 [77.4%] were White, mean age was 39.3 years). Agreement was moderate (weighted kappa = 0.52): compared with physician ratings, patient-rated severity was higher in 76 patients (11.2%), lower in 137 patients (20.2%), and matched in 465 patients (68.6%). There were no differences in the rates of agreement between physician and patient ratings based on physician specialty (p = 0.6781), objective severity measures [Eczema Area and Severity Index score (p = 0.5308), percent body surface area affected (p = 0.9872), and current systemic immunosuppressant use (p = 0.9197)]. Multivariate analysis showed patients with a worse quality of life (Dermatology Life Quality Index) were more likely to rate a higher severity (relative risk ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.08; p = 0.0460). Physicians were more likely to rate a higher severity with a greater physician-reported sleep disturbance (relative risk ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.89; p = 0.0440). Almost one-third of patients rated atopic dermatitis severity differently from their physicians, supporting the importance of the patient perspective in

  9. Topical application of an ethanol extract prepared from Illicium verum suppresses atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yang, Won-Kyung; Lee, A Yeong; Kim, Dong-Seon; Nho, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Young Sang; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2012-10-31

    Illicium verum is a traditional herbal medicine with anti-inflammatory properties used in Asia. However, its usefulness in the treatment of allergic diseases remains unclear. This study evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antiallergic effects of I. verum extract (IVE) in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. We investigated the effects of IVE on compound 48/80-induced histamine release, and phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated cytokines secretion in MC/9 mast cells. Atopic dermatitis was induced in NC/Nga mice by exposure to extract of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae). After a topical application of IVE on ear and skin lesions, we evaluated the severity of skin symptoms, ear thickness, inflammatory cell infiltration, and serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), histamine, interleukin (IL)-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. In addition, we determined the expression of IL-4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in ear tissues. IVE inhibited secretion of histamine, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-α from mast cells in a dose-dependent manner. Topical application of IVE significantly reduced dermatitis scores, ear thickness, and serum levels of IgE, histamine, IL-6, and ICAM-1. Histopathological analysis demonstrated decreased epidermal thickening and dermal infiltration by inflammatory cells. In the ear lesions, IVE treatment reduced expression of IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α, TARC, RANTES, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1, but not IFN-γ. These results indicate that IVE inhibits atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions by suppressing the expression of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. These results suggest that IVE may be a potential therapeutic candidate for atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Central serous chorioretinopathy secondary to corticosteroids in patients with atopic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketti, Peter A; Unkle, David W; Cleri, Dennis J; Prenner, Jonathan L; Coluccielo, Michael; Ricketti, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is of unknown etiology and is the most common cause of retinopathy after age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal vein occlusion. Vision loss results from fluid leakage and serous detachment in the macula. Five percent of patients develop chronic CSCR. It is predominantly found in middle-aged men (age-adjusted rates per 100,000: 9.9 for men and 1.7 for women) and is usually unilateral and reversible. Three-quarters of CSCR patients resolve within 3 months but 45% have recurrences, usually with only minor visual acuity changes. Risk factors include type A personality, emotional stress, elevated catecholamines, hypertension, pregnancy, organ transplantation, increased levels of endogenous cortisol, psychopharmacologic medication, use of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, obstructive sleep apnea, Helicobacter pylori infection, or treatment with corticosteroids. Five percent of patients develop chronic disease as a result of subretinal fibrin formation within the blister. CSCR is often bilateral, multifocal, and recurrent, and may be associated with subretinal fibrin formation within the blister. Permanent loss of vision may result from subretinal fibrin-fibrosis with scarring of the macula. Corticosteroid-associated CSCR occurs bilaterally in 20% of patients. Steroid-associated therapy may begin days to years after therapy with any form of drug delivery. We present three atopic patients who presented at various times after oral, inhaled, intranasal, and topical corticosteroid therapy. One patient developed CSCR after three separate types of administration of corticosteroids, which, to our knowledge, has not been observed in the literature.

  11. Mathematical modeling of atopic dermatitis reveals "double-switch" mechanisms underlying 4 common disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Christodoulides, Panayiotis; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Irvine, Alan D; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kubo, Masato; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2017-06-01

    The skin barrier acts as the first line of defense against constant exposure to biological, microbial, physical, and chemical environmental stressors. Dynamic interplay between defects in the skin barrier, dysfunctional immune responses, and environmental stressors are major factors in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). A systems biology modeling approach can yield significant insights into these complex and dynamic processes through integration of prior biological data. We sought to develop a multiscale mathematical model of AD pathogenesis that describes the dynamic interplay between the skin barrier, environmental stress, and immune dysregulation and use it to achieve a coherent mechanistic understanding of the onset, progression, and prevention of AD. We mathematically investigated synergistic effects of known genetic and environmental risk factors on the dynamic onset and progression of the AD phenotype, from a mostly asymptomatic mild phenotype to a severe treatment-resistant form. Our model analysis identified a "double switch," with 2 concatenated bistable switches, as a key network motif that dictates AD pathogenesis: the first switch is responsible for the reversible onset of inflammation, and the second switch is triggered by long-lasting or frequent activation of the first switch, causing irreversible onset of systemic T H 2 sensitization and worsening of AD symptoms. Our mathematical analysis of the bistable switch predicts that genetic risk factors decrease the threshold of environmental stressors to trigger systemic T H 2 sensitization. This analysis predicts and explains 4 common clinical AD phenotypes from a mild and reversible phenotype through to severe and recalcitrant disease and provides a mechanistic explanation for clinically demonstrated preventive effects of emollient treatments against development of AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of oral administration of di-(2-ethylhexyl) and diisononyl phthalates on atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakane, Kaori; Ichinose, Takamichi; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko

    2014-02-01

    Subcutaneous injection of low dose of phthalates causes adjuvant effects on immunoglobulin production. Moreover, intraperitoneal injection of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and diisononyl phthalate (DINP) at doses lower than the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) causes aggravation of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions (ADSLs) in mouse models. However, the effects of oral exposure to these phthalates, including their effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) symptoms, remain unclear. To investigate the effects of oral administration of DEHP and DINP at doses lower than the NOAEL on AD in an NC/Nga mouse model. NC/Nga mice were subcutaneously injected with mite-allergen (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) to induce ADSLs and orally administered varying doses of DEHP (0, 8.3, 166.3 or 3325 µg/animal) or DINP (0, 6.6, 131.3 or 2625 µg/animal) once a week for four weeks. Skin disease symptomatology was subsequently evaluated and immunoglobulin production levels in serum and inflammatory cytokine levels in lesion sites were measured. Oral administration of low doses of both DEHP and DINP tended to increase infiltration of eosinophils; degranulation of mast cells and local expression of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-13 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha in subcutaneous tissue, whereas DINP administration tended to aggravate allergen-induced ADSL production. Oral administration of both DEHP and DINP at doses lower than the NOAEL tends to increase the allergic response in animal AD models, but only DINP administration slightly aggravates allergen-induced ADSL production.

  13. Serum OX40 ligand: a potential marker of atopic dermatitis disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: OX40 ligand (OX40L) and OX40 are members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor (TNFR) super families respectively. Recent studies have indicated the critical involvement of OX40/OX40L interaction in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. To our knowledge, no data could be cited in literature ...

  14. Childhood atopic dermatitis: a cross-sectional study of relationships between child and parent factors, atopic dermatitis management, and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amy E; Fraser, Jennifer A; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Morawska, Alina; Yates, Patsy

    2015-01-01

    Successful management of atopic dermatitis poses a significant and ongoing challenge to parents of affected children. Despite frequent reports of child behaviour problems and parenting difficulties, there is a paucity of literature examining relationships between child behaviour and parents' confidence and competence with treatment. To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parents' self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, self-reported performance of management tasks, observed competence with providing treatment, and atopic dermatitis severity. Cross-sectional study design. Participants A sample of 64 parent-child dyads was recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Parents completed self-report questionnaires examining child behaviour, parents' adjustment, parenting conflict, parents' relationship satisfaction, and parents' self-efficacy and self-reported performance of key management tasks. Severity of atopic dermatitis was assessed using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index. A routine home treatment session was observed, and parents' competence in carrying out the child's treatment assessed. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified significant relationships (prelationship satisfaction. There were also significant relationships between each of these variables and parents' self-reported performance of management tasks. More profound child behaviour difficulties were associated with more severe atopic dermatitis and greater parent stress. Using multiple linear regressions, significant proportions of variation in parents' self-efficacy and self-reported task performance were explained by child behaviour difficulties and parents' formal education. Self-efficacy emerged as a likely mediator for relationships between both child behaviour and parents' education, and self-reported task performance. Direct observation of treatment sessions revealed strong relationships

  15. Microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Claire E; McShane, Diana B; Gilligan, Peter H; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with drastic impacts on pediatric health. The pathogenesis of this common disease is not well understood, and the complex role of the skin microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of atopic dermatitis is being elucidated. Skin commensal organisms promote normal immune system functions and prevent the colonization of pathogens. Alterations in the skin microbiome may lead to increased Staphylococcus aureus colonization and atopic dermatitis progression. Despite the evidence for their important role, probiotics have not been deemed efficacious for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, although studies suggest that probiotics may be effective at preventing the development of atopic dermatitis when given to young infants. This review will cover the most recent published work on the microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. The mediating effect of sleep satisfaction on the relationship between stress and perceived health of adolescents suffering atopic disease: Secondary analysis of data from the 2013 9th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won Oak; Im, YeoJin; Suk, Min Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Difficulty in sleep is one disturbing symptom in adolescents with atopic diseases including asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. Assuming psychological stress can affect adolescents' health status, impaired sleep quality can be one mediator that negatively impacts the health status of adolescents with atopic disease. This study aimed to identify the mediating effect of sleep satisfaction on the relationship between stress and perceived health status in Korean adolescents with atopic disease and to examine the differences among three types of atopic disease. A cross-sectional descriptive study was completed based on secondary analysis of raw data from the 2013 9th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The 21,154 adolescents (29.2%) ever diagnosed and treated for at least one atopic disease regardless of the symptom presence in a recent year were extracted out of 72,435 survey participants. Then, the 13,216 individuals with exclusively single atopic diseases were included in analyzing the mediation model. Variables including demographics, stress, perceived health status, and sleep satisfaction were included. Pearson correlation, one-way ANOVA, path analysis to define direct/indirect effects with bootstrapping analysis, and multi-group variance analysis were conducted. High levels of stress in adolescents with atopic diseases had a significant and direct effect on their negative health status perception for all atopic disease groups. A significant negative mediating effect of sleep satisfaction was identified on the relationship between stress and perceived health status, irrespective of the type of atopic disease. Total effect and remaining direct effect on the path from stress and perceived health status via sleep satisfaction was high in adolescents with atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis compared to those with asthma. To improve sleep satisfaction for adolescents with atopic diseases, interventions are needed to enhance the adolescents

  18. A prospective birth cohort study of different risk factors for development of allergic diseases in offspring of non-atopic parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Wu, Chih-Chiang; Ou, Chia-Yu; Chang, Jen-Chieh; Liu, Chieh-An; Wang, Chih-Lu; Chuang, Hau; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsu, Te-Yao; Chen, Chie-Pein; Yang, Kuender D

    2017-02-14

    Allergic diseases are thought to be inherited. Prevalence of allergic diseases has, however, increased dramatically in last decades, suggesting environmental causes for the development of allergic diseases. We studied risk factors associated with the development of atopic dermatitis (AD), allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma (AS) in children of non-atopic parents in a subtropical country. In a birth cohort of 1,497 newborns, parents were prenatally enrolled and validated for allergic diseases by questionnaire, physician-verified and total or specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels; 1,236 and 756 children, respectively, completed their 3-year and 6-year follow-up. Clinical examination, questionnaire, and blood samples for total and specific IgE of the children were collected at each follow-up visit. Prevalence of AD, AR and AS was, respectively, 8.2%, 30.8% and 12.4% in children of non-atopic parents. Prevalence of AR (prisk for AD (OR=3.111, p=.006). Infants living in homes with curtains and no air filters had the highest risk for AR (OR=2.647, prisk for AS (OR=1.930, p=.039). Breastfeeding and C/S affect development of AD. Gender, use of curtains and/or air filters affect AR and AS, suggesting that control of the perinatal environment is necessary for the prevention of atopic diseases in children of non-atopic parents.

  19. Validity of information on atopic disease and other illness in young children reported by parents in a prospective birth cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vissing Nadja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The longitudinal birth cohort study is the preferred design for studies of childhood health, particularly atopic disease. Still, prospective data collection depends on recollection of the medical history since the previous visit representing a potential recall-bias. We aimed to ascertain the quality of information on atopic disease and other health symptoms reported by parental interview in a closely monitored birth cohort study. Possible bias from symptom severity and socioeconomics were sought. Methods Copenhagen study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC is a clinical birth cohort study of 411 children born of asthmatic mothers from 1999 to 2001. Child health is monitored at six-monthly visits with particular emphasis on atopic symptoms and infections. Data from the first three study years on 260 children was compared with records from their family practitioner as an external reference. Results A total of 6134 medical events were reported at the COPSAC interviews. Additional 586 medical events were recorded by family practitioners but not reported at the interview. There were no missed events related to asthma, eczema or allergy. Respiratory, infectious and skin related symptoms showed completeness above 90%, other diseases showed lower completeness around 77%. There was no meaningful influence from concurrent asthma or socioeconomics. Conclusions The COPSAC study exhibited full sensitivity to the main study objectives, atopic disease, and high sensitivity to respiratory, infectious and skin related illness. Our findings support the validity of parental interviews in longitudinal cohort studies investigating atopic disease and illness in childhood.

  20. Prevalence and sensitization of atopic allergy and coeliac disease in the Northern Sweden Population Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Enroth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atopic allergy is effected by a number of environmental exposures, such as dry air and time spent outdoors, but there are few estimates of the prevalence in populations from sub-arctic areas. Objective. To determine the prevalence and severity of symptoms of food, inhalation and skin-related allergens and coeliac disease (CD in the sub-arctic region of Sweden. To study the correlation between self-reported allergy and allergy test results. To estimate the heritability of these estimates. Study design. The study was conducted in Karesuando and Soppero in Northern Sweden as part of the Northern Sweden Population Health Study (n=1,068. We used a questionnaire for self-reported allergy and CD status and measured inhalation-related allergens using Phadiatop, food-related allergens using the F×5 assay and IgA and IgG antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG to indicate prevalence of CD. Results. The prevalence of self-reported allergy was very high, with 42.3% reporting mild to severe allergy. Inhalation-related allergy was reported in 26.7%, food-related allergy in 24.9% and skin-related allergy in 2.4% of the participants. Of inhalation-related allergy, 11.0% reported reactions against fur and 14.6% against pollen/grass. Among food-related reactions, 14.9% reported milk (protein and lactose as the cause. The IgE measurements showed that 18.4% had elevated values for inhalation allergens and 11.7% for food allergens. Self-reported allergies and symptoms were positively correlated (p<0.01 with age- and sex-corrected inhalation allergens. Allergy prevalence was inversely correlated with age and number of hours spent outdoors. High levels of IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies, CD-related allergens, were found in 1.4 and 0.6% of participants, respectively. All allergens were found to be significantly (p<3e–10 heritable, with estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.34 (F×5 to 0.65 (IgA. Conclusions. Self-reported allergy

  1. [Prevalence of house dust mite allergy in cases with atopic disease symptoms in Kocaeli province, Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez Tamer, Gülden; Calişkan, Seyda

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house dust mite sensitization and to detect the IgE and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) levels in the positive cases living in Kocaeli province (located in Northwest region of Turkey). The results of mixed house dust mite skin tests of 1279 patients (620 male, 659 female) of which 670 were children (3-14 years), 68 were adolescents (15-19 years) and 541 were adults (20-86 years) who were admitted to Kocaeli University Medical Faculty Hospital during the period of January 2003-January 2005, with symptoms of atopic disease such as upper/lower respiratory tract symptoms, asthma and/or rhinitis and/or eczema were evaluated retrospectively. Serum IgE and ECP levels of all cases were determined by enzyme immunoassay method (UniCAP 100 System, Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden). The allergy test performed by using mixed house dust mite panel (Dermatophogoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae) was found positive in 328 (25%) cases. Among those 154 (46.9%) were sensitive to D. pteronyssinus, 151 (46%) were sensitive to D. farinae, and 23 (7%) were sensitized to both mites. The mean IgE (259 +/- 25.5 kU/ml) and ECP levels (35.7 +/- 17.9 kU/ml) of house dust mite sensitized cases were found significantly higher than the non-sensitized subjects (IgE; 144 +/- 18.9 kU/ml, ECP; 33.1 +/- 18.3 kU/ml) (p dust mite allergy in our region were determined as 17% (114/670), 19.1% (13/68), and 37.1% (201/541) in pediatric, adolescent and adult populations, respectively. There was no predilection for allergy prevalence in terms of sex (p = 0.7). However, the prevalence increases during autumn-winter seasons (p = 0.01 and p = 0.007, respectively). In conclusion, it was determined that the rate of the sensitization against house dust mite was high in Kocaeli, Turkey and it exhibited an increasing tendency with age.

  2. Atopic dermatitis - children - homecare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantile eczema; Dermatitis - atopic children; Eczema - atopic - children ... child's provider what kind is right for your child. Atopic dermatitis is usually treated with medicines placed directly on ...

  3. STAT6 polymorphisms are associated with neonatal regulatory T cells and cytokines and atopic diseases at 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaca, V I; Illi, S; Klucker, E; Ballenberger, N; Schedel, M; von Mutius, E; Kabesch, M; Schaub, B

    2013-10-01

    The transcription factor STAT6 is crucial for activation of the interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13 pathway and has been linked to regulatory T cells (Tregs). Associations of STAT6 polymorphisms with IgE levels were described; however, their impact on neonatal immune responses and early disease development is unknown. STAT6 polymorphisms were genotyped in cord blood mononuclear cells by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Gene expression was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cytokines by Multiplex. At age 3 years, atopic diseases were assessed by questionnaires. STAT6 rs324011 but not rs1059513 polymorphism was associated with significant or borderline significant decreased mRNA expression of Treg-associated genes (FOXP3, GITR, LAG3). Heterozygotes and minor allele homozygotes of rs324011 had low levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and increased interferon gamma (IFN-γ) (P ≤ 0.04), while heterozygotes and minor allele homozygotes of rs1059513 had increased TNF-α and Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (P ≤ 0.05). In minor allele homozygotes of rs324011, expression of Treg-associated genes was strongly inverse correlated with IFN-γ (unstimulated, r = -0.7, P = 0.111; LpA stimulation, r = -0.8, P = 0.011), but not in heterozygotes or major allele homozygotes. Heterozygotes and minor allele homozygotes of rs324011 presented a lower risk of atopic dermatitis and obstructive bronchitis until age 3 years. Two STAT6 polymorphisms were associated with altered immune responses already at birth. STAT6 rs324011 was associated with lower neonatal Treg and increased Th1 response. Those neonates had a lower risk of atopic dermatitis and obstructive bronchitis until 3 years. Our data suggest a role for STAT6 polymorphisms in early immune regulation and implications on early atopic disease development. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  4. Skin prick test results of atopic asthmatic subjects in a chest disease clinic in Sanliurfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Koç

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Skin prick test (SPT is used widely to determine the allergens in atopic patients. In this study, we aimed to determine the spectrum of aeroallergen sensitivity of atopic asthmatic subjects in Şanlıurfa district. Methods: We evaluated clinical, demographic findings and SPT results of 95 male and 162 female in a total 257 patients who had asthma and allergic symptoms. Results: Most common allergens causing a sensitivity reaction detected in our clinic were as follows; cockroach (56.8%, wheat pollen (53.3%, corn pollen (47.4%, grass pollen (36.5%, poplar tree pollen (26%, house dust mite (19.4%, pepper (16.7% and cat dander (15.1%. Conclusion: High levels of sensitivity to wheat and corn pollens and relatively low sensitivity levels of cat dander results meet our expectations in the area of agricultural land and where pet ownership is not common.

  5. [Atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    1994-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial skin disease with a chronic or a chronic-relapsing course which often starts during infancy. The persistence rate of AD after the puberty is certainly higher than mostly assumed. 60% of the patients also develop respiratory atopies as hay fever or bronchial asthma. The etiology of this distressing skin condition is still obscure, but an immunological disturbance of the T-cell immune response is most probably implicated in its pathogenesis. The demonstration of IgE-bearing epidermal Langerhans cells with high-affinity receptors for IgE opens up new perspectives in its pathophysiology. As no efficient treatment of AD is known and a symptomatic treatment, local with emolients, corticosteroids and/or disinfectants as well as internal with antihistamines, is often difficult and unsatisfactory, prevention is of particular importance. The efficacy of prolonged breast-feeding, a strict prohibition of cow milk, egg, fish--during the first six months of life--and of keeping pets as well as a consequent treatment against house-dust mites can reduce the incidence of AD in 'at risk' children with a family history of atopy. Besides symptomatic treatment a substitution of essential fatty acids, a UV therapy and a climate therapy are other possible approaches in the management of such patients.

  6. Therapy of atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-10-01

    anti-septic treatment of the skin. Due to the lack of randomized controlled studies there is still not certain proof that antimicrobial or anti-septic treatment of non-infected eczematous skin is efficient for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. A reduction of Staphylococcus aureus is observable during an anti-inflammatory treatment of the skin with topical corticosteroids and/or the topical calcineurin-inhibitor tacrolimus. Antihistaminic drugs which are orally applied in atopic dermatitis may support the therapy of the itching skin disease. One controlled study showed a rapid reduction of itch during the use of a non-sedating antihistaminic drug. There are, however, no controlled studies which show the efficacy of antihistaminic drugs on the skin condition in atopic dermatitis. Dietetic restrictions should be applied only after a specific allergological diagnostic clarification. The “gold standard” is still a (blinded oral provocation test which has to show an influence of a given food on the skin condition. There is sufficient evidence that there is no general dietetic approach which shows efficacy in atopic dermatitis. The treatment of patients with lactobacillae is still controversially discussed. Available studies which showed an efficacy show methodological weaknesses so that this approach can not be generally recommended for clinical practice at the time now. Approaches reducing house dust mite in the surroundings of patients with atopic dermatitis can have an effect on the skin condition so that at least in mite sensitized patients this approach appears to be reasonable. The specific immunotherapy with house dust mite showed clinical efficacy in a controlled study and in some open studies. The education of patients with atopic dermatitis or their parents is a further efficient approach in the management of this chronic skin disease. Interdisciplinary approaches in patients’ education containing also psychological elements appear to be an attractive new

  7. Validity of information on atopic disease and other illness in young children reported by parents in a prospective birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Jensen, Signe Marie; Bisgaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    to ascertain the quality of information on atopic disease and other health symptoms reported by parental interview in a closely monitored birth cohort study. Possible bias from symptom severity and socioeconomics were sought. METHODS: Copenhagen study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) is a clinical birth cohort...... study of 411 children born of asthmatic mothers from 1999 to 2001. Child health is monitored at six-monthly visits with particular emphasis on atopic symptoms and infections. Data from the first three study years on 260 children was compared with records from their family practitioner as an external...... symptoms showed completeness above 90%, other diseases showed lower completeness around 77%. There was no meaningful influence from concurrent asthma or socioeconomics. CONCLUSIONS: The COPSAC study exhibited full sensitivity to the main study objectives, atopic disease, and high sensitivity to respiratory...

  8. Pruni cortex ameliorates skin inflammation possibly through HMGB1-NF?B pathway in house dust mite induced atopic dermatitis NC/Nga transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Takashi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Fukumoto, Kyoko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Pruni cortex, the bark of Prunus jamasakura Siebold ex Koidzumi, has been used in the Japanese systems of medicine for many years for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitussive properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of pruni cortex on atopic dermatitis NC/Nga mouse model. Atopic dermatitis-like lesion was induced by the application of house dust mite extract to the dorsal skin. After induction of atopic dermatitis, pruni cortex aqueous extract (1?g/kg, p.o.) was adminis...

  9. Peculiar Distribution of Tumorous Xanthomas in an Adult Case of Erdheim-Chester Disease Complicated by Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Murakami

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Erdheim-Chester disease is a rare non-Langerhans form of histiocytosis with multiple organ involvement. Approximately 20% of patients have xanthoma-like lesions, usually on the eyelids. We report a case of Erdheim-Chester disease in a 32-year-old male who showed peculiar xanthomatous skin lesions and also had atopic dermatitis. His skin manifestations included ring-like yellowish tumors on his periorbital regions, rope necklace-like tumors on his neck, and spindle-shaped tumors on his right preauricular region and cubital fossas. He also had exophthalmos and diabetes insipidus. Chronic eczematous lesions were present on the flexor aspect of his extremities, and his serum eosinophil numbers and immunoglobulin E levels were elevated. A histological examination of his right neck tumor showed foamy macrophages and touton-type giant cells, which were positive for CD68 and CD163 and negative for S-100 and CD1a. We suggest that the complication of atopic dermatitis may have contributed to the uncommon clinical features in this case.

  10. Parenting and childhood atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study of relationships between parenting behaviour, skin care management, and disease severity in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amy E; Fraser, Jennifer A; Morawska, Alina; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Yates, Patsy

    2016-12-01

    The development of child behaviour and parenting difficulties is understood to undermine treatment outcomes for children with atopic dermatitis. Past research has reported on correlates of child behaviour difficulties. However, few research studies have sought to examine parenting confidence and practices in this clinical group. To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parent-reported and directly-observed child and parent behaviour, parents' self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour, self-reported parenting strategies, and disease severity. Cross-sectional study design. Parent-child dyads (N=64) were recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Children had a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis of ≥3months and no other chronic health conditions except asthma, allergic rhinitis, or allergy. Parents completed self-report measures assessing child behaviour; parent depression, anxiety, and stress; parenting conflict and relationship satisfaction; self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour, and use of ineffective parenting strategies; and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, and performance of atopic dermatitis management tasks. The Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index was used to assess disease severity. Routine at-home treatment sessions were coded for parent and child behaviour. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified relationships (pparent depression and stress, parenting conflict and relationship satisfaction, and household income. There were also relationships between each of these variables and use of ineffective parenting strategies. Greater use of ineffective parenting strategies was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis. Using multiple linear regressions, child behaviour and household income explained unique variance in self-efficacy for managing difficult child behaviour; household income alone explained unique variance in use of

  11. Patient perspectives on triggers, adherence to medical recommendations, and disease control in atopic dermatitis: the DATOP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Frutos, F J; Torrelo, A; de Lucas, R; González, M A; Alomar, A; Vera, Á; Ros, S; Mora, A M; Cuervo, J

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the triggers of atopic dermatitis (AD), adherence to medical recommendations, disease control, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) from the patient's perspective. This was a multicenter, cross-sectional, epidemiological study with the participation of adults (age >16 years; n=125) and children (age, 2-15 years, n=116). Patients had a history of at least 12 months of moderate to severe AD with a moderate to severe flare (Investigator Global Assessment score>2) at the time of recruitment. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate relationships between disease severity, determined according to the Scoring in Atopic Dermatitis index, and triggers reported by patients, adherence to recommendations and pharmacological therapy, HRQOL, and patient-perceived control. The most common triggers were cosmetic products, clothing, mites, detergents/soaps, and changes in temperature. In 47.2% of adults and 39.7% of children, pharmacological therapy was not initiated at flare onset. Adherence was highest to pharmacological therapy, skin moisturizing, and medical care recommendations. Disease control was considered insufficient by 41.6% of adults and 27. 6% of pediatric patients and, in adults, this was associated with the severity of AD (P=.014). The therapeutic control of AD is susceptible to improvement, especially in adults. Although patients state that they follow medical recommendations, a significant percentage of patients do not apply recommended treatments correctly. Better education about the disease and its management would appear to be necessary to improve disease control and HRQOL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of electroacupuncture on capsaicin-induced model of atopic dermatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dal-Lim; Lee, Seung-Deok; Choi, In-Hwa; Na, Heung-Sik; Hong, Seung-Ug

    2014-04-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is used as a prescription to treat pruritus and atopic dermatitis. Whether EA affects experimental itch in rat models of immunologic or neuronal damages, however, is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the therapeutic effects of high-frequency EA on atopic dermatitis-like lesions in rats. Capsaicin (50mg/kg) was subcutaneously administered rat pups within 48h after birth. Rats then underwent 30min of EA at six acupoints (bilateral BL13, and unilateral LI11, ST36, SP10, SP6) every other day (EA group) for 3 weeks. Measurements of IgE, mast cells, scratching behavior, dynorphin release, skin thickness and dermatitis score were obtained. Only the dermatitis score and dynorphin expression were decreased in the EA group compared with the control non-EA group. We suggest that high-frequency EA alleviates pruritus of atopic dermatitis-like lesions in rats induced by capsaicin injection, via the release of dynorphin. These findings indicate a new potential therapeutic approach for the amelioration of symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Annette; Bjerke, Torbjørn; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2004-01-01

    to focus on this phenotype, and specific susceptibility genes remain to be found. To identify candidate regions holding genes for atopic dermatitis we performed a genome-scan in Danish affected sib-pair families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype definition of both clinical atopic dermatitis...... and confirmed specific allergy. The scan was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers and non-parametric linkage results were obtained from the MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. We found evidence of linkage to three candidate regions in chromosomes 3p (MLS=2.14), 4p (MLS=2.00) and 18q (MLS=2.25), one of which...

  14. Autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa are more frequent in adolescents and young adults suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Francesca; Marzatico, Alice; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2017-09-19

    Evidence has emerged about the relationship between atopic dermatitis (AD) and autoimmune diseases, but the underlying mechanism of this association is complex and still unclear. Recent epidemiological data from the published work suggest a positive correlation. The aim of this review is to analyze the frequency of co-occurrence of AD and autoimmune diseases. Our systematic review included 22 articles from PubMed describing the reciprocal association between AD and autoimmune diseases. Although not all the studies achieved statistically significant results, patients suffering from autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, such as vitiligo, alopecia areata, celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases, showed a higher risk to have AD as comorbidity. In contrast, patients with rheumatological autoimmune disorders did not show a significant correlation with AD. By analyzing the occurrence of autoimmune disorders in patients with AD, we confirmed a positive correlation between AD and autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, but also with systemic lupus erythematosus, while the association between AD and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis and rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. Further investigations are need to explain the mechanism underlying the observed comorbidity between AD and autoimmune diseases and to develop targeted prevention strategies and treatment. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Atopic asthmatic subjects but not atopic subjects without ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a known risk factor for acute ozone-associated respiratory disease. Ozone causes an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. The role of atopy and asthma in modulation of ozone-induced inflammation has not been determined. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether atopic status modulates ozone response phenotypes in human subjects. METHODS: Fifty volunteers (25 healthy volunteers, 14 atopic nonasthmatic subjects, and 11 atopic asthmatic subjects not requiring maintenance therapy) underwent a 0.4-ppm ozone exposure protocol. Ozone response was determined based on changes in lung function and induced sputum composition, including airway inflammatory cell concentration, cell-surface markers, and cytokine and hyaluronic acid concentrations. RESULTS: All cohorts experienced similar decreases in lung function after ozone. Atopic and atopic asthmatic subjects had increased sputum neutrophil numbers and IL-8 levels after ozone exposure; values did not significantly change in healthy volunteers. After ozone exposure, atopic asthmatic subjects had significantly increased sputum IL-6 and IL-1beta levels and airway macrophage Toll-like receptor 4, Fc(epsilon)RI, and CD23 expression; values in healthy volunteers and atopic nonasthmatic subjects showed no significant change. Atopic asthmatic subjects had significantly decreased IL-10 levels at baseline compared with healthy volunteers; IL-10 levels did not significa

  16. IL-31 significantly correlates with disease activity and Th2 cytokine levels in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Ulrike; Weißmantel, Sigo; Gehring, Manuela; Eisenberg, Anna M; Kapp, Alexander; Fölster-Holst, Regina

    2012-05-01

    Recently, we could show that IL-31 serum levels are significantly increased in adult patients with atopic dermatitis compared with skin healthy controls. However, the regulation of IL-31 in children with atopic dermatitis so far is not clear. Thus, we analyzed IL-31 serum levels together with IL-4, IL-13, ECP, and total IgE levels in 60 children with extrinsic, in five children with intrinsic atopic dermatitis, and 20 non-atopic healthy children. Further, we determined the SCORAD score, sleeplessness, and pruritus severity in all children with atopic dermatitis. IL-31 was significantly increased in children with the intrinsic and extrinsic type of atopic dermatitis compared with non-atopic healthy children (p children with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. There was no correlation of IL-31 with pruritus, total IgE Ab, and ECP levels, whereas ECP levels significantly correlated with the SCORAD score in children with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. Together, IL-31 represents an interesting cytokine especially with regard to the severity of the inflammatory process indicated by the correlation of IL-31 with SCORAD score and Th2 cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13 in children with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Infectious, atopic and inflammatory diseases, childhood adversities and familial aggregation are independently associated with the risk for mental disorders: Results from a large Swiss epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Rodgers, Stephanie; Mutsch, Margot; Tesic, Anja; Müller, Mario; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf; Seifritz, Erich; Castelao, Enrique; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Vandeleur, Caroline; von Känel, Roland; Paolicelli, Rosa; Landolt, Markus A; Witthauer, Cornelia; Lieb, Roselind; Preisig, Martin

    2016-12-22

    To examine the associations between mental disorders and infectious, atopic, inflammatory diseases while adjusting for other risk factors. We used data from PsyCoLaus, a large Swiss Population Cohort Study ( n = 3720; age range 35-66). Lifetime diagnoses of mental disorders were grouped into the following categories: Neurodevelopmental, anxiety (early and late onset), mood and substance disorders. They were regressed on infectious, atopic and other inflammatory diseases adjusting for sex, educational level, familial aggregation, childhood adversities and traumatic experiences in childhood. A multivariate logistic regression was applied to each group of disorders. In a complementary analysis interactions with sex were introduced via nested effects. Associations with infectious, atopic and other chronic inflammatory diseases were observable together with consistent effects of childhood adversities and familial aggregation, and less consistent effects of trauma in each group of mental disorders. Streptococcal infections were associated with neurodevelopmental disorders (men), and measles/mumps/rubella-infections with early and late anxiety disorders (women). Gastric inflammatory diseases took effect in mood disorders (both sexes) and in early disorders (men). Similarly, irritable bowel syndrome was prominent in a sex-specific way in mood disorders in women, and, moreover, was associated with early and late anxiety disorders. Atopic diseases were associated with late anxiety disorders. Acne (associations with mood disorders in men) and psoriasis (associations with early anxiety disorders in men and mood disorders in women) contributed sex-specific results. Urinary tract infections were associated with mood disorders and, in addition, in a sex-specific way with late anxiety disorders (men), and neurodevelopmental and early anxiety disorders (women). Infectious, atopic and inflammatory diseases are important risk factors for all groups of mental disorders. The sexual

  18. Filaggrin gene variants and atopic diseases in early childhood assessed longitudinally from birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Tavendale, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) was one of the discovery cohorts of the association between eczema and variants in the filaggrin coding gene (FLG). Here, we study the FLG-associated risk of asthma symptoms in early life and describe the temporal relationship...... in the development of the different FLG-associated atopic outcomes: asthma, sensitization and eczema, assessed longitudinally from birth. A high-risk cohort of 411 children was assessed in a prospective clinical study from birth to school-age. Asthma, acute severe asthma exacerbations, sensitization and eczema were....... Children with filaggrin variants had a marked and persistent increase in acute severe asthma exacerbations from 1 yr of age (incidence ratio 2.40 [1.19-4.81], p = 0.01) and increased risk of asthma by age 5 (odds ratio 2.62 [1.12-6.11], p = 0.03). FLG variants increased the risk of eczema, manifesting...

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-10 in breast milk and development of atopic diseases in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, E; Piacentini, G L; Ress, M; Pigozzi, R; Boner, A L; Peroni, D G

    2006-05-01

    Precise relationship between breastfeeding and infant allergy is poorly understood. Objective Aim was to quantify TGF-beta(1) and IL-10 in colostrum and mature milk from allergic and non-allergic mothers and to verify relationship with allergic disease development. Mothers (13 allergics, nine controls) of 22 newborns participated to prospective study on development of children atopy. Colostrum and mature milk were assayed for TGF-beta(1) and IL-10 by ELISA. Children underwent paediatrician evaluation at 6 months of life. Data are presented as median values and range. A significant difference in concentration of TGF-beta(1) between colostrum (330, range 0-3400 pg/mL) and mature milk (215, range 0-2400 pg/mL) was observed in samples from allergic mothers (P=0.015). In mature milk TGF-beta(1) was significantly lower in allergic (215, range 0-2400 pg/mL) than in non-allergic mothers (1059, range 0-6250 pg/mL) (P=0.015). IL-10 was weakly expressed without significant differences between allergic (4.8, range 0-42 and 9.5, range 0-42 pg/mL in colostrum and in mature milk) and non-allergic mothers (0, range 0-42 pg/mL in colostrum and 0, range 0-42 pg/mL in mature milk). After 6 months 46% infants from allergic mothers, but none from controls, presented atopic dermatitis. TGF-beta(1) was significantly less secreted in mature milk of allergic mothers, while no difference in IL-10 was found. Particular cytokine patterns in milk could influence development of atopic diseases. Further immunological studies in this field are necessary.

  20. Lesson from performing SCORADs in children with atopic dermatitis: subjective symptoms do not correlate well with disease extent or intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, K L E; Leung, T F; Wong, Y; Fok, T F

    2006-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a distressing disease associated with pruritus and sleep disturbance. It is not known how well these symptoms correlate with the extent and intensity of eczematous involvement. We evaluated whether: (i) the level of sleep loss correlates with pruritus and (ii) the level of pruritus correlates with the extent or severity of AD in children according to the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index. Patients with AD younger than 18 years old were recruited from the pediatric dermatology clinic of a university teaching hospital, and AD severity was evaluated by the SCORAD index. One hundred and eighty-two Chinese children with AD (107 boys and 75 girls) [mean (SD) age of 9.6 (4.2) years] were recruited. Their mean (SD) overall SCORAD was 30.1 (19.2). Sleep loss was strongly correlated with pruritus (r = 0.57, P < 0.001). However, the two subjective symptoms were only weakly correlated with the objective signs (extent and intensity) of AD. The correlations between pruritus and extent and intensity were 0.42 (P < 0.001) and 0.38 (P < 0.001), respectively, and the correlations between sleep loss and extent and intensity were 0.38 (P < 0.001) and 0.34 (P < 0.001), respectively. We speculate that the lack of a better correlation was either because pruritus and sleep loss as reported by parents were imprecise, or that mechanisms other than disease extent or severity are responsible for the pathogenesis of these subjective symptoms.

  1. Prevention of atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Hywel C.; Chalmers, Joanne R; Simpson, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis now affects one in five children, and may progress to asthma and hay fever. In the absence of effective treatments that influence disease progression, prevention is a highly desirable goal. The evidence for most existing disease prevention strategies, such as avoidance of allergens and dietary interventions, has been unconvincing and inconsistent. Fresh approaches to prevention include trying to induce tolerance to allergens in early life, and enhancing the defective skin ba...

  2. Maternal mental health and social support: effect on childhood atopic and non-atopic asthma symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Dos Santos, LM; Dos Santos, DN; Rodrigues,LC; Barreto,ML

    2011-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: Atopic and non-atopic asthma have distinct risk factors and immunological mechanisms, and few studies differentiate between the impacts of psychosocial factors on the prevalence of these disease phenotypes. The authors aimed to identify whether the effect of maternal mental health on prevalence of asthma symptoms differs between atopic and non-atopic children, taking into account family social support. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1013 children participating in th...

  3. Association of atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder : A systematic review and meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, Jurjen; Cicek, Rukiye; de Vries, Tjalling W.; Hak, Eelko; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    Over the last decades, the hypothesis has been raised that an atopic response could lead to the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study systematically reviews the observational cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that assessed the association between atopic

  4. Comparison of the Psychological Impacts of Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Cutaneous Diseases: Vitiligo and Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seongmin; Kim, Miri; Park, Chang Ook; Hann, Seung-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitiligo and atopic dermatitis (AD) are common dermatological disorders which may cause significant psychological and social distress leading to impaired quality of life (QoL) in patients. Objective We evaluated the degree of psychological stress and impairment of QoL in vitiligo patients as compared with AD patients and normal controls (NCs). Methods A total of 60 patients from each group and 60 NCs were enrolled. Five questionnaires on depression (Beck depression inventory, BDI), state anxiety (SA) and trait anxiety (TA), interaction anxiousness (IAS), private body consciousness (PBC) and dermatologic QoL were used. Results The vitiligo patients had a significantly higher level of TA (pvitiligo groups, all of the indexes except body consciousness were higher in AD patients than in vitiligo patients: BDI (pvitiligo lesions was not a significant variable in the analysis of the contribution of clinical variables of vitiligo on psychological stress and QoL. Conclusion Vitiligo, which is not accompanied by any symptoms, involves less psychological impact than AD, which is accompanied by itching. Compared to NCs, however, the elevated general anxiety and body consciousness in patients with vitiligo suggests that they may be more concerned with the aggravation of hypopigmented patches than difficulties in social interactions. PMID:24371393

  5. Management of Children with Atopic Dermatitis: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Golpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing skin disorder that affects all ages including infancy and childhood. There are many proved and unproved treatments for atopic dermatitis. Evidence Acquisition Data sources of this narrative review included studies about pediatric atopic dermatitis with the following keywords, pediatric, atopic dermatitis, immunity, acute, chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disorder, infancy, childhood, diagnosis, management and treatment. All of the articles were written in English language with full text on management or treatment. Results Innate and adaptive immune system involved atopic dermatitis. Major characteristics of atopic dermatitis include pruritus, chronic or relapsing lesions and personal or family history of atopic disease. There is no specific treatment for atopic dermatitis. The treatment included rehydration, emollients, topical steroid, calcineurin inhibitors and immunosuppressant. Crisaborole topical ointment, a PDE4 anti-inflammatory topical agent (phase three of the research could be effective in atopic dermatitis. Conclusions Avoidance from trigger factors and emollients are basic treatments of atopic dermatitis.

  6. Effects of early nutritional interventions on the development of atopic disease in infants and children: the role of maternal dietary restriction, breastfeeding, timing of introduction of complementary foods, and hydrolyzed formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Frank R; Sicherer, Scott H; Burks, A Wesley

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report reviews the nutritional options during pregnancy, lactation, and the first year of life that may affect the development of atopic disease (atopic dermatitis, asthma, food allergy) in early life. It replaces an earlier policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics that addressed the use of hypoallergenic infant formulas and included provisional recommendations for dietary management for the prevention of atopic disease. The documented benefits of nutritional intervention that may prevent or delay the onset of atopic disease are largely limited to infants at high risk of developing allergy (ie, infants with at least 1 first-degree relative [parent or sibling] with allergic disease). Current evidence does not support a major role for maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy or lactation. There is evidence that breastfeeding for at least 4 months, compared with feeding formula made with intact cow milk protein, prevents or delays the occurrence of atopic dermatitis, cow milk allergy, and wheezing in early childhood. In studies of infants at high risk of atopy and who are not exclusively breastfed for 4 to 6 months, there is modest evidence that the onset of atopic disease may be delayed or prevented by the use of hydrolyzed formulas compared with formula made with intact cow milk protein, particularly for atopic dermatitis. Comparative studies of the various hydrolyzed formulas also indicate that not all formulas have the same protective benefit. There is also little evidence that delaying the timing of the introduction of complementary foods beyond 4 to 6 months of age prevents the occurrence of atopic disease. At present, there are insufficient data to document a protective effect of any dietary intervention beyond 4 to 6 months of age for the development of atopic disease.

  7. Increased Risk of Atopic Dermatitis in Preschool Children with Kawasaki Disease: A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yeong Woon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and has been reported to be associated with allergic disease. The risk of atopic dermatitis (AD in preschool children with KD has not been investigated. The study was to determine the longitudinal risk of the development of AD in preschool children with KD. A nationwide 5-year population-based study was performed using data from the National Health Insurance Database in Taiwan between 1999 and 2003. The risk factors for AD were compared between the 2 study groups during the follow-up period using the Cox proportional hazards model. In addition, plasma interleukin (IL-5 levels were analyzed in normal subjects and KD patients. Among the 1440 subjects included, 21.6% developed AD during the 5-year follow-up period, of which 30.3% and 18.7% belonged to the study cohort and the comparison group, respectively. Children with KD were 1.25 times more likely to have AD than those in controls (P=0.04. Levels of IL-5 and IgE were significantly higher in KD patients. Children with KD had a higher risk of developing AD during the 5-year follow-up period than the control group. Increased IL-5 and IgE levels may be key factors contributing to the risk of AD.

  8. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2017-04-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the “Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016” together with those for other allergic diseases.

  9. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2014-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  10. Glycomacropeptide Attenuates Inflammation, Pruritus, and Th2 Response Associated with Atopic Dermatitis Induced by 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Fabiola Carolina; Cervantes-García, Daniel; Jiménez, Mariela; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common skin diseases, whose incidence is increasing in industrialized countries. The epicutaneous application of a hapten, such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), evokes an experimental murine AD-like reaction. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a dairy bioactive peptide derived from hydrolysis of κ-casein by chymosin action. It has anti-inflammatory, prebiotic, and immunomodulatory effects. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of GMP administration on DNCB-induced AD in rats. The severity of inflammatory process, pruritus, production of cytokines, and total immunoglobulin E (IgE) content were measured, and the histopathological features were analyzed. GMP reduced the intensity of inflammatory process and edema of DNCB-induced dermatitis, with a significant decrease in eosinophils recruitment and mast cells hyperplasia. In addition GMP suppressed the serum levels of total IgE and IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 expression in AD-lesions. Besides, the levels of IL-10 were significantly increased. Remarkably, GMP administration before AD-induction abolished pruritus in dermatitis-like reactions in the rats. Taken together, these results indicate that GMP has an inhibitory effect on AD by downregulating Th2 dominant immune response, suggesting GMP as a potential effective alternative therapy for the prevention and management of AD. PMID:28265582

  11. Childbirth and consequent atopic disease: emerging evidence on epigenetic effects based on the hygiene and EPIIC hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, H G; Downe, S; Wright, M L; Kennedy, H P; Taylor, J Y

    2016-01-13

    In most high and middle income countries across the world, at least 1:4 women give birth by cesarean section. Rates of labour induction and augmentation are rising steeply; and in some countries up to 50% of laboring women and newborns are given antibiotics. Governments and international agencies are increasingly concerned about the clinical, economic and psychosocial effects of these interventions. There is emerging evidence that certain intrapartum and early neonatal interventions might affect the neonatal immune response in the longer term, and perhaps trans-generationally. Two theories lead the debate in this area. Those aligned with the hygiene (or 'Old Friends') hypothesis have examined the effect of gut microbiome colonization secondary to mode of birth and intrapartum/neonatal pharmacological interventions on immune response and epigenetic phenomena. Those working with the EPIIC (Epigenetic Impact of Childbirth) hypothesis are concerned with the effects of eustress and dys-stress on the epigenome, secondary to mode of birth and labour interventions. This paper examines the current and emerging findings relating to childbirth and atopic/autoimmune disease from the perspective of both theories, and proposes an alliance of research effort. This is likely to accelerate the discovery of important findings arising from both approaches, and to maximize the timely understanding of the longer-term consequences of childbirth practices.

  12. Atopic dermatitis phenotypes and the need for personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Brehler, Ann-Christin; Novak, Natalija

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent developments in therapies which target the molecular mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Recent findings Current advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis are leading to the stratification of different atopic dermatitis phenotypes. New therapies offer the option to target-specific molecules involved in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Current new therapies under investigation aim to modulate specific inflammatory pathways associated with distinctive atopic dermatitis phenotypes, which would potentially translate into the development of personalized, targeted-specific treatments of atopic dermatitis. Summary Despite the unmet need for well tolerated, effective, and personalized treatment of atopic dermatitis, the current standard treatments of atopic dermatitis do not focus on the individual pathogenesis of the disease. The development of targeted, phenotype-specific therapies has the potential to open a new promising era of individualized treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:28582322

  13. Current Approach to Phototherapy Applications in Dermatology Practice: Part 2. Phototherapy in Vitiligo, Mycosis Fungoides, Atopic Dermatitis, Sclerosing Diseases and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Seçkin Gençosmanoğlu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many skin diseases can be treated with phototherapy, however, the method choice depends on the disease’s characteristics. First-line phototherapy for generalized plaque psoriasis is narrowband ultraviolet B whereas it is psoralen and ultraviolet A for plaque stage mycosis fungoides and ultraviolet A1 for severe localized scleroderma. In this review, efficacy of different phototherapy methods in the most common diseases treated with phototherapy such as vitiligo, mycosis fungoides, atopic dermatitis, sclerosing diseases and psoriasis will be discussed in light of current guidelines.

  14. Disease severity and quality of life in children with atopic dermatitis: PO-SCORAD in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Daniela; D'Auria, Enza; Turati, Federica; DI Vito, Michele; Sortino, Sabrina; Riva, Enrica; Cerri, Amilcare

    2017-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) can significantly compromise the quality of life (QoL). The aim of our investigation was to evaluate whether QoL correlates with AD severity, evaluated through the physician and the patient perspective, in a sample of Italian children. Forty children with AD were evaluated. Disease severity was assessed by the physician and the patients (or their parents) using the SCORAD and the patient-oriented SCORAD (PO-SCORAD) tools, respectively. Patients or their parents completed specific QoL questionnaires (IDQOL/CDLQI). Spearman's correlation coefficient and non-parametric analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. SCORAD e PO-SCORAD were moderately but significantly correlated (ρ Spearman=0.55, Pchildren with SCORAD>40 had significantly higher QoL scores (more impaired QoL) than those with SCORAD≤40 (median QoL of 5 and 4, respectively, P=0.048). Even higher differences emerged when AD severity was self-assessed (median QoL of 6 and 3.5 for children with PO-SCORAD>40 and PO-SCORAD≤40, respectively, P=0.01). AD children with concomitant food allergy had a significantly more impaired QoL than those with AD only (P=0.040). No significant difference in QoL was observed according to sex or age. In our sample of AD children, QoL appeared slightly-moderately altered, and increasing disease severity was associated with greater impairment in QoL. SCORAD and PO-SCORAD were fairly correlated and the association of QoL was somewhat stronger with the PO-SCORAD than the SCORAD Index. This supports the usefulness of PO-SCORAD for the self-assessment of AD in children, and suggests the importance to integrate physician and patient perspectives in the management of AD.

  15. The effect of a Web-based education programme (WBEP) on disease severity, quality of life and mothers' self-efficacy in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hae Kyoung; Lim, Jiyoung

    2014-10-01

    To develop and evaluate the effects of a web-based education programme in early childhood for children with atopic dermatitis. The prevalence rate of atopic dermatitis is highest in early childhood. A holistic approach is urgently needed for young children with respect to disease severity, quality of life and management, particularly parental knowledge about atopic dermatitis and adherence to treatment. A quasi-experimental study design was used. A total of 40 mother-child dyads participated in the study from 1 July-30 November 2011 in Korea. All children were under 3 years of age. The programme was based on the Network-Based Instructional System Design model, which consists of five phases: analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. The experimental group participated in the programme for 2 weeks. Participants took part in a learning session during the first week and then conducted the practice session at home during the second week. Participant knowledge and compliance were evaluated through online quizzes and self-checklists. Statistical analyses (chi-square test and t-test) were performed using the Statistical Analysis System, Version 9.13. There was a significant improvement in disease severity, quality of life and mothers' self-efficacy in the experimental group; thus, the web-based education programme was effective. The web-based education programme as an advanced intervention may be useful in providing basic data for future atopic dermatitis-related studies. Moreover, the programme may serve as a nursing educational intervention tool for clinical nursing practices. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Psychological interventions in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Jan P. C.

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease that places a large burden on patients and their families. It is characterized as a chronic inflammatory disease that most commonly begins in early childhood. Prevalence is high, especially in children, and increases in western countries. Originally,

  17. Cytokine, chemokine and secretory IgA levels in human milk in relation to atopic disease and IgA production in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Malin F; Jenmalm, Maria C; Björkstén, Bengt

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between breast-feeding, IgA production and development of atopic disease in children is a matter of controversy. Some of this controversy might be due to individual differences in the composition of breast milk. The aim of this study was to relate the levels of cytokines, chemokines and secretory (S)-IgA antibodies in breast milk to the development of atopic manifestation and salivary IgA production in infants. Cytokine, chemokine and SIgA levels, as measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in colostrum and mature milk were analyzed in relation to the development of positive skin-prick tests (SPT), allergic symptoms and salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life in 53 infants. There was no association between levels of IL-4, -5, -6, -8, -10, -13, -16, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta1, -beta2, RANTES, eotaxin or SIgA levels in the breast milk with either SPT-positivity, development of allergic symptoms or salivary IgA levels during the first 2 years of life in the infants. Thus, differences in the composition of cytokines, chemokines and SIgA in breast milk did not, to any major degree, affect the development of a positive SPT, atopic symptoms, nor salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life.

  18. Effects of Atopic Syndrome on Keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajari, Mehdi; Eberhardt, Emanuel; Müller, Michael; Al Khateeb, Ghada; Friderich, Stefan; Remy, Matthias; Kohnen, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of atopic syndrome on manifestations of keratoconus. In this retrospective study, we reviewed patient files and data generated by Scheimpflug imaging of 670 eyes of 434 keratoconus patients. Patients were divided into a study group consisting of patients suffering from atopic syndrome (110 eyes of 75 patients), namely allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis, and/or allergic rhinitis, and a control group of patients without known atopic syndrome (560 eyes of 359 patients). We found a significant difference with the mean age being 36.1 ± 11.7 for the control group, 32.8 ± 9.6 for the atopic group (P = 0.002) with 1 atopic trait, and 30.4 ± 7.5 for patients with 2 or more atopic traits (P = 0.002). No statistically significant differences were found in the mean corrected distance visual acuity, corneal pachymetry, minimum relative pachymetric progression (RPImin), mean refraction, keratoconus index, anterior chamber depth and volume, Kmax, and location of Kmax in relation to the corneal apex. However, we found a significantly higher corneal density for the anterior 120 μm of the cornea in the atopic group (control: 20.74 ± 4.68, atopic group: 21.92 ± 4.65 P = 0.016). Keratoconus patients suffering from atopic syndrome were significantly younger but showed no topographical changes except in corneal densitometry compared with keratoconus patients without an atopic disease. This suggests atopic syndrome is a factor, which can trigger earlier manifestation of keratoconus.

  19. Immunological mechanisms in atopic dermatitis : clinical and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tengvall Linder, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate immunological mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Serum IgE levels are elevated in 80% of atopic dermatitis patients and CD4+ T cells and environmental allergens are known to be of importance in the pathogenesis of the disease. It was therefore of interest to further elucidate the role of these factors in atopic dermatitis. Cyclosporin A (CSA) was used as a tool for exploring the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, with emphasis on the...

  20. Morus alba L. suppresses the development of atopic dermatitis induced by the house dust mite in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hye-Sun; Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Hoyoung; Lee, Jun Kyung; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2014-04-23

    Morus alba, a medicinal plant in Asia, has been used traditionally to treat diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia. However, the effects of M. alba extract (MAE) on atopic dermatitis have not been verified scientifically. We investigated the effects of MAE on atopic dermatitis through in vitro and in vivo experiments. We evaluated the effects of MAE on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7, as well as thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) in HaCaT cells. In an in vivo experiment, atopic dermatitis was induced by topical application of house dust mites for four weeks, and the protective effects of MAE were investigated by measuring the severity of the skin reaction on the back and ears, the plasma levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and histamine, and histopathological changes in the skin on the back and ears. MAE suppressed the production of NO and PGE2 in RAW 264.7 cells, as well as TARC in HaCaT cells, in a dose-dependent manner. MAE treatment of NC/Nga mice reduced the severity of dermatitis and the plasma levels of IgE and histamine. MAE also reduced the histological manifestations of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions such as erosion, hyperplasia of the epidermis and dermis, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the skin on the back and ears. Our results suggest that MAE has potent inhibitory effects on atopic dermatitis-like lesion and may be a beneficial natural resource for the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  1. The Atopic March. A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Salazar-Espinosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The atopic march is defined as the progression of atopic diseases, generally during childhood, such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergies. The main risk factors for developing these atopic diseases include genetics, aeroallergens, food allergens, late food introduction to the infant, and living in developing countries. The immunologic contributors to this problem include the Th2 response, epigenetics, and lack of certain factors like thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP and filaggrin. As a whole, the therapeutic approach has been changing during recent years because of the discovery of new factors involved in this problem. This article explains the definition of atopic march, the immunological pathway, clinical features, epidemiology and therapeutic approaches to create a context for the broader understanding of this important condition.

  2. IRRITANT SUSCEPTIBILITY AND WEAL AND FLARE REACTIONS TO BIOACTIVE AGENTS IN ATOPIC-DERMATITIS .1. INFLUENCE OF DISEASE SEVERITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TUPKER, RA; COENRAADS, PJ; FIDLER, [No Value; DEJONG, MCJM; VANDERMEER, JB; DEMONCHY, JGR

    The two main pathogenetic characteristics of atopic dermatitis (AD) are: (i) antigen-dependent 'specific' reactivity, and (ii) altered non-immunological 'non-specific' reactivity, Our understanding of the role of non-specific reactivity is hampered by the fact that methods available for its

  3. Consumption of organic foods and risk of atopic disease during the first 2 years of life in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummeling, Ischa; Thijs, Carel; Huber, Machteld; van de Vijver, Lucy P. L.; Snijders, Bianca E. P.; Penders, John; Stelma, Foekje; van Ree, Ronald; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.

    2008-01-01

    We prospectively investigated whether organic food consumption by infants was associated with developing atopic manifestations in the first 2 years of life. The KOALA Birth Cohort Study in the Netherlands (n 2764) measured organic food consumption, eczema and wheeze in infants until age 2 years

  4. News from dendritic cells in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäkel, Knut; Hänsel, Anja

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cells are essential for the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, which makes them stay on center stage when studying the immuno pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This review will discuss recent findings on the role of dendritic cells subsets in atopic dermatitis and will report novel findings on how the microenvironment conditions dendritic cells to fuel atopic dermatitis. Several microenvironmental factors characteristic for atopic dermatitis and with direct relevance for the disease have been defined. We now increasingly understand how thymic stromal lymphopoietin and histamine contribute to the disease by modulating the function of dendritic cells. We have learned much about the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis by the studies on inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells. However, the current analysis on the functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of dendritic cells in eczematous skin lesions may lead to the definition of additional dendritic cell types relevant in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. In this respect, it appears interesting to further discuss the parallels and differences in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Understanding the heterogeneity of dendritic cells and their functional alteration by local factors in the inflamed skin will provide essential clues to the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  5. Atopic dermatitis: professional orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimat, Paul; Boughattas, Wided; Even, Dorothée

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is often exacerbated by the working environment. In order to reduce the risk of allergy, young people must receive better medical guidance when they choose a career. This is all the more relevant for young atopic patients.

  6. Twin Studies of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmose, Camilla; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    about filaggrin and its role in the atopic march and provide suggestions for future research in this area. Methods. We identified all twin studies (published after 1970) that have calculated the concordance rate and/or the heritability of AD, or the genetic and environmental correlations between AD...... was around 85% explained by genetic pleiotropy. Conclusions. Genetic factors account for most of the variability in AD susceptibility and for the association between AD and asthma. Controversy remains as to whether the atopic diseases are causally related or whether they are diverse clinical manifestations...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DY. Filaggrin mutations associated with skin and allergic diseases. N Engl J Med. 2011 Oct 6;365(14):1315-27. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra1011040. Review. Citation on PubMed Liang Y, Chang C, Lu Q. The Genetics and Epigenetics of Atopic Dermatitis-Filaggrin and Other Polymorphisms. Clin ...

  8. Maternal mental health and social support: effect on childhood atopic and non-atopic asthma symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques dos Santos, Letícia; Neves dos Santos, Darci; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2012-11-01

    Atopic and non-atopic asthma have distinct risk factors and immunological mechanisms, and few studies differentiate between the impacts of psychosocial factors on the prevalence of these disease phenotypes. The authors aimed to identify whether the effect of maternal mental health on prevalence of asthma symptoms differs between atopic and non-atopic children, taking into account family social support. This is a cross-sectional study of 1013 children participating in the Social Change Allergy and Asthma in Latin America project. Psychosocial data were collected through a household survey utilising Self-Reporting Questionnaire and Medical Outcome Study Social Support Scale. Socioeconomic and wheezing information was obtained through the questionnaire of the International Study of Allergy and Asthma in Childhood, and level of allergen-specific IgE was measured to identify atopy. Polytomous logistic regression was used to estimate the association between maternal mental health, social support and atopic and non-atopic wheezing. Effect modification was evaluated through stratified polytomous regression according to social support level. Maternal mental disorder had the same impact on atopic and non-atopic wheezing, even after adjusting for confounding variables. Affective, material and informational supports had protective effects on non-atopic asthma, and there is some evidence that social supports may act as a buffer for the impact of maternal mental disorder on non-atopic wheezing. Poor maternal mental health is positively associated with wheezing, independent of whether asthma is atopic or non-atopic, but perception of high levels of social support appears to buffer this relationship in non-atopic wheezers only.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis and Homeopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Chukwudi Nwabudike

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, relapsing disorder of the skin associated with allergen sensitization and impaired barrier function. There is often a family history of pruritic skin disease or asthma.Materials and Methods: Three cases of atopic dermatitis treated with homeopathy are presented. Case 1 is a case of a 22-year-old female, with AD since early childhood, which had not responded to standard topical therapy. She received several homeopathic medicines, with transitory effect until she finally received the medicine Aurum metallicum, at M potency. At present, 1 year after cessation of treatment, she remains lesion-free. Case 2 is a case of a 10-month-old baby with a an 8-month history of itchy rash and poor sleep, that had failed to respond to treatment. The patient was given the homeopathic medicine Lachesis at C30 potency and responded. The rashes receded and the patient was able to sleep better at night. Case 3 is a case of an 11-month-old boy with a 3-month history of itchy rash, diagnosed as having AD and treated with topical steroids. After 3 months of unsuccessful treatment, the patient was brought in for homeopathic therapy. He received the homeopathic medicine Lachesis, at C30 potency. He improved under this treatment and is currently lesion-free, 6 months after cessation of treatment.Conclusions: Three cases of atopic dermatitis that failed to respond to treatment were given homeopathic therapy and responded adequately. The patients remained free of lesions even after cessation of treatment.

  10. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Colver, G. B.; Symons, J A; Duff, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations are related to disease activity in atopic eczema. DESIGN--Single cohort longitudinal study with controls. SETTING--Outpatient and general medicine departments in secondary referral centre. PATIENTS--Of 15 patients aged 17-57 with severe atopic eczema, all with acute exacerbations of disease, 13 were admitted to hospital and two treated as outpatients until the skin lesions had resolved or greatly improved. Nin...

  11. [Adulthood atopic dermatitis: epidemiology, clinical symptoms, provoking and prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pónyai, Györgyi; Temesvári, Erzsébet; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2007-01-07

    The prevalence of atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma bronchiale and atopic dermatitis is increasing both in children and adults at different parts of the world. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting mostly children, but the atopic trait continues, not only for later respiratory allergies, but also for skin symptoms in adulthood. In this form dry skin, flexural lichenification, head and neck dermatitis, hand dermatitis are typical. The exact etiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, in the background interactions of genetical predisposition, skin barrier defects and immunological and environmental factors can be verified. In the complex approach of atopic dermatitis, a pivotal role is ascribed to the evaluation and possibly the elimination of provoking factors, like gender, family structure, clothing, aero-, alimentary and contact allergens, psychosocial stress, migration, infections, and personal home environment. Authors review clinical manifestations, triggering and prognostic factors of the adulthood atopic dermatitis.

  12. The Relationship Between Serum Levels of Total IgE, IL-18, IL-12, IFN- γ and Disease Severity in Children With Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies about the role of cytokines on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD are generally based on in vitro observations and this role has not been completely clarified yet. Serum levels of total IgE, IL-18, IL-12, IFN- γ and the relationship between these parameters and disease severity, determined using the SCORAD index, in a group of atopic patients were investigated in this study. Serum levels of total IgE were measured by the nephelometric method and serum levels of IL-18, IL-12/p40 and IFN- γ were measured by ELISA method. Serum levels of total IgE and IL-18 were found significantly higher in study group than in controls ( p<.001 . There was no statistically significant difference between patients and controls in respect of serum levels of IL-12/p40 ( p=.227 . A statistically significant relationship between SCORAD values and serum levels of total IgE ( p<.001 , IL-18 ( p<.001 , and IL-12/p40 ( p<.001 was determined. These results show that serum levels of IL-18 can be a sensitive parameter that importantly correlates with clinical severity of AD, can play a role in the immunopathogenesis of AD, and furthermore may be used in the diagnosis and follow-up of the disease in addition to other parameters.

  13. Variation in Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Relation to Disease Severity in Adults with Atopic Dermatitis during a Five-month Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Alsterholm

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to monitor Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in adults with atopic dermatitis (AD during 5 months. Twenty-one patients attended 3 visits each for severity SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD assessment, quantitative cultures from the skin and conventional cultures from the anterior nares, tonsils and perineum. S. aureus isolates were typed for strain identity with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Seventy-one percent of patients were colonized with S. aureus on lesional skin at least once. Density (colony-forming units (CFU/cm2 was higher on lesional skin than on non-lesional skin (p < 0.05. Density on lesional skin and number of colonized body sites were positively correlated with SCORAD (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.007, respectively. Persistent carriers of the same strain on lesional skin had higher mean SCORAD index than intermittent/non-carriers (36.3 and 17.1, respectively, p = 0.002. The results show a temporal correlation between several aspects of S. aureus colonization and disease severity in AD raising the question of the importance of this in pathogenesis and treatment.

  14. [Atopic dermatitis: pathophysiology update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Alain

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is very common in industrialized countries, where it affects 15% to 30% of children and 2% to 10% of adults. AD has a complex determinism, combining environmental influences and genetic predisposition, hitherto dominated by an immunological perspective, particularly after the discovery of associated high IgE serum levels. DA is a possible mode of onset of asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergies, resulting in the poorly understood "atopic march". The discovery of mutations in the filaggrin gene, a key protein for stratum corneum maturation, have refocused attention on the skin and operated a Copernican revolution in our understanding of this group of disorders. AD has become a prototype of inflammatory epithelial barrier diseases. The epidermal barrier has three major elements: the stratum corneum, which provides an air-liquid barrier, tight junctions in the granular layer (liquid-liquid barrier), and Langerhans cells that capture antigens (immunological barrier). Better knowledge of the molecular events underlying epidermal barrier function and its dysfunction in AD should lead to ways of preventing and eventually curing this group of disorders.

  15. Evolving Concepts in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidbury, Robert; Khorsand, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in the field of atopic dermatitis in the past 5 years. We will explore developments in burden of disease, co-morbidities, pathogenesis, prevention, and management. The tremendous burden moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) places on families from a medical, psychosocial, and financial perspective has been characterized. Epidemiologic studies have identified intriguing new associations beyond the well-characterized "atopic march" of food allergies, asthma, and hay fever. Studies of primary prevention have gained traction including the remarkable impacts of early emollient therapy. Basic advances have simultaneously elucidated the nature of atopic inflammation, setting the stage for an explosion of new potential therapeutic targets. After a fallow period of nearly 15 years without a substantial therapeutic advance, this year has already seen two new FDA-approved treatments for AD. AD has a tremendous impact on quality of life with an underappreciated burden of disease; there are important newly described co-morbidities including ADHD and anemia; new insights into etio-pathogenesis have paved the way for novel topical therapies like crisaborole, and new systemic interventions like dupilumab.

  16. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S

    2016-01-01

    terms for AD. METHODS: A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. RESULTS: In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only...... 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD...... was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals...

  17. Atopic dermatitis and association of risk for primary immune thrombocytopenia and autoimmune diseases among children: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chang-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Shen, Te-Chun; Tsai, Jeng-Dau

    2016-07-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is currently defined as an acquired autoimmune disorder with persistent thrombocytopenia. However, the temporal interaction between T helper type 2 cell (Th2)-mediated allergic diseases and T helper type 1 cell (Th1)-mediated ITP remains unknown. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is considered one of the first steps in the atopic march. Herein, we conducted a population-based cohort analysis to investigate the risk of ITP in children with AD in comparison with non-AD controls. We subsequently compared the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases in ITP children in both AD and non-AD cohorts. From 2000 to 2007, 120,704 children with newly diagnosed AD and 241,408 randomly selected non-AD controls were included in the study. By the end of 2008, incidences of ITP in both cohorts and the AD cohort to non-AD cohort hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were measured. Comparison of the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases in ITP between children with and without AD was analyzed. The incidence of ITP during the study period was 1.72-fold greater (95% CI: 1.13-2.62) in the AD cohort than in the non-AD cohort (6.96 vs 4.00 per 100,000 person-years). The risk was greatest among male children, children >2 years, those in densely populated areas, and those with white-collar parents. The HR of ITP in AD children increased significantly with the number of AD-related clinical visits (P children had a greater risk of developing ITP and other autoimmune diseases. Further research is needed to clarify the role of allergy in the pathogenesis of ITP and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Precision medicine in patients with allergic diseases: Airway diseases and atopic dermatitis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Antonella; Lemanske, Robert F; Hellings, Peter W; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bieber, Thomas; Casale, Thomas B; Jutel, Marek; Ong, Peck Y; Poulsen, Lars K; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Seys, Sven F; Agache, Ioana

    2016-05-01

    In this consensus document we summarize the current knowledge on major asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis endotypes under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is an initiative of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology aiming to harmonize the European and American approaches to best allergy practice and science. Precision medicine is of broad relevance for the management of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in the context of a better selection of treatment responders, risk prediction, and design of disease-modifying strategies. Progress has been made in profiling the type 2 immune response-driven asthma. The endotype driven approach for non-type 2 immune response asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is lagging behind. Validation and qualification of biomarkers are needed to facilitate their translation into pathway-specific diagnostic tests. Wide consensus between academia, governmental regulators, and industry for further development and application of precision medicine in management of allergic diseases is of utmost importance. Improved knowledge of disease pathogenesis together with defining validated and qualified biomarkers are key approaches to precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbiome in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting ~10–20% of the general population. AD is characterized by disturbances in epidermal barrier function and hyperactive immune response. Recently, changes in the skin and intestinal microbiome have been analyzed in more detail. The available data suggest a link between disturbed skin microbiome and course of the disease. Flares of the disease are associated with an expansion of Staphylococcus aureus on lesional skin and a substantial loss of biodiversity in skin microbiome. Staphylococci exoproteins and superantigens evoke inflammatory reactions in the host. Skin microbiome includes superficial stratum corneum that is affected by environmental factors such as exposure to germs and cleansing. Available evidence argues for a link between epidermal barrier impairment and disturbances in skin microbiome in AD. In contrast to skin microbiome, intestinal microbiome seems to become stabilized after infancy. There is also a significant heritable component for intestinal microbiome. The microbial taxa, relative percentages and quantities vary remarkably between the different parts of the intestinal tract. Early intestinal microbial colonization may be a critical step for prevention of further development of AD. Skin barrier-aimed topical treatments help to develop a neo-microbiome from deeper compartments. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics have been investigated for the treatment of AD, but further investigations are needed. Targeted treatment options to normalize skin and intestinal microbiome in AD are under investigation. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, microbiome, staphylococci, skin, intestine, antimicrobial peptides

  20. Increased numbers of FoxP3-expressing CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells in peripheral blood from dogs with atopic dermatitis and its correlation with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Verena; Hügli, Patrick; Meli, Marina L; Rostaher, Ana; Fischer, Nina; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Favrot, Claude

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease of humans and dogs. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential controllers of immune homeostasis and have been shown to play a key role in human AD, even though frequencies of Tregs in atopic human patients vary greatly. Only two studies have reported Treg numbers in the peripheral blood of dogs with canine AD (CAD). This study aimed to assess the numbers of circulating Tregs in healthy and atopic dogs, and to determine whether Treg numbers correlate with age, sex, disease severity or pre-treatment. Client-owned dogs including 14 healthy dogs and 35 dogs with CAD. Expression of Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Tregs were phenotypically identified as T cells triple positive for CD4, CD25 and FoxP3. The percentage of circulating CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) Tregs in atopic dogs was increased significantly compared to healthy dogs (mean 2.1% versus 1%, P = 0.002) and correlated with disease severity (Pruritus Scale: r = 0.48, P = 0.003; CADESI-04: r = 0.34, P = 0.044). No significant differences in age or sex were found in either group and pre-treatment had no influence on results for atopic dogs. Data suggest that, as in humans, CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) Tregs may contribute to the pathogenesis of CAD as indicated by an association between Treg frequency and disease severity. Further investigation is required to improve the understanding of the role of Tregs in atopic dogs. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Circulating levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor correlate with disease severity in the intrinsic type of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, U; Werfel, T; Goltz, C; Deneka, N; Langer, K; Bruder, M; Kapp, A; Schmid-Ott, G; Wedi, B

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have shed light on the complex regulation of genetic, environmental, immunologic and pharmacologic factors, which contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, it is still unclear to which extent neuroimmune mediators have a role in AD. To assess peripheral neurotrophin levels and their correlation with scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) scores in both the intrinsic and extrinsic types of AD compared with patients with psoriasis and nonatopic healthy subjects. Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) were assessed in peripheral blood with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Based on IgE-mediated sensitization, AD was divided into the extrinsic and intrinsic type. Severity of AD was assessed with SCORAD score and with psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) in patients with psoriasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NGF were detectable in all the subjects studied. However, the levels of both neurotrophins were significantly higher in patients with extrinsic and intrinsic types of AD compared with patients with psoriasis and nonatopic healthy subjects (NGF: P neurotrophin action in chronic inflammatory skin.

  2. Consumption of organic foods and risk of atopic disease during the first 2 years of life in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummeling, Ischa; Thijs, Carel; Huber, Machteld; van de Vijver, Lucy P L; Snijders, Bianca E P; Penders, John; Stelma, Foekje; van Ree, Ronald; van den Brandt, Piet A; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2008-03-01

    We prospectively investigated whether organic food consumption by infants was associated with developing atopic manifestations in the first 2 years of life. The KOALA Birth Cohort Study in the Netherlands (n 2764) measured organic food consumption, eczema and wheeze in infants until age 2 years using repeated questionnaires. Diet was defined as conventional ( 90 % organic). Venous blood samples taken from 815 infants at 2 years of age were analysed for total and specific IgE. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to control for potential confounding factors. Eczema was present in 32 % of infants, recurrent wheeze in 11 % and prolonged wheezing in 5 %. At 2 years of age, 27 % of children were sensitised against at least one allergen. Of all the children, 10 % had consumed a moderately organic diet and 6 % a strictly organic diet. Consumption of organic dairy products was associated with lower eczema risk (OR 0.64 (95 % CI 0.44, 0.93)), but there was no association of organic meat, fruit, vegetables or eggs, or the proportion of organic products within the total diet with the development of eczema, wheeze or atopic sensitisation. Further studies to substantiate these results are warranted.

  3. Egg Allergy in Adolescent and Adult Patient Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis--Association with Concomitant Allergic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelakovská, Jarmila; Ettlerová, Květuše; Ettler, Karel; Bukač, Josef

    2015-01-01

    A few reports demonstrate the occurrence of egg allergy in adolescent and adult patients suffering from atopic dermatitis and the association of this allergy to other food and aeroallergens. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of egg allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis at the age 14 years and older and to evaluate the relationship between egg allergy or egg sensitisation and the sensitisation to dust, mites, feather, and animal dander. Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed. These parameters were examined: food allergy and food sensitisation to egg white and yolk, to mites, animal dander (mixture), feather and dust. The statistical evaluation of the relations among egg allergy, egg sensitisation and sensitisation to mites, animal dander (mixture), feather and dust was performed. Two hundred and eighty eight patients were included in the study (90 men, 198 women, with the average age 25.2). Egg allergy was recorded in 5% and egg sensitisation in 20% of patients; sensitisation to dust is recorded more often in patients with positive results in sIgE for egg white and/or yolk.

  4. Gastrointestinal disorders in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokaite, Rūta; Labanauskas, Liutauras

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the peculiarities of allergies to food; to determine gastrointestinal disorders, endoscopic signs of mucosal damage and histological lesions of the mucosa and to establish their relation to the extent of atopic dermatitis and its degree of severity. A total of 164 children (86 boys and 78 girls) suffering only from atopic dermatitis were examined. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed using standard diagnostic criteria; extent of disease (the Basic Clinical Scoring System (BCSS)) and the severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index), total serum IgE levels were determined; skin prick and patch tests with the main food allergens were performed. Using questionnaire gastrointestinal disorders with the symptoms of atopic dermatitis were ascertained. In children with atopic dermatitis suffering from chronic dyspepsia esophagealgastroduodenoscopy was performed and biopsy samples from the antrum of the stomach and duodenum were taken. The age of patients ranged from 6 months to 18 years. According to extent of atopic dermatitis and degree of severity localized, mild atopic dermatitis prevailed. Analysis of the changes in total Ig E levels showed different degree of sensitization of the children examined. Considering the type of allergic reaction, immediate-type allergic reactions dominated only in 11.6% of children with atopic dermatitis, whereas delayed-type allergic reactions manifested in 44.5% of children. No food allergy was present in one-fifth of children with atopic dermatitis. One hundred four (63.4%) children complained of gastrointestinal disorders. Of these 104 patients, 17 children (mean age 6.9 years) who underwent esophagealgastroduodenoscopy with biopsy had no pathology; however, histological examination of mucosa revealed eosinophilic infiltration in the gastric antrum and duodenum in three children. The most common gastrointestinal disorders are: abdominal pain vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal distention, and

  5. Family management of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Dong Hee; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Heejung; Chung, Kyoungmee; Kim, Hee-Soon

    2018-02-22

    To identify the variables that affect family management of childhood atopic dermatitis and establish a prediction model based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent skin disease and common health problem in childhood. It is necessary to use an approach that includes parental factors when considering the effective management of childhood atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study design. A convenience sample, comprising 168 Korean mothers caring for a child with atopic dermatitis under the age of 13, was recruited from the pediatric outpatient departments of two general hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. Data were collected using structured self-reported questionnaires including severity, antecedents, effort, self-efficacy and family management of childhood atopic dermatitis from 1 November 1 2015 - 28 February 28 2016. Descriptive statistics regarding the participants and variables were examined and data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The hypothetical model had an adequate fit to the data, indicating that severity, antecedents, effort and self-efficacy influenced family management of childhood atopic dermatitis. These results suggest that strategies to support children with atopic dermatitis and their family should consider the influence of such variables. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. [Atopic dermatitis in children. New aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnopp, C; Mempel, M

    2015-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis in childhood is controlled by adaequate topical treatment in the majority of cases. Severe manifestations, recurrent superinfections, associated food allergy and psychosocial aspects of a chronic disease in childhood need special consideration. Furthermore, prevention is an important issue in this age group. The following article focuses on new aspects with repercussions on the management of childhood atopic dermatitis and possible implications for the future.

  7. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti; Chiara Mameli; Valentina Fabiano; Fabio Meneghin

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many ...

  8. Atopic dermatitis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000418.htm Atopic dermatitis - self-care To use the sharing features on ... skin disorder characterized by scaly and itchy rashes. Atopic dermatitis is the most common type. Atopic dermatitis is ...

  9. Associations of TNFα -308G>A, TNFα -238G>A, IL-1α -889C>T and IL-10 -1082G>A Genetic Polymorphisms with Atopic Diseases: Asthma, Rhinitis and Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babić, Željka; Sabolić Pipinić, Ivana; Varnai, Veda Marija; Kežić, Sanja; Macan, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms of cytokine genes are an interesting focus for association studies involving atopic diseases due to their role in immune cell communications during inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of TNFα -308G>A, TNFα -238G>A, IL-1α -889C>T and IL-10 -1082G>A

  10. Atopic dermatitis 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    No, Daniel J; Amin, Mina; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago.......Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago....

  11. Atopic dermatitis in the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2016-01-01

    Dogs may develop a syndrome of spontaneous, inflammatory, pruritic dermatitis that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis, including a young age of onset, characteristic lesion distribution, immunoglobulin E sensitization to common environmental allergen sources, and evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction. There are also several important differences between canine and human atopic dermatitis. Although dogs may suffer from multiple-organ hypersensitivity syndromes, there is no evidence that this species experiences the progressive evolution from cutaneous to respiratory allergy characteristic of the human atopic march. Despite the presence of epidermal barrier derangement, there is no significant association between canine atopic dermatitis and mutations in filaggrin. Finally, treatment of canine disease relies much less heavily on topical therapy than does its human counterpart, while allergy testing and allergen-specific immunotherapy provide an often essential component of effective clinical management of affected dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: JAK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, David G; Schairer, David; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2018-03-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway is a conserved master regulator of immunity and myeloproliferation. Advanced understanding of this pathway has led to development of targeted inhibitors of Janus kinases (Jakinibs). As a class, JAK inhibitors effectively treat a multitude of hematologic and inflammatory diseases. Given such success, use of JAK inhibitors for mitigation of atopic dermatitis is under active investigation. Herein, we review the evolving data on the safety and efficacy of JAK inhibitors in treatment of atopic dermatitis. Although it is still early in the study of JAK inhibitors for atopic dermatitis, evidence identifies JAK inhibitors as effective alternatives to conventional therapies. Nonetheless, multiple large safety and efficacy trials are needed before widespread use of JAK inhibitors can be advocated for atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbard, Christina M; Hebert, Adelaide A

    2008-02-02

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  14. Patient Burden of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Cathryn; Drucker, Aaron M

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is associated with significant patient burden, with impacts from symptoms and visible physical manifestations of the disease. Consequences include detrimental effects on quality of life (QoL), sleep, self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, participation in leisure and sports, and attendance or performance at school or work. Patients also spend a significant amount of time on treatments and care. Worsening severity of disease appears to be associated with a higher risk of impaired QoL, and pharmacologic and educational interventions that improve disease severity appear to, for the most part, simultaneously improve QoL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Ichiro; Aihara, Michiko; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shimojo, Naoki; Shoji, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masami; Yamada, Hidekazu

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016" together with those for other allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The history of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Owen N; Strom, Mark A; Ladizinski, Barry; Lio, Peter A

    Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the suspected historical precursors of this disease and reported treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gut microbiota composition and development of atopic manifestations in infancy: the KOALA Birth Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penders, John; Thijs, Carel; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Kummeling, Ischa; Snijders, Bianca; Stelma, Foekje; Adams, Hanne; van Ree, Ronald; Stobberingh, Ellen E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Perturbations in intestinal microbiota composition due to lifestyle changes may be involved in the development of atopic diseases. We examined gut microbiota composition in early infancy and the subsequent development of atopic manifestations and sensitisation. METHODS: The

  18. [From atopic dermatitis to asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businco, L; Marziali, M; Furcolo, G; Meglio, P

    1997-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic skin disorder in infancy and childhood and is the main hallmark of atopic constitution. The disease is multifactorial, and although genetic predisposition is certainly a prerequisite, a number of environmental factors modulate the phenotypic expression of AD. The majority of affected children shows IgE sensitisation towards a large variety of foods and aeroallergens. Since at least 1600, it has been recognized that patients with AD have a high predisposition to develop asthma. Recent epidemiological studies show that AD is commonly seen in individuals from families with a history of asthma. In addition, in population where asthma is uncommon, AD is also uncommon. The sex distribution of AD and asthma is the same, with boys affected significantly more often by these two atopic diseases and in similar proportions. The ETAC project (Early Treatment of the Atopic Child) is a large multicenter, multi-national, double blind, placebo controlled, randomised trial. The main objective of the study is to stop the progression from AD to asthma in young children with AD using early therapeutic intervention with Cetirizine and the second objective is to investigate the main risk factors for the onset of asthma. The results of this study indicate that exposure to potent allergens such as cat or mite significantly increased the risk of sensitisation to these allergens. Prolonged breast feeding was associated with a lowest sensitisation rate to cow milk proteins and to egg. Therefore environmental factors seem to play a crucial role in IgE sensitisation in children with AD.

  19. [Atopic dermatitis: a modern view of pediatricians and pediatric allergologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikova, O M

    2011-01-01

    The article presents the views of pediatric allergologist on the problem of atopic dermatitis/ atopic eczema in children. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is considered from a modern viewpoint of allergic 'march', which is characteristic (typical) for children with atopy. These data indicate to systemic nature of atopic 'march', the first step of which is atopic eczema. Further evolution of atopic dermatitis leads to a transformation of it in other atopic diseases--allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma; this fact indicates that immunopathological disorders are united in these diseases and it conditions the possibility of prevention. It has taken into consideration the systemic nature of atopic diseases, combined therapy is great important and has to include not only basic local therapy, in particular topical corticosteroids (mometasone furoate--Elokom) during the exacerbation, and the systematic elimination of trigger factors, diet, the removal of the digestive system dysfunctions and the imbalance of vitamins. A long-time systemic basic therapy by H1-antihistamines of second generation, such as desloratadine (Aerius) takes a special place in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  20. Life-long diseases need life-long treatment: long-term safety of ciclosporin in canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Tim; Reece, Douglas; Roberts, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Ciclosporin (Atopica; Novartis Animal Health) has been licensed for canine atopic dermatitis (AD) since 2002. Adverse events (AEs) have been reported in 55 per cent of 759 dogs in 15 clinical trials, but are rare in pharmacovigilance data (71.81 AEs/million capsules sold). Gastrointestinal reactions were most common, but were mild and rarely required intervention. Other AEs were rare (≤1 per cent in clinical trials; dermatitis were rarely significant and resolved on dose reduction. Ciclosporin decreases staphylococcal and Malassezia infections in AD, and at the recommended dose is not a risk factor for other infections, neoplasia, renal failure or hypertension. The impact on glucose and calcium metabolism is not clinically significant for normal dogs. Concomitant treatment with most drugs is safe. Effects on cytochrome P450 and MDR1 P-glycoprotein activity may elevate plasma ciclosporin concentrations, but short-term changes are not clinically significant. Monitoring of complete blood counts, urinalysis or ciclosporin levels is not justified except with higher than recommended doses and/or long-term concurrent immunosuppressive drugs. Ciclosporin is not a contraindication for killed (including rabies) vaccines, but the licensed recommendation is that live vaccination is avoided during treatment. In conclusion, ciclosporin has a positive risk-benefit profile for the long-term management of canine AD.

  1. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Ricci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated around 5-15% in European countries. AD persists from childhood through adolescence in around 40% of cases and some risk factors have been identified: female sex, sensitization to inhalant and food allergens, allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, the practice of certain jobs. During adolescence, AD mainly appears on the face and neck, often associated with overinfection by Malassezia, and on the palms and soles. AD persistence during adolescence is correlated with psychological diseases such as anxiety; moreover, adolescents affected by AD might have problems in the relationship with their peers. Stress and the psychological problems represent a serious burden for adolescents with AD and cause a significant worsening of the patients’ quality of life (QoL. The pharmacological treatment is similar to other age groups. Educational and psychological approaches should be considered in the most severe cases.

  2. ATOPIC DERMATITIS: NEW ASPECTS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease, which demands a prolonged treatment. A modern views on the main approaches to treatment of atopic dermatitis in children and adults are analyzed in this article. The treatment is based on the permanent use of emollients in order to achieve an anti-inflammatory effect — topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, and short courses (5 days of topical corticosteroids during relapses. For the 10-year period of topical calcineurin inhibitors usage in treatment of atopic dermatitis a great amount of experimental and clinical data have been accumulated. Two the most important changes and additions in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in recent times were related to a new hypothesis of proactive therapy with the use of topical tacrolimus and closing of «black box» warnings, associated to malignization risk due to the long-term usage of topical calcineurin inhibitors. Since atopic dermatitis is characterized by relapsing course, nowadays topical tacrolimus should be considered the most appropriate treatment approach, both in adults and children. The results of investigations confirmed more than 6-times decrease in relapse rate, as well as the significant improvement of quality of life, when the above-mentioned treatment scheme is used, both in children and adults.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, emollients, treatment, tacrolimus.

  3. THE APPLICATION OF ENTEROSORBENTS TO TREAT ATOPIC DERMATITIS AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. Shcherbakov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the study of the peculiarities of atopic dermatitis run from the viewpoint of allergistcimmunologist and gastroenterologist. The authors give an analysis of the reasons for atopic dermatitis development conditioned by the food allergy and define the place and meaning of the digestive apparatus function within the mechanisms of the disease development. The authors dwell in detail on the state of the intestinal tract mucosa and peculiarities of its lesion during atopic dermatitis. They give the schemes of the combined treatment for atopic dermatitis aimed at recovery of the affected small bowel mucosa and recovery of its protective properties with the help of cytomucoprotective adsorbing agents. They also present the findings of their own clinical experience of treatment of children, suffering from atopic dermatitis and having various lesions of the digestive apparatus.Key words: atopic dermatitis, children, food allergy, cytomucoprotection, adsorbing agents, dioctahedral smectite.

  4. Study of the role of serum folic acid in atopic dermatitis: A correlation with serum IgE and disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha A Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Most atopic dermatitis (AD patients have elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE. Impaired folic acid (FA metabolism was found to reduce the intracellular methyl donor pool, associated with a higher prevalence of atopy. Aim : To assess serum IgE and FA in AD patients and to correlate their levels with the disease severity, and with each other. Materials and Methods : Twenty patients with AD were assessed for serum FA and IgE, compared with 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Patients were classified into three groups (mild, moderate, and severe AD based on clinical severity according to Nottingham index. In both patients and controls, serum IgE was measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique and serum FA was measured using Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay technique. Results : Serum FA levels were lower in AD patients compared with controls, but the difference was not statistically significant. FA levels did not show statistically significant difference among disease severity groups and did not correlate with serum IgE levels. On the other hand, serum IgE levels were significantly elevated in AD patients compared with controls, and among AD patients, its levels were significantly elevated in severe AD compared with mild and moderate disease. Conclusion : Serum IgE is useful in assessment of AD severity and activity. FA contribution to AD needs further investigations.

  5. Allergic march in children: Atopic dermatitis in Japanese children with bronchial asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsufumi Mayumi; Yusei Ohshima; Kenji Katamura; Setsuko Ito; Takao Hirao; Hiroshi Akutagawa; Naomi Kondo; Akihiro Morikawa

    1996-01-01

    Atopic diseases in children often develop in series and atopic dermatitis usually occurs first. To clarify the serial development of atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma in atopic children in Japan, the present and/or past history of atopic dermatitis in patients with bronchial asthma was examined. Patients (n=280) with bronchial asthma in five prefectures in Japan were examined at a mean (± SD) age of 8.2 (±4.5) years and asked about prior and/or concurrent atopic dermatitis. The mean (± S...

  6. Current evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction and thymic stromal lymphopoietin in the atopic march

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It has long been observed that the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy are frequently preceded by atopic dermatitis, a phenomenon known as the “atopic march”. Clinical, genetic and experimental studies have supported the fact that atopic dermatitis could be the initial step of the atopic march, leading to the subsequent development of other atopic diseases. This brief review will focus on the current evidence showing that epidermal barrier dysfunction and the keratinocyte-derived cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin play critical roles in the onset of the atopic march.

  7. Pruni cortex ameliorates skin inflammation possibly through HMGB1-NFκB pathway in house dust mite induced atopic dermatitis NC/Nga transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Takashi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Fukumoto, Kyoko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    Pruni cortex, the bark of Prunus jamasakura Siebold ex Koidzumi, has been used in the Japanese systems of medicine for many years for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitussive properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of pruni cortex on atopic dermatitis NC/Nga mouse model. Atopic dermatitis-like lesion was induced by the application of house dust mite extract to the dorsal skin. After induction of atopic dermatitis, pruni cortex aqueous extract (1 g/kg, p.o.) was administered daily for 2 weeks. We evaluated dermatitis severity, histopathological changes and cellular protein expression by Western blotting for nuclear and cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear factor κB, apoptosis and inflammatory markers in the skin of atopic dermatitis mice. The clinical observation confirmed that the dermatitis score was significantly lower when treated with pruni cortex than in the atopic dermatitis group. Similarly pruni cortex inhibited hypertrophy and infiltration of inflammatory cells as identified by histopathology. In addition, pruni cortex significantly inhibited the protein expression of cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear p-nuclear factor kappa B, apoptosis and inflammatory markers. These results indicate that pruni cortex may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of atopic dermatitis by attenuating high mobility group box 1 and inflammation possibly through the nuclear factor κB pathway.

  8. Atopic Dermatitis and Comorbidities: Added Value of Comprehensive Dermatoepidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is common and in its severe form is devastating. This chronic inflammatory dermatosis is part of the atopic syndrome, which includes asthma, food allergies, and hay fever and is known to be associated with mental health disorders. In line with psoriasis, several recent observational studies using national survey and linkage data have suggested a link between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease. The atopic dermatitis field can benefit from the past experiences in psoriasis research and should not follow the same path, but, rather, aim for a more comprehensive approach from the beginning. A recent German consortium studying links between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease first screened a large claims database, followed by analyses of more deeply phenotyped (birth) cohorts with longitudinal data. In addition, genetic and metabolic analyses assessing the predisposition of patients with atopic dermatitis for cardiovascular disease were performed. Overall, the association between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease was at most modest, but in more refined cohorts the cardiovascular risk profile and genetic architecture was comparable. A more integrated approach could create clarity about the clinical relevance of cardiovascular disease in individuals with atopic dermatitis sooner, avoid speculation that affects patient care, and save scientific resources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathie Page, Sarah; Weston, Stephanie; Loh, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a frequent reason for presentation to general practice. A large number of children are affected by this condition and its treatment can cause significant anxiety for parents. The role of the general practitioner (GP) is to provide advice and allay concerns regarding conventional and alternative treatments. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of atopic dermatitis management in children in the general practice setting. This article also reviews when it is necessary to refer to specialists, the evidence for management and the link to allergies. Prescribing topical steroids to young children with atopic dermatitis involves a thorough understanding of this condition. Achieving treatment compliance partly involves providing adequate explanation to parents in order to reduce their concerns regarding the long-term side effects of topical corticosteroids. Making GPs confident and knowledgeable about atopic dermatitis will make the interaction between the practitioner, families and children more rewarding.

  10. Forsythia suspensa Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Jang, Seol; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Forsythia suspensa (F. suspensa) is a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of an ethanol extract from F. suspensa fruits on atopic dermatitis both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the inhibitory effects of F. suspensa extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model exposed to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract. Topical application of F. suspensa extract to the mice attenuated the atopic dermatitis symptoms, including increased dermatitis severity score, ear thickness, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the skin lesions, serum levels of IgE, TNF-α, and histamine, and expression of chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules in ear tissue. In addition, F. suspensa extract inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of FSE revealed the presence of four chemical constituents (forsythiaside, phillyrin, pinoresinol, and phylligenin). These compounds inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. These results suggest that the F. suspensa might be a useful candidate for treating allergic skin inflammatory disorders.

  11. Forsythia suspensa Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Young Sung

    Full Text Available Forsythia suspensa (F. suspensa is a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of an ethanol extract from F. suspensa fruits on atopic dermatitis both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the inhibitory effects of F. suspensa extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model exposed to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract. Topical application of F. suspensa extract to the mice attenuated the atopic dermatitis symptoms, including increased dermatitis severity score, ear thickness, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the skin lesions, serum levels of IgE, TNF-α, and histamine, and expression of chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules in ear tissue. In addition, F. suspensa extract inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of FSE revealed the presence of four chemical constituents (forsythiaside, phillyrin, pinoresinol, and phylligenin. These compounds inhibited the production of chemokines in TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes. These results suggest that the F. suspensa might be a useful candidate for treating allergic skin inflammatory disorders.

  12. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte; Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease with various risk factors of which atopic dermatitis is known to be one of the most important. Recently, two mutations in the gene coding for filaggrin, a protein important for the skin barrier, have repeatedly been shown to be associated with atopic dermatitis. Mo...

  13. Review of Critical Issues in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F; Simpson, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    About a decade age, loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin molecule were first implicated in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris and, subsequently, of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. Since then, intensive study of the role of filaggrin null mutations have led to other milestones in understanding the pathologic pathways in these diseases, including the initiation, maintenance, and promotion of the disease processes. The result has been new and emerging clinical and pharmacologic strategies for early identification of and intervention in atopic diseases. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S89-S91. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  14. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Joong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA- induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC- γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK. These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  15. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Cha, Hae-Sim; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Seo Ho; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM) on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE)/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA-) induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC-) γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK). These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  16. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many literature data show that probiotics may modulate the intestinal microflora composition and may have immunomodulatory effect. Based on this hypothesis, probiotics are supposed to confer benefits to allergic diseases. Administration of probiotics when a natural population of indigenous intestinal bacteria is still developing could theoretically influence immune development by favoring the balance between Th1 and Th2 inflammatory responses. For this reason, some studies have evaluated the potential impact of probiotics supplementation in the prevention of atopic dermatitis, with contrasting results. Clinical improvement in immunoglobulin (IgE-sensitized (atopic eczema following probiotic supplementation has been reported in some published studies and the therapeutic effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis seemed to be encouraging. However, as far as the usefulness of probiotics as a prevention strategy is concerned, results are still inconclusive. In fact, the clinical benefits of probiotic therapy depend upon numerous factors, such as the type of bacteria, dosing regimen, delivery method and other underlying host factors, such as age and diet. More studies are still needed to definitively prove the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic eczema.

  17. The study of microbial-intestinal tissue complex in patients with atopic dermatitis in different periods of clinical course of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Babkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was examined 40 patients with atopic dermatitis in various stages of the clinical course of dermatosis. It has revealed typical endoscopic changes of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with atopic dermatitis in quiescent and acute stages. It has studied the cellular composition of infiltrates and histomorphology of mucous coat of stomach and distal part of sigmoid colon. It has found the generic dysbiotic malfunctions of intestinal microflora in different periods of the clinical course of dermatosis. It is suggested an assumption about the relations between morphological changes of mucous coat of stomach and distal part of sigmoid colon in patients with atopic dermatitis with symtomatic dysbiotic disorders of the intestine and the severity of skin lesions in atopic dermatitis.

  18. Effect of Alpinia katsumadai Hayata on House Dust Mite-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Sun Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of Alpinia katsumadai Hayata (AKH, Zingiberaceae extract on the production of nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in RAW 264.7 cells, thymus- and-activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17 in HaCaT cells, and histamine level in HMC-1 cells. In an in vivo experiment, atopic dermatitis was induced by topical application of house dust mites for 4 weeks, and the protective effects of AKH was investigated by measuring the severity of the skin reaction on the back and ears, and plasma levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE and histamine. AKH extract suppressed the production of NO and PGE2 in RAW 264.7 cells, TARC in HaCaT cells, and histamine in HMC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In in vivo experiments, the severity of dermatitis, including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, erosion and scaling, and plasma levels of IgE, and histamine were lower in NC/Nga mice with atopic dermatitis, treated with AKH extract than in untreated mice. AKH extract reduced the histological manifestations of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions such as erosion, hyperplasia of the epidermis and dermis, and inflammatory cell infiltration on the skin of the back and ear. These results suggest that AKH inhibits the development of house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

  19. RESULTS OF APPLYING POLYVITAMIN COMPLEX FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Ivanova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents findings of applying vitamin-and-mineral complex (VMC for children frequently suffering from diseases and children with atopic dermatitis. It shows that usage of VMC within a complex therapy promotes regression of subnormal vitamin provision symptoms, as well as symptoms of the core disease. This happens against heightened vitamin content in child's organism — which was proven with the test of A and E vitamins content in blood. The research has demonstrated a quite good tolerance of VMC by children suffering from atopic dermatitis.Key words: children frequently suffering from diseases, atopic dermatitis, vitamins, treatment.

  20. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a mouse (left) shows no ... that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema. The finding ...

  1. Sweat mechanisms and dysfunctions in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Aleksi J; Vaughn, Alexandra R; Clark, Ashley K; Yosipovitch, Gil; Shi, Vivian Y

    2018-02-01

    Skin barrier dysfunction is inherent to atopic dermatitis (AD), causing dryness, irritation, and increased permeability to irritants, allergens and pathogens. Eccrine sweat functions as part of the skin's protective barrier. Variations in sweat responses have been observed in patients with AD, and altered sweat composition and dynamics are under-recognized as important factors in the disease cycle. This review discusses the role that sweat plays in the pathogenesis of AD, examines evidence on abnormal sweat composition, secretion, and neuro-immune responses to sweat in atopic skin, and highlights the value of sweat management. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Atopic dermatitis: Burden of illness, quality of life, and associated complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Aaron M

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin condition that is burdensome for individuals with the disease, their families, and for society as a whole. The purpose of this review was to provide a broad overview of the burden of atopic dermatitis, including quality of life and its associated complications. This article was divided into four main sections: (1) atopic dermatitis prevalence, persistence, and population-level burden; (2) burden of atopic dermatitis for individuals and their families; (3) medical complications and comorbidities of atopic dermatitis; and (4) assessment of the burden of atopic dermatitis in clinical practice. Having an understanding of the burden of atopic dermatitis is important for clinicians as they assess and manage atopic dermatitis in the clinical setting.

  3. Inhibitory effects of Drynaria fortunei extract on house dust mite antigen-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Kim, Dong-Seon; Yang, Won-Kyung; Nho, Kyoung Jin; Seo, Hyeong Seok; Kim, Young Sang; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2012-10-31

    Drynaria fortunei (Kunze) J. Sm has been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammation, hyperlipidemia, arteriosclerosis, rheumatism, and bone healing. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of a 70% ethanol extract of Drynaria fortunei (DFE). We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of topically applied DFE on house dust mite Dermatophargoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Treatment of NC/Nga mice with DFE reduced the dermatitis score, ear thickness, and serum levels of IgE, IgG1, and IL-6. Histopathological analyses of ear and skin lesions showed inhibition of the thickening of the epidermis and reduced epidermal/dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells. In ear lesions, mRNA expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were reduced by DFE treatment. DFE inhibited the development of dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. These results suggest that DFE may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, G. B.; Symons, J. A.; Duff, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations are related to disease activity in atopic eczema. DESIGN--Single cohort longitudinal study with controls. SETTING--Outpatient and general medicine departments in secondary referral centre. PATIENTS--Of 15 patients aged 17-57 with severe atopic eczema, all with acute exacerbations of disease, 13 were admitted to hospital and two treated as outpatients until the skin lesions had resolved or greatly improved. Nineteen controls gave single blood samples. INTERVENTIONS--Daily skin dressing with betamethasone valerate (0.025%) and ichthammol paste and tubular dressings. END POINT--Resolution of or considerable improvement in skin lesions. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations in blood samples taken on admission, at intervals subsequently, and on discharge. Clinical scores of disease activity were also made. Median concentrations on admission were significantly higher (770 U/ml) in the patients than the controls (300 U/ml). Concentrations fell significantly during treatment. In 25 assessments made at different times in 13 patients serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentration correlated significantly (R = 0.73) with clinical disease activity. CONCLUSIONS--Cellular immunopathogenic mechanisms contribute to atopic eczema. Immune activation can be measured in atopic eczema by measurements of soluble interleukin 2 receptor, and this should facilitate assessment of response to treatment. PMID:2568868

  5. [Atopic dermatitis in children and adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipozencić, Jasna; Ljubojević, Suzana; Gregurić, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease characterized by itching and typical clinical features, depending on patient age. It is often associated with other atopic diseases such as asthma or allergic rhinitis, resulting from the complex etiology and pathogenesis. It occurs more frequently in people with genetic predisposition for atopic diseases. The intensity and extent of skin lesions (Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis, SCORAD Index) vary significantly among AD patients, depending on whether it is acute or chronic, and there are variations in laboratory parameters, especially immune. In the future, it will be necessary to reach consensus on the new criteria for defining AD instead of the old ones (brought by Hanifin and Rajka 31 years ago). What is needed is effective and safe treatment, and control of the early stages of AD as well as maintaining AD remission. The new therapeutic approach in AD has greatly improved the quality of life of AD patients. As the prevalence of the disease continues to increase, we emphasize the importance of prevention, prompt recognition and optimal treatment of the many patients with AD.

  6. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2011-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2009 (ADGL2009” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle.

  7. 850nm light-emitting-diode phototherapy plus low-dose tacrolimus (FK-506) as combination therapy in the treatment of Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Cheong, Kyung Ah; Lee, Ai-Young

    2013-11-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) phototherapy is an effective alternative for the treatment of inflammatory skin disorders. Tacrolimus (FK-506) is a potent immunomodulating agent, which has been used to treat AD. Combination therapy is often used in the treatment of AD to improve therapeutic efficacy or to reduce the dose of each drug. To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of monotherapy with either 850nm LED phototherapy or low-dose FK-506, and combination therapy in Dermatophagoides farina (Df)-induced AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. The Df-induced NC/Nga mice with a clinical score of 7 were used for treatment with LED (10 and 25J/cm(2)) alone, low-dose FK-506 (1mg/kg) or in combination. The synergistic effects of combined therapy were evaluated by dermatitis scores, skin histology, skin barrier function, and immunological parameters, such as IgE, NO, Th2-mediated cytokines and chemokines. Combination therapy with 850nm (25J/cm(2)) LED and low-dose FK-506 showed a significant reduction in the severity of skin lesions. Combined therapy decreased in the serum level of IgE, NO, and in the splenic level of Th2-mediated cytokines and chemokines. Combination therapy significantly also reduced the inflammatory cellular infiltrate into the skin lesions. Moreover, combination therapy led to recovery of skin barrier function in the skin lesions. The use of combination of LED phototherapy and low-dose immunosuppressant improved Df-induced AD-like skin lesions in an NC/Nga mouse model by dominantly reducing IgE, NO, suppressing Th2-mediated immune responses, and inhibiting inflammatory cells, as well as improving skin barrier function. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

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    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  9. 'Perfect skin', the media and patients with skin disease: a qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker; Adams, Jon; Heading, Gaynor; Pond, Dimity

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of skin disease with societal ideals of beauty, and the role of the media in this relationship, has not previously been researched. The overall objective of this study was to explore the psychological effects of skin disease. The theme of the ideal of perfect skin and the role of the media in generating this ideal arose via an inductive study methodology and was explored in the context of respondents' psychological morbidity. A qualitative study, 62 semi-structured interviews were conducted with respondents with acne, eczema or psoriasis recruited from both general practice and specialist dermatology practice in an Australian regional city. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis employing a process of constant comparison in which data collection and analysis were cumulative and concurrent. The themes of perfect skin, societal ideals and media influence emerged from this iterative process. Respondents identified a societal ideal of flawless skin, largely mediated by media portrayals of perfection. Failure to meet this ideal precipitated psychological morbidity in female, but not male, respondents. An appreciation of the pervasive pressures of society and media upon females with skin disease may inform management strategies, particularly psychological management strategies, in patients with skin disease.

  10. Feasibility of actigraphy wristband monitoring of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, C J; O'Neill, J; Hix, E; McLaren, D T; Buxton, O M; Feldman, S R

    2014-11-01

    Actigraphy monitors are used to monitor sleep and scratching. Previous studies have implemented these monitors to evaluate behavior in adult patients with atopic dermatitis. However, such monitoring devices have been implemented in a paucity of studies involving pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of actigraphy monitoring in children with mild-to-severe atopic dermatitis. A total of six pediatric subjects were recruited. The severity of atopic dermatitis at the wrist area was assessed prior to placement of the wristband monitor. After wearing the wristbands for 7 days, subjects returned to clinic to undergo reassessment of the wrist area to determine if atopic dermatitis was exacerbated by the wrist-worn device. Data on sleep quality and how often patients wore the wristband monitors were also collected. No subjective data from the subjects or parents/caregivers were collected on tolerability of the monitors. None of the subjects exhibited exacerbation of atopic dermatitis at the wrist area after wearing the actigraphy monitors for 7 days. No adverse events were reported. Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis exhibited less total sleep time compared with children evaluated in previous actigraphy studies. Actigraphy wristband monitoring can be used to continuously assess disease severity in children with atopic dermatitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Omalizumab for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper Grønlund; Agner, Tove; Sand, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE, registered for the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria and severe allergic asthma. We present a case series of nine patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated off-label with omalizumab...

  12. Atopic predisposition in cholinergic urticaria patients and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrichter, S; Koch, K; Church, M K; Maurer, M

    2016-12-01

    Cholinergic urticaria (CholU) is a frequent chronic urticaria disorder with itchy weal and flare-type skin reactions in response to physical exercise or passive warming. A higher frequency of atopy among CholU patients has been reported, but the significance of this observation is unclear. To assess the prevalence and relevance of atopy in CholU patients. Thirty CholU patients were assessed for atopic skin diathesis (atopic predisposition) by use of the Erlangen Atopy Score and divided into atopic and non-atopic predisposed CholU individuals. Both groups were assessed for disease severity (CholUSI) and activity (CholUAS7), quality of life impairment [Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and CU-Q2 OL], seasonal exacerbation, total and specific serum IgE and comorbidities. CholU patients were found to exhibit high rates of atopic predisposition (57%), with higher prevalence and scores in female than in male patients. High Erlangen Atopy Scores were linked to high CholU severity, activity and impact on QoL. Atopic predisposed CholU patients show different seasonal exacerbation patterns, IgE specificity and comorbidity profiles as compared to non-atopic CholU patients. Atopic predisposition and cholinergic urticaria appear to be linked more closely than previously thought, which suggests shared pathogenetic mechanisms. Atopic patients with cholinergic urticaria have more severe disease and poorer quality of life than those who do not. Thus, all cholinergic urticaria patients should be assessed for atopic predisposition. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. Lipid Nutrition and the Epidermal Barrier: The Connection Between Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors, a New Therapeutic Target in Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarrubia, V G; Vidal-Asensi, S; Pérez-Bañasco, V; Cuevas-Santos, J; Cisterna-Cáncer, R

    2010-09-01

    The authors describe peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) transcription factors as connectors between the enzymatic mechanisms of the epidermal barrier and the abnormal immune and inflammatory responses that characterize atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Also described is a new connection between lipid metabolism and the epidermal barrier. A suggestion that emerges is that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis share at least 2 pathogenic mechanisms-namely, deficient expression of PPAR-#a and impaired production of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ-in spite of differences in causes and manifestations. A standardized olive oil formulation with powerful bactericidal and fungicidal effects also has the ability to increase serum levels of these 2 cytokines and regulate serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients at high risk for inflammatory and cardiovascular disease, suggesting that these may be among the mechanisms responsible for the benefits observed following oral and/or topical administration in patients with atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Atopic dermatitis in Tunisian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouri, Meriem; Masmoudi, Abderahmen; Borgi, Nozha; Rebai, Ahmed; Turki, Hamida

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) is low in North Africa. We describe the epidemiology of this atopic condition among school children in Tunisia. We conducted a Cross-sectional survey study of 5 to 6-year-old schoolchildren from 21 primary schools of Sfax. The diagnosis of AD was based on the U.K. Working Party diagnostic criteria. A questionnaire including these criteria and some risk factors of AD was issued to the children. All children were examined by one dermatologist. Among the 1617 examined children, ten had AD giving a one-year prevalence of 0.65%. The overall sex ratio was 2.33. The disease occurred before the age of 2 years in 3 children. Pure AD without concomitant respiratory allergies was noted in 3 cases. One first-degree family member with atopy was at least noted in seven children. The strongest associated factor was the presence of AD in at least one parent and maternal age at the time of the child birth. Nor breast-feeding neither environmental characteristics of the house did correlate with AD. The prevalence of AD in Tunisian schoolchildren is low but comparable to those of other developing countries. Family history of atopy and maternal age at the birth time was the most important associated factors.

  15. Unbalance of intestinal microbiota in atopic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela Marco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Playing a strategic role in the host immune function, the intestinal microbiota has been recently hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of atopy. In order to investigate the gastrointestinal microbial ecology of atopic disease, here we performed a pilot comparative molecular analysis of the faecal microbiota in atopic children and healthy controls. Results Nineteen atopic children and 12 healthy controls aged 4–14 years were enrolled. Stools were collected and the faecal microbiota was characterized by means of the already developed phylogenetic microarray platform, HTF-Microbi.Array, and quantitative PCR. The intestinal microbiota of atopic children showed a significant depletion in members of the Clostridium cluster IV, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Akkermansia muciniphila and a corresponding increase of the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusion Depleted in key immunomodulatory symbionts, the atopy-associated microbiota can represent an inflammogenic microbial consortium which can contribute to the severity of the disease. Our data open the way to the therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal microbiota in the treatment of atopy by means of pharmaceutical probiotics.

  16. Guidelines of Care for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis Part 4: Prevention of Disease Flares and Use of Adjunctive Therapies and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidbury, Robert; Tom, Wynnis L.; Bergman, James N.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Silverman, Robert A.; Berger, Timothy G.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Cohen, David E.; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Davis, Dawn M.; Feldman, Steven R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J.; Paller, Amy S.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Simpson, Eric L.; Williams, Hywel C.; Elmets, Craig A.; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G.; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic inflammatory dermatosis that can affect all age groups. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. In this final section, treatments for flare prevention and adjunctive and complementary therapies and approaches are reviewed. Suggestions on utilization are given based on available evidence. PMID:25264237

  17. Association of childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with atopic diseases and skin infections? A matched case-control study using the General Practice Research Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, Eelko; de Vries, Tjalling W.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Jick, Susan S.

    Background: Data to support the hypothesis of a relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and allergies are conflicting. Objective: To assess whether children with ADHD are more likely to have a history of atopic disorders, skin infections, and medical prescriptions than

  18. Risk factors for atopic and non-atopic asthma in a rural area of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca, Maritza; Oviedo, Gisela; Erazo, Silvia; Quinzo, Isabel; Fiaccone, Rosemeire L; Chico, Martha E; Barreto, Mauricio L; Cooper, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    Background Asthma has emerged as an important public health problem of urban populations in Latin America. Epidemiological data suggest that a minority of asthma cases in Latin America may be associated with allergic sensitisation and that other mechanisms causing asthma have been overlooked. The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for atopic and non-atopic asthma in school-age children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 3960 children aged 6–16 years living in Afro-Ecuadorian rural communities in Esmeraldas province in Ecuador. Allergic diseases and risk factors were assessed by questionnaire and allergic sensitisation by allergen skin prick reactivity. Results A total of 390 (10.5%) children had wheeze within the previous 12 months, of whom 14.4% had at least one positive skin test. The population-attributable fraction for recent wheeze associated with atopy was 2.4%. Heavy Trichuris trichiura infections were strongly inversely associated with atopic wheeze. Non-atopic wheeze was positively associated with maternal allergic symptoms and sedentarism (watching television (>3 h/day)) but inversely associated with age and birth order. Conclusions The present study showed a predominance of non-atopic compared with atopic wheeze among schoolchildren living in a poor rural region of tropical Latin America. Distinct risk factors were associated with the two wheeze phenotypes and may indicate different causal mechanisms. Future preventive strategies in such populations may need to be targeted at the causes of non-atopic wheeze. PMID:20435862

  19. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Gelbard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Gelbard1, Adelaide A Hebert1,21Departments of Dermatology; 2Pediatrics, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IFN-γ

  20. La sensibilización a hongos ambientales y su relación con enfermedades atópicas en escolares The sensitivity to environmental fungus and its relation to atopic diseases present in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Díaz Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades alérgicas y el asma, sobre todo en la población infantil, son afecciones muy frecuentes en todo el mundo y en Cuba. Con el objetivo de determinar la frecuencia de sensibilización a hongos ambientales y su relación con enfermedades atópicas, se realizó un estudio analítico transversal en 100 escolares de 6 a 7 años de una escuela primaria de San Antonio de los Baños, provincia La Habana, en el período comprendido entre septiembre de 2006 y marzo de 2007. El 27 % de la muestra seleccionada padecía de asma, el 40 % de rinitis alérgica y el 26 % de dermatitis atópica. La sensibilización micótica más frecuente resultó Penicillium, para un 50 % de la muestra. No hubo una asociación estadísticamente significativa entre reactividad cutánea a hongos ambientales y la presencia de enfermedades atópicas; tampoco fue significativa su asociación con la enfermedad alérgica respiratoria ni dermatitis atópica. Se concluye que la mayor sensibilización a hongos anemófilos se apreció al Penicillium, aunque sin asociación con la presencia de enfermedades atópicas.The allergic diseases and the asthma, mainly in children, are very frequent affections at world level and in Cuba. The objective of present paper was to determine the sensitization frequency to environmental fungi and its relation to atopic diseases, thus, a cross-sectional and analytical study was conducted in 100 school children aged 6 to 7 from a primary school of San Antonio de los Baños, La Habana province, from September 2006 to March, 2007. The 27 % of the selected sample suffered from asthma, the 40 % of allergic rhinitis, and the 26 % had Penicillium for the 50 % of sample. There was not a significant statistic association between the cutaneous reactivity to environmental fungi and the presence of atopic diseases and its association with the respiratory allergic disease as well as the atopic dermatitis was not significant. We conclude that the greater

  1. Immunology of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piloto Valdés, L J; Valdés Sánchez, A F; Gómez Echevarría, A H

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-two adult patients with atopic dermatitis were studied at the Allergology Service of the "Hnos. Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital. The diagnosis was established following the criteria of Hanifin and Lobitz. A detailed medical history was written for the patients; the study of some immunological parameters, such as the serum immunoglobulin quantification, delayed skin tests with a battery of antigens, and the spontaneous rosette-test, was also carried out. Almost all the patients showed serum IgE values above 150 UI, by means of the ELISA test modified by C.E.N.I.C. The mean values of the spontaneous rosette-test were low; this was more noticeable during the exacerbation period of the lesions. Candida sp, Mantoux and Streptokinase-Streptodornase antigens showed negative results in a high proportion of patients with atopic dermatitis, in relation with the control group. In atopic dermatitis, there are humoral disorders of immunity; this was demonstrated in our group by increased values of IgE and cellular disorders due to skin anergy, and to a low percentage of rosette forming cells; this does not allow to state that these phenomena have an active participation in the etiopathogenesis of this entity.

  2. Atopic dermatitis: new evidence on the role of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heratizadeh, Annice

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease. In the presence of a complex genetic background, there is increasing evidence for the role of specific allergenic trigger factors in perpetuating skin inflammation in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients. In this review, clinical and in-vitro data so far published on allergen-induced adaptive immune responses in atopic dermatitis are summarized. Emerging new data have been published particularly on adaptive immune responses to inhalant allergens in atopic dermatitis. In a randomized controlled study, the induction of a flare-up by grass pollen exposure in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients could be demonstrated for the first time. T cells directed to the two major allergens of house dust mite have been characterized to display a Th2, and moreover, a Th17 and Th2/Th17 phenotype in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients. With regard to microbial antigens, T cell-mediated immune responses directed to proteins of the species themselves can be observed - as has been published for Staphylococcus aureus and Malassezia spp. Beyond this, specific T-cell activation to cross-reacting human proteins might further trigger the disease in distinct patients. The role of 'autoallergic' phenomena in atopic dermatitis, because of human antigens without known cross-reactivity to environmental allergens, is currently under investigation as well. Recent findings on immunological and clinical characteristics of adaptive immune responses to allergens in atopic dermatitis, but also on the identification of new, potentially relevant allergen sources might contribute to the development of effective treatment strategies 'customized' for allergic inflammation in atopic dermatitis in future.

  3. ENTEROSORBENTS AS A PART OF COMPLEX THERAPY OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Alexeeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common allergic diseases in children which is assuming ever greater medical and social importance. Risk factors of AD include gastro-intestinal tract disturbances, especially intestinal dysbiosis, which is revealed in 89–94,1% of children with atopic dermatitis. Both correlation of the dysbiosis and AD manifestations severity and increase of underlying disease treatment efficacy as a result of target influence on intestinal microflora confirm that. For many decades guidelines of atopic dermatitis treatment in children along with elimination diet, antihistamine drugs and topic medicines include enterosorbents. The most effective drugs are those ones, consisting of prebiotics and sorbents. The wide experience of prebiotic drug with sorbent action (Lactofiltrum in complex therapy of atopic dermatitis in children is reviewed in this article.

  4. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, C.; Lerbaek, A.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    mutations. We believe this will increase the possibility of subgrouping this otherwise heterogenic disease and thereby enable a better phenotype-genotype characterization of hand eczema. This could improve the preventive initiatives, secure better information of patients about the prognosis......Hand eczema is a common disease with various risk factors of which atopic dermatitis is known to be one of the most important. Recently, two mutations in the gene coding for filaggrin, a protein important for the skin barrier, have repeatedly been shown to be associated with atopic dermatitis....... Moreover, one study point towards an association between the filaggrin null alleles and the subgroup of patients having both hand eczema and atopic dermatitis. For the remainder of hand eczema patients, still unknown genetic risk factors exist. We propose that in future, classification of atopic hand...

  5. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection contribute to disease exacerbation and thus justify additional antimicrobial / antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) may relieve pruritus but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength. “Eczema school” educational programs have been proven to be helpful. PMID:23663504

  6. Innovative technologies of teaching self-government atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz S.R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The new understanding of the disease requires the development of modern methods in the management strategy of atopic dermatitis. Individual approach to educate patients with use of modern gadgets in addition to the standard methods of treatment is a relatively new concept in dermatology. Educational programs for atopic dermatitis have a positive impact on the severity of dermatoses, as well as on psychological status.

  7. Atopic Dermatitis and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ali R.  Tehrani; Zahra Rahnama; Elham Ahmadi

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Atopic diseases, including asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis, are characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction mediated by T helper 2 cells, while type 1 diabetes mellitus is mediated by T helper 1 cells. Approach: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of atopic dermatitis between children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and age-matched controls. We conducted a case-control study enrolling 150 cases with type 1 diabetes mellitus between 2-20 years from pe...

  8. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort: prevalence, persistence and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortz, C G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C; Barington, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2015-07-01

    While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34.1%), and a considerable number of adults still suffered from atopic dermatitis evaluated both by questionnaire (17.1%) and clinical examination (10.0%). Persistent atopic dermatitis was found in 50% of those diagnosed in school age, and persistent atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with early onset, childhood allergic rhinitis and hand eczema. A close association was also found with allergic contact dermatitis and increased specific IgE to Malassezia furfur, but not with filaggrin gene defect. Persistence of atopic dermatitis in adulthood is common and affects quality of life. Persistent atopic dermatitis is particularly prevalent in those with early onset, allergic rhinitis and hand eczema in childhood. It is important to recognizing atopic dermatitis as a common and disabling disease not only in children but also in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Atopic march in pediatrics: genotype-associated mechanisms Part 1. Genotype-associated mechanisms of the atopic march in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Dytiatkovsky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the data of studies over last 10 years of populations of different countries on association of atopic diseases being the components of the atopic march in children (atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, bronchial asthma with pathologic mutations of genes (single nucleotid polymorphisms — SNP, which encode the molecules participating in allergic inflammation in the skin and mucosa. PubMed had been used as the search tool. There is a review of studies provided on investigated SNPs — filaggrin, receptors, toll-like receptors; the article describes a perspective bronchial asthma inflammation cascade — interleukin-1 receptor-like-1 and interleukin-33. There has been proposed conducting the studies of SNP on Ukrainian pediatric population for working out the personalized genotype-associated approach for diagnosing and management of atopic diseases in Ukrainian children population.

  10. Treating pediatric atopic dermatitis: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriades VR; Wisner E

    2015-01-01

    Victoria R Dimitriades, Elizabeth Wisner Division of Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Children's Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition which affects millions of people worldwide. It is most commonly seen in children but may also progress into adulthood. Management of this complex disease requires a multi-pronged approach which can address th...

  11. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease which usually starts during the first years of life. In the management of AD, the correct approach requires a combination of multiple treatments to identify and eliminate trigger factors, and to improve the alteration of the skin barrier. In this article we try to explain the importance of skin care in the management of AD in relation to the use of textiles: they may be useful to improve disrupted skin but they are also a possible cause of triggering or worsening the lesions. Garments are in direct contact with the skin all day long, and for this reason it is important to carefully choose suitable fabrics in atopic subjects who have disrupted skin. Owing to their hygienic properties fabrics produced from natural fibres are preferential. Wool fibres are frequently used in human clothes but are irritant in direct contact with the skin. Wool fibre has frequently been shown to be irritant to the skin of atopic patients, and for this reason wool intolerance was included as a minor criterion in the diagnostic criteria of AD by Hanifin and Rajka in 1980. Cotton is the most commonly used textile for patients with AD; it has wide acceptability as clothing material because of its natural abundance and inherent properties like good folding endurance, better conduction of heat, easy dyeability and excellent moisture absorption. Silk fabrics help to maintain the body temperature by reducing the excessive sweating and moisture loss that can worsen xerosis. However, the type of silk fabric generally used for clothes is not particularly useful in the care and dressing of children with AD since it reduces transpiration and may cause discomfort when in direct contact with the skin. A new type of silk fabric made of transpiring and slightly elastic woven silk is now commercially available (Microair Dermasilk) and may be used for the skin care of children with AD. The presence of increased bacterial colonization

  12. Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize...

  13. Truth or fiction: risk factors for childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Kendra Gail

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is increasing in prevalence throughout the developed world, in parallel with asthma and hay fever. The reasons for the increase remain unclear. As a practical question, it is valuable to understand which interventions might decrease risk for childhood atopic disease. Prospective studies among infants and children are challenging to design and to execute. Fortunately, several large studies from Europe and the United States are better characterizing whether behavioral interventions such as breastfeeding, delayed introduction of solid foods, hydrolyzed protein infant formulas, or pets in the home might be protective or impart increased risk of developing atopic dermatitis. As this body of literature grows, physicians will be able to recommend behavioral interventions that can prevent atopic dermatitis in individuals and ideally decrease prevalence over the population.

  14. Apgar score is related to development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3-9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis....... We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit) = 1.23 (1.06-1.44), P = 0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06-1.61), P...... = 0.012, were risk factors for atopic dermatitis in cotwin control analysis, whereas birth anthropometric factors were not significantly related to disease development. Risk estimates in monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different for the identified risk factors. Conclusions...

  15. Evaluation of Immune Indices and Serum Vitamin D Content in Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska-Opałka, Agnieszka; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Lewicki, Sławomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Kalicki, Bolesław

    2017-01-01

    The influence of vitamin D on allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis, is linked to the presence of vitamin D nuclear receptors in immune cells. The present study seeks to determine the possible relationship between serum vitamin D content and immune indices in children with atopic dermatitis. The study was conducted in 19 children with atopic dermatitis. The control consisted of 17 age-matched healthy children. A single significant finding was a distinctly lower number of serum regulatory T cells in atopic dermatitis compared with controls (p atopic dermatitis. In conclusion, the results point to a regulatory role of T cells in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, but fail to substantiate the influence of vitamin D on the course of the disease.

  16. The Association Between Bathing Habits and Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroulis, Ioannis; Pyle, Tia; Kopylov, David; Little, Anthony; Gaughan, John; Kratimenos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that frequently affects children. The current recommendations on management using lifestyle modification are highly variable, leading to confusion and uncertainty among patients. To determine current bathing behaviors and the subsequent impact on disease severity. This was an observational cross-sectional study conducted at an urban pediatric emergency department. Parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning the patient's bathing habits. The results were correlated with the atopic dermatitis severity determined by the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) tool. No difference between variables was found to be significant for bathing frequency, time spent bathing, or use of moisturizers. Multivariate analysis showed that atopic dermatitis severity increased with age greater than 2 years (P = .0004) and with greater bathing duration (P = .001). Atopic dermatitis severity may be associated with a longer duration of bathing. The frequency of bathing does not appear to affect atopic dermatitis severity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Study of urinary leukotriene E4 in atopic dermatitis: relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease prevalent in patients with a personal or family history of atopy. Cysteinyl leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory mediators which play a role in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. Urinary leukotriene E4 (LTE4) has been used as an index of ...

  18. SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes modern data on risk factors of severe course of atopic dermatitis in children: the role of alimentary and inhalant allergens, cutaneous infections, allergic reactions to drugs used in the treatment of disease. The most important questions of differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis in children and the distinctive features of the illness, which may be mistaken for atopic dermatitis (primary immunodeficiencies, keratosis pilaris, psoriasis, enteropatic acrodermatitis; cutaneous bacterial and fungal infections, and drug-induced contact dermatitis to topical creams and ointments are discussed. Treatment of atopic dermatitis is based on modern approaches and includes recommendations on the use of emolents, anti-inflammatory drugs (topical glucocorticoids and calcineurin inhibitors. The article provides indications and contraindications to the administration of anti-inflammatory drugs. Special recommendations for use of cleansers and emolents at all degrees of severity of atopic dermatitis, which helps reduce the risk of side effects of topical corticosteroids, complications such as cutaneous infections and helps to maintain remission of disease are given. The importance of training programs patients is emphasized. Compliance of patients and/or their parents contributes to the achievement of the desired effect of the treatment of atopic dermatitis, which will improve the patients’ quality of life.

  19. Probiotics and infantile atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akelma AZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Zülfikar Akelma,1 Aziz Alper Biten2 1Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Unit, Ankara Kecioren Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 2General Directorate of Management Services, Republic of Turkey Ministry of Health, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Pediatric eczema is a common disease which causes economic and social burden. Its incidence differs among the societies, with an incidence reported to reach up to 20% in developed countries. Eczema is the first allergic disease seen in the childhood, and it is recognized as a precursor for the development of atopic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy in the forthcoming years of children. Increased incidence of eczema in recent years has led to new research in epidemiology, prevention, and intervention of this disease. It is no doubt important to treat itching, rash, and excoriation of the skin; however, treatment of pediatric eczema should not be considered only as a treatment of skin lesions. Considering skin treatment as the tip of the iceberg, proper management of the allergic processes can be accepted as the rest of the iceberg. The role of probiotics in the prevention of atopic eczema is yet to be clarified. Evidence presented by existing studies suggesting that probiotics may prevent pediatric eczema is not strong enough. A positive effect, if any, may be related with onset time, dose, duration, and use of specific probiotics. To date, there is no strong evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of eczema; however, administration of probiotics in breast-feeding mothers in the prenatal period and in infants in the postnatal period can be accepted as a safe and helpful option in the prevention of eczema. Nevertheless, there are still questions to be answered in the future about probiotic administration for eczema. Clinical use of probiotics will gradually become more widespread when these questions are answered. Based on current information, the administration

  20. Development of atopic dermatitis and its association with prenatal and early life exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Roduit, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of children in industrialized countries are affected by atopic dermatitis. From epidemiological studies, it is quite obvious that the worldwide prevalence of atopic dermatitis has considerably increased over the past decades and constitutes a major public health problem. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that occurs in very early life and frequently precedes the development of asthma and allergic rhinitis during the first several years of life. Although a large...

  1. Diagnostic clinical features of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Lata

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common disease which varies widely in clinical presentation at different ages and places. Although authors working in western countries on white races have suggested many criteria, there is no uniform set which can be used in large population studies in this part of the world. Hence keeping in mind differences in environment and ethnicity of population, the present study was carried out. Seventy- three patients of atopic dermatitis and 71 age matched controls were studied. All the subjects were examined using a set of 34 potentially useful clinical features selected from different studies, including features for evaluation of photosensitivity. Multiple regression technique was used for analysing the data. It was found that 6 clinical features were diagnostic, 1. presence of itch, 2. history of flexural involvement, 3. history of dry skin, 4. family history of atopy, 5. personal history of diagnosed asthma and 6, visible flexural dermatitis. Photosensitivity was not a significant feature.

  2. EFFICACY OF HYPOALLERGENIC FORMULA IN PRIMARY PROPHYLAXIS OF ALLERGY TO COW MILK PROTEINS IN CHILDREN WITH HIGH RISK ON ATOPIC DISEASES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Borovik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of usage of specific hypoallergenic formula in atopic dermatitis prophylaxis in children of the 1st year of life with high risk of allergy development is reviewed in this article. Sixty-six children of the 1st year of life with compromised anamnesis were included into the study. In multicenter researches it was shown that this formula meets modern requirements, which are raised to composition of children adapted hypoallergenic formulas, that it fits physiological needs of nutrients and energy and is well-tolerated by infants, including newborns, with high risk of allergy development

  3. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-01-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer scores, and the probability of this occurring by chance in one or more patients out of 12 was 0.46. In this sample we were unable to confirm intolerance to tartrazine in 11 out of 12 patients. PMID:1626990

  4. Quality of life in children and teenagers with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cláudia Soïdo Falcão do; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto

    2012-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis is a disease which has increased during the past years despite our improved understanding of it. To assess the impact of Atopic Dermatitis in the quality of life of children and teenagers and their family. A descriptive cross-sectional method with prospective data collection of 50 children and teenagers diagnosed with Atopic Dermatitis ranging in age from 5-16 years. Fifty parents and/or guardians answered the quality of life questionnaires The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index and Family Dermatitis Impact Questionnaire. The socio-demographic and clinical variables were evaluated by a clinical record chart designed specifically for the research and socioeconomic standardized questionnaire by the Brazilian Association of Research Enterprises, which evaluates assets acquired and the educational level of the head of the household. Thirty-five out of the 50 patients were female (70%), and 28 (56%) of them were from social class C. The Questionnaire Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index showed that 19 (38%) patients ranged from 7 to 12 points (moderate impact of atopic dermatitis) and 17 patients (34%) ranged from 13 to 30 points (high impact of atopic dermatitis). The Family Dermatitis Impact Questionnaire revealed that 15 (30%) families had scores between 7 and 12 points and 22 families (44%) scored between 13 and 30 points. The results show that there is a very high impact on the QoL for atopic dermatitis patients and their families. This makes us suggest the importance of including the quality of life study in clinical evaluations.

  5. Management of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: The Role of Emollient Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Catherine Mack Correa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder that afflicts a growing number of young children. Genetic, immune, and environmental factors interact in a complex fashion to contribute to disease expression. The compromised stratum corneum found in atopic dermatitis leads to skin barrier dysfunction, which results in aggravation of symptoms by aeroallergens, microbes, and other insults. Infants—whose immune system and epidermal barrier are still developing—display a higher frequency of atopic dermatitis. Management of patients with atopic dermatitis includes maintaining optimal skin care, avoiding allergic triggers, and routinely using emollients to maintain a hydrated stratum corneum and to improve barrier function. Flares of atopic dermatitis are often managed with courses of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. This paper discusses the role of emollients in the management of atopic dermatitis, with particular emphasis on infants and young children.

  6. Disease: H01863 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01863 Atopic myelitis; Eosinophilic myelitis Atopic myelitis, also described as i...tepwise progression of mostly the sensory symptoms. Atopic myelitis is often with coexistent atopic diseases, such as atopic...ificantly increased in patients with atopic myelitis. Upregulation of CCL11 and IL-9 explain quite well the ...ids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchanges (PE), are effective in atopic...um IgE level Corticosteroids Immunoglobulin (IVIG) Plasma exchanges (PE) See also H00079 Asthma and H01358 Atopic

  7. The Burden of Atopic Dermatitis: Summary of a Report for the National Eczema Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Aaron M; Wang, Annie R; Li, Wen-Qing; Sevetson, Erika; Block, Julie K; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2017-01-01

    To assess the patient-level and societal burden of atopic dermatitis, we comprehensively reviewed the literature related to quality of life, social, economic, academic, and occupational impacts. Atopic dermatitis has profound impacts on patient and family quality of life. A conservative estimate of the annual costs of atopic dermatitis in the United States is $5.297 billion (in 2015 USD). People with atopic dermatitis may change their occupation because of their skin disease. Research gaps include quality of life assessments outside of tertiary care centers, impacts on partners and families of adult patients, and updated comprehensive cost estimates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Atopic dermatitis: global epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutten, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease posing a significant burden on health-care resources and patients' quality of life. It is a complex disease with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and combinations of symptoms. AD affects up to 20% of children and up to 3% of adults; recent data show that its prevalence is still increasing, especially in low-income countries. First manifestations of AD usually appear early in life and often precede other allergic diseases such as asthma or allergic rhinitis. Individuals affected by AD usually have genetically determined risk factors affecting the skin barrier function or the immune system. However, genetic mutations alone might not be enough to cause clinical manifestations of AD, and it is merely the interaction of a dysfunctional epidermal barrier in genetically predisposed individuals with harmful effects of environmental agents which leads to the development of the disease. AD has been described as an allergic skin disease, but today, the contribution of allergic reactions to the initiation of AD is challenged, and it is proposed that allergy is rather a consequence of AD in subjects with a concomitant underlying atopic constitution. Treatment at best achieves symptom control rather than cure; there is thus a strong need to identify alternatives for disease prevention. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Darsow (U.); A. Wollenberg (A.); D. Simon; A. Taieb; T. Werfel; A.P. Oranje (Arnold); C. Gelmetti (C.); Ã. Svensson (Ãke); M. Deleuran (M.); A.M. Calza; F. Giusti; J. Lübbe (Jann); S. Seidenari (Stefania); J. Ring (J.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDifficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for

  10. Clinical implications of new mechanistic insights into atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-08-01

    The review will examine recent advances in our understanding of atopic dermatitis and how these mechanisms provide a framework for new approaches to the management of this common skin disease. The mechanisms by which epithelial skin barrier and immune responses contribute to the complex clinical phenotypes found in atopic dermatitis are being elucidated. Atopic dermatitis often precedes food allergy because reduced skin barrier function allows environmental food allergens to penetrate the skin leading to systemic allergen sensitization. There is increasing evidence that atopic dermatitis is a systemic disease. New treatments are focused on intervention in polarized immune responses leading to allergic diseases. This includes antagonism of IL-4 and IL-13 effects. Prevention strategies involve maintaining normal skin barrier function with emollients to prevent allergens and microbes from penetrating the skin. Recent work on the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis has important implications for its clinical management, including the development of effective barrier creams and biologicals targeting specific polarized immune pathways resulting in skin inflammation.

  11. EFFICIENT INTRODUCTION OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND PREDISPOSITION TO ALLERGIC REACTIONS FOR PREVENTION OF ATOPIC MARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kamaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of allergic diseases grows constantly. Realization of genetic defects to the disease depends of impact of environment and contacts with different allergens. Prophylactic dietary avoidance is important to prevent debut of the atopic dermatitis and secondary exacerbations of the disease. Terms and preferable sequence of complementary food introduction are discussed for breast-fed and formula-fed infants; advantages of ready-made industrial products of infant meals are proved. The gradual outreach of infant’s taste spectrum and increasing step by step of load on infant’s intestine can become serious hedge for the atopic march and important measure of prevention of allergic rhinitis and asthma.Key words: atopic march, dietetics, complementary foods, prevention of allergies, children.

  12. Identification of atopic dermatitis subgroups in children from two longitudinal birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Savenije, Olga E M; Heron, Jon; Evans, David M; Vonk, Judith M; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet H; Henderson, A John; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brown, Sara J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a prevalent disease with variable natural history. Longitudinal birth cohort studies provide an opportunity to define subgroups based on disease trajectories, which may represent different genetic and environmental pathomechanisms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the

  13. No effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis in infancy : a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, ML; Wolt-Plompen, SAA; Dubois, AEJ; van der Heide, S; Jansen, DF; Hoijer, MA; Kauffman, HF; Duiverman, EJ

    Studies have been performed suggesting that administration of probiotics may have therapeutic and/or preventive benefits in the development of sensitization and atopic disease, particularly in infants with atopic dermatitis (AD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and

  14. Serum IgE and atopic dermatitis | Abdulla | Sudanese Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic disease that starts early in infancy and may continue into adolescence presenting a consistent problem to the patient and in severe cases to the whole family. Many hypotheses claimed to explain the clinical course of Atopic Dermatitis by attributing a central role to serum ...

  15. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy: the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M.; Koopman, L. P.; van Strien, R. T.; Wijga, A.; Smit, H. A.; Aalberse, R. C.; Neijens, H. J.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D. S.; Gerritsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. Seventy-six children

  16. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy : the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M; Koopman, LP; van Strien, RT; Wijga, A; Smit, HA; Aalberse, RC; Neijens, HJ; Brunekreef, B; Postma, DS; Gerritsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. Objective We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life.

  17. USAGE OF DIOCTAHEDRAL SMECTITE IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Botkina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of enter sorbent — dioctahedral Smectite (Neosmektin — usage as part of complex therapy of children with atopic dermatitis (ATD. It is shown that the administration of Smectite favored better efficacy of baseline treatment of ATD, more express and quick regression of skin manifestations of the disease, decrease in number of children with eosinophilia. High efficacy of ATD treatment with Smectite indicates the pathogenetic justification of efferent therapy of the disease. Observation results witness the good tolerability of Smectite: side effects related to the treatment were only observed in 14 percent of children.Key words: children, atopic dermatits, smectite, treatment.

  18. Emerging drugs for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Peck Y

    2009-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, affecting 10-20% of children and 2% of adults worldwide. Preventive treatment of AD consists of daily skin hydration and emollient therapy; but the majority of patients still require symptomatic treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors, both of which may be associated with potential long-term side effects. With increasing evidence supporting the role of skin barrier defects in the pathogenesis of AD, there is also a parallel increase in medications that claim to assist barrier repair. The current review discusses some exciting results with these medications, as well as the challenges that lie ahead of them. While barrier repair treatments offer some promise, there continues to be a need for safer anti-inflammatory medications. Some of these medications under investigation are phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, urocanic acid oxidation products and IL-4/IL-13 receptor blockers. The review also discusses anti-staphylococcal treatments including nanocrystalline silver cream, silver and antimicrobial-coated fabrics, and anti-itch treatments including mu-opiod receptor antagonists, chymase inhibitors and cannabinoid receptor agonists. These medications may become an integral part of AD therapy.

  19. Surfactant protein D in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwy, Thomas; Otkjaer, Kristian; Madsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    was examined using immunohistochemistry on skin biopsies from patients with the two major dermatologic diseases, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. SP-D was located in the stratum basale of all biopsies with similar intense staining in both diseased and normal skin. Differences were detected in stratum spinosum......, no substantial up-regulation of SP-D mRNA was detected in lesional psoriatic skin, and a comparison of serum levels of SP-D between patients with atopic dermatitis or psoriasis and a group of age matched healthy controls did not show significant differences. In conclusion SP-D was significantly more abundant...... where involved psoriatic skin showed intense staining through the entire region significantly different from uninvolved and normal skin. Lesional atopic skin showed moderate staining extending through the basal three-fourths of stratum spinosum. Using real time polymerase chain reaction analysis...

  20. Common loss-of-function variants of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin are a major predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Colin N A; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Atopic disease, including atopic dermatitis (eczema), allergy and asthma, has increased in frequency in recent decades and now affects approximately 20% of the population in the developed world. Twin and family studies have shown that predisposition to atopic disease is highly heritable. Although...... dermatitis. This work establishes a key role for impaired skin barrier function in the development of atopic disease....... most genetic studies have focused on immunological mechanisms, a primary epithelial barrier defect has been anticipated. Filaggrin is a key protein that facilitates terminal differentiation of the epidermis and formation of the skin barrier. Here we show that two independent loss-of-function genetic...

  1. Measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ lifetime using B$0\\atop{d}$ → J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$ decays at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balm, Paul Wijnand [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-12-08

    This thesis describes a measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ lifetime in the decay to (J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$), using 114 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron from October 15, 2002, to June 10, 2003. The measurement is motivated by the tests of the Standard Model that it makes possible. These include tests of Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicting B-meson lifetimes, and of the complex phase in the CKM-matrix as the source of CP-violation in B$0\\atop{d}$ decays to (J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$).

  2. Burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adults: Analysis of data from the 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Kazuhiko; Gupta, Shaloo; Gadkari, Abhijit; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kono, Takeshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Demiya, Sven; Eckert, Laurent

    2018-01-31

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. The objective of this study was to characterize the burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adult patients relative to the general population. Japanese adults (≥18 years) with a self-reported diagnosis of atopic dermatitis and adult controls without atopic dermatitis/eczema/dermatitis were identified from the 2013 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey. Atopic dermatitis patients were propensity-score matched with non-atopic dermatitis controls (1:2 ratio) on demographic variables. Patient-reported outcome data on comorbidities, mood and sleep disorders, health-related quality of life, work productivity and activity impairment, and health-care resource utilization were analyzed in atopic dermatitis patients and matched controls. A total of 638 Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis were identified, of whom 290 (45.5%) rated their disease as "moderate/severe" and 348 (54.5%) as "mild". The analysis cohort comprised 634 atopic dermatitis patients and 1268 matched controls. Atopic dermatitis patients reported a significantly higher prevalence of arthritis, asthma, nasal allergies/hay fever, anxiety, depression and sleep disorders compared with controls (all P Atopic dermatitis patients also reported a significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher overall work and activity impairment, and higher health-care resource utilization (all P atopic dermatitis reported a substantial disease burden relative to adults without atopic dermatitis, suggesting an unmet need for effective strategies targeting disease management. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Atopic and non-atopic sensitivity in a large bakery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, I G; Ulmeanu, V; Murariu, D

    1981-01-01

    Flour is an allergen which can sensitize either by the digestive or the inhalatory route, particularly those who work with this product. Factors involved occupational four-induced asthma also include various insects and their excreta, fungi and dermato-farinae. In this study, 1303 subjects from a number of bakeries were studied. They underwent allergological investigation by means of prick-tests with allergens and respiratory function tests for those with bronchial asthma. Also studied is the relationship with atopic syndromes or atopic family history.

  4. Treating pediatric atopic dermatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriades VR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Victoria R Dimitriades, Elizabeth Wisner Division of Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Children's Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition which affects millions of people worldwide. It is most commonly seen in children but may also progress into adulthood. Management of this complex disease requires a multi-pronged approach which can address the myriad of issues which underscore its development. Avoidance of triggering factors is imperative in establishing consistent control of skin irritation while daily moisturization can be very effective in skin barrier repair and maintenance. Judicious use of anti-inflammatory medications has been shown to make a significant impact on both treatment as well as prevention of disease. Unfortunately, pruritus, a key feature of AD, has proven much harder to control. Finally, awareness of the risks of colonization and infection in patients with AD should be incorporated into their surveillance and management plans. While our understanding has progressed greatly regarding this disease, further research is still needed regarding future directions for both treatment and prevention. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, eczema, treatment, corticosteroids, antipruritic

  5. Dermatitis, atopic on the legs (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are caused by an inherited allergic condition called atopic dermatitis. Many of these areas have been scratched until ... infection triggering and perpetuating the problem. In adults, atopic dermatitis frequently involves the body creases, such as inside ...

  6. Dermatitis, atopic on the arms (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This person has inherited allergic skin inflammation (atopic dermatitis) on the arms. Red (erythematous), scaly plaques can be seen on the inside of the elbows (antecubital fossa). In adults, atopic dermatitis usually ...

  7. Impact of adult atopic dermatitis on topical drug penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Ortiz, Patricia; Hansen, Steen H; Shah, Vinod P

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate methodologies for the determination of drug penetration in diseased skin have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a metronidazole cream formulation in atopic dermatitis, employing dermal microdialysis and tape strip sampling...... in the atopic dermatitis compared with uninvolved skin (p... techniques. Non-invasive measuring methods were used for the quantification of the severity of the dermatitis. Skin thickness and the depth of the microdialysis probes in the skin were measured by 20 MHz ultrasound scanning. Metronidazole concentration, sampled by microdialysis, was 2.4-fold higher...

  8. Potential role of reduced environmental UV exposure as a driver of the current epidemic of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Zirwas, Matthew J; Elias, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The basis for the sudden and dramatic increase in atopic dermatitis (AD) and related atopic diseases in the second half of the 20th century is unclear. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that the transition from rural to urban living leads to reduced childhood exposure to pathogenic microorganisms....... Hence instead of having the normal TH1 bias and immune tolerance because of repeated exposure to pathogens, urban dwellers have TH2 cell immune activity and atopic disease in a more sterile environment. Various other environmental exposures have been implicated in the explosion of AD (and atopic...

  9. Distinct molecular signatures of mild extrinsic and intrinsic atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta Cathrina; Litman, Thomas; Hald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with underlying defects in epidermal function and immune responses. In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate differences in gene expression in lesional skin from patients with mild extrinsic or intrinsic AD compared...

  10. Gallstone risk in adult patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Andersen, Yuki M.F.; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Adult atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with overweight, obesity and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Americans, similarly to psoriasis, but no increased risk of CVD has been shown in European patients with AD. This study investigated the prevalence and risk of gallstones in adults with AD...

  11. An overview of topical treatment for atopic eczema | Motswaledi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atopic eczema is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disease of the skin. It is characterised by dry, itchy skin and a typical distribution on the elbows and knees in younger children, and the cubital and popliteal fossae in older children and adults. Treatment modalities include emollients, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin ...

  12. An approach to mild to moderate atopic eczema | Motswaledi | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atopic eczema is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disease of the skin characterised by dryness and itching, with typical distribution on the elbows and knees in younger children and on the cubital and popliteal fossae in older children and adults. It can be classified as mild, moderate or severe. S Afr Fam Pract 2012 ...

  13. Regulatory natural killer cell expression in atopic childhood asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Different subsets of natural killer (NK) cells were found to play a role in pathogenesis of allergy. We sought to investigate the expression of regulatory NK cells (CD56+CD16+CD158+) in atopic children with bronchial asthma in order to outline the value of these cells as biomarkers of disease severity and/or ...

  14. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İjlal Erturan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore, we aimed to investigate self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with atopic dermatitis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. The Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI were used for determining self-esteem and quality of life. The Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD Index was used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. Results: It was found that patient group had lower self-esteem than healthy controls according to the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale. A statistically significant difference was observed in happiness/satisfaction and anxiety subscale scores between the patients and healthy controls while there was no significant difference between the other sub-scale scores. Mean value of dermatological quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in healthy controls. A moderate negative correlation was found between self-esteem and CDLQI scores among adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Discussion: This study results have shown that self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were adversely affected in adolescents with atopic dermatitis irrespective of gender. These patients should be examined psychiatrically besides dermatological examination and treatment. We suggest that improvement will be observed in self-esteem and quality of

  15. Specific IgE to common food allergens in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin; Kashef, Sara; Alyasin, Soheila; Afrasiabi, Maryam; Orooj, Marzieh

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a major public health problem, often starting in early childhood and sometimes followed by other allergic diseases. Although hypersensitivity to foods is assumed to play an essential role in the development of atopic dermatitis in some patients, little is known about common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. This study was designed to identify probable food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis and find the relationship between food sensitization and the severity of atopic dermatitis. This study included 90 children aged 2-48 months with atopic dermatitis. Skin prick tests for cow's milk, hen's egg, almond, potato and soybean were done. Serum specific IgE to 20 food allergens was also screened. Among children with atopic dermatitis, the frequency of food sensitization was 40% by skin prick test and 51% by food-specific IgE. Children with atopic dermatitis were most commonly sensitized to cow's milk (31%), hen's egg (17.7%), tree nuts (17.7%), wheat (12.2%), potato (11.1%), tomato (8.8%) and peanut (8.8%). In 42 children with moderate to severe eczema, sensitivity to food allergens was 78.5% by skin prick test and 88% by serum specific IgE evaluation. Our results showed that cow's milk, hen's egg and tree nuts were the most common food allergens in Iranian children with atopic dermatitis. Sensitization to foods was much higher in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Determining specific IgE in children with atopic dermatitis can be helpful in managing these patients.

  16. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGENS ON ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wardhana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic eczematous skin disease that develops in a patient with atopic diathesis, which is characterized by an increased liability to produce IgE antibodies for allergens mostly derived from environmental or inhalant allergens and food allergens. They are produced by cell-mediated allergic contact reactions, and recently contact sensitivity to various environmental allergens has been demonstrated in patients with AD. Atopic patients are recognized by their ability to produce large amounts of specific IgE antibodies to common substances as environmental allergens, i.e. house dust mites, grass pollens, animal danders, molds, food, etc. These antibodies can be detected by skin prick test. The aim of this study was to identify the sensitization against environmental or inhalants allergens through skin prick tests in the patients with atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, descriptive study. We revised all medical records of patients with AD since January 2002 to December 2004 in the Out Patients Unit of Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. The variables studied were: gender, age, work related, diagnosis associates to AD, and prick test of environmental allergens. Results: In 3 years periods we had revised 46 of patients with AD that was done skin prick tests. The median age was 38 years (range 29-54 years, 34/46 (73.9 % of these were male and 12 (26.1 % female. Twenty nine patients presented pure AD, and 17 patients had AD with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Only 16 (34.7% of patients had no history of allergic disease. Thirsty six of 46 (78.20% of all tested AD patients had a positive skin prick tests against inhalant (aeroallergens 16 patients and food allergens 21 patients. Sixteen patients with positive of skin test include; dust mite in 12 patients, animal dander in 10 patients, grass pollen in 9 patients and cockroach in 6 patients. Conclusion: We concluded that

  17. Systemic therapy of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Nathaniel A; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common childhood inflammatory disease that, in a small percentage of cases, can become severe enough to require potent systemic treatment. Many trials have been conducted with systemic agents for the treatment of severe pediatric AD; we review the evidence here. Although corticosteroids are widely used in practice, they are not generally recommended as a systemic treatment option for AD in children. Most patients experience a relatively rapid and robust response to cyclosporine. Treating children with cyclosporine long term is troubling; however, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate are all reasonable alternatives for maintenance therapy in recalcitrant cases. Several additional options are available for the most refractory cases, including interferon-γ, intravenous immunoglobulin, and various biologics. Phototherapy is another modality that can be effective in treating severe AD. Ultimately the choice of agent is individualized. Systemic therapy options are associated with potentially severe adverse effects and require careful monitoring. Nonsystemic approaches toward prevention of flares and long-term control of atopic dermatitis in pediatric patients should be continued in conjunction with systemic therapy. In the future, more targeted systemic treatments hold the potential for effective control of disease with fewer side effects than broadly immunosuppressive agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Topical tacrolimus as treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masutaka Furue

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Masutaka Furue, Satoshi TakeuchiDepartment of Dermatology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic, relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. The mainstays of treatment for AD are topical tacrolimus and topical steroids. Tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, not only complements existing treatment options but also overcomes some of the drawbacks of topical steroid therapy when given topically and thus meets the long-term needs of patients in preventing disease progression. Topical tacrolimus has been widely recognized in terms of its short- and long-term efficacies and safety, and it is also accepted as a first-line treatment for inflammation in AD. The recent proactive use of topical tacrolimus may emphasize a long-term benefit of this calcineurin inhibitor for AD treatment. To reduce possible long-term adverse effects, it is important to monitor its topical doses in daily clinics.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical tacrolimus, topical steroids, dose, proactive use, adverse effects

  19. The natural history of atopic dermatitis and its association with Atopic March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanunt, Sinjira; Chinratanapisit, Sasawan; Pacharn, Punchama; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the first manifestation of Atopic March. The natural history of AD and predictive factors for Atopic March have not been widely studied in Asia. To study the natural history and associated factors of disease remission and risk of respiratory allergy in Thai children with AD. Medical records of AD patients attending Allergy clinic at Siriraj hospital from 2004-2014 were reviewed. Patients were further followed-up to obtain current symptoms and treatment. One hundred and two AD patients (60.8% female) were followed for 10.2±4.7 years. The median age at diagnosis was 1.5 (0.1-12.0) years. The most common allergen sensitization was Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae. Forty-four percent of patients had complete remission at the median age of 6.3 (2.0-15.0) years. Forty-seven percent of early AD patients (onset children had complete remission at school age with a better prognosis in early AD. At preschool age, two-thirds and one-third developed AR and asthma, respectively. Early AD and food allergy were risk factors of early asthma.

  20. THE CASE OF HERPETIC ECZEMA IN A CHILD WITH CONGENITAL ICHTHYOSIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Stadnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of the development of herpetic eczema (Kaposi's eczema is presented against the background of congenital ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. It has been shown that the presence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and pollinosis, sensitization to many common allergens, and a positive family history of atopic dermatitis are factors of a more severe course of Kaposi's eczema. The presented clinical observation of the child with Kaposi's eczema showed that early diagnosis and timely initiated complex  therapy are the determining factors of a favorable prognosis of the disease.

  1. Efficient introduction of complementary foods for children with atopic dermatitis and predisposition to allergic reactions for prevention of atopic march

    OpenAIRE

    Kamaev, A.

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of allergic diseases grows constantly. Realization of genetic defects to the disease depends of impact of environment and contacts with different allergens. Prophylactic dietary avoidance is important to prevent debut of the atopic dermatitis and secondary exacerbations of the disease. Terms and preferable sequence of complementary food introduction are discussed for breast-fed and formula-fed infants; advantages of ready-made industrial products of infant meals are proved. The gra...

  2. Atopic eczema in school children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AC, Hay RJ. Validation of the UK diagnostic criteria for Atopic dermatitis in a population setting. BR J Dermatol. 1996;135:12~7. \\ 6. International Study of Asthma and. Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Manual. Munster: University of Munster; 1992. 7. Jose I. Figueroa, L-Claire F, Aynalem A,. Rod J Hay, Pediatric Dermatology.

  3. Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Marsella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies.

  4. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis in Arar, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaifallah A. Alenizi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: 65% of Saudi children with atopic dermatitis are colonized with S. aureus in their skin lesions. The rate of colonization is affected by severity of the disease and by the age of the patient.

  5. Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Rosanna; De Benedetto, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies. PMID:29056696

  6. Domestic dog exposure at birth reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, S; Thyssen, J P; Stokholm, J; Vissing, N H; Waage, J; Bisgaard, H

    2016-12-01

    While the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis is complex and poorly understood, neonatal exposures are important for disease occurrence. However, the effect of dog exposure on the risk of atopic dermatitis is unresolved. We investigated whether domestic dog exposure affected the risk of atopic dermatitis in children during the first 3 years of life. Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) are ongoing prospective clinical birth cohort studies. Data from 411 children born to mothers with asthma (COPSAC 2000 ) and 700 unselected children (COPSAC 2010 ) were analyzed following the same protocols at the same research site. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed prospectively according to the Hanifin-Rajka criteria. Parental history of asthma, eczema, or rhinitis was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis. In the COPSAC 2000 , maternal specific serum IgE against eight inhalant allergens was sampled after the children's birth and at pregnancy week 24 in the COPSAC 2010 cohort. Associations between dog exposure and atopic dermatitis were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression models and adjusted for lifestyle confounders. In the COPSAC 2000 and COPSAC 2010 cohorts, the risk of atopic dermatitis was significantly lower in children with domestic dog exposure ( adjusted HR = 0.46 [0.25-0.87], P = 0.02; and adjusted HR = 0.58 [0.36-0.93], P = 0.03, respectively). The risk of atopic dermatitis decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing number of dogs ( adjusted HR = 0.58 [0.38-0.89], P = 0.01) in the COPSAC 2010 . The protective effect was restricted to children born to mothers with atopic disease in the unselected COPSAC 2010 cohort ( adjusted HR = 0.39 [0.19-0.82], P = 0.01), as no effect was observed in children born to mothers without atopic disease ( adjusted HR = 0.92 [0.49-1.73], P = 0.79). Paternal atopic status did not affect the risk of atopic dermatitis. We found no significant interaction between the CD14 T/T genotype and

  7. Sensitive skin is highly frequent in extrinsic atopic dermatitis and correlates with disease severity markers but not necessarily with skin barrier impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, Tsuyoshi; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hayato; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Aoshima, Masahiro; Ikeya, Shigeki; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Ito, Taisuke; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2018-01-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition of cutaneous hypersensitivity to environmental factors. Lactic acid stinging test (LAST) is commonly used to assess sensitive skin and composed of four distinct sensations (pain, burning sensation, itch, and crawly feeling). A link between sensitive skin and barrier dysfunction has been proposed in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. However, clinical and laboratory factors that are associated with sensitive skin remain unelucidated. To investigate relationship between sensitive skin and AD-associated markers. Forty-two Japanese AD patients and 10 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. AD patients were divided into extrinsic (EAD; high IgE levels) and intrinsic (IAD; normal IgE levels) types. We conducted 1% LAST by assessing the four distinct sensations and calculated the frequencies of sensitive skin in EAD, IAD, and HS. We also performed clinical AD-related tests, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), visual analogue scale (VAS) of pruritus, and quality of life, and measured laboratory markers, including blood levels of IgE, CCL17/TARC, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and eosinophil counts, and concentration levels of serum Th1/Th2 cytokines. Filaggrin (FLG) mutations were examined in 21 patients. These values were subjected to correlation analyses with each of the four sensation elements. According to the standard criteria for LAST positivity, the frequencies of LAST-positive subjects were 54.8% and 10.0% in AD and HS, respectively (P=0.014). EAD patients showed a significantly (P=0.026) higher frequency of positive LAST (65.6%) than did IAD patients (20.0%). Among the four LAST sensation elements, the crawly feeling and pain scores positively correlated with VAS of pruritus, total serum IgE, mite-specific IgE, CCL17/TARC, and/or LDH. There was no association of the LAST scores with serum Th1/Th2 cytokine levels. Notably, neither TEWL nor FLG mutations correlated with LAST positivity or any sensation scores. The frequency of sensitive

  8. Atopic march in pediatrics: genotype-associated mechanisms Part 2. Perspective genotype-associated mechanisms and markers of atopic disorders in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Dytiatkovsky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the data of studies covering last 10 years held in populations of different countries concerning the association of atopic diseases, which compose the atopic march in children (atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, bronchial asthma with genes pathologic mutations (single nucleotid polymorphisms — SNP, which encode the molecules participating in allergic inflammation in the skin and mucosae. The review has been made using the PubMed as a search tool. There is analysis of studies provided on the candidate gens for allergic inflammation — interleukin-1-like-receptor-1, sphyngolipid synthesis regulator, glucorticoid receptor gene, programmed cell death gene 4. There are also provided the candidate markers for the severity of atopic diseases course, particularly, atopic eczema: vitamin D, thymus and activation regulated chemokine, TARC/CCl17 and cutaneous T-cell attracting chemokine, CTAC/CCL27. There has been proposed conducting the studies of provided SNP and allergic inflammation markers on Ukrainian pediatric population for working out the personalized genotype-associated approach for diagnosing and management of atopic diseases in Ukrainian pediatric population.

  9. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Kieler, Helle; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. Using national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross-national, population-based cohort study. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child cohorts were ascertained through disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication, specific hospital contacts, or both. In both countries the incidence rate of atopic dermatitis was stable during the study periods. The incidence rate of asthma increased until 2006 and stabilized for the rest of the study period in Denmark and increased in Sweden. The incidence rate of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis decreased in both countries. The study revealed similar trends, with stable incidence rates of atopic dermatitis in both Danish and Swedish children, an increase and then stabilization in asthma incidence rates in Denmark and an increase in Sweden, and a decrease in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis incidence rates. At age 5 years, one third of all children were affected with at least one of the conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resolving the Etiology of Atopic Disorders by Genetic Analysis of Racial Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jayanta; Johansson, Elisabet; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Mersha, Tesfaye B.

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergy (FA), allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma are common atopic disorders of complex etiology. The frequently observed “atopic march” from early AD to asthma and/or AR later in life as well as the extensive comorbidity of atopic disorders, suggests common causal mechanisms in addition to distinct ones. Indeed, both disease-specific and shared genomic regions exist for atopic disorders. Their prevalence also varies among races; for example, AD and asthma have a higher prevalence in African-Americans when compared to European-Americans. Whether this disparity stems from true genetic or race-specific environmental risk factors or both is unknown. Thus far, the majority of the genetic studies on atopic diseases have utilized populations of European ancestry, limiting their generalizability. Large cohort initiatives and new analytic methods such as admixture mapping are currently being employed to address this knowledge gap. Here we discuss the unique and shared genetic risk factors for atopic disorders in the context of ancestry variations, and the promise of high-throughput “-omics” based systems biology approach in providing greater insight to deconstruct into their genetic and non-genetic etiologies. Future research will also focus on deep phenotyping and genotyping of diverse racial ancestry, gene-environment, and gene-gene interactions. PMID:27297995

  11. Atopic dermatitis in adults: clinical and epidemiological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Leão Orfali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory disease causing intense pruritus, and with typical clinical features. There are few epidemiological studies concerning AD in adults, as well as little information about its prognostic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological course of adults with AD. METHODS: 80 patients aged above 18 years (mean age = 29 years were selected (30 males and 50 females and interviewed about hospitalization, systemic corticoid usage, age of AD onset, and personal and/or familial history of atopy. Disease severity was evaluated through the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD tool. Laboratory examination included IgE serum levels and eosinophil blood count. RESULTS: 71 out of 80 patients referred association with respiratory symptoms (18 had asthma, 17 had rhinitis, and 36 had both conditions; nine out of 80 patients denied any respiratory disease. AD patients were divided in mild (n = 25, moderate (n = 30, and severe (n = 25; 56% had one or more hospitalizations due to AD. A positive association was found between IgE serum levels, eosinophil blood count, and disease severity. CONCLUSION: Adult AD represents a clinical challenge that needs to be better characterized, since it can be misdiagnosed and interferes with the patient's social and personal life. The association of skin and respiratory atopic disease is frequent, and laboratory parameters such as circulating IgE levels and eosinophil blood count may be helpful to assess disease severity.

  12. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$±\\atop{s}$K)/Br($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→; D$+\\atop{s}$ π-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D± s K∓¢/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-) = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+π-) and B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π-) and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  13. ATOPIC DERMATITIS AS A CLINICAL CHALLENGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Davidovic

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease which is characterized by rash, pruritus and xerosis.The disease is most prevalent in infants and small children with about 70% of cases presenting before the age of 5.The prevalence of AD has increased two to three times during the past thirty years in industrially developed countries and, today, AD is considered to be a major public health concern.AD is a complex, multifactorial disease resulting from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Although the pathogenesis of AD is not completely clear, it is known that T-helper cells play the central role in it. Its characteristic is predomination of Th2-type response to allergens instead of the Th1 response which is predominant in normal individuals.Disease runs a chronic course, with remissions and exacerbations, while clinical presentation varies among patients depending on age and disease severity.There is no cure for AD, and an adequate disease control generally involves a combination of preventive measures and an individualised therapeutic approach. The conventional management includes the use of emollients to maintain the proper skin hydratation. Topical corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment to control disease flares. However the use of these agents is limited to intermittent and short-term treatment due to potentially adverse effects, such as skin atrophy. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are steroid-free topical immunomodulators, providing safe and effective treatment for moderate to severe AD.

  14. Childhood Atopic Dermatitis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Jen; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Yeh, Kuo-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) appears to have increased dramatically over the past decades. It is generally believed that such rapid increase in prevalence cannot be explained fully by genetic factors. Environmental factors might play a role in such an increment. Children with AD are most likely to suffer considerable school absences, family stress, and health care expenditures. Because the onset of AD occurs relatively early in life, identification of early life risk factors and early management for AD to prevent the development of atopic march are of critical importance. However, there is still no consensus on coordinated prevention and management for AD in Taiwan. In this review, we discuss the specific risk factors of AD and important results of recent articles on AD from Taiwan. The management and prevention strategies of AD for Asian skin are also discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Childhood Atopic Dermatitis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Jen Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD appears to have increased dramatically over the past decades. It is generally believed that such rapid increase in prevalence cannot be explained fully by genetic factors. Environmental factors might play a role in such an increment. Children with AD are most likely to suffer considerable school absences, family stress, and health care expenditures. Because the onset of AD occurs relatively early in life, identification of early life risk factors and early management for AD to prevent the development of atopic march are of critical importance. However, there is still no consensus on coordinated prevention and management for AD in Taiwan. In this review, we discuss the specific risk factors of AD and important results of recent articles on AD from Taiwan. The management and prevention strategies of AD for Asian skin are also discussed.

  16. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Duijts, Liesbeth; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Albrecht, Eva; Baurecht, Hansjoerg; Feenstra, Bjarke; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Hysi, Pirro; Warrington, Nicole M.; Curjuric, Ivan; Myhre, Ronny; Curtin, John A.; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Saaf, Annika; Franke, Andre; Ellinghaus, David; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Prokisch, Holger; Heim, Katharina; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Pekkanen, Juha; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Kaakinen, Marika; Duffy, David L.; Madden, Pamela A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Thompson, Philip J.; Matheson, Melanie C.; Le Souef, Peter; St Pourcain, Beate; Smith, George Davey; Henderson, John; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Deloukas, Panos; Ring, Susan M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Novak, Natalija; Klopp, Norman; Rodriguez, Elke; McArdle, Wendy; Linneberg, Allan; Menne, Torkil; Nohr, Ellen A.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijin, Cornelia M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; de Jongste, Johan C.; van der Valk, Ralf J. P.; Wjst, Matthias; Jogi, Rain; Geller, Frank; Boyd, Heather A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Kim, Cecilia; Mentch, Frank; March, Michael; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Bataille, Veronique; Pennell, Craig E.; Holt, Patrick G.; Sly, Peter; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Illig, Thomas; Imboden, Medea; Nystad, Wenche; Simpson, Angela; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Postma, Dirkje; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Smit, Henriette A.; Soderhall, Cilla; Chawes, Bo; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Melen, Erik; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Custovic, Adnan; Jacobsson, Bo; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Glass, Daniel; Hakonarson, Hakon; Melbye, Mads; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Gieger, Christian; Strachan, David P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M.; Weidinger, Stephan

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16

  17. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 popul...

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, L.; Standl, M.; Chen, C.M.; Ramasamy, A.; Bønnelykke, K.; Duijts, L.; Ferreira, M.A.; Couto Alves, A.; Thyssen, J.P.; Albrecht, E.; Baurecht, H.; Feenstra, B.; Sleiman, P.M.A.; Hysi, P.; Warrington, N.M.; Curjuric, I.; Myhre, R.; Curtin, J.A.; Groen-Blokhuis, M.M.; Kerkhof, M.; Sääf, A.; Franke, A.; Ellinghaus, D.; Fölster-Holst, R.; Dermitzakis, E.; Montgomery, S.B.; Prokisch, H.; Heim, K.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Pouta, A.; Pekkanen, J.; Blakemore, A.I.F.; Buxton, J.L.; Kaakinen, M.; Duffy, DL; Madden, P.A.F.; Heath, A.C.; Montgomery, G.W.; Thompson, P.J.; Matheson, M.C.; Le Souëf, P.; St Pourcain, B.; Davey Smith, G.; Henderson, J.; Kemp, J.P.; Timpson, N.J.; Deloukas, P.; Ring, S.M.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Müller-Nurasyid, M.; Novak, N.; Klopp, N.; Rodríguez, E.; McArdle, W.; Linneberg, A.; Menné, T.; Nohr, E.A.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; van Duijn, C.M.; Rivadeneira, F.; de Jongste, J.C.; van der Valk, R.J.P.; Wjst, M.; Jogi, R.; Geller, F.; Boyd, H.A.; Murray, J.C.; Kim, C.; Mentch, F.; March, M.; Mangino, M.; Spector, T.D.; Bataille, V.; Pennell, C.E.; Holt, P.G.; Sly, P.; Tiesler, C.M.T.; Hottenga, J.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Hakonarson, H.; Melbye, M.; Ljarvis, D.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Gieger, C.; Strachan, D.P.; Martin, N.G.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Heinrich, J.; Evans, D.M.; Weidinger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16

  20. The role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębińska, Anna; Sikorska-Szaflik, Hanna; Urbanik, Magdalena; Boznański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has been suggested to have an important impact on a much wider aspects on human health than calcium homeostasis and mineral metabolism, specifically in the field of human immunology. It has been reported that vitamin D influences the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems, which makes the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases a field of interest. Although many studies have sought to determine whether vitamin D has an influence on progression of allergic disease, the impact of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis development and severity remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies relating vitamin D to atopic dermatitis and discuss its possible role in the pathogenesis of allergic skin diseases, emphasizing the need for well-designed, prospective trials on vitamin D supplementation in the context of prevention and treatment for allergic conditions.

  1. Clinical studies on serum IgE level Part Ⅱ. Studies on serum IgE level in patients with non atopic disease

    OpenAIRE

    上田, 暢男

    1980-01-01

    Serum IgE level was measured by the methods of radioimmunosorbent test (RIST) in 116 subjects including 41 patients with malignant lymphomas and 20 patients of myasthenia gravis. In Hodgkin's disease, the serum IgE level was evaluated according to the clinical stages and to the effects of chemotherapy. Also, the changes of serum IgE level was compared before and after thymectomy in myasthenia gravis patients. The results were as follows: 1) Patients with Hodgkin's disease showed remarkably hi...

  2. Lactose malabsorption in young Lithuanian children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzeviciene, O; Narkeviciute, I; Eidukevicius, R

    2004-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of lactose malabsorption in young Lithuanian atopic dermatitis children; to evaluate the relationship between lactose malabsorption and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and the relationship between lactose malabsorption and cow's milk intolerance in parents and grandparents. 144 children with atopic dermatitis aged 1.5-24 mo (study group) and 32 children without symptoms of allergic diseases aged 1.5-23 mo (control group) were investigated. Lactose and glucose-galactose absorption tests based on serial blood glucose determination, culture of stool, latex agglutination test for rotavirus and microscopic examination of stool for parasites were performed. Lactose malabsorption was determined in 59 (40.9%) and glucose-galactose malabsorption in 17 (11.8%) children with atopic dermatitis. The risk of developing lactose malabsorption was higher in children fed exclusively on breast milk up to 1 mo of age than in children fed exclusively on breast milk for 4 to 6 mo (OR: 2.62; 95% CI: 1.02-6.75). Lactose malabsorption was significantly more frequent in patients whose mothers did not tolerate cow's milk (20/30; 66.7%) than in patients whose mothers were tolerant to it (39/95; 41.1%) (p = 0.02). Lactose malabsorption was determined in 40.9% of Lithuanian atopic dermatitis children aged under 2 y. Lactose malabsorption appeared to be associated with the duration of exclusive breastfeeding up to only 1 mo and mothers' milk intolerance.

  3. Immune response to Varicella vaccine in children with atopic dermatitis compared to non-atopic controls

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Lynda; Weinberg, Adriana; Boguniewicz, Mark; Taylor, Patricia; Oettgen, Hans; Heughan, Lisa; Zaccaro, Daniel; Armstrong, Brian; Holliday, Aaron; Leung, Donald Y. M.

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis subjects and controls had similar cellular immune responses to Varicella vaccine. Atopic dermatitis subjects with a history of eczema herpeticum made high levels of Varicella specific IgE.

  4. Atopic eczema in children: another harmful sequel of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockelbrink, A; Heinrich, J; Schäfer, I; Zutavern, A; Borte, M; Herbarth, O; Schaaf, B; von Berg, A; Schäfer, T

    2006-12-01

    Different lifestyle factors seem to be associated with the risk for atopic diseases and some studies suggest that stress increases the risk of allergic sensitization, asthma and atopic eczema. Only few studies have investigated the association of early stressful life events and atopic eczema (AE) in children. Parents of participants of the ongoing LISA birth cohort study were asked to give information on life events, such as severe disease or death of a family member, unemployment, or divorce of the parents. Lifetime prevalence of AE and incidence after the assessment period for life events were compared. Prevalence of AE until the age of 4 years was 21.4%. Reported life events within the first 2 years were: severe disease (17.5%) or death (8.4%) of a family member, divorce/separation (3.4%), and unemployment (2.7%). Divorce/separation was associated with a significantly [odds ratio (OR) 3.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.69-7.66] increased and disease with a significantly (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.13-0.68) decreased incidence of AE for the subsequent 2 years of life. No effect was seen for unemployment. Divorce/separation of the parents and severe disease of a family member influence the risk of developing AE.

  5. [Atopic dermatitis - risk factors and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska, Martyna; Trojacka, Ewelina; Savitskyi, Stepan; Terlikowska-Brzósko, Agnieszka; Galus, Ryszard

    2017-08-21

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by severe itching and eczematic skin lesions. In Poland from 1.5 to 2.5 million people suffer from AD. The pathophysiologic complexity and the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes cause diagnostic and therapeutic problems and this is the basis for the division of the disease into subtypes. Heterogeneity of the disease is also confirmed in the study of the genotype of the disease. In relation with AZS more than 1000 loci in chromosomes were demonstrated. The roles of certain genes and the pathophysiology of lesions caused by their polymorphism were described. Wide spectrums of AD risk factors are: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption during pregnancy, obesity and high and low birth weight. The quality of life in patients with AD is impaired, the disease disrupts family and professional relationships. Biological medical products are an example of an individual approach to the treatment of AD. It seems, individual approach to disease and treatment can be a successive solution to the problem.

  6. Satisfaction with treatment of atopic dermatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Maciejewska-Franczak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Atopic dermatitis is a frequent chronic skin disease in children. The major clinical manifestations include itching and dryness of the skin. The pathomechanism of skin changes results from an interaction of genetic and environmental factors as well as impairments of skin barrier function and immune response. Despite chronic treatment the disease is characterized by exacerbation and remission periods and lowers the quality of life of patients and their families. Objective. To evaluate treatment satisfaction in children with atopic dermatitis, identify components of medical care which contribute to treatment satisfaction, and evaluate the relationship between satisfaction and adherence to a doctor’s recommendations. Material and methods. One hundred and nineteen children (6 months to 12 years old, mean age 4.9 years with atopic dermatitis were enrolled in the study. The doctor performed physical examinations and history taking and filled in questionnaires evaluating the course and exacerbation of the disease, the type of administered therapy and diagnostics. The patients’ parents completed two questionnaires: a questionnaire assessing satisfaction with the therapy (the type of recommended therapy, adherence to recommendations, contact with the doctor, obtained information, degree of psychological support, role of parents in taking decisions regarding the therapy and a quality of life questionnaire. Results. The authors observed that 56% of parents were dissatisfied with the administered treatment, and 40% failed to adhere to at least one therapeutic recommendation. Parents of children with mild atopic dermatitis significantly more often stop using emollients. It was also observed that lack of treatment satisfaction in children with severe atopic dermatitis whose parents are insufficiently educated contributes to decreased adherence. The authors identified independent factors of lack of treatment satisfaction: failure to obtain

  7. Precipitins to dietary proteins in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnetson, R S; Drummond, H; Ferguson, A

    1983-12-01

    Precipitating antibodies to foods have been assayed in three groups of patients with atopy. Forty-five per cent of patients with atopic eczema and IgE-mediated food allergy had precipitins to foods in their serum compared with only 15% of patients with atopic eczema without evidence of food allergy, and 16% of patients with atopic asthma and/or rhinitis. It is likely that this results from increased intestinal permeability in the group with eczema and food allergy.

  8. Quantitative determination of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids by chiral liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in a murine atopic dermatitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Han, Ji Eun; Ko, Ji-Seung; Do, Sun Hee; Lee, Eung Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis, one of the most important skin diseases, is characterized by both skin barrier impairment and immunological abnormalities. Although several studies have demonstrated the significant relationship between atopic dermatitis and immunological abnormalities, the role of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) in atopic dermatitis remains unknown. To develop chiral methods for characterization of 12-HETE enantiomers in a 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis mouse model and evaluate the effects of 12-HETE on atopic dermatitis, BALB/c mice were treated with either DNCB or acetone/olive oil (AOO) to induce atopic dermatitis, after which 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs in the plasma, skin, spleen, and lymph nodes were quantified by chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs in biological samples of DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis mice increased significantly compared with the AOO group, reflecting the involvement of 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that 12(R)- and 12(S)-HETEs could be a useful guide for understanding the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  9. A study of targeted enhanced patient care for pediatric atopic dermatitis (STEP PAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Maren; Morrell, Dean S; Goldsmith, Lowell A

    2008-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin condition in children. Treatment strategies often require stringent adherence to skin care regimens for symptom resolution. As many factors influence the course of the condition, we investigated the role of a designated "atopic dermatitis educator" in a pediatric dermatology clinic. We planned to determine whether the individual interaction with an atopic dermatitis educator affects the course of disease severity, resolution, and quality of life in atopic children. New and return pediatric atopic dermatitis patients from English-speaking families were recruited from a pediatric dermatology clinic with a single pediatric dermatologist. The 151 subjects were randomized to either the control or the intervention group. A total of 106 subjects completed the study. Those in the intervention group received the atopic dermatitis educator's individual counseling/education session. Subjects' severity was determined by the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis severity index and quality of life by either the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index or the Infants' Dermatitis Quality of Life index depending on the patient's age. Analysis of covariance was measured. No significant difference was found in the percentage change of severity or quality of life between the groups.

  10. IMMUNOLOGICAL MARKERS OF UNCONTROLLED ATOPIC BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Smolnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a prevalent chronic allergic disease of lungs at early ages. A priority  task in allergology  is to search  biological  markers  related  to uncontrolled atopic  bronchial asthma. Cytokines fulfill their distinct function in pathogenesis of atopic  bronchial asthma, participating at the initiation, development and persistence of allergic inflammation in airways, causing different  variations of clinical course of the disease (with  respect  to its acuteness, severity, frequency of exacerbations. The  present  work has studied  indices  of cellular  and  humoral links of immunity, as well as levels of some  pro and  anti-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood serum (IL-4, IL-10, IL-2 and TNFα, aiming to determine potential markers of uncontrolled atopic bronchial asthma in children. A group of Caucasian (European children was involved into the research: Cohort 1, moderate atopic  bronchial asthma with controlled course during the last 3 months (n = 59; Cohort 2, severe/moderate-severe atopic bronchial asthma with uncontrolled course of the disease within last 3 months (n = 51,  Cohort 3 – control, practically healthy  children without signs of atopy  (n = 33. All the  children included in the group with atopic  bronchial asthma underwent regular mono/combined basic therapy  at high/ intermediate therapeutic doses.  We performed a comparative analysis  of cell  population indices  reflecting certain cellular  immunity links,  and  determined significantly  lower  levels of CD3+   lymphocytes, as well as decrease in relative  and  absolute  contents of CD4+  and  CD8+  cells in the  cohort with  uncontrolled course of atopic  bronchial asthma, as compared with controlled-course cohort. When  evaluating concentrations  of cytokines in peripheral blood serum of the patients with controlled and uncontrolled atopic  bronchial asthma, we revealed  significantly  higher

  11. Topical cyclosporine for atopic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Julio J; López-Alcalde, Jesús; Morcillo Laiz, Rafael; Fernández Buenaga, Roberto; Rebolleda Fernández, Gema

    2012-09-12

    Atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) is a chronic ocular surface non-infectious inflammatory condition that atopic dermatitis patients may suffer at any time point in the course of their dermatologic disease and is independent of its degree of severity. AKC is usually not self resolving and it poses a higher risk of corneal injuries and severe sequelae. Management of AKC should prevent or treat corneal damage. Although topical corticosteroids remain the standard treatment for patients with AKC, prolonged use may lead to complications. Topical cyclosporine A (CsA) may improve AKC signs and symptoms, and be used as a corticosteroid sparing agent. To determine the efficacy and gather evidence on safety from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of topical CsA in patients with AKC. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 6), MEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2012), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (January 1937 to July 2012), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en), the IFPMA Clinical Trials Portal (http://clinicaltrials.ifpma.org/no_cache/en/myportal/index.htm) and Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 9 July 2012. We also handsearched the following conference proceedings: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, International Council of Opthalmology and Societas

  12. Selected aspects of quality of life in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kasznia-Kocot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic dermatological disease of multifactorial pathogenesis with persistent pruritus and extreme skin dryness including typical skin changes caused by many interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The study aims to evaluate the selected aspects of quality of life in AD. Material and methods. To what extent does the disease affect the daily practice of the patient and their family, what are their expenditures in connection with the treatment, and also how they perceive themselves and emotional, sexual, social behavior. 71 adult subjects 48(68% women and 23 (32% men were selected from the allergology clinics in the region of Silesia for this questionnaire based study. Results. Pruritus was felt by everyone, skin pain by 69%, and skin burning by 86%. The great majority of subjects had some constrains in doing housework due to skin complaints. The disease also affected professional work and school achievements. Almost everyone agreed that money spent on medication purchase and skin care agents impacted on financial resources. Atopic dermatitis affected 75% in social functioning, leisure time, sports practicing. The disease affected self-esteem level and confidence. Half of the examined subjects experienced bad feelings in contact with a partner, or felt stigmatized by negative reactions of the environment because of the skin appearance. Often atopic dermatitis caused problems with sound sleep (65% various emotional disorders and also disorders in the sexual sphere (32%. Every fourth subject felt depressed and every seventh thought of suicide. Conclusions. Atopic dermatitis is a disease which adversely influences many aspects of life and undoubtedly impairs the quality of life in a serious and distressing way. Therefore its treatment should be supported by psychotherapy.

  13. Genome-wide comparative analysis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis gives insight into opposing genetic mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    IRVINE, ALAN; CORVIN, AIDEN; MORRIS, DEREK

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Export Date: 3 March 2015 Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing im- mune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data fro...

  14. Adjuvant treatment with the bacterial lysate (OM-85) improves management of atopic dermatitis: A randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Bodemer, C; Guillet, G.; Cambazard, F.; Boralevi, F; Ballarini, S.; Milliet, C.; Bertuccio, P.; La Vecchia, C.; Bach, J.; De Prost, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background Environmental factors play a major role on atopic dermatitis (AD) which shows a constant rise in prevalence in western countries over the last decades. The Hygiene Hypothesis suggesting an inverse relationship between incidence of infections and the increase in atopic diseases in these countries, is one of the working hypothesis proposed to explain this trend. Objective This study tested the efficacy and safety of oral administration of the bacterial lysate OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom?, B...

  15. Phenotypes of Atopic Dermatitis Depending on the Timing of Onset and Progression in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roduit, Caroline; Frei, Remo; Depner, Martin; Karvonen, Anne M; Renz, Harald; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Schmausser-Hechfellner, Elisabeth; Pekkanen, Juha; Riedler, Josef; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; von Mutius, Erika; Lauener, Roger Pascal; Hyvärinen, Anne; Kirjavainen, Pirkka; Remes, Sami; Roponen, Marjut; Dalphin, Marie-Laure; Kaulek, Vincent; Ege, Markus; Genuneit, Jon; Illi, Sabina; Kabesch, Micahel; Schaub, Bianca; Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Doekes, Gert

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory, pruritic skin disease that often occurs in early infancy with a chronic course. However, a specific description of subtypes of atopic dermatitis depending on the timing of onset and progression of the disease in childhood is lacking. To identify different phenotypes of atopic dermatitis using a definition based on symptoms before age 6 years and to determine whether some subtypes are more at risk for developing other allergic diseases. The Protection Against Allergy Study in Rural Environments (PASTURE) is a European birth cohort where pregnant women were recruited between August 2002 and March 2005 and divided in 2 groups dependent on whether they lived on a farm. Children from this cohort with data on atopic dermatitis from birth to 6 years of age were included. Atopic dermatitis, defined as an itchy rash on typical locations from birth to 6 years. The latent class analysis was used to identify subtypes of atopic dermatitis in childhood based on the course of symptoms. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to analyze the association between atopic dermatitis phenotypes and other allergic diseases. We included 1038 children; of these, 506 were girls. The latent class analysis model with the best fit to PASTURE data separated 4 phenotypes of atopic dermatitis in childhood: 2 early phenotypes with onset before age 2 years (early transient [n = 96; 9.2%] and early persistent [n = 67; 6.5%]), the late phenotype with onset at age 2 years or older (n = 50; 4.8%), and the never/infrequent phenotype (n = 825; 79.5%), defined as children with no atopic dermatitis. Children with both parents with history of allergies were 5 times more at risk to develop atopic dermatitis with an early-persistent phenotype compared with children with parents with no history of allergies. Both early phenotypes were strongly associated with food allergy. The risk of developing asthma was significantly increased among the early

  16. Immunoadsorption for treatment of severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Joanna; Weinmann-Menke, Julia; von Stebut, Esther

    2017-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease affecting up to 10-20% of the population with the largest disease burden in childhood. Treatment options include basic emollient treatment, topical as well as systemic immunosuppressants. The pathogenesis is complex and among various triggers, genetic predisposition and immunological alterations contribute to development of disease. Atopy is common in patients with AD and many patients have high levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE), some of which recognizes exogenous or auto/self-allergens. Treatment options targeting IgE such as specific immunotherapy against e.g. house dust mites or using anti-IgE antibodies (omalizumab) showed variable results that were not convincing. We now review recent data on the application of unspecific and IgE-selective immunoadsorption (IA) in AD. All in all, 53 patients have been treated with non-specific pan Ig IA and 28 patients with IgE-selective IA. Side effects were rarely seen. The efficacy of IgE depletion was generally high (<∼80%) for each IA cycle, but transient and lasted only a few days/weeks. Of note, disease activity appeared to improve in almost all cases and lasted for several weeks. Although the evidence is still weak, these case studies suggest that IgE depletion in AD is effective and helped control the disease. The mechanism of action is not understood yet. Future controlled trials are needed to validate this observation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis From the Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine: Presentation of a Novel Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choopani, Rasool; Mehrbani, Mehrzad; Fekri, Alireza; Mehrabani, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    There is a strong current trend for using complementary and alternative medications to treat atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a common, chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory skin disease. It can have a profound, negative effect on patients' quality of life. Mild cases of atopic dermatitis can be controlled by the application of moisturizers and topical corticosteroids. However, in severe cases, application of immunosuppressive medication is unavoidable but it can have adverse effects. In traditional Persian medicine, diseases similar to resistant atopic dermatitis are treated with whey in combination with decoction of field dodder. Both whey and field dodder have anti-inflammatory properties. Consumption of whey can also aid skin repair, mitigate pruritus, and help combat the high level of stress experienced by patients. Therefore, it is hypothesized that consumption of traditional medicinal treatment of whey with decoction of field dodder can be applied as a complementary treatment for atopic dermatitis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Consensus Conference on Clinical Management of pediatric Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elena; Neri, Iria; Ricci, Giampaolo; Baldo, Ermanno; Barone, Maurizio; Belloni Fortina, Anna; Bernardini, Roberto; Berti, Irene; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Capra, Lucetta; Carello, Rossella; Cipriani, Francesca; Comberiati, Pasquale; Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, Maya; Fontana, Elena; Gruber, Michaela; Haddock, Ellen; Maiello, Nunzia; Meglio, Paolo; Patrizi, Annalisa; Peroni, Diego; Scarponi, Dorella; Wielander, Ingrid; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2016-03-02

    The Italian Consensus Conference on clinical management of atopic dermatitis in children reflects the best and most recent scientific evidence, with the aim to provide specialists with a useful tool for managing this common, but complex clinical condition. Thanks to the contribution of experts in the field and members of the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) and the Italian Society of Pediatric Dermatology (SIDerP), this Consensus statement integrates the basic principles of the most recent guidelines for the management of atopic dermatitis to facilitate a practical approach to the disease. The therapeutical approach should be adapted to the clinical severity and requires a tailored strategy to ensure good compliance by children and their parents. In this Consensus, levels and models of intervention are also enriched by the Italian experience to facilitate a practical approach to the disease.

  19. Atopic dermatitis in children in the United States, 1997-2004: visit trends, patient and provider characteristics, and prescribing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Kimberly A; Simon, Stephen D; Liu, Deede Y; Sharma, Vidya

    2007-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease of childhood and is increasing in prevalence throughout the world. Morbidity and resource use for atopic dermatitis are comparable to other chronic diseases. Topical corticosteroids are first-line therapeutic agents for atopic dermatitis; topical calcineurin inhibitors are considered second-line agents for patients who are older than 2 years. The aims of this study were to examine trends in visits for atopic dermatitis in children in the United States between 1997 and 2004, identify factors that were associated with a pediatric visit for atopic dermatitis, and assess changes in the treatment of atopic dermatitis over time. Visits for atopic dermatitis by children (0-18 years) to office-based physicians and hospital outpatient departments using 1997-2004 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey databases were analyzed. Medication prescribing rates during 2 time periods (1997-2000 and 2001-2004) were also analyzed. There were an estimated 7.4 million visits for atopic dermatitis. Statistically significant differences in patients with atopic dermatitis included age 2 to 5 years, black race, Asian race, and specialist or hospital outpatient clinic evaluation. The increase in atopic dermatitis visits per year was statistically significant. No statistical differences in prescribing rates were identified between the 2 time periods. Between 1997 and 2000, topical corticosteroids were prescribed in 34% of visits, decreasing to 25% between 2001 and 2004. Between 2001 and 2004, topical calcineurin inhibitors were prescribed in 23% of visits. In the same period, topical corticosteroids were prescribed in 24% of visits by children who were younger than 2 years; topical calcineurin inhibitors were prescribed in 22% of visits. Visits for atopic dermatitis in children are increasing. A recommended first-line treatment was prescribed in a minority of the visits.

  20. Phototherapy in atopic dermatitis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferriols, A; Aranegui, B; Pujol-Montcusí, J A; Martín-Gorgojo, A; Campos-Domínguez, M; Feltes, R A; Gilaberte, Y; Echeverría-García, B; Alvarez-Pérez, A; García-Doval, I

    2015-06-01

    Phototherapy is a treatment option for atopic dermatitis recommended by several guidelines. To perform a systematic review of the efficacy of different modalities of phototherapy and photochemotherapy in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. We considered all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) performed in patients with atopic dermatitis, and accepted all outcome measures. Articles were identified via an online search of the MEDLINE (via Ovid) and Embase databases and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We also searched for clinical trials registered in Current Controlled Trials and in the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Twenty-one RCTs (961 patients) were included in the qualitative analysis. Two of the trials included children and adolescents (32 patients). The efficacy of narrow-band UV-B and UV-A1 phototherapy was similar for the different outcome measures contemplated. Two RCTs assessed the efficacy of psoralen plus UV-A therapy (PUVA). No serious adverse events were described. In general, the publications reviewed were characterized by a high risk of bias and poor reporting of methodology and results. There is evidence for the use of narrow-band UV-B and UV-A1 phototherapy in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Evidence supporting the use of PUVA in atopic dermatitis is scarce and there is little information on the use of phototherapy in childhood. For the purpose of future studies, it would be advisable to use comparable criteria and scales for the evaluation of disease severity and patients, to standardize radiation methods, and to establish a minimum follow-up time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. [Drinking water hardness and chronic degenerative diseases. III. Tumors, urolithiasis, fetal malformations, deterioration of the cognitive function in the aged and atopic eczema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, F; Monarca, S; Premi, S; Gelatti, U

    2003-01-01

    For several decades a causal relation has been hypothesised between drinking water hardness and cardiovascular and other chronic degenerative diseases in humans. Only recently some epidemiological studies also investigated the association between the concentration of the minerals responsible for the hardness of drinking water (calcium and magnesium) and other chronic diseases. Some case-control studies carried out in Taiwan using aggregated data showed a possible protective effect of water hardness toward the risk of dying from various neoplasms, though more research is needed on the issue, possibly based on individual data, to draw definitive conclusions. There is a substantial evidence that consumption of water with high levels of calcium does not increase, and maybe reduces the risk of developing urinary stones of the most common type in developed countries (calcium oxalate), on the contrary, there is no conclusive evidence on the relation between water hardness and foetal malformations, cognitive functions in old men, diabetes and eczema.

  2. Centenary Celebration for Scottish Missionary Mary Slessor: A Lasting Legacy for Twins/Twin Research: Twins With Kleinfelter's Syndrome; Twin Research on Atopic Diseases; Twin Study of Autism; Psychotherapy with Twins / General Interest: Female Twin Pole-Vaulters; Longest Twin Birth Interval; Pair of Franco-Cuban Vocalists; Croatian Twin Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L

    2015-06-01

    The centenary celebration for Scottish missionary, Mary Slessor, took place on February 14, 2015 in Melle, Belgium. Slessor saved many newborn twins and their mothers from death and disownment by members of their community, including their families, who believed twins harbored evil spirits. The events of this unusual and significant gathering are described. Next, twin research and reports concerning Kleinfelter's disease, atopic diseases, autism and psychotherapy are presented. General interest subjects include identical female twin pole-vaulters, the longest twin birth interval, Franco-Cuban twin vocalists, and Croatian twin models.

  3. Clinical management of atopic dermatitis: practical highlights and updates from the atopic dermatitis practice parameter 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Peter A; Lee, Margaret; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Timmons, Karol G; Schneider, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a challenging condition for clinicians and patients. Recent advances were documented in the Atopic Dermatitis Practice Parameter 2012, and we want to provide clinicians with key points from the Atopic Dermatitis Practice Parameter 2012. In this article, we highlight the evidence-based therapy of atopic dermatitis as well as provide practical tips for clinicians and families. An updated review of immunopathology provides a firm basis for patient education and therapy. We also review clinical diagnosis and ways to improve quality of life for patients with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic studies of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Lianghua; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the complex interaction of genetic, immune and environmental factors. There have many recent discoveries involving the genetic and epigenetic studies of AD. A retrospective PubMed search was carried out from June 2009 to June 2016 using the terms "atopic dermatitis", "association", "eczema", "gene", "polymorphism", "mutation", "variant", "genome wide association study", "microarray" "gene profiling", "RNA sequencing", "epigenetics" and "microRNA". A total of 132 publications in English were identified. To elucidate the genetic factors for AD pathogenesis, candidate gene association studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and transcriptomic profiling assays have been performed in this period. Epigenetic mechanisms for AD development, including genomic DNA modification and microRNA posttranscriptional regulation, have been explored. To date, candidate gene association studies indicate that filaggrin (FLG) null gene mutations are the most significant known risk factor for AD, and genes in the type 2 T helper lymphocyte (Th2) signaling pathways are the second replicated genetic risk factor for AD. GWAS studies identified 34 risk loci for AD, these loci also suggest that genes in immune responses and epidermal skin barrier functions are associated with AD. Additionally, gene profiling assays demonstrated AD is associated with decreased gene expression of epidermal differentiation complex genes and elevated Th2 and Th17 genes. Hypomethylation of TSLP and FCER1G in AD were reported; and miR-155, which target the immune suppressor CTLA-4, was found to be significantly over-expressed in infiltrating T cells in AD skin lesions. The results suggest that two major biologic pathways are responsible for AD etiology: skin epithelial function and innate/adaptive immune responses. The dysfunctional epidermal barrier and immune responses reciprocally affect each other, and thereby drive development of AD.

  5. An Unusual Case of Subclinical Peripheral Neuropathy and Cervical Spondylosis in Atopic Myelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Leventoglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cases of atopic myelitis have been reported in Japan; however very few were described in western countries. An 82-year-old woman with a past medical history of atopic dermatitis and asthma presented with progressive paresthesia (tingling of both hands and tetraparesis. Before the onset of neurological symptoms, she complained of ichthyosis of both legs for 5 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated multisegmental degenerative arthritis, degenerative disc disease, and abnormal spinal cord signal intensity over several cervical segments, suggesting the diagnosis of myelitis. Total serum IgE level was elevated. Nerve conduction studies revealed asymmetric axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. The cerebrospinal fluid specimen showed lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein level. Based on clinical, imaging, and laboratory findings, atopic myelitis was diagnosed. The diagnosis of atopic myelitis should be considered in myelopathy patients with history of atopy and elevated serum IgE levels.

  6. [Activity of B and D factors of complement alternative pathway in children with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, N V; Kozlov, L V; Logunov, O V; Bashkina, O A; Rubalskiĭ, O V; Aleshkin, V A

    2014-01-01

    Development of enzyme immunoassay detection of B and D factors of complement alternative pathway functional activity for solving diagnostic and prognostic problems of patient therapy. Study activity of these factors in blood sera of children with atopic dermatitis before and after therapy for elucidation of the role of complement alternative pathway in pathogenesis of this disease. Children aged 6 months to 18 years with atopic dermatitis were examined for functional activity of B and D factors in blood sera before and after therapy by the developed methods. The developed enzyme immunoassay methods for determination of functional activity of B and D complement alternative pathway showed high sensitivity and reliability. In children with atopic dermatitis factor B and D activity was significantly lower than normal before treatment. After treatment these activity increased significantly (p atopic dermatitis in children and the possibility of use of factor B and D functional activity analysis for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

  7. NEW POTENTIALITIES OF TOPICAL THERAPY OF SEVERE ATOPIC ECZEMA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Korotkiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing effectiveness of topical exposure in atopic dermatitis in children, as well as search for new safe external facilities is one of the urgent problems of modern dermatology. Data concerning the need for inclusion of topical calciumneurin inhibitors in the scheme of topical treatment of atopic dermatitis as for the relief of acute and for long term monitoring of the further course of the disease are proved. Authors evaluated and showed the high clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of tacrolimus ointment 0.03% in the external treatment of 40 children with atopic dermatitis of moderate and severe degrees in children aged from 2 to 15 years. Key words: atopic eczema, topical therapy, long-term control, tacrolimus ointment, children. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 96–102.

  8. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. OBJECTIVE: Using...... national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. METHODS: Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross...... similar trends, with stable incidence rates of atopic dermatitis in both Danish and Swedish children, an increase and then stabilization in asthma incidence rates in Denmark and an increase in Sweden, and a decrease in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis incidence rates. At age 5 years, one third of all children...

  9. Increasing Comorbidities Suggest that Atopic Dermatitis Is a Systemic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Patrick M; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Paller, Amy S; Kabashima, Kenji; Amagai, Masayuki; Luger, Thomas A; Deleuran, Mette; Werfel, Thomas; Eyerich, Kilian; Stingl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of the International Eczema Council found a strong pattern of immune activation in peripheral blood and the propensity to both skin and systemic infections. Associations with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, and malignant diseases were increasingly reported, but confirmation of their link with atopic dermatitis requires longitudinal studies. Given the possibility of atopic dermatitis-related systemic immune activation, future investigations of new interventions should concurrently examine the impact on these comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A B; Johansen, J D; Deleuran, M

    2017-01-01

    The importance of contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis is frequently debated. Previously, patients with atopic dermatitis were believed to have a reduced ability to produce a type IV immunological response. However, this belief has been challenged and authors have highlighted the risk...... of underestimating and overlooking allergic contact dermatitis in children with atopic dermatitis. Several studies have been published aiming to shed light on this important question but results are contradictory. To provide an overview of the existing knowledge, we systematically reviewed studies that report...... frequencies of positive patch test reactions in children with atopic dermatitis. We identified 436 manuscripts of which 31 met the inclusion criteria. Although the literature is conflicting, it is evident that contact allergy is a common problem in children with atopic dermatitis....

  11. [Analysis of selected constitutional and environmental factors in patients with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myłek, D; Kaczmarski, M

    In 156 children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis retrospective analysis was carried out for establishing the effect of constitutional and environmental factors on the process of development and clinical course of this disease. It was demonstrated that the type of feeding during infancy was related to the beginning of the first symptoms. The onset of atopic dermatitis was earliest and most frequent in children with a history of only brief breast-feeding (up to 2 months) or fed with cow milk formulas since birth. Breast-feeding during 2-6 months delayed the onset of atopic dermatitis by about 2 months in relation to the former group. The effect of environmental factors manifested itself also as exacerbation of skin changes after contact with house dust, animal hairs, feathers and other antigens (fish food, contact with plants). At the same time positive results were observed of point tests with these allergens. A significant effect of the constitutional factor on the development of atopic dermatitis included familial occurrence of atopic diseases (mostly atopic dermatitis). Only 12.8% of the studied children had no family history of atopy.

  12. Comparison of atopic features between children and adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Natalia; Shah, Sapna; Lehman, Erik; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinicopathological diagnosis seen in children as well as adults. Growing evidence suggests that EoE is strongly associated with atopic disorders. Presenting symptoms differ in children and adults and it is not known whether atopic features vary by age. This study was designed to compare atopic features and allergic sensitization between children and adults with EoE. We conducted a retrospective analysis of demographic and clinical data from 50 children (aged 2-18 years) and 50 adults (aged 21-75 years) with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of EoE referred to our allergy clinic. Data regarding patient characteristics, history of atopic diseases, and allergy test results were collected for analysis. The majority of children and adults were white and male patients. When compared with adults, a higher percentage of children had a history of asthma (52% versus 24%; p children regarding history of allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy, and family history of atopy. There was no statistically significant difference between children and adults regarding immediate-type sensitization to foods and aeroallergens. Compared with adults, a higher percentage of children showed a positive reaction to one or more foods on patch testing (62% versus 31%; p = 0.01). A high prevalence of comorbid atopic diseases and sensitizations to food and environmental allergens was seen in both children and adults. Children had a significantly higher rate of asthma and positive patch test to foods compared with adults.

  13. Health-related Quality of Life and Mental Health of Adults With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeunhee; Kim, Yoonjung

    2017-10-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the association between the prevalence of atopic dermatitis in Korean adults and their health-related quality of life and mental health. Data from a nationally representative sample of 11,913 adults who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010-2012) were analyzed by using SAS version 9.3. The adults with atopic dermatitis had significantly lower quality of life and higher stress than did those without it. Moreover, the health-related quality of life of the adults with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than those without the disease, after adjusting for all covariates. The adjusted odds ratios of the adults with atopic dermatitis were 1.74 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.65) for stress, 1.69 (95% CI: 1.00-2.84) for depression, and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.02-2.69) for suicidal ideation. Improving our understanding of atopic dermatitis should help nurses and patients manage the stress, depression, suicidal ideation, and reduced quality of life associated with this chronic disease. There is a need to develop and conduct intervention of programs for improving mental health as well as clinical aspects of adult atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS INCIDENCE IN THE CHILD POPULATION OF THE GRODNO REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokha R. N.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Research objective. To estimate a geographical variation of the indicator of the incidence of atopic dermatitis among the child population of the Grodno region. Material and methods. The data of the official statistical reports of the Grodno Regional Department of Statistics, the annual report forms «Form 1 – children» of the medical statistics office of the Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital for the period of 1999-2016 years were analyzed. Territorial differentiation of the indicator of disease incidence was carried out by the method of cluster analysis (k-means clustering. Results. The geographical characteristic of the indicator of the incidence of atopic dermatitis among the child population of the Grodno region aged 0–14 years during 1999-2016 years has been given. Low, below the average, above the average, average and high values of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence have been established. The cartogram of territorial distribution of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence among the child population has been made. Conclusion. The established features, various intensity of the degree of a geographical variation of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence reflect the influence of a set of various factors determining an indicator of diseases incidence in various territories of the region and confirm the need to analyze the cause-and-effect relationships in the system «medium-indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence among the child population».

  15. [Atopic dermatitis in scholar children from Ciudad Guzman, Mexico. Prevalence and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla Barajas, Martín; Barrera Zepeda, Ana Teresa; Morales Romero, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an ever more frequent disease in children; its etiology is unknown, although a genetic predisposition along with environment factors could be the origin. To determine the prevalence of atopic dermatitis among school-children and the main associated risk factors. A randomized, stratified and conglomerated sample of 6 to 12 year-old school-children was obtained. Their parents answered the main ISAAC questionnaire, to which some variables were added, such as family and hereditary history, tobacco smoking exposure and nutritional condition according to the body mass index as associated risk factors. We found a prevalence of 3% for atopic dermatitis, and the presence of dermatitis symptoms during the last twelve months was found in 6.8% of the cases. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an elevated risk for atopic dermatitis in children of mothers with any type of allergic disease (OR 2.75, CI 95% 1.09 to 6.92, p = 0.031). The frequency of atopic dermatitis as well as that of the symptoms was low, similar to previous reports conducted in Mexico. Maternal atopy was the only factor associated with atopic dermatitis.

  16. Targeted anti-staphylococcal therapy with endolysins in atopic dermatitis and the effect on steroid use, disease severity and the microbiome: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (MAAS trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Totté, J.; Wit, J. de; Pardo, L.; Schuren, F.; Doorn, M. van; Pasmans, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with reduced skin microbial diversity and overgrowth of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus. However, the importance of S. aureus colonisation in the complex pathogenesis remains unclear and studies on the effect of anti-staphylococcal therapy in non-infected

  17. Targeted anti-staphylococcal therapy with endolysins in atopic dermatitis and the effect on steroid use, disease severity and the microbiome: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (MAAS trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Totté (Joan); de Wit, J. (Jill); Pardo, L. (Luba); Schuren, F. (Frank); van Doorn, M. (Martijn); S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with reduced skin microbial diversity and overgrowth of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus. However, the importance of S. aureus colonisation in the complex pathogenesis remains unclear and studies on the effect of anti-staphylococcal therapy in

  18. Atopic Dermatitis in Adults: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre Salvador, J F; Romero-Pérez, D; Encabo-Durán, B

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a prevalence of 1%-3% in adults. Adult-onset AD has only been defined recently, and lack of familiarity with this condition and confusion regarding the appropriate terminology persist. AD may first appear in childhood or de novo in adults and is characterized by pronounced clinical heterogeneity. The disease often deviates from the classic pattern of flexural dermatitis, and there are forms of presentation that are specific to adults, such as head-and-neck dermatitis, chronic eczema of the hands, multiple areas of lichenification, or prurigo lesions. Although diagnosis is clinical, adult-onset AD frequently does not fit the traditional diagnostic criteria for the disease, which were developed for children. Thus, AD is often a diagnosis of exclusion, especially in de novo cases. Additional diagnostic tests, such as the patch test, prick test, skin biopsy, or blood test, are usually necessary to rule out other diseases or other types of eczema appearing concomitantly with AD. This article presents an update of the different forms of clinical presentation for AD in adults along with a proposed diagnostic approach, as new treatments will appear in the near future and many patients will not be able to benefit from them unless they are properly diagnosed.

  19. Mold Occurring on the Air Cleaner High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filters Used in the Houses of Child Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Ahn, Geum Ran; Son, Seung Yeol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Yun, Yeo Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are the known sources of irritation associated with atopic diseases (e.g., asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema). To quantitatively estimate their presence in the indoor environment of atopic dermatitis-inflicted child patient's houses (ADCPHs), the high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters installed inside the air cleaners of three different ADCPHs were investigated for the presence of mold. The air cleaner HEPA filters obtained from the three different ADCPHs w...

  20. Skin microbiome before development of atopic dermatitis: Early colonization with commensal staphylococci at 2 months is associated with a lower risk of atopic dermatitis at 1 year.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Disease flares of established atopic dermatitis (AD) are generally associated with a low-diversity skin microbiota and Staphylococcus aureus dominance. The temporal transition of the skin microbiome between early infancy and the dysbiosis of established AD is unknown.

  1. Search for rare decays of the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson with the DØ experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Ralf Patrick [Univ. of Zurich, Irchel (Switzerland)

    2005-10-01

    This document presents the searches for the flavour-changing neutral current decays B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ- and B$0\\atop{s}$s → φμ+μ- . A data set with integrated luminosity of 300 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √ s = 1 . 96 TeV collected with the DØ detector in Run II of the FERMILAB Tevatron collider is used. The former decay mode is particularly sensitive to supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. For the latter mode, a measurement of the branching ratio could validate the prediction of the Standard Model. In the absence of an apparent signal, a limit on the branching fraction B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ-) can be computed by normalising the upper limit on the number of events in the B$0\\atop{s}$ signal region to the number of reconstructed B ± → J/ψ K ± events. An upper limit on the branching fraction of B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+ μ- ) ≤ 3.7 × 10-7 at a 95% CL is obtained. This limit can be used to constrain models beyond the Standard Model. In models where the lightest supersymmetric particle is considered to be a dark matter candidate the limit aids in restricting the dark matter scattering cross section on nucleons. For the decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → φμ+μ- also no signal has been observed and an upper limit on the branching ratio normalised to B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψ φ events of B$0\\atop{s}$ B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → φ μ+ μ-)/B(B$0\\atop{s}$→J/ψφ) < 4 . 4 × 10-3 at a 95% CL is obtained. In addition, the rare decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → ψ (2 S ) φ has been observed. To measure a branching ratio, the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψ φ mode was used for normalisation, while B± → ψ (2S) K± and B± → J/ψ K± modes were used as control samples. The relative branching ratio has been measured to be B(B$0

  2. Recent advances in epidemiology and prevention of atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Francesca; Dondi, Arianna; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2014-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), named also atopic eczema, is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease with a considerable social and economic burden. The primum movens of AD is in most cases a genetic and/or immune-supported defect of the skin barrier, facilitating penetration and sensitization to food or airborne allergens, as well as infections by Staphylococcus aureus, herpes simplex virus, or other microbes. New pathogenetic concepts have generated new approaches to prevention and therapy of AD. In particular, the daily use of emollients in newborns at high risk of AD has shown interesting results, with a reduction in the cumulative incidence of AD ranging from 32% to 50% of the treated infants. On the other hand, the AD preventive efficacy of food and/or inhalant allergen avoidance has been questioned, and supplementation strategies (vitamin D, probiotics, or other compounds) need to be further investigated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Hypnotherapy of atopic dermatitis in an adult. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczel, Kristóf; Gál, János

    2016-01-17

    Hypnosis is well known for its modulatory effects on immune and inflammatory processes, and it is a therapeutic option for certain diseases of such pathogenesis. The authors report treatment of an adult patient with extensive atopic dermatitis, who was only minimally responsive to conservative treatment. In a 15 session hypnotherapy the authors combined the use of direct, symptom-oriented suggestive techniques with hypnotic procedures to identify and modify comorbid psychological issues. To monitor the effect of the treatment, patient diaries (quality and quantity of sleep, intensity of pain and itch) and repeated psychometric tests were used. At the end of treatment there were improvements in all measured dimensions (itch, pain, insomnia, activity, anxiety and emotional state) both clinically and psychometrically. The authors conclude, that hypnosis can be an effective adjunctive therapy in atopic dermatitis, and in certain severe cases may constitute a salvage therapy.

  4. Extended implementation of educational programs for atopic dermatitis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Birgit; Staab, Doris

    2015-05-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis (AD) suffer from chronic relapsing inflammatory skin lesions accompanied by insatiable itching, dryness, excoriated skin, or even (super-)infections. This burden impairs the quality of life of affected children and their families. Due particularly to the recurrent course of the disease, patients often lose confidence in treatment and fear side effects of steroids. Family education programs for AD have been established in the last decades to provide appropriate education and psychosocial support. However, the need for long-lasting strategies in treatment and prevention has even increased. Recent findings not only underline the importance of an intact skin barrier in regard to acute therapy but also suggest that an impairment of skin barrier integrity promotes the development of subsequent atopic diseases in the course of the atopic march. Moreover, in addition to the psychosocial burden due to stigmatized appearance or sleep disturbance, new observations document an increased presence of psychosomatic comorbidities in patients with AD. We reviewed recent educational interventions regarding the theoretical background and here will discuss the heterogeneous approaches of existing programs in childhood. Despite high variations of educational strategies, an overriding aim should be the broader integration of supporting programs in the treatment of children with AD to empower the affected child and its caregiver's to obtain the best possible care, quality of life, and to promote (secondary) prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. CYCLOSPORINE IN TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Alekseeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AtD is one of the most widespread types of allergic lesions of skin in children. Increase of severe types of AtD with lesion of big parts of skin, high frequency of exacerbations, presence of concomitant atopic diseases, and inefficiency of standard therapeutic approaches, torpid clinical course and early development of disability, causes an anxiety. Present standard approaches can be ineffective in children with severe clinical course of AtD and they are not able to prevent progression of disease, development of severe exacerbations and child’s disability. One of therapeutic alternatives for these patients is treatment with immunosuppressive agents. The article describes questions of treatment with cyclosporine in systemic therapy of severe resistant forms of AtD in children. Author discusses effectiveness and safety of a drug, formulated rules of treatment of severe AtD with cyclosporine. Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, cyclosporine, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:117-120

  6. Praktyczne aspekty opieki nad dzieckiem chorym na atopowe zapalenie skóry: rola współpracy personelu medycznego z pacjentem i jego rodzicami. Obraz kliniczny, rozpoznanie i leczenie / Practical aspects of caring for a child with atopic eczema: the role of cooperation among medical staff and patients and their parents. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skiba Anna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atopic eczema (or atopic dermatitis, AD has a great impact on the quality of life of the affected person as well as the whole family. Hospitalization may be required during exacerbations of the disease.

  7. Atopic dermatitis in a high-risk cohort: natural history, associated allergic outcomes, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Chris; Dimich-Ward, Helen; Ferguson, Alexander; Watson, Wade; Rousseau, Roxanne; Dybuncio, Anne; Becker, Allan; Chan-Yeung, Moira

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly associated with asthma and other atopic disorders in childhood. To evaluate the natural history of AD and its association with other allergic outcomes in a high-risk cohort through the age of 7 years. A total of 373 high-risk infants, who had undergone a randomized controlled trial with intervention measures for primary prevention of asthma applied during the first year of life, were assessed for asthma, AD, and allergic sensitization at 1, 2, and 7 years. The multifaceted intervention program did not reduce AD despite reducing the prevalence of asthma significantly. Sixty-two children (16.6%) had AD during the first 2 years (early-onset AD); of these, 26 continue to have AD at the age of 7 years (persistent), whereas 36 no longer had the disease (nonpersistent) at the age of 7 years. Twenty-three children (6.2%) developed AD only after the age of 2 years (late-onset AD). Early-onset AD, persistent or nonpersistent, was associated with increased risk of allergic sensitization to food allergens within the first 2 years of life and asthma diagnosis at year 7. However, only persistent AD was associated with an increased risk of other atopic diseases and allergic sensitization to food and aeroallergens at year 7. Late-onset AD was not associated with atopic diseases or allergic sensitization at year 7 with the exception of Alternaria alternans. In this cohort of infants at high risk of asthma, early-onset persistent AD, which was highly associated with atopic sensitization, increased the risk of atopic diseases in later childhood and thus appears to be part of the atopic march. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel concepts of prevention and treatment of atopic dermatitis through barrier and immune manipulations with implications for the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnowicki, Tali; Krueger, James G; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2017-06-01

    Skin barrier abnormalities have been suggested to play an essential role in initiation of early atopic dermatitis (AD). Antigen penetration through a compromised barrier likely leads to increased innate immune responses, antigen-presenting cell stimulation, and priming of overt cutaneous disease. In a T H 2-promoting environment, T-cell/B-cell interactions occurring in regional lymph nodes lead to excessive IgE switch. Concurrent redistribution of memory T cells into the circulation not only leads to exacerbation of AD through T-cell skin infiltration but also spreads beyond the skin to initiate the atopic march, which includes food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis. Possible primary interventions to prevent AD are focusing on improving skin barrier integrity, including supplementing barrier function with moisturizers. As for secondary prophylaxis in children with established AD, this can be stratified into prevention of disease exacerbations by using proactive approaches (with either topical corticosteroids or topical calcineurin inhibitors) in mild AD cases or the prevention of other atopic disorders that will probably mandate systemic immunosuppression in severe AD cases. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Current Clinical Guidelines for Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic multifactorial skin disease that is common enough in childhood. The article presents the current data on epidemiology and dynamics of incidence of pathological symptoms, pathogenesis basics, and key factors of the disease development, shows the current classification of the disease. The authors consider in detail the key principles of the diagnosis and peculiarities of a clinical aspect depending on age. Algorithms of a therapeutic approach, as well as basics of an individual hypoallergenic diet are proposed. General recommendations and possible prognosis for pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis are given.

  10. Intestinal permeability in patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, I; Goolamali, S K; Levi, A J; Peters, T J

    1985-03-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in adult patients with atopic eczema by in vivo and in vitro techniques. Patients with symptoms of 'immediate' food allergy were specifically excluded. A 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetate absorption test was carried out in eighteen patients. Their mean (+/- s.d.) 24-hour urine excretion following oral administration of the test substance (2.1 +/- 0.9%) did not differ significantly from that of thirty-four normal controls (1.9 +/- 0.5%). Small bowel permeability was estimated directly in jejunal mucosal samples in ten patients with three permeability probes of differing molecular weight. Mucosal permeability did not differ significantly from that of fifteen control patients for any of the test substances. Two patients had abnormal results by both tests and in one this was due to coeliac disease. These results suggest that altered intestinal permeability is not important in the pathogenesis of eczema. Patients demonstrating increased intestinal permeability should undergo jejunal biopsy to exclude significant small bowel disease.

  11. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  12. Neonatal BCG vaccination and atopic dermatitis before 13 months of age: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøstesen, L M; Kjaergaard, J; Pihl, G T; Birk, N M; Nissen, T N; Aaby, P; Jensen, A K G; Olesen, A W; Stensballe, L G; Jeppesen, D L; Benn, C S; Kofoed, P-E

    2017-09-20

    Studies have suggested that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. The Danish Calmette Study was conducted 2012-2015. Within 7 days of birth new-borns were randomised 1:1 to BCG or no BCG. Exclusion criteria were gestational age clinical examinations until 13 months. Clinical atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 466/2,052 (22.7%) children in the BCG group and 495/1,952 (25.4%) children in the control group (RR = 0.90 [95% confidence intervals 0.80-1.00]). The effect of neonatal BCG vaccination differed significantly between children with atopic predisposition (RR 0.84 (0.74-0.95)) and children without atopic predisposition (RR 1.09 [0.88-1.37]) (test of no interaction, P = .04). Among children with atopic predisposition, the number-needed-to-treat with BCG to prevent one case of atopic dermatitis was 21 (12-76). © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  13. Atopic Eczema and Stress among Single Parents and Families: An Empirical Study of 96 Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, Uwe; Schoof, Stefanie; Gieler, Tanja; Scheewe, Sibylle; Schut, Christina; Kupfer, Jörg

    2017-01-04

    This study investigated the extent to which single mothers of children with atopic eczema experience disease-related stress. A total of 96 mothers were divided into 4 groups: mothers living with a partner, who had or did not have a child with atopic eczema, and single mothers, who had or did not have a child with atopic eczema. The following questionnaires were used to assess psychological burden: Short Stress Questionnaire (Kurzer Fragebogen zur Erfassung von Belastung; KFB), Satisfaction with Life Questionnaire (Fragebogen zur Lebenszufriedenheit; FLZ), General Depression Scale (Allgemeine Depressions-Skala; ADS), and the Questionnaire for Parents of Children with Atopic Eczema (Fragebogen für Eltern von Neurodermitis kranken Kindern; FEN). Single mothers had higher levels of helplessness and aggression due to their child's scratching behaviour than did mothers living with a partner and a child with atopic eczema. Single mothers of children with atopic eczema had the highest scores regarding experienced stress in the family and the lowest scores concerning general life satisfaction. Special care should be provided for single mothers with higher stress, in order to teach them how to deal with the scratching behaviour of their children.

  14. Patch testing with dermatophagoides and its correlation with chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Chetna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic eczema is commonly encountered in the Indian set up. So also is atopic dermatitis. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides are implicated in various diseases like atopic dermatitis, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. It has also been proven that patch testing with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP is important for detection of contact sensitization in chronic dermatitis. Aims: To study clinical characteristics of DP mix positive patients with regards to chronic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Methods: Dermatology outpatients presenting to the department of Skin and STD of Kasturba Medical College (KMC, with clinically diagnosed atopic dermatitis and chronic eczema were chosen for the study. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were well demarked. Eighty six randomly selected patients of dermatitis were subjected to patch testing with standard series and DP mix. Results: Of the 86, 50 (58% showed positive reaction to DP mix. Among these positive patients, chronic dermatitis was seen in 42 (84% with involvement of exposed parts in 37 (74%. Atopic dermatitis was seen in 19 patients (38% from DP positive group whereas it was observed in 4 patients (17% from the other group. Conclusion: Dermatophagoides mix positivity was statistically significant in chronic eczema as well as atopic dermatitis. Patch testing is an important tool to detect delayed type allergy to house dust mite.

  15. Interleukin-31 pathway and its role in atopic dermatitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammed D; Oussedik, Elias; D'Amber, Veronica; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory disease, has a lifetime prevalence of 10-20%. Atopic dermatitis reduces quality of life, primarily due to pruritus. Interleukin-31 and its target receptor are newly discovered entities that are involved in pruritus. To summarize the current understanding of interleukin-31 and its role in atopic dermatitis, potential therapeutic interventions and future prospects. A systematic review was designed to identify articles related to interleukin-31 and its role in pruritus. Predefined queries containing interleukin-31 and related key terms were searched with no past date restriction, through 31 August 2016, using MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal database. Of 151 identified articles, 61 met eligibility criteria. Interleukin-31 receptors are expressed constitutively on the surface of keratinocytes, eosinophils and small diameter neurons. Overexpression of interleukin-31, independent of mast cells and lymphocytes, induces clinical and histological features consistent with atopic dermatitis. In addition, overexpression of interleukin-31 causes reversible alopecia. Human monoclonal interleukin-31 antagonist, CIM331, decreased pruritus in phase-I and phase-II clinical trials. Interleukin-31 plays an important role in atopic dermatitis and alopecia. Inhibiting this pathway may provide an alternative to antihistamines for the pruritus of atopic dermatitis.

  16. Barrier-Restoring Therapies in Atopic Dermatitis: Current Approaches and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Valdman-Grinshpoun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a multifactorial, chronic relapsing, inflammatory disease, characterized by xerosis, eczematous lesions, and pruritus. The latter usually leads to an “itch-scratch” cycle that may compromise the epidermal barrier. Skin barrier abnormalities in atopic dermatitis may result from mutations in the gene encoding for filaggrin, which plays an important role in the formation of cornified cytosol. Barrier abnormalities render the skin more permeable to irritants, allergens, and microorganisms. Treatment of atopic dermatitis must be directed to control the itching, suppress the inflammation, and restore the skin barrier. Emollients, both creams and ointments, improve the barrier function of stratum corneum by providing it with water and lipids. Studies on atopic dermatitis and barrier repair treatment show that adequate lipid replacement therapy reduces the inflammation and restores epidermal function. Efforts directed to develop immunomodulators that interfere with cytokine-induced skin barrier dysfunction, provide a promising strategy for treatment of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, an impressive proliferation of more than 80 clinical studies focusing on topical treatments in atopic dermatitis led to growing expectations for better therapies.

  17. Pesticides and atopic and nonatopic asthma among farm women in the Agricultural Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; London, Stephanie J; Henneberger, Paul K; Kullman, Greg J; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma among farm women are understudied. We evaluated pesticide and other occupational exposures as risk factors for adult-onset asthma. Studying 25,814 farm women in the Agricultural Health Study, we used self-reported history of doctor-diagnosed asthma with or without eczema and/or hay fever to create two case groups: patients with atopic asthma and those with nonatopic asthma. We assessed disease-exposure associations with polytomous logistic regression. At enrollment (1993-1997), 702 women (2.7%) reported a doctor's diagnosis of asthma after age 19 years (282 atopic, 420 nonatopic). Growing up on a farm (61% of all farm women) was protective for atopic asthma (odds ratio [OR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.70) and, to a lesser extent, for nonatopic asthma (OR, 0.83; 95%CI, 0.68-1.02; P value for difference = 0.008). Pesticide use was almost exclusively associated with atopic asthma. Any use of pesticides on the farm was associated only with atopic asthma (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.14-1.87). This association with pesticides was strongest among women who had grown up on a farm. Women who grew up on farms and did not apply pesticides had the lowest overall risk of atopic asthma (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.27-0.62) compared with women who neither grew up on farms nor applied pesticides. A total of 7 of 16 insecticides, 2 of 11 herbicides, and 1 of 4 fungicides were significantly associated with atopic asthma; only permethrin use on crops was associated with nonatopic asthma. These findings suggest that pesticides may contribute to atopic asthma, but not nonatopic asthma, among farm women.

  18. Comparison of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis guidelines-an argument for aggressive atopic dermatitis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Mary E; Lio, Peter A

    2017-11-01

    The development of effective systemic treatments has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. The availability of safe new treatments and the understanding of psoriasis as a systemic disease with comorbidities and effects on quality of life have driven the current aggressive treatment paradigm of psoriasis. Historically the morbidity of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been dismissed, given the perception of AD as "just" a rash. Differences in the guidelines for psoriasis and AD management may suggest variations in the current conceptualization of disease severity and effects on quality of life. Published guidelines from the American Academy of Dermatology for the management of psoriasis and AD were reviewed. We recorded the similarities and differences in disease assessment and therapy. The threshold to use biologic agents for moderate to severe psoriasis highlights the aggressive nature of modern psoriasis treatment. AD guidelines include an assessment of quality of life but do not designate a disease severity threshold for systemic treatment. AD and psoriasis have a tremendous effect on quality of life. The AD guidelines have a less aggressive approach to disease management than the psoriasis guidelines. We should think critically about rapid advancement to systemic agents in AD management, especially now that more and better agents are being developed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the small bowel mucosa of children with celiac disease and atopic dermatitis in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Ress, Krista; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Oivi; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we aimed to evaluate the impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of children with celiac disease (CD) and atopic dermatitis (AD) in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD). Seventy-five children (37 male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.8 years), who randomly underwent small bowel biopsy, were studied. The CD was diagnosed in 14 children, including five persons with concomitant AD (all positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and with small bowel atrophy). Normal small bowel mucosa was found in eight patients with AD and in 53 patients with FGD. The sera of all patients were tested for total and specific IgE antibodies to food allergen panels. Staining for CD11c+, langerin (CD207+) DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of bioptates using immunohistochemistry. The density of CD11c+ DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was higher in the CD patients compared to the AD and FGD patients (p = 0.02; p = 0.001). In AD, significantly higher density of CD11c+ DCs was detected in patients positive for specific IgE to food allergen panels (p = 0.02). The FGD patients with elevated total IgE had increased density of langerin (CD207)+ DCs compared to the patients with normal total IgE levels (p = 0.01). The increased density of FOXP3+ Treg cells, CD4+, cells and CD11c+ DCs was associated with CD but not with AD. The elevated level of total IgE or specific IgE to food allergens was associated with more pronounced expression of DCs, indicating a possible link between the presence of these cells in small bowel mucosa with elevated level of serum IgE. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Comparison of atopic cough with cough variant asthma: is atopic cough a precursor of asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, M; Ogawa, H.; Nishizawa, Y.; Nishi, K.

    2003-01-01

    Background: We have described a group of patients who present with isolated chronic bronchodilator resistant non-productive cough with an atopic constitution, eosinophilic tracheobronchitis, and airway cough receptor hypersensitivity without bronchial hyperresponsiveness, which we have termed "atopic cough". Although cough variant asthma (in which the cough responds to bronchodilators) is recognised as a precursor of typical asthma, it is not known whether atopic cough is also a precursor of ...

  1. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  2. Atopic dermatitis in children: clinical features, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J; Milner, Joshua D; Stone, Kelly D

    2015-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia, and other allergic diseases. Medications such as antihistamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. New approaches to the prevention of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, C; Mann, J

    2014-01-01

    There has been a steep rise in the burden of atopic dermatitis (AD), and up to 20% of children in developed countries now suffer of the disease. At present, treatment at best achieves symptom control rather than cure, and there is a strong need to identify new methods of disease prevention. While earlier approaches focused on allergen avoidance strategies, there has been a clear shift towards attempts to induce tolerance and enhancement of skin barrier function, as skin barrier breakdown plays an important role in AD development. This article reviews the latest developments in the prevention of AD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. GUIDELINES OF CARE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Tom, Wynnis L.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Feldman, Steven R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Simpson, Eric L.; Berger, Timothy G.; Bergman, James N.; Cohen, David E.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Davis, Dawn M.; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J.; Paller, Amy S.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Elmets, Craig A.; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G.; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2–3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in AD management and care, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of four sections, methods for diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. PMID:24290431

  5. ADHD and atopic diseases : Pharmacoepidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, Jurjen

    2017-01-01

    Aandachtsdeficiëntie-/hyperactiviteitsstoornis (ADHD) is een chronische aandoening met een hoge prevalentie. Gebrek aan kennis met betrekking tot de oorzaak van ADHD brengt vragen over de mogelijke verbinding met andere aandoeningen. Om deze reden was het hoofddoel van dit proefschrift om de

  6. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis--own observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotsztejn, Helena; Frankowska, Joanna; Kamer, Barbara; Trznadel-Grodzka, Ewa

    2012-02-24

    The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor. The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of disease among children born in 2005-2008 treated in Outpatient Clinic of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz. Children suffering from atopic dermatitis are more prone to develop infectious diseases. Infectious diseases in children with atopic dermatitis are of more chronic nature and more often require antibiotic therapy. Such children often manifest chronic diarrhea and their stool contains Staphylococcus aureus. They are more often hospitalized because of difficulty in setting a diagnosis and applying treatment in outpatient clinics.

  7. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis – own observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Rotsztejn

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor.Material/Methods:The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of disease among children born in 2005–2008 treated in Outpatient Clinic of the Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital in Lodz.Results:Children suffering from atopic dermatitis are more prone to develop infectious diseases.Conclusions:Infectious diseases in children with atopic dermatitis are of more chronic nature and more often require antibiotic therapy. Such children often manifest chronic diarrhea and their stool contains Staphylococcus aureus. They are more often hospitalized because of difficulty in setting a diagnosis and applying treatment in outpatient clinics.

  8. Atopic dermatitis in the first six months of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, E; Meneghini, C L

    1989-01-01

    1,476/2,320 of our cases of atopic dermatitis (AD) start in the first six months of life. The diagnosis is usually easy, but at this age it is sometimes more difficult, mainly because of lack of or rare evidence of scratching, but also because of the brief clinical history that does not allow observation of the characteristic chronic and relapsing course. Moreover, the major atopic disorders-asthma, rhinitis-usually appears later in the natural history of atopic subjects. From a differential diagnosis point of view, AD is the most definite dermatological disorder at this age. Other not well defined conditions occurring in the first six months of life are usually referred to as infantile seborrheic dermatitis, a name that has been used for at least four different disorders: cradle cap, cradle cap with involvement of inguinal, axillary and retroauricular folds, napkin psoriasis and Leiner's erythroderma. From a clinical point of view, AD in the first months of life is characterized by the prevalence of exudating lesions; moreover, the lack of or the rare evidence of scratching allows us to observe isolated vesicular lesions that are found with difficulty in the further course of the disease.

  9. Comparison of Dermatology and Allergy Guidelines for Atopic Dermatitis Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Girish C; Lio, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin condition treated by dermatologists, allergists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians. Several treatment guidelines and therapeutic parameters exist for the management of this disease. Health care professionals may be unaware of guidelines created by specialty organizations other than their own. To review, compare, and contrast the most recent AD management guidelines. The guidelines for AD management published by the American Academy of Dermatology 2014 work group were compared with those created by the 2012 Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. International guidelines created by the 2012 European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis and the 2013 Asia-Pacific Consensus Group for Atopic Dermatitis were also considered. Several differences among the guidelines suggest that there may be disparity in the perceptions of AD between US dermatologists and allergists and health care professionals in other areas of the world. There are notable differences among the guidelines regarding the recommendations for the use of diluted bleach baths, vitamin D, and environmental modifications. Comparison of different guidelines may ultimately augment knowledge of treatment strategies and enhance realization of biases in the understanding and management of AD.

  10. Search for B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Tulika [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency via B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analyses provides a powerful constraint on the CKM matrix elements. A search for B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations was performed using data collected by the DØ detector during the period 2002-2005 at the Fermilab Tevatron. Approximately 610 pb-1 of data was analyzed to reconstruct a large set of B0 s mesons in different semileptonic decay modes. Opposite-side flavor tagging algorithms that were tested on semileptonic B0 d decays with the measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing frequency were used to determine the initial state flavor of the reconstructed B0 s meson. No significant signal for any particular value of the oscillation frequency was found. A 95% confidence level limit on the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms > 7.3 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 9.5 ps-1 were obtained.

  11. Predictive factors of persistent infantile atopic dermatitis up to 6 years old in Taiwan: a prospective birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M M-H; Tseng, W-N; Ou, C-Y; Hsu, T-Y; Kuo, H-C; Yang, K D

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis affects 15-30% of children worldwide. Onset of disease usually occurs within the first year of life, over half of which regress by 6 years of age. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors related to the persistence of infantile atopic dermatitis. In this birth cohort study, patients were enrolled prenatally and followed until 6 years of age; 246 patients had infantile atopic dermatitis at 6 months of age. Family history, maternal and paternal total and specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, and cord blood IgE were recorded. Clinical examination, questionnaire survey, and blood samples for total and specific IgE of the children were collected at each follow-up visit. Of the 246 patients with infantile atopic dermatitis at 6 months of age, 48 patients had persisted atopic dermatitis at 6 years of age (19.5%). Risk factors associated with persistent infantile atopic dermatitis included egg white sensitization (odds ratio: 3.801, P = 0.020), and atopic dermatitis involving two or more areas at 6 months old (odds ratio: 2.921, P = 0.018) after multivariate analysis with logistic regression. Patients with persistent infantile atopic dermatitis had a higher risk of asthma before 6 years old (39.6% vs 24.2%, P = 0.032). Egg white sensitization and the initial involvement of two or more areas at 6 months of age were associated with the persistent infantile atopic dermatitis. Patients with persistent infantile atopic dermatitis are more likely to develop asthma by 6 years of age. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Qualitative vs. quantitative atopic dermatitis criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, R M; Thyssen, J P; Maibach, H I

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based on the imp......This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based...... phenomenon. Specific pheno- and endotypes are now emerging potentially enabling us to better classify patients with AD, but the influence of these on the diagnosis of AD is so far unclear. Few diagnostic models use quantitative scoring systems to establish AD cases from normal population, which, however, may...

  13. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  14. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Eric L; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic ...

  15. Human skin equivalents for atopic dermatitis : investigating the role of filaggrin in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen, Vincent van

    2014-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a frequent occurring inflammatory skin disease causing physical discomfort, social embarrassment and stress. This skin disease is characterized by decreased skin barrier function and various other epidermal changes, as well as immunological changes. A decreased skin barrier

  16. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic March

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Marenholz (Ingo); J. Esparza-Gordillo (Jorge); F. Rüschendorf (Franz); A. Bauerfeind (Anja); D.P. Strachan (David P.); B.D. Spycher (Ben D.); H. Baurecht (Hansjörg); P. Margaritte-Jeannin (Patricia); A. Sääf (Annika); M. Kerkhof (Marjan); M. Ege (Markus); S. Baltic (Svetlana); J. Matheson; J. Li (Jin); S. Michel (Sven); W.Q. Ang (Wei Q.); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. Arnold (Andreas); G. Homuth (Georg); F. Demenais; E. Bouzigon (Emmanuelle); C. Söderhäll (Cilla); G. Pershagen (Göran); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Braun-Fahrländer (Charlotte); E. Horak (Elisabeth); L.M. Ogorodova (Ludmila M.); V.P. Puzyrev (Valery P.); E.Y. Bragina (Elena Yu); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); C. Morin (Charles); D.L. Duffy (David); G.B. Marks (Guy B.); C. Robertson; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A.W. Musk (Arthur); P.J. Thompson (Philip); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A.L. James (Alan); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); E. Toskala (Elina); P.M. Rodríguez; R. Fölster-Holst (R.); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Heinzmann (Andrea); E. Rietschel (Ernst); M. Keil (Mark); S. Cichon (Sven); M.M. Nöthen (Markus M.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D. Sly; C.O. Schmidt (Carsten Oliver); A. Matanovic (Anja); V. Schneider (Valentin); M. Heinig (Matthias); N. Hübner (Norbert); P.G. Holt (Patrick); S. Lau (Susanne); M. Kabesch (Michael); S. Weidinger (Stefan); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); C. Laprise (Catherine); M.B. Freidin (M.); J. Genuneit (Jon); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); E. Melén (Erik); M.-H. Dizier; A.J. Henderson (A. John); Y.-A. Lee (Young-Ae)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the a 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12

  17. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rueschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P.; Spycher, Ben D.; Baurecht, Hansjoerg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Saaf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C.; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q.; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Soderhall, Cilla; Pershagen, Goran; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J.; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L.; Marks, Guy B.; Robertson, Colin F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Noethen, Markus M.; Pennell, Craig E.; Sly, Peter D.; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Huebner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G.; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A. R.; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B.; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Melen, Erik; Dizier, Marie-Helene; Henderson, A. John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-01-01

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations

  18. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic March

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Marenholz (Ingo); J. Esparza-Gordillo (Jorge); F. Rüschendorf (Franz); A. Bauerfeind (Anja); D.P. Strachan (David P.); B.D. Spycher (Ben D.); H. Baurecht (Hansjörg); P. Margaritte-Jeannin (Patricia); A. Sääf (Annika); M. Kerkhof (Marjan); M. Ege (Markus); S. Baltic (Svetlana); J. Matheson; J. Li (Jin); S. Michel (Sven); W.Q. Ang (Wei Q.); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. Arnold (Andreas); G. Homuth (Georg); F. Demenais; E. Bouzigon (Emmanuelle); C. Söderhäll (Cilla); G. Pershagen (Göran); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Braun-Fahrländer (Charlotte); E. Horak (Elisabeth); L.M. Ogorodova (Ludmila M.); V.P. Puzyrev (Valery P.); E.Y. Bragina (Elena Yu); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); C. Morin (Charles); D.L. Duffy (David); G.B. Marks (Guy B.); C. Robertson; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A.W. Musk (Arthur); P.J. Thompson (Philip); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A.L. James (Alan); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); E. Toskala (Elina); P.M. Rodríguez; R. Fölster-Holst (R.); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Heinzmann (Andrea); E. Rietschel (Ernst); M. Keil (Mark); S. Cichon (Sven); M.M. Nöthen (Markus M.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D. Sly; C.O. Schmidt (Carsten Oliver); A. Matanovic (Anja); V. Schneider (Valentin); M. Heinig (Matthias); N. Hübner (Norbert); P.G. Holt (Patrick); S. Lau (Susanne); M. Kabesch (Michael); S. Weidinger (Stefan); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); C. Laprise (Catherine); M.B. Freidin (M.); J. Genuneit (Jon); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); E. Melén (Erik); M.-H. Dizier; A.J. Henderson (A. John); Y.-A. Lee (Young-Ae)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the a € atopic marcha €. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in

  19. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: section 1. Diagnosis and assessment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Tom, Wynnis L; Chamlin, Sarah L; Feldman, Steven R; Hanifin, Jon M; Simpson, Eric L; Berger, Timothy G; Bergman, James N; Cohen, David E; Cooper, Kevin D; Cordoro, Kelly M; Davis, Dawn M; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J; Paller, Amy S; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A; Williams, Hywel C; Elmets, Craig A; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G; Smith Begolka, Wendy; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic, inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2% to 3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in the management and care of AD, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of 4 sections, methods for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment, and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Common Allergens in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bonyadi, MR. (PhD; Ezzati, F. (MSc

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Being exposed to different allergens, followed by the production of specific IgE, has an important role in causing atopic dermatitis, recognizing the allergens and applying immunotherapy for treatment. We aimed to determine the frequency of common allergens in the patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: In this descriptive- analytical study the serum level of total IgE and frequency of specific IgE were measured by Immunoblotting method again...

  1. The Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism rs510432 in ATG5 Gene and the Development of Atopic March in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Iemets

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism rs510432 in gene ATG5 and the development of atopic march in children, to find out the probability of clinical manifestation and the features of the clinical course of atopic diseases in individuals with different allelic variants of polymorphism. Methods. Genotyping assay of polymorphism rs510432 in gene ATG5 was performed in children with atopic diseases and apparently healthy children using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. The minor T allele of rs510432 in ATG5 gene was significantly more often found in patients with atopic diseases than in apparently healthy children (χ2 = 6.36; р < 0.05. The results of logistic regression demonstrated that the risk of atopic diseases in children with minor genotype is 2.4 times higher than in carriers of major genotype. The average values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 are significantly lower in asthma patients with minor genotype than in thereof with major genotype (Q = 2.71; р < 0.05. There were no statistically significant differences in the distribution of allelic variants of rs510432 polymorphism of the gene ATG5 depending on the severity of bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis in children. Conclusions. Children with minor TT genotype of gene ATG5 polymorphism had an increased risk of atopic diseases, which is 72 %. In patients with bronchial asthma, minor TT genotype of gene ATG5 polymorphism has been associated with reduced FEV1. Rs510432 polymorphism of the gene ATG5 should be used to predict the development of atopic diseases in children.

  2. Lifetime difference in the B$0\\atop{s}$ system from untagged B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ decay at √s= 1.96 TeV at D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Avdhesh [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai (India)

    2006-01-01

    In this dissertation, they present a study of the untagged decay of B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ, the final state of which is a superposition of the CP-even and CP-odd states. Within the framework of the standard model (SM), to a good approximation, the two CP eigenstates of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system are equivalent to mass eigenstates. The data collected by the D0 detector between June 2002 to August 2004 (an integrated luminosity of approximately 450 pb-1) has been used for the analysis presented in this thesis. From a simultaneous fit to the B$0\\atop{s}$ candidate mass, lifetime, and the angular distribution of the decay products, they obtain the CP-odd fraction in the final state at production time to be 0.16 ±} 0.10(stat) ± 0.02(syst). The average lifetime of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system is measured to be 1.39$+0.13\\atop{-0.16}$(stat)$+0.01\\atop{-0.02}$(syst) ps, with the relative width difference between the heavy and light mass eigenstates, Δγ/$\\bar{γ}$ = (γLH)/$\\bar{γ}$ = 0.24$+0.16\\atop{-0.38}$(stat)$+0.03\\atop{-0.04}$(syst). With the additional constraint from the world average of the B$0\\atop{s}$ lifetime measurements using semileptonic decays, they find average lifetime of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system 1.39 ± 0.06 ps with Δγ/$\\bar{γ}$ = 0.25$+0.14\\atop{-0.15}$. They have also done B0 lifetime measurement for its analogous decay mode to J/Ψ}K*. With this measurement they get B0 lifetime 1.530 ± 0.043(stat) ± 0.023(syst) ps. Using above results, they get 0.91 ± 0.09(stat) ± 0.003(syst), for the ratio of the B$0\\atop{s}$ and B0 lifetimes ($\\bar{γ}$(B$0\\atop{s}$)/γ(B0)). These measurements are consistent with the predictions of SM within the measurement uncertainty.

  3. Effects of examination stress on psychological responses, sleep and allergic symptoms in atopic and non-atopic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernelöv, Susanna; Höglund, Caroline Olgart; Axelsson, John; Axén, Jennie; Grönneberg, Reidar; Grunewald, Johan; Stierna, Pontus; Lekander, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that atopics may be more vulnerable to stress than non-atopics. However, the roles of psychological well-being and sleep in this presumed increased sensitivity are not known. To investigate the effects of a brief naturalistic stressor on psychological responses, sleep, and allergic symptoms and to compare those responses between atopic and non-atopic individuals. We assessed atopic and non-atopic students during a period without and during a period with examinations. For both atopic and non-atopic students, tension, anxiety, and depression deteriorated in response to examination, as did sleep latency and sleep quality. Overall, atopics were more tense, had more anxiety, longer sleep latencies, and were less well rested than non-atopics. Non-atopic students rose from bed later during the examination period. In response to examination, atopic students reported increased frequency of stress behaviors (e.g., eating fast), while decreased stress behaviors were reported by non-atopic students. Allergic symptoms were not affected. Atopic students were worse off in aspects of psychological well-being and sleep, but displayed only partly stronger responses to a stressor compared to non-atopic students. In spite of a broad negative response to examination, allergic symptoms were not affected.

  4. Fatty acids in breast milk and development of atopic eczema and allergic sensitisation in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, C; Müller, A; Rist, L; Kummeling, I; Snijders, B E P; Huber, M; van Ree, R; Simões-Wüst, A P; Dagnelie, P C; van den Brandt, P A

    2011-01-01

    One of the explanations for the increasing prevalence of atopic diseases is a relative low perinatal supply of n-3 fatty acids. However, this does not explain the protective effects of whole-fat dairy products or high levels of transfatty acids in breast milk, observed in some studies. We evaluated the role of perinatal supply of fatty acids in the early development of atopic eczema and allergic sensitisation. Fatty acids, including n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPs) as well as ruminant fatty acids (rumenic acid, cis-9,trans-11-C18:2 conjugated linoleic acid; and vaccenic acid, trans-11-C18:1), were determined in breast milk sampled at 1 month postpartum from 310 mother-infant pairs in the KOALA Birth Cohort Study, the Netherlands. Children were followed for atopic outcomes until 2 years of age. Higher concentrations of n-3 LCPs as well as ruminant fatty acids were associated with lower risk of (1) parent-reported eczema, (2) atopic dermatitis (UK Working Party criteria), and (3) sensitisation at age 1 year (as revealed by specific serum IgE levels to cow's milk, hen's egg and/or peanut). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the inverse associations between ruminant fatty acid concentrations in breast milk and atopic outcomes were found to be independent from n-3 LCPs. The results confirm a protective role of preformed n-3 LCPs in the development of atopic disease. Moreover, this is the first study in humans confirming results from animal studies of protective effects of ruminant fatty acids against the development of atopic manifestations. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. [The estimation of atopic dermatitis in infants and small children in general practitioner's practice--own observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowska, Joanna; Kamer, Barbara; Trznadel-Budźko, Ewa; Rotsztejn, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of atopic dermatitis in general practitioner's practice. The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of individual history of disease among children born in 2005-2008 treated in an outpatient clinic of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. Infants and small children suffering from atopic dermatitis are abig group (31.8%) in own observations. Many of them have dissemination skin lesions. Atopic dermatitis becomes a more frequent problem in infants and small children in general practitioner's practice. We observe more and more children with disseminated allergic skin lesions.

  6. CORRECTION OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOCENOSIS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND RELATED FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS OF DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Arshba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the relevance of the correction of bacterial overgrowth syndrome in children with atopic dermatitis and concomitant diseases of digestive system. The main functions of the microflora, the influence of various factors on the colonization resistance of the body of the child have been identified. The results of our own observations are cited. On their basis we proposed approaches to the treatment of children with atopy and concomitant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, microbiota, bacterial overgrowth syndrome. (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 114–117.

  7. Allergic investigations in children with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siłakowska, Z; Rybak, B

    1995-01-01

    In the study the results of allergic investigations in 36 children with atopic eczema were demonstrated. Prick testing with 22 allergens made by Bencard and 5 natural allergens showed an allergic reaction in 28 children (77.8%). The positive reaction was noted more often in children with a generalized form of disease compared to a limited one (81.85 and 76.0% respectively). Allergy to inhalatory allergens was observed in 72.2%, to food allergens in 38.9% and to other allergens in 27.8% of patients. Among inhalatory allergens, sensitivity to domestic dust (55.6%), inhalatory allergens A1 and grass pollen (both 50.0%) and Dermatophagoides pt. (44.4%) were most common. Food allergens were represented by grain (16.7%), uncooked milk and chocolate (both 11.1%). The conducted investigations indicate, that uncooked or cooked milk and milk cream seem to be more accurate indicators of milk sensitivity than milk allergen by Bencard.

  8. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan A. Rather

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, recurrent, chronic inflammatory skin disease that is a cause of considerable economic and social burden. Its prevalence varies substantially among different countries with an incidence rate proclaimed to reach up to 20% of children in developed countries and continues to escalate in developing nations. This increased rate of incidence has changed the focus of research on AD toward epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. The effects of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of AD remain elusive. However, evidence from different research groups show that probiotics could have positive effect on AD treatment, if any, that depend on multiple factors, such as specific probiotic strains, time of administration (onset time, duration of exposure, and dosage. However, till date we still lack strong evidence to advocate the use of probiotics in the treatment of AD, and questions remain to be answered considering its clinical use in future. Based on updated information, the processes that facilitate the development of AD and the topic of the administration of probiotics are addressed in this review.

  9. Fatty-acid composition of maternal and umbilical cord plasma and early childhood atopic eczema in a Spanish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, R; Chisaguano, A M; Castellote, A I; Morales, E; Sunyer, J; López-Sabater, M C

    2013-06-01

    Fatty-acid status during in-utero development might influence the risk of atopic diseases in early childhood. The aim of this work was to identify the relationship between maternal plasma and cord blood fatty acid (FA) composition and the risk of atopic eczema in the offspring at 14 months of age. Two hundred and eleven non-atopic mothers and their children were studied. Mothers were recruited in their first trimester of gestation and children were monitored until 14 months of age. Samples of maternal plasma and cord blood plasma were analyzed to determine the FA profile of total lipids. Presence of atopic eczema in the infants was documented through questionnaires at 6 and 14 months of age. Higher concentrations of total long-chain polyunsaturated FA (LC-PUFA) were found in maternal plasma of non-atopic children in relation to atopic group. Moreover, this maternal plasma LC-PUFA content was negatively correlated with the atopic eczema (odds ratios (OR)=0.83, P=0.04) in infants. Regarding cord blood samples, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA C22:6n3) and the sum of total n-3 and of LC-PUFA n-3 showed a negative correlation with the prevalence of the disease (OR=0.50, 0.49 and 0.49, respectively). Our results show that the fatty-acid status of the fetus during pregnancy has an important role in the development of atopic eczema in early childhood. The prevalence of this atopic disorder is related to lower cord blood plasma levels of FA belonging to n-3 series, especially DHA.

  10. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma and Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Stokholm, Lonny; Linder, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. It is prescribed to children at high risk for severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus. However, little is known about the risk of the immune-mediated dise.......94-1.48) or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (HR 1.14; 95% CI 0.92-1.42) were observed. CONCLUSION: Exposure to palivizumab neither increased the risk of atopic disease nor protected against asthma.......BACKGROUND: Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. It is prescribed to children at high risk for severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus. However, little is known about the risk of the immune......-mediated diseases atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis after palivizumab exposure. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in childhood. METHODS: This was a cross-national population...

  11. Wheeze in children : the impact of parental education on atopic and non-atopic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, Gea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Brunekreef, Bert

    There is conflicting evidence for the relationship between parental socioeconomic position and their children's asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between parental education and respiratory symptoms in their children, distinguishing atopic and non-atopic symptoms. A

  12. Wheeze in children: the impact of parental education on atopic and non-atopic symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, G.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Brunekreef, B.

    2010-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence for the relationship between parental socioeconomic position and their children's asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between parental education and respiratory symptoms in their children, distinguishing atopic and non-atopic symptoms. A

  13. [Food allergy in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, K; Heratizadeh, A; Werfel, T

    2012-04-01

    Food allergy predominantly affects children rather than adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Early sensitization to foods has been found to be significantly associated with AD. Three different patterns of clinical reactions to food allergens in AD patients exist: i. immediate-type reaction, ii. isolated late-type reaction, iii. combined reaction (i. + ii.). While in children allergens from cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat, fish, peanut or tree nuts are mostly responsible for allergic reactions, birch-pollen related food allergens seem to play a major role in adolescent and adults with AD in Central and Northern Europe. Defects of the epidermal barrier function seem to facilitate the development of sensitization to allergens following epicutaneous exposure. The relevance of defects of the gut barrier as well as genetic characteristics associated with an increased risk for food allergy remain to be further investigated. Numerous studies focus on prevention strategies which include breast-feeding or feeding with hydrolyzed milk substitute formula during the first 4 months of life.

  14. Dupilumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Magdalena; Worm, Margitta

    2017-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an increasing prevalence. Treatment of patients suffering from mild or moderate disease includes the use of emollients and topical glucocorticoids or topical calcineurin inhibitors. Patients with chronic and severe atopic dermatitis where topical therapy is usually insufficient require the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs, which is often limited due to toxicity and severe adverse effects. Areas covered: This review summarizes the literature on the mechanism of action, clinical efficacy and safety of dupilumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the α-subunit of the interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4Rα) leading to the inhibition of both the IL-4 and IL-13 pathways. A literature search was performed on Pubmed and ClinicalTrials.gov using key words 'dupilumab', 'REGN668', 'IL-4'/'IL-13' and 'atopic dermatitis'. Expert commentary: Dupilumab offers an innovative therapeutic approach for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. It is not approved for clinical use in any country yet; however, due to its excellent clinical efficacy and a favorable safety profile, dupilumab may revolutionize the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in the next upcoming years.

  15. Correlation of the severity of atopic dermatitis with absolute eosinophil counts in peripheral blood and serum IgE levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of epidemiological studies, showing incidence and prevalence of atopic dermatitis, were available, scant attention has been paid to the correlation between the parameters of the disease like severity, absolute eosinophil count and IgE level, which has been known to be associated inconsistently. Hence this study was undertaken. METHODS: A total of 102 patients of atopic dermatitis, both children and adults, and 107 age matched controls were studied at the Pediatric Dermatology clinic, Institute of Child Health and department of Dermatology, AMRI-Apollo hospitals, Kolkata. RESULTS: The average age of onset of atopic dermatitis was observed to be 4.55 years. Both the average absolute eosinophil count and IgE levels in patients of atopic dermatitis were significantly higher than that of the controls. Each of these parameters showed significant correlation with severity of the disease and showed a nonhomogeneous distribution reflected by significant association with personal history of bronchial asthma and family history of atopy, when both parents were atopic. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that clinical activity of the disease as recorded by the "SCORAD" index can be used as an indicator of the hematological abnormalities as well as to some extent as a prognostic indicator. Family history of atopy correlates with the hematological abnormalities only if both parents are involved and bronchial asthma is the only associated atopic condition which correlates with the parameters of the disease .

  16. Analysis of the prevalence of and risk factors for atopic dermatitis using an ISAAC questionnaire in 8,750 Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin-Ok; Hong, Soyoung; Son, Dong-Koog; Lee, Jong-Rok; Roh, Joo-Young; Kwon, Ho-Jang

    2013-01-01

    Since 1995, epidemiologic studies of atopic disorders using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire have been performed in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. The prevalence, burden and risk factors of atopic dermatitis were surveyed in these studies, which helped to enhance their comparability among different areas and age groups, as well as to clarify the nature of atopic dermatitis and other atopic disorders. From 21 facilities, 8,750 children were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The data were collected via the Internet using a questionnaire based on the Korean-language version of the ISAAC study format. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis over the previous 12 months was 14.4%. The prevalence in preschool children was significantly higher than in elementary school children. Family history of atopic diseases, diagnosis of allergic conjunctivitis and diagnosis of food allergy were positively associated with atopic dermatitis in both preschool and elementary school children. In addition, raising pets was positively associated with atopic dermatitis in preschool children. In elementary school children, female gender, secondhand smoking, breastfeeding, changing the parents' house to a newly built one during the first year of life, diagnosis of asthma and diagnosis of allergic rhinitis were positively associated with atopic dermatitis. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis in preschool and elementary school children in Korea is similar to that of children in other developing countries. The risk factors for atopic dermatitis are different in preschool and elementary school children. More detailed strategies will be necessary to reduce atopic dermatitis in both age groups. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Magnitude and associated factors of Atopic dermatitis among children in Ayder referral hospital, Mekelle, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbore, Abraham Getachew; Alemu, Workalemahu; Shumye, Ashenafi; Getachew, Sefonias

    2015-08-25

    strengthening the national skin diseases prevention and control services in particular in skin care of children related to atopic dermatitis and others. In avoiding early initiation of supplementary feeding specially with personal and families with atopic problem needs further attention of prevention activities.

  18. Study of B$0\\atop{s}$ Mixing at the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab Using the Semi-leptonic Decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ μ+v X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzelc, Meghan [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing studies provide a precision test of Charge-Parity violation in the Standard Model. A measurement of Δms constrains elements of the CKM quark rotation matrix [1], providing a probe of Standard Model Charge-Parity violation. This thesis describes a study of B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing in the semileptonic decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → Ds- μ+vX, where Ds- → Φπ-, using data collected at the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator in Batavia, Illinois. Approximately 2.8 fb-1 of data collected between April 2002 and August 2007 was used, covering the entirety of the Tevatron's RunIIa (April 2002 to March 2006) and part of RunIIb (March 2006-August 2007). Taggers using both opposite-side and same-side information were used to obtain the flavor information of the Bs0 meson at production. The charge of the muon in the decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → Ds-μ+vX was used to determine the flavor of the B$0\\atop{s}$ at decay. The B$d\\atop{0}$ mixing frequency, Δmd, was measured to verify the analysis procedure. A log-likelihood calculation was performed, and a measurement of Δms was obtained. The final result was Δms = 18.86 ± 0.80(stat.) ± 0.37(sys.) with a significance of 2.6σ.

  19. Grading Of Severity Of Atopic Dermatitis In North Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Severity of atopic dermatitis (AD was assessed in 80 children (up to12 years, 48 boys and 32 girls, using grading system as suggested by Rajka and Langeland. Thirty-three (41.25%, 44 (55% and 3(3.75% patients had mid, moderate and severe diseases respectively. Mean severity scores were 3.5,5.7 and 8.3 respectively in these 3 groups. Boys had a more Severe disease than girls. Patients with early (0-3 months and late onset (6-9 years of disease had maximum severity, mean severity scores being 5 and 5.3 respectively. Patients with moderate AD had a more prolonged course than those with mild disease. Family history of atopy had no impact on the severity of AD, although personal history of atopy was common in patients with moderate AD. Face was equally affected in mild disease group.

  20. Emollient enhancement of the skin barrier from birth offers effective atopic dermatitis prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Chalmers, Joanne R; Hanifin, Jon M; Thomas, Kim S; Cork, Michael J; McLean, W H Irwin; Brown, Sara J; Chen, Zunqiu; Chen, Yiyi; Williams, Hywel C

    2014-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached epidemic proportions in children worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Because of the significant socioeconomic effect of atopic dermatitis and its effect on the quality of life of children and families, there have been decades of research focused on disease prevention, with limited success. Recent advances in cutaneous biology suggest skin barrier defects might be key initiators of atopic dermatitis and possibly allergic sensitization. Our objective was to test whether skin barrier enhancement from birth represents a feasible strategy for reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in high-risk neonates. We performed a randomized controlled trial in the United States and United Kingdom of 124 neonates at high risk for atopic dermatitis. Parents in the intervention arm were instructed to apply full-body emollient therapy at least once per day starting within 3 weeks of birth. Parents in the control arm were asked to use no emollients. The primary feasibility outcome was the percentage of families willing to be randomized. The primary clinical outcome was the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at 6 months, as assessed by a trained investigator. Forty-two percent of eligible families agreed to be randomized into the trial. All participating families in the intervention arm found the intervention acceptable. A statistically significant protective effect was found with the use of daily emollient on the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis with a relative risk reduction of 50% (relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = .017). There were no emollient-related adverse events and no differences in adverse events between groups. The results of this trial demonstrate that emollient therapy from birth represents a feasible, safe, and effective approach for atopic dermatitis prevention. If confirmed in larger trials, emollient therapy from birth would be a simple and low

  1. Correlation of the severity of atopic dermatitis with absolute eosinophil counts in peripheral blood and serum IgE levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar Sandipan; Malakar Rajib; Chattopadhyay Soumen; Banerjee Raghubir; Ghosh Apurba

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although a number of epidemiological studies, showing incidence and prevalence of atopic dermatitis, were available, scant attention has been paid to the correlation between the parameters of the disease like severity, absolute eosinophil count and IgE level, which has been known to be associated inconsistently. Hence this study was undertaken. METHODS: A total of 102 patients of atopic dermatitis, both children and adults, and 107 age matched controls were studied at the Pedia...

  2. Patient-Oriented SCORAD (PO-SCORAD): a new self-assessment scale in atopic dermatitis validated in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stalder, J-F; Barbarot, S; Wollenberg, A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROund: Patient-oriented medicine is an emerging concept, encouraged by the World Health Organization, to greater involvement of the patient in the management of chronic diseases. The Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD) index is a self-assessment score allowing the patient...... to comprehensively evaluate the actual course of atopic dermatitis (AD), using subjective and objective criteria derived mainly from the SCORAD, a validated AD severity clinical assessment tool....

  3. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L. Goddard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed “effective” in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  4. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Allison L; Lio, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed "effective" in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  5. Mixing and CP violation in the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson system at CDF; Mélange et violation de CP dans le système des mésons B$0\\atop{s}$ à CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero [Univ. of Paris VI-VII (France)

    2008-01-01

    The two analyses presented in the thesis, the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ angular analysis, share most of the technical implementations and features. Thus, my choice was to pursue in parallel the common aspects of the analyses, avoiding, whenever possible, repetitions. Each Chapter is split in two parts, the first one dedicated to the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the second one describing the angular analysis on the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode. They are organized as follows. In Chapter 1 we present the theoretical framework of the B$0\\atop{s}$ neutral mesons system. After a general introduction on the Standard Model, we focus on the quantities which are relevant to the Δms measurement and the CP violation phenomena, underlying the details concerning the study of pseudo-scalar to vector vector decays, P → VV, which allow to carry out an angular analysis. A discussion on the implication of the measurements performed in the search of physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. The accelerator facilities and the CDF-II detector are reported in Chapter 2. While describing the detector, more emphasis is given to the components fundamental to perform B physics analyses at CDF. The Chapter 3 is focused on the reconstruction and selection of the data samples. The Chapter starts with a description of the on-line trigger requirements, according to the B$0\\atop{s}$ sample considered, followed by the offline selection criteria implemented to reconstruct B$0\\atop{s}$ semileptonic and hadronic decays, fully and partially reconstructed, for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis, as well as the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode for the angular analysis. The subsequent Chapter 4 is dedicated to the revision of the technical ingredients needed in the final analyses. The B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing elements are firstly described. The methodology historically used in the oscillation searches, the 'amplitude scan', is here

  6. Histamine and antihistamines in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddenkotte, Jörg; Maurer, Marcus; Steinhoff, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Itching (pruritus) is perhaps the most common symptom associated with inflammatory skin diseases and can be a lead symptom ofextracutaneous disease (e.g., malignancy, infection, metabolic disorders). In atopic dermatitis itching sensations constitute one of the most prominent and distressing features. The most characteristic response to itching is the scratch reflex: a more or less voluntary, often sub-conscious motor activity, to counteract the itch by slightly painful stimuli. The benefit of a short-termed relieve from itching through this scratch reflex though is counteracted by a simultaneous damage of the epidermal layer of the skin which leads to increased transepidermal water loss and drying, which in turn results in a cycle of more itching and more scratching. A wide range of peripheral itch-inducing stimuli generated within or administered to the skin are able to trigger pruritus, one of them being histamine. Based on early experiments, histamine has been suggested to may play a key role in the pathogenesis ofAD. This is reflected by a history for antihistamines in the therapeutic medication of AD patients. Antihistamines are believed to share a common antipruritic effect and therefore are prescribed to the vast majority of AD patient suffering from itch to act alleviating. The level of evidence in support of the benefits of antihistamine treatment, however, is low. To assess the benefit of antihistamines in the treatment of AD in a better way, their mechanisms and specific effects need to be understood more precisely. In particular their precise indication is crucial for successful use. This book chapter will therefore summarize and assess the role of histamine in AD and the efficacy of antihistamines in its treatment based on results of basic research and clinical studies.

  7. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema? A systematic review, meta-analysis, and recommendation for uniform use of 'atopic dermatitis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S; Silverberg, J I

    2016-10-01

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates unnecessary confusion for patients, healthcare providers, and researchers. It also negatively impacts accurate communication of research in the scientific literature. We sought to determine the most commonly used terms for AD. A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals. Atopic dermatitis is the most commonly used term and appears to be increasing in popularity. Given that eczema is a nonspecific term that describes the morphological appearance of several forms of dermatitis, we strongly suggest the use of a more specific term, AD, in publications, healthcare clinician training, and patient education. Support from researchers, reviewers, and editors is key to success. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A mixed longitudinal study of physical growth in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palit Aparna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing disorder associated with significant morbidity. Growth retardation is known to occur in children affected with atopic dermatitis. However, there is not enough Indian data for this disorder. Aims: We conducted a longitudinal study to look for the effect of atopic dermatitis on growth attainment of Indian preschool children. Methods: The growth patterns of 62 children, aged 3-5 years and suffering from atopic dermatitis were studied in terms of body weight, height and head circumference. Sixty-eight normal healthy children matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status were taken as controls. Every child was followed up at intervals of three months following a mixed longitudinal study design for the duration of one year. Severity of the disease was determined by the scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD index. Results: Growth velocities were lower in patients than in controls. Mean changes in body weight of patients of both sexes showed close similarity to controls. Mean values for height and head circumference were found to be significantly lower in girls than in the girls of the control group at majority of the age levels. In contrast, in boys, these values for the patients remained comparable or higher than in the boys of the control group at some of the ages. Girls had comparatively more severe disease than boys and they had lower values than boys for all the growth parameters assessed. Conclusion: Growth retardation was observed among children with a more severe form of the disease. Height of the affected children was compromised mostly, though a tendency for catch-up growth was observed. Severe forms of atopic dermatitis may impair a child′s linear growth temporarily.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Stone, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia and other allergic diseases. Staphylococcus aureus colonization is common and may contribute to disease progression and severity. Targeted therapies to restore both impaired skin barrier and control inflammation are required for optimal outcomes for patients with moderate to severe disease. Pruritus is universal among patients with AD and has a dominant impact on diminishing quality of life. Medications such as anti-histamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. PMID:25459583

  10. Microbiota in Healthy Skin and in Atopic Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Baviera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Italian interest group (IG on atopic eczema and urticaria is member of the Italian Society of Allergology and Immunology. The aim of our IG is to provide a platform for scientists, clinicians, and experts. In this review we discuss the role of skin microbiota not only in healthy skin but also in skin suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD. A Medline and Embase search was conducted for studies evaluating the role of skin microbiota. We examine microbiota composition and its development within days after birth; we describe the role of specific groups of microorganisms that colonize distinct anatomical niches and the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin. Specific AD disease states are characterized by concurrent and anticorrelated shifts in microbial diversity and proportion of Staphylococcus. These organisms may protect the host, defining them not as simple symbiotic microbes but rather as mutualistic microbes. These findings reveal links between microbial communities and inflammatory diseases such as AD and provide novel insights into global shifts of bacteria relevant to disease progression and treatment. This review also highlights recent observations on the importance of innate immune systems and the relationship with normal skin microflora for the maintenance of healthy skin.

  11. Cause-specific mortality in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Skov, Lone; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Adult atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with several comorbidities, but cause-specific mortality risk is unknown. To examine cause-specific death rates and risk in adults with AD. We performed cross-linkage of nationwide health care and cause of death registers. Adult patients with AD were matched with 10 controls per study subject. We calculated incidence rates per 1000 person-years and hazard ratios (HRs) of cause-specific death with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) using Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 8686 patients and 86,860 matched controls were studied. The risk for death due to any cause was significantly increased in patients with AD (HR 1.27, 95%CI 1.11-1.45). Significant causes included cardiovascular (HR 1.45; 95% CI 1.07-1.96), infectious (HR 3.71; 95% CI 1.43-9.60), and urogenital diseases (HR 5.51; 95% CI 1.54-19.80). No increased risk for death due to cancer, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, respiratory, or gastroenterologic disease was observed. The results might not be generalizable to patients seen exclusively by primary care physicians. Adults with atopic dermatitis had slightly increased risk for death during follow-up. While the risk for death from cardiovascular, urogenital, and infectious diseases was slightly elevated among patients with AD, the absolute risk was very low. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. RESTORATION OF MICROBIOCENOSIS OF THE INTESTINES WITHIN THE COMPLEX THERAPY FOR ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Mel'nikova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a wide spread disease in the practices of the pediatrician. Quite often, the development of atopic dermatitis among children is accompanied by dysbacteriosis of the intestines, whose correction assisted by the probiotics is not always efficient. The purpose of the present research was to study the «Primadophilus for children» dietary supplement efficacy and safety to restore microbiocenosis of the intestines among children with atopic dermatitis. 102 patients aged between 6 months and 6 years took a part in the open research. It was discovered that most children, who received the dietary supplement along with the basic therapy, showed restoration of the normal intestinal microflora. The positive dynamics of the skin process evaluated according to SCORAD scale was marked among 76% of children from the main group and among 68% of children from the screening group. The most drastic reduction of the SCORAD index (by 16–20 points was noted among 52% of children from the main group and only among 30% of children from the screening group (p < 0,05. No side effects were reported during the treatment. Thus, the researchers proved that «Primadophilus for children» was an efficient and safe means for the complex therapy for atopic dermatitis among children.Key words: microbiocenosis of the intestines, probiotics, atopic dermatitis, children.

  13. Current insights into the role of human β-defensins in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieosilapatham, P; Ogawa, H; Niyonsaba, F

    2017-11-01

    Anti-microbial peptides or host defence peptides are small molecules that display both anti-microbial activities and complex immunomodulatory functions to protect against various diseases. Among these peptides, the human β-defensins (hBDs) are localized primarily in epithelial surfaces, including those of the skin, where they contribute to protective barriers. In atopic dermatitis skin lesions, altered skin barrier and immune dysregulation are believed to be responsible for reduced hBD synthesis. Impaired hBD expression in the skin is reportedly the leading cause of increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infection in patients with atopic dermatitis. Although hBDs have considerable beneficial effects as anti-microbial agents and immunomodulators and may ameliorate atopic dermatitis clinically, recent evidence has also suggested the negative effects of hBDs in atopic dermatitis development. In the current review, we provide an overview of the regulation of hBDs and their role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The efforts to utilize these molecules in clinical applications are also described. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Polypodium leucotomos extract in atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Bosca, A; Zapater, P; Betlloch, I; Albero, F; Martínez, A; Díaz-Alperi, J; Horga, J F

    2012-09-01

    Topical corticosteroids are used to treat inflammation and relieve itching in atopic dermatitis, but their use is limited by adverse reactions. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether daily treatment with Polypodium leucotomos extract would reduce the use of topical corticosteroids in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. We also analyzed oral antihistamine use and changes in disease severity. We performed a phase IV randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial involving 105 patients aged between 2 and 17 years who were receiving topical corticosteroids to treat moderate atopic dermatitis. The patients were randomized to receive, in addition to their standard treatment, Polypodium leucotomos extract or placebo (both in capsule form) for 6 months. The percentage of days on which topical corticosteroids and other atopic dermatitis treatments were used was calculated. Use of Polypodium leucotomos extract did not significantly reduce the mean (SD) percentage of days on which topical corticosteroids were used (11% [12%] vs 12% [11%] for placebo). A significant reduction was, however, observed for oral histamine use (median percentage of days, 4.5% in the Polypodium leucotomos group and 13.6% in the placebo group [P= .038]). The percentage of patients who used oral antihistamines was also lower in the Polypodium leucotomos group. Long-term treatment with Polypodium leucotomos extract has benefits for children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis who require pharmacologic treatment to reduce inflammation and relieve itching. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Correction of pancreatic insufficiency in young children with atopic dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solodovnichenko, I.G; Voloshina, L.G; Babadzhanyan, E.N; Savitskaya, E.V

    2016-01-01

    ...% of patients with atopic dermatitis. Objective: evaluation of the effectiveness of the enzyme mini-tableted Ermital 10,000 for the compensation of pancreatic insufficiency in children with atopic dermatitis...

  16. Hyperlinearity in atopic dermatitis, on the palm (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture shows a manifestation of atopic dermatitis on the palm. Individuals with atopic dermatitis characteristically have increased numbers and depth of skin lines (hyperlinearity) on the palms with little ...

  17. Typical and atypical clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    Atopic dermatitis is a complex, systemic inflammatory disorder associated with a variety of clinical features. The original criteria of Hanifin and Rajka include major criteria and a list of about two dozen minor criteria however, even the minor criteria do not include some features of atopic dermatitis noted less commonly but still seen with some frequency. This contribution first reviews the common clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis in infancy, childhood, and adulthood, as well as the less typical appearances, including lichenoid atopic dermatitis; juvenile plantar dermatosis; nummular-type atopic dermatitis; follicular atopic dermatitis; alopecia of atopic dermatitis; eczema coxsackium; and psoriasiform, perineal, and lip licker's dermatitis. The clinician will be able to recognize and treat rarer forms of atopic dermatitis and incorporate this into their daily practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Infection cases in infants and small children with atopic dermatitis – own observations

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Rotsztejn; Joanna Frankowska; Barbara Kamer; Ewa Trznadel-Grodzka

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The purpose of the work is to estimate the frequency of occurrence of various infections in infants and small children, aged between 0 and 36 months with atopic dermatitis in the practice of a family doctor.Material/Methods:The study has been conducted on the basis of the retrospective analysis of medical documentation of disease among children born in 2005–2008 treated in Outpatient Clinic of the Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital in Lodz.Results:Children suffering from atopic de...

  19. Contact sensitization to common haptens is associated with atopic dermatitis: new insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Engkilde, K

    2012-01-01

    -analysis in non-pierced women, a positive association was also found for nickel sensitization. Nickel and thimerosal sensitization may introduce bias in data analysis since these allergies often develop following skin piercing where the skin compartments are bypassed. Discussion: We suspect that individuals...... with self-reported atopic dermatitis from this study mainly suffered from mild disease. However, clinicians should be aware of increased levels of contact sensitization in individuals with atopic dermatitis. Patch testing should therefore be considered at an early point in individuals with a history...

  20. COMPARISON OF CLINICAL ACTIVITY OF PIMECROLIMUS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH MILD AND MODERATE ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Deeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (ad is prevalent disease in younger children. Calcium inhibitor pimecrolimus (elidel, cream 1% is the latest anti-inflammatory drug offered for management of ad. The activity of pimecrolimus was evaluated in open, prospective, randomized, comparison trial, on 60 children (age from 3 months to 7 years with mild and moderate ad. Pimecrolimus was more effective in management of mild ad on the assumption of regular use of drug (TIS < 17, and topical corticosteroids were effective in patients with moderate ad.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, pimecrolimus, topical corticosteroids, management.

  1. Heritability of hand eczema is not explained by comorbidity with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Mortensen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Genetic factors have been shown to influence the risk of hand eczema, and may theoretically influence the frequency of eruptions as well as age at onset of the disease. However, the result may be confounded by atopic dermatitis, which is a major risk factor for development of hand eczema...... and is known to be influenced by genetic factors. In this study, the importance of genetic and environmental risk factors in the etiology of hand eczema, independent of atopic dermatitis, was investigated in a population-based twin cohort. In addition, any possible genetic influence on frequency of hand eczema...

  2. The multiple factors affecting the association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2014-01-01

    , fragrances and other ingredients in emollients. Moreover, the prevalence of metal allergy seems to be increased, probably due to compromised chelation of the metals in the stratum corneum of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, conversely, the T-helper cell 2 bias that characterizes immune responses......Atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis are both common skin diseases having an immune pathogenesis. There has been considerable interest about their inter-relationships with regard to altered susceptibility. Recent investigations have shed new light on this important question...

  3. Wheeze in children: the impact of parental education on atopic and non-atopic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meer, Gea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Brunekreef, Bert

    2010-08-01

    There is conflicting evidence for the relationship between parental socioeconomic position and their children's asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between parental education and respiratory symptoms in their children, distinguishing atopic and non-atopic symptoms. A cross-sectional survey among 3262 elementary school children (age 8-13) was performed; data on parental education were obtained for 3213 children. Parents completed a questionnaire on their child's allergic and respiratory symptoms, and potential explanatory variables including family history, indoor environment, and the child's medical history. Subsets of children were tested for atopy (n = 1983), lung function (n = 2325), and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) (n = 880). Logistic regression was used to assess relationships of health outcomes with parental education. A high parental education was associated with an increased risk of atopic sensitization to indoor allergens (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.02; 1.69). Studied explanatory variables did not influence the relationship. In contrast, a high parental education protected children from wheeze (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61; 0.97). This only applied to non-atopic wheeze (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.43; 0.99) and not to atopic wheeze (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.60; 1.31). The protection from non-atopic wheeze in children of highly educated parents declined after adjustment for household smoking and breastfeeding (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.58; 1.57). Similar results were observed for non-atopic and atopic rhinitis. We conclude that children from highly educated parents are protected from non-atopic respiratory symptoms, which is largely explained by a lower rate of household smoking and a higher rate of breastfeeding.

  4. Neonatal BCG-vaccination and atopic dermatitis before 13 months of age. A randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøstesen, Lisbeth Marianne; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pihl, Gitte Thybo

    2018-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. The Danish Calmette Study was conducted 2012-2015. Within 7 days of birth new-borns were randomised 1:1 to BCG or no BCG. Exclusion criteria were gestational...... age BCG group and 495/1,952 (25.4%) children...... in the control group (RR=0.90 (95% confidence intervals 0.80 to 1.00)). The effect of neonatal BCG vaccination differed significantly between children with atopic predisposition (RR 0.84 (0.74 to 0.95)) and children without atopic predisposition (RR 1.09 (0.88 to 1.37)) (test of no interaction, p=0.04). Among...

  5. Emotion with tears decreases allergic responses to latex in atopic eczema patients with latex allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2006-07-01

    Allergic responses are enhanced by stress, whereas they are reduced by laughter in atopic eczema patients. Emotion with tears decreases plasma IL-6 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, the effect of emotion with tears on allergic responses in patients with atopic eczema was studied. Sixty patients with atopic eczema having latex allergy viewed both the weather information video and the heart-warming movie, Kramer vs. Kramer. Just before and immediately after viewing each video, allergic responses to latex were measured. Viewing the weather information video did not cause emotion with tears in any patients, and it failed to modulate allergic responses. In contrast, viewing Kramer vs. Kramer caused emotion with tears in 44 of 60 patients, and it reduced allergic skin wheal responses to latex and latex-specific IgE production in them. Emotion with tears reduced allergic responses, and it may be useful in the treatment of allergic diseases.

  6. Neonatal BCG-vaccination and atopic dermatitis before 13 months of age. A randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøstesen, Lisbeth Marianne; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pihl, Gitte Thybo

    2017-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. The Danish Calmette Study was conducted 2012-2015. Within 7 days of birth new-borns were randomised 1:1 to BCG or no BCG. Exclusion criteria were gestational...... in the control group (RR=0.90 (95% confidence intervals 0.80 to 1.00)). The effect of neonatal BCG vaccination differed significantly between children with atopic predisposition (RR 0.84 (0.74 to 0.95)) and children without atopic predisposition (RR 1.09 (0.88 to 1.37)) (test of no interaction, p=0.04). Among...

  7. Atopic dermatitis in children: Epidemiological and clinical aspects in Côte d'Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouadio Celestin Ahogo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have been devoted to atopic dermatitis in children in sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore make this study in Côte d’Ivoire in order to contribute to a better knowledge of atopic dermatitis in children on black skin. In our study the prevalence was 9.2%. The duration of the disease before the consultation ranged from 3-45 days. Atopic dermatitis occurs more frequently in children from2 to 5 years old. More than half of the patients had a history of atopy and the lesions generally were localized in the folds. 60% of the lesions were dry and were trigged by dust. The pruritus was often insomnia and the scratching leads to hyperpigmentation of the lower eyelid; a characteristic sign on black skin not often reported in the literature.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic eczema and its association with filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. L.; Edslev, S. M.; Andersen, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    were characterized with respect to disease severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) and FLG mutations (n = 88). Fisher's exact test was used to analyse differences in S. aureus colonization in relation to FLG mutations. Results: Of the 101 patients included, 74 (73%) were colonized with S. aureus...

  9. Prospective study of atopic status in infants of the cohort in Tokyo, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Iwata

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Several risk factors for the development of allergic diseases are considered including, for example, the level of IgE in cord blood or in the peripheral blood of neonates and the antigenic effect of some foods that are ingested by both babies and mothers during pregnancy and during the lactation period. However, not all infants with atopic diathesis develop allergic diseases. To clarify the risk factors and the mechanism for developing allergic diseases, particularly bronchial asthma (BA, we prospectively investigated atopic diatheses and symptoms in children in a cohort using a questionnaire method. The factors correlated to development of allergic diseases, as a whole, at the age of 5–6 years were atopic family history and any allergic symptom at 4 months of age. However, not all subjects with atopic dermatitis developed BA later on. High levels of total IgE and positive IgE antibody against egg white were not risk factors for developing BA at the age of 5–6 years.

  10. Role of foods in irregular aggravation of skin lesions in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Uehara, Masami

    2008-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease that especially affects children and adolescents. Many environmental factors have been recognized as relevant in aggravating skin lesions of the disease. However, it remains to be determined whether foods play a role in worsening of skin lesions in children with atopic dermatitis. In the present study, we investigated whether foods play a role in irregular aggravation of skin lesions in children with the disease. The study population consisted of 69 patients aged 3-15 years with atopic dermatitis. They were hospitalized and open challenge tests were performed with suspected foods. Photographs of representative skin lesion sites were taken at baseline and before and after the challenge. We determined challenge-positive foods by evaluating the comparable before/after challenge photographs. One to three (average, 1.9) challenge-positive foods were confirmed in 52 (75%) of the 69 patients examined. Predominant offending foods were chocolate, cheese and yogurt. Specific immunoglobulin E values to offending foods were mostly negative. We asked patients to exclude challenge-positive foods from their diets. They were then discharged and followed up for 3 months at our outpatient clinic. Exclusion of the offending foods for 3 months brought about a remarkable improvement in the disease. These results suggest that foods play an important role in irregular aggravation of skin lesions in children with atopic dermatitis.

  11. Intensive patient education and treatment program for young adults with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Span, L; Jaspers, JPC; Fidler, [No Value

    Background and Objective. By means of a 2-week intensive multidisciplinary training & treatment course in small groups (ISBP), young adults with atopic dermatitis may be able to achieve better self-management of their disease and reduce their number of doctor visits. Methods. Patients aged 18-35

  12. Linkage of atopic dermatitis to chromosomes 4q22, 3p24 and 3q21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Møller-Larsen, Steffen; Nyegaard, Mette

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, itchy skin disease of complex inheritance characterized by dermal and epidermal inflammation. The heritability is considerable and well documented. To date, four genome scans have examined the AD phenotype, showing replicated linkage at 3p26-22, 3q13-21 and 18q11...

  13. Cyclosporine and Extracorporeal Photopheresis are Equipotent in Treating Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Poulsen, Johan; Grunnet, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent and debilitating disease often requiring systemic immunosuppressive treatment. The efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) is well proven but potential side effects are concerning. Several reports point at extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) as an ...

  14. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Murota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1 leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2 heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This “contagious itch” can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such

  15. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1) leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2) heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This "contagious itch" can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such causes. Copyright

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF CETIRIZINE ON THE CONCENTRATION OF sCD14 IN BLOOD OF THE CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Nisheva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available 66 children with atopic dermatitis aged 1B2 years and 21 children as A control group were examined in an effort to study the impact of cetirizine on the concentration of scd14 in case of allergic disbeases in children. 33 children with atopic dermatitis had referbences in anamnesis on obstructive bronchitis. Children with atopic dermatitis were divided into 3 approximately equal groups — the first group took cetirizine during 2 weeks, the second group — during 4 months, for the third group cetirizine was not given. The level of sCD14 was determined in children's blood by immuneb enzyme analysis method before treatment, directly after treatment with cetirizine and in 2 months after it. In children with allergic diseases the level of sCD14 was 50% lower than in children with out allergy. The short course of cetirizine treatment transiently reduced clinical presentations of atopic dermatitis, but didn't have effect on sCD14 content. Prolonged therapy with cetirizine not only improved the condition of children with atopic dermatitis and decrease the occurrence of obstructive bronchitis in these cases, but also resulted in considerable increase in the concentration of sCD 14 in blood of these patients. We presume the therapeutic and prophylactic effects of cetirizine in allergic diseases in many respects are conditioned by its capacity to improve functions of macrophages in response to infectious and allergic stimuli.Key words: sCD 14, atopic dermatitis, cetirizine, children, treatment.

  17. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    of atopic eczema in general practice. Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition characterised by dry, itchy skin associated with flares and remissions. .... atopy. This effect is lessened in the general population and neg- ligible in children without first- order atopic relatives. Breast- feeding should be strongly rec-.

  18. Prospective study of atopic status in infants of the cohort in Tokyo, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutomu Iwata; Hiroshi Hayakawa; Fusako Komoda; Masae Koseki; Tatsuko Miyakawa; Toyoo Sakurayama; Kaeko Yamasaki; Michie Honjou; Noriko Hirakawa; Kazuko Inoue; Naohiro Hohashi; Chieko Sugishita

    1997-01-01

    Several risk factors for the development of allergic diseases are considered including, for example, the level of IgE in cord blood or in the peripheral blood of neonates and the antigenic effect of some foods that are ingested by both babies and mothers during pregnancy and during the lactation period. However, not all infants with atopic diathesis develop allergic diseases. To clarify the risk factors and the mechanism for developing allergic diseases, particularly bronchial asthma (BA), we...

  19. Rutin suppresses atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common allergic inflammatory skin disease caused by a combination of eczematous, scratching, pruritus and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. The aim of our study was to examine whether rutin, a predominant flavonoid having anti-inflammatory and antioxidative potential, modulates AD and ACD symptoms. We established an atopic dermatitis model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) extract (DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. In addition, 2,4-dinitroflourobenzene-sensitized a local lymph node assay was used for the ACD model. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD symptoms. Topical application of rutin reduced AD based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE levels. Rutin inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. Rutin suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-31, IL-32 and interferon (INF)-γ in the tissue. In addition, rutin suppressed ACD based on ear thickness and lymphocyte proliferation, serum IgG2a levels, and expression of INF-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor-α in ACD ears. This study demonstrates that rutin inhibits AD and ACD, suggesting that rutin might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic skin diseases.

  20. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas; Haerskjold, Ann; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Simonsen, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions. Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital contacts and/or filled prescriptions of disease-specific medication. Confirmative answers to questions about physician-diagnosed atopic disease were used as the gold standard for the comparison with the algorithms, resulting in sensitivities and specificities and 95% confidence intervals. The interviews with the caretaker of the included 454 Danish children born 1997-2003 were carried out May-September 2015; the mean age of the children at the time of the interview being 15.2 years (standard deviation 1.3 years). For the algorithm capturing children with atopic dermatitis, the sensitivity was 74.1% (95% confidence interval: 66.9%-80.2%) and the specificity 73.0% (67.3%-78.0%). For the algorithm capturing children with asthma, both the sensitivity of 84.1% (78.0%-88.8%) and the specificity of 81.6% (76.5%-85.8%) were high compared with physician-diagnosed asthmatic bronchitis (recurrent wheezing). The sensitivity remained high when capturing physician-diagnosed asthma: 83.3% (74.3%-89.6%); however, the specificity declined to 66.0% (60.9%-70.8%). For allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, the sensitivity