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Sample records for atomic spectrometry techniques

  1. Prospects in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bolshakov, A A; Nemets, V M

    2006-01-01

    Tendencies in five main branches of atomic spectrometry (absorption, emission, mass, fluorescence and ionization spectrometry) are considered. The first three techniques are the most widespread and universal, with the best sensitivity attributed to atomic mass spectrometry. In the direct elemental analysis of solid samples, the leading roles are now conquered by laser-induced breakdown and laser ablation mass spectrometry, and the related techniques with transfer of the laser ablation products into inductively-coupled plasma. Advances in design of diode lasers and optical parametric oscillators promote developments in fluorescence and ionization spectrometry and also in absorption techniques where uses of optical cavities for increased effective absorption pathlength are expected to expand. Prospects for analytical instrumentation are seen in higher productivity, portability, miniaturization, incorporation of advanced software, automated sample preparation and transition to the multifunctional modular archite...

  2. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  3. Atomic spectrometry update : environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Cairns, Warren R. L.; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the 27th annual review published in Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry of the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This Update refers to papers published approximately between September 2010 and August 2011 and continues the series of Atomic Spectrometry Updates (ASUs) in Environmental Analysis1 that should be read in conjunction with other related ASU reviews in the series, namely: clinical and biological materials, foods and be...

  4. Slurry sampling techniques for the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Kaneco, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tohru; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Ohta, Kiyohisa

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer has been applied to the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples. The slurry sampling conditions, such as slurry stabilizing agent, slurry concentration, pyrolysis temperature for the slurried fish samples, particle size and ultrasonic agitation time, were optimized for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with the Mo tube atomizer. Thiourea was used as the chemical modifier for the interference of matrix elements. The detection limit was 53 fg (3S/N). The determined amount of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples was consistent with those measured in the dissolved acid-digested samples. The advantages of the proposed methods are easy calibration, simplicity, low cost and rapid analysis.

  5. Analysis of trace element in intervertebral disc by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry techniques in degenerative disc disease in the Polish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nowakowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Although trace elements are regarded crucial and their content has been determined in number of tissue there are only few papers addressing this problem in intervertebral disc in humans. Most of the trace elements are important substrates of enzymes influencing metabolism and senescence process. Others are markers of environmental pollution. Therefore the aim of the research was to analyzed of the trace element content in the intervertebral disc, which may be a vital argument recognizing the background of degenerative changes to be the effect of the environment or metabolic factors. Materials and methods. Material consist of 18 intervertebral disc from 15 patients, acquired in surgical procedure of due to the degenerative disease with Atomic Absorption Spectrometry content of Al, Cd, Co, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, Zn was evaluated. Results. Only 4 of the trace elements were detected in all samples. The correlation analysis showed significant positive age correlation with Al and negative in case of Co. Among elements significant positive correlation was observed between Al/Pb, Co/Mo, Al/Mg, Al/Zn Pb/Zn and Mg/Zn. Negative correlation was observed in Al/Co, Cd/Mg, Co/Mg, Mo/Mg, Co/Zn and Mo/Zn. Conclusions. This study is the first to our knowledge that profiles the elements in intervertebral disc in patients with degenerative changes. We have confirmed significant differences between the trace element contents in intervertebral disc and other tissue. It can be ground for further investigation.

  6. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry — NICE-AAS — A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10−12 cm−1 Hz−1∕2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10−11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm3 (10 fg/m3 or 10−5 ng/m3), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm3, and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10−21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:1021) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated under

  7. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry - NICE-AAS - A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axner, Ove; Ehlers, Patrick; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang

    2014-10-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10- 12 cm- 1 Hz- 1/2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10- 11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm3 (10 fg/m3 or 10- 5 ng/m3), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm3, and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10- 21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:1021) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated under atmospheric

  8. Spectrometry techniques for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy of the radiation emission following the nuclear decay is unique and the characteristic of the radio nuclide which undergoes decay. Thus measurement of the energy of the radiation offers a method of identifying the radio nuclides. The prime requirement of the energy measurement is a suitable detector which shows response proportional to the energy of the radiation rather than the presence of the radiation. The response from such detectors are suitably processed and distributed with respect to the signal strength which is proportional to incident energy. This distribution is normally referred as energy spectrum and is recorded in the multichannel analyser. The measurement of energy and intensity of radiation from the spectrum is called radiation spectrometry. Thus the radiation spectrometry allows the identification and quantification of radioactive isotopes in variety of matrices. The radiation spectrometry has now become a popular radioanalytical technique in wide area of nuclear fuel cycle programs. The popular spectrometry techniques commonly used for the radioactivity measurement and analysis are Alpha spectrometry, Gamma ray spectrometry and Beta spectrometry

  9. An automated flow injection system for metal determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry involving on-line fabric disk sorptive extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthemidis, A; Kazantzi, V; Samanidou, V; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-08-15

    A novel flow injection-fabric disk sorptive extraction (FI-FDSE) system was developed for automated determination of trace metals. The platform was based on a minicolumn packed with sol-gel coated fabric media in the form of disks, incorporated into an on-line solid-phase extraction system, coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This configuration provides minor backpressure, resulting in high loading flow rates and shorter analytical cycles. The potentials of this technique were demonstrated for trace lead and cadmium determination in environmental water samples. The applicability of different sol-gel coated FPSE media was investigated. The on-line formed complex of metal with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was retained onto the fabric surface and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) was used to elute the analytes prior to atomization. For 90s preconcentration time, enrichment factors of 140 and 38 and detection limits (3σ) of 1.8 and 0.4μgL(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium determination, respectively, with a sampling frequency of 30h(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was estimated by analyzing standard reference materials and spiked water samples. PMID:27260436

  10. Estimation of zirconium in Zr-C-Nb alloy by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper discusses a new method developed for estimation of Zirconium (Zr) in Niobium alloy by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). The present procedure involves dissolution of Niobium alloy in a mixture of Sulfuric acid, Nitric acid and Hydro Fluoric acid and subsequent analysis of Zr in Niobium alloy by sequential ICP-AES (Model: JY Ultima 2C HR). A Relative Standard Deviation of less than ± 5% has been achieved in this method. (author)

  11. Ultrasound-assisted extraction technique for establishing selenium contents in breast cancer biopsies by Zeeman-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using multi-injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid-liquid extraction method is developed to establish the contents of selenium in breast cancer biopsies. The method is based on the ultrasound-assisted extraction of selenium from pretreated biopsies prior to Se determination by atomic absorption spectrometry with longitudinal-Zeeman background correction. Fifty-one breast biopsies were collected from the Cies Hospital (Vigo, Spain), 32 of which correspond to tumor tissue and 19 to normal tissue (parenchyma). Difficulties arising from the samples analyzed, i.e. small samples mass (50-100 mg), extremely low Se contents and sample texture modification including tissue hardening due to formaldehyde preservation are addressed and overcome. High intensity sonication using a probe together with addition of hydrogen peroxide succeeded in completely extracting Se from biopsies. The multiple injection technique was useful to tackle the low Se contents present in some biopsies. The detection limit was 25 ng g-1 of Se and the precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was less than 10%. Se contents ranged from 0.08 to 0.4 μg g-1 for parenchyma samples and from 0.09 to 0.8 μg g-1 for tumor samples. In general, Se levels in tumor biopsies were higher as compared with the adjacent normal tissue in 19 patients by a factor of up to 6. Analytical data confirmed Se accumulation in the breast tumors

  12. Ultrasound-assisted extraction technique for establishing selenium contents in breast cancer biopsies by Zeeman-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using multi-injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavilla, I. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Mosquera, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Millos, J. [Centro de Apoyo Cientifico y Tecnologico a la Investigacion, Universidad de Vigo (Spain); Cameselle, J. [Complejo Hospitalario Xeral-Cies, Pizarro 22, 36311 Vigo (Spain); Bendicho, C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: bendicho@uviqo.es

    2006-04-27

    A solid-liquid extraction method is developed to establish the contents of selenium in breast cancer biopsies. The method is based on the ultrasound-assisted extraction of selenium from pretreated biopsies prior to Se determination by atomic absorption spectrometry with longitudinal-Zeeman background correction. Fifty-one breast biopsies were collected from the Cies Hospital (Vigo, Spain), 32 of which correspond to tumor tissue and 19 to normal tissue (parenchyma). Difficulties arising from the samples analyzed, i.e. small samples mass (50-100 mg), extremely low Se contents and sample texture modification including tissue hardening due to formaldehyde preservation are addressed and overcome. High intensity sonication using a probe together with addition of hydrogen peroxide succeeded in completely extracting Se from biopsies. The multiple injection technique was useful to tackle the low Se contents present in some biopsies. The detection limit was 25 ng g{sup -1} of Se and the precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was less than 10%. Se contents ranged from 0.08 to 0.4 {mu}g g{sup -1} for parenchyma samples and from 0.09 to 0.8 {mu}g g{sup -1} for tumor samples. In general, Se levels in tumor biopsies were higher as compared with the adjacent normal tissue in 19 patients by a factor of up to 6. Analytical data confirmed Se accumulation in the breast tumors.

  13. Economical Alternatives for High Sensitivity in Atomic Spectrometry Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yavuz Ataman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used analytical tools for determination of elements at trace levels are atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, inductively coupled plasma, optical emission and mass spectrometry (ICP-OES and ICP-MS and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS. Although sensitive plasma techniques are becoming predominant in most of the western laboratories, AAS keeps its importance in developing countries. Simple and inexpensive ways of enhancing sensitivity will be described for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer. Although there are many chemical preconcentration procedures to improve sensitivity of flame AAS, only some atom trapping techniques will be included here. One kind of atom trapping device is a slotted quartz tube (SQT used for in situ preconcentration of analyte species followed by a rapid revolatilization cycle to obtain an enhanced signal. These devices provide limits of detection at a level of µg L-1. Another kind of atom trapping involves use of vapor generation technique and quartz or tungsten atom trapping surfaces. The analytical steps consist of the generation of volatile species, usually by hydride formation using NaBH4, trapping these species at the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and finally re-volatilizing analyte species by rapid heating of trap. These species are transported using a carrier gas to an externally heated quartz tube as commonly used in hydride generation AAS systems; a transient signal is formed and measured. These traps have limits of detection in the order of ng L-1.

  14. Determination of mercury species by the diffusive gradient in thin film technique and liquid chromatography – atomic fluorescence spectrometry after microwave extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DGT–MAE–LC–CV-AFS method was developed for determination of four mercury species. • The microwave extraction was used for isolation of mercury species from resin gels. • Optimized DGT–MAE–LC–CV-AFS method provides low detection limits (13–38 ng L−1). • The diffusion coefficients of four mercury species were simultaneously determined. - Abstract: A diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was combined with liquid chromatography (LC) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS) for the simultaneous quantification of four mercury species (Hg2+, CH3Hg+, C2H5Hg+, and C6H5Hg+). After diffusion through an agarose diffusive layer, the mercury species were accumulated in resin gels containing thiol-functionalized ion-exchange resins (Duolite GT73, and Ambersep GT74). A microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) in the presence of 6 M HCl and 5 M HCl (55 °C, 15 min) was used for isolation of mercury species from Ambersep and Duolite resin gels, respectively. The extraction efficiency was higher than 95.0% (RSD 3.5%). The mercury species were separated with a mobile phase containing 6.2% methanol + 0.05% 2-mercaptoethanol + 0.02 M ammonium acetate with a stepwise increase of methanol content up to 80% in the 16th min on a Zorbax C18 reverse phase column. The LODs of DGT–MAE–LC–CV-AFS method were 38 ng L−1 for CH3Hg+, 13 ng L−1 for Hg2+, 34 ng L−1 for C2H5Hg+ and 30 ng L−1 for C6H5Hg+ for 24 h DGT accumulation at 25 °C

  15. 原子吸收光谱分析中的绿色萃取富集技术%Green extraction and preconcentration techniques in atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓勃

    2011-01-01

    Sample pretreatment is an essential condition to obtain exact results in the analysis of complicated samples and trace components. Extraction has been extensively applied to the separation and preconcentra-tion of trace inorganic metallic ions. In recent years, analysts have developed several enviroment-friendly green extraction techniques, including single-drop microextraction, cloud point extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, room-temperature ionic liquid extraction, solid-liquid extraction, solid phase microextraction and molecularly imprinted polymer extraction. Their common advantages over conventional liquid-liquid extraction are: (1) using only small quantities of organic solvents; (2) high extraction efficiency and large enrichment factor; (3) less consumption of samples and reagents; (4) fast and simple-to-operate; (5) easy to combine with instrumental analysis methods; and (6) wide application fields. In this paper, the advances of applications of these green extraction techniques in atomic absorption spectrometry during last three years are reviewed with 85 references.%分析复杂样品和测定痕量组分时,样品预处理是获得准确结果的必要条件.萃取是广泛使用的分离富集方法,近年来,分析工作者陆续开发了多种新型绿色微萃取技术,包括单滴微萃取、浊点萃取、分散液-液微萃取、室温离子液体萃取、固-液萃取、固相微萃取、分子印迹聚合物萃取等.他们共同的优点是:有机萃取溶剂用量非常小;萃取效率高,富集倍数大;样品和试剂消耗少;操作简便、快速;便于与其他分析仪器联用;应用范围广等.本文介绍这些新型绿色萃取技术近3年来的进展,引用文献85篇.

  16. Study on the GaAs(110) surface using emitted atom spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facilities implemented at Bariloche for the ion scattering spectrometry is described, and recent examples of the technique application to determine the atomic structure and the composition of metallic and semiconductor surfaces, pure and with different adsorbates. The surface analysis technique using emitted atom spectrometry is discussed. The sensitivity to the GaAs(110) surface atomic relaxation is presented, and the kinetic of hydrogen adsorption by the mentioned surface is studied

  17. The Rewards of Fundamental Atomic Spectrometry Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Walter Slavin

    2000-01-01

    Atomic spectrometry research is the life-blood of the atomic spectrometry instrument industry.The instrument designer can be expected to innovate in the execution of instrumentation and should be expected to be the expert in optical,electronic and software engineering.Fundamentally new technology has required too long a period of gestation to be compatible with commercial time scales and budgets.But in the past decade,the pressure from stockholders for increased return on investments has put increasingly strong pressure on management to reduce expenses and focus increasingly on projects that guarantee a fast payback.This pressure falls particularly heavily on the larger companies;the same companies that a decade or more ago were the ones that brought the more far-reaching and expensive new concepts to market. Fundamental research in atomic spectrometry has been accomplished in the past several decades mostly in the academic environment and in research institutions that are Federally funded.All of the Federally funded research institutions have been forced to alter their missions to more tangible and immediate goals,and many have also seen severe financial reductions.

  18. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Iracema Takase; Hugo Borges Pereira; Aderval S. Luna; Patrícia Grinberg; Reinaldo Calixto de Campos

    2002-01-01

    The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES) are considered. Hydride generation...

  19. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  1. Quantifying uncertainty in measurement of mercury in suspended particulate matter by cold vapor technique using atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nahar; Ahuja, Tarushee; Ojha, Vijay Narain; Soni, Daya; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Leito, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    As a result of rapid industrialization several chemical forms of organic and inorganic mercury are constantly introduced to the environment and affect humans and animals directly. All forms of mercury have toxic effects; therefore accurate measurement of mercury is of prime importance especially in suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected through high volume sampler (HVS). In the quantification of mercury in SPM samples several steps are involved from sampling to final result. The quality, reliability and confidence level of the analyzed data depends upon the measurement uncertainty of the whole process. Evaluation of measurement uncertainty of results is one of the requirements of the standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005 (European Standard EN IS/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, issue1:1-28, 2006). In the presented study the uncertainty estimation in mercury determination in suspended particulate matter (SPM) has been carried out using cold vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG) technique followed by wet chemical digestion process. For the calculation of uncertainty, we have considered many general potential sources of uncertainty. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that the mercury concentration varies from 1.59 ± 0.37 to 14.5 ± 2.9 ng/m(3) with 95% confidence level (k = 2). PMID:24083104

  2. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  3. Glass frit nebulizer for atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    The nebuilizatlon of sample solutions Is a critical step In most flame or plasma atomic spectrometrlc methods. A novel nebulzatlon technique, based on a porous glass frit, has been Investigated. Basic operating parameters and characteristics have been studied to determine how thte new nebulizer may be applied to atomic spectrometrlc methods. The results of preliminary comparisons with pneumatic nebulizers Indicate several notable differences. The frit nebulizer produces a smaller droplet size distribution and has a higher sample transport efficiency. The mean droplet size te approximately 0.1 ??m, and up to 94% of the sample te converted to usable aerosol. The most significant limitations In the performance of the frit nebulizer are the stow sample equMbratton time and the requirement for wash cycles between samples. Loss of solute by surface adsorption and contamination of samples by leaching from the glass were both found to be limitations only In unusual cases. This nebulizer shows great promise where sample volume te limited or where measurements require long nebullzatlon times.

  4. Preliminary results on the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in tea samples using a flow injection on-line solid phase extraction separation and preconcentration technique to couple with a sequential injection hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Taicheng; Song, Xuejie; Jin, Dan; Li, Hongfei; Xu, Jingwei; Chen, Hangting

    2005-10-31

    In this work, a method was developed for determination of ultra-trace levels of Cd in tea samples by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A flow injection solid phase extraction (FI-SPE) separation and preconcentration technique, to on-line couple with a sequential injection hydride generation (SI-HG) technique is employed in this study. Cd was preconcentrated on the SPE column, which was made from a neutral extractant named Cyanex 923, while other matrix ions or interfering ions were completely or mostly separated off. Conditions for the SPE separation and preconcentration, as well as conditions for the HG technique, were studied. Due to the separation of interfering elements, Cd hydride generation efficiency could be greatly enhanced with the sole presence of Co(2+) with a concentration of 200mugL(-1), which is much lower than those in other works previously reported. Interferences on both the Cd separation and preconcentration, and Cd hydride generation (HG) were investigated; it showed that both the separation and preconcentration system, and the HG system had a strong anti-interference ability. The SPE column could be repeatedly used at least 400 times, a R.S.D. of 0.97% was obtained for 6 measurements of Cd with 0.2mugL(-1) and a correlation coefficiency of 1.0000 was obtained for the measurement of a series of solutions with Cd concentrations from 0.1 to 2mugL(-1). The method has a low detection limit of 10.8ngL(-1) for a 25mL solution and was successfully validated by using two tea standard reference materials (GBW08513 and GBW07605).

  5. 液相色谱-原子荧光联用法测定鱼油中的甲基汞%Determination of methylmercury in fish oil by interface technique coupled high performance liquid chromatography with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐君辉; 周向阳; 沈飚; 秦德元

    2011-01-01

    先后采用10% KOH+ 1%硫脲和20% HCl提取鱼油样品,用液相色谱-原子荧光联用技术测定样品中的甲基汞含量.试验结果表明,线性范围在0~ 10 μg/L之间,相关系数为0.999 3,检出限为0.2 μg/L,加标回收率在96.0%~105.0%之间,相对标准偏差小于5%.该方法快速、简便、准确.%Methylmercury was extracted from fish oil sample with 10% potassium hydroxide and 1% thio-urea, then with 20% hydrochloric acid, and then was determined by interface technique coupled high performance liquid chromatography with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The results showed that the linear range was between 0 and 10 μg/L,the linear coefficient was 0.999 3 ,the detection limit was 0.2 μg/ L,recovery was between 96.0% and 105. 0% ,the relative standard was less than 5%. The method was rapid, simple, and accurate.

  6. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  7. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification.

  8. Advances with tungsten coil atomizers: Continuum source atomic absorption and emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new tungsten coil spectrometers are described: a continuum source tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer and a tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometer. Both devices use a 150 W tungsten coil extracted from a slide projector bulb. The power is provided by a computer-controlled, solid state, constant current 0-10 A supply. The heart of the optical system is a high-resolution spectrometer with a multi-channel detector. The continuum source system employs xenon or deuterium lamps, and is capable of multi-element analyses of complex samples like engine oil, urine, and polluted water. Spiked engine oil samples give mean percent recoveries of 98 ± 9, 104 ± 9, and 93 ± 0.8 for Al, V, and Ni, respectively. Copper, Zn, and Cd are determined in urine samples; while Cd, Co, Yb, and Sr are determined in water samples. Detection limits for Cd, Zn, Cu, Yb, Sr, and Co are: 8, 40, 1, 4, 1, and 4 μg l-1. The technique of tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry using a 150 W commercial projector bulb is reported for the first time. Calcium, Ba, and Sr are determined with detection limits of 0.01, 0.5, and 0.1 μg l-1. Relative standard deviations are lower than 10% in each case, and Sr is determined in two water standard reference materials

  9. Study on Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Excited by Synchrotron Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-jia Guo; Wu-er Gan; Guo-bin Zhang; Qing-de Su

    2008-01-01

    A novel analysis approach using atomic fluorescence excited by synchrotron radiation is presented. A system for synchrotron radiation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed, and experimental conditions such as flow rate, analyte acidity, concentration of pre-reducing and hydrogenation system are optimized. The proposed method is successfully applied to get an excitation spectrum of arsenic. Seven of ten primary spectral lines, four of which have never been reported by means of atomic fluorescence spectrometry, agree well with the existing reports. The other three are proposed for the first time. Excitation potentials and possible transitions are investigated. Especially for the prominent line at 234.99 nm, the mechanism of generation is discussed and a model of energy transition processes is proposed.

  10. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D2 background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg. - Highlights: • New approaches were developed to cope with interferences of B determination by ETAAS • Ge was used as internal standard for the determination of B by simultaneous ETAAS • Citric acid was used during digestion

  11. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasias, I.N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Thomaidis, N.S., E-mail: ntho@chem.uoa.gr; Piperaki, E.A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D{sub 2} background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg. - Highlights: • New approaches were developed to cope with interferences of B determination by ETAAS • Ge was used as internal standard for the determination of B by simultaneous ETAAS • Citric acid was used during

  12. Atomic spectrometry methods for wine analysis: A critical evaluation and discussion of recent applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of wine is of great importance since wine components strongly determine its stability, organoleptic or nutrition characteristics. In addition, wine analysis is also important to prevent fraud and to assess toxicological issues. Among the different analytical techniques described in the literature, atomic spectrometry has been traditionally employed for elemental wine analysis due to its simplicity and good analytical figures of merit. The scope of this review is to summarize the main advantages and drawbacks of various atomic spectrometry techniques for elemental wine analysis. Special attention is paid to interferences (i.e. matrix effects) affecting the analysis as well as the strategies available to mitigate them. Finally, latest studies about wine speciation are briefly discussed.

  13. Atomic spectrometry methods for wine analysis: A critical evaluation and discussion of recent applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindlay, Guillermo, E-mail: guillermo.grindlay@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Alicante, PO Box 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Mora, Juan; Gras, Luis [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Alicante, PO Box 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T.C. de [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Analytical Biotechnology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-04-08

    The analysis of wine is of great importance since wine components strongly determine its stability, organoleptic or nutrition characteristics. In addition, wine analysis is also important to prevent fraud and to assess toxicological issues. Among the different analytical techniques described in the literature, atomic spectrometry has been traditionally employed for elemental wine analysis due to its simplicity and good analytical figures of merit. The scope of this review is to summarize the main advantages and drawbacks of various atomic spectrometry techniques for elemental wine analysis. Special attention is paid to interferences (i.e. matrix effects) affecting the analysis as well as the strategies available to mitigate them. Finally, latest studies about wine speciation are briefly discussed.

  14. Microwave Digestion of Hair Samples in Closed Vessels for the Determinations of Copper and Iron by Derivative Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry using Flow-injection Technique%微波溶样-流动注射-导数火焰原子吸收光谱测定人发中的铜和铁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兰菊; 郑连义; 孙汉文

    2002-01-01

      本文以微波消解人发样,利用流动注射-导数火焰原子吸收法测定其中微量铜、铁的含量。微波溶样技术具有快捷、污染小、损失少、消化完全等优点;流动注射进样技术可以克服常规火焰原子吸收法耗样量大和基体干扰严重的缺点;导数技术应用于火焰原子吸收可提高方法的灵敏度和信号的选择性。微波溶样、流动注射与导数技术相结合应用于火焰原子吸收成功地测定了人发中的微量铜和铁。%  A new method was presented for the determinations of copper and iron in hair samples,which was based on the technique of microwave digestion in closed vessels,flow-injection and derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The technique of microwave digestion is convenient, little of pollution, less in loss, and complete digestion. The flaws that sampling is large and matrix interference is serious in conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry(FAAS) were overcome by flow-injection sampling technique. The sensitivity and signal selectivity were enhanced when derivative technique was used. This new method that derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry combined with microwave digestion and flow-injection technique is simple and rapid with satisfactory results for determination of copper and iron in hair.

  15. 磁处理水技术在电感耦合等离子体原子发射光谱中的应用%Application of magnetic treatment technique of water in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金忠; 陈凤玲; 刘素玲; 王春生

    2011-01-01

    在电感耦合等离子体原子发射光谱法(ICP-AES)中,为了提高溶液样品的雾化效率,增强光源辐射强度,降低光谱分析检出限,实验研究了磁化水技术在水溶液前处理中的应用.结果表明,水溶液的物理性质随着磁感应强度改变有着明显变化,在磁感应强度为280 mT时,溶液的表面张力和粘度最小.随着磁化时间的延长,光源中各元素的发射光谱强度也有不同的响应,当水溶液被磁化10 min时,多数元素的发射谱线强度最大.为了了解光谱增强的机理,通过测量铁元素的一组谱线强度,用斜率法求得等离子体的激发温度;测量氩元素的一条谱线,用Stark变宽法求得电子密度.实验证明,样品溶液经过磁化以后引入ICP光源是降低分析检出限的一种有效方法.%In inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) , the magnetic treatment technique of water was used in the pretreatment of aqueous solution to improve the nebulization efficiency of sample, enhance the radiation intensity of light source and reduce the detection limit of spectral analysis. The results showed that the physical property of aqueous solution had significant change with the change of magnetic induction density. When the magnetic induction density was 280 mT, the surface tension and viscosity of solution were the lowest. With the prolonging of magnetizing time, the emission spectral intensity of elements in light source had different responses. When the aqueous solution was magnetized for 10 min, the emission spectral intensity of most elements was the highest. In order to understand the spectrum enhancing mechanism, one group of spectral intensity of iron was measured, and excitation temperature of plasma was obtained by slope method. One spectral line of argon was measured, and the electron density was obtained by Stark broadening method. The experiment indicated that the introduction of sample solution after magnetic

  16. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1). PMID:25381584

  17. Electrochemical preconcentration and hydride generation methods for trace determination of selenium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of atomic absorption spectrometry in combination with two different preconcentration/separation techniques for the determination of trace concentrations of selenium is described. Electrochemical preconcentration onto a platinum electrode with a subsequent atomization of selenium is discussed briefly. Several parameters are considered such as the presence of depolarizers, and the temperature of the electrolyzed solutions. Special attention is payed to the efficiency of the atomization step, and a method to improve this is proposed. Applications of the technique to real samples are also reported. Secondly, the separation of the selenium as the volatile selenium hydride from the sample solution is considered. Several papers in this thesis deal with commonly occurring interferants as nickel and copper and with ways of minimizing or avoiding the interferring effects, whereas other papers relate to more theoretical aspects of the hydride generation process. New methods for the determination of selenium in technical samples with high contents of nickel and copper are also presented

  18. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  19. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  20. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  1. Atmospheric Deposition of Heavy Metals around the Lead and Copper-Zinc Smelters in Baia Mare, Romania, Studied by the Moss Biomonitoring Technique, Neutron Activation Analysis and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Culicov, O A; Steinnes, E; Okina, O S; Santa, Z; Todoran, R

    2002-01-01

    The mosses Pleurozium schreberi, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus were used as biomonitors to study the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals around the lead and copper-zinc smelters in Baia Mare. Samples representing the last three years' growth of moss or its green part, collected on the ground at 28 sites located 2-17 km from the source area, were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons and by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A total of 31 elements were determined, including most of the heavy metals characteristic of emissions from this kind industry. The observed data for Pb, As, Cu, and Cd are all high compared with those observed in other regions of Europe with similar industries, but the concentrations in moss approach regional background levels at a distance of about 8 km from the main source area. Factor analysis of the data distinguishes two industrial components, one characterized by Pb, Cu, As, and Sb, and another one by Zn and Cd...

  2. Comparison of electrothermal atomization diode laser Zeeman- and wavelength-modulated atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry by using a near-infrared diode laser with and without Zeeman and wavelength modulation were carried out with graphite furnace electrothermal atomization. Analytical curves and limits of detection were compared. The magnetic field was modulated with 50 Hz, and the wavelength of the diode laser with 10 kHz. Coherent forward scattering was measured with crossed and slightly uncrossed polarizers. The results show that the detection limits of atomic absorption spectrometry are roughly the same as those of coherent forward scattering spectrometry with crossed polarizers. According to the theory with bright flicker noise limited laser sources the detection limits and linear ranges obtained with coherent forward scattering spectrometry with slightly uncrossed polarizers are significantly better than those obtained with crossed polarizers and with atomic absorption spectrometry. This is due to the fact that employing approaches of polarization spectroscopy reduce laser intensity fluctuations to their signal carried fractions

  3. Preconcentration and Atomization of Arsane in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Detection by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Petr; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Atomization of arsane in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized, and its performance was compared to that of a multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (MMQTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Argon, at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free As atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. A dryer tube filled with NaOH beads placed downstream from the gas-liquid separator to prevent residual aerosol and moisture transport to the atomizer was found to improve the response by 25%. Analytical figures of merit were comparable, reaching an identical sensitivity of 0.48 s ng (-1) As in both atomizers and limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 ng mL(-1) As in MMQTA and 0.16 ng mL(-1) As in DBD, respectively. Compared to MMQTA, DBD provided 1 order of magnitude better resistance to interference from other hydride-forming elements (Sb, Se, and Bi). Atomization efficiency in DBD was estimated to be 100% of that reached in the MMQTA. A simple procedure of lossless in situ preconcentration of arsane was developed. Addition of 7 mL min(-1) O2 to the Ar plasma discharge resulted in a quantitative retention of arsane in the optical arm of the DBD atomizer. Complete analyte release and atomization was reached as soon as oxygen was switched off. Preconcentration efficiency of 100% was observed, allowing a decrease of the LOD to 0.01 ng mL(-1) As employing a 300 s preconcentration period. PMID:27159266

  4. Use of Atomic Absorption Technique in Environmental Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter consists of some points including the process of atomic absorption, historical hint, key basics, the atom ionization and formation of plasma, applications in the device of atomic absorption, quantum analysis with atomic absorption, components of the device of atomic absorption, standardization of this device, atomic absorption in the the graphite furnace, supervising the analytical interventions, spectral interventions, non-spectral interventions, the utmost electric energy for atomization, preparation of standards and samples, the system of acidic digestion, similar analytical techniques.

  5. A Review on Mass Spectrometry: Technique and Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Ashwini Yerlekar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction has gain important in area of life sciences, because of its complex structure. The protein-protein interaction is necessary to study the behavior of protein in a specific environment, and study molecular relationship in living systems. Therefore, large scale proteomics technologies are required to measure physical connection of proteins in living organisms. Mass Spectrometry uses the technique to measure mass-to-charge ratio of ion. It's an evolving technique for characterization of proteins. A Mass Spectrometer can be more sensitive and specific, also complement with other LC detectors. Liquid Chromatography, unlike gas chromatography is a separation technique which helps to separate wide range of organic compounds from small molecular metabolites to peptides and proteins. This paper addresses the study of data analysis using mass Spectrometry. It also includes the study of various methods of Mass Spectrometry data analysis, the tools and various applications of Mass Spectrometry.This review briefs on Mass Spectrometry technique, its application, usage, and tools used by Mass Spectrometry

  6. Quantitative determination of impurities in nuclear grade aluminum by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with quantitative determination of impurity elements in nuclear grade aluminum, used as fin tubes in research reactors, by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). The results have been compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) method. Experimental conditions used in both the methods are given in the paper. (author)

  7. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l−1 and 1.0 ng l−1, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l−1

  8. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschner, Karel, E-mail: karel.marschner@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Albertov 8, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4} in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l{sup −1} and 1.0 ng l{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l{sup −1}.

  9. Determination of Arsenic in Palm Kernel Expeller using Microwave Digestion and Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Method

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Niefaizal Abdul Hammid; Ainie Kuntom; RazaIi Ismail; Norazilah Pardi

    2013-01-01

    A study on the method to determine arsenic in palm kernel expeller wascarried out. Microwave digestion technique is widely applied in the analytical chemistry field. In comparison to conventional sample digestion method, the microwave technique is simple, reduced contamination, usage of safe reagent and matrix completely digested. A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method was used for the total determination of arsenic in palm kernel expeller. Arsenic was extracted from palm ke...

  10. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JingZhen

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating,high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,st the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10~8-5×10~9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10~7-10~(14) fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polarization and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electromagnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  11. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating, high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,at the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10 8 ―5×10 9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10 7 ―10 14 fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polari- zation and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electro- magnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  12. Study on the application of cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of Hg and As traces in sea water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace amount of total mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) in sea water samples were quantitatively determined by using the Atomic Absorption Spectrometry connected with the hydride generation technique (HG-AAS) for As, and with the cold vapour technique (CV-AAS) for Hg. The experiments were carried out at room temperature on a Hydride System Module (HS55) combined with an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (VARIO 6, Analytik Jena AG). The effect of reductants concentration, and that of matrix on the absorption intensity of each analyzed element was studied in details. The sea water sample after fitrating through a membrane with 0.45(μm-hole size was pre-treated with an oxidant or an reductant to obtain the identical medium. The absorption intensity of each element was then measured on the VARIO-6 under the optimum parameters for spectrometer such as: maximum wavelength, current of hollow cathode lamp, and that for hydride system such as cell temperature, speed of peristaltic pump, pump time, reaction time and rewash time, ect. The analytical procedures were set-up and applied for the determination of these above mentioned elements in the synthesized sea water sample and in the real sea water samples with high precision and accuracy. (author)

  13. Plasma jet desorption atomization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and its application to mercury speciation by coupling with thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifu; Zhu, Zhenli; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2012-12-01

    A novel plasma jet desorption atomization (PJDA) source was developed for atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) and coupled on line with thin layer chromatography (TLC) for mercury speciation. An argon dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, which is generated inside a 300 μm quartz capillary, interacts directly with the sample being analyzed and is found to desorb and atomize surface mercury species rapidly. The effectiveness of this PJDA surface sampling technique was demonstrated by measuring AFS signals of inorganic Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) deposited directly on TLC plate. The detection limits of the proposed PJDA-AFS method for inorganic Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg were 0.51, 0.29, and 0.34 pg, respectively, and repeatability was 4.7%, 2.2%, and 4.3% for 10 pg Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg. The proposed PJDA-AFS was also successfully coupled to TLC for mercury speciation. Under optimized conditions, the measurements of mercury dithizonate (Hg-D), methylmercury dithizonate (MeHg-D), and phenylmercury dithizonate (PhHg-D) could be achieved within 3 min with detection limits as low as 8.7 pg. The combination of TLC with PJDA-AFS provides a simple, cost-effective, relatively high-throughput way for mercury speciation. PMID:23153091

  14. In situ atom trapping of Bi on W-coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry and interference studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılınç, Ersin, E-mail: kilincersin@gmail.com [Medical Laboratory Techniques, Vocational Higher School of Healthcare Studies, Mardin Artuklu University, 47200 Mardin (Turkey); Bakırdere, Sezgin [Yıldız Technical University, Art and Science Faculy, Department of Chemistry, Esenler, TR 34220 İstanbul (Turkey); Aydın, Fırat [Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, TR 21280 Diyarbakır (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-11-01

    Analytical performances of metal coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) and slotted quartz tube in situ atom trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-AT-FAAS) systems were evaluated for determination of Bi. Non-volatile elements such as Mo, Zr, W and Ta were tried as coating materials. It was observed that W-coated SQT gave the best sensitivity for the determination of Bi for SQT-FAAS and SQT-AT-FAAS. The parameters for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS were optimized. Sensitivity of FAAS for Bi was improved as 4.0 fold by W-coated SQT-FAAS while 613 fold enhancement in sensitivity was achieved by W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS using 5.0 min trapping with respect to conventional FAAS. MIBK was selected as organic solvent for the re-atomization of Bi from the trapping surface. Limit of detection values for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained as 0.14 μg mL{sup −1} and 0.51 ng mL{sup −1}, respectively. Linear calibration plot was obtained in the range of 2.5–25.0 ng mL{sup −1} for W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS system was checked by analyzing a standard reference material, NIST 1643e. - Highlights: • Further increasing in sensitivity of SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained by using a W coated SQT. • 613 fold sensitivity enhancement was achieved by W coated SQT-AT-FAAS versus FAAS. • A sensitive, rapid and simple technique for Bi was developed with an LOD of 0.51 ng mL{sup −1}. • The technique is suggested for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer.

  15. Chlorine Analysis by Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim Koch; Aleksandr Zybin; Kay Niemax

    2000-01-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particulary with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine-and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the exspected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample.

  16. Advances in metallomics by atomic and molecular spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The scope of research in the field of elemental speciation has considerably evolved during the last decade. The analysis of specific metal-containing contaminants reached the maturity and has given way to the development of analytical methods to describe interactions of metals with biomolecules which are constituents of the genome, proteome, metabolome and other -omes in a cell, tissue or organism. The entirety of metal-biomolecule species has been termed the 'metallome' which gave rise to an emerging discipline: metallomics. Advances of trace element analysis in life sciences resulted in the proliferation of new terms related to the description of metal-interactions with biomolecules, such as, e.g. ionome, metalloproteome, metallogenome, metallometabolome, heteroatom-tagged proteome, single element proteomes (e.g., selenoproteome) and the corresponding -omics. The analytical chemistry challenges in the area metallomics include the detection, quantification, identification and characterization of complexes of metals (metalloids) at trace levels in an environment rich in biomolecules often having similar physicochemical properties. In the past, the only way to access to this information was modelling using stability constants. Today, hyphenated techniques based on the coupling of a high resolution separation technique with sensitive elemental (ICP MS) and molecular (ES MS/MS) mass spectrometry offer the possibility of high-throughput acquisition of metallomics information in many biological systems. The lecture discusses advances in analytical techniques in the field of metallomics. Particular attention will be to developments in multidimensional nanoHPLC with the parallel ICP MS and ESI MS detection and the sensitive spotting of heteroelement-containing proteins in 2D gels, accompanied by advances in MALDI TOF MS. Potential for medical research (e.g., characterization for selenoproteins as new biomarkers of clinical utility

  17. The Kalman filter approach to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veen, E. H.; Bosch, S.; De Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    1994-07-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text, comprising the main article and two appendices, is accompanied by a disk containing the compiled program, a reference manual and data files. The work deals with data handling in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). With this technique, the analyte signal is superimposed on a background signal. When separating the signals by manual or automated three-point background correction, there are many instances in which the data reduction fails. Based on scans recorded in a fast-scanning mode and on a library of pure-component scans, the Kaiman filter approach models the emission in the spectral window (about 100 pm) of the analyte and mathematically solves the problem of background correction. By using a criterion-based algorithm to correct for optical instability, the uncertainty in the determination of the interferent line signal is eliminated. Therefore, the present filter implementation yields more accurate and precise results, especially in the case of line overlap. The Kalman filter Approach to Atomic Spectrometry (KAAS) software automatically processes Perkin-Elmer Plasma 1000/2000 text files, but can also handle ASCII data files. Practical and comprehensive examples are given to evoke the "Kalman filter feeling" in the crucial step of creating the emission model.

  18. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  19. Determination of molybdenum in silicates through atomic absorption spectrometry using pre-concentration by active carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical procedure for molybdenum determination in geological materials through Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, after pre-concentration of the Mo-APDC complex in activated carbon, has been developed, which is needed in order to reduce the dilution effect in the sample decomposition. During the development of this method the influence of pH, the amount of APDC for complexation of Mo and the interference of Fe, Ca, Mn, Al, K, Na, Mg and Ti were tested. It was shown that none of these causes any significant effect on the Mo determination proposed. The results of the analysis at the international geochemical reference samples JB-1 (basalt) and GH (granite) were very accurate and showed that the detection limit in rocks (1,00g) is 0,6 ppm, when using sample dilution of 1 ml and microinjection techniques. (author)

  20. Development of an analytical model for the determination of {sup 60}Co in aqueous samples by atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry techniques; Elaboracion de un modelo analitico para la determinacion de {sup 60}Co en muestras acuosas mediante tecnicas de absorcion atomica y espectrometria gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis A, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    The applications of the nuclear energy in industry and medicine generate radioactive wastes that must be isolated and confined in order to limit its spread in the biosphere. These types of wastes are generated in hospitals, industry, research centers and nuclear power plants (during de fuel cycle). The radioactive elements (radionuclides) cannot be destroyed by any known method, either chemical or mechanical. Its final destruction is produced by radioactive decay, which makes them stable isotopes, or nuclear transmutation being bombarded with atomic particles. Consequently, the radioactive waste management is to control the radioactive discharges and reduce to tolerable limits, eliminating of effluents and wastes the radionuclides of interest, concentrating them so they can be stored or evacuated so that later not appear in dangerous concentration in the biosphere. In Mexico, the main generators of radioactive wastes are the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Hospitals of the public and private sector, in addition Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) some institutes and facilities of the UNAM and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) and industries among others. The aqueous radioactive wastes, particularly those from the nuclear power plants contain traces of cobalt-60. Currently there is no model or analytical technique for the separation of this radionuclide, so it became necessary to develop an analytical model for separation and facilitate their disposal. In this paper was shown that atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry techniques can separate the active concentration of the inactive, which is important because the total concentration can be associated through direct relationships with the wear of metal parts of the nuclear reactor, since the metal alloys of the same reactor containing a fraction of cobalt. Also this analytical and mathematical model that can be reproducible and applicable to full sets of samples and that this

  1. Padronização interna em espectrometria de absorção atômica Internal standardization in atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly G. Fernandes; Mercedes de Moraes; José A. Gomes Neto; Joaquim A. Nóbrega; Pedro V. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a review on internal standardization in atomic absorption spectrometry with emphasis to the systematic and random errors in atomic absorption spectrometry and applications of internal standardization in flame atomic absorption spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The rules for selecting an element as internal standard, limitations of the method, and some comments about the application of internal standardization in atomic absorption spectrometry...

  2. A comparative study of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the direct determination of lanthanides in water and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new instrumental technique – Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (MP - AES) is compared to conventional Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP - OES) for direct determination of lanthanides. Estimation of both methods is done using standard measurement conditions. The present study includes spectral and non- spectral matrix effect evaluation. Tested analytical wavelengths of lanthanides are divided into three groups: 1) relatively free, 2) interfered by other lanthanides and 3) interfered by concomitant elements. Non spectral effect on analytes is examined in two typical real matrices – acidic plant digests and saline water. The capabilities of both plasma methods for quantitative determination of La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Gd and Er are compared. The interference - free emission lines are selected; appropriate background correction is proposed and the corresponding instrumental detection limits are calculated. Key words: lanthanides, ICP -OES, MP -AES, spectral and non-spectral interference

  3. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    1968-01-01

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional bro

  4. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using Direct Liquid Extraction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2015-11-13

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that enables label-free spatial localization and identification of molecules in complex samples.1-4 MSI applications range from forensics5 to clinical research6 and from understanding microbial communication7-8 to imaging biomolecules in tissues.1, 9-10 Recently, MSI protocols have been reviewed.11 Ambient ionization techniques enable direct analysis of complex samples under atmospheric pressure without special sample pretreatment.3, 12-16 In fact, in ambient ionization mass spectrometry, sample processing (e.g., extraction, dilution, preconcentration, or desorption) occurs during the analysis.17 This substantially speeds up analysis and eliminates any possible effects of sample preparation on the localization of molecules in the sample.3, 8, 12-14, 18-20 Venter and co-workers have classified ambient ionization techniques into three major categories based on the sample processing steps involved: 1) liquid extraction techniques, in which analyte molecules are removed from the sample and extracted into a solvent prior to ionization; 2) desorption techniques capable of generating free ions directly from substrates; and 3) desorption techniques that produce larger particles subsequently captured by an electrospray plume and ionized.17 This review focuses on localized analysis and ambient imaging of complex samples using a subset of ambient ionization methods broadly defined as “liquid extraction techniques” based on the classification introduced by Venter and co-workers.17 Specifically, we include techniques where analyte molecules are desorbed from solid or liquid samples using charged droplet bombardment, liquid extraction, physisorption, chemisorption, mechanical force, laser ablation, or laser capture microdissection. Analyte extraction is followed by soft ionization that generates ions corresponding to intact species. Some of the key advantages of liquid extraction techniques include the ease

  5. Thermal Lens Spectrometry: Still a Technique on the Horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingqiang; Franko, Mladen

    2016-07-01

    In this article, the historical development of thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) is briefly reviewed as an introduction. In continuation, the emphasis is on the recent progresses of TLS for measurements in ensembled sample cells and in microfluidic flow injection systems. Novel theories, instrumentation and their applications for high sample throughput for environmental, chemical and biomedical analysis, as well as thermal characterization and imaging, particularly in microspace, are presented. Discussion is given on the limitations of present TLS systems that open new horizons for future progress of this technique, which has already found place among routine techniques for chemical analysis. In the final section, proposals for the future development of TLS towards advanced applications in new research fields are presented.

  6. A NEW GENERATION OF INSTRUMENTATION AND CAPABILITIES FOR ATOMIC MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Atomic mass spectrometry,embodied usually as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS),has become a widely accepted tool for trace and ultra-trace elemental analysis.ICPMS offers detection limits below 1 ppt in solution,a dynamic concentration levels,isotope-analysis and isotope-dilution capabilities,modest matrix interferences,understandable spectral interferences (isobaric overlaps),precision in range of 2—5%,and rapid measurements (typically 10 seconds per isotope).

  7. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-09-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  8. Determination of As, Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples by modern electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardans, Jordi, E-mail: j.sardans@creaf.uab.ca [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain); Montes, Fernando [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), C/ Senda del Rey 9. 28040 Madrid (Spain); Penuelas, Josep [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Pollution from heavy metals has increased in recent decades and has become an important concern for environmental agencies. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, mercury and lead are among the trace elements that have the greatest impact and carry the highest risk to human health. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has long been used for trace element analyses and over the past few years, the main constraints of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) methods, namely matrix interferences that provoked high background absorption and interferences, have been reduced. The use of new, more efficient modifiers and in situ trapping methods for stabilization and pre-concentration of these analytes, progress in control of atomization temperatures, new designs of atomizers and advances in methods to correct background spectral interferences have permitted an improvement in sensitivity, an increase in detection power, reduction in sample manipulation, and increase in the reproducibility of the results. These advances have enhanced the utility of Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) for trace element determination at mug L{sup -1} levels, especially in difficult matrices, giving rise to greater reproducibility, lower economic cost and ease of sample pre-treatment compared to other methods. Moreover, the recent introduction of high resolution continuum source Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-ETAAS) has facilitated direct solid sampling, reducing background noise and opening the possibility of achieving even more rapid quantitation of some elements. The incorporation of flow injection analysis (FIA) systems for automation of sample pre-treatment, as well as chemical vapor generation renders (ETAAS) into a feasible option for detection of As and Hg in environmental and food control studies wherein large numbers of samples can be rapidly analyzed. A relatively inexpensive approach with low sample consumption provide additional advantages

  9. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg−1. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml−1, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect. - Highlights: • On-line atomization of gold volatile species for AAS in quartz devices was studied. • Atomization mechanism was proposed and atomization efficiency was estimated. • Possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species were assessed

  10. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Yasin [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Chemistry Department, 15030 Burdur (Turkey); Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří, E-mail: dedina@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg{sup −1}. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml{sup −1}, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect. - Highlights: • On-line atomization of gold volatile species for AAS in quartz devices was studied. • Atomization mechanism was proposed and atomization efficiency was estimated. • Possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species were assessed.

  11. Direct solid soil analysis by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of heavy metals in soils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) usually involves the time-consuming step of preparing a solution of the solid that is then nebulized into the plasma. According to regulations, digestion by aqua regia(hydrochloric acid + nitric acid, 3 + 1) should be carried out although it is known that this method is incomplete for silicate soils. The problem can be eliminated by introducing the solid directly into the plasma using the laser ablation technique for sampling. Results are described for a study of laser ablation using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser coupled with a new échelle spectrometer which has a multichannel solid-state detector. The laser pulses were focused onto the solid surface of pressed soil samples to generate an aerosol which is entrained in a flowing Ar stream, transported through a tube and then introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. Some characteristics of the preparation technique, the selection of an internal standard and homogeneity tests of the elemental distribution are reported along with a comparison and evaluation of three methods of calibration. The criteria used to measure the performance of laser ablation ICP-AES are the relative standard deviations obtained of 4.9–12.7% and the accuracy, 0.3–12.4% for Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Zn and Ni

  12. Rapid accurate analysis of metal (oxide)-on-silica catalysts by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jütte, B.A.H.G.; Heikamp, A.; Agterdenbos, J.

    1979-01-01

    The catalysts, which contain 10–60% copper, chromium, nickel and silicon, are decomposed in sealed Teflon-lined vessels and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Matrix matching and bracketing standards are applied. The RSD of a single determination is about 1% for all components.

  13. Direct microcomputer controlled determination of zinc in human serum by flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Nielsen, Bent; Jensen, Arne;

    1986-01-01

    A procedure is described for the direct determination of zinc in human serum by fully automated, microcomputer controlled flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry (Fl-AAS). The Fl system is pumpless, using the negative pressure created by the nebuliser. It only consists of a three-way valve...

  14. Determination of metal content in valerian root phytopharmaceutical derivatives by atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Silvia; Cerutti, Soledad; Olsina, Roberto; Gomez, María R; Martínez, Luis D

    2005-01-01

    Phytopharmaceuticals containing Valerian are used as mild sleep-inducing agents. The elemental composition of 3 different marks of Valeriana officinalis roots commercially available in the Argentinian market, their teas, and a commercial tincture have been studied. The content of Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn was determined in phytopharmaceuticals by flame atomic emission/absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, and ultrasonic nebulization coupled to inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Prior to analyses of the samples, a digestion procedure was optimized. The analytical results obtained for Fe, Al, Ca, and V in the solid sample study were within the range 100-1000 mg/kg, and for Mn, Zn, and Pb within the range 10-100 mg/kg. Cadmium was found at levels up to 0.0125 mg/kg. PMID:15759744

  15. Vapor generation – atomic spectrometric techniques. Expanding frontiers through specific-species preconcentration. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Raúl A.; Pacheco, Pablo H.; Cerutti, Soledad [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Martinez, Luis D., E-mail: ldm@unsl.edu.ar [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina)

    2015-05-22

    This article reviews 120 articles found in SCOPUS and specific Journal cites corresponding to the terms ‘preconcentration’; ‘speciation’; ‘vapor generation techniques’ and ‘atomic spectrometry techniques’ in the last 5 years. - Highlights: • Recent advances in vapor generation and atomic spectrometry were reviewed. • Species-specific preconcentration strategies after and before VG were discussed. • New preconcentration and speciation analysis were evaluated within this framework. - Abstract: We review recent progress in preconcentration strategies associated to vapor generation techniques coupled to atomic spectrometric (VGT-AS) for specific chemical species detection. This discussion focuses on the central role of different preconcentration approaches, both before and after VG process. The former was based on the classical solid phase and liquid–liquid extraction procedures which, aided by automation and miniaturization strategies, have strengthened the role of VGT-AS in several research fields including environmental, clinical, and others. We then examine some of the new vapor trapping strategies (atom-trapping, hydride trapping, cryotrapping) that entail improvements in selectivity through interference elimination, but also they allow reaching ultra-low detection limits for a large number of chemical species generated in conventional VG systems, including complete separation of several species of the same element. This review covers more than 100 bibliographic references from 2009 up to date, found in SCOPUS database and in individual searches in specific journals. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this field.

  16. Micro-determination of ytterbium with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication reports the use of a pyrolytic graphite coated tube, lined with tantalum-tungsten, and a local made atomic absorption spectrometer (Model WFD-Y3) for the determination of small amount Yb in pure Y2O3 and mixed rare earth oxides. It is found that the method proposed is sensitive, reproducible and simple in manipulation. Even as low as 0.2 μg Yb in one gram sample (n x 10-7) can be determined directly without pre-concentration. It is found experimentally that the optimum condition for drying is at 150 deg C. for 20 sec, ashing at 1000 deg C. for 20 sec and atomization at 2770 deg C. for 12 sec. Within the range 1.0-18ng Yb/ml the calibration curve of Yb is linear. Before injecting into the tube, the acidity of the sample solution should be ajusted to 0.1 to 2 M with nitric or hydrochloric acid. For 5ng Yb/ml, Al(III), Ca(II) and La(III) interference, when their amount present is 50 μg/ml or more. On the other hand, Cu(II), Fe(III), Mg(II), K(I) and Y(III) in amount up to 1 mg/ml do not interfere

  17. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC. PMID:15910814

  18. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC.

  19. Ion beam analysis and spectrometry techniques for Cultural Heritage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of experimental techniques for the characterisation of Cultural heritage materials has to take into account some requirements. The complexity of these past materials requires the development of new techniques of examination and analysis, or the transfer of technologies developed for the study of advanced materials. In addition, due to precious aspect of artwork it is also necessary to use the non-destructive methods, respecting the integrity of objects. It is for this reason that the methods using radiations and/or particles play a important role in the scientific study of art history and archaeology since their discovery. X-ray and γ-ray spectrometry as well as ion beam analysis (IBA) are analytical tools at the service of Cultural heritage. This report mainly presents experimental developments for IBA: PIXE, RBS/EBS and NRA. These developments were applied to the study of archaeological composite materials: layered materials or mixtures composed of organic and non-organic phases. Three examples are shown: evolution of silvering techniques for the production of counterfeit coinage during the Roman Empire and in the 16. century, the characterization of composites or mixed mineral/organic compounds such as bone and paint. In these last two cases, the combination of techniques gave original results on the proportion of both phases: apatite/collagen in bone, pigment/binder in paintings. Another part of this report is then dedicated to the non-invasive/non-destructive characterization of prehistoric pigments, in situ, for rock art studies in caves and in the laboratory. Finally, the perspectives of this work are presented. (author)

  20. Polymer architectures via mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Sarah; Gerişlioğlu, Selim; Endres, Kevin J; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-08-17

    This review covers the application of mass spectrometry (MS) and its hyphenated techniques to synthetic polymers of varying architectural complexities. The synthetic polymers are discussed as according to their architectural complexity from linear homopolymers and copolymers to stars, dendrimers, cyclic copolymers and other polymers. MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) has been extensively used for the analysis of synthetic polymers. However, the increase in structural or architectural complexity can result in analytical challenges that MS or MS/MS cannot overcome alone. Hyphenation to MS with different chromatographic techniques (2D × LC, SEC, HPLC etc.), utilization of other ionization methods (APCI, DESI etc.) and various mass analyzers (FT-ICR, quadrupole, time-of-flight, ion trap etc.) are applied to overcome these challenges and achieve more detailed structural characterizations of complex polymeric systems. In addition, computational methods (software: MassChrom2D, COCONUT, 2D maps etc.) have also reached polymer science to facilitate and accelerate data interpretation. Developments in technology and the comprehension of different polymer classes with diverse architectures have significantly improved, which allow for smart polymer designs to be examined and advanced. We present specific examples covering diverse analytical aspects as well as forthcoming prospects in polymer science. PMID:27286765

  1. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.

    In this project, new high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are developed for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). These devices offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, nutrition, and biomedicine. Emphasis is being placed on: (1) generation of annular, helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies, with the intent of enhancing the detecting powers of a number of elements; (2) computer modelings of ICP discharges to predict the behavior of new and existing plasmas; (3) diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems to quantify their fundamental properties, with the ultimate aim to improve analytical performance of atomic spectrometry; (4) development and characterization of new, low cost sample introduction systems that consume microliter or microgram quantities of samples; and (5) investigation of new membrane separators for stripping solvent from sample aerosol to reduce various interferences and to enhance sensitivity and selectivity in plasma spectrometry.

  2. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FI-AAS) -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1996-01-01

    of (especially HG- forming) elements. In the words of the one of the authorities of AAS and foremost pioneers of FI-AAS - Professor Z. L. Fang, who is the author on two recently published monographs on this hyphenated technique - the impact of FI on AAS is "so dramatic" that it has brought "new vitality...

  3. Determination of iron in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLANDAS KAZLAUSKAS

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple methods for the determination of Fe in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS are suggested. The results of the investigation of selectivity of the proposed AAS method proved that this procedure is not affected by high concentrations of other metals. The calibration graph for iron was linear at levels near the detection limit up to at least 0.10 mg ml-1. For the determination of microamounts of iron in mineral waters, an extraction AAS technique was developed. Iron was retained as Fe-8-oxyquinoline complex and extracted into chloroform. The optimal conditions for the extraction of the iron complex were determined. The AAS method was applied to the determination of Fe in mineral waters and natural waters from different areas of Lithuania. The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated in comparison with a photometric method. The obtained results demonstrated that the procedure could be successfully applied for the analysis of water samples with satisfactory accuracy.

  4. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry: trace elements in oil matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C. A.

    1977-12-01

    The simultaneous determination of up to 20 trace elements in various oil matrices by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry is reported. The oil matrices investigated were lubricating oils (for wear metals), fuel oil, centrifuged coal liquefaction product, crude soybean oil, and commercial edible oils. The samples were diluted with appropriate organic solvents and injected into the plasma as an aerosol generated by a pneumatic nebulization technique. Detection limits of the 28 elements studied ranged from 0.0006 to 9 ..mu..g/g with the majority falling in the 0.01 to 0.1 ..mu..g/g range. Analytical calibration curves were linear over at least two orders of magnitude and for some elements this linearity extended over 4.5 orders of magnitude. Relevant data on precision and accuracy are included. Because metals often occur as particles in lubricating oil and coal liquefaction products, the effect of particles on the analytical results was examined. Wear metal particles in used oil did not appear to affect the analytical results. However, incomplete recovery relative to organometallic reference solutions was obtained for iron particles with a nominal mean diameter of 3.0 ..mu..m suspended in oil. It was shown that the following factors contributed to incomplete recovery for the particles: settling of the suspended particles in the flask, a difference in nebulization efficiency between particle suspensions and organometallic solutions, and indications of incomplete vaporization of the larger particles in the plasma.

  5. Ultratrace determination of tin by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Průša, Libor [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, CZ 128 43 Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Sn. •A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. •Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. •Hundred percent preconcentration efficiency for tin was reached. •Routine analytical method was developed for Sn determination (LOD of 0.03 ng mL{sup −1} Sn). -- Abstract: A quartz multiatomizer with its inlet arm modified to serve as a trap (trap-and-atomizer device) was employed to trap tin hydride and subsequently to volatilize collected analyte species with atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Generation, atomization and preconcentration conditions were optimized and analytical figures of merit of both on-line atomization as well as preconcentration modes were quantified. Preconcentration efficiency of 95 ± 5% was found. The detection limits reached were 0.029 and 0.14 ng mL{sup −1} Sn, respectively, for 120 s preconcentration period and on-line atomization mode without any preconcentration. The interference extent of other hydride forming elements (As, Se, Sb and Bi) on tin determination was found negligible in both modes of operation. The applicability of the developed preconcentration method was verified by Sn determination in a certified reference material as well as by analysis of real samples.

  6. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, UFSM, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 {mu}g g{sup -1} of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  7. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R S; Pozebon, Dirce; Mello, Paola A; Flores, Erico M M

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO3)2 was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 microg g(-1) of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES).

  8. MERCURY QUANTIFICATION IN SOILS USING THERMAL DESORPTION AND ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY: PROPOSAL FOR AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Catone Soares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable environmental importance of mercury (Hg, given its high toxicity and ability to contaminate large areas via atmospheric deposition, little is known about its activity in soils, especially tropical soils, in comparison with other heavy metals. This lack of information about Hg arises because analytical methods for determination of Hg are more laborious and expensive compared to methods for other heavy metals. The situation is even more precarious regarding speciation of Hg in soils since sequential extraction methods are also inefficient for this metal. The aim of this paper is to present a technique of thermal desorption associated with atomic absorption spectrometry, TDAAS, as an efficient tool for quantitative determination of Hg in soils. The method consists of the release of Hg by heating, followed by its quantification by atomic absorption spectrometry. It was developed by constructing calibration curves in different soil samples based on increasing volumes of standard Hg2+ solutions. Performance, accuracy, precision, and quantification and detection limit parameters were evaluated. No matrix interference was detected. Certified reference samples and comparison with a Direct Mercury Analyzer, DMA (another highly recognized technique, were used in validation of the method, which proved to be accurate and precise.

  9. Determination of total selenium in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Shah, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    The total selenium (Se) was determined in herbal and pharmaceutical supplements used for liver diseases. The total Se contents were determined in different pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the techniques was evaluated by using certified reference material and the standard addition method. The recoveries of total Se were 99.4 and 99.0% for HGAAS and GFAAS, respectively. The precision of the techniques expressed as RSD were 2.34 and 4.54% for HGAAS and GFAAS measurements, respectively. The LOD values for HGAAS and GFAAS were 0.025 and 0.052 pglg, respectively. The concentrations of Se in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements were found in the range of 19.2-53.8 and 25.0-42.5 pg/g, respectively, corresponding to 35-76% and 45-76% of the total recommended dose of Se for adults. PMID:25632445

  10. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  11. Use of mass spectrometry techniques for the characterization of metal bound to proteins (metallomics) in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ariza, J.L.; Garcia-Barrera, T.; Lorenzo, F.; Bernal, V.; Villegas, M.J.; Oliveira, V

    2004-10-25

    The need to determine the individual chemical species (speciation), especially when they are known to have a differential action and behavior in relation to toxicity, mobility, or bioavailability, is discussed. The analytical approaches for small mass metal species characterization, as well as sample treatment and storage, is now well established on the basis of chromatographic-atomic detector combinations. The description of a new scenario centered on endogenous and exogenous metallic species in biological systems, bioactive macromolecules, such as proteins, DNA restriction fragments, phytochelatins, metallothioneins and others is fulfilled. Many of these systems are not well known at present and require a new generation of analytical tools that substitute the traditional atomic detectors based in the use of photons (atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), flame photoionization detector (FPD), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS)) by mass detectors (mass spectrometry (MS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) that characterize ions. The photonic analytical tool is now being substituted by the ionic paradigm. Many cases related to biological molecules involving proteins and multiprotein systems, in which metals frequently participate (metallomics) are described, and a generic metallomics analytical approach is proposed for the identification and quantification of metalloproteins, and other metallomacromolecules present in life systems, on the basis of three experimental focuses: (i) a separation technique - selectivity component; (ii) an element-high sensitivity detector--sensitivity component; and (iii) a molecule-specific detector, generally based on mass spectrometry-structural component. This multiplexed analytical approach brings together both elemental and molecular detectors for easy metalloproteins identification. Finally, the possibilities of the metallomics approach in

  12. Determination of cadmium in rice and water by tungsten coil electrothermal vaporization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Xiaodong [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Wu Peng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Chen Li [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Hou Xiandeng, E-mail: houxd@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2009-09-14

    In this work, the microsampling nature of tungsten coil electrothermal vaporization Ar/H{sub 2} flame atomic fluorescence spectrometry (W-coil ETV-AFS) as well as tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (W-coil ET-AAS) was used with cloud point extraction (CPE) for the ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in rice and water samples. When the temperature of the extraction system is higher than the cloud point temperature of the selected surfactant Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium with dithizone can be quantitatively extracted into the surfactant-rich phase and subsequently separated from the bulk aqueous phase by centrifugation. The main factors affecting the CPE, such as concentration of Triton X-114 and dithizone, pH, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were optimized for the best extract efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection for cadmium by W-coil ETV-AFS and W-coil ET-AAS were 0.01 and 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with sensitivity enhancement factors of 152 and 93, respectively. The proposed methods were applied to the determination of cadmium in certified reference rice and water samples with analytical results in good agreement with certified values.

  13. Structural analyses of sucrose laurate regioisomers by mass spectrometry techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Aleksander; Stensballe, Allan; Pedersen, Lars Haastrup

    2015-01-01

    6- And 6′-O-lauroyl sucrose were isolated and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), Orbitrap high-resolution (HR) MS, and electrospray-ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The analyses aimed to explore...

  14. New diagnostic technique for Zeeman-compensated atomic beam slowing: technique and results

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, P.A.; Van Der Straten, P.; Heideman, H.G.M.; Metcalf, H.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the study of Zeeman-compensated slowing of an alkali atomic beam. Our time-of-flight technique measures the longitudinal veloc- ity distribution of the slowed atoms with a resolution below the Doppler limit of 30 cm/s. Furthermore, it can map the position and velocity distribution of atoms in either ground hyperfine level inside the solenoid without any devices inside the solenoid. The technique reveals the optical pumping ef- fects, and shows in de...

  15. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  16. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-01-01

    The three axis magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only reflected signal from the polarimeter, thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors or / and high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  17. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-09-01

    The three axis vector magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer geometry offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only the reflected signal (one polarization component) from the polarimeter and thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors and/or high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  18. Direct determination of selenoproteins in polyvinylidene difluoride membranes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, U; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2000-01-01

    were excised and chemical modifier was added on top of the excised membrane prior to atomic absorption measurement. Acceptable linearity was achieved in the range 2-10 ng Se, corresponding to selenium concentrations close to 1 mg/L, when aqueous solutions of selenomethionine standard as well......A method for the direct determination of selenoproteins in plastic membranes after protein separation by gel electrophoresis was developed. Quantification was based on the determination of the selenium content of the proteins by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after manual...

  19. Determination of serum lithium: comparison between atomic emission and absorption spectrometry methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Elielton do Espírito Santo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The therapeutic monitoring of lithium, through concentration measurements, is important for individual dose adjustment, as a marker of treatment adherence and to prevent poisoning and side effects. Objectives: Validate and compare two methods - atomic emission and atomic absorption - for the determination of lithium in serum samples. Methodology: Parameters such as specificity, precision, accuracy, limit of detection (LOD and linearity were considered. The atomic absorption spectrometer was used, operating in either emission or absorption mode. For the quantitative comparison of 30 serum samples from patients with mood disorder treated with lithium, the results were submitted to Student's t-test, F-test and Pearson's correlation. Results: The limit of quantification (LOQ was established as 0.05 mEq/l of lithium, and calibration curves were constructed in the range of 0.05-2 mEq/l of lithium, using aqueous standards. Sample preparation time was reduced, what is important in medical laboratory. Conclusion: Both methods were considered satisfactory, precise and accurate and can be adopted for lithium quantification. In the comparison of quantitative results in lithium-treated patients through statistical tests, no significant differences were observed. Therefore the methods for lithium quantification by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS and flame atomic emission spectrometry (FAES may be considered similar.

  20. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  1. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL−1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL−1)−1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL−1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01–4 μg mL−1 and sample throughput: 72 h−1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided. - Highlights: ► Quartz tubes as furnaces in TS-FFAAS. ► Small tubes for controlling radial dispersion. ► Improved figures of merit for gold determination. ► Analysis of homeopathic medicines.

  2. Determination of Trace Iron in High Purity Sodium Fluoride by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for the direct determination of iron in high purity sodium fluoride using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Interferences caused by the matrix are investigated. It is shown that the ashing temperature can be increased to 1 400°C and matrix interferences eliminated, the sensi tivity of iron increased in 1.27 fold by the addition of nickel nitrate. The method is applied to the determina tion of iron in sodium fluoride and satisfactory results are obtained.

  3. Mineral Analysis the Infusion of Black Tea Samples by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lahiji N.; Tadayon F.; Tamiji F.; Lahiji A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Tea infusion is one of the most popular drinks around the world. Since tea infusion is known to contain several essential nutrients, it is considered a healthy beverage. In this study eight different Iranian brands of tea infusion and eleven brands imported tea infusion samples from another country for Cu, Zn, Mn and Al were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after wet digestion. The results of analysis showed that the extraction rates of minerals from dry black tea to infusio...

  4. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, Jaroslav; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Atomization of selenium hydride in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and its performance was compared to that of the externally heated quartz multiatomizer. Argon was found as the best DBD discharge gas employing a flow rate of 75 ml min- 1 Ar while the DBD power was optimized at 14 W. The detection limits reached 0.24 ng ml- 1 Se in the DBD and 0.15 ng ml- 1 Se in the multiatomizer. The tolerance of DBD to interferences is even better than with the multiatomizer.

  5. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  6. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  7. ALCHEMI: a new technique for locating atoms in small crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom Location by Channelling Enhanced Microanalysis (ALCHEMI) is a quantitative technique for identifying the crystallographic sites, distribution and types of substitutional impurities in many crystals. The method involves no adjustable parameters, can be applied to areas as small as a few hundred Angstroms and to impurity concentrations down to about 0.1 atomic per cent. It is capable of distinguishing neighbours in the periodic table. The method uses the incident electron beam orientation dependence of characteristic X-ray emission and uses an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser fitted to a transmission electron microscope. The method does not require the specimen thickness or precise orientation to be known, and makes few assumptions about the form of the dynamical electron wavefunction, which need not be calculated or predicted. The classical problems of cation ordering in spinels, feldspars and olivine have now been studied by this method. (author)

  8. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel, E-mail: tudino@qi.fcen.uba.ar

    2012-11-15

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, sensitivity: 0.306 ({mu}g mL{sup -1}){sup -1}, RSD% (n = 10, 1 {mu}g mL{sup -1}): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and sample throughput: 72 h{sup -1}. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz tubes as furnaces in TS-FFAAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small tubes for controlling radial dispersion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved figures of merit for gold determination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of homeopathic medicines.

  9. Pre-concentration of trace metals from sea-water for determination by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, R E; Berman, S S; Desaulniers, A; Russell, D S

    1980-02-01

    Determination of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Ni in coastal sea-water by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by solvent extraction and use of a chelating ion-exchange resin is described. Following the extraction of the pyrrolidine-N-carbodithioate and oxinate complexes into methyl isobutyl ketone, the trace metals are further preconcentrated by back-extraction into 1.5M nitric acid. Preconcentration on the chelating resin is effected by a combined column and batch technique, allowing greater preconcentration factors to be obtained. Provided samples are appropriately treated to release non-labile metal species prior to preconcentration, both methods yield comparable analytical results with respect to the mean concentrations determined as well as to mean relative standard deviations. Control and treatment of the analytical blank is also described. PMID:18962623

  10. Solid phase microextraction capillary gas chromatography combined with furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry for speciation of mercury in fish tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of solid phase microextraction in conjunction with tandem gas chromatography-furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry (SPME-GC-FAPES) was evaluated for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish tissue. Samples were digested with methanolic potassium hydroxide, derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate and extracted by SPME. After the SPME extraction, species were separated by GC and detected by FAPES. All experimental parameters were optimized for best separation and analytical response. A repeatability precision of typically 2% can be achieved with long-term (3 months) reproducibility precision of 4.3%. Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DOLT-2 and TORT-2 from the National Research Council of Canada were analyzed to verify the accuracy of this technique. Detection limits of 1.5 ng g-1 for methylmercury and 0.7 ng g-1 for inorganic mercury in biological tissues were obtained

  11. Nonlinear control techniques for an atomic force microscope system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongchun FANG; Matthew FEEMSTER; Darren DAWSON; Nader M.JALILI

    2005-01-01

    Two nonlinear control techniques are proposed for an atomic force microscope system.Initially,a learning-based control algorithm is developed for the microcantilever-sample system that achieves asymptotic cantilever tip tracking for periodic trajectories.Specifically,the control approach utilizes a learning-based feedforward term to compensate for periodic dynamics and high-gain terms to account for non-periodic dynamics.An adaptive control algorithm is then developed to achieve asymptotic cantilever tip tracking for bounded tip trajectories despite uncertainty throughout the system parameters.Simulation results are provided to illustrate the efficacy and performance of the control strategies.

  12. A double cell for X-ray absorption spectrometry of atomic Zn

    CERN Document Server

    Mihelic, A; Arcon, I; Padeznik-Gomilsek, J; Borowski, M

    2002-01-01

    A high-temperature cell with a double wall design has been constructed for X-ray absorption spectrometry of metal vapors. The inner cell, assembled from a corundum tube and thin plates without welding or reshaping, serves as a container of the vapor sample. It is not vacuum tight: instead, the outer tube provides inert atmosphere. Several spectra of K-edge atomic absorption of Zn were obtained in the stationary working regime below the Zn boiling point. The K-edge profile shows an extremely strong resonance and, above the continuum threshold, coexcitations of the outer electrons.

  13. Analysis of atmospheric aerosols by atomic emission spectrometry with electrical discharge sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is developed for the determination of the concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Mn, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd) in atmospheric air by atomic emission spectrometry with gas-discharge sampling onto the end of a standard carbon electrode. A design of a two-section sampler is proposed; the sampler provides the rapid determination of deposition factors for the deposition of heavy metals contained in aerosol particles onto the end of a carbon electrode. Examples of determining metal concentrations in a model sample of air and in atmospheric air and determination limits of metals deposited onto the end of a carbon electrode are given

  14. Enhancement effect of alkaline earth metal on the determination of aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry with a graphite furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Matsusaki, Koji

    1987-01-01

    In the determination of aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry with a graphite furnace, coexisting oxyanion salts of alkaline earth metal enhanced the aluminium atomic absorption. The relative absorbance was increased with decreasing of the ramp atomization rate and with decreasing of the sheathing gas flow rate less than 51 min^. These results show that the enhancement effect is caused by the reductivity of the carbide of alkaline earth metal which is formed in the furnace at ashing and...

  15. Electron--photon coincidence technique for electron impact on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief introduction is given to the general theory of the electron photon coincidence technique, and the specific application to 1P and 3P excitations in helium is described. The relation between the complex excitation amplitudes which characterize the collision process and the alignment and orientation of the excited atoms is emphasized. The data from the first electron photon angular correlation measurements are presented. These data yield values for the ratio of differential cross sections for exciting the degenerate sublevels and the relative phase of the corresponding amplitudes, or, equivalently, the alignment and orientation parameters. The results are obtained in dimensionless form and are free from absolute calibration or normalization difficulties. They are compared with various theoretical approximations. The application of the coincidence technique to a measurement of threshold polarization is described and results for 31P excitations are discussed

  16. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, Y.; Fernandez, P. [Centro de Control do Medio Marino, Peirao de Vilaxoan s/n, Vilagarcia de Arousa, 36611 Pontevedra (Spain); Gonzalez, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, 15706, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 C and 2600 C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg{sup -1} (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg{sup -1} (wet weight). (orig.)

  17. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  18. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza, E-mail: luis.claudio@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: adriana@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: gomide@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: ieda@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CEA/CTMSP), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Centro Experimental Aramar

    2013-07-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  19. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  20. Arsenic in marine tissues - The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Serafimovski, Ivan [Food Institute, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 95, MK-1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Stafilov, Trajce [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 162, MK-1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Tsalev, Dimiter L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)], E-mail: tsalev@chem.uni-sofia.bg

    2007-03-15

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant (Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae (Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 deg. C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 deg. C and atomization temperature 2100 deg. C) with 1.5 {mu}g Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 {mu}mol of zirconium and then with 0.10 {mu}mol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely

  1. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Joseph, E-mail: jkhoury@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C. [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  2. Speciation analysis of thallium using solid phase extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Thallium is a heavy, very toxic metallic element, which occurs in earth's crust in an estimated abundance from 0.1 to 0.8 mg.kg-1. In the environment, it is mainly combined with other elements (primarily oxygen, sulfur, halogens, potassium and rubidium) in inorganic compounds. During the weathering processes it can be mobilized by aqueous media and accumulated in sediments and soils. The main sources of pollution nowadays come from anthropogenic emissions from refineries, coal-fired power stations, mining activities, metal smelters and the cement industry. Thallium exists in natural waters as either Tl(I) (thallous) or Tl(III) (thallic) species. The oxidation state of Tl affects its complexation and subsequent bioavailability and toxicity in the environment. Thallium content in surface waters is within the range 1-82 ng l-1. Due to this low contents of Tl in water samples, it is necessary to combine the laboratory separation, preconcentration and determination techniques for the purpose of Tl speciation analysis. The scope of the presented work was to use an solid phase extraction (SPE) for the separation and preconcentration of Tl species in water samples followed by the determination using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). In this method, Tl(III) was stabilized by formation of a Tl(III)-DTPA complex. Tl(I) species remained in its original form. These two species were then separated by using a cation exchange resin Amberlite IR120 and nitric acid as the eluent in a batch SPE protocol. The potential interferences of Fe (III), Al, Ca, Mg and other metals were investigated. The optimized experimental conditions for separation/preconcentration step (pH 2-3, time 15 min, temperature 60 deg C) and Zeeman ET AAS determination (chemical modifier Pd + ascorbic acid, atomization temperature 2100 deg C) were used for the speciation analysis of thallium in filtered acid water samples from open quartzite mine in the

  3. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance.

  4. Determination of trace elements in ground water by two preconcentration methods using atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a comparative study between two different methods of preconcentration done to separate the trace elements cadmium, nickel. chromium, manganese, copper, zinc, and lead in drinking (ground) water samples taken from different locations in Gezira State, central Sudan (the map); these methods are (coprecipitation) with aluminium hydroxide and by Ammonium Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate (APDC) using Methyl Isobutyl Ketone (MIBK) as an organic solvent; and subsequent analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) for both methods. The result of comparison showed the superiority of the (APDC) coprecipitation method over the aluminium hydroxide coprecipitation method in the total percentage recoveries of the studied trace elements in drinking (ground) water samples, such results confirm previous studies. This study also involves direct analysis of these water samples by atomic absorption spectrometry to determine the concentrations of trace elements Cadmium, Nickel, Chromium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc and Lead and compare it to the corresponding guide line values described by the World Health Organization and the maximum concentrations of trace elements in drinking water permitted by the Sudanese Standards and Metrology Organizations (SSMO), where the concentrations of some elements in some samples were found to be different than the described values by both of the organizations. The study includes a trial to throw light on the effect of the proximity of the water samples sources to the Blue Nile river on its trace elements concentrations; no relation was proved to exist in that respect.(Author)

  5. Determination of Elements by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Medicinal Plants Employed to Alleviate Common Cold Symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F Zehra Küçükbay; Ebru Kuyumcu

    2014-01-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of com-mon cold have been studied for their mineral contents .Eleven minor and major elements (essential ,non-essen-tial and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L .,Althaea of ficinalis L .,Verbascum phlomoides L .,Euphorbiachamaesyce L .,Zizyphus jujube Miller ,Peganum harmala L .,Arum dioscori-dis Sm .,Sambucus nigra L .,Piper longum L .,Tussilago farfara L .and Elettariacardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrom-etry .Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolu-tion of medicinal plants .Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification .These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants .The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential ,non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive ,preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants .

  6. Atomic force microscopy fishing and mass spectrometry identification of gp120 on immobilized aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov YD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuri D Ivanov,1 Natalia S Bukharina,1 Tatyana O Pleshakova,1 Pavel A Frantsuzov,1 Elena Yu Andreeva,1 Anna L Kaysheva,1,2 Victor G Zgoda,1 Alexander A Izotov,1 Tatyana I Pavlova,1 Vadim S Ziborov,1 Sergey P Radko,1 Sergei A Moshkovskii,1 Alexander I Archakov1 1Department of Personalized Medicine, Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia; 2PostgenTech Ltd., Moscow, Russia Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM was applied to carry out direct and label-free detection of gp120 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein as a target protein. This approach was based on the AFM fishing of gp120 from the analyte solution using anti-gp120 aptamers immobilized on the AFM chip to count gp120/aptamer complexes that were formed on the chip surface. The comparison of image contrasts of fished gp120 against the background of immobilized aptamers and anti-gp120 antibodies on the AFM images was conducted. It was shown that an image contrast of the protein/aptamer complexes was two-fold higher than the contrast of the protein/antibody complexes. Mass spectrometry identification provided an additional confirmation of the target protein presence on the AFM chips after biospecific fishing to avoid any artifacts. Keywords: gp120 HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, aptamer, atomic force microscopy, mass spectrometry

  7. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeini Jahromi, Elham [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bidari, Araz [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Assadi, Yaghoub [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: y_assadi@iust.ac.ir; Milani Hosseini, Mohammad Reza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamali, Mohammad Reza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-03-07

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). In this extraction method, 500 {mu}L methanol (disperser solvent) containing 34 {mu}L carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 0.00010 g ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (chelating agent) was rapidly injected by syringe into the water sample containing cadmium ions (interest analyte). Thereby, a cloudy solution formed. The cloudy state resulted from the formation of fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride, which have been dispersed, in bulk aqueous sample. At this stage, cadmium reacts with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and therefore, hydrophobic complex forms which is extracted into the fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride. After centrifugation (2 min at 5000 rpm), these droplets were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (25 {+-} 1 {mu}L). Then a 20 {mu}L of sedimented phase containing enriched analyte was determined by GF AAS. Some effective parameters on extraction and complex formation, such as extraction and disperser solvent type and their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH and concentration of the chelating agent have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor 125 was obtained from only 5.00 mL of water sample. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 2-20 ng L{sup -1} with detection limit of 0.6 ng L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for ten replicate measurements of 20 ng L{sup -1} of cadmium was 3.5%. The relative recoveries of cadmium in tap, sea and rivers water samples at spiking level of 5 and 10 ng L{sup -1} are 108, 95, 87 and 98%, respectively. The characteristics of the proposed method have been compared with cloud point extraction (CPE), on-line liquid-liquid extraction, single drop microextraction (SDME), on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) and co-precipitation based on bibliographic data

  8. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry - An Effective and Attractive Analytical Chemical Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Nielsen, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    One of the advantages of the flow injection (FI) concept is that it is compatible with virtually all detection techniques. Being a versatile vehicle for enhancing the performance of the individual detection devices, the most spectacular results have possibly been obtained in conjunction with atomic...

  9. Multivariate techniques of analysis for ToF-E recoil spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multivariate statistical methods are being developed by the Australian -Swedish Recoil Spectrometry Collaboration for quantitative analysis of the wealth of information in Time of Flight (ToF) and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry. An overview is presented of progress made in the use of multivariate techniques for energy calibration, separation of mass-overlapped signals and simulation of ToF-E data. 6 refs., 5 figs

  10. Multivariate techniques of analysis for ToF-E recoil spectrometry data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, H.J.; Bouanani, M.E.; Persson, L.; Hult, M.; Jonsson, P.; Johnston, P.N. [Lund Institute of Technology, Solvegatan, (Sweden), Department of Nuclear Physics; Andersson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry; Ostling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal institute of Technology, Electrum, Kista, (Sweden), Department of Electronics; Johnston, P.N.; Bubb, I.F.; Walker, B.R.; Stannard, W.B. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Multivariate statistical methods are being developed by the Australian -Swedish Recoil Spectrometry Collaboration for quantitative analysis of the wealth of information in Time of Flight (ToF) and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry. An overview is presented of progress made in the use of multivariate techniques for energy calibration, separation of mass-overlapped signals and simulation of ToF-E data. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Simultaneous multielement analysis of rock samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using discrete microsampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous multielement analysis of geological standard rock samples (JG-1 and JB-2) has been successfully performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a discrete microsampling technique. In this technique only 100 μl sample solution was used for simultaneous determination of 5-10 elements in solution. (author)

  12. Trapping and diffusion of noble gas atoms in some off-stoichiometric ceramics studied by thermal desorption spectrometry. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoondert, W.H.B.

    1993-01-01

    The thesis deals with the mobility of small noble gas atoms, mainly helium, in ceramic materials with high defect concentrations. Hence, two subjects are covered: diffusion and defect physics. The experimental technique employed is Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS). An introductory outline of TDS is given. The present study was initiated for various reasons. First of all, research on helium retention and mobility behavior, such as bubble nucleation and subsequent bubble migration, in potential fusion reactor wall materials (which some of the ceramics are) is of practical interest. Secondly, because the ceramic materials investigated in the present work have defect concentrations on the order of percents, and because they are binary compounds where in principle more defect types can be present than in pure materials, the defect physics is more complicated and diverse than e.g., in simple metals. Finally, high defective materials can serve as a model system for thin films produced by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD). TDS as an analytical tool is of key importance to be able to control the IBAD process, and for the understanding of the atomic-scale phenomena involved.

  13. Investigation of lead contents in lipsticks by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the lead contents of different kinds of lipsticks were determined by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS ET AAS) and the results were compared with those obtained after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples. The experimental parameters for solid sampling such as the maximum amount of sample on the platforms of solid autosampler, graphite furnace program were optimized. Samples were directly loaded on the platforms of solid autosampler between 0.25 and 2.0mg and lead was determined applying 800 °C for pyrolysis and 2100 °C for atomization. Under optimized conditions, interference-free determination could be performed using aqueous standards. The LOD and the characteristic mass were 21.3 and 12.6 pg, respectively. The lead in the same lipstick samples was determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion and compared with those found by solid sampling. Mostly, there was no significant difference between the lead concentrations found by the two techniques. The lead in 25 lipstick samples with different properties were 0.11-4.48 ng mg(-1) which were not significantly different from those (<0.026-7.19 ng mg(-1)) reported by FDA for around 400 samples. PMID:23099440

  14. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography- inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Currier, J. M.; Saunders, R J; Ding, L.; Bodnar, W.; Cable, P.; Matoušek, T. (Tomáš); Creed, J. T.; Stýblo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-CT-AAS) have been frequently used for the analysis of MAsIII and DMAsIII in biological samples. While HG-CT-AAS has con...

  15. 毛细管电泳-原子光(质)谱联用技术在金属形态与生物分子相互作用研究中的应用%Novel Hyphenated Techniques of Atomic Spectrometry for Metal Species Interaction with Biomolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李妍; 严秀平

    2015-01-01

    Trace metals may be adopted by biological systems to assist in the syntheses and metabolic functions of genes (DNA and RNA)and proteins in the environment.These metals may be beneficial or may pose a risk to humans and other life forms. Novel hybrid techniques are required for studies on the interaction between different metal species and biomolecules,which is significant for biology,biochemistry,nutrition,agriculture,medicine,pharmacy,and environmental science.In recent years, our group dwells on new hyphenated techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE),electrothermal atomic absorption spec-trometry (ETAAS),and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS),and their application for different metal spe-cies interaction with biomolecules such as DNA,HSA,and GSH.The CE-ETAAS assay and CE-ICP-MS assay allow sensitive-ly probing the level of biomolecules such as DNA damage by different metal species and extracting the kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules,provides direct evidences for the formation of differ-entmetal species-biomolecule adducts.In addition,the consequent structural information were extracted from circular dichroism (CD)and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Raman spectroscopy,and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)spectroscopy. The present works represent the most complete and extensive study to date on the interactions between different metal species with biomolecules,and also provide new evidences for and insights into the interactions of different metal species with biomole-cules for further understanding of the toxicological effects of metal species.%金属形态与生物分子相互作用研究对于揭示金属元素在正常生命过程、重大疾病的发生、诊断和治疗过程中的作用机理具有重要意义,发展研究金属元素形态与生物活性分子相互作用的新技术和新方法非常重要。简要总结了十余年来,在发展毛

  16. Determination of noble metals by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well known that significant quantities of soluble fission products such as La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Sm and noble metals such as Ag, Pt, Au, Ru, Rh, Pd are produced in the spent fuel dissolver solutions, in nuclear reactors. The recovery of noble metals from generated high level waste assumes importance in view of their usage in chemical and electronic industries. In the present work, Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) technique has been explored to determine six noble metals in aqueous solutions. Synthetic solution standards containing individually Ag, Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ru in the range of 1-500 μg/mL were prepared. Individual elemental solutions at 100μg/mL were fed in to the plasma. The instrumental parameters were obtained for positioning of the analytical line with appropriate sensitivity on the photomultiplier tube. The prominent ICP lines reported in literature in decreasing order of sensitivities for Au are 242.745, 267.895, 197.819, 208.219 nm; Ru are 240.272, 245.657, 267.876 nm; for Rh are 233.477, 249.077, 343.419, 252.053 nm and for Pt are 214.423, 203.646, 214.937 nm respectively. Of these the lines shown in bold are only accessible with the axial ICP unit used in these studies. In addition less sensitive lines in the polyscan mode were chosen, where one can access an elemental line 2.2 nm on either side of the analytical channel provided in polychromator of the instrument. The lines chosen in the polyscan are: Pt 306.471, Ru 249.877 and Rh at 343.489 nm. For Ag and Pd the lines at 328.068 nm and 340.458 nm available with the polychromator of the ICP unit were used. A three point standardization containing the analytes in the concentration range of 0.1 to 200 μg/mL was used. The detection limits determined as per the IUPAC convention for these elements are given. The analytical range for Ag and Pd were 0.05-200 μg/mL while for other elements viz: Au, Pt, Rh and Ru it was 0.5-500 μg/mL . Synthetic samples

  17. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  18. Analysis of soil reference materials for vanadium(+5) species by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) with known vanadium(+5) content are currently not commercially available. Because of this, vanadium species have been determined in solid CRMs of soil, viz. CRM023-50, CRM024-50, CRM049-50, SQC001 and SQC0012. These CRMs are certified with only total vanadium content. Vanadium(+5) was extracted from soil reference materials with 0.1 M Na2CO3. The quantification of V(+5) was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). The concentration of V(+5) in the analyzed CRMs was found to be ranging between 3.60 and 86.0 μg g-1. It was also found that SQC001 contains approximately 88% of vanadium as V(+5) species. Statistical evaluation of the results of the two methods by paired t-test was in good agreement at 95% level of confidence.

  19. The coupling of rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction with thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) was coupled with thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) to result in new CPE patterns and accelerated (1 min) protocols. It is demonstrated, for the case of copper (II) ion, that TS-FF-AAS improves the sampling efficiency and the sensitivity of FAAS determinations. Problems of nebulization associated with previous methods based on the coupling of FAAS and RS-CPE are overcome. TS-FF-AAS also improves sensitivity and gives a limit of detection for copper of 0.20 μg L-1, which is better by a factor of 32. Compared to direct FAAS, the factor is 114. (author)

  20. Determination of Trace Selenium in Electrolytic Manganese by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Jun; ZHOU Fang-qin; MA Cheng-jin; TUO Yong; LIU Jian-ben; WU Zhu-qin; TAN Zhu-zhong

    2003-01-01

    The effects of four types of graphite tube and five matrix modifiers on the determination of selenium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry were compared.The results show that platform thermolysis coat graphite tube and magnesium nitrate and cobaltco as matrix modifer can get a high sensitivity and a good recovery.The optimized working conditions and interference in the determination were invesigated.This result is consistent with that of XRF.The recovery is from 100.8 % to102.2 %,the relative standard deviation is from 3.47% to 5.56 % (n=9),and the detection limit of selenium is 378 pg (C=44.5μg/g to 97.3μg/g.).The proposed method can be applied to the rapid determination of selenium in electrolytic manganese.

  1. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, Ondřej; Komárek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    This research was aimed at the direct determination of HgS in environmental samples by means of thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. Operating parameters of the apparatus used for thermal desorption (including a prototype desorption unit) are described in this work, as well as the procedure for measuring mercury release curves together with an evaluation of the analytical signal including two methods of peak integration. The results of thermal desorption were compared with HgS contents obtained by sequential extraction. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for the selective determination of the black and red forms of HgS were 4 μg kg- 1 and 5 μg kg- 1, respectively. The limit of quantification of red HgS in soils was 35 μg kg- 1. The developed analytical procedure was applied to soil and sediment samples from historical mining areas.

  2. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Shokrollahi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple cloud point extraction procedure is presented for the preconcentration of copper in various samples. After complexation by 4-hydroxy-2-mercapto-6-propylpyrimidine (PTU, copper ions are quantitatively extracted into the phase rich in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.5 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Analytical parameters including concentrations for PTU, Triton X-114 and HNO3, bath temperature, centrifugation rate and time were optimized. The influences of the matrix ions on the recoveries of copper ions were investigated. The detection limits (3SDb/m, n=4 of 1.6 ng mL-1 along with enrichment factors of 30 for Cu were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of environmental samples.

  3. Preconcentration of Vanadium(Ⅴ) on Crosslinked Chitosan and Determination by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method is proposed for the preconcentration of vanadium(Ⅴ) with crosslinked chitosan (CCTS) and determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The adsorption rate of vanadium(Ⅴ) by CCTS was 97% at pH 4.0, and vanadium(Ⅴ) was eluted from crosslinked chitosan with 2 mL 2.0 mol*L-1 chlorhydric acid and determined by GFAAS. The detection limit (3σ,n=7) for vanadium(Ⅴ) was 4.8×1 0-12g and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D) at concentration level of 2.6 μg*L-1 is less than 3.6%. The method shows a good selectivity and high sensitivity, and it was applied to determination of vanadium(Ⅴ) in oyster and water samples. The analytic recoveries are (97±5)%.

  4. Inductively Coupled Plasma(ICP) Mass Spectrometry(MS) Hyphenated with Atomic Emission Spectrometry(AES) for Simultaneous Determination of Major, Minor and Micro Amounts of Elements in Geochemical Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhen-yu; ZHANG Qin; HU Ke; WU Jian-ling; YANG Peng-yuan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction Geological resource survey demands for determining various constituents including major, minor, micro, trace and ultra-trace levels of elements for preparing the map of resource distribution of our country. As a powerful and popularly used technique for multi-element analysis, inductively coupled plasma(ICP) atomic emission spectrometry (AES) has been applied to this field for a period of time[1-3]. However, ICP spectrometric determination of those micro, trace and ultratrace elements needs enrichment procedures for improving the detection limit, which is unacceptable in case a great mass of samples should be analyzed as that in the task of geological resource survey. On the other hand, although ICP mass spectrometry(MS) is considered the most powerful method for trace elements determination[4,5], it is difficult for ICP-MS to be used to determine the trace and major analytes simultaneously in a spectrum.

  5. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification of cosmetic samples prior to elemental analysis by different atomic spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, I; Cabaleiro, N; Costas, M; de la Calle, I; Bendicho, C

    2009-11-15

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted emulsification with a probe system is proposed as a rapid and simple sample treatment for atomic spectrometric determinations (Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry, Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn) in cosmetic samples such as shampoos, gel (hair gel), crèmes (body milk, hair conditioner) and oil (body oil). The type of dispersion medium, the sample mass-to-dispersion medium volume ratio, as well as the parameters related to the ultrasound-assisted emulsification (sonication amplitude and treatment time) were exhaustively studied. Only 1 min of ultrasonic shaking and a dispersion medium containing 0.5% (w/v) of SDS+3% (v/v) of HNO(3) or HCl allows obtaining a stable emulsion at least for 3 months. Thermal programs, nebulization of emulsions, speed of pumps and concentration of reagents used in cold vapour generation were optimized. Calibration using aqueous standards was feasible in all cases. Calibration by the standard addition method and recovery studies was also applied for validation. Microwave-assisted digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry were used for comparison purposes. Relative standard deviations from analysis of five independent emulsions were less than 9% in all cases. PMID:19782199

  6. Synchrotron radiation, neutron, and mass spectrometry techniques at user facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, S. R.; Caffee, M. W.; Dove, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    User research facilities around the world offer tremendous opportunities for scientific experimentation by members of the Earth science community. Synchrotron radiation sources, neutron sources, mass spectrometers, and others represent a powerful force in tackling complex scientific problems. In these techniques, Earth materials are bombarded with beams of ions, subatomic particles and/or photons to learn the secr...

  7. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D2 and Xe lamps within 200–400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3–5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground water

  8. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D{sub 2} and Xe lamps within 200–400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3–5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground

  9. Atomic and Nuclear Analytical Methods XRF, Mössbauer, XPS, NAA and Ion-Beam Spectroscopic Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, H R

    2007-01-01

    This book is a blend of analytical methods based on the phenomenon of atomic and nuclear physics. It comprises comprehensive presentations about X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Neutron- Activation Analysis (NAA), Particle Induced X-ray Emission Analysis (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Analysis (RBS), Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA), Particle Induced Gamma-ray Emission Analysis (PIGE), and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). These techniques are commonly applied in the fields of medicine, biology, environmental studies, archaeology or geology et al. and pursued in major international research laboratories.

  10. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method for the speciation of selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenite and selenate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic spectrometric detection is presented. An organic polymeric strong anion exchange column was used as the stationary phase in combination...... with an aqueous solution of 6 mmol L-1 of salicylate ion at pH 8.5 as the mobile phase which allowed the isocratic separation of the four selenium analytes within 8 minutes. The separated selenium species were detected on-line by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) or inductively coupled plasma mass...

  11. Mass Spectrometry as a Powerful Analytical Technique for the Structural Characterization of Synthesized and Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Massoui, Mohamed; Banoub, Joseph

    Mass spectrometry is an important tool for the identification and structural elucidation of natural and synthesized compounds. Its high sensitivity and the possibility of coupling liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection make it a technique of choice for the investigation of complex mixtures like raw natural extracts. The mass spectrometer is a universal detector that can achieve very high sensitivity and provide information on the molecular mass. More detailed information can be subsequently obtained by resorting to collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS). In this review, the application of mass spectrometric techniques for the identification of natural and synthetic compounds is presented. The gas-phase fragmentation patterns of a series of four natural flavonoid glycosides, three synthesized benzodiazepines and two synthesized quinoxalinone derivatives were investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry techniques. Exact accurate masses were measured using a modorate resolution quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight QqTOF-MS/MS hybrid mass spectrometer instrument. Confirmation of the molecular masses and the chemical structures of the studied compounds were achieved by exploring the gas-phase breakdown routes of the ionized molecules. This was rationalized by conducting low-energy collision CID-MS/MS analyses (product ion- and precursor ion scans) using a conventional quadrupole hexapole-quadrupole (QhQ) tandem mass spectrometer.

  12. Application of FTIR spectrometry to determine the atomic composition of submicron silicon nitride layers HxSirNzHy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors presents the developed software that allows to use the data from Fourier transform infrared spectrometry to calculate atomic composition in the silicon nitride HxSirNzHy layers of the submicron thickness. Autonomous and rapid method for the quantitative analysis of the IR spectra does not require prior measurement of thickness and density of the layers

  13. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM(IV) AND SELENIUM(VI) USING COUPLED ION CHROMATOGRAPHY: HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple method was developed to speciate inorganic selenium in the microgram per liter range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determination of the redox states selenite, Se(IV), and s...

  14. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  15. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz [Islamic Azad University, Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran)

    2006-11-15

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 {mu}g g{sup -1} and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. (orig.)

  16. Electrochemical hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection of tin in canned foods using polyaniline-modified lead cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrochemical hydride generation system with polyaniline-modified lead cathode was developed for tin determination by coupling with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The tin fluorescence signal intensity was improved evidently as the polyaniline membrane could facilitate the transformation process from atomic tin to the SnH4 and prevent the aggradation of Sn atom on Pb electrode surface. The effects of experimental parameters and interferences have been studied. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.5 ng mL-1 (3σ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.3% for 11 consecutive measurements of 50 ng mL-1 Sn(IV) standard solution.

  17. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as an Adsorbent for Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amount of Nickel in Environmental Samples by Atom Trap Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhanloo, H.; Falahnejad, M.; Zavvar Mousavi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid enrichment method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been established for preconcentration and separation of trace Ni(II) ions in water samples prior to their determination by atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A column filled with bulky NH2-UVM7 was used as the novel adsorbent. Under optimal conditions, the linear range, limit of detection (LOD), and preconcentration factor (PF) were 3-92 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 100, respectively. The validity of the method was checked by the standard reference material.

  18. Permanent modification in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — advances, anticipations and reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Georgieva, Rositsa

    2000-05-01

    Permanent modification is an important recent development in chemical modification techniques which is promising in view of increasing sample throughput with 'fast' programs, reducing reagent blanks, preliminary elimination of unwanted modifier components, compatibility with on-line and in situ enrichment, etc. An overview of this approach based on the authors' recent research and scarce literature data is given, revealing both success and failure in studies with permanently modified surfaces (carbides, non-volatile noble metals, noble metals on carbide coatings, etc.), as demonstrated in examples of direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) applications to biological and environmental matrices and vapor generation (VG)-ETAAS coupling with in-atomizer trapping of hydrides and other analyte vapors. Permanent modifiers exhibit certain drawbacks and limitations such as: poorly reproducible treatment technologies — eventually resulting in poor tube-to-tube repeatability and double or multiple peaks; impaired efficiency compared with modifier addition to each sample aliquot; relatively short lifetimes; limitations imposed on temperature programs, the pyrolysis, atomization and cleaning temperatures being set somewhat lower to avoid excessive loss of modifier; applicability to relatively simple sample solutions rather than to high-salt matrices and acidic digests; side effects of overstabilization, etc. The most important niches of application appear to be the utilization of permanently modified surfaces in coupled VG-ETAAS techniques, analysis of organic solvents and extracts, concentrates and fractions obtained after enrichment and/or speciation separations and direct ETAAS determinations of highly volatile analytes in relatively simple sample matrices.

  19. Simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Gian P. G.; Dakuzaku, Carolina S.; de Moraes, Mercedes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Gomes Neto, José A.

    2001-10-01

    A method has been developed for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd and Pb in white and red wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) using a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behavior of both analytes during pyrolysis and atomization stages were investigated in 0.028 mol l -1 HNO 3 and in 1+1 v/v diluted wine using mixtures of Pd(NO 3) 2+Mg(NO 3) 2 and NH 4H 2PO 4+Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifiers. With 5 μg Pd+3 μg Mg as the modifiers and a two-step pyrolysis (10 s at 400°C and 10 s at 600°C), the formation of carbonaceous residues inside the atomizer was avoided. For 20 μl of sample (wine+0.056 mol l -1 HNO 3, 1+1, v/v) dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curves in the 0.10-1.0 μg l -1 Cd and 5.0-50 μg l -1 Pb ranges were established. The characteristic mass was approximately 0.6 pg for Cd and 33 pg for Pb, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 400 firings. The limits of detection (LOD) based on integrated absorbance (0.03 μg l -1 for Cd, 0.8 μg l -1 for Pb) exceeded the requirements of Brazilian Food Regulations (decree #55871 from Health Department), which establish the maximum permissible level for Cd at 200 μg l -1 and for Pb at 500 μg l -1. The relative standard deviations ( n=12) were typically <8% for Cd and <6% for Pb. The recoveries of Cd and Pb added to wine samples varied from 88 to 107% and 93 to 103%, respectively. The accuracy of the direct determination of Cd and Pb was checked for 10 table wines by comparing the results with those obtained for digested wine using single-element ET-AAS, which were in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  20. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts. PMID:22970588

  1. Determination of micro yttrium in an ytterbium matrix by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiaoguo

    2005-01-01

    In the determination of trace yttrium (Y) in an ytterbium (Yb) matrix by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), the most prominent line of yttrium, Y 371.030 nm line, suffers from strong interference due to an emission line of ytterbium. In this work, a method based on wavelet transform was proposed for the spectral interference correction. Haar wavelet was selected as the mother wavelet. The discrete detail after the third decomposition, D3,was chosen for quantitative analysis based on the consideration of both separation degree and peak height. The linear correlation coefficient between the height of the left positive peak in D3 and the concentration of Y was calculated to be 0.9926.Six synthetic samples were analyzed, and the recovery for yttrium varied from 96.3% to 110.0%. The amounts of yttrium in three ytterbium metal samples were determined by the proposed approach with an average relative standard deviation (RSD)of 2.5%, and the detection limit for yttrium was 0.016%. This novel correction technique is fast and convenient, since neither complicated model assumption nor time-consuming iteration is required. Furthermore, it is not affected by the wavelength drift inherent in monochromators that will severely reduce the accuracy of results obtained by some chemometric methods.

  2. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Wang, Mei; Zhong, Yizhou; Zhang, Zehua; Yang, Bingyi

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea-ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of wavelength poisitioning errors on Kalman filtering results in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work evaluates the effect of wavelength positioning errors in spectral scans on analytical results when the Kalman filtering technique is used for the correction of line interferences in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that a positioning accuracy of 0.1 pm is required in order to obtain accurate and precise estimates for analyte concentrations. The positioning error in sample scans is more crucial than that in model scans. The relative bias in measured analyte concentration originating from a positioning error in a sample scan increases linearly with an increase in the magnitude of the error and the peak distance of the overlapping lines, but is inversely proportional to the signal-to-background ratio. By the use of an optimization procedure for the positions of scans with the innovations number as the criterion, the wavelength positioning error can be reduced and, correspondingly, the accuracy and precision of analytical results improved. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts.

  5. Emerging Techniques in Vegetable Oil Analysis Using Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S. D.; Rhodes, C.

    2002-07-01

    As the practice of vegetable oil adulteration becomes more sophisticated, the possibility to subvert detection using established techniques such as capillary gas chromatography is increasing. One of the most powerful techniques to be used in food authenticity studies is stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SIRMS) which utilises differences in the natural abundance of the stable isotopes of the light bio elements hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulfur to detect food fraud. SIRMS has found application in the authentication of a wide range of foodstuffs, including fruit juices, wines, spirits, honey and to detect the adulteration of flavour compounds with synthetic analogues. This papers reviews the current state-of-the-art for the authentication of vegetable oils using SIRMS and highlights emergent techniques such as compound-an position specific-isotope mass spectrometry. These latter developments offer the potential to provide more rapid and improved detection of the economic adulteration of vegetable oils. (Author) 38 refs.

  6. Optimized determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, M; Cruz González, M; Cabrera, C; López, M C

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods examined include dealcoholization and dry and wet mineralization treatment using different acids and/or mixtures of them, both with and without heating. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectivity of each method were established. The best results were obtained for wet mineralization with heated acid (HNO3-H2SO4); the results for table wines had an accuracy of 97.5-101.6%, a relative standard deviation of 3.51%, a detection limit of 19.2 micrograms/L, and a determination limit of 32.0 micrograms/L. The method was also sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of iron in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained ranged from 3.394 +/- 2.15 mg/L for the juice, 2.938 +/- 1.47 mg/L for the white wines, 19.470 +/- 5.43 mg/L for the sweet wines, 0.311 +/- 0.07 mg/L for the brandies, and 0.564 +/- 0.12 mg/L for the anisettes. Thus, the method is useful for routine analysis in the quality control of these beverages. PMID:10693020

  7. Gas chromatography coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry — a sensitive instrumentation for mercury speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emteborg, Håkan; Sinemus, Hans-Werner; Radziuk, Bernard; Baxter, Douglas C.; Frech, Wolfgang

    1996-07-01

    New instrumentation for the speciation of mercury is described, and is applied to the analysis of natural water samples. The separation of mercury species is effected using gas chromatography of derivatized mercury species on a widebore capillary column. The solvent is vented using a bypass valve and the separated mercury species are pyrolysed on-line at 800°C for production of mercury atoms. These are then detected by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) at the 253.7 and 184.9 nm lines simultaneously in a quartz cuvette. The use of the 184.9 nm line provides a more than five-fold increase in sensitivity compared with the conventional 253.7 nm line and an absolute detection limit of 0.5 pg of mercury. The dynamic range of the combined analytical lines provides a linear response over more than three orders of magnitude. A number of organic compounds not containing mercury are also detected following pyrolysis, especially at the 184.9 nm line. These background species must not co-elute at the retention times for methyl- and inorganic mercury, as otherwise a positive interference would result. By maximizing the chromatographic resolution and minimizing the band broadening in the cuvette by use of a make-up gas, the retention times of interest are freed from co-eluting background peaks. The instrumentation has been applied to the determination of ng l -1 concentrations of methyl- and inorganic mercury in Lake Constance, Germany and within the Lake Constance drinking water supply organization, Bodenseewasserversorgung (BWV). The accuracy for the sum of methyl- and inorganic mercury has been assessed by comparison with an independent method for total mercury based on AAS detection implemented at BWV. Relative detection limits using 1 litre water samples and 15 ml injections of the final hexane extract were 0.03 ng l -1 for methylmercury and 0.4 ng l -1 for inorganic mercury based on the 3j criterion.

  8. The determination of trace metals in lubricating oils by atomic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucelio, Ricardo Q. [Departamento de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: aucelior@rdc.puc-rio.br; Martins de Souza, Roseli; Calixto de Campos, Reinaldo; Miekeley, Norbert; Porto da Silveira, Carmem L. [Departamento de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    The determination of trace metals in lubricating oils using atomic spectrometric methods is reviewed. The importance of such analyses for technical diagnostics as well as the specific sample characteristics related to the analyte form (metallo-organic and metal particles) is discussed. Problems related to sample pre-treatment for appropriate sample introduction and calibration are addressed as well as the strategies to overcome them. Recent trends aimed at simplifying sample manipulation are presented. The applications and scope of AAS, ICP OES and ICP MS techniques for the determination of trace metals in lubricating oil is individually discussed, as well as some present instrumental trends.

  9. Determination of selenium and tellurium in the gas phase using specific columns and atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muangnoicharoen, S.; Chiou, K.Y.; Manuel, O.K.

    1986-11-01

    Total selenium and tellurium in the gas phase were analyzed after adsorption on gold-coated beads and charcoal. The thermally eluting gas was trapped on columns filled with quartz beads that were cooled in an ice bath. The beads were boiled in dilute HCl, and the resulting solution was analyzed for Se and Te by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Their results demonstrate that gold-coated beads efficiently trap gaseous Se and Te at a low gas flow rate, but at higher flow rates charcoal traps are more expedient. With charcoal traps, it was found that local air samples contain Se in the range of 0.92-3.05 ng m/sup -3/ and Te in the range of 0.10-0.34 ng m/sup -3/. Detection limits down to about 0.1 ng m/sup -3/ allow the ready detection of Se and Te in rural air with a precision of about +/- 6% at the nanogram level of Te and about +/- 4% at the nanogram level of Se.

  10. Determination of inorganic species of Sb and Te in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Mariela N.M.; Cervera, Maria L.; Guardia, Miguel de la, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.e [University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    A non-chromatographic fast, sensitive and easy method has been developed for the determination of Sb(III), Sb(V), Te(IV) and Te(VI) in cereal samples. The procedure is based on ultrasound assisted extraction and determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG AFS). Preliminary studies were made in order to get the best extraction efficiency using 1 mol L{sup -1} phosphoric acid, 1 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid, aqua regia, 1 mol L{sup -1} sulfuric acid and 6 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid. The extraction with aqua regia showed a clear interconversion of the species during the process, being H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} the best extractant with efficiencies greater than 90% from the total content of Sb and Te quantified previously and without species interconversion. This point was checked by recovery experiments at different spiked levels. The method provided limits of detection values from 0.1 to 0.5 ng g{sup -1} with relative standard deviation values from 5.4 to 9.2% of 10 independent analysis of samples containing few ng g-1 of Sb and Te species. (author)

  11. Determination of inorganic species of Sb and Te in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-chromatographic fast, sensitive and easy method has been developed for the determination of Sb(III), Sb(V), Te(IV) and Te(VI) in cereal samples. The procedure is based on ultrasound assisted extraction and determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG AFS). Preliminary studies were made in order to get the best extraction efficiency using 1 mol L-1 phosphoric acid, 1 mol L-1 nitric acid, aqua regia, 1 mol L-1 sulfuric acid and 6 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid. The extraction with aqua regia showed a clear interconversion of the species during the process, being H2SO4 the best extractant with efficiencies greater than 90% from the total content of Sb and Te quantified previously and without species interconversion. This point was checked by recovery experiments at different spiked levels. The method provided limits of detection values from 0.1 to 0.5 ng g-1 with relative standard deviation values from 5.4 to 9.2% of 10 independent analysis of samples containing few ng g-1 of Sb and Te species. (author)

  12. Determination of manganese in thermoluminescent materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of manganese in the mixed fluorides CaF2: MnF2 and CaF2: Mn thermoluminophors was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and spectrophotometry. The various Mn emission lines were compared and the manganese emission line at 257.610 nm was used for ICP-AES analysis. For the spectrophotometric determination the manganese(II) ions were oxidized to intensively coloured permanganate ions using potassium periodate. No statistically significant differences were found between the results of ICP-AES and spectrophotometric methods of analysis. The thermoluminophors were synthesized by coprecipitation of manganese with CaF2, varying the concentration of manganese in the initial solutions in the range of 0.01 - 2.0 % (m/m). The coprecipitated mixed fluorides CaF2: MnF2 were heated at 1423 K. The glow curves of synthesized CaF2: Mn thermoluminophors were measured. (author)

  13. Speciation Analysis of Serum Copper by Ultrafiltration Com-bined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Hua; MA Hui-Min; MA Quan-Li; LIANG Shu-Chuan

    2001-01-01

    UItrafiltration combined with graphite furnace atomic absorp-tion spectrometry(GFAAS)was used to study protein binding and speciation of copper in human serum..UItrafiltration was carried out using a cell unit ultrafiltration membraoes having a nominal cut-off of 10,000Dalton.The effects of var-ious experimental factors including the kind and concentration of electrolyte,sample storge,pH,pressure and the precon-ditioning of the membranes on the speciation analysis of serum copper by ultrafiltration were examined.It was observed that 4.5±2.3% of the total copper in serum was ultrafiltrable and this value did not seem to be influenced by the total serum ele-mental concentration,the PH (6.5——10) adn the pressure(≤1.5kg/cm2).the preconditioning of the ultrafiltration system with 0.1mol/L calcium nitrate can overcome the adsorption loss of copper effectively,and the addition of tris-HCI sohtion (pH 7.4)to serum accelerates the ultrafiltration.The present method was proved to be suitable for speciation analysis for its simplicity,rapidity,small sample reuqirement and easy con-trol.The results obtained with the method are accurate and reliable.

  14. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C. Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  15. Determination of lead in croatian wines by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for direct determination of lead in wine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behaviour of Pb during pyrolysis and atomisation stages was investigated without matrix modifier and in the presence of Pd(NO3)2, Pd(NO3)2 + Mg(NO3)2 x 6H2O, and NH4H2PO4 + Mg(NO3)2 x 6H2O as matrix modifiers. A simple 1:1 dilution of wine samples with Pd(NO3)2 as a matrix modifier proved optimal for accurate determination of Pb in wine. Mean recoveries were 106 % for red and 114 % for white wine, and the detection limit was 3 μg L-1. Within-run precision of measurements for red and white wine was 2.1 % and 1.8 %, respectively. The proposed method was applied for analysis of 23 Croatian wines. Median Pb concentrations were 33 μg L-1, range (16 to 49) μg L-1 in commercially available wines and 46 μg L-1, range (14 to 559) μg L-1 in home-made wines. There were no statistically significant differences (P<0.05) in Pb concentration between commercial and home-made wines or between red and white wines. (authors)

  16. EVALUATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTENT IN EDIBLE MUSHROOMS BY MICROWAVE DIGESTION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Radulescu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Mn, Zn, Fe and Cu content of the fruiting bodies (cap and stipe of four species (Amanita caesarea, Pleurotus ostreatus, Fistulina hepatica and Armillariella mellea and their substrate, collected from forest sites in Dâmboviţa County, Romania. The elements were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS after microwave assisted digestion. From the same collecting point were taken n = 5 samples of young and mature fruiting bodies of mushrooms and their substrate. The high concentrations of lead, chrome and cadmium (Pb: 0.25 – 1.89 mg.kg-1, Cr: 0.36 – 1.94 mg.kg-1, Cd: 0.23 – 1.13 mg.kg-1 for all collected wild edible mushrooms, were determined. These data were compared with maximum level for certain contaminants in foodstuffs established by the commission of the European Committees (EC No 466/2001. A quantitative evaluation of the relationship of element uptake by mushrooms from substrate was made by calculating the accumulation coefficient (Ka. The moderately acid pH value of soil influenced the accumulation of Zn and Cd inside of the studied species. The variation of heavy metals content between edible mushrooms species is dependent upon the ability of the species to extract elements from the substrate and on the selective uptake and deposition of metals in tissue.

  17. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  18. Stabilizing Agents for Calibration in the Determination of Mercury Using Solid Sampling Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Zelinková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC, diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC, and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS. These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L-1 TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants.

  19. Use of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Assessment of Biomonitor Plants for Lead, Cadmium and Copper Pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokce Kaya; Mehmet Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep,Turkey.Lead,cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.Lead,Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304~602,0.4~0.44 and 31~37 mg · kg-1,respectively.Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg · kg-1 was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L.plant.The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima >Morus sp.> Juglans regia L.> Ficus carica L.>Cydonia oblonga Miller> Prunus x domestica L.The plants,Populus nigra L.,Eleagnus angustifolia L.and Salix sp.were found useful for Cd,and the plant,Eleagnus angustifolia L.for Pb,to be considered as potential biomonitor.Especially,leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations.Therefore,people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks.

  20. Speciation of iron (II) and (III) by using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: myaman@firat.edu.tr; Kaya, Gokce [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)

    2005-05-17

    A method for speciation, preconcentration and separation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in different matrices was developed using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. PAN as complexing reagent for Fe{sup 2+} and chloroform as organic solvent were used. The complex of Fe{sup 2+}-PAN was extracted into chloroform phase in the pH range of 0.75-4.0 and Fe{sup 3+} remains in water phase in the pH range 0.75-1.25. The optimum conditions for maximum recovery of Fe{sup 2+} and minimum recovery of Fe{sup 3+} were determined as pH = 1, the stirring time of 20 min, the PAN amount of 0.5 mg and chloroform volume of 8 mL. The developed method was applied to the determination of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in tea infusion, fruit juice, cola and pekmez. It is seen that there is high bioavailable iron (Fe{sup 2+}) in pekmez. The developed method is sensitive, simple and need the shorter time in comparison with other similar studies.

  1. Wet sample digestion for quantification of vanadium(V) in serum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of pressure digestion systems used prior to the determination of the ultratrace element vanadium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry were evaluated: The high-pressure ashing (HPA) system, the DAB III pressure digestion system and the pressurized microwave digestion (PMD) system. Complete sample digestion and no loss of graphite tube sensitivity as well as reliable vanadium values could only be achieved with HPA digests of freeze-dried serum. The mean recovery rate was 98% and no loss of tube sensitivity could be observed. Using non-lyophilized serum the mean recovery rate was 70%. The DAB III digestion system, vicarious for closed pressure digestion in steel bombs with an allowable temperature up to about 200C, cannot be recommended to mineralize human biological material for vanadium determinations, because the remaining not completely decomposed organic compounds extracted together with the vanadium-cupferron complex caused a marked carbon-buildup and formation of carbides in the graphite tube were found to change the shape of the absorption signals distinctly, and to decline the tube sensitivity strongly (about 25%) so that reliable results cannot be achieved. The recovery rate was too low in general (about 50%). In addition, a subsequent treatment of the DAB III digests with perchloric acid was unsuccessful. The PMD system proved to be not suited, because the samples became highly contaminated by vanadium possibly from the titan seal. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Novel Method for Indirect Determination of Iodine in Marine Products by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jian-ping; TAN Fang-wei; TANG Qiong; JIANG Tian-cheng

    2013-01-01

    A method for the determination of iodine based upon compound H2HgI4,formed between I-and Hg2+ in nitric acid and extracted in methyl isobutyl ketone(MIBK),was developed via atomic fluorescence spectrometry(AFS).After the compound is reduced with potassium borohydrid(KBH4),the resultant mercury vapor was injected into the instrument and iodine was,therefore,indirectly determined.Experimental parameters such as the conditions of extraction reagents,aqueous phase acidity,elemental mercury diffusion temperature in a vial and other factors were investigated and optimized.Under the optimum experimental conditions,this method shows a detection limit of 0.038 μg/L iodine and a linear relationship between 0.04-20 μg/L.The method was applied to determining the iodine content in marine duck eggs,kelps,laver and Ganoderma lucidum spirulina,showing a relative standard deviation(RSD) of 2.15% and the recoveries in the range of 98.1%-102.5%.

  3. Determination of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grases, F.; Perello, J.; Isern, B.; Prieto, R.M

    2004-05-10

    Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is a substance present in urine with an important role in preventing calcium renal calculi development. In spite of this, the use of urinary phytate levels on stone-formers' evaluation and treatment is still notably restricted as a consequence of the enormous difficulty to analyze this substance in urine. In this paper, a simple procedure for routinary urinary phytate determination based on phosphorus determination through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method only requires a previous separation of phytate from other components by column anion exchange chromatography. The working linear range used was 0-2 mg l{sup -1} phosphorus (0-7 mg l{sup -1} phytate). The limit of detection was 64 {mu}g l{sup -1} of phytate and the limit of quantification was 213 {mu}g l{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 1.35 mg l{sup -1} phytate was 2.4%. Different urine samples were analyzed using an alternative analytical methodology based on gas chromatography (GC)/mass detection used for inositol determination (phytate was previously hydrolyzed), resulting both methods comparable using as criterion to assess statistical significance P<0.05.

  4. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks.

  5. Determination of eight trace elements in doped crystal ALN by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In this paper, an accurate and simple method has been developed for the determination of trace Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn ,Ni and Zn in doped AlN crystal using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). AlN crystal becomes ideal substrate for the epitaxial growth of GaN, AlGaN with high Al ingredient and AlN which are used to fabricate ultraviolet LEDs, blue- ultraviolet solid state LDs, lasers, ultraviolet detectors. At present, It is a very important aspect for scientific workers to promote in the transition metals elements doped AlN showing ferromagne. Owing its low detection limits and multi-element capability, ICP-AES has been used in many fields.The optimum instrument working conditions are selected .AlN crystal was fused with KOH and the fusion product was dissolved in dilute aqua regia. Matrix effect from KOH and interference to the spectral lines of the elements to be determined were investigated and corrected by matrix matching and background correction method. Detection limits of elements were 0.01% to 0.0002% The recoveries for elements were 98% to 104%. The relative standard deviation was 0.5% to 4.0%.

  6. Bismuth determination in environmental samples by hydride generation-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscoso-Perez, Carmen; Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernandez-Fernandez, Esther; Prada-Rodriguez, Dario [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071, A Coruna (Spain)

    2003-12-04

    A hydride generation procedure, via flow injection, coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was optimised for Bi determination in sea water and hot-spring water and acid extracts from coal, coal fly ash and slag samples. The effects of several variables such as hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations, hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rates, reaction coil length, trapping and atomisation temperatures, trapping time and the Ar flow rate have been investigated by using a 2{sup 9}*3/128 Plackett-Burman design. From these studies, certain variables (sodium tetrahydroborate concentration and trapping time) showed up as significant, and they were optimised by a 2{sup 2}+star central composite design. In addition, a study of the bismuthine trapping and atomisation efficiency from graphite tubes (GTs) permanently treated with uranium, tantalum, lanthanum oxide, niobium, beryllium oxide, chromium oxide and tantalum carbide were investigated. The results obtained were compared with those achieved by iridium and zirconium-treated GTs. The best analytical performances, with characteristic mass of 35 pg and detection limit of 70 ng l{sup -1}, were achieved by using U-treated GTs. Accuracy were checked using several reference materials: 1643d (Trace Elements in Water), TM-24 (Reference Water), GBW-07401 (Soil) and 1632c (Trace Elements in Coal)

  7. Sapphire: a better material for atomization and in situ collection of silver volatile species for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, Stanislav, E-mail: stanomusil@biomed.cas.cz; Matoušek, Tomáš; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-06-01

    Sapphire is presented as a high temperature and corrosion resistant material of an optical tube of an atomizer for volatile species of Ag generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4}. The modular atomizer design was employed which allowed to carry out the measurements in two modes: (i) on-line atomization and (ii) in situ collection (directly in the optical tube) by means of excess of O{sub 2} over H{sub 2} in the carrier gas during the trapping step and vice versa in the volatilization step. In comparison with quartz atomizers, the sapphire tube atomizer provides a significantly increased atomizer lifetime as well as substantially improved repeatability of the Ag in situ collection signals shapes. In situ collection of Ag in the sapphire tube atomizer was highly efficient (> 90%). Limit of detection in the on-line atomization mode and in situ collection mode, respectively, was 1.2 ng ml{sup −1} and 0.15 ng ml{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Sapphire was tested as a new material of an atomizer tube for Ag volatile species. • Two measurement modes were investigated: on-line atomization and in situ collection. • In situ collection of Ag was highly efficient (> 90%) with LOD of 0.15 ng ml{sup −1}. • No devitrification of the sapphire tube observed in the course of several months.

  8. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  9. Towards broadening thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: Influence of organic solvents on the analytical signal of magnesium

    OpenAIRE

    Ezequiel Morzan; Jorge Stripeikis; Mabel Tudino

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the influence of the solvent when thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) is employed for the determination of elements of low volatility, taking magnesium (Mg) as leading case. Several organic solvents/water solutions of different characteristics (density, surface tension, viscosity, etc.) and proportions were employed for the TS-FF-AAS analytical determination. To this end, solutions containing methanol, ethanol and isopropanol in water w...

  10. Elemental analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Lim, Jong Myoung; Kim, Young Jin [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Quraishi, Shamshad Begum [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2003-05-01

    Elemental analyses for certified reference materials were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Five Certified Reference Materials (CRM) were selected for the study on comparative analysis of environmental samples. The CRM are Soil (NIST SRM 2709), Coal fly ash (NIST SRM 1633a), urban dust (NIST SRM 1649a) and air particulate on filter media (NIST SRM 2783 and human hair (GBW 09101)

  11. Elemental analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analyses for certified reference materials were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Five Certified Reference Materials (CRM) were selected for the study on comparative analysis of environmental samples. The CRM are Soil (NIST SRM 2709), Coal fly ash (NIST SRM 1633a), urban dust (NIST SRM 1649a) and air particulate on filter media (NIST SRM 2783 and human hair (GBW 09101)

  12. Determination of Copper-Based Fungicides by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Digestion Procedure with Sulfuric and Nitric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena Milinović; Rada Đurović

    2007-01-01

    Copper-based fungicides can be effectively digested by treatment with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid in exactly 15 minutes for the rapid determination via copper using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Under optimum conditions, the results of copper fungicide analysis were consistent to those obtained by the AOAC’s recommended method. Recovery values ranged from 98.63 to 103.40%. Relative standard deviation values are lower than 2%. The proposed digestion procedu...

  13. Determination of Trace Silver in Water Samples by Online Column Preconcentration Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Termite Digestion Product

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce Nunes Bianchin; Eduardo Carasek; Edmar Martendal

    2011-01-01

    A new method for Ag determination in water samples using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent used for Ag preconcentration and extraction was the termite digestion product. Flow and chemical variables of the system were optimized through a multivariate procedure. The factors selected were adsorbent mass, buffer type and concentration, sample pH, and sample flow rate. The detection limit and precisio...

  14. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  15. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Alexandre de; Zmozinski, Ariane Vanessa [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Damin, Isabel Cristina Ferreira [Faculdade Dom Bosco de Porto Alegre, 90520-280, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, Marcia Messias, E-mail: mmsilva@iq.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, a direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil samples. The samples were weighed directly on the solid sampling platforms and introduced into the graphite tube for analysis. The chemical modifier used for both analytes was a mixture of 0.1% Pd + 0.06% Mg + 0.06% Triton X-100. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were obtained for both analytes using standards and samples. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for both analytes. The limits of detection obtained were 5.1 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for arsenic and 0.2 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for cadmium, calculated for the maximum amount of sample that can be analyzed (8 mg and 10 mg) for arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Relative standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. For validation purposes, a calibration curve was constructed with the SRM 1634c and aqueous standards for arsenic and the results obtained for several crude oil samples were in agreement according to paired t-test. The result obtained for the determination of arsenic in the SRM against aqueous standards was also in agreement with the certificate value. As there is no crude oil or similar reference material available with a certified value for cadmium, a digestion in an open vessel under reflux using a 'cold finger' was adopted for validation purposes. The use of paired t-test showed that the results obtained by direct sampling and digestion were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. Recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic standards and the results were between 88% and 109%. The proposed method is simple, fast and reliable, being appropriated for routine analysis. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct sampling GF AAS method to determine As and Cd in crude oil was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conventional chemical modifier Pd/Mg has been used to stabilize As and Cd. Black

  16. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  17. Determination of Inorganic Arsenic Species by Electrochemical Hydride Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Selective Electrochemical Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xun; WANG Zheng-Hao

    2007-01-01

    A new direct procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic species was developed by electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (EcHG-AAS) with selective electrochemical reduction. The determination of inorganic arsenic species is based on the fact that As(Ⅲ) shows significantly higher absorbance at low electrolytic currents than As(Ⅴ) in 0.3 mol·L-1 H2SO4.The electrolytic current used for the determination of As(Ⅲ) without considerable interferences of As(V) was 0.4 A, whereas the current for the determination of As(Ⅲ)and As(V) was 1.2 A. For equal concentrations of As(Ⅲ) and As(V) in a sample, the interferences of As(V) during the As(Ⅲ) determination were smaller than 5%. The absorbance for As(V) could be calculated by subtracting that for As(Ⅲ) measured at 0.4 A from the total absorbance for As(Ⅲ) and As(V) measured at 1.2 A, and then the concentration of As(V) can be obtained by its calibration curve at 1.2 A. The methodology developed provided the detection limits of 0.3 and 0.6 ng·ml-1 for As(Ⅲ) and As(V) respectively.The relative standrad deviations were of 3.5% for 20 ng·ml-1 As(Ⅲ) and 302% for 20 ng·ml-1 As(V).The method was successfully applied to determination of soluble inorganic arsenic species in Chinese medicine.

  18. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  19. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death. PMID:17721164

  20. Determination of Lead in Human Teeth by Hydride Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan T. Abdulsahib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The determination of lead in human teeth at concentration levels of ìg/ml is proposed using Hydride Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HG-AAS. To do this, 2% (wv lanthanum chloride solution is employed as matrix modifying reagent to increase sensitivity and remove matrix interferences. Approach: About 100 µL of sample and 100 µL of 3.0% (m/v NaBH4 are simultaneously injected into carrier streams. The detection of limit of 0.46 µg L-1 for Pb was achieved and the relative standard deviation of 3.0% for 10 µg L-1 lead was obtained. The recovery percentage of the method has been found to be (92.8-100.5% for known quantities of lead added to teeth sample which were completely recovered. A comparison of the proposed method with standard addition method showed nearly results in the same samples of teeth and the results compared with other studies in the world. Results: The method was shown to be satisfactory for determination of traces of lead in teeth samples with excellent accuracy. Teeth analysis reveals that intact teeth contained the highest amounts of lead which provide an evidence that lead may reduce the prevalence of dantal caries. Statistically significant differences (pConclusion: Statistically significant difference between age groups were seen in the mean value of lead concentrations in human teeth, the concentration of lead increased with age. The differences may be due to the exposure of lead and others factors such as differences in diet and drinking water.

  1. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood.

  2. Investigation of aging processes of graphite tubes modified with iridium and rhodium used for atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulska, Ewa; Piaścik, Marek; Katskov, Dmitri; Darangwa, Nicholas; Grotti, Marco

    2007-11-01

    UV spectrometry (187-380 nm) with charge coupled device (CCD) detection was used to study the evolution of absorption spectra during the vaporization of various species in the pyrocoated graphite furnace, with electrodeposited Ir and Rh as modifiers. In order to mimic a typical matrix composition, various salts of aluminum, manganese, copper, magnesium, sodium, and lead were used in microgram amounts. Changes in spectra and vapor release rate, along with aging of the tubes in the repetitive temperature cycles, were observed. Compared to the unmodified pyrocoated tubes, the presence of Ir or Rh causes a significant reduction in the vaporization efficiency, especially for microgram amounts of copper and aluminum introduced as nitrates, and manganese introduced as a sulfate. The vaporization efficiency, for magnesium and sodium as chlorides, and for lead as a sulfate, remained unchanged. Interestingly, the aging of the tubes was accompanied by partial restoration of the spectral characteristics for unmodified tubes. For example, with unmodified pyrocoated tubes, the vaporization spectrum, appearing as a consequence of the decomposition of aluminum nitrate, consisted of Al2O bands overlapped by Al atomic lines. In the freshly modified tubes, intensities of those lines and bands were substantially reduced, and in this case, the dominance of AlO molecules was observed. The efficiency of vaporization of aluminum species increased in the aged modified tubes. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the modified surfaces for the new and aged tubes indicated that aging of the tubes is accompanied by the destruction of the pyrocoating, formation of pyrographite shells around the areas where the modifier was electrodeposited, and finally, complete substitution of the metal on the graphite surface by pyrographite debris.

  3. A new technique for processing airborne gamma ray spectrometry data for mapping low level contaminations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aage, H.K. E-mail: hka@iau.dtu.dk; Korsbech, U.; Bargholz, K.; Hovgaard, J

    1999-12-01

    A new technique for processing airborne gamma ray spectrometry data has been developed. It is based on the noise adjusted singular value decomposition method introduced by Hovgaard in 1997. The new technique opens for mapping of very low contamination levels. It is tested with data from Latvia where the remaining contamination from the 1986 Chernobyl accident together with fallout from the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests includes {sup 137}Cs at levels often well below 1 kBq/m{sup 2} equivalent surface contamination. The limiting factors for obtaining reliable results are radon in the air, spectrum stability and accurate altitude measurements.

  4. Graphene for Preconcentration of Trace Amounts of Ni in Water and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Liver Loggerhead Turtles Specimens Prior to flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanie Arbabi Rashid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new sensitive and simple method was developed for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Ni using 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol (PAN as chelating reagent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method is based on the uti- lization of a column packed with graphene as sorbent. Several effective parameters on the extraction and complex formation were selected and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 5.0–240.0 µg L-1 with a detection limit of 0.36 µg L-1. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 20.0 and 100.0 µg L-1 of Ni were 3.45 and 3.18%, respectively. Comparative studies showed that graphene is superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of Ni. In the present study, we report the application of preconcentration techniques still continues increasingly for trace metal determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS for quantification of Ni in Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues from Liver loggerhead turtles. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of four real environmental water samples. Good spiked recoveries over the range of 95.8–102.6% were obtained.

  5. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. PMID:26496130

  6. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  7. Gamma-ray Spectrometry in Geothermal Exploration: State of the Art Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair T. McCay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray spectrometry is a surveying technique that allows the calculation of the heat produced during radioactive decay of potassium, uranium, and thorium within rock. Radiogenic heat producing rocks are often targets for geothermal exploration and production. Hence, refinements in gamma-ray spectrometry surveying will allow better constraint of resources estimation and help to target drilling. Gamma-rays have long half-lengths compared to other radiation produced during radiogenic decay. This property allows the gamma-rays to penetrate far enough through media to be detected by airborne or ground based surveying. A recent example of ground-based surveying in Scotland shows the ability of gamma-ray spectrometry to quickly and efficiently categorize granite plutons as low or high heat producing. Some sedimentary rocks (e.g., black shales also have high radiogenic heat production properties and could be future geothermal targets. Topographical, atmospheric and spatial distribution factors (among others can complicate the collection of accurate gamma-ray data in the field. Quantifying and dealing with such inaccuracies represents an area for further improvement of these techniques for geothermal applications.

  8. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Georg, E-mail: georg.hartmann@tum.de [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schuster, Michael, E-mail: michael.schuster@tum.de [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We optimized cloud point extraction and ET-AAS parameters for Au-NPs measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A selective ligand (sodium thiosulphate) is introduced for species separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A limit of detection of 5 ng Au-NP per L is achieved for aqueous samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of samples with high natural organic mater content is possible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Real water samples including wastewater treatment plant effluent were analyzed. - Abstract: The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 {+-} 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 {+-} 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L{sup -1} is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L{sup -1}. The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L{sup -1} is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples.

  9. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shan, E-mail: ls_tuzi@163.com; Wang, Mei, E-mail: wmei02@163.com; Zhong, Yizhou, E-mail: yizhz@21cn.com; Zhang, Zehua, E-mail: kazuki.0101@aliyun.com; Yang, Bingyi, E-mail: e_yby@163.com

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea–ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries. - Highlights: • Cloud point extraction was firstly established to determine trace inorganic arsenic(As) species combining with HGAFS. • Separate As(III) and As(V) determinations improve the accuracy. • Ultrasonic release of complexed As(V) enables complete As(V) reduction to As(III). • Direct HGAFS analysis can be performed.

  10. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea–ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries. - Highlights: • Cloud point extraction was firstly established to determine trace inorganic arsenic(As) species combining with HGAFS. • Separate As(III) and As(V) determinations improve the accuracy. • Ultrasonic release of complexed As(V) enables complete As(V) reduction to As(III). • Direct HGAFS analysis can be performed

  11. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia, E-mail: e.vasileva-veleva@iaea.org

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6–4.3%), repeatability (4–9%), reproducibility (9–11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as

  12. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry).

  13. Determination of natural isotopic variation in antimony using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for an uncertainty estimation of the standard atomic weight of antimony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic variation of industrially produced antimony was estimated using multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A reproducible 123Sb/121Sb ratio of ±0.004% (2 standard deviations) was routinely obtained using a Sn doping mass discrimination correction technique. Only a small isotopic variation of about 0.05% was observed among industrially important Sb materials (five commercially available reagents and two ore minerals). The degree of Sb isotopic variation to determine the uncertainty in Sb atomic weight can be reduced by this new analytical technique to 0.00025 compared to the currently accepted IUPAC isotopic variation determined by conventional mass spectrometry of ±0.001. Heavy isotope enrichment of Sb in a drainage water sample from a stibnite mining area was found. This heavy isotope enrichment tendency in an aqueous environment may be useful in detecting anthropogenic Sb input from industrial emission by the smelting process via air because Sb of anthropogenic origin will have lighter isotope enrichment features. (author)

  14. Optimized determination of calcium in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, Manuel; González, Maria Cruz; Cabrera, Carmen; Gimenez, Rafael; López, Maria Carmen

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of calcium in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by flame atomic absorption spectrometry; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods tested included dealcoholization, dry mineralization, and wet mineralization with heating by using different acids and/or mixtures of acids. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectiviy of each method were established. Such research is necessary because of the better analytical indexes obtained after acid digestion of the sample, as recommended by the European Union, which advocates the direct method. In addition, although high-temperature mineralization with an HNO3-HCIO4 mixture gave the best analytical results, mineralization with nitric acid at 80 degrees C for 15 min gave the most satisfactory results in all cases, including those for wines with high levels of sugar and beverages with high alcoholic content. The results for table wines subjected to the latter treatment had an accuracy of 98.70-99.90%, a relative standard deviation of 2.46%, a detection limit of 19.0 microg/L, and a determination limit of 31.7 microg/L. The method was found to be sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of Ca in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained for Ca were 90.00 +/- 20.40 mg/L in the grape juices, 82.30 +/- 23.80 mg/L in the white wines, 85.00 +/- 30.25 mg/L in the sweet wines, 84.92 +/- 23.11 mg/L in the red wines, 85.75 +/- 27.65 mg/L in the rosé wines, 9.51 +/- 6.65 mg/L in the brandies, 11.53 +/- 6.55 mg/L in the gin, 7.3 +/- 6.32 mg/L in the pacharán, and 8.41 +/- 4.85 mg/L in the anisettes. The method is therefore useful for routine analysis in the

  15. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace–atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L−1 when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS. (author)

  16. ULSI technology and materials: Quantitative answers by combined mass spectrometry surface techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, M.; Fedrizzi, M.; Sbetti, M.; Anderle, M.

    1998-11-01

    The progressive microelectronics ULSI device shrinking towards improving the performances has driven the development of new materials and process technologies. A good example is given by oxynitride, an innovative material which is thought for the next generation of 0.25 μm MOS circuits. Oxynitrides have replaced thermal silicon oxides as gate insulator due to the properties of good masking against impurity diffusion, together with the excellent dielectric strength and the better resistance to dielectric breakdown. The strong request from microelectronics industries for a complete and accurate characterization of this new material and the technological processes concerned, has considerably stimulated the research, particularly in the field of analytical methodology. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, linked since the beginning with microelectronics development, shows again to be the most reliable and suitable microanalytical technique to give answers to this topics. In this work we present some examples of methodologies applied to an accurate quantitative characterization of this new material, together with its impact on the production processes. We show how the complementary employing of several mass spectrometry techniques, such as magnetic sector SIMS, SNMS and ToF-SIMS, can give a more complete overview both to process issues and to methodological developements of the techniques themselves.

  17. Studies on atom deceleration process by using the Zeeman-tuned technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zeeman-tuned technique to slow an atomic beam of sodium atoms was detailed studied. A new technique to study the deceleration which consists in monitoring the fluorescence along the deceleration path is used. This allows a direct observation of the process and open possibilities to investigate the adiabatic following of atoms in the magnetic field, and others very important aspects of the process. With a single laser and some modification of the magnetic field profile it is possible stop atoms outside the slower solenoid, which make a lot of experiments much simpler. A systematic study of the optical pumping effects and adiabatic following conditions allow to produce a very strong slow motion atomic beam. (author)

  18. Investigation of ion-atom collision dynamics through imaging techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The principle and technique details of recoil ion momentum imaging are discussed and summarized. The recoil ion momentum spectroscopy built at the Institute of Modern Physics (Lanzhou) is presented. The first results obtained at the setup are analyzed. For 30 keV He2+ on He collision, it is found that the capture of single electron occurs dominantly into the first excited states, and the related scattering angle results show that the ground state capture occurs at large impact parameters, while the capture into excited states occurs at small impact parameters. The results manifest the collision dynamics for the sub-femto-second process can be studied through the techniques uniquely. Finally, the future possibilities of applications of the recoil ion momentum spectroscopy in other fields are outlined.

  19. On atomization of europium and dysprosium in U-Pu matrix after chemical separation using GF-AAS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct analysis of U-Pu bearing material by atomic emission spectrometry (AES) is not possible for determination of Eu and Dy at trace level, because of their rich emission line spectra, which can cause severe spectral interference. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) is the alternate method for determination of these elements. Though the direct determination of Dy and Eu is possible by AAS, the atomization of these elements in U-Pu matrix is the result of analyte-matrix-carbon type of interactions. During the method development for Dy and Eu by AAS, absorbance signal was significantly suppressed in presence of U-Pu as compared to matrix free solution

  20. Combination of cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry for preconcentration and determination of nickel and manganese ions in water and food samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, rapid, inexpensive, and nonpolluting cloud point extraction (CPE) technique has been improved for the preconcentration and determination of nickel and manganese. After complexation with p-nitrophenylazoresorcinol (Magneson I), the analytes could be competitively extracted in a surfactant octylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effects of experimental conditions such as pH, concentration of chelating agent and surfactant, equilibration temperature and time on CPE were studied. Under the optimum conditions, preconcentration of a 25 mL sample solution permitted the detection of 2.7 ng mL-1 Ni2+ and 2.9 ng mL-1 Mn2+ with enrichment factors of 17 and 19 for Ni2+ and Mn2+, respectively. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace nickel and manganese in water and food samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Combination of cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry for preconcentration and determination of nickel and manganese ions in water and food samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpa Sahin, Cigdem, E-mail: carpa@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Chemistry Department, 06800, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Efecinar, Melis; Satiroglu, Nuray [Hacettepe University, Chemistry Department, 06800, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    A simple, rapid, inexpensive, and nonpolluting cloud point extraction (CPE) technique has been improved for the preconcentration and determination of nickel and manganese. After complexation with p-nitrophenylazoresorcinol (Magneson I), the analytes could be competitively extracted in a surfactant octylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effects of experimental conditions such as pH, concentration of chelating agent and surfactant, equilibration temperature and time on CPE were studied. Under the optimum conditions, preconcentration of a 25 mL sample solution permitted the detection of 2.7 ng mL{sup -1} Ni{sup 2+} and 2.9 ng mL{sup -1} Mn{sup 2+} with enrichment factors of 17 and 19 for Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}, respectively. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace nickel and manganese in water and food samples with satisfactory results.

  2. ANALYSES OF QUINOLONE ANTIMICROBIALS IN HUMAN PLASMA BY CAPILLARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/FAST ATOM BOMBARDMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Hideki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seno, Hiroshi; Ishii, Akira; Yamada, Takamichi

    1993-01-01

    Capillary high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was combined with frit fast atom bombardment (FAB)-mass spectrometry (MS) , and a detailed procedure has been established for on-line analysis of ten quinolone antimicrobials in human plasma by the HPLC/FAB-MS. A special column switching device for concentration enabled injection of as large as a 500 μl sample; and the capillary column (0.5 mm i. d.) enabled introduction of its entire effluent to the frit interface of FAB-MS. These condi...

  3. Determination of Heavy Metals in Meat, Intestine, Liver, Eggs, and Chicken Using Neutron Activation Analysis and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elements As, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, se and Zn in meat, intestine, and liver of cow and goat, as well as in broiler, local breed chicken and eggs have been determined using Neutron Activation Analysis and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Mercury was determined after being separated radiochemically. The results showed that concentration of the essential elements studied i.e. Cr, Cu, Fe, Zn, Co, and Ni were higher in liver and intestine than in the meat, but still in the normal range, while toxic elements As, Cd, and Pb were undetectable in all samples. (author). 8 refs., 6 tabs

  4. Arsenic speciation by hydride generation-quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Optimization of analytical parameters and application to environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenat, N.; Astruc, A.; Holeman, M.; Pinel, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bioinorganique et Environnement, Dept. de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 64 - Pau (France); Maury, G. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France). Dept. de Chimie Organique Fine

    1999-11-01

    Analytical parameters of hydride generation, trapping, gas chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry detection in a quartz cell furnace (HG/GC/QFAAS) device have been optimized in order to develop an efficient and sensitive method for arsenic compounds speciation. Good performances were obtained with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.1 - 0.5 ng for arsenite, arsenate, mono-methyl-arsonic acid (MMAA), dimethyl-arsinic acid (DMAA) and trimethyl-arsine oxide (TMAO). A pH selective reduction for inorganic arsenic speciation was successfully reported. Application to the accurate determination of arsenic compounds in different environmental samples was performed. (authors)

  5. Element analysis and characteristic identification of non-fumigated and sulfur-fumigated Fritillaria thunbergii Miq. using microwave digestion-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry combined with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulfur-fumigation may induce chemical transformation of traditional Chinese medicines leading to harmful effects following patient ingestion. For quality control, it is urgently needed to develop a reliable and efficient method for sulfur-fumigation identification. Materials and Methods: The spectrochemical identification of non-fumigated and sulfur-fumigated Fritillaria thunbergii Miq. was carried out to evaluate inorganic elements and organic components. The concentrations of 12 elements, including Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, Li, Mg, Sr, Pb, As, Cd, Hg, and S of samples were determined by microwave digestion - inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES. Meanwhile, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR was used for the study of chemical group characteristic reactions after sulfur-fumigation. Results: The concentrations of Fe, Mg, Hg, and S elements showed significant differences between non-fumigated and sulfur-fumigated Fritillaria thunbergii Miq. The characteristic stretching vibrations of some groups in FTIR spectra, such as -OH, -S = O and -S-O, provided the identification basis for the discrimination of non-fumigated and sulfur-fumigated Fritillaria thunbergii Miq. Conclusion: The application of microwave digestion - ICP-AES was successfully used in combination with FTIR to authenticate and evaluate the quality of medicinal Fritillaria thunbergii Miq. Further applications of this technique should be explored.

  6. Direct determination of arsenic in petroleum derivatives by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between filter and platform atomizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Emilene; Rampazzo, Roger T.; Dessuy, Morgana B. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq - INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Silva, Marcia M. da [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq - INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Katskov, Dmitri A. [Tshwane University of Technology (TUT), Faculty of Science, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-05-15

    In the present work a direct method for the determination of arsenic in petroleum derivatives has been developed, comparing the performance of a commercial transversely heated platform atomizer (THPA) with that of a transversely heated filter atomizer (THFA). The THFA results in a reduction of background absorption and an improved sensitivity as has been reported earlier for this atomizer. The mixture of 0.1% (m/v) Pd + 0.03% (m/v) Mg + 0.05% (v/v) Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier for both atomizers. The samples (naphtha, gasoline and petroleum condensate) were stabilized in the form of a three-component solution (detergentless microemulsion) with the sample, propan-1-ol and 0.1% (v/v) HNO{sub 3} in a ratio of 3.0:6.4:0.6. The characteristic mass of 13 pg found in the THFA was about a factor of two better than that of 28 pg obtained with the THPA; however, the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were essentially the same for both atomizers (1.9 and 6.2 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively, for THPA, and 1.8 and 5.9 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively, for THFA) due to the increased noise observed with the THFA. A possible explanation for that is a partial blockage of the radiation from the hollow cathode lamp by the narrow inner diameter of this tube and the associated loss of radiation energy. Due to the lack of an appropriate certified reference material, recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic arsenic standards and the results were between 89% and 111%. The only advantage of the THFA found in this work was a reduction of the total analysis time by about 20% due to the 'hot injection' that could be realized with this furnace. The arsenic concentrations varied from < LOQ to 43.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} in the samples analyzed in this work.

  7. Cosmology with intensity mapping techniques using atomic and molecular lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, José; Santos, Mário G; Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the intensity mapping technique using updated models for the different emission lines from galaxies and identify which ones are more promising for cosmological studies of the post reionization epoch. We consider the emission of ${\\rm Ly\\alpha}$, ${\\rm H\\alpha}$, H$\\beta$, optical and infrared oxygen lines, nitrogen lines, CII and the CO rotational lines. We then identify that ${\\rm Ly\\alpha}$, ${\\rm H\\alpha}$, OII, CII and the lowest rotational CO lines are the best candidates to be used as IM probes. These lines form a complementary set of probes of the galaxies emission spectra. We then use reasonable experimental setups from current, planned or proposed experiments to access the detectability of the power spectrum of each emission line. Intensity mapping of ${\\rm Ly\\alpha}$ emission from $z=2$ to 3 will be possible in the near future with HETDEX, while far-infrared lines require new dedicated experiments. We also show that the proposed SPHEREx satellite can use OII and ${\\r...

  8. Characterization of Arsenic Biotransformation Products from an Open Anaerobic Degradation of Fucus distichus by Hydride Generation Gas Chromatography Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abiodun A. Ojo; Onasanya, Amos

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the isolation and determination of biotransformation products obtained from the organoarsenic compounds that are present in Fucus distichus when it was subjected to an open anaerobic decomposition by using the Hydride Generation Gas Chromatography Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HG-GC-AAS) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). The seaweed and filtrate residues obtained from the open anaerobic degradation pro...

  9. Determination of the elemental composition of cyanobacteria cells and cell fractions by atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to studying the elemental composition of cyanobacteria Spirulina platensis and Nostoc commune using a set of complementary analytical methods (ICP-AES, PAAS, and ETAAS) was proposed . The procedures were adapted for the determination of macro- and microelements (Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Mo, Zn, B, and Se) in the biomass of cyanobacteria and separated cell fractions (chloroform and water-methanol extracts and precipitates). The conditions for the mineralization of biological materials were optimized for autoclave and microwave sample preparation procedures. The evaporation and atomization of Se and Mo in a graphite furnace in the presence of chloroform and methanol were studied

  10. Plutonium determination in urine by techniques of mass spectrometry; Determinacion de plutonio en orina por tecnicas de espectrometria de masas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, H. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Yllera de Ll, A., E-mail: hector.hernandez520@gmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The objective of this study was to develop an analytic method for quantification and plutonium reappraisal in plane tables of alpha spectrometry be means of the mass spectrometry technique of high resolution with plasma source inductively coupled and desolvator Aridus (Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms) and mass spectrometry with accelerator (AMS). The obtained results were, the recovery percentage of Pu in the plane table was of ∼ 90% and activity minimum detectable obtained with Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS was of ∼ 3 and ∼ 0.4 f g of {sup 239}Pu, respectively. Conclusion, the results demonstrate the aptitude of the Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS techniques in the Pu reappraisal in plane tables with bigger speed and precision, improving the values notably of the activity minimum detectable that can be obtained with the alpha spectrometry (∼ 50 f g of {sup 239}Pu). (author)

  11. A espectrometria atômica e a determinação de elementos metálicos em material polimérico Atomic spectrometry and the determination of metals in polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Cadore

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials are widely used in the chemical industry and are part of our daily lives. Inorganic species may be added to them as additives, anti-oxidizing agents, stabilizers, plasticizers, colorants and catalysts and may be present in a wide range of concentrations. Their determination demands the development of analytical methods considering different kinds of polymeric materials, their composition and the final use of the material. Although many different analytical techniques may be used, this review emphasizes those based on atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Solid sampling techniques and digestion methods are described and discussed and compared considering published results.

  12. Contents of cadmium, mercury and lead in fish from the Atlantic sea (Morocco) determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahid, Adil; Hilali, Mustapha; Benlhachimi, Abdeljalil; Bouzid, Taoufiq

    2014-03-15

    As a part of a specific monitoring program, lead (Pb) cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) concentrations in important species of fish from various fishing ports of the southern Kingdom of Morocco (Sardina pilchardus, Scomber scombrus, Plectorhinchus mediterraneus, Trachurus trachurus, Octopus vulgaris, Boops boops, Sarda sarda, Trisopterus capelanus, and Conger conger) were investigated by the Moroccan Reference Laboratory (NRL) for trace elements in foodstuffs of animal origin. The samples were analysed for lead and cadmium by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS); and for mercury by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The results were expressed as μg/g of wet weight (w/w). The levels of Cd, Pb and Hg in muscles of fish were 0.009-0.036, 0.013-0.114 and 0.049-0.194 μg/g, respectively. The present study showed that different metals were present in the sample at different levels but within the maximum residual levels prescribed by the EU for the fish and shellfish from these areas, in general, should cause no health problems for consumers.

  13. Determination of gaseous semi-and low-volatile organic halogen compounds by barrier-discharge atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifei Sun; Nobuhisa Watanabe; Wei Wang; Tianle Zhu

    2013-01-01

    A group parameter approach using "total organic halogen" is effective for monitoring gaseous organic halogen compounds,including fluorine,chlorine,and bromine compounds,generated from combustion.We described the use of barrier-discharge radiofrequencyhelium-plasma/atomic emission spectrometry,for the detection of semi-and low-volatile organic halogen compounds (SLVOXs),which can be collected by CarbotrapTM adsorbents and analyzed using thermal desorption.The optimal carrier gas flow rates at the injection and desorption lines were established to be 100 mL/min.The detection range for SLVOXs in the gaseous samples was from 10 ng to tens of micrograms.Measuring F was more diflicult than measuring Cl or Br,because the wavelength ofF is dose to that of air.The barrierdischarge radiofrequency-helium-plasma/atomic emission spectrometry measured from 85% to 103% of the SLVOXs in the gas sample.It has been found that Carbotrap B is appropriate for high-boiling-point compounds,and Carbotrap C is suitable for the determination of organic halogen compounds with lower boiling points,in the range 200-230℃.Under optimal analysis conditions,a chlorinecontaining plastic was destroyed using different oxygen concentrations.Lower oxygen concentrations resulted in the production of lower amounts of organic halogen compounds.

  14. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  15. Iodine Determination by Microwave Plasma Torch Atomic Emission Spectrometer Coupled with Online Preconcentration Vapor Generation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Yan-qun; LUO Gui-min; FENG Guo-dong; CHEN Huan-wen; FEI Qiang; HUAN Yan-fu; JIN Qin-han

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on iodine determination by microwave plasma torch atomic emission spectrometry (MPT-AES) coupled with online preconcentration vapor generation method.A new desolvation device,multistrand Nation dryer,was used as the substitute for condenser desolvation system.Some experimental conditions,such as preconcentration time,acidity of sample solution,rinsing solution acidity and dynamic linear range were investigated and optimized.The new desolvation system eliminates the problem of decreasing emission intensity of I(I) 206.238 nm line with the increase of working time on a conventional condenser desolvation system,thus greatly improving the reproducibility.

  16. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  17. Nonstationary structure of atomic and molecular layers in electrothermal. Atomic absorption spectrometry: formation of atomic and molecular absorbing layers of gallium and indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of the formation of absorbing layers of gallium and indium atoms and their compounds in a graphite tubular atomizer was investigated by the shadow spectral filming method. These compounds are localozed in the central part of the furnace over the platform and dissapear ay the hotter walls. It the case of gallium and indium atomization, the effects of chemical reactions between the vapor and the walls of the furnace on the formation of absorbing layers are stronger than that of diffusion and convective mass-transfer processes, which are common to all of the elements. Atom propagation from the center to the stomizer ends proceeds through the cascade mechanism because of its relatively low rate of warming up and strong longitudinal anisothermicity

  18. Ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in seawater by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jin-feng; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-fu; He, Bin; Hu, Xia-lin; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2007-05-01

    A new procedure, based on hollow fiber supported liquid membrane preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection, was developed for the determination of trace Cd in seawater samples. With 1-octanol that contained a mixture of dithizone (carrier) and oleic acid immobilized in the pores of the polypropylene hollow fiber as a liquid membrane, Cd was selectively extracted from water samples into 0.05 M HNO 3 that filled the lumen of the hollow fiber as a stripping solution. The main extraction related parameters were optimized, and the effects of salinity and some coexisting interferants were also evaluated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, an enrichment factor of 387 was obtained for a 100-mL sample solution. In combination with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, a very low detection limit (0.8 ng L - 1 ) and a relative standard deviation (2.5% at 50 ng L - 1 level) were achieved. Five seawater samples were analyzed by the proposed method without dilution, with detected Cd concentration in the range of 56.4-264.8 ng L - 1 and the relative spiked recoveries over 89%. For comparison, these samples were also analyzed by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method after a 10-fold dilution for matrix effect elimination. Statistical analysis with a one-way ANOVA shows no significant differences (at 0.05 level) between the results obtained by the proposed and ICP-MS methods. Additionally, analysis of certified reference materials (GBW (E) 080040) shows good agreement with the certified value. These results indicate that this present method is very sensitive and reliable, and can effectively eliminate complex matrix interferences in seawater samples.

  19. Ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in seawater by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Jinfeng; Liu Rui [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu Jingfu [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: jfliu@rcees.ac.cn; He Bin; Hu Xialin; Jiang Guibin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2007-05-15

    A new procedure, based on hollow fiber supported liquid membrane preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection, was developed for the determination of trace Cd in seawater samples. With 1-octanol that contained a mixture of dithizone (carrier) and oleic acid immobilized in the pores of the polypropylene hollow fiber as a liquid membrane, Cd was selectively extracted from water samples into 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} that filled the lumen of the hollow fiber as a stripping solution. The main extraction related parameters were optimized, and the effects of salinity and some coexisting interferants were also evaluated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, an enrichment factor of 387 was obtained for a 100-mL sample solution. In combination with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, a very low detection limit (0.8 ng L{sup -1}) and a relative standard deviation (2.5% at 50 ng L{sup -1} level) were achieved. Five seawater samples were analyzed by the proposed method without dilution, with detected Cd concentration in the range of 56.4-264.8 ng L{sup -1} and the relative spiked recoveries over 89%. For comparison, these samples were also analyzed by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method after a 10-fold dilution for matrix effect elimination. Statistical analysis with a one-way ANOVA shows no significant differences (at 0.05 level) between the results obtained by the proposed and ICP-MS methods. Additionally, analysis of certified reference materials (GBW (E) 080040) shows good agreement with the certified value. These results indicate that this present method is very sensitive and reliable, and can effectively eliminate complex matrix interferences in seawater samples.

  20. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight measurements on cold atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mohapatra; C S Unnikrishnan

    2006-06-01

    We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sensitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and figure of merit of the simple method by measuring the time-of-flight of atoms moving upwards from a magneto-optical trap released in the gravitational field.

  1. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO2, H2 and H2O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L-1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L-1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  2. Three-dimensional time-dependent computer modeling of the electrothermal atomizers for analytical spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivilskiy, I. V.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    A full three-dimensional nonstationary numerical model of graphite electrothermal atomizers of various types is developed. The model is based on solution of a heat equation within solid walls of the atomizer with a radiative heat transfer and numerical solution of a full set of Navier-Stokes equations with an energy equation for a gas. Governing equations for the behavior of a discrete phase, i.e., atomic particles suspended in a gas (including gas-phase processes of evaporation and condensation), are derived from the formal equations molecular kinetics by numerical solution of the Hertz-Langmuir equation. The following atomizers test the model: a Varian standard heated electrothermal vaporizer (ETV), a Perkin Elmer standard THGA transversely heated graphite tube with integrated platform (THGA), and the original double-stage tube-helix atomizer (DSTHA). The experimental verification of computer calculations is carried out by a method of shadow spectral visualization of the spatial distributions of atomic and molecular vapors in an analytical space of an atomizer.

  3. Extraction and preconcentration of trace levels of cobalt using functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in a sequential injection lab-on-valve system with detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: An approach to performing extraction and preconcentration employing functionalized magnetic particles for the determination of cobalt in the sequential injection lab-on-valve system using detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Highlights: ► New SPE method for cobalt separation/preconcentration was reported. ► Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were used as adsorbent. ► Extraction, elution, and detection procedures were performed in the LOV system. ► This automatic extraction technique provided a good platform for metal analysis. - Abstract: A new approach to performing extraction and preconcentration employing functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the determination of trace metals is presented. Alumina-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and used as the solid support. The nanoparticles were functionalized with sodium dodecyl sulfate and used as adsorbents for solid phase extraction of the analyte. Extraction, elution, and detection procedures were performed sequentially in the sequential injection lab-on-valve (SI-LOV) system followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Mixtures of hydrophobic analytes were successfully extracted from solution using the synthesized magnetic adsorbents. The potential use of the established scheme was demonstrated by taking cobalt as a model analyte. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration curve showed an excellent linearity in the concentration range of 0.01–5 μg L−1, and the relative standard deviation was 2.8% at the 0.5 μg L−1 level (n = 11). The limit of detection was 6 ng L−1 with a sampling frequency of 18 h−1. The present method has been successfully applied to cobalt determination in water samples and two certified reference materials.

  4. A simple and fast method for assessment of the nitrogen–phosphorus–potassium rating of fertilizers using high-resolution continuum source atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechlin, Marcos André; Fortunato, Felipe Manfroi; Moutinho da Silva, Ricardo; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta, E-mail: anchieta@iq.unesp.br

    2014-11-01

    The determination of N, P, and K in fertilizers by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry is proposed. Under optimized conditions, measurements of the diatomic molecules NO and PO at 215.360 and 247.620 nm, respectively, and K using the wing of the alternative line at 404.722 nm allowed calibration curves to be constructed in the ranges 500–5000 mg L{sup −1} N (r = 0.9994), 100–2000 mg L{sup −1} P (r = 0.9946), and 100–2500 mg L{sup −1} K (r = 0.9995). Commercial fertilizers were analyzed by the proposed method and the concentrations of N, P, and K were found to be in agreement with those obtained by Kjeldahl, spectrophotometric, and flame atomic emission spectrometry methods, respectively, at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test). A phosphate rock certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed and the results for P and K were in agreement with the reference values. Recoveries from spiked CRM were in the ranges 97–105% (NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N), 95–103% (NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N), 93–103% (urea-N), 99–108% (P), and 99–102% (K). The relative standard deviations (n = 12) for N, P, and K were 6, 4, and 2%, respectively. - Highlights: • A single technique is proposed to analyze NPK fertilizer. • HR-CS FAAS is proposed for the first time for N, P and K determination in fertilizers. • The method employs the same sample preparation and dilution for the three analytes. • Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} allows analysis of fertilizers with different nitrogen species. • Proposal provides advantages over traditional methods in terms of cost and time.

  5. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  6. Chemical vapor generation of silver for atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer: Radiotracer efficiency study and characterization of silver species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatile Ag species were generated in flow injection arrangement from nitric acid environment in the presence of surfactants (Triton X-100 and Antifoam B) and permanent Pd deposits as the reaction modifiers. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer heated to 900 deg. C was used for atomization; evidence was found for thermal mechanism of atomization. Relative and absolute limits of detection (3σ, 250 μl sample loop) measured under optimized conditions were: 1.4 μg l-1 and 0.35 ng, respectively. The efficiency of chemical vapor generation (CVG) as well as spatial distribution of residual analyte in the apparatus was studied by 111Ag radioactive indicator (half-life 7.45 days) of high specific activity. It was found out that 23% of analyte was released into the gaseous phase. However, only 8% was found on filters placed at the entrance to the atomizer due to transport losses. About 40% of analyte remained in waste liquid, whereas the rest was found deposited over the CVG system. Presented study follows the hypothesis that the 'volatile' Ag species are actually metallic nanoparticles formed upon reduction in liquid phase and then released with good efficiency to the gaseous phase. Number/charge size distributions of dry aerosol were determined by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. Ag was detected in 40-45 nm particles holding 10 times more charge if compared to Boltzmann equilibrium. At the same time, Ag was also present on 150 nm particles, the main size mode of the CVG generator. The increase of Ag in standards was reflected by proportional increase in particle number/charge for 40-45 nm size particles only. Transmission electron microscopy revealed particles of 8 ± 2 nm sampled from the gaseous phase, which were associated in isolated clusters of few to few tens of nanometres. Ag presence in those particles was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  7. Atomic Mineral Characteristics of Indonesian Osteoporosis by High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zairin Noor; Sutiman Bambang Sumitro; Mohammad Hidayat; Agus Hadian Rahim; Akhmad Sabarudin; Tomonari Umemura

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research indicates that negative calcium balance is associated with low bone mass, rapid bone loss, and high fracture rates. However, some studies revealed that not only calcium is involved in bone strengthening as risk factor of fracture osteoporosis. Thus, in this report, the difference of metallic and nonmetallic elements in osteoporosis and normal bones was studied by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). The influence of these elements on bone...

  8. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Farinas, M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Barciela Garcia, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Garcia Martin, S. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Pena Crecente, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Herrero Latorre, C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain)]. E-mail: cherrero@lugo.usc.es

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1}), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  9. Determination of Ultratrace Amounts of Copper(Ⅱ) in Water Samples by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry After Cloud Point Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach was developed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of copper in water samples by using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after cloud point extraction (CPE). 1-( 2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol was used as the chelating reagent and Triton X-114 as the micellar-forming surfactant. CPE was conducted in a pH 8.0 medium at 40 ℃ for 10 min. After the separation of the phases by centrifugation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 1 mL of a methanol solution of 0. 1 mol/L HNO3. Then 20 μL of the diluted surfactant-rich phase was injected into the graphite furnace for atomization in the absence of any matrix modifier. Various experimental conditions that affect the extraction and atomization processes were optimized. A detection limit of 5 ng/L was obtained after preconcentration. The linear dynamic range of the copper mass concentration was found to be 0-2.0ng/mL, and the relative standard deviation was found to be less than 3.1% for a sample containing 1.0 ng/mL Cu(Ⅱ). This developed method was successfully applied to the determination of ultratrace amounts of Cu in drinking water, tap water, and seawater samples.

  10. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qingyang, E-mail: liuqingyang0807@yahoo.com.c [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg{sup 0}, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL{sup -1} for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury (n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  11. 原子荧光光谱法测定土壤中的砷含量%Determination of Arsenic in Soil by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕芬

    2015-01-01

    通过结合具体的试验对运用原子荧光光谱法测定土壤中的砷含量进行了探讨,以期能为有关方面的需要提供有益的参考和借鉴。%In order to provide a useful reference for the relevant aspects of the arsenic content in soil by atomic fluorescence spectrometry, the method of atomic fluorescence spectrometry was used to determine the arsenic content in soil.

  12. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  13. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za [Tshwane University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Hlongwane, Miranda [Tshwane University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Heitmann, Uwe [German Aerospace Center, Rose-Luxemburg Str. 2, 10178 Berlin (Germany); Florek, Stefan [ISAS-Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9,12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 {mu}g{center_dot}L{sup -1} using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New calculation algorithm for HR-CS ET AAS measurements was proposed and applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The suggested formulas include two parameters to be determined experimentally. Black

  14. Electron impact ionization and excitation of laser-excited atoms: investigation by means of electron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the electron spectra following the excitation and ionization of laser-excited atoms by impact of 1.5 keV electrons: 2p excitation and 2s ionization of Na(3p3/2), 1s excitation of Li(2p3/2) and 5p ionization of Ba(6s5d 1,3D). Except for Ba the intensities of ejected electrons are directly proportional to the cross sections of Auger and autoionizing states. Theoretical excitation cross sections (Na 2p, Li 1s) are obtained in first Born approximation including the full relaxation of the atomic electrons. Relative ionization cross sections (Na 2s, Ba 5p) are evaluated in sudden approximation as a two-step process: pure 2s(5p) ionization plus relaxation of the rest of the atomic electrons. The experimental spectra are compared to theoretical spectra

  15. Characterization of the Plasma Edge for Technique of Atomic Helium Beam in the CIEMAT Fusion Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the measurement of Electron Temperature and Density in the Boundary Plasma of TJ-II with a Supersonic Helium Beam Diagnostic and work devoted to the upgrading of this technique are described. Also, simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. This last technique is now being installed in the CIEMAT fusion device. (Author )

  16. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  17. Feasibility guidelines for kaonic-atom experiments with ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of strong interaction effects in kaonic atoms suggest that analysing so-called `lower' and `upper' levels in the same atom could separate one-nucleon absorption from multinucleon processes. The present work examines the feasibility of direct measurements of upper level widths in addition to lower level widths in future experiments, using superconducting microcalorimeter detectors. About ten elements are identified as possible candidates for such experiments, all of medium-weight and heavy nuclei. New experiments focused on achieving good accuracy for widths of such pairs of levels could contribute significantly to our knowledge of the $K^-$-nucleon interaction in the nuclear medium.

  18. Cloud point extraction thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yunchang; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2006-12-01

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 μg/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  19. Cloud point extraction-thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Peng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Zhang Yunchang [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Lv Yi [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Hou Xiandeng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China) and College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)]. E-mail: houxd@scu.edu.cn

    2006-12-15

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 {mu}g/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  20. Speciation determination of chromium(III) and (VI) using preconcentration cloud point extraction with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, S.V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India); Kumar, K. Suresh; Prasad, B.; Suvardhan, K. [Department of Chemistry, S. V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India); Lekkala, Ramesh Babu [Department of Environmental Sciences, S.V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India); Janardhanam, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, S.V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India)], E-mail: Kandukurijanardhanam@gmail.com

    2008-02-11

    bis-[2-Hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde] thiourea was synthesized and preconcentration cloud point extraction (CPE) for speciation determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in various environmental samples with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Chromium(III) complexes with bis-[2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde] thiourea is subsequently entrapped in the surfactant micelles. After complexation of chromium(III) with reagent, the analyte was quantitatively extracted to the surfactant-rich phase in the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 after centrifugation. The effect of pH, concentration of chelating agent, surfactant, equilibration temperature and time on CPE was studied. The relative standard deviation was 2.13% and the limits of detection were around 0.18 {mu}g L{sup -1}.

  1. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals studied by analysis of moss samples using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a study of the atmospheric deposition of trace elements in different parts of Norway samples of the moss Hylocomium splendens were analyzed with respect to 26 elements. The determination of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Ni was carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, while an additional 21 elements were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Several elements showed a substantially higher deposition in the southernmost parts of Norway than in places located farther north. As regards Pb, As and Sb, the difference amounted to a factor of ten or more. A similar but less pronounced trend was evident for elements such as V, Zn, Cd, Se and Ag. In some cases local pollution sources or marine aerosols had a significant effect on the results. For several heavy metals however long-distance transport from areas to the south and the south west of Norway was responsible for a major part of the air pollution

  2. Determination of daily intake of elements from Philippine total diet samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total diet samples were analyzed for major elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and some minor trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn, Al, Sr, Cu, Ba, Yt) using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Samples analyzed were classified into sex and age groups. Results for some elements (Na, K, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn) were compared with values from Bataan dietary survey calculated using the Philippine composition table. Exceot for Na, analytical results were similar to calculated values. Analytical results for Ca and Fe were also compared with the values from Food and Nutrition Research Institute. In general, values obtained in the study were lower than the FNRI values. Comparison of the analytical and calculated results with the Japanese and ICRP data showed that Philippine values were lower than foreign values. (Auth.). 22 refs., 9 tabs

  3. Application of multiwalled carbon nanotubes treated by potassium permanganate for determination of trace cadmium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated the enrichment ability of oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and established a new method for the determination of trace cadmium in environment with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The MWCNTs were oxidized by potassium permanganate under appropriate conditions before use as preconcentration packing. Parameters influencing the recoveries of target analytes were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the target analyte exhibited a good linearity (R2=0.9992)over the concentration range 0.5-50 ng/ml. The detection limit and precision of the proposed method were 0.15 ng/ml and 2.06%,respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of cadmium in real-world environmental samples and the recoveries were in the range of 91.3%-108.0%. All these experimental results indicated that this new procedure could be applied to the determination of trace cadmium in environmental waters.

  4. Acid dissolution of soils and rocks for the determination of boron by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron concentration in rocks, soils and standard reference materials was determined using hydrofluoric acid-aqua regia dissolution followed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) using the B 1 249.773 -nm line, corrected for spectral interference by iron. An excess of fluoride was complexed with aluminium to release boron from the stable fluoroborate ion and to protect the borosilicate and quartz components of the instrument. Boron was not lost by volatilisation during volume reduction. Soil and rock boron values determined using the recommended dissolution procedures were comparable to those obtained using the accepted sodium carbonate fusion procedure and by d.c. arc emission spectrophotometry, and those for standard reference materials showed good agreement and precision with the literature values. (author)

  5. Rapid determination of major and minor elements in rare earth-cobalt magnets by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major and minor constituents, Sm, Ce, Y, Co, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zr and Hf, in typical rare earth-cobalt magnets were determined sequentially by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Sample solutions were prepared by dissolving the magnets with aqua regia followed by dilution with 1.2 M HCl to suitable concentration. Beryllium was added as an internal standard in order to improved experimental accuracy and precision, and the emission intensity of Be was measured by using an additional small monochromator attached to the original instrument system. Cobalt, Fe, Cu and Zr in the magnets were also determined by conventional spectrophotometry. The results obtained by both methods were in good agreement with each other. (author)

  6. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg−1. •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg−1 for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg−1 for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg−1 for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are comparable to

  7. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancsak, Stacia E. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States)

    2014-01-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg{sup −1}. •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg{sup −1} for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg{sup −1} for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg{sup −1} for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated

  8. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  9. Application of methane as a gaseous modifier for the determination of silicon using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: hans-joachim.heinrich@bam.de; Kipphardt, Heinrich

    2012-04-15

    For determination of silicon in aqueous solutions by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry methane/argon mixtures as a gaseous modifier were applied during the pyrolysis step to improve the analytical performance. The beneficial effects observed on thermal stabilization, signal enhancement and shape of absorbance signals were attributed to the thermal decomposition products of methane, which were hydrogen and carbon black (soot). Using a 5% CH{sub 4} mixture with argon, the optimized pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1350 Degree-Sign C and 2450 Degree-Sign C, respectively. A flushing step following the pyrolysis was mandatory to avoid background absorption and accelerated deposition of pyrolytic graphite. Characteristic masses of 50 and 30 pg were obtained for standard transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) tubes and end-capped THGA tubes, respectively, which were lower than with other previously applied modifiers. A limit of detection of 0.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} (3 s, n = 10) has been obtained. In addition, this gaseous modifier did not contribute to contamination which often was significant when a liquid modifier solution was co-injected. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of silicon in ultrapure water, nitric and hydrochloric acids. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CH{sub 4}/Ar gas mixtures act as new modifier in the determination of Si using ET AAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CH{sub 4} improved thermal stabilization, atomization efficiency and signal shape of Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum performance by addition of 5% CH{sub 4} during pyrolysis at 1350 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gaseous modifier does not contribute to blank values. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized method suitable for determination of Si in ultrapure reagents.

  10. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively.

  11. Nonthermal Optical Emission Spectrometry: Direct Atomization and Excitation of Cadmium for Highly Sensitive Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Wu, De-Fu; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-04-19

    The low atomization and excitation capability of nonthermal microplasma, e.g., dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), has greatly hampered its potential applications for the determination of metals in solution. In the present work, an inspiring development is reported for direct atomization and excitation of cadmium in aqueous solution by DBD and facilitates highly sensitive determination. A DBD microplasma is generated on the nozzle of a pneumatic micronebulizer to focus the DBD energy on a confined space and atomize/excite metals in the spray. Meanwhile, an appropriate sample matrix and nebulization in helium further improves the atomization and excitation capability of DBD. With cadmium as a model, its emission is recorded by a CCD spectrometer at 228.8 nm. By using an 80 μL sample solution nebulized at 3 μL s(-1), a linear range of 5-1000 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.5 μg L(-1) is achieved, which is comparable to those obtained by commercial bulky inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based instrumentations. PMID:27030025

  12. Mass spectrometry based imaging techniques for spatially resolved analysis of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eMatros

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher plants are composed of a multitude of tissues with specific functions, reflected by distinct profiles for transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Comprehensive analysis of metabolites and proteins has advanced tremendously within recent years, and this progress has been driven by the rapid development of sophisticated mass spectrometrical techniques. In most of the current omics-studies, analysis is performed on whole organ or whole plant extracts, rendering to the loss of spatial information. Mass spectrometry based imaging (MSI techniques have opened a new avenue to obtain information on the spatial distribution of metabolites and of proteins. Pioneered in the field of medicine, the approaches are now applied to study the spatial profiles of molecules in plant systems. A range of different plant organs and tissues have been successfully analyzed by MSI, and patterns of various classes of metabolites from primary and secondary metabolism could be obtained. It can be envisaged that MSI approaches will substantially contribute to build spatially resolved biochemical networks.

  13. Immersed single-drop microextraction interfaced with sequential injection analysis for determination of Cr(VI) in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-drop microextraction (SDME) and sequential injection analysis have been hyphenated for ultratrace metal determination by Electrothermal-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETAAS). The novel method was targeted on extraction of the Cr(VI)-APDC chelate and encompasses the potential of SDME as a miniaturized and virtually solvent-free preconcentration technique, the ability of sequential injection analysis to handle samples and the versatility of furnace autosamplers for introducing microliter samples in ETAAS. The variables influencing the microextraction of Cr(VI) onto an organic solvent drop, i.e., type of organic solvent, microextraction time, stirring rate of the sample solution, drop volume, immersion depth of the drop, salting-out effect, temperature of the sample, concentration of the complexing agent and pH of the sample solution were fully investigated. For a 5 and 20 min microextraction time, the preconcentration factors were 20 and 70, respectively. The detection limit was 0.02 μg/L of Cr(VI) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was 7%. The SDME-SIA-ETAAS technique was validated against BCR CRM 544 (lyophilized solution) and applied to ultrasensitive determination of Cr(VI) in natural waters

  14. Salt-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction of Cr(VI) ion using an ionic liquid for preconcentration prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the salt-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction of cationic complexes of Cr(VI) ion using the hydrophilic ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoraborate and potassium hydrogen phosphate. This is a novel, simple, non-toxic and effective technique for sample pretreatment technique that displays large extraction efficiency and represents a new platform where Cr(VI) is complexed with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) in sulfuric acid medium. It was applied to the extraction of Cr(VI) in the form of the Cr(VI)-DPC complex prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Cr(III) ion also can be determined by this procedure after oxidation to Cr(VI). Extraction is mainly affected by the amount of water-soluble IL, the kind and quantity of inorganic salts, by pH and the concentration of DPC. Calibration plots are linear in the range from 3 to 150 μg L-1 of Cr(VI), and the limit of detection is 1. 25 μg L-1. The method was successfully applied to the speciation and determination of trace levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental water samples containing high levels of dissolved salts or food grade salts. (author)

  15. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sidnei G. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Santos, Luana N. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Charge transfer reactions increase the population of Cr{sup +}. •Chromium ions and electrons recombine to form excited-state Cr atoms. •A 10-fold improvement in LOD is observed for Cr emission measurements. •The two-step ionization/excitation mechanism improves sensitivity and accuracy. •High concentrations of Co also minimize matrix effects. -- Abstract: Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L{sup −1} Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ = 425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L{sup −1}; a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr{sup +} by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr{sup +}/e{sup −} recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25–10 mg L{sup −1} and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n = 10) for a 2.0 mg L{sup −1} Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and

  16. Use of Atomic and Nuclear Techniques in Elemental and Isotopic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is divided into four chapters which were presented by six authors of the best Arab specialists who have used the atomic and nuclear techniques for a long time and recognized their importance and capabilities in scientific researches. Atomic and Nuclear techniques are very successful in the field of analysis because they are the only way to proceed the analysis process with the requested accuracy and they are the cheapest at the same time. A number of these techniques were collected in this book on the basis of their accuracy and the abundance of using them in the analysis of material components, specially when these elements exist with insignificant percentage as in the case of poisons science, archaeology, nutrition, medicine and other applications.

  17. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  18. Direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and solid sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlene S; Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposed an analytical method for the direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing the high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry combined with the solid sample analysis (SS-HR-CS ET AAS). Sample masses up to 2.0mg were directly weighted on a solid sampling platform and introduced into the graphite tube. In order to minimize the formation of carbonaceous residues and to improve the contact of the modifier solution with the solid sample, a volume of 10 µL of a solution containing 6% (v/v) H2O2, 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1% (v/v) HNO3 was added. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures established were 1600 and 2400 °C, respectively, using magnesium as chemical modifier. The calibration technique was evaluated by comparing the slopes of calibration curves established using aqueous and solid standards. This test revealed that chromium can be determined employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards. Under these conditions, the method developed allows the direct determination of chromium with limit of quantification of 11.5 ng g(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 4.0-17.9% (n=3) and a characteristic mass of 1.2 pg of chromium. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves furnished by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The method proposed was applied for the determination of chromium in five different infant formula samples. The chromium content found varied in the range of 33.9-58.1 ng g(-1) (n=3). These samples were also analyzed employing ICP-MS. A statistical test demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the results found by two methods. The chromium concentrations achieved are lower than the maximum limit permissible for chromium in foods by Brazilian Legislation.

  19. International comparison of Cd content in a quality control material of Navajuelas (Tagelus dombeii) determined by anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic absorption spectrometry and neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queirolo, F. (Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. of Chemistry Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Electrochemistry); Ostapczuk, P. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie); Valenta, P.; Stegen, S. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Electrochemistry); Marin, C.; Vinagre, F.; Sanchez, A. (Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Electrochemistry)

    1991-05-01

    The determination of Cd was performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with flame or in the electrothermal mode and anodic stripping voltammetry in the differential pulse mode (DPASV) and the square wave mode (SWASV). (orig./EF).

  20. Investigations into the Role of Modifiers for Entrapment of Hydrides in Flow Injection Hydride Generation Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry as Exemplified for the Determination of Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Bo; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1997-01-01

    Pd-conditioned graphite tubes, placed in the furnace of an atomic absorption spectrometry instrument, are used for entrapment of germane as generated in an associated flow injection system. Two different approaches are tested with the ultimate aim to allow multiple determinations, that is...

  1. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  2. Speciation of arsenic(III)/arsenic(V) and selenium(IV)/ selenium(VI) using coupled ion chromatography - hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple analytical methods have been developed to speciate inorganic arsenic and selenium in the ppb range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determinations of the redox states arsenite A...

  3. Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK). A technique for characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. Part 1. Methodology and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK) is a technique for the characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. GSAK uses gamma-ray spectrometry to quantify a portion of the fission product inventory of RH-TRU wastes. These fission product results are then coupled with calculated inventories derived from acceptable process knowledge to characterize the radionuclide content of the assayed wastes. GSAK has been evaluated and tested through several test exercises. GSAK approach is described, while test results are presented in Part II. (author)

  4. Column system using diaion HP-2MG for determination of some metal ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2004-02-23

    A column solid-phase extraction method for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium(II), copper(II), cobalt(II), iron(III), lead(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) dithizone chelates by atomic absorption spectrometry has been described. Diaion HP-2MG was used as adsorbent for column studies. The influences of the various analytical parameters including pH of the aqueous solutions, amounts of ligand and resin were investigated for the retentions of the analyte ions. The recovery values are ranged from 95 to 102%. The influences of alkaline and earth alkaline ions were also discussed. The preconcentration factor was 375, when the sample volume and final volume are 750 and 2 ml, respectively. The detection limits of the analyte ions (k=3, N=21) were varying 0.08 {mu}g/l for cadmium to 0.25 {mu}g/l for lead. The relative standard deviations of the determinations at the concentration range of 1.8x10{sup -4} to 4.5x10{sup -5} mmol for the investigated elements were found to be lower than 9%. The proposed solid-phase extraction procedure were applied to the flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations of analyte ions in natural waters (sea, tap, river), microwave digested samples (milk, red wine and rice) and two different reference standard materials (SRM1515 apple leaves and NRCC-SLRS-4 riverine water)

  5. Analysis of slurries by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using desolvation to improve transport efficiency and atomization efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, James H. D.; Hill, Steve J.; Ebdon, Les

    1993-09-01

    A slurry sample introduction system incorporating a heated spray chamber and a condenser, cooled using Peltier coolers, has been designed to desolvate the slurry before entry into the plasma. Drying the slurry increased the transport efficiency (2.2-4.9%) and the atomization efficiency. This enhanced both sensitivities and recoveries. The increase in the recovery enabled larger particles to be fully atomized (≈8μm c.f.3˜μm) principally because of the desolvation that decreases the droplet size of the particles that enter the plasma. Fractionation of the samples before analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, using a cascade impactor, enabled information about the transport efficiency and recoveries to be obtained and also effects of inhomogeneity in the sample to be observed. The desolvation of the slurry also caused a decrease in the ionization temperature (from ≈6400°C to ≈5500°C). Local thermal equilibrium is supposed to be obtained and the ionization temperature here is obtained from the Saha equation. The reason for the increase in the recoveries is therefore considered to be due to the removal of the jacket of aqueous solvent around the particle. The ionization temperature of the plasma can be increased by increasing the forward power or by the addition of molecular gases to the nebulizer gas, particularly hydrogen. The addition of 1.5% v/v hydrogen can raise the ionization temperature from about 5500 to 8400°C.

  6. Determination of cadmium, aluminium, and copper in beer and products used in its manufacture by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Pilar; Aguinaga, Nerea; López-García, Ignacio; Hernandez-Córdoba, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Procedures were developed for determining cadmium, aluminium, and copper in beer and the products used in its manufacture by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Beer samples were injected into the furnace and solid samples were introduced as suspensions after preparation in a medium containing hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate for cadmium atomization. Calibration was performed with aqueous standards, and characteristic masses and detection limits were, respectively, 1 and 0.3 pg for cadmium, 18 and 5.4 pg for aluminium, and 5.6 and 6.8 pg for copper. Different samples of beer, wort, brewer's yeast, malt, raw grain, and hops were analyzed by the proposed procedures. Cadmium was found in low concentrations (0.001-0.08 microg/g and 0-1.3 ng/mL); copper (3-13 microg/g and 25-137 ng/mL) and aluminium (0.6-9 microg/g and 0.1-2 microg/mL) were found at higher levels. The reliability of the procedure was confirmed by comparing the results obtained with others based on microwave oven sample digestion, and by analyzing several certified reference materials. PMID:12083268

  7. Investigation of spectral interferences in the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; François, Luciane L.; Jesus, Alexandre de [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B., E-mail: mbdessuy@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Andrade, Jailson B. de [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples were investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the main analytical lines: 217.001 and 283.306 nm. For these investigations, samples were introduced into the furnace as slurry together with a mixture of Pd and Mg as chemical modifier. Spectral interferences were observed for some samples at both analytical lines. In order to verify whether a wet digestion procedure would avoid these interferences, a reference method for wet digestion of fertilizers was employed as an alternative sample preparation procedure. However, the same interferences were also observed in the digested samples. In order to identify and eliminate the fine-structured background using a least-squares background correction, reference spectra were generated using the combination of different species. The use of the latter technique allowed the elimination of spectral interferences for most of the investigated samples, making possible the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples free of interferences. The best results were found using a reference spectrum of NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at 217.001 nm, and a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + Ca and HNO{sub 3} + Ca at the 283.306 nm line. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a certified reference material “Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer”. Similar results were obtained using line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction, indicating that the latter technique was also capable to correct the spectral interferences, at least in part. - Highlights: • Spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone. • The analytical lines at 217.001 nm and 283.306 nm using HR-CS GF AAS. • Various combinations of compounds were used to create reference spectra. • LSBC

  8. Investigation of spectral interferences in the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples were investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the main analytical lines: 217.001 and 283.306 nm. For these investigations, samples were introduced into the furnace as slurry together with a mixture of Pd and Mg as chemical modifier. Spectral interferences were observed for some samples at both analytical lines. In order to verify whether a wet digestion procedure would avoid these interferences, a reference method for wet digestion of fertilizers was employed as an alternative sample preparation procedure. However, the same interferences were also observed in the digested samples. In order to identify and eliminate the fine-structured background using a least-squares background correction, reference spectra were generated using the combination of different species. The use of the latter technique allowed the elimination of spectral interferences for most of the investigated samples, making possible the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples free of interferences. The best results were found using a reference spectrum of NH4H2PO4 at 217.001 nm, and a mixture of H2SO4 + Ca and HNO3 + Ca at the 283.306 nm line. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a certified reference material “Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer”. Similar results were obtained using line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction, indicating that the latter technique was also capable to correct the spectral interferences, at least in part. - Highlights: • Spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone. • The analytical lines at 217.001 nm and 283.306 nm using HR-CS GF AAS. • Various combinations of compounds were used to create reference spectra. • LSBC eliminated spectral interferences for most of

  9. Behaviour of the thermospray nebulizer as a system for the introduction of organic solutions in flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Juan; Canals, Antonio; Hernandis, Vicente

    1996-10-01

    The results obtained in the evaluation of the thermospray nebulizer for the introduction of organic solutions in atomic spectrometry are described. To this end, the influence of the nebulization variables (i.e., liquid flow, control temperature and inner diameter of the capillary) and of the nature of the solvent on the fraction of solvent vaporized, on the drop size distribution of the primary aerosol, on the rates of analyte and solvent transport to the atomization cell and on the analytical signal has been studied. Experimental fraction of solvent vaporized values obtained under different nebulization conditions are reported for the first time. The results show that the characteristics of the aerosol generated strongly depend on the nebulization variables since they determine the amount of energy available for surface generation. The median of the volume drop size distribution of the primary aerosol decreases when the control temperature or the liquid flow is increased or when the inner diameter of the capillary is decreased. As regards the physical properties of the solvent, the so-called expansion factor (i.e., the volume of vapour produced per unit volume of liquid solvent) is the most influential. Surface tension and viscosity are much less significant here than in ordinary pneumatic nebulization. The volatility of the solvent and the characteristics of the primary aerosol determine the solvent transport efficiency which reaches values close to 100% in many cases. The analytical signal is mainly determined by the analyte transport rate, although a severe negative effect appears which is related to the high solvent load to the flame. Due to this fact, the use of organic solvents instead of water in thermospray nebulization for Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry does not provide clear advantages, at least without desolvation. A new modified Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation has been presented and evaluated in order to predict the Sauter mean diameter of the thermal

  10. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  11. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranhao, Tatiane de A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: daniel@qmc.ufsc.br; Veiga, Marcia A.M.S. da [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05513-970, CP 26077, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curtius, Adilson J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-06-30

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 deg. C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 deg. C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3{sigma} {sub B}) of 6 and 40 ng g{sup -1}, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3}. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  12. An investigation of polarized atomic photofragments using the ion imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracker, A.S.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis describes measurement and analysis of the recoil angle dependence of atomic photofragment polarization (atomic v-J correlation). This property provides information on the electronic rearrangement which occurs during molecular photodissociation. Chapter 1 introduces concepts of photofragment vector correlations and reviews experimental and theoretical progress in this area. Chapter 2 described the photofragment ion imaging technique, which the author has used to study the atomic v-J correlation in chlorine and ozone dissociation. Chapter 3 outlines a method for isolating and describing the contribution to the image signal which is due exclusively to angular momentum alignment. Ion imaging results are presented and discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 discusses a different set of experiments on the three-fragment dissociation of azomethane. 122 refs.

  13. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels. PMID:17386783

  14. Mapping of explosive contamination using GC/chemiluminescence and ion mobility spectrometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla J.; Glenn, D. F.; Hartenstein, Steven D.; Hallowell, Susan F.

    1998-12-01

    Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have included mapping explosive contamination resulting from manufacturing and carrying improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Two types of trace detection equipment were used to determine levels of contamination from designated sampling areas. A total of twenty IEDs were constructed: ten using TNT and ten using C-4. Two test scenarios were used. The first scenario tracked the activities of a manufacturer who straps the device onto an independent courier. The courier then performed a series of activities to simulate waiting in an airport. The second scenario tracked the activities of a manufacturer who also served as the courier. A sample set for each test consisted of thirty samples from various locations on each IED manufacturer, thirty from each IED courier, twenty-five from the manufacturing area, and twenty-five from the courier area. Pre-samples and post-samples were collected for analysis with each detection technique. Samples analyzed by gc/chemiluminescence were taken by swiping a teflon- coated sampling swipe across the surface of the sampling area to pick up any explosive particles. Samples analyzed by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) were taken from the clothing of the manufacturer and courier by vacuuming the surface and collecting particulates on a fiberglass filter. Samples for IMS analysis from the manufacturing and courier rooms were taken by wiping a cotton sampling swipe across the surface area. Currently, building IEDs and monitoring the explosive contamination is being directed toward detection with portal monitors.

  15. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry as a technique for characterization of complex lysimeter leachate samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Laurence H; Marshall, Samantha J; Saeed, Mansoor; Earll, Mark; Hadfield, Stephen T; Richardson, Kevan; Rawlinson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Lysimeter studies can be used to identify and quantify soil degradates of agrochemicals (metabolites) that have the potential to leach to groundwater. However, the apparent metabolic profile of such lysimeter leachate samples will often be significantly more complex than would be expected in true groundwater samples. This is particularly true for S-metolachlor, which has an extremely complex metabolic pathway. Consequently, it was not practically possible to apply a conventional analytical approach to identify all metabolites in an S-metolachlor lysimeter study, because there was insufficient mass to enable the use of techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Recent advances in high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry, however, allow innovative screening approaches to characterize leachate samples to a greater extent than previously possible. Leachate from the S-metolachlor study was screened for accurate masses (±5 ppm of the nominal mass) corresponding to more than 400 hypothetical metabolite structures. A refined list of plausible metabolites was constructed from these data to provide a comprehensive description of the most likely metabolites present. The properties of these metabolites were then evaluated using a principal component analysis model, based on molecular descriptors, to visualize the entire chemical space and to cluster the metabolites into a number of subclasses. This characterization and principal component analysis evaluation enabled the selection of suitable representative metabolites that were subsequently used as exemplars to assess the toxicological relevance of the leachate as a whole. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1401-1412. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627902

  16. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  17. Speciation of mercury in fish samples by flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2012-04-01

    A rapid flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-CCV-AAS) method is described for speciation and determination of mercury in biological samples. Varying concentrations of NaBH(4) were employed for mercury vapour generation from inorganic and mixture of inorganic and organic (total) Hg. The presence of Fe(3+), Cu(2+) and thiourea had catalytic effect on mercury vapour generation from methylmercury (MeHg) and, when together, Cu(2+) and thiourea had synergistic catalytic effect on the vapour generation. Of the two metal ions, Fe(3+) gave the best sensitivity enhancement, achieving the same sensitivity for MeHg and inorganic Hg(2+). Due to similarity of resulting sensitivity, Hg(2+) was used successfully as a primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total Hg. The catalysis was homogeneous in nature, and it was assumed that the breaking of the C-Hg bond was facilitated by the delocalization of the 5d electron pairs in Hg atom. The extraction of MeHg and inorganic mercury (In-Hg) in fish samples were achieved quantitatively with hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiourea and determined by FI-CCV-AAS. The application of the method to the quantification of mercury species in a fish liver reference material DOLT-4 gave 91.5% and 102.3% recoveries for total and methyl mercury, respectively. The use of flow injection enabled rapid analysis with a sample throughput of 180 h(-1).

  18. The radioactivity measurements in soils and fertilizers using gamma spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of their mineral content, soils are naturally radioactive and one of the sources of radioactivity other than those of natural origin is mainly due to the extensive use of fertilizers. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the fluxes of natural radionuclides in local production of phosphate fertilizers to determine the content of radioactivity in several commercial fertilizers produced in Algeria and to estimate their radiological impact in a cultivated soil even for the long-term exposure due to their application. For these purposes, virgin and fertilized soils were collected from outlying Setif region in Algeria and from phosphate fertilizers used in this area. Gamma spectrometry was exploited to determine activity concentration due to naturally occurring 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in five types of samples (two different sorts of fertilizers, virgin and fertilized soils and well water used for irrigation) taken from Setif's areas. The results show that these radionuclides were present in an average concentration of 134.7 ± 24.1, 131.8 ± 16.7, 11644 ± 550 Bq/kg for the first fertilizer NPK and 190.3 ± 30, 117.2 ± 10.3, 5312 ± 249 Bq/kg for the second fertilizer (NPKs). For the virgin and the fertilized soils, the corresponding values were respectively 47.01 ± 7.3, 33 ± 7, 329.4 ± 19.7 Bq/kg and 53.2 ± 10.6, 50.0 ± 7, 311.4 ± 18.7 Bq/kg. For well water, the values were 1.93 and 0.12 Bq/kg; however the third value was below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). The radium equivalent activity (Raeq) and the representative level index Iγr for all samples were also calculated. The data were discussed and compared with those given in the literature. - Highlights: → We analyze radioactivity in Fertilizers and agricultural soils using Gamma spectrometry technique. → The activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples were within the world average. → The fertilizer samples show much higher concentrations.

  19. The radioactivity measurements in soils and fertilizers using gamma spectrometry technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukhenfouf, Wassila, E-mail: boukhenfoufw@yahoo.f [DAC Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, UFAS University, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Boucenna, Ahmed [DAC Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, UFAS University, Setif 19000 (Algeria)

    2011-04-15

    Because of their mineral content, soils are naturally radioactive and one of the sources of radioactivity other than those of natural origin is mainly due to the extensive use of fertilizers. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the fluxes of natural radionuclides in local production of phosphate fertilizers to determine the content of radioactivity in several commercial fertilizers produced in Algeria and to estimate their radiological impact in a cultivated soil even for the long-term exposure due to their application. For these purposes, virgin and fertilized soils were collected from outlying Setif region in Algeria and from phosphate fertilizers used in this area. Gamma spectrometry was exploited to determine activity concentration due to naturally occurring {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in five types of samples (two different sorts of fertilizers, virgin and fertilized soils and well water used for irrigation) taken from Setif's areas. The results show that these radionuclides were present in an average concentration of 134.7 {+-} 24.1, 131.8 {+-} 16.7, 11644 {+-} 550 Bq/kg for the first fertilizer NPK and 190.3 {+-} 30, 117.2 {+-} 10.3, 5312 {+-} 249 Bq/kg for the second fertilizer (NPKs). For the virgin and the fertilized soils, the corresponding values were respectively 47.01 {+-} 7.3, 33 {+-} 7, 329.4 {+-} 19.7 Bq/kg and 53.2 {+-} 10.6, 50.0 {+-} 7, 311.4 {+-} 18.7 Bq/kg. For well water, the values were 1.93 and 0.12 Bq/kg; however the third value was below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). The radium equivalent activity (Raeq) and the representative level index I{sub {gamma}r} for all samples were also calculated. The data were discussed and compared with those given in the literature. - Highlights: {yields} We analyze radioactivity in Fertilizers and agricultural soils using Gamma spectrometry technique. {yields} The activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples were within the world average. {yields

  20. Arsenic species analysis in porewaters and sediments using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Meng-xia; DENG Tian-long

    2006-01-01

    It was observed that the atomic fluorescence emission due to As(Ⅴ) could has a 10% to 40% of fluorescence emission signal during the determination of As(Ⅲ) in the mixture of As(Ⅲ) and As(Ⅴ). Besides, interferes from heavy metals such as Pb(Ⅱ),Cu(Ⅱ) can cause severe increase of the signals as compared to the insignificant effects caused by Cd(Ⅱ), Zn(Ⅱ), Mn(Ⅱ) and Fe(Ⅲ). On the basis of further studies, the masking agent of 8-hydroxyquinoline was used as an efficient agent to eliminate interference of As(Ⅴ)emission and the heavy metal of Cu2+ and Pb2+ in the measurements of arsenic species. After a series standard additions and CRM researches, a sensitive and interference-free analytical procedure was developed for the speciation of arsenic in samples ofporewaters and sediments in Poyang Lake, China.

  1. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions. PMID:27236436

  2. Emerging techniques in vegetable oil analysis using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available As the practice of vegetable oil adulteration becomes more sophisticated, the possibility to subvert detection using established techniques such as capillary gas chromatography is increasing. One of the most powerful techniques to be used in food authenticity studies is stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SIRMS which utilises differences in the natural abundance of the stable isotopes of the ‘light’ bio-elements hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulfur to detect food fraud. SIRMS has found application in the authentication of a wide range of foodstuffs, including fruit juices, wines, spirits, honey and to detect the adulteration of flavour compounds with synthetic analogues. This papers reviews the current state-of-the-art for the authentication of vegetable oils using SIRMS and highlights emergent techniques such as compound- and position specific-isotope mass spectrometry. These latter developments offer the potential to provide more rapid and improved detection of the economic adulteration of vegetable oils.A medida que la práctica de la adulteración de aceites vegetales se hace más sofisticada, las posibilidades de evitar la detección utilizando técnicas tradicionales como la cromatografía de gases en columna capilar aumentan. Una de las técnicas más poderosas que más se utilizan en los estudios de autentificación de alimentos es la espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas, que utiliza diferencias en la abundancia natural de isótopos estables de elementos ligeros biológicos hidrógeno, nitrógeno, carbón, oxigeno y azufre para detectar fraude en los alimentos. La espectrometría de masas de relaciones isotópicas ha encontrado aplicación en la autentificación de una amplia gama de alimentos, incluyendo zumos de frutas, vinos, bebidas alcohólicas de alta graduación, miel, y en la detección de la adulteración de los compuestos aromáticos con sus análogos de origen sintético. Este trabajo

  3. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Pamela C.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2007-03-01

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass ( m0), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 ± 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 ± 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 ± 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection limits (3

  4. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Pamela C. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Parsons, Patrick J. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Lead Poisoning/Trace Elements Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)], E-mail: patrick.parsons@wadsworth.org

    2007-03-15

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass (m{sub 0}), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 {+-} 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 {+-} 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 {+-} 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection

  5. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min−1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m0) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m0 of 18 analytes were calculated for stopped & mini furnace gas flows. • Experimental

  6. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  7. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  8. Determination of trace copper in water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration on a phosphoric acid functionalized cotton chelator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XINGYAN LIU

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the preparation of a phosphorylated cotton chelator (PCC by solid phase esterification of phosphoric acid (PA onto defatted cotton fibres using urea as the catalyst. The synthesized PCC was employed for the preconcentration of copper from water samples prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The preconcentration of copper was studied under both batch and column techniques. The pH range for the quantitative preconcentration of copper was 4.0–7.0. The sorption time required for each sample was less than 30 min by the batch method. The copper sorption capacity of the PCC was found to be 15.3 mg/g at the optimum pH value. Elution with 1.0 mol dm-3 hydrochloric acid was found to be quantitative. Feasible flow rates of the copper solution for quantitative sorption onto the column packed with PCC were 0.5–4.0 ml min-1, whereas the optimum flow rate of the hydrochloric acid solution for desorption was less than 1.5 ml min-1. An 80-fold preconcentration factor could be achieved under the optimum column conditions. The tolerance limits for common metal ions on the preconcentration of copper and the number of times of column reuse were investigated. The proposed method was successfully applied for the preconcentration and determination of trace copper in natural and drinking water samples by FAAS.

  9. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L(-1), with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  10. Determination of trace amounts of molybdenum in plant tissue by solvent extraction-atomic-absorption and direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, L H; Kubin, A

    1986-03-01

    Methods are presented for determination of molybdenum in plant tissue by flame and graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry and direct-current argon-plasma emission spectrometry. The samples are digested in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4)-HC1O(4) mixture, and Mo is separated and concentrated by chelation and extraction. Three organic solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, di-isobutyl ketone and isoamyl alcohol) and two ligands (8-hydroxyquinoline and toluene-3,4-dithiol) were studied. The procedure were tested on pine needle and birch leaf samples. PMID:18964076

  11. Elemental determination of microsamples by liquid film dielectric barrier discharge atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qian; Zhu, Zhenli; Hu, Shenghong; Zheng, Hongtao; Jin, Lanlan

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a new liquid-film dielectric barrier discharge (LFDBD) atomic emission source was developed for microsample elemental determination. It consists of a copper electrode, a tungsten wire electrode, and a piece of glass slide between them, which serves as the dielectric barrier as well as the sample plate. The sample solution with 1 mol L(-1) nitric acid, when deposited onto the surface of the glass slide, forms a thin liquid film. The plasma is generated between the tip of the tungsten wire electrode and the liquid film surface when alternating-current (ac) high voltage (peak voltage ~3.7 kV, frequency ~30 kHz) is applied on the electrodes. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions in the sample solution were achieved by atomic emission measurements in the plasma and were demonstrated in this study with elements Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Cd. Detection limits were in the range from 0.6 ng (7 μg L(-1)) for Na to 6 ng (79 μg L(-1)) for Zn. Repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation from seven repetitive analyses of samples with analyte concentrations at 1 mg L(-1), varied from 2.1% to 4.4%. Compared with other liquid discharge systems that operate at atmospheric pressure, the current system offers several advantages: First, it eliminates the use of a sample flow system (e.g., syringe or peristaltic pump); instead, a small aliquot of sample is directly pipetted onto the glass slide for analysis. Second, it is a microanalysis system and requires sample volume ≤80 μL, a benefit when a limited amount of sample is available. Third, because the sample is applied in aliquot, there is no washout time, and the analysis can be easily extended to sample array for high-throughput analysis. The proposed LFDBD is promising for in-field elemental determination because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, low power supply, and no inert gas requirement. PMID:22486234

  12. Determination of platinum traces contamination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by cloud point extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and sensitive method is described for the determination of platinum surface contamination originating from cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Following extraction from swabs and preconcentration with the cloud point extraction (CPE) method, detection was by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). After desorption of platinum compounds from the swab, CPE involved on preconcentration of platinum in aqueous solution with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as chelating agent and Triton X-114 as extraction medium. DDTC is not only a chelating agent, but may also be a good candidate for the inactivation of platinum compounds. DDTC is recommended by the Word Health Organization (WHO) for the destruction of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, pH of the sample solution, concentrations of DDTC and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were evaluated in order to enhance sensitivity of the method. The desorption of platinum compounds from the swab was investigated in parallel. Since platinum is bound to DDTC, it must exchange with copper in order to enhance platinum atomizing by GFAAS. A preconcentration factor of 29 was obtained for 10 mL of a platinum solution at 10 μg mL-1. In optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.2 ng mL-1, corresponding to 2.0 ng of platinum metal on the swab. Absorbance was linear between 0.7 and 15 ng mL-1. The proposed method was applied for the determination of surface contamination by platinum compounds with correct results.

  13. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K2Cr2O7/H2SO4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L-1 of Hg2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L-1 (0.14 μg kg-1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L-1

  14. Study of matrix effects produced by inorganic species in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with several spray chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the influence of the spray chamber design on the matrix effects was investigated in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The study was carried out in terms of aerosol drop size distribution and emission signal. Solutions of two inorganic acids and salts were employed to characterize the extent of the matrix effects throughout this work. Several spray chambers. a double-pass (Scott - type), a conventional cyclonic, and two low-volume cyclonic - type spray chambers (i.e., Cinnabar, and Genie) were used in order to evaluate the matrix effects produced by nitric and sulphuric acid solutions. A glass concentric pneumatic micro nebulizer (Atom Mist) was used in conjunction with all four chambers. When nitric or sulphuric acid solutions were nebulized, the double pass spray chamber registered noticeable changes in the drop size distribution. The low-volume spray chambers, in turn, afforded changes in the aerosol drop size distributions similar to the conventional cyclonic one. The matrix effects on the signal were reduced with all three cyclonic spray chambers with respect to the double pass one. Concerning the effect of inorganic salts, the results obtained with a High Efficiency Nebulizer (HEN) coupled to a double pass spray chamber and to a cyclonic type one revealed several issues: (i) the matrix effects were more severe at low liquid and gas flow rates; (ii) as for inorganic acids, the use of a cyclonic spray chamber led to a mitigation of the matrix effects with respect to a double pass spray chamber. (author)

  15. Determination of platinum traces contamination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappuy, M. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Caudron, E., E-mail: eric.caudron@eps.aphp.fr [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bellanger, A. [Department of Pharmacy, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (Paris Public Hospital Authority), 47 boulevard de l' hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Pradeau, D. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    A simple and sensitive method is described for the determination of platinum surface contamination originating from cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Following extraction from swabs and preconcentration with the cloud point extraction (CPE) method, detection was by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). After desorption of platinum compounds from the swab, CPE involved on preconcentration of platinum in aqueous solution with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as chelating agent and Triton X-114 as extraction medium. DDTC is not only a chelating agent, but may also be a good candidate for the inactivation of platinum compounds. DDTC is recommended by the Word Health Organization (WHO) for the destruction of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, pH of the sample solution, concentrations of DDTC and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were evaluated in order to enhance sensitivity of the method. The desorption of platinum compounds from the swab was investigated in parallel. Since platinum is bound to DDTC, it must exchange with copper in order to enhance platinum atomizing by GFAAS. A preconcentration factor of 29 was obtained for 10 mL of a platinum solution at 10 {mu}g mL{sup -1}. In optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.2 ng mL{sup -1}, corresponding to 2.0 ng of platinum metal on the swab. Absorbance was linear between 0.7 and 15 ng mL{sup -1}. The proposed method was applied for the determination of surface contamination by platinum compounds with correct results.

  16. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Luna, Aderval Severino

    2005-06-01

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH 4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO 3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K 2Cr 2O 7/H 2SO 4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg 0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N 2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L -1 of Hg 2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L -1 (0.14 μg kg -1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L -1.

  17. Separation of seven arsenic compounds by high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by hydrogen-argon flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S. H.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Pritzl, G.;

    1992-01-01

    Seven molecular forms of arsenic were separated by anion- and cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with on-line detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The interfacing was established by a vented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) capillary tubing connecting......-to-noise ratio of the on-line AAS detector was optimized. This involved the use of the hydrogen-argon-entrained air flame, a slotted tube atom trap in the flame for signal enhancement, electronic noise damping and a high-intensity light source. The detection limits in mu-g cm-3, using 100 mm3 injections...

  18. Separation of seven arsenic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by hydrogen–argon flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S. H.; Larsen, E. H.; Pritzl, G.;

    1992-01-01

    Seven molecular forms of arsenic were separated by anion- and cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with on-line detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The interfacing was established by a vented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) capillary tubing connecting......-to-noise ratio of the on-line AAS detector was optimized. This involved the use of the hydrogen-argon-entrained air flame, a slotted tube atom trap in the flame for signal enhancement, electronic noise damping and a high-intensity light source. The detection limits in mu-g cm-3, using 100 mm3 injections...

  19. Determination of trace elements in refined gold samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steharnik Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for determination the trace contents of silver, copper, iron, palladium, zinc and platinum in refined gold samples. Simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer with radial torch position and cross flow nebulizer was used for determination. In order to compare the different calibration strategies, two sets of calibration standards were prepared. The first set was based on matrix matched calibration standards and the second was prepared without the addition of matrix material. Detection limits for matrix matching calibrations were higher for some elements than those without matrix matching. In addition, the internal standardization method was applied and experiments indicated that indium was the best option as internal standard. The obtained results for gold sample by matrix matching and matrix free calibrations were compared with the obtained results by standard addition method. The accuracy of the methods was tested performing recovery test. Recoveries for spiked sample were in the range of 90-115 %. The accuracy of the methods was also tested by analysis of certified reference material of high pure goldAuGHP1. The best results were achieved by matrix free calibration and standard addition method using indium as internal standard at wavelength of 230 nm. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34024: Development of Technologies for Recycling of Precious, Rare and Associated Metals from Solid Waste in Serbia to High Purity Products

  20. Atomic-absorption spectrometric, neutron-activation and radioanalytical techniques for the determination of trace metals in environmental, biochemical and toxicological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioanalytical techniques and atomic-absorption spectrometry have been used for the micro-determination of vanadium in biological specimens such as human tissues and body fluids in environmental, biochemical and toxicological research. The use of 48V as a radiotracer permitted investigations on the vaporisation and retention mechanisms of vanadium. Higher vanadium oxides are probably converted into lower oxides, decomposing to VO in gaseous form, followed by the dissociation to 'free vanadium' and oxygen. It was found that about 20% of the 48V radioactivity was consistently retained in the graphite tube after 10 repeated introductions and firings of 50 μl of 50 ng ml-148V-labelled vanadium solution. However, the amount retained, probably in the form of carbide, does not vaporise under the conditions used for the analysis. Determinations of vanadium at the parts per billion level in 10 urine samples by neutron-activation analysis and by graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry showed agreement that can be considered satisfactory for practical purposes. (author)

  1. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium

  2. Evaluation of four sample treatments for determination of platinum in automotive catalytic converters by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional and microwave assisted digestion, both using aqua regia, alkaline fusion with lithium metaborate and aqueous slurries were evaluated as sample treatments for determination of Pt in automotive catalytic converters by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GF-AAS). Determination of platinum by GF-AAS in samples of the catalytic converter's substrates, prepared by the four methods described, indicates that the highest platinum concentration i.e. maximum Pt extraction in the range of 748 ± 15-998 ± 10 μg mL-1, is obtained for samples dissolved by alkaline fusion, closely followed by analysis of aqueous plus Triton X-100 slurries 708 ± 14-958 ± 10 μg mL-1, while neither one of the acid digestion procedures achieved total dissolution of the samples. Slurry analysis is thus shown to be a viable alternative and is recommended, based on its speed and ease of implementation. Aqueous standards calibration curves and the standard addition methods were also compared. The results showed that no appreciable matrix effects are present, regardless of the sample preparation procedure used. Precision of the measurements, expressed as percentage relative standard deviation, ranged between 2.5 to 4.9%. Accuracy of the results was assessed by recovery tests which rendered values between 98.9 and 100.9%

  3. Determination of platinum and palladium in road dust after their separation on immobilized fungus by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woinska, Sylwia; Godlewska-Zylkiewicz, Beata, E-mail: bgodlew@uwb.edu.pl

    2011-07-15

    A flow solid phase extraction procedure based on biosorption of Pt(IV) and Pd(II) on Aspergillus sp. immobilized on cellulose resin Cellex-T was proposed for the separation and preconcentration of Pt and Pd before their determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The analytical conditions including sample pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions were examined. The analytes were selectively retained on the biosorbent in acidic medium (pH 1) and subsequently eluted from the column with 1 mL of thiourea solution (0.25 mol L{sup -1} thiourea in 0.3 mol L{sup -1} HCl). The reproducibility of the procedure was below 5%. The limit of detection of the method was 0.020 ng mL{sup -1} for Pt and 0.012 ng mL{sup -1} for Pd. The method validation was performed by analysis of certified reference materials BCR-723 (tunnel dust) and SARM-76 (platinum ore). The developed separation procedure was applied to the determination of Pt and Pd in road dust samples by ETAAS. The applied biosorbent is characterized by high sorption capacity: 0.47 mg g{sup -1} for Pt and 1.24 mg g{sup -1} for Pd.

  4. Determination of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin by cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the preconcentration of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin prior to its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) had been developed in this paper. The CPE method was based on the complex of Al(III) with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and Triton X-114 was used as non-ionic surfactant. The main factors affecting cloud point extraction efficiency, such as pH of solution, concentration and kind of complexing agent, concentration of non-ionic surfactant, equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 34.8 was obtained for the preconcentration of Al(III) with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Al(III) was 0.06 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation (n = 7) of sample was 3.6%, values of recovery of aluminum were changed from 92.3% to 94.7% for three samples. This method is simple, accurate, sensitive and can be applied to the determination of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin.

  5. Determination of total arsenic in coal and wood using oxygen flask combustion method followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and sensitive procedure for the determination of total arsenic in coal and wood was conducted by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). The effect of various items (composition of absorbent, standing time between the combustion and filtration, particle size and mass of sample) was investigated. Under the optimized conditions of the OFC method, nine certified reference materials were analyzed, and the values of arsenic concentration obtained by this method were in good accordance with the certified values. The limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method were 0.29 μg g-1 and less than 8%, respectively. In addition, eight kinds of coals and four chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood wastes were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from the microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method. The determination of arsenic in solid samples was discussed in terms of applicable scope and concentration range of arsenic.

  6. Determination of lead in environmental waters with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction prior to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qingxiang, E-mail: zhouqx@cup.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Henan Normal University, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huaihe River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Xinxiang 453007 (China); State Laboratory of Petroleum Resource and Prospecting, College of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum Beijing, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhao, Na [State Laboratory of Petroleum Resource and Prospecting, College of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum Beijing, Beijing 102249 (China); Xie, Guohong [College of Resources and Environment, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang 453003 (China)

    2011-05-15

    This paper established a new, rapid and sensitive method for the determination of lead in water samples preconcentrated by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) prior to atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Dithizone was used as the chelating agent. In the DLLME procedure, lead formed lead-dithizone complex and migrated into the carbon tetrachloride micro-droplets. Important factors that would affect the extraction efficiency had been investigated including the kind and volume of extraction solvent and dispersive solvent, sample pH, the amount of chelating agent, extraction time and centrifugation time. The results showed that the coexisting ions containing in water samples had no obvious negative effect on the determination of lead. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method had a good linear range of 0.01-100 ng mL{sup -1} (r{sup 2} = 0.9990). The precision was 2.12% (RSD, n = 7) and the detection limit was 0.95 ng L{sup -1}. Proposed method was validated with four real environmental samples and the results indicated that the proposed method was excellent for the future use and satisfied spiked recoveries were in the range of 92.9-97.4%.

  7. Determination of lead in environmental waters with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction prior to atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zhao, Na; Xie, Guohong

    2011-05-15

    This paper established a new, rapid and sensitive method for the determination of lead in water samples preconcentrated by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) prior to atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Dithizone was used as the chelating agent. In the DLLME procedure, lead formed lead-dithizone complex and migrated into the carbon tetrachloride micro-droplets. Important factors that would affect the extraction efficiency had been investigated including the kind and volume of extraction solvent and dispersive solvent, sample pH, the amount of chelating agent, extraction time and centrifugation time. The results showed that the coexisting ions containing in water samples had no obvious negative effect on the determination of lead. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method had a good linear range of 0.01-100 ng mL(-1) (r(2) = 0.9990). The precision was 2.12% (RSD, n = 7) and the detection limit was 0.95 ng L(-1). Proposed method was validated with four real environmental samples and the results indicated that the proposed method was excellent for the future use and satisfied spiked recoveries were in the range of 92.9-97.4%. PMID:21398026

  8. Evaluation of vapor generation for the determination of nickel by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Julieta [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650-San Martin, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad Proyectos Especiales de Suministros Nucleares, Av. Libertador 8250, 1429-Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-09-01

    Volatile species of Ni were generated by merging acidified aqueous samples and sodium tetrahydroborate(III) in a continuous flow system. The gaseous analyte was subsequently introduced via a stream of Ar carrier into the inlet tube of the plasma torch. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used for detection. The operating conditions (chemical and physical parameters) and the concentrations of different acids were evaluated for the efficient generation of Ni vapor. The detection limit (3 {sigma}{sub blank}) was 1.8 ng mL{sup -1}. The precision (RSD) of the determination was 4.2% at a level of 500 ng mL{sup -1} and 7.3% for 20 ng mL{sup -1} (n=10). The efficiency of the generation process was estimated to be 51%. The possible interfering effect of transition metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Zn), hydride forming elements (As, Ge, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te), and Hg on Ni signal was examined. This study has demonstrated that Ni vapor generation is markedly free of interferences. (orig.)

  9. Unusual calibration curves observed for iron using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welz, Bernhard, E-mail: w.bernardo@terra.com.b [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CMPq-INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador-BA (Brazil); Santos, Lisia M.G. dos [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saude-INCQS-Fiocruz, 21040-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Rennan G.O. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 Sao Cristovao-SE (Brazil); Jacob, Silvana do C. [Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saude-INCQS-Fiocruz, 21040-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CMPq-INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador-BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil); Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and iron in plant and soil samples has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The primary cadmium resonance line at 228.802 nm and an adjacent secondary iron line at 228.726 nm, which is within the spectral interval covered by the charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector, have been used for the investigations. Due to the very high iron content in most of the soil samples the possibility has been investigated to reduce the sensitivity and extend the working range by using side pixels for measurement at the line wings instead of the line core. It has been found that the calibration curves measured at all the analytically useful pixels of this line consisted of two linear parts with distinctly different slopes. This effect has been independent of the positioning of the wavelength, i.e., if the Cd line or the Fe line was in the center of the CCD array. The most likely explanation for this unusual behavior is a significant difference between the instrument width DELTAlambda{sub Instr} and the absorption line width DELTAlambda{sub Abs}, which is quite pronounced in the case of Fe. Using both parts of the calibration curves and simultaneous measurement at the line center and at the wings made it possible to extend the working range for the iron determination to more than three orders of magnitude.

  10. Ultrasensitive determination of mercury in human saliva by atomic fluorescence spectrometry based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a new, rapid and simple method for the determination of ultra-trace quantities of mercury ion in human saliva. It is based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction and detection by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Mercury ion was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate, and the hydrophobic complex was then extracted into fine droplets of 1-undecanol. By cooling in an ice bath after extraction, the droplets in solution solidify to form a single ball floating on the surface of solution. The solidified micro drop containing the mercury complex was then transferred for determination by CV-AFS. The effects of pH value, concentration of chelating reagent, quantity of 1-undecanol, sample volume, equilibration temperature and time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the preconcentration of a 25-mL sample is accomplished with an enrichment factor of 182. The limit of detection is 2.5 ng L-1. The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations at 0.1 ng mL-1 level is 4.1%. The method was applied to the determination of mercury in saliva samples collected from four volunteers. Two volunteers having dental amalgam fillings had 0.4 ng mL-1 mercury in their saliva, whereas mercury was not detectable in the saliva of two volunteers who had no dental fillings. (author)

  11. An automatic countercurrent liquid-liquid micro-extraction system coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry for metal determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Constantina; Anthemidis, Aristidis N

    2015-02-01

    A novel and versatile automatic sequential injection countercurrent liquid-liquid microextraction (SI-CC-LLME) system coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is presented for metal determination. The extraction procedure was based on the countercurrent flow of aqueous and organic phases which takes place into a newly designed lab made microextraction chamber. A noteworthy feature of the extraction chamber is that it can be utilized for organic solvents heavier or lighter than water. The proposed method was successfully demonstrated for on-line lead determination and applied in environmental water samples using an amount of 120 μL of chloroform as extractant and ammonium diethyldithiophosphate as chelating reagent. The effect of the major experimental parameters including the volume of extractant, as well as the flow rate of aqueous and organic phases were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions for 6 mL sample consumption an enhancement factor of 130 was obtained. The detection limit was 1.5 μg L(-1) and the precision of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% at 40.0 μg L(-1) Pb(II) concentration level. The proposed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials and spiked environmental water samples. PMID:25435230

  12. Cloud point extraction for the preconcentration of silver and palladium in real samples and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Yazdandoust, Saeed; Yazdandoust, Mozhdeh [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-03-15

    A cloud point extraction procedure is presented for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of Ag{sup +} and Pd{sup 2+} in various samples. After complexation with 2-((2-((1H-benzo[d]imidazole-2-yl)methoxy)phenoxy)methyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol (BIMPI), which was used as a new chelating agent, analyte ions were quantitatively extracted to a phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation, and determination was carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Under the optimum experimental conditions (i. e., pH = 7.0, 15.0.10{sup -5} mol/L BIMPI and 0.036% (w/v) Triton X-114), calibration graphs were linear in the range of 28.0-430.0 {mu}g/L and 57.0-720.0 {mu}g/L with detection limits of 10.0 and 25.0 {mu}g/L for Ag{sup +} and Pd{sup 2+}, respectively. The enrichment factors were 35.0 and 28.0 for Ag{sup +} and Pd{sup 2+}, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to evaluate these metals in some real samples, including waste water, soil and hydrogenation catalyst samples. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Preconcentration procedure using cloud point extraction in the presence of electrolyte for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luciana Melo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes a micelle-mediated phase separation in the presence of electrolyte as a preconcentration method for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cadmium was complexed with ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in an acidic medium (0.32 mol l- 1 HCl) using Triton X-114 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume (about 20 μl) of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The chemical variables that affect the cloud point extraction, such as complexing time (0 20 min), Triton X114 concentration (0.043 0.87% w/v) and complexing agent concentration (0.01 0.1 mol l- 1), were investigated. The cloud point is formed in the presence of NaCl at room temperature (25 °C), and the electrolyte concentration (0.5 5% w/v) was also investigated. Under optimized conditions, only 8 ml of sample was used in the presence of 0.043% w/v Triton X-114 and 1% (w/v) NaCl. This method permitted limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 μg l- 1 and 2.9 μg l- 1 Cd, respectively, and a linear calibration range from 3 to 400 μg l- 1 Cd. The proposed method was applied to Cd determination in physiological solutions (containing 0.9% (w/v) of NaCl), mineral water, lake water and cigarette samples (tobacco).

  14. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedi, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Yasouj, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Shokrollahi, A.; Ahmadi, F.; Rajabi, H.R. [Chemistry Department, University of Yasouj, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-02-11

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in various samples. After complexation with methyl-2-pyridylketone oxime (MPKO) in basic medium, analyte ions are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation. 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} nitric acid in methanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The adopted concentrations for MPKO, Triton X-114 and HNO{sub 3}, bath temperature, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} along with preconcentration factors of 30 and for these ions and enrichment factor of 65, 58 and 67 for Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}, respectively. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of analytes in complex matrices was demonstrated. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of biological, natural and wastewater, soil and blood samples.

  15. Determination of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin by cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Mei, E-mail: sunmei@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences on Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96, Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu Qianghua [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2010-04-15

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the preconcentration of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin prior to its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) had been developed in this paper. The CPE method was based on the complex of Al(III) with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and Triton X-114 was used as non-ionic surfactant. The main factors affecting cloud point extraction efficiency, such as pH of solution, concentration and kind of complexing agent, concentration of non-ionic surfactant, equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 34.8 was obtained for the preconcentration of Al(III) with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Al(III) was 0.06 ng mL{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (n = 7) of sample was 3.6%, values of recovery of aluminum were changed from 92.3% to 94.7% for three samples. This method is simple, accurate, sensitive and can be applied to the determination of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin.

  16. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry combination for copper(II) ion in environmental and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, Ardeshir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ashokrollahi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Mehrorang [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Hossaini, Omid; Khanjari, Narges [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, Mustafa [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-12-30

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper(II) ion in various samples. After complexation by 4-(phenyl diazenyl) benzene-1,3-diamine (PDBDM) (chrysoidine), copper(II) ions were quantitatively recovered in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. 0.5 ml of methanol acidified with 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influence of analytical parameters including ligand, Triton X-114 and HNO{sub 3} concentrations, bath temperature, heating time, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. The effect of the matrix ions on the recovery of copper(II) ions was investigated. The detection limit (3S.D.{sub b}/m, n = 10) of 0.6 ng mL{sup -1} along with preconcentration factor of 30 and enrichment factor of 41.1 with R.S.D. of 1.0% for Cu was achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of various environmental and biological samples.

  17. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry method for preconcentration and determination of trace cadmium in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jinyan; Jiao, Yang; Zhao, Jiao; Meng, Lifen; Yang, Yaling

    2014-01-01

    A method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration of trace cadmium (Cd) as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. Cadmium reacted with 8-hydroxyquinoline to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of nonionic surfactant oligoethylene glycol monoalkyl ether (Genapol X-080) in an alkaline medium. Octanol was used to depress the cloud point of Genapol X-080 in the extraction process. The chemical variables that affect the CPE, such as pH of complexation reaction, amount of chelating agent, Genapol X-080 and octanol were evaluated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, linearity was obeyed in the range of 10-500 μg/L, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9993. For 5 mL of sample solution, the enhancement factor was about 20. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the method were 0.21 and 0.63 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) was 3.2% for a solution containing 100 μg/L of Cd. The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. Recoveries of spiked samples varied in the range of 94.1-103.8%.

  18. Determination of Trace Amounts of Nickel (Ⅱ) by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Coupled with Cloud Point Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAH Syed Mazhar; WANG Hao-nan; SU Xing-guang

    2011-01-01

    A new method based on the cloud point extraction(CPE) for separation and preconcentration of nickel(Ⅱ)and its subsequent determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry(GFAAS) was proposed,8-hydroxyquinoline and Triton X-100 were usedl as the ligand and surfactant respectively. Nickel(Ⅱ) can form a hydrophobic complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline, the complex can be extracted into the small volume surfactant rich phase at the cloud point temperature(CPT) for GFAAS determination. The factors affecting the cloud point extraction,such as pH, ligand concentration, surfactant concentration, and the incubation time were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 12 ng/L and a relative standard deviation(RSD) of 2.9% were obtained for Ni(Ⅱ) determination. The enrichment factor was found to be 25. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of nickel(Ⅱ) in certified reference material and different types of water samples and the recovery was in a range of 95% 103%.

  19. Determination of trace nickel in water samples by cloud point extraction preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Zhimei [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Department of Chemistry and Biology, Huainan Normal University, Huainan 232001 (China); Liang Pei [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)]. E-mail: liangpei@mail.ccnu.edu.cn; Ding Qiong [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Cao Jing [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2006-09-21

    A new method based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection was proposed for the determination of trace nickel in water samples. When the micelle solution temperature is higher than the cloud point of surfactant p-octylpolyethyleneglycolphenyether (Triton X-100), the complex of Ni{sup 2+} with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP) could enter surfactant-rich phase and be concentrated, then determined by GFAAS. The main factors affecting the cloud point extraction were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 27 was obtained for the preconcentration of Ni{sup 2+} with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Ni{sup 2+} is 0.12 ng mL{sup -1} with R.S.D. of 4.3% (n = 10, c = 100 ng mL{sup -1}). The proposed method was applied to determination of trace nickel in water samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Preconcentration and determination of zinc and lead ions by a combination of cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavallali, H. [Chemistry Department, Payamenore University, Shiraz (Iran); Shokrollahi, A.; Zahedi, M. [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran); Niknam, K. [Chemistry Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr (Iran); Soylak, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, Kayseri (Turkey); Ghaedi, M.

    2009-04-15

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of lead(II) and zinc(II). After complexation with 3-[(4-bromophenyl) (1-H-inden-3-yl)methyl]-1 H-indene (BPIMI), the analytes were quantitatively extracted to a phase rich in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The concentration of bis((1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2yl)ethyl)sulfane, Triton X-114, pH and amount of surfactant were all optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 2.5 and 1.6 ng/mL for Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} along with preconcentration factors of 30 and an enrichment factor of 32 and 48 for Pb{sup 2+}and Zn {sup 2+} ions were obtained, respectively. The proposed cloud point extraction was been successfully applied for the determination of these ions in real samples with complicated matrices such as food and soil samples, with high efficiency. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Observations on the quantitation of the phosphate content of peptides by fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, L; Ang, S G; Williams, D H; Cohen, P

    1987-07-29

    Equimolar mixtures of the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of several peptides have been subjected to fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS), to investigate whether the stoichiometry of phosphorylation can be determined from the relative molecular-ion abundances of the phospho and dephospho derivatives. It is concluded that quantitation can be achieved for peptides with large positive or negative hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity indices (delta F values) where addition of a phosphate group does not alter the distribution of the peptide within the matrix significantly. For peptides with small positive or negative delta F values, phosphopeptides tend to be partially suppressed by their dephosphorylated counterparts. Suppression can be partially or totally overcome by conversion of the peptide to a hydrophobic derivative, and by the selection of an appropriate matrix. Alternatively, addition of a very strong acid, perchloric acid, can even reverse the original suppression effect. This last effect is believed to be due to the increased ionic strength in the matrix, which forces a relatively hydrophilic analyte to the matrix surface; and the ability of such a phosphorylated analyte to form a more stable gas-phase cation. PMID:3038197

  2. Evaluation of four sample treatments for determination of platinum in automotive catalytic converters by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Ana I.; Alvarado, José I.

    2006-09-01

    Conventional and microwave assisted digestion, both using aqua regia, alkaline fusion with lithium metaborate and aqueous slurries were evaluated as sample treatments for determination of Pt in automotive catalytic converters by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GF-AAS). Determination of platinum by GF-AAS in samples of the catalytic converter's substrates, prepared by the four methods described, indicates that the highest platinum concentration i.e. maximum Pt extraction in the range of 748 ± 15-998 ± 10 μg mL - 1 , is obtained for samples dissolved by alkaline fusion, closely followed by analysis of aqueous plus Triton X-100 slurries 708 ± 14-958 ± 10 μg mL - 1 , while neither one of the acid digestion procedures achieved total dissolution of the samples. Slurry analysis is thus shown to be a viable alternative and is recommended, based on its speed and ease of implementation. Aqueous standards calibration curves and the standard addition methods were also compared. The results showed that no appreciable matrix effects are present, regardless of the sample preparation procedure used. Precision of the measurements, expressed as percentage relative standard deviation, ranged between 2.5 to 4.9%. Accuracy of the results was assessed by recovery tests which rendered values between 98.9 and 100.9%.

  3. Cadmium and lead determination in foods by beam injection flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method for cadmium and lead determination in foods by beam injection flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (BIFF-AAS) was proposed. Food slurries were prepared by transferring an exact amount of cryogenic-ground homogenized material (50-100 mg) to centrifuge tubes, followed by addition of 5 ml (up to 2.8 mol l-1) nitric acid solution and sonication in an ultrasonic bath during 5-10 min. Thereafter, slurries were diluted with water to 10 ml, centrifuged during 5 min at 5400 rpm and 400 μl aliquot of the supernatant was analyzed by BIFF-AAS. The detection limits based on peak height measurements were 0.03 μg g-1 Cd and 1.6 μg g-1 Pb for 2% (m/v) slurry (200 mg/10 ml). For method validation, the certified reference materials Pig Kidney (BCR 186) and Rice Flour (NIES 10) were used. Quantitative cadmium and lead recoveries were obtained and no statistical differences were found at 95% level by applying the t-test

  4. Cloud Point Extraction Using Tergitol TMN-6 of Gold(III)in Real Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, safe and rapid method on the basis of cloud point extraction (CPE) with tergitol TMN-6 had been used for the preconcentration and extraction of gold(Au) ion in selenium reduction solution sample prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).Pyrrolidine dithio formic acid salt (PDFAS) which was regarded as a selective complexing agent could formed stable Au-complex with Au ion, and Au-complex could be extracted by TMN-6 at a short time. Some influencing factors such as sample pH, concentration of TMN-6, concentration of PDFAS and the effect of foreign ions were further researched .Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 1.3 meu g L/sup -1/, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0-500 meu g/L and the relative standard deviation (RSD%) was 2.0%(n=8). The CPE method had been shown to be a useful and effective methodology for the separation of Au, with a preconcentration factor of 30. The recoveries of the spiked Au(?) ions were got in the range 95-103%. (author)

  5. Investigation of the levels of some element in edible oil samples produced in Turkey by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendil, Durali, E-mail: dmendil@gop.edu.tr [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Uluoezlue, Ozguer Dogan; Tuezen, Mustafa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    The element contents (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Co, Cd, Na, K, Ca and Mg) in edible oils (olive oil, hazelnut oil, sunflower oil, margarine, butter and corn oil) from Turkey were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The concentrations of trace element in the samples were found to be 291.0-52.0, 1.64-0.04, 3.08-1.03, 0.71-0.05, 0.03-0.01, 1.30-0.50, 84.0-0.90, 50.1-1.30, 174.2-20.8 and 20.8-0.60 {mu}g/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium, respectively. Cadmium was found to be 4.57-0.09 {mu}g/kg. The high heavy metal and minerals accumulation levels in the samples were found in olive oil for Cu, Pb, Co, margarine for Fe, K, corn oil for Zn, Mn, butter for Na, Mg, sunflower oil for Ca and hazelnut oil for Cd, respectively.

  6. Determination of essential and toxic elements in commercial baby foods by instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The World Health Organization recommends that infants should be breast fed exclusively for at least six months after birth. After this period, it is recommended to start introducing complementary foods, in order to meet the child's nutritional, mineral and energy needs. Commercial food products for infants form an important part of the diet for many babies. Thus, it is very important that such food contains sufficient amounts of minerals. Inadequate complementary feeding is a major cause of high rates of infant malnutrition in developing countries. In this study, essential elements: Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Se and Zn and toxic elements: As, Cd, Hg levels were determined in twenty seven different commercial infant food product samples by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). In order to validate both methodologies the reference material: INCT MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs and NIST - SRM 1577b Bovine Liver by INAA and NIST - SRM 1548th Typical Diet and NIST - SRM 1547 Peach Leaves by AAS were analyzed. The twenty seven baby food samples were acquired from Sao Paulo city supermarkets and stores. Essential and toxic elements were determined. Most of the essential element concentrations obtained were lower than the World Health Organization requirements, while concentrations of toxic elements were below the tolerable upper limit. These low essential element concentrations in these samples indicate that infants should not be fed only with commercial complementary foods. (author)

  7. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslima Daşbaşı

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4- complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040–1.00 mg L−1 with detection limit of 4.0 μg L−1 (n=13. The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n=11, 0.20 mg L−1 and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water.

  8. [Study on adsorption behavior of crosslinked polyarylonitrile for copper, lead, cadmium and zinc ions by atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawket, Abliz; Peng, Yang; Wang, Ji-De; Ismayil, Nurulla

    2010-04-01

    The crosslinked polymer polyacrylonitrile was synthesized by suspension polymerization using acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. It has been used as adsorbent of some toxic heavy metals in environmental waters. Its adsorption for metals and the factors which affect the adsorption capacity were studied by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The experimental results showed that under the optimal adsorption conditions, the pH of adsorbate solution was 5-6, static adsorption time was 1.5-2 h, and adsorption procedure was carried out at room temperature, polyacrylonitrile as adsorbent has high adsorption capacity (mg x g(-1)) for Cu2+, Pb2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+, which can reach 26.6, 45.2, 39.7 and 32.5 separately. Adsorption rate (%) was 83.6, 87.1, 85.3 and 86.7 respectively during the 1.5-2 h static adsorption time. It will be more than five-hour static adsorption time before adsorption rate reaches more than 96%. Using 0.10 mol x L(-1) chloride acid as the best desorption solvent to desorb the adsorbates, the recovery of them reached 95%. At the same time the adsorption mechanism of polymer was studied. PMID:20545173

  9. The use of a sequential extraction procedure for heavy metal analysis of house dusts by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Huseyin; Dundar, Mustafa Sahin; Doganci, Secil; Celik, Muhammed; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, dust is considered as house or street dust. Indoor dust, as a contamination source, has been studied for many years. In this work, the original Community Bureau of Reference of the European Commission (BCR) three-stage sequential extraction procedure was applied to the fractionation of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn in 20 house dust samples from five different areas of Sakarya, Turkey. Acetic acid, hydroxylammonium chloride, and hydrogen peroxide plus ammonium acetate were used for the first, second, and third steps of the BCR method, respectively. The extracts were analyzed for the studied heavy metals using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Validation of the results was performed by using a standard reference material (BCR 701 Sediment) to certify the experimental results obtained and to evaluate the reliability of the method used. The elemental loadings typically increased in magnitude according to the area order: Izmit Caddesi>Ankara Caddesi >Erenler>Karaman>Korucuk. The results were in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  10. Chemical modifiers in arsenic determination in biological materials by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, C.G.; Huerta, V.N.; Neira, J.Y. [Departamento de Analisis Instrumental, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Concepcion, P.O. Box 237, Concepcion (Chile)

    2004-01-01

    Palladium, iridium, and rhodium are evaluated as possible chemical modifiers in the determination of As in digest solutions of biological materials (human hair and clam) by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry (TCA-AAS). The modifier in solution was applied onto the coil and thermally pre-reduced; the pre-reduction conditions, the amount of modifier, and the thermal program were optimized. Palladium was not satisfactory, whereas Ir and Rh were effective modifiers and rendered better relative sensitivity for As by a factor of 1.4 and 1.9, respectively compared to the case without modifier. Upon optimization of thermal conditions for As in pre-reduced Ir (2.0 {mu}g) and Rh (2.0 {mu}g) modifiers and in the digest solutions of the study matrices, Rh (2.0 {mu}g) was more effective modifier and was selected as such. The mean within-day repeatability was 2.8% in consecutive measurements (25-100 {mu}g L{sup -1}) (3 cycles, each of n=6) and confirmed good short-term stability of the absorbance measurements. The mean reproducibility was 4.4% (n=20 in a 3-day period) and the detection limit (3{sigma}{sub blank}/slope) was 29 pg (n=15). The useful coil lifetime in Rh modifier was extended to 300-400 firings. Validation was by determination of As in the certified reference material (CRM) of ''Oyster tissue'' solution with a percentage relative error (E{sub rel}%) of 2% and percentage relative standard deviation (RSD%) of 3% (n=4), and by analytical recovery of As spiked in CRM of human hair [94{+-}8% (n=4)]. The methodology is simple, fast (sample readout frequency 21 h{sup -1}), reliable, of low cost, and was applied to the determination of As in hair samples of exposed and unexposed workers. (orig.)

  11. Atom interferometric techniques for measuring gravitational acceleration and constant magnetic field gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, B

    2011-01-01

    We discuss two techniques for probing the effects of a homogeneous force acting on cold atoms, such as that due to gravity or a constant magnetic field gradient, using grating echo-type atom interferometers. A comprehensive theoretical description of signals generated by both two-pulse and three-pulse interferometers, accounting for magnetic sub-levels in the atomic ground state, is shown to agree with experimental results. Laser-cooled samples of $^{85}$Rb with temperatures as low as 2.4 $\\mu$K have been achieved in a relatively large glass cell with well-suppressed magnetic fields. Using transit time limited interferometer signals, we demonstrate sensitivity to externally applied magnetic gradients as small as $\\sim 4$ mG/cm. With these timescales we estimate that precision measurements of the gravitational acceleration, $g$, are possible with both the two-pulse and three-pulse echo interferometers. Whereas the two-pulse signal is a position-sensitive technique to measure the absolute value of $g$, the thre...

  12. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  13. Characterization of phenolic compounds using separation techniques coupled to mass spectrometry of plant extracts with demonstrated bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Iswaldi, Ihsan

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis, entitled "Characterization of phenolic compounds using separation techniques coupled to mass spectrometry of plant extracts with demonstrated bioactivity", consists of two main sections: the Introduction and the Experimental Section. The first section describes an overview of traditional medicine and functional food, plant foods as natural source of bioactive compounds, polyphenols and bioactivity and the analytical tools used to identify polyphenols such as high-pe...

  14. Determination of the species generated in atmospheric-pressure laser-induced plasmas by mass spectrometry techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, F; Apiñaniz, J I; Carpentier, A V; Albaneda, M Sánchez; Roso, L; Raposo, C; Padilla, C; Conde, A Peralta

    2015-01-01

    We present temporal information obtained by mass spectrometry techniques about the evolution of plasmas generated by laser filamentation in air. The experimental setup used in this work allowed us to study not only the dynamics of the filament core but also of the energy reservoir that surrounds it. Furthermore, valuable insights about the chemistry of such systems like the photofragmentation and/or formation of molecules were obtained. The interpretation of the experimental results are supported by PIC (particle in cell) simulations.

  15. The determination of trace elements in crude oil and its heavy fractions by atomic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duyck, Christiane; Miekeley, Norbert; Porto da Silveira, Carmem L.; Aucelio, Ricardo Q. [Departamento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Campos, Reinaldo C. [Departamento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: rccampos@rdc.puc-rio.br; Grinberg, Patricia; Brandao, Geisamanda P. [Departamento de Quimica da Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    A literature review on the determination of trace elements in crude oil and heavy molecular mass fractions (saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes) by ICP-MS, ICP OES and AAS is presented. Metal occurrences, forms and distributions are examined as well as their implications in terms of reservoir geochemistry, oil refining and environment. The particular analytical challenges for the determination of metals in these complex matrices by spectrochemical techniques are discussed. Sample preparation based on ashing, microwave-assisted digestion and combustion decomposition procedures is noted as robust and long used. However, the introduction of non-aqueous solvents and micro-emulsions into inductively coupled plasmas is cited as a new trend for achieving rapid and accurate analysis. Separation procedures for operationally defined fractions in crude oil are more systematically applied for the observation of metal distributions and their implications. Chemical speciation is of growing interest, achieved by the coupling of high efficiency separation techniques (e.g., HPLC and GC) to ICP-MS instrumentation, which allows the simultaneous determination of multiple organometallic species of geochemical and environmental importance.

  16. The determination of trace elements in crude oil and its heavy fractions by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyck, Christiane; Miekeley, Norbert; Porto da Silveira, Carmem L.; Aucélio, Ricardo Q.; Campos, Reinaldo C.; Grinberg, Patrícia; Brandão, Geisamanda P.

    2007-09-01

    A literature review on the determination of trace elements in crude oil and heavy molecular mass fractions (saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes) by ICP-MS, ICP OES and AAS is presented. Metal occurrences, forms and distributions are examined as well as their implications in terms of reservoir geochemistry, oil refining and environment. The particular analytical challenges for the determination of metals in these complex matrices by spectrochemical techniques are discussed. Sample preparation based on ashing, microwave-assisted digestion and combustion decomposition procedures is noted as robust and long used. However, the introduction of non-aqueous solvents and micro-emulsions into inductively coupled plasmas is cited as a new trend for achieving rapid and accurate analysis. Separation procedures for operationally defined fractions in crude oil are more systematically applied for the observation of metal distributions and their implications. Chemical speciation is of growing interest, achieved by the coupling of high efficiency separation techniques (e.g., HPLC and GC) to ICP-MS instrumentation, which allows the simultaneous determination of multiple organometallic species of geochemical and environmental importance.

  17. Revealing the composition of organic materials in polychrome works of art: the role of mass spectrometry-based techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Palmisano, Francesco; Sabbatini, Luigia

    2016-10-01

    The most recent advances in the identification and determination of organic constituents in paintings and other polychrome objects using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques are reviewed. The latest achievements in gas chromatography (GC)-MS and pyrolysis (Py-) GC-MS are mainly related to sample pretreatment protocols and to the employment of double-shot or laser desorption pyrolysis, respectively. MS techniques based on soft ionization methods such as matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) are discussed. So far, MALDI and ESI MS have been mainly used in the characterization of proteinaceous materials, but further applications are definitely emerging, e.g., in the fields of lipids, resins, and organic colorants analysis. Chemical imaging by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF SIMS), formerly applied to the detection and localization of lipid binders and inorganic materials, has been recently extended to proteins. Finally, the potential of niche techniques such as direct temperature resolved mass spectrometry (DTMS) and direct analysis in real time (DART) MS are outlined. PMID:27558102

  18. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry to determine metallic impurities in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brazilian Energetic Alternative Program expects the reduction of our dependence on foreign energy sources, by replacing fuel oil by mineral coal. Its gasification by means of nuclear energy must be also considered. However, the intensive burning of coal leads to serious environmental problems. During its combustion the release to atmosphere of toxic elements such as As, Hg, Pb, Zn and others is of great concern. Hence, it is important to have reliable analytical methods which can monitor inorganic constituents at various stages of coal production and utilization. The AAS is a suitable analytical technique to determine pollutants in coal because it is sensitive, simple, economic and cover a large range of concentration. The need of a previous treatment of sample is overcome by using an acid attack (HNO3 + HClO4 + HF) which has been proved to be rapid and efficient. (Author)

  19. Nondestructive atomic compositional analysis of BeMgZnO quaternary alloys using ion beam analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolnai, Z., E-mail: zolnai.zsolt@ttk.mta.hu [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Toporkov, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601W Main St, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Volk, J. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601W Main St, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Demchenko, D.O. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, 701W. Grace St., Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Okur, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601W Main St, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Szabó, Z. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Avrutin, V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601W Main St, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Kótai, E. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • BeMgZnO thin layers were grown with plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). • The Be contents were accurately measured with RBS and proton elastic backscattering. • The Tauc bandgap was measured from optical transmittance experiments. • The bandgap has been varied between 3.26 eV and 4.62 eV via the Be and Mg content. • Experimental and density functional theory calculated bandgaps were in good agreement. - Abstract: The atomic composition with less than 1–2 atom% uncertainty was measured in ternary BeZnO and quaternary BeMgZnO alloys using a combination of nondestructive Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with 1 MeV He{sup +} analyzing ion beam and non-Rutherford elastic backscattering experiments with 2.53 MeV energy protons. An enhancement factor of 60 in the cross-section of Be for protons has been achieved to monitor Be atomic concentrations. Usually the quantitative analysis of BeZnO and BeMgZnO systems is challenging due to difficulties with appropriate experimental tools for the detection of the light Be element with satisfactory accuracy. As it is shown, our applied ion beam technique, supported with the detailed simulation of ion stopping, backscattering, and detection processes allows of quantitative depth profiling and compositional analysis of wurtzite BeZnO/ZnO/sapphire and BeMgZnO/ZnO/sapphire layer structures with low uncertainty for both Be and Mg. In addition, the excitonic bandgaps of the layers were deduced from optical transmittance measurements. To augment the measured compositions and bandgaps of BeO and MgO co-alloyed ZnO layers, hybrid density functional bandgap calculations were performed with varying the Be and Mg contents. The theoretical vs. experimental bandgaps show linear correlation in the entire bandgap range studied from 3.26 eV to 4.62 eV. The analytical method employed should help facilitate bandgap engineering for potential applications, such as solar blind UV photodetectors and

  20. Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Andrew Douglas

    Gas atomized magnesium powders are critical for the production of a wide variety of flares, tracer projectiles, and other munitions for the United States military, along with a growing number of applications in both alloying and powder metallurgy. Gas atomization of magnesium is performed by numerous companies worldwide, but represents a single point failure within the United States as there is only one domestic producer. These powders are pyrophoric and must be handled carefully and kept dry at all times. Recent studies have explored the ability of certain fluorine containing cover gases to protect molten magnesium in casting operations from excessive vaporization and burning by modifying the native oxide (MgO) through interaction with these gas atmospheres. The present study sought to adapt this melt protection strategy for use as an in-situ passivation technique that could be employed to form a protective reaction film during gas atomization of magnesium powders. This fluorinated oxide shell was intended to provide superior coverage and adherence to the underlying metal, which may improve the ability of powders to resist ignition at elevated temperatures and during powder handling. Two candidate gases were tested in this research, SF6 and NF3, and reaction films of both were produced on miniature melt samples in a controlled environment and characterized using auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultimately, SF6 was chosen to conduct a small scale magnesium atomization experiment for verification of the fluorination reaction and to experimentally test the ignition temperature of these coated particles compared to other magnesium powders available today. This novel passivation technique was found to be far superior to magnesium's native oxide at resisting ignition and, thus, to reduce the hazard associated with handling and transport of magnesium powders for defense applications. If fully commercialized, this passivation method also

  1. Determination of trace selenium in high purity tellurium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry after solid phase extraction of a diaminobenzidine-selenium chelate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wang; Ying, Zeng; Jinyong, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Macroporous adsorption resin was used as the sorbent for solid phase extraction and determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium prior to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis. Selenium was converted into an organic Se chelate using 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine and was separated from the tellurium matrix by solid phase extraction. The resin was packed as a column for solid phase extraction. Under optimum conditions, trace Se can be quantitatively extracted and the tellurium matrix can be removed. The Se in the eluate was determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The limit of detection (3σ) of this method was 0.22 ng g- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) ranged from 2.0 to 2.5% for the three investigated tellurium samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium samples.

  2. Determination of Pb(Ⅱ) and Cu(Ⅱ) by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Preconcentration by a Schiff Base Adsorbed on Surfactant Coated Alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SABER TEHRANI Mohammad; RASTEGAR Faramarz; PARCHEHBAF Ayob; KHATAMIAN Masoomeh

    2006-01-01

    1,2-Bis(salicylidenamino)ethane loaded onto sodium dodecyl sulfate-coated alumina was used as a new chelating sorbent for the preconcentration of traces of Pb(Ⅱ) and Cu(Ⅱ) prior to atomic absorption spectrometric determination. The influence of pH, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions, and foreign ions on the recovery of Pb(Ⅱ)by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The data of limit of detection (3σ) for Pb(Ⅱ) and Cu(Ⅱ)posed method was successfully applied to determination of lead and copper in different water samples.

  3. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  4. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid–liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L−1, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L−1. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96–102% obtained for Cd and 97–101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE–SS–ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd and Pb determination based on the combination of DSP, SS and ETAAS • Urine matrix was eliminated using DSPE based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. • Slurry sampling technique permitted the direct injection of sample into the ETAAS atomizer. • Appropriate

  5. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid–liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R.M.; Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L{sup −1}, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L{sup −1}. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96–102% obtained for Cd and 97–101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE–SS–ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd and Pb determination based on the combination of DSP, SS and ETAAS • Urine matrix was eliminated using DSPE based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. • Slurry sampling technique permitted the direct injection of sample into the ETAAS atomizer.

  6. Quantitation of motexafin lutetium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Dale; Mody, Tarak D.; Hatcher, Lori I.; Fiene, John; Stiles, Mark; Patrick P. Lin; Lee, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) methods were developed and validated for the evaluation of motexafin lutetium (MLu, lutetium texaphyrin, PCI-0123) pharmacokinetics in human plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was specific for MLu, whereas the ICP-AES method measured total elemental lutetium. Both methods were fast, simple, precise, and accurate. For the LC-MS/MS method, a closely related analogue (PCI-0353...

  7. Application of atomic absorption spectrometry with continuous light source to analyze selected metals important for human health in different parts of oranges

    OpenAIRE

    Szwerc Wojciech; Sowa Ireneusz

    2014-01-01

    The publication describes the application of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (H-R CS AAS) to determine some physiologically essential and toxic elements occurring in citrus fruits of different origins. Before analysis, the samples were mineralized using a mixture of deionized water and 69% nitric acid 3:1 (v/v) in high pressure microwave digestion at 188°C during one hour.

  8. Selective Flow Injection Analysis of Ultra-trace Amounts of Cr(VI), Preconcentration of It by Solvent Extraction, and Determination by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETAAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen; Sturup, Stefan; Spliid, Henrik;

    1999-01-01

    A rapid, robust, sensitive and selective time-based flow injection (FI) on-line solvent extraction system interfaced with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is described for analyzing ultra-trace amounts of Cr(VI). The sample is initially mixed on-line with isobutyl methyl keto......(VI)-reference material, synthetic seawater and waste waters, and waste water samples from an incineration plant and a desulphurization plant, respectively....

  9. RAPID AND SENSITIVE DETERMINATION OF PALLADIUM USING HOMOGENEOUS LIQUID-LIQUID MICROEXTRACTION VIA FLOTATION ASSISTANCE FOLLOWED BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Rezaee; Reyhaneh Shadaniyan; Majid Haji Hosseini; Faezeh Khalilian

    2015-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace amounts of palladium was developed using homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction via flotation assistance (HLLME-FA) followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was used as a complexing agent. This was applied to determine palladium in three types of water samples. In this study, a special extraction cell was designed to facilitate collection of the low-density solvent extraction. No...

  10. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  11. Application of atomic absorption spectrometry with continuous light source to analyze selected metals important for human health in different parts of oranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwerc Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The publication describes the application of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (H-R CS AAS to determine some physiologically essential and toxic elements occurring in citrus fruits of different origins. Before analysis, the samples were mineralized using a mixture of deionized water and 69% nitric acid 3:1 (v/v in high pressure microwave digestion at 188°C during one hour.

  12. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A cal...

  13. Characterization of the occupational exposure and air transported particles using the techniques of PIXE 252Cf PMDS and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk for human health due to exposure to aerosols depends on the intake pattern, the mass concentration and the speciation of the elements present in airborne particles. In this work PDMS (Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry) was used as complementary technique to the PIXE (Particle Induced X ray Emission) technique to characterize aerosols samples collected in the environment. The PIXE technique allows the identification of the elements present in the sample and to determine their mass concentrations. The mass spectrometry (PDMS) was used to identify the speciation of these elements present in the samples. The aerosol samples were collected using a six stage cascade impactor in three sites. The Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) measured indicated that the airborne particulate were in the fine fraction of the aerosols. The theoretical uranium concentration in urine samples using ICRP lung model parameters suggest that the elemental mass concentration in respirable fraction of aerosol and the chemical speciation are important factors to determine the uranium concentration in urine and that the determination of specific solubility parameters for each compound is the most important factor to calculate the uranium concentration in urine. PIXE allows to identify and quantify the elements heavier than Na (Z=11) while PDMS allows to identify the organic and inorganic compounds present in the samples. As these techniques are used as complementary techniques they provide important information about the aerosols characterization. (author)

  14. Ionic liquid ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we consider ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of rhodium from aqueous samples and show that this is a fast and reliable sample pre-treatment for the determination of rhodium ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Rh(III) was transferred into its complex with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylamino phenol as a chelating agent, and an ultrasonic bath with the ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide at room temperature was used to extract the analyte. The centrifuged rhodium complex was then enriched in the form of ionic liquid droplets and prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, 300 μL ethanol was added to the ionic liquid-rich phase. Finally, the influence of various parameters on the recovery of Rh(III) was optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.0-500.0 ng mL-1, the detection limit was 0.37 ng mL-1 (3Sb/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was ±1.63% (n = 7, C = 200 ng mL-1). The results show that ionic liquid based ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, is a rapid, simple, sensitive and efficient analytical method for the separation and determination of trace amounts of Rh(III) ions with minimum organic solvent consumption.

  15. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  16. Electrical characterization of grain boundaries of CZTS thin films using conductive atomic force microscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhunthan, N.; Singh, Om Pal [Compound Semiconductor Solar Cell, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, New Delhi 110012 (India); Toutam, Vijaykumar, E-mail: toutamvk@nplindia.org [Quantum Phenomena and Applications Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, V.N., E-mail: singhvn@nplindia.org [Compound Semiconductor Solar Cell, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Experimental setup for conducting AFM (C-AFM). - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin film was grown by reactive co-sputtering. • The electronic properties were probed using conducting atomic force microscope, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. • C-AFM current flow mainly through grain boundaries rather than grain interiors. • SKPM indicated higher potential along the GBs compared to grain interiors. • The SCM explains that charge separation takes place at the interface of grain and grain boundary. - Abstract: Electrical characterization of grain boundaries (GB) of Cu-deficient CZTS (Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide) thin films was done using atomic force microscopic (AFM) techniques like Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM), Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Absorbance spectroscopy was done for optical band gap calculations and Raman, XRD and EDS for structural and compositional characterization. Hall measurements were done for estimation of carrier mobility. CAFM and KPFM measurements showed that the currents flow mainly through grain boundaries (GB) rather than grain interiors. SCM results showed that charge separation mainly occurs at the interface of grain and grain boundaries and not all along the grain boundaries.

  17. Introduction to Body Composition Assessment Using the Deuterium Dilution Technique with Analysis of Urine Samples by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has fostered the more widespread use of a stable isotope technique to assess body composition in different population groups to address priority areas in public health nutrition in Member States. It has done this by supporting national and regional nutrition projects through its technical cooperation programme and coordinated research projects over many years. This publication was developed by an international group of experts to provide practical hands-on guidance in the use of this technique in settings where analysis of stable isotope ratios in biological samples is to be made by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The publication is targeted at new users of this technique, for example nutritionists, analytical chemists and other professionals. More detailed information on the theoretical background and the practical applications of state of the art methodologies to monitor changes in body composition can be found in IAEA Human Health Series No. 3, Assessment of Body Composition and Total Energy Expenditure in Humans by Stable Isotope Techniques

  18. Technique for measuring the frequency of slow electron collisions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The described technique was applied for registering the frequency of slow electrons collisions with molecules and atoms of substances. The registering is carried out through superpositioning of crossing high-frequency electrical and adjustable constant magnetic fields over the investigated media, through inserting in this media electrons with the necessary energy and by registering the forms of the curve that characterizes the electron-cyclotron resonance, by which a judgement can be made about the collision frequency. To lower the electrical field frequency, to simplify the apparatus and widen the nomenclature of the investigated substances a stationary flux of electrons is inserted in the investigated media with the help of thermoionic cathode, for example, hence the resonance curve of the electron power reaching the collector is registered. The described technique can be applied for investigating the plasma parameters. (author)

  19. A Fabrication Technique for Nano-gap Electrodes by Atomic Force Microscopy Nano lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple technique is introduced for fabrication of nano-gap electrodes by using nano-oxidation atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography with a Cr/ Pt coated silicon tip. AFM local anodic oxidation was performed on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) surfaces by optimization of desired conditions to control process in contact mode. Silicon electrodes with gaps of sub 31 nm were fabricated by nano-oxidation method. This technique which is simple, controllable, inexpensive and fast is capable of fabricating nano-gap structures. The current-voltage measurements (I-V) of the electrodes demonstrated very good insulating characteristics. The results show that silicon electrodes have a great potential for fabrication of single molecule transistors (SMT), single electron transistors (SET) and the other nano electronic devices. (author)

  20. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some noble gases using the high-frequency deflection technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B Das; S Karmakar

    2005-12-01

    High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have been performed with great success in a large number of atoms and ions. The present version of the apparatus is described in this paper together with a brief description of the basic features and performance.

  1. Ion storage techniques and time-of-flight mass spectrometry in physical forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D M; Grace, L I

    2000-06-27

    Effective investigative analysis requires proper selection of sample-collection procedures, preservation, and analysis methods. To achieve these objectives it is essential to tailor the collection and analysis methods to the application requirements, which are constrained by different parameters such as analysis time, sample concentration, matrix interferences, and analyte stability (e.g., surface activity (''stickiness'') and chemical reactivity). In addition, method optimization must be accomplished without compromising sample integrity. Maintaining sample integrity requires minimizing and characterizing contamination as well as reducing sample degradation and loss to prevent both false positive and negative detection, respectively. When specific constraints are defined, depending on target chemical(s) and application scenarios, it is sometimes necessary to modify or develop new equipment and methods to best satisfy the application requirements. For this work, we are interested in real-time monitoring of airborne chemicals, which are commonly referred to as volatile organic compounds (VOC). Although there are a number of techniques for remote analysis of VOCs, many of these applications do not provide the specificity and sensitivity needed in real-time application scenarios. For example, spectroscopic techniques are capable of providing low part-per-billion volume/volume (ppb v/v) detection if a compound is distributed over a large area, however, they provide limited compound structural information. A different approach using air monitoring mass spectrometry can provide more specific chemical information in terms of compound molecular weight and structural information, however, preconcentration is required to achieve low ppb detection. Operation of the trap as a pulsed extraction eliminates many of the limitations that accompany operating the trap using mass selective axial ejection. As pulsed extraction source, the IS can be operated under

  2. Determination of Cd, Pb and As in sediments of the Sava River by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONA MURKO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The applicability of nitric acid, palladium nitrate and a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrate as matrix modifiers were estimated for the accurate and reproducible determination of cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb and arsenic (As in sediments of the Sava River by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, ETAAS. Decomposition of the samples was done in a closed vessel microwave-assisted digestion system using nitric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, followed by the addition of boric acid to convert the fluorides into soluble complexes. The parameters for the determination of Cd, Pb and As in sediments were optimised for each individual element and for each matrix modifier. In addition, two sediment reference materials were also analysed. In determination of Cd and Pb, nitric acid was found to be the most appropriate matrix modifier. The accurate and reliable determination of Cd and Pb in sediments was possible also in the presence of boric acid. The use of a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrate efficiently compensated for matrix effects and enabled the accurate and reliable determination of As in the sediments. Quantification of Cd and As was performed by calibration using acid matched standard solutions, while the standard addition method was applied for the quantification of Pb. The repeatability of the analytical procedure for the determination of Cd, Pb and As in sediments was ±5 % for Cd, ±4 % for Pb and ±2 % for As. The LOD values of the analytical procedure were found to be 0.05 mg/kg for Cd and 0.25 mg/kg for Pb and As, while the LOQ values were 0.16 mg/kg for Cd and 0.83 mg/kg for Pb and As. Finally, Cd, Pb and As were successfully determined in sediments of the Sava River in Slovenia.

  3. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagarová, Ingrid; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb-dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l- 1 HNO3. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l- 1, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l- 1, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l- 1 of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5-4.0 μg l- 1 (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91-96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters.

  4. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagarová, Ingrid, E-mail: hagarova@fns.uniba.sk; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb–dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l{sup −1}, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l{sup −1}, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l{sup −1} of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5–4.0 μg l{sup −1} (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91–96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters. - Highlights: • The potential of coacervates for the extraction of metal ions is examined. • No difficulties in coupling of ETAAS with the proposed CAE are observed. • Achieved preconcentration factor results in enhanced sensitivity. • Analytical performance is confirmed by the reliable determination of trace Pb. • The proposed CAE is ecofriendly and efficient.

  5. Determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a three-component solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; de Jesus, Alexandre; Vale, Maria G R; Silva, Márcia M

    2010-12-15

    Lubricating oils are used to decrease wear and friction of movable parts of engines and turbines, being in that way essential for the performance and the increase of that equipment lifespan. The presence of some metals shows the addition of specific additives such as detergents, dispersals and antioxidants that improve the performance of these lubricants. In this work, a method for determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in lubricating oil by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. The samples were diluted with a small quantity of aviation kerosene (AVK), n-propanol and water to form a three-component solution before its introduction in the F AAS. Aqueous inorganic standards diluted in the same way have been used for calibration. To assess the accuracy of the new method, it was compared with ABNT NBR 14066 standard method, which consists in diluting the sample with AVK and in quantification by F AAS. Two other validating methods have also been used: the acid digestion and the certified reference material NIST (SRM 1084a). The proposed method provides the following advantages in relation to the standard method: significant reduction of the use of AVK, higher stability of the analytes in the medium and application of aqueous inorganic standards for calibration. The limits of detection for calcium, magnesium and zinc were 1.3 μg g(-1), 0.052 μg g(-1) and 0.41 μg g(-1), respectively. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium and zinc in six different samples obtained by the developed method did not differ significantly from the results obtained by the reference methods at the 95% confidence level (Student's t-test and ANOVA). Therefore, the proposed method becomes an efficient alternative for determination of metals in lubricating oil.

  6. Preconcentration of gold ions from water samples by modified organo-nanoclay sorbent prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzali, Daryoush, E-mail: daryoush_afzali@yahoo.com [Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzaei, Mohammad [Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    In this work, the applicability of modified organo nanoclay as a new and easy prepared solid sorbent for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Au(III) ion from water samples is studied. The organo nanoclay was modified with 5-(4'-dimethylamino benzyliden)-rhodanine and used as a sorbent for separation of Au(III) ions. The sorption of gold ions was quantitative in the pH range of 2.0-6.0. Quantitative desorption occurred with 6.0 mL of 1.0 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The amount of eluted Au(III) was measured using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the initial solution the linear dynamic range was in the range of 0.45 ng mL{sup -1} to 10.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, the detection limit was 0.1 ng mL{sup -1} and the preconcentration factor was 105. Also, the relative standard deviation was {+-}2.3% (n = 8 and C = 2.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1}) and the maximum capacity of the sorbent was 3.9 mg of Au(III) per gram of modified organo nanoclay. The influences of the experimental parameters including sample pH, eluent volume and eluent type, sample volume, and interference of some ions on the recoveries of the gold ion were investigated. The proposed method was applied for preconcentration and determination of gold in different samples.

  7. Preconcentration procedure using cloud point extraction in the presence of electrolyte for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Coelho, Luciana [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Arruda, Marco Aurelio Zezzi [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: zezzi@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-06-30

    This paper describes a micelle-mediated phase separation in the presence of electrolyte as a preconcentration method for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cadmium was complexed with ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in an acidic medium (0.32 mol l{sup -} {sup 1} HCl) using Triton X-114 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume (about 20 {mu}l) of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The chemical variables that affect the cloud point extraction, such as complexing time (0-20 min), Triton X114 concentration (0.043-0.87% w/v) and complexing agent concentration (0.01-0.1 mol l{sup -} {sup 1}), were investigated. The cloud point is formed in the presence of NaCl at room temperature (25 deg. C), and the electrolyte concentration (0.5-5% w/v) was also investigated. Under optimized conditions, only 8 ml of sample was used in the presence of 0.043% w/v Triton X-114 and 1% (w/v) NaCl. This method permitted limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 {mu}g l{sup -} {sup 1} and 2.9 {mu}g l{sup -} {sup 1} Cd, respectively, and a linear calibration range from 3 to 400 {mu}g l{sup -} {sup 1} Cd. The proposed method was applied to Cd determination in physiological solutions (containing 0.9% (w/v) of NaCl), mineral water, lake water and cigarette samples (tobacco)

  8. Simultaneous flow injection preconcentration of lead and cadmium using cloud point extraction and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Edson Luiz [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario, 303, CP 96, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: edsonqmc@hotmail.com; Santos Roldan, Paulo dos [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario, 303, CP 96, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    A flow injection (FI) micelle-mediated separation/preconcentration procedure for the determination of lead and cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been proposed. The analytes reacted with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of 0.05% (w/v) Triton X-114 in a solution buffered at pH 8.4. In the preconcentration stage, the micellar solution was continuously injected into a flow system with four mini-columns packed with cotton, glass wool, or TNT compresses for phase separation. The analytes-containing micelles were eluted from the mini-columns by a stream of 3 mol L{sup -1} HCl solution and the analytes were determined by FAAS. Chemical and flow variables affecting the preconcentration of the analytes were studied. For 15 mL of preconcentrated solution, the enhancement factors varied between 15.1 and 20.3, the limits of detection were approximately 4.5 and 0.75 {mu}g L{sup -1} for lead and cadmium, respectively. For a solution containing 100 and 10 {mu}g L{sup -1} of lead and cadmium, respectively, the R.S.D. values varied from 1.6 to 3.2% (n = 7). The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. The method was susceptible to matrix effects, but these interferences were minimized by adding barium ions as masking agent in the sample solutions, and recoveries from spiked sample varied in the range of 95.1-107.3%.

  9. Determination of ultra trace arsenic species in water samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulusoy, Halil Ibrahim, E-mail: hiulusoy@yahoo.com [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey); Akcay, Mehmet; Ulusoy, Songuel; Guerkan, Ramazan [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey)

    2011-10-10

    Graphical abstract: The possible complex formation mechanism for ultra-trace As determination. Highlights: {yields} CPE/HGAAS system for arsenic determination and speciation in real samples has been applied first time until now. {yields} The proposed method has the lowest detection limit when compared with those of similar CPE studies present in literature. {yields} The linear range of the method is highly wide and suitable for its application to real samples. - Abstract: Cloud point extraction (CPE) methodology has successfully been employed for the preconcentration of ultra-trace arsenic species in aqueous samples prior to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). As(III) has formed an ion-pairing complex with Pyronine B in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 10.0 and extracted into the non-ionic surfactant, polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114). After phase separation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 2 mL of 1 M HCl and 0.5 mL of 3.0% (w/v) Antifoam A. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 60 and a detection limit of 0.008 {mu}g L{sup -1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.9918 was obtained with a calibration curve in the range of 0.03-4.00 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The proposed preconcentration procedure was successfully applied to the determination of As(III) ions in certified standard water samples (TMDA-53.3 and NIST 1643e, a low level fortified standard for trace elements) and some real samples including natural drinking water and tap water samples.

  10. Trace-element determination in lichens of Cordoba (Argentina) using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalina ecklonii (Spreng.) Mey. and Flot. is a lichen widely distributed in Cordoba, a central province of Argentina. The ability of this lichen as an atmospheric pollution bioindicator has already been studied in relation to its physiological response to air pollutants. This work has to do with the study of R. ecklonii in terms of its capacity to accumulate heavy metals and other trace elements. The sampled area, located in the province of Cordoba, covered 50,000 km2 and was divided following a grid of 25 x 25 km. Lichens were collected at the intersecting points, no least than 500 m from main routes or highly populated centres and individuals were randomly gathered following the four cardinal directions and no more than 100 m from the geographically settled point. From each pool, three sub-samples were taken for independent analysis using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA), for the determination of twenty nine elements (Cu, Ni, Mn, and Pb (AAS) and As, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, and Zn (NAA). The quality of the determinations was checked using standard reference material and data sets were evaluated using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and factor analysis. The highest variation coefficients correspond to Ca, Cr, and Zn. The studied elements were identified as of physiological importance and as emitted by natural (soil and rocks) and anthropogenic sources (non-ferrous metallurgy, coal combustion, oil-fired plants, fossil fuel combustion and, other industries). (author)

  11. Simultaneous flow injection preconcentration of lead and cadmium using cloud point extraction and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Edson Luiz; Roldan, Paulo Dos Santos

    2009-01-15

    A flow injection (FI) micelle-mediated separation/preconcentration procedure for the determination of lead and cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been proposed. The analytes reacted with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of 0.05% (w/v) Triton X-114 in a solution buffered at pH 8.4. In the preconcentration stage, the micellar solution was continuously injected into a flow system with four mini-columns packed with cotton, glass wool, or TNT compresses for phase separation. The analytes-containing micelles were eluted from the mini-columns by a stream of 3molL(-1) HCl solution and the analytes were determined by FAAS. Chemical and flow variables affecting the preconcentration of the analytes were studied. For 15mL of preconcentrated solution, the enhancement factors varied between 15.1 and 20.3, the limits of detection were approximately 4.5 and 0.75microgL(-1) for lead and cadmium, respectively. For a solution containing 100 and 10microgL(-1) of lead and cadmium, respectively, the R.S.D. values varied from 1.6 to 3.2% (n=7). The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. The method was susceptible to matrix effects, but these interferences were minimized by adding barium ions as masking agent in the sample solutions, and recoveries from spiked sample varied in the range of 95.1-107.3%. PMID:18456398

  12. Determination of manganese in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2008-08-01

    The determination of Mn in diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples at µg L - 1 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, after sample stabilization in a three-component medium (microemulsion) was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of sample, propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution, and a stable system was immediately and spontaneously formed. After multivariate optimization by central composite design the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program was defined. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solution was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the optimized microemulsion media and 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The use of modifier was not necessary. Recoveries at the 3 µg L - 1 level using both inorganic and organic Mn standards spiked solutions ranged from 98 to 107% and the limits of detection were 0.6, 0.5 and 0.3 µg L - 1 in the original diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples, respectively. The Mn characteristic mass 3.4 pg. Typical relative standard deviation ( n = 5) of 8, 6 and 7% were found for the samples prepared as microemulsions at concentration levels of 1.3, 0.8, and 1.5 µg L - 1 , respectively. The total determination cycle lasted 4 min for diesel and 3 min for gasoline and naphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in diesel and 10 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in gasoline and naphtha. Accuracy was also assessed by using other method of analysis (ASTM D 3831-90). No statistically significant differences were found between the results obtained with the proposed method and the reference method in the analysis of real samples.

  13. Development of an automated sequential injection on-line solvent extraction-back extraction procedure as demonstrated for the determination of cadmium with detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2002-01-01

    An automated sequential injection (SI) on-line solvent extraction-back extraction separation/preconcentration procedure is described. Demonstrated for the assay of cadmium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), the analyte is initially complexed with ammonium...

  14. Ultrasonic atomization for spray drying: a versatile technique for the preparation of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, B; Kissel, T

    1999-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BDA) loaded microspheres with a spherical shape and smooth surface structure were successfully prepared from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) using an ultrasonic nozzle installed in a Niro laboratory spray dryer. Process and formulation parameters were investigated with respect to their influence on microsphere characteristics, such as particle size, loading capacity, and release properties. Preparation of microspheres in yields of more than 50% was achieved using an ultrasonic atomizer connected to a stream of carrier air. Microsphere characteristics could be modified by changing several technological parameters. An increased polymer concentration of the feed generated larger particles with a significantly reduced initial release of the protein. Moreover, microspheres with a smooth surface structure were obtained from the organic polymer solution with the highest viscosity. Microparticles with a low BSA loading showed a large central cavity surrounded by a thin polymer layer in scanning electron microspheres. A high protein loading led to an enlargement of the shell layer, or even to dense particles without any cavities. A continuous in vitro release pattern of BSA was obtained from the particles with low protein loading. Glass transition temperatures (Tg) of the microspheres before and after lyophilization did not differ from those of the BSA loaded particles prepared by spray drying with a rotary atomizer. Analysis of the polymer by gel permeation chromatography indicated that ultrasonication had no effect on polymer molecular weight. Molecular weight and polydispersity of the pure polymer, placebo microspheres prepared by spray drying, and placebo microspheres prepared using the ultrasonic nozzle were in the same range. In conclusion, ultrasonic atomization represents a versatile and reliable technique for the production of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres without inducing a degradation of the polymer matrix. Particle characteristics

  15. Determination of lead in blood by chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate followed by tungsten-coil atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salido, Arthur; Sanford, Caryn L.; Jones, Bradley T.

    1999-08-01

    An inexpensive, bench-top blood Pb analyzer has been developed. The system is based on tungsten-coil atomic absorption spectrometry. Pb atomization occurs on W-coils extracted from commercially available slide projector bulbs. The system has minimal power requirements: 120 ACV and 15 A. A small, computer-controlled CCD spectrometer is used as the detector. A Pb hollow cathode lamp is used as the source. Blood Pb is chelated with ammonium pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate and extracted into methyl iso-butyl ketone (4-methyl 2-pentanone). Twenty-microliter volumes of the organic phase are deposited on the W-coil, dried at 1.4 A, charred at 2.3 A and atomized at 6.0 A. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry is used as a comparison for W-coil results. Levels 1-4 of a NIST standard reference material 955b ‘lead in bovine blood’ are used to test accuracy and precision. The analytical figures of merit for the system are: 12-pg instrument detection limit, 24-pg blood detection limit and a characteristic mass of 28 pg.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Jorge S.; Anunciação, Taiana A. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); Brandão, Geovani C. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); Dantas, Alailson F. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitário de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-280 (Brazil); Lemos, Valfredo A. [Laboratório de Química Analítica (LQA), Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Campus de Jequié, Jequié, Bahia 45506-191 (Brazil); and others

    2015-05-01

    This work presents an ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction procedure for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Some initial tests showed that the best extraction efficiency was obtained when using ultrasound instead of mechanical agitation, indicating that acoustic cavitation improved the extraction process. Nitric, hydrochloric and acetic acids were evaluated for use in the extraction process, and HNO{sub 3} gave the best results. A two-level full-factorial design was applied to investigate the best conditions for the extraction of Cd from the oil samples. The influences of the sonication amplitude, time and temperature of the extraction were evaluated. The results of the design revealed that all of the variables had a significant effect on the experimental results. Afterward, a Box–Behnken design was applied to determine the optimum conditions for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oil samples. According to a multivariate study, the optimum conditions were as follows: sonication amplitude of 60%, extraction time of 15 min, extraction temperature of 46 °C and 0.1 mol L{sup −1} HNO{sub 3} as the extractor solution. Under optimized conditions, the developed method allows for the determination of Cd in oil samples with a limit of quantification of 7.0 ng kg{sup −1}. Addition and recovery experiments were performed in vegetable oil samples to evaluate the accuracy of the method, and the recoveries obtained varied from 90% to 115%. The samples were also analyzed after the acid digestion procedure, and the paired t-test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences from the proposed method. - Highlights: • The determination of cadmium in vegetable oils was developed using UA-SDME. • HR-CS ET-AAS was employed as a detection technique with direct drop sampling. • The procedure allowed for a reduction in the consumption of reagents and

  17. A comprehensive analysis about the influence of low-level preprocessing techniques on mass spectrometry data for sample classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Hugo; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Fernández-Riverola, Florentino

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) is one of the high-throughput mass spectrometry technologies able to produce data requiring an extensive preprocessing before subsequent analyses. In this context, several low-level preprocessing techniques have been successfully developed for different tasks, including baseline correction, smoothing, normalisation, peak detection and peak alignment. In this work, we present a systematic comparison of different software packages aiding in the compulsory preprocessing of MALDI-TOF data. In order to guarantee the validity of our study, we test multiple configurations of each preprocessing technique that are subsequently used to train a set of classifiers whose performance (kappa and accuracy) provide us accurate information for the final comparison. Results from experiments show the real impact of preprocessing techniques on classification, evidencing that MassSpecWavelet provides the best performance and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are one of the most accurate classifiers.

  18. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  19. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Fabio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Goldschmidt Antes, Fabiane; Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: flores@quimica.ufsm.br

    2009-06-15

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L{sup - 1} KBr in 6 mol L{sup - 1} HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L{sup - 1} HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH{sub 4} solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 deg. C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 deg. C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g{sup - 1} for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  20. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS) using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrumen...

  1. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  2. Monitoring heavy metals pollution in Bandar Emam region by using atomic absorption technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level and distribution of five heavy metals Ni, V, Cr, Pb, and Cd in the sediments waters of three areas Bandar Emam were investigated by the use of atomic absorption technique. Metals have been analyzed for different grain size fractions. These metals levels in sediment are expressed as μgg4+ and metal level in water is expressed as ppm. The concentrations of the elements under investigation is much higher than the concentrations of these elements and these of mean in sediments and waters which were compared with the concentration of these elements in the earth crust and international atomic energy agency and ICRP standards. Significant variations in the level of these metals were considered due to: atmospheric fall out as well as waste waters disposal and anthropogenic inputs, Ni and V were due to non-anthropogenic sources and analysis indicate that the sources of Cr and Cd are mainly oil pollution. High level of lead was considered due to inputs from oil discarded solid waters and the prior high rate petrol combustion lead. Monitoring water and sediments, in other words periodic or continuous determination of the amounts of ionizing radiation in water and sediments is one of the positive steps against the pollution in these regions

  3. Atomic resolution holography using advanced reconstruction techniques for two-dimensional detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, M; Szakal, A; Cser, L [Neutron Spectroscopy Department, Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Krexner, G [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schefer, J, E-mail: marko@szfki.h [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS), Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Atomic resolution holography is based on two concepts. Either the emitter of the radiation used is embedded in the sample (internal source concept) or, on account of the optical reciprocity law, the detector forms part of the sample (internal detector concept). In many cases, holographic objects (atoms and nuclei) simultaneously adopt the roles of both source and detector. Thus, the recorded image contains a mixture of both inside source and inside detector holograms. When reconstructing one type of hologram, the presence of the other hologram causes serious distortions. In the present work, we propose a new method, the so-called double reconstruction (DR), which not only suppresses the mutual distortions but also exploits the information content of the measured hologram more effectively. This novel approach also decreases the level of distortion arising from diffraction and statistical noise. The efficiency of the DR technique is significantly enhanced by employing two-dimensional (2D) area detectors. The power of the method is illustrated here by applying it to a real measurement on a palladium-hydrogen sample.

  4. Surface nanobubbles studied by atomic force microscopy techniques: Facts, fiction, and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Holger; Hain, Nicole; Walczyk, Wiktoria; Wesner, Daniel; Druzhinin, Sergey I.

    2016-08-01

    In this review surface nanobubbles, which are presumably gas-filled enclosures found at the solid-liquid interface, are introduced and discussed together with key experimental findings that suggest that these nanoscale features indeed exist and are filled with gas. The most prominent technique used thus far has been atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, due to its potentially invasive nature, AFM data must be interpreted with great care. Owing to their curved interface, the Laplace internal pressure of surface nanobubbles exceeds substantially the outside ambient pressure, and the experimentally observed long term stability is in conflict with estimates of gas transport rates and predicted surface nanobubble lifetimes. Despite recent explanations of both the stability and the unusual nanoscopic contact angles, the development of new co-localization approaches and the adequate analysis of AFM data of surface nanobubbles are important as a means to confirm the gaseous nature and correctly estimate the interfacial curvature.

  5. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  6. Laser-excitation technique for the measurement of absolute transition probabilities of weak atomic lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, H. S.; Smith, P. L.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique is presented for the measurement of transition probabilities for weak allowed, intersystem, and forbidden lines. The method exploits the fact that oscillator strength is proportional to the number of stimulated absorptions and emissions produced by a narrow-band laser pulse of known energy which is in resonance with an atomic transition. The method is tested for a particular transition of Mg I with a known oscillator strength value and of appropriate magnitude. The number densities are measured using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the hook method for the lower level population and by measuring an absorption-equivalent width for the other. The apparatus consisted of a high-power tunable laser and a magnesium oven to produce excited Mg vapor, and a laser-plasma background continuum. The results are in good agreement with theoretical and other experimental data.

  7. Coordinate space translation technique for simulation of electronic process in the ion-atom collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Jian; Kim, Kwang S

    2011-04-21

    Recently we developed a theoretical model of ion-atom collisions, which was made on the basis of a time-dependent density functional theory description of the electron dynamics and a classical treatment of the heavy particle motion. Taking advantage of the real-space grid method, we introduce a "coordinate space translation" technique to allow one to focus on a certain space of interest such as the region around the projectile or the target. Benchmark calculations are given for collisions between proton and oxygen over a wide range of impact energy. To extract the probability of charge transfer, the formulation of Lüdde and Dreizler [J. Phys. B 16, 3973 (1983)] has been generalized to ensemble-averaging application in the particular case of O((3)P). Charge transfer total cross sections are calculated, showing fairly good agreements between experimental data and present theoretical results.

  8. Site-controlled quantum dots fabricated using an atomic-force microscope assisted technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuma Y

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn atomic-force microscope assisted technique is developed to control the position and size of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Presently, the site precision is as good as ± 1.5 nm and the size fluctuation is within ± 5% with the minimum controllable lateral diameter of 20 nm. With the ability of producing tightly packed and differently sized QDs, sophisticated QD arrays can be controllably fabricated for the application in quantum computing. The optical quality of such site-controlled QDs is found comparable to some conventionally self-assembled semiconductor QDs. The single dot photoluminescence of site-controlled InAs/InP QDs is studied in detail, presenting the prospect to utilize them in quantum communication as precisely controlled single photon emitters working at telecommunication bands.

  9. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  10. Effect of magnesium acetylacetonate on the signal of organic forms of vanadium in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Welz, Bernhard; Castilho, Ivan N B; Carasek, Eduardo

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of magnesium acetylacetonate (MgA) on the signal of organic forms of vanadium in xylene solution by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MgA alone or mixed with palladium acetylacetonate (PdA) was considered as a chemical modifier. It has been found that MgA does not improve, but decreases significantly the integrated absorbance of V in the form of alkyl-aryl sulfonates, acetylacetonates, porphyrins and in lubricating oils, while its effect is negligible in the case of "dark products" from petroleum distillation, i.e., heavy oil fractions and residues. The decrease is also observed in the presence of Pd. The MgA (or MgA+PdA) effect on the integrated absorbance of V has been studied using the following variants: different ways of modifier application, various pyrolysis temperature, additional application of air ashing, preliminary pretreatment with iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride, application of various graphite furnace heating systems (longitudinal or transverse) and various optical and background correction systems (medium-resolution line source spectrometer with deuterium background correction or high-resolution continuum source spectrometer). The experiments indicate formation of more refractory compounds as a possible reason for the decrease of the integrated absorbance for some forms of V in the presence of MgA. The application of MgA as a chemical modifier in V determination is not recommended. Results of this work have general importance as, apart from the intentional use of MgA as a modifier, organic Mg compounds, present in petroleum products for other reason (e.g. as an additive), can influence the signal of V compounds and hence the accuracy in V determination. Generally, petroleum products with known amount of V are recommended as standards; however, lubricating oils can be inadequate for "dark products" from petroleum distillation. In the case of unknown samples it is

  11. Evaluation of arsenic and selenium in Brazilian soluble coffee by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with hydride generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder José dos Santos

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A method for the evaluation of arsenic and selenium in soluble coffee by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with continuous hydride generation to attend the Brazilian food legislation is described. Samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide in a focused microwave system. Slow heating eliminated nitric acid and selenium (VI was reduced to selenium (IV by addition of 6 mol/L hydrochloric acid and heating at 90° C under a reflux system. The influence of sample acidity on sensitivity was investigated. Hydrochloric acid 6 mol/L was the most suitable reaction medium. Practical detection limits of 2.0mug/L for As and 1.0mu g/L for Se were achieved and attended the Brazilian food legislation. The results of recoveries on spiked samples demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the procedure.O presente trabalho descreve um método para determinação de arsênio e selênio em café solúvel por espectrometria de emissão atômica com plasma acoplado a geração de hidretos, com o objetivo de atender aos limites estabelecidos pela legislação Brasileira de alimentos. Digestões das amostras foram realizadas com ácido nítrico e peróxido de hidrogênio em sistema de microondas focalizadas. O excesso de ácido nítrico foi eliminado através de aquecimento lento e o selênio (VI foi reduzido a selênio (IV através de tratamento com ácido clorídrico 6 mol/L e aquecimento a 90° C em sistema de refluxo. A influência da acidez na sensibilidade foi investigada, sendo o meio mais estável a concentração de ácido clorídrico de 6 mol/L. Os limites de determinação foram de 2.0 mig/L para o As e 1.0 mig/L para o Se. Os resultados das amostras enriquecidas demonstram a precisão e exatidão do método proposto.

  12. Lead and cadmium in human teeth from Jordan by atomic absorption spectrometry: Some factors influencing their concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to measure the concentrations of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in human teeth and to investigate the affecting factors. Teeth samples (n = 268) were collected from people living in different cities in Jordan including Amman, Zarqa, Al-Mafraq and Irbid and analyzed for Pb and Cd using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). A questionnaire was used to gather information on each person, such as age, sex, place where the patient lives, smoking, presence of amalgam fillings inside the mouth, and whether the patient uses toothpaste or not. The mean concentrations of Pb and Cd were 28.91 μg/g and 0.44 μg/g, respectively. The results indicate that there is a clear relation between Pb and Cd concentrations and the presence of amalgam fillings, smoking, and place of living. Pb was sex-dependent, whereas Cd was not. Our results show that Pb and Cd concentrations in samples obtained from Al-Mafraq and Irbid are higher than those obtained from Amman and Zarqa. Pb was highest in Mafraq, whereas Cd was highest in Irbid. The Pb and Cd concentrations in teeth from smokers (means: Pb = 31.89 μg/g, Cd = 0.49 μg/g) were significantly higher than those from nonsmokers (means: Pb = 24.07 μg/g, Cd = 0.37 μg/g). Pb and Cd concentrations in teeth of patients with amalgam fillings (means: Pb = 31.02 μg/g and Cd = 0.52 μg/g) were significantly higher than those from patients without amalgam fillings (means: Pb = 26.87 μg/g and Cd = 0.41 μg/g). Our results show that brushing the teeth daily with toothpaste does not significantly decrease the concentration of both Pb and Cd. The mean concentrations of Pb and Cd do not vary significantly between the ages 20-30, 31-40, and 41-50, but both increased rapidly at age 51-60

  13. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy as a Technique for the Identification of Cancerous Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monograph presents the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a tool for the identification of cancerous cells by studies of the expression of different types of molecules directly on the surface of living cells. The full quantitative description (that is not accessible by other techniques) performed for a given type of molecular interactions has been obtained by using the following quantities: an unbinding force, probability, rupture length and the effective spring constant taking into account the stiffness of a single complex. All, these parameters were extracted from AFM measurements The analysis of the interaction forces performed by AFM allows the quantitative determination of: i) the static properties of a single molecular complex where its strength of interaction and stiffness of the studied complex can be obtained, ii) dynamic properties, on the basis of which the kinetic properties of the unbinding process can be delivered, and iii) properties of adhesion clusters, where the interrelation between single complexes can be characterized, in particular the mechanism of the unbinding can be obtained. The presented characterization of the interaction force between single molecules demonstrates that atomic force microscopy can be used as exceptional technique to study the expression of molecules on a cell surface. Such measurements are not limited to a typical interactions occurring between single molecules but also it is possible to study the interactions between parts of molecules. The results presented in this monograph point to a novel approach to identify cancer-related changes in a quantitative way what can be used for describing and confirming the pathological state of a single cell. (author)

  14. -OH What? A Review of Mass Spectrometry Techniques for the Analysis of Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathyani Parasram

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds, also called phenolics, are found in a variety of plant sources and can provide pharmacological and nutritive effects as well as taxonomic information. A single source can contain hundreds of phenolic compounds making characterization of these compounds time consuming and expensive. The recent leaps in mass spectrometry (MS development including coupling to chromatographic columns, UV-vis, and tandem MS MS/MS has renewed the study of phenolic compounds in both the agricultural and medical fields through its capability for fast, accurate and high throughput analyses. This paper will summarize recent discoveries, methodologies, and applications of MS in studies of phenolic compounds.

  15. Hyphenating multisyringe flow injection lab-on-valve analysis with atomic fluorescence spectrometry for on-line bead-injection preconcentration and determination of trace levels of hydride-forming elements in environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald;

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the third generation of flow injection analysis, that is, the so-called micro-Lab-on-Valve (μLOV) approach, is proposed for the first time for the separation, preconcentration and monitoring of metalloids as hyphenated with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). This was made...... feasible by interfacing the micromachined LOV-module with AFS by a multisyringe flowing stream network for on-line post column derivatization of the eluate aimed at the generation of hydride species. The potential of this new hyphenated technique for environmental assays was ascertained via...... quantified by AFS. The flow system facilitates on-column reduction of the retained arsenic with no need for application of programmable stopped-flow. Yet, the high concentration of reductant and extreme pH conditions for elution hinder the sorbent to be re-used due to the gradual deactivation...

  16. Improved microwave-assisted wet digestion procedures for accurate Se determination in fish and shellfish by flow injection-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate determination of Se in biological samples, especially fish and shellfish, by hydride generation techniques has generally proven troublesome owing to the presence of organoselenium that cannot readily converted into inorganic selenium under usual oxidising conditions. Further improvements in the oxidation procedures are needed so as to obtain accurate concentration values when this type of samples is analyzed. Microwave-assisted wet digestion (MAWD) procedures of seafood based on HNO3 or the mixture HNO3/H2O2 and further thermal reduction of the Se(VI) formed to Se(IV) were evaluated. These procedures were as follows: (I) without H2O2 and without heating to dryness; (II) without H2O2 and with heating to dryness; (III) with H2O2 and without heating to dryness; (IV) with H2O2 and with heating to dryness. In general, low recoveries of selenium are obtained for several marine species (e.g., crustaceans and cephalopods), which may be ascribed to the presence of Se forms mainly associated with nonpolar proteins and lipids. Post-digestion UV irradiation proved very efficient since not only complete organoselenium decomposition was achieved but also the final step required for prereduction of Se(VI) into Se(IV) (i.e. heating at 90 deg. C for 30 min in 6 M HCl) could be avoided. With the MAWD/UV procedure, the use of strong oxidising agents (persuphate, etc.) or acids (e.g. perchloric acid) which are typically applied prior to Se determination by hydride generation techniques is overcome, and as a result, sample pre-treatment is significantly simplified. The method was successfully validated against CRM DOLT-2 (dogfish liver), CRM DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and CRM TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas). Automated ultrasonic slurry sampling with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was also applied for comparison. Total Se contents in ten seafood samples were established. Se levels ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 μg g-1

  17. Ionic liquid ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaakbari, Elaheh [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Research Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali, E-mail: mostafavi.ali@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Environment and Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Science, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Science, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-30

    In this article, we consider ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of rhodium from aqueous samples and show that this is a fast and reliable sample pre-treatment for the determination of rhodium ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Rh(III) was transferred into its complex with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylamino phenol as a chelating agent, and an ultrasonic bath with the ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide at room temperature was used to extract the analyte. The centrifuged rhodium complex was then enriched in the form of ionic liquid droplets and prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, 300 {mu}L ethanol was added to the ionic liquid-rich phase. Finally, the influence of various parameters on the recovery of Rh(III) was optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.0-500.0 ng mL{sup -1}, the detection limit was 0.37 ng mL{sup -1} (3S{sub b}/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was {+-}1.63% (n = 7, C = 200 ng mL{sup -1}). The results show that ionic liquid based ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, is a rapid, simple, sensitive and efficient analytical method for the separation and determination of trace amounts of Rh(III) ions with minimum organic solvent consumption.

  18. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  19. Mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  20. Elemental Analysis of Nanomaterial Using Photon-Atom Interaction Based EDXRF Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Presence of trace amount of foreign impurities (both metallic and non-metallic in standard salts used for sample preparation and during the synthesis process can alter the physical and chemical behavior of the pure and doped nano-materials. Therefore, it becomes important to determine concentration of various elements present in synthesized nano-material sample. In present work, the elemental and compositional analysis of nano-materials synthesized using various methods has been performed using photon-atom interaction based energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF technique. This technique due to its multielement analytical capability, lower detection limit, capability to analyze metals and non-metals alike and almost no sample preparation requirements can be utilized for analysis of nano-materials. The EDXRF spectrometer involves a 2.4 kW Mo anode x-ray tube (Pananalytic, Netherland equipped with selective absorbers as an excitation source and an LEGe detector (FWHM = 150 eV at 5.895 keV, Canberra, US coupled with PC based multichannel analyzer used to collect the fluorescentx-ray spectra. The analytical results showed good agreements with the expected values calculated on the basis of the precursor used in preparation of nano-materials.

  1. Introduction to body composition assessment using the deuterium dilution technique with analysis of saliva samples by fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the IAEA has fostered the more widespread use of stable isotope techniques to assess body composition in different population groups to address priority areas in public health nutrition in Member States. The objective is to support national and regional nutrition projects through both the IAEA's technical cooperation programme and its coordinated research projects. In particular, during the last few years, the increased access to analyses of deuterium enrichment by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry has increased the application of this technique in Africa, Asia and Latin America. This publication was developed by an international group of experts to provide practical, hands-on guidance in the use of this technique in settings where the analysis of deuterium enrichment in saliva samples will be made by FTIR. It is targeted at new users of this technique, for example nutritionists, analytical chemists and other professionals. More detailed information on the theoretical background and the practical application of state of the art methodologies to monitor changes in body composition can be found in an IAEA publication entitled Assessment of Body Composition and Total Energy Expenditure in Humans by Stable Isotope Techniques (IAEA Human Health Series No. 3)

  2. Dithizone chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhefeng; Zhou, Wei

    2006-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3 σ) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% ( c = 0.2 μg/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  3. Dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Zhefeng [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)]. E-mail: zhefengfan@163.com; Zhou Wei [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2006-07-15

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3{sigma}) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% (c = 0.2 {mu}g/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  4. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction with 1,5-bis (di-2-pyridylmethylene) thiocarbohydrazide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, G.; Bosch Ojeda, C.; Garcia de Torres, A.; Cano Pavon, J.M. [University of Malaga (Spain)

    1995-06-01

    A method for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in biological samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization extraction conditions were evaluated from a critical study of the effects of pH, concentration of extractant, shaking time and ionic strength. The detection limit for cobalt is 0.06 ng ml{sup -1} and the calibration is linear from 0.1 to 2.5 ng ml{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements is 1.7 % for 0.5 ng ml{sup -1} of cobalt. The effect of interferences was studied and no interferences from the elements commonly found in biological materials were observed. The chief advantage of the method lies in its maximum allowable aqueous-to-organic phase volume ratio of 30:1. Results from the analysis of some certified biological reference materials are given. (authors). 14 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Direct determination of Cr and Cu in urine samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using ruthenium as permanent modifier (R1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelis, Katia Linces Alves; Rocha, Clelia Aparecida [Instituto de Patologia Clinica Hermes Pardini, 30140-070 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Magalhaes, Cristina Goncalves; Silva, Jose Bento Borba of [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2002-12-01

    In this study Ru, deposited thermally on an integrated platform pyrolytic graphite tube, is proposed as a permanent modifier for the determination of Cu and Cr in urine samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were diluted 1:1 with nitric acid (1% v/v). Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for spiked urine samples were 1,100 C and 1,900 C respectively for Cu, and 1,400 C and 2,500 C respectively for Cr. For comparison purposes, the conventional modification with Pd+Mg was also studied. The sensitivity for Ru as permanent modifier was higher for the two analytes. The characteristic masses were 7.3 and 17.7 for Cr and Cu. The detection limits (3{sigma}) were 0.22 and 0.32 {mu}g/L, for Cr and Cu, respectively. Good agreement was obtained with certified urine samples for the two elements. (orig.)

  6. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrument. The results suggested that REMPI is superior to electron impact ionization method for soft ionization and suppresses the background signal due to aliphatic hydrocarbons. Thus, GC/REMPI-TOFMS is a more reliable method for the determination of PAHs present in the environment.

  7. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  8. In-situ vaporization and matrix removal for the determination of rare earth impurities in zirconium dioxide by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for the determination of trace rare earth impurities in ZrO2 powder has been developed based on electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. A polytetrafluoroethylene slurry was used as a fluorinating reagent to convert both the matrix (Zr) and the analytes (rare earth elements) into fluorides with different volatilities at a high temperature in a graphite furnace. The more volatile ZrF4 was removed in-situ by selective vaporization prior to the determination of the analytes, removing matrix spectral interferences. Under optimum operating conditions, the absolute detection limits of the analytes varied from 0.04 ng (Yb) to 0.50 ng (Pr) with relative standard deviations less than 5%. The recommended approach has been successfully applied to the determination of trace rare earth impurities (La, Pr, Eu, Gd, Ho and Yb) in ZrO2 powder and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by pneumatic nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after the separation of the matrix using a solvent extraction procedure

  9. Recyclable decoration of amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with Ni(2+) for determination of histidine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2014-01-01

    It is critically important to accurately determine histidine since it is an indicator for many diseases when at an abnormal level. Here, an inexpensive and simple method using an amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle-based Ni(2+)-histidine affinity pair system was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of histidine in human urine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry. Ni(2+) was first bound to the amine groups of the amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and then liberated to solution via the highly specific interaction between the histidine and Ni(2+) in the presence of histidine. The liberated histidine-Ni(2+) complex was exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl, which was separated from the sample matrix and determined by atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry. Compared to other methods, this approach promises high sensitivity, simplicity in design, and convenient operation. The need for organic solvents, enzymatic reactions, separation processes, chemical modification, expensive instrumentations, and sophisticated and complicated pretreatment is minimized with this strategy. A limit of detection of 1 nM was obtained and provided tens-to-hundreds of fold improvements over that achieved with conventional methods. The protocol was evaluated by analysis of several urine samples with good recoveries and showed great potential for practical application. PMID:24286112

  10. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: A multivariate study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G.; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-01

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu2+ using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046 μg L-1 and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu2+ in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu2+ in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls.

  11. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: a multivariate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-10

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu(2+)) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu(2+) using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046μgL(-1) and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu(2+) in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu(2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls.

  12. Selective quantification of trace palladium in road dusts and roadside soils by displacement solid-phase extraction online coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Jiang, Yan; Yan, Xiu-Ping; Ni, Zhe-Ming

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the effect of palladium on human health because of the toxicity and increasing occurrence of palladium as a result of its extensive use in automotive catalytic converters. Development of reliable analytical methodologies for the determination of palladium in environmental materials is of great importance for critical evaluation of the possible risks for human health. In this work, a displacement solid-phase extraction technique was developed and online coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) for selective and sensitive determination of trace palladium in environmental samples without need of any special selective complexing agents, selective sorbents, and masking agents. The developed methodology involved the online formation of copper pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (Cu-PDC), and the resultant Cu-PDC was extracted onto a microcolumn packed with the sorbent from a cigarette filter. Trace Pd(II) was selectively preconcentrated through loading the sample solution onto the microcolumn by online displacement reaction between Pd(II) and the extracted Cu-PDC on the microcolumn. The retained analyte was subsequently eluted with 40 microL of ethanol for online ETAAS determination. Interferences from coexisting heavy metal ions with lower stability of their PDC complexes relative to Cu-PDC were minimized. The tolerable concentrations of Cd-(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), and Zn(II) were up to 2, 6, 40, 2, 1.5, and at least 100 mg L(-1), respectively. Compared with conventional solid-phase extraction methodology, the developed displacement solid-phase extraction protocol gave 2-4 orders of magnitude improvement in the maximum tolerable concentrations of coexisting heavy metal ions. With the consumption of only 2.8 mL of sample solution, an enhancement factor of 52 and a detection limit (3sigma) of 18 ng L(-1) were achieved at a sample throughput of 30 samples h(-1). The precision (RSD, n = 13) was 2.5% at the 1

  13. Continuous Determination of Heavy Metals in Water by Atomic Fluorescence and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry%原子荧光和原子吸收法连续测定水中的重金属

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢倩

    2015-01-01

    通过剖析原子荧光和原子吸收法的不同消解体系,优化实验条件,确定了原子荧光和原子吸收法连续测定水中的硒、砷、锌、铜的含量的最佳消解条件和最佳仪器测定条件。经加标回收以及标样分析,连续测定的灵敏度高,回收率在95.9%~109%之间,相对标准误差低于4.41%,操作简便快速,结果精确。%By analyzing the different digestion system of atomic fluorescence and atomic absorption method and optimizing experimental conditions, the optimal digestion conditions and the best measurement conditions of instruments for continuous determination selenium, arsenic, zinc, copper content in water by atomic fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrometry were determined.Spiking recovery and standard analysis result showed that continuous measurement had high sensitivity, and the recoveries was between 95.9% and 109%, relative standard deviation was less than 4.41%, the operation was simple, rapid and accurate.

  14. Determination of Synthetic Cathinones in Urine Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Yin; Ko, Ya-Chun; Lin, Mei-Chih; Wang, Po-Yu; Chen, Yu-Pen; Chiueh, Lih-Ching; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih; Chou, Hsiu-Kuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones has increased considerably. This study proposes a method, based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to analyze and quantify six synthetic cathinones in urine samples: mephedrone (4-MMC), methylone (bk-MDMA), butylone, ethylone, pentylone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In our procedure, the urine samples undergo solid-phase extraction (SPE) and derivatization prior to injection into the GC-MS device. Separation is performed using a HP-5MS capillary column. The use of selective ion monitoring (SIM mode) makes it is good sensitivity in this method, and the entire analysis process is within 18 min. In addition, the proposed method maintains linearity in the calibration curve from 50 to 2,000 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.995). The limit of detection of this method is 5 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (20 ng/mL); the limit of quantification is 20 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (50 ng/mL). In testing, the extraction performance of SPE was between 82.34 and 104.46%. Precision and accuracy results were satisfactory MDMA. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in the identification of synthetic cathinones in urine, with regard to the limits of detection and quantification. This method is highly repeatable and accurate. PMID:26410364

  15. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  16. Advanced analytical techniques for the extraction and characterization of plant-derived essential oils by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Rabia; Low, Kah Hin

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, essential oils have received a growing interest because of the positive health effects of their novel characteristics such as antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. For the extraction of plant-derived essential oils, there is the need of advanced analytical techniques and innovative methodologies. An exhaustive study of hydrodistillation, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction, pressurized liquid extraction, pressurized hot water extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, matrix solid-phase dispersion, and gas chromatography (one- and two-dimensional) hyphenated with mass spectrometry for the extraction through various plant species and analysis of essential oils has been provided in this review. Essential oils are composed of mainly terpenes and terpenoids with low-molecular-weight aromatic and aliphatic constituents that are particularly important for public health.

  17. Laser frequency stabilization and large detuning by Doppler-free dichroic lock technique: Application to atom cooling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V B Tiwari; S R Mishra; H S Rawat; S Singh; S P Ram; S C Mehendale

    2005-09-01

    We present results of a study of frequency stabilization of a diode laser ( = 780 nm) using the Doppler-free dichroic lock (DFDL) technique and its use for laser cooling of atoms. Quantitative measurements of frequency stability were performed and the Allan variance was found to be 6.9 × 10−11 for an averaging time of 10 s. The frequency-stabilized diode laser was used to obtain the trapping beams for a magneto-optic trap (MOT) for Rb atoms. Using the DFDL technique, the laser frequency could be locked over a wide range and this enabled measurement of detuning dependence of the number and temperature of cold atoms using a relatively simple experimental set-up.

  18. Studies on Elemental Contents of Some Biological and Environmental Materials Using Nuclear And Atomic Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elemental concentration values of 31 elements in the fertilizer samples, have been determined by applying a sensitive nondestructive analytical techniques such as INAA. It has also shown enough sensitivity to determine the concentrations of several trace and rare earth elements, The concentration values of elements were compared with the corresponding elements obtained by the ICP-MS and XRF techniques, for the same samples. Phosphorus fertilizers contain varying amounts of heavy metals and other rare earth elements as contaminants from either phosphate rock ores or other ingredients used in the phosphate fertilizer industry. As some heavy metals are potentially harmful to human health, attention is being given to its avenues of entry into the human food chain. Uptake of such elements by plants consumed directly or indirectly by humans is one avenue of entry, so the effects of heavy metal contaminants in phosphate fertilizers are of concern. Commercial fertilizers have been used for decades and will probably continue to be used for many decades to come. Hence, even low annual accumulations may finally build up undesired concentrations in soil, especially where fertilizers with high heavy metal or rare earth element concentrations are used.Thus, a total of three synthetic and natural eye-liner samples of known origin that are commercially available in the Egyptian market were analyzed using Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), Atomic Absorption Mass Spectroscopy (AA-MS) and elemental analysis using Thermal Neutron Activation Technique (TNAT) for the natural one in powder form. It was found that lead (>86%) represents the main hazardous element in the natural eye-liner from African sources. Aluminum and Antimony were also found in the later sample in considerable concentration 0.92% and 0.71% respectively. For the synthetic two samples from French and American sources, the major hazardous element found to be Carbon in high concentration 94% and 52% respectively. The

  19. Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK). A technique for characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. Part 2. Testing and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK) is a technique for the characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. GSAK uses gamma-ray spectrometry to quantify a portion of the fission product inventory of RH-TRU wastes. These fission product results are then coupled with calculated inventories derived from acceptable process knowledge to characterize the radionuclide content of the assayed wastes. GSAK has been evaluated and tested through several test exercises. These tests and their results are described; while the former paper in this issue presents the methodology, equipment and techniques. (author)

  20. A POLYNOMIAL CORRECTION TECHNIQUE USING RhKα COMPTON PEAK IN X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包生祥

    2003-01-01

    @@ Compton scattering radiation of an X ray tube target line is widely used for matrix absorption correction in X-ray fluorescence analysis of heavy trace elements in light matrix samples,Compton scatter ing internal standard technique has been a routine method in geological samples since Reynolds recommended the method in 1963.

  1. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed. PMID:27591638

  2. Selective determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone by atomic-absorption spectrometry with a carbon-tube atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, T; Yamamoto, Y

    1977-05-01

    The extraction behaviour of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone in organic solvents has been investigated by means of frameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with a carbon-tube atomizer. The selective extraction of antimony(III) and differential determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) have been developed. With ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and methyl isobutyl ketone, when the aqueous phase/solvent volume ratio is 50 ml/10 ml and the injection volume in the carbon tube is 20 mul, the sensitivity for antimony is 0.2 ng/ml for 1% absorption. The relative standard deviations are ca. 2%. Interferences by many metal ions can be prevented by masking with EDTA. The proposed methods have been applied satisfactorily to determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) in various types of water. PMID:18962096

  3. Hollow fiber based-liquid phase microextraction using ionic liquid solvent for preconcentration of lead and nickel from environmental and biological samples prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and effective hollow fiber based-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) technique by using ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [C6MIM][PF6], coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for the determination of lead and nickel in environmental and biological samples. Ammonium pyrroldinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was used as chelating agent. Several factors that influence the microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pH, APDC concentration extraction time, amounts of ionic liquid, stirring rate, pyrolysis and atomization temperature were investigated and the microextraction conditions were established. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits (3 s) of the method were 0.03 and 0.02 μg L-1, for Ni and Pb, respectively and corresponding relative standard deviations (0.5 μg L-1, n = 6) were 4.2% and 5%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and applied to the determination of lead and nickel in real samples.

  4. Antimony in drinking water, red blood cells, and serum: development of analytical methodology using transversely heated graphite furnace atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K S; Poon, R; Chu, I; Connor, J W

    1997-05-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) method has been developed for determining microg/L levels of Sb in samples of water and blood. The AAS method is based on the concept of stabilized temperature platform furnace atomization (STPF) realized through the use of a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) furnace, longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction, and matrix modification with palladium nitrate-magnesium nitrate-nitric acid. The method of standard additions is not mandatory. The detection limit (3 standard deviations of the blank) is 2.6 microg Sb/L for the water, red blood cells (RBCs), and serum samples. Data are presented on the degree of accuracy and precision. The THGA-AAS method is simple, fast, and contamination-free because the entire operation from sampling to AAS measurement is carried out in the same tube. The method has been applied to the determination of Sb in some leachate tap water samples derived from a static copper plumbing system containing Sn/Sb solders, and in small samples (0.5 ml) of RBCs and serum derived from rats given Sb-supplemented drinking water. PMID:9175512

  5. A novel methodology for rapid digestion of rare earth element ores and determination by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and dynamic reaction cell-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmeczi, Erick; Wang, Yong; Brindle, Ian D

    2016-11-01

    Short-wavelength infrared radiation has been successfully applied to accelerate the acid digestion of refractory rare-earth ore samples. Determinations were achieved with microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) and dynamic reaction cell - inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS). The digestion method developed was able to tackle high iron-oxide and silicate matrices using only phosphoric acid in a time frame of only 8min, and did not require perchloric or hydrofluoric acid. Additionally, excellent recoveries and reproducibilities of the rare earth elements, as well as uranium and thorium, were achieved. Digestions of the certified reference materials OREAS-465 and REE-1, with radically different mineralogies, delivered results that mirror those obtained by fusion processes. For the rare-earth CRM OKA-2, whose REE data are provisional, experimental data for the rare-earth elements were generally higher than the provisional values, often exceeding z-values of +2. Determined values for Th and U in this reference material, for which certified values are available, were in excellent agreement. PMID:27591646

  6. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed). PMID:26838401

  7. Determination of hafnium at the 10−4% level (relative to zirconium content) using neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We worked out ICP-MS method of Hf determination in Zr and Zr compounds. •We used NAA method as reference one. •We obtained pure zirconium matrix by ion exchange (Diphonix® resin). •These permit to determine ≥1 × 10−4% Hf in Zr sample by ICP MS with good precision and accuracy. -- Abstract: Hafnium at the very low level of 1–8 ppm (in relation to zirconium) was determined in zirconium sulfate solutions (originating from investigations of the separation of ca. 44 ppm Hf from zirconium by means of the ion exchange method) by using three independent methods: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results of NAA and ICP MS determinations were consistent with each other across the entire investigated range (the RSD of both methods did not exceed 38%). The results of ICP-AES determination were more diverse, particularly at less than 5 ppm Hf (RSD was significantly higher: 29–253%). The ion exchange method exploiting Diphonix® resin proved sufficient efficiency in Zr–Hf separation when the initial concentration ratio of the elements ([Zr]0/[Hf]0) ranged from 1200 to ca. 143,000

  8. Atomic force microscopy analysis of progenitor corneal epithelial cells fractionated by a rapid centrifugation isolation technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM to image the three groups of corneal epithelial cells fractionated by a novel rapid centrifugation isolation technique. METHODS: Epithelial cells harvested from primary cultures of rabbit limbal rings were centrifuged onto uncoated dishes, first at 1400 rpm and then at 1800 rpm. The adherent cells after centrifugation at 1400 rpm (ATC1, the adherent cells at 1800 rpm (ATC2 and the non-adherent cells at 1800 rpm (NAC were investigated for BrdU retention and were subjected to contact mode AFM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. RESULTS: Compared with unfractionated cells, the ATC1 group, accounting for about 10% of the whole population, was enriched in BrdU label-retaining cells. There were dramatic overall shape, surface membrane and intra-cellular ultrastructure differences noted among ATC1, ATC2 and NAC populations. The whole cell roughness measurements were 21.1±1.5 nm, 79.5±3.4 nm and 103±4.6 nm for the ATC1, ATC2 and NAC groups, respectively. The mero-nucleus roughness measurements were 34.2±1.7 nm, 13.0±0.8 nm and 8.5±0.5 nm in the ATC1, ATC2 and NAC populations, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: AFM was found to be a good tool for distinguishing among the three groups of cells. BrdU label retention, the AFM parameters and TEM together suggest that the ATC1, ATC2 and NAC populations may be progenitor corneal epithelial cells, transit amplifying cells and terminal differentiation cells, respectively.

  9. Characterization of cobalt oxide thin films prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louardi, A.; Rmili, A.; Ouachtari, F.; Bouaoud, A. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Elidrissi, B., E-mail: e.bachir@mailcity.com [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Erguig, H. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films show a micro porous structure. > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films are formed with spherical grains less than 50 nm in diameter. > The porous structure of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} films is expected to have promising application in electrochromism. - Abstract: Cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer from aqueous solution of hydrated cobalt chloride salt (CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O) as source of cobalt. The films were deposited onto the amorphous glass substrates kept at different temperatures (300-500 deg. C). The influences of molar concentration of the starting solution and substrate temperature on the structural, morphological and optical properties of (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were studied. It was found from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis that the films prepared with molar concentration greater than 0.025 M/L were polycrystalline spinel type cubic structure. The preferred orientation of the crystallites of these films changes gradually from (6 2 2) to (1 1 1) when the substrate temperature increases. By Raman spectroscopy, five Raman active modes characteristic of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel type cubic structure were found and identified at 194, 484, 522, 620 and 691 cm{sup -1}. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed micro porous structure with very fine grains less than 50 nm in diameter. These films exhibited also a transmittance value of about 70% in the visible and infra red range.

  10. Quantitative comparison of two independent lateral force calibration techniques for the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkley, Sarice S.; Cannara, Rachel J. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Deng Zhao [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Two independent lateral-force calibration methods for the atomic force microscope (AFM)--the hammerhead (HH) technique and the diamagnetic lateral force calibrator (D-LFC)--are systematically compared and found to agree to within 5% or less, but with precision limited to about 15%, using four different tee-shaped HH reference probes. The limitations of each method, both of which offer independent yet feasible paths toward traceable accuracy, are discussed and investigated. We find that stiff cantilevers may produce inconsistent D-LFC values through the application of excessively high normal loads. In addition, D-LFC results vary when the method is implemented using different modes of AFM feedback control, constant height and constant force modes, where the latter is more consistent with the HH method and closer to typical experimental conditions. Specifically, for the D-LFC apparatus used here, calibration in constant height mode introduced errors up to 14 %. In constant force mode using a relatively stiff cantilever, we observed an {approx_equal} 4 % systematic error per {mu}N of applied load for loads {<=} 1 {mu}N. The issue of excessive load typically emerges for cantilevers whose flexural spring constant is large compared with the normal spring constant of the D-LFC setup (such that relatively small cantilever flexural displacements produce relatively large loads). Overall, the HH method carries a larger uncertainty, which is dominated by uncertainty in measurement of the flexural spring constant of the HH cantilever as well as in the effective length dimension of the cantilever probe. The D-LFC method relies on fewer parameters and thus has fewer uncertainties associated with it. We thus show that it is the preferred method of the two, as long as care is taken to perform the calibration in constant force mode with low applied loads.

  11. Study of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference in the selenium determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-02-01

    The use of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference when measuring selenium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with deuterium background correction was evaluated. Ammonium molybdate did not produce a selenium thermal stabilization; however, the presence of ammonium molybdate decreased the phosphate interference. The study was carried out with mussel acid digests and mussel slurries. Pd-Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as a chemical modifier at optimum concentrations of 300 and 250 mg l -1, respectively, yielding optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 and 2100 °C, respectively. A yellow solid (ammonium molybdophosphate) was obtained when adding ammonium molybdate to mussel acid digest solutions. This precipitate can be removed after centrifugation prior to ETAAS determination. Additionally, studies on the sampling of the solid ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) together with the liquid phase, as a slurry, were also developed. The volatilization of the solid AMP was not reached at temperatures lower than 2500 °C. By this way, phosphate, as AMP, is not present in the vapor phase at the atomization temperature (2100 °C), yielding a reduction of the spectral interference by phosphate. The proposed method was validated analyzing three reference materials of marine origin (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1). Good agreement with the certified selenium contents was reached for all cases.

  12. Development of a simple method for the determination of lead in lipstick using alkaline solubilization and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Aline Rodrigues; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-02-15

    A simple method was developed for determining the total lead content in lipstick samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions of sample preparation. The graphite furnace heating program was optimized through pyrolysis and atomization curves. An aliquot containing approximately 50mg of the sample was mixed with TMAH and heated in a water bath at 60°C for 60 min. Using Nb as the permanent modifier and Pd as the chemical modifier, the optimal temperatures were 900°C and 1800°C for pyrolysis and atomization, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the working range was from 1.73 to 50.0 μg L(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.20 and 0.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The precision was evaluated under conditions of repeatability and intermediate precision and showed standard deviations of 2.37%-4.61% and 4.93%-9.75%, respectively. The % recovery ranged from 96.2% to 109%, and no significant differences were found between the results obtained using the proposed method and the microwave decomposition method for real samples. Lead was detected in 21 tested lipstick samples; the lead content in these samples ranged from 0.27 to 4.54 μg g(-1). PMID:23598019

  13. Microextraction Techniques Coupled to Liquid Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry for the Determination of Organic Micropollutants in Environmental Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Esther Torres Padrón

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, sample preparation was carried out using traditional techniques, such as liquid–liquid extraction (LLE, that use large volumes of organic solvents. Solid-phase extraction (SPE uses much less solvent than LLE, although the volume can still be significant. These preparation methods are expensive, time-consuming and environmentally unfriendly. Recently, a great effort has been made to develop new analytical methodologies able to perform direct analyses using miniaturised equipment, thereby achieving high enrichment factors, minimising solvent consumption and reducing waste. These microextraction techniques improve the performance during sample preparation, particularly in complex water environmental samples, such as wastewaters, surface and ground waters, tap waters, sea and river waters. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF/MS techniques can be used when analysing a broad range of organic micropollutants. Before separating and detecting these compounds in environmental samples, the target analytes must be extracted and pre-concentrated to make them detectable. In this work, we review the most recent applications of microextraction preparation techniques in different water environmental matrices to determine organic micropollutants: solid-phase microextraction SPME, in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME, stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE and liquid-phase microextraction (LPME. Several groups of compounds are considered organic micropollutants because these are being released continuously into the environment. Many of these compounds are considered emerging contaminants. These analytes are generally compounds that are not covered by the existing regulations and are now detected more frequently in different environmental compartments. Pharmaceuticals, surfactants, personal care products and other chemicals are considered micropollutants. These

  14. Microextraction techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of organic micropollutants in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón, Ma Esther Torres; Afonso-Olivares, Cristina; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, sample preparation was carried out using traditional techniques, such as liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), that use large volumes of organic solvents. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) uses much less solvent than LLE, although the volume can still be significant. These preparation methods are expensive, time-consuming and environmentally unfriendly. Recently, a great effort has been made to develop new analytical methodologies able to perform direct analyses using miniaturised equipment, thereby achieving high enrichment factors, minimising solvent consumption and reducing waste. These microextraction techniques improve the performance during sample preparation, particularly in complex water environmental samples, such as wastewaters, surface and ground waters, tap waters, sea and river waters. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF/MS) techniques can be used when analysing a broad range of organic micropollutants. Before separating and detecting these compounds in environmental samples, the target analytes must be extracted and pre-concentrated to make them detectable. In this work, we review the most recent applications of microextraction preparation techniques in different water environmental matrices to determine organic micropollutants: solid-phase microextraction SPME, in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and liquid-phase microextraction (LPME). Several groups of compounds are considered organic micropollutants because these are being released continuously into the environment. Many of these compounds are considered emerging contaminants. These analytes are generally compounds that are not covered by the existing regulations and are now detected more frequently in different environmental compartments. Pharmaceuticals, surfactants, personal care products and other chemicals are considered micropollutants. These compounds must be

  15. Determination of metallic impurities in uranium compounds of nuclear purity by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption spectrometry, with electrothermal atomization, has been used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni in uranium oxide standards. The analysis were performed without sample dissolution and without uranium chemical separation. This technique is adequate for the qualification of uranium of nuclear purity according to the standard specifications. (Author)

  16. Headspace-programmed temperature vaporizer-mass spectrometry and pattern recognition techniques for the analysis of volatiles in saliva samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Antón, Ana; Del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Crisolino Pozas, Ángel Pedro; Pérez Pavón, José Luis; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2016-11-01

    A rapid method for the analysis of volatiles in saliva samples is proposed. The method is based on direct coupling of three components: a headspace sampler (HS), a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (qMS). Several applications in the biomedical field have been proposed with electronic noses based on different sensors. However, few contributions have been developed using a mass spectrometry-based electronic nose in this field up to date. Samples of 23 patients with some type of cancer and 32 healthy volunteers were analyzed with HS-PTV-MS and the profile signals obtained were subjected to pattern recognition techniques with the aim of studying the possibilities of the methodology to differentiate patients with cancer from healthy controls. An initial inspection of the contained information in the data by means of principal components analysis (PCA) revealed a complex situation were an overlapped distribution of samples in the score plot was visualized instead of two groups of separated samples. Models using K-nearest neighbors (KNN) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) showed poor discrimination, specially using SIMCA where a small distance between classes was obtained and no satisfactory results in the classification of the external validation samples were achieved. Good results were obtained when Mahalanobis discriminant analysis (DA) and support vector machines (SVM) were used obtaining 2 (false positives) and 0 samples misclassified in the external validation set, respectively. No false negatives were found using these techniques. PMID:27591583

  17. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, J G

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10(-9)-10(-12) g at 2500 degrees . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values. PMID:18962852

  18. A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination in complex mining residues by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in typical, complex residues from gold mining is presented. Three digestion methods were evaluated: an open vessel digestion using a mixture of HCl:HNO3:HF acids (Method A) and two microwave digestion methods using a mixture of HCl:H2O2:HNO3 in high (Method B) and medium-pressure (Method C) vessels. The matrix effect was also investigated. Arsenic concentration from external and standard addition calibration curves (at a 95% confidence level) were statistically equal (p-value = 0.122) using microwave digestion in high-pressure vessel. The results from the open vessel digestion were statistically different (p-value = 0.007) whereas in the microwave digestion in medium-pressure vessel (Method C) the dissolution of the samples was incomplete.

  19. A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination in complex mining residues by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantuzzo, Fernando L; Silva, Julio César J; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2009-09-15

    A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in typical, complex residues from gold mining is presented. Three digestion methods were evaluated: an open vessel digestion using a mixture of HCl:HNO(3):HF acids (Method A) and two microwave digestion methods using a mixture of HCl:H(2)O(2):HNO(3) in high (Method B) and medium-pressure (Method C) vessels. The matrix effect was also investigated. Arsenic concentration from external and standard addition calibration curves (at a 95% confidence level) were statistically equal (p-value=0.122) using microwave digestion in high-pressure vessel. The results from the open vessel digestion were statistically different (p-value=0.007) whereas in the microwave digestion in medium-pressure vessel (Method C) the dissolution of the samples was incomplete. PMID:19345010

  20. A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination in complex mining residues by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantuzzo, Fernando L.; Silva, Julio Cesar J. [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Rua Espirito Santo, 35/206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ciminelli, Virginia S.T., E-mail: ciminelli@demet.ufmg.br [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Rua Espirito Santo, 35/206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in typical, complex residues from gold mining is presented. Three digestion methods were evaluated: an open vessel digestion using a mixture of HCl:HNO{sub 3}:HF acids (Method A) and two microwave digestion methods using a mixture of HCl:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:HNO{sub 3} in high (Method B) and medium-pressure (Method C) vessels. The matrix effect was also investigated. Arsenic concentration from external and standard addition calibration curves (at a 95% confidence level) were statistically equal (p-value = 0.122) using microwave digestion in high-pressure vessel. The results from the open vessel digestion were statistically different (p-value = 0.007) whereas in the microwave digestion in medium-pressure vessel (Method C) the dissolution of the samples was incomplete.

  1. 电感耦合等离子体-原子发射光谱法的应用%Application of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时亮; 隋欣

    2013-01-01

    The application of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry in animal and plant analysis, environmental analysis, metallurgical analysis, electric power production, food analysis, lithium niobate analysis, harmful heavy metals detection in toys, and the cultural relics protection, etc, were summarized.%  综述了利用电感耦合高频等离子体作为激发光源的原子发射光谱法在动植物分析、环境分析、冶金分析、电力生产、食品分析、铌酸锂分析、玩具中有害重金属测定及文物保护科学研究等方面中的应用。

  2. Flow injection analysis-flame atomic absorption spectrometry system for indirect determination of cyanide using cadmium carbonate as a new solid-phase reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noroozifar, M. [Analytical Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Sistan and Baluchestan University, P.O. Box 98165-181, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: mnoroozifar@hamoon.usb.ac.ir; Khorasani-Motlagh, M. [Inorganic Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Sistan and Baluchestan University, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, S.-N. [Analytical Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Sistan and Baluchestan University, P.O. Box 98165-181, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-01-10

    A new and simple flow injection system procedure has been developed for the indirect determination of cyanide. The method is based on insertion of aqueous cyanide solutions into an on-line cadmium carbonate packed column (25% m/m suspended on silica gel beads) and a sodium hydroxide with pH 10 is used as the carrier stream. The eluent containing the analyte as cadmiumcyanide complexes, produced from reaction between cadmium carbonate and cyanide, measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The absorbance is proportional to the concentration of cyanide in the sample. The linear range of the system is up to 15 mg L{sup -1} with a detection limit 0.2 mg L{sup -1} and sampling rate 72 h{sup -1}. The method is suitable for determination of cyanide in industrial waste waters with a relative standard deviation better than 1.22%.

  3. Determination of lead in water resources by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after pre-concentration with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate immobilized on surfactant-coated alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAYED MORTEZA TALEBI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Arapid, simple, and sensitive procedure based on modified solid phase extraction was developed for the pre-concentration and determination of trace amount of lead in water resources. Lead was reacted with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC to make a complex. The complex was then collected in a column packed with surfactant-coated alumina. The parameters affecting the collection efficiency and desorption rate of the lead complexes from the column were investigated and optimized. The collection efficiency of the lead complex on the adsorbent was excellent under the optimized conditions. The results obtained from the recovery test showed the capability and reliability of the method for the analysis of trace amounts of lead. The proposed pre-concentration procedure made it possible to apply conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS for the sensitive determination of trace amounts of lead in water resources.

  4. Solvent microextraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SME-FAAS) for determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2009-02-11

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on solvent microextraction (SME) for separation/preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of a hydrophobic complex by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution. In suitable conditions, the complex of cadmium-APDC entered the micro organic phase, and thus, separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, a detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.8 ng L(-1) and an enrichment factor of 93 were achieved. The relative standard deviation for the method was found to be 2.2% for Cd. The interference effects of some anions and cations were also investigated. The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in meat and fish samples. PMID:19138082

  5. Determination of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma in waters and sediments from San Juan Ecosystem, Santiago de Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the levels of concentration of copper, zinc, lead and cadmium in waters and sediments from the ecosystem San Juan in the Santiago of Cuba province were evaluated. Two sampling of the ecosystem in two stations belonging to the high and middle part of the river, in rainy and little rainy periods were carried out. The conservation and treatment of the samples were developed according to established standards and the determinations of the elements were realized using atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The concentrations intervals of the studied elements were established so much in the superficial waters like in the sediments and it was demonstrated that exists statistical significant differences for the factors station, period and type of sample, being the middle part of the river, the little rainy period and the sediments, where the grater concentrations of the pollutants appear

  6. Speciation of organic and inorganic selenium in selenium-enriched rice by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Liu, Guijian; Wu, Qianghua

    2013-11-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of organic and inorganic selenium in selenium-enriched rice by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection after cloud point extraction. Effective separation of organic and inorganic selenium in selenium-enriched rice was achieved by sequentially extracting with water and cyclohexane. Under the optimised conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.08 μg L(-1), the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.1% (c=10.0 μg L(-1), n=11), and the enrichment factor for selenium was 82. Recoveries of inorganic selenium in the selenium-enriched rice samples were between 90.3% and 106.0%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of organic and inorganic selenium as well as total selenium in selenium-enriched rice.

  7. Determination of Iron in Layered Crystal Sodium Disilicate and Sodium Silicate by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Boric Acid as a Matrix Modifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Hua WANG; Min CAI; Shu Jun WANG

    2006-01-01

    The effects of matrix silicate and experimental conditions on the determination of iron in flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) were investigated. It was found that boric acid as a matrix modifier obviously eliminated silicate interference. Under the optimum operating conditions, the determination results of iron in layered crystal sodium disilicate and sodium silicate samples by FAAS were satisfactory. The linear range of calibration curve is 0-10.5 μg.mL-1, the relative standard deviation of method is 1.2%-2.2%, the recovery of added iron is 96.0%-101%, the of iron of the standard curve method, standard addition calibration and colorimetry method was the same, but the first has the merits of rapid sample preparation, reduced contamination risks and fast analysis.

  8. Functionalization of cross linked chitosan with 2-aminopyridine-3-carboxylic acid for solid phase extraction of cadmium and zinc ions and their determination by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a new method for solid phase extraction (SPE) and preconcentration of trace amounts of cadmium and zinc using cross linked chitosan that was functionalized with 2-aminopyridine-3-carboxy acid. Analytical parameters, sample pH, effect of flow rate, sample volume, and concentration of eluent on column SPE were investigated. The effect of matrix ions on the recovery of cadmium and zinc has been investigated and were found not to interfere with preconcentration. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the preconcentration factors for Cd(II) and Zn(II) were found to be 90. The two elements were quantified via atomic absorption spectrometry. The detection limits for cadmium and zinc are 21 and 65 ng L -1, respectively. The method was evaluated by analyzing a certified reference material (NIST 1643e; water) and has been successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and zinc in environmental water samples. (author)

  9. Evaluation of cadmium in greenhouse soils and agricultural products of Jiroft (Iran) using microwave digestion prior to atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzali, Daryoush; Fathirad, Fariba; Afzali, Zahra; Majdzadeh-Kermani, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2015-03-01

    This study determines total levels of potentially toxic trace element, Cd (II) in Jiroft (Kerman, Iran) greenhouse soil and agricultural products that are grown in these greenhouses (tomatoes and cucumbers), and the comparison with soil outside of greenhouse using microwave digestion prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. The results show that the cadmium concentration in greenhouse soil is 0.9-1.9 mg kg(-1) and out of greenhouse is 0.4-1.0 mg kg(-1). Also, cadmium concentration range in tomatoes and cucumbers is about 0.07-0.40 mg kg(-1). The obtained results show that the concentration of this metal in greenhouse soil is higher than outside soil samples and is below the safe limit.

  10. Validation of a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry methodology for determination of mercury in fish designed for application in the Brazilian national residue control plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damin, Isabel C F; Santo, Maria A E; Hennigen, Rosmari; Vargas, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a method for the determination of mercury (Hg) in fish was validated according to ISO/IEC 17025, INMETRO (Brazil), and more recent European recommendations (Commission Decision 2007/333/EC and 2002/657/EC) for implementation in the Brazilian Residue Control Plan (NRCP) in routine applications. The parameters evaluated in the validation were investigated in detail. The results obtained for limit of detection and quantification were respectively, 2.36 and 7.88 μg kg(-1) of Hg. While the recovery varies between 90-96%. The coefficient of variation was of 4.06-8.94% for the repeatability. Furthermore, a comparison using an external proficiency testing scheme was realized. The results of method validated for the determination of the mercury in fish by Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were considered suitable for implementation in routine analysis. PMID:24007488

  11. Spectral aspects of the determination of Si in organic and aqueous solutions using high-resolution continuum source or line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Pilarczyk, Janusz; Gościniak, Łukasz

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) was applied to reveal and investigate spectral interference in the determination of Si. An intensive structured background was observed in the analysis of both aqueous and xylene solutions containing S compounds. This background was attributed to absorption by the CS molecule formed in the N2O-C2H2 flame. The lines of the CS spectrum at least partially overlap all five of the most sensitive Si lines investigated. The 251.611 nm Si line was demonstrated to be the most advantageous. The intensity of the structured background caused by the CS molecule significantly depends on the chemical form of S in the solution and is the highest for the most-volatile CS2. The presence of O atoms in an initial S molecule can diminish the formation of CS. To overcome this S effect, various modes of baseline fitting and background correction were evaluated, including iterative background correction (IBC) and utilization of correction pixels (WRC). These modes were used either independently or in conjunction with least squares background correction (LSBC). The IBC + LSBC mode can correct the extremely strong interference caused by CS2 at an S concentration of 5% w:w in the investigated solution. However, the efficiency of this mode depends on the similarity of the processed spectra and the correction spectra in terms of intensity and in additional effects, such as a sloping baseline. In the vicinity of the Si line, three lines of V were recorded. These lines are well-separated in the HR-CS FAAS spectrum, but they could be a potential source of overcorrection when using line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS). The expected signal for the 251.625 nm Fe line was not registered at 200 mg L- 1 Fe concentration in the solution, probably due to the diminished population of Fe atoms in the high-temperature flame used. The observations made using HR-CS FAAS helped to establish a "safe" level

  12. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    have now measured the level of hydrogen scrambling in a deprotonated, selectively labeled peptide using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results conclusively show that hydrogen scrambling is prevalent in the deprotonated peptide upon collisional activation. The amide hydrogens ((1)H......We have previously shown that peptide amide hydrogens undergo extensive intramolecular migration (i.e., complete hydrogen scrambling) upon collisional activation of protonated peptides (Jørgensen et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2785-2793). The occurrence of hydrogen scrambling enforces severe....../(2)H) have migrated extensively in the anionic peptide, thereby erasing the original regioselective deuteration pattern obtained in solution....

  13. Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Based Topographical Imaging and Nanometer Scale Resolved Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Bradshaw, James A [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer scale proximal probe thermal desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD/ESI-MS) was demonstrated for molecular surface sampling of caffeine from a thin film using a 30 nm diameter nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) probe tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled via a vapor transfer line and ESI interface to a MS detection platform. Using a probe temperature of 350 C and a spot sampling time of 30 s, conical desorption craters 250 nm in diameter and 100 nm deep were created as shown through subsequent topographical imaging of the surface within the same system. Automated sampling of a 5 x 2 array of spots, with 2 m spacing between spots, and real time selective detection of the desorbed caffeine using tandem mass spectrometry was also demonstrated. Estimated from the crater volume (~2x106 nm3), only about 10 amol (2 fg) of caffeine was liberated from each thermal desorption crater in the thin film. These results illustrate a relatively simple experimental setup and means to acquire in automated fashion sub-micrometer scale spatial sampling resolution and mass spectral detection of materials amenable to TD. The ability to achieve MS-based chemical imaging with 250 nm scale spatial resolution with this system is anticipated.

  14. Influence of matrix effects on determination of the trace element content in zirconium by the atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Kulik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sample matrix prepared on the basis of hydrofluoric acid on the measured content of trace elements in zirconium was studied. The accuracy of determination of the trace element content was verified by the “introduced-found” method. Based on verification results the temperature regime of electrothermal atomizer was optimized.

  15. Studies on the formation of atomic and molecular ions of uranium and thorium in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of molecular and atomic ions of U and Th as a function of the plasma conditions such as nebulizer gas flow and plasma power has been studied. The experiments performed and the results of these experiments are briefly described in this paper

  16. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero, E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption–elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L{sup −1}, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64–22.9 μg Pb L{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Lead determination in urine using a solid phase extraction procedure followed by ETAAS • Carbon nanotubes as SPE adsorbent for Pb in urine • Matrix elimination for the Pb determination in urine by using SPE based on carbon nanotubes • The detection limit was 0.08 μg Pb L{sup −1}.

  17. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Jin, Yan; Han, Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi, Shuping

    2006-07-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h - 1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l - 1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l - 1 for CH 3Hg +. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l - 1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  18. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jin Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han Weiying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Miao, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bi Shuping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: bisp@nju.edu.cn

    2006-07-15

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH{sub 4} solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h{sup -1} with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l{sup -1} for Hg{sup 2+} and 2.0 ng l{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  19. Arsenic speciation in edible alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Salgado, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Quijano, M.A., E-mail: marian.quijano@upm.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Bonilla, M.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total As and As species were analyzed in edible marine algae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A microwave-assisted extraction method with deionized water was applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As compounds identified comprised DMA, As(V) and four arsenosugars Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerably high As(V) concentrations were found in the most of the algae studied. - Abstract: Twelve commercially available edible marine algae from France, Japan and Spain and the certified reference material (CRM) NIES No. 9 Sargassum fulvellum were analyzed for total arsenic and arsenic species. Total arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after microwave digestion and ranged from 23 to 126 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Arsenic species in alga samples were extracted with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction and showed extraction efficiencies from 49 to 98%, in terms of total arsenic. The presence of eleven arsenic species was studied by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet photo-oxidation-hydride generation atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-(UV)-HG-AFS) developed methods, using both anion and cation exchange chromatography. Glycerol and phosphate sugars were found in all alga samples analyzed, at concentrations between 0.11 and 22 {mu}g g{sup -1}, whereas sulfonate and sulfate sugars were only detected in three of them (0.6-7.2 {mu}g g{sup -1}). Regarding arsenic toxic species, low concentration levels of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) (<0.9 {mu}g g{sup -1}) and generally high arsenate (As(V)) concentrations (up to 77 {mu}g g{sup -1}) were found in most of the algae studied. The results obtained are of interest to highlight the need to perform speciation analysis and to introduce appropriate legislation to limit toxic arsenic species content in these food products.

  20. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption–elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L−1, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64–22.9 μg Pb L−1). - Highlights: • Lead determination in urine using a solid phase extraction procedure followed by ETAAS • Carbon nanotubes as SPE adsorbent for Pb in urine • Matrix elimination for the Pb determination in urine by using SPE based on carbon nanotubes • The detection limit was 0.08 μg Pb L−1

  1. Adapting desorption mass spectrometry and pattern recognition techniques to petroleum fluid correlation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, J.C.; Durfee, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Petroleum explorationists are often faced with determining the relationship between the products of wells completed in lithologies that may have some spatial or communicative relationship. Conventional methods of sampling and analysis are often time consuming and expensive. A new method for the sampling, analysis, and computerized data interpretation of the C2-C16 fraction of crude oil and natural gas is reported here. Controlled temperature headspace sampling of crude oils and direct pressure equilibrated natural gas exposure of carbon adsorption wires has been successfully applied to the sampling of the volatile fractions of petroleum fluids. Thermal vacuum desorption followed by mass spectrometric analysis of these volatile organic compounds is a rapid and sensitive method for obtaining detailed information of the distribution (fingerprint) of the components in a given sample; however, the resulting information is too complex for direct human interpretation. Techniques of computerized chemical pattern recognition such as principal components analysis (PCA) with graphical rotation, discriminant analysis, and similarity analysis (SIMCA) have proven useful in establishing the relationships between potentially correlated samples via the fingerprints of their volatile fractions. Studies have been conducted on multiple samples from numerous continental basins. The results of several of these studies will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new, rapid, cost-efficient approach to correlation studies.

  2. Enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of mass spectrometry by Doppler-free resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of two-photon Doppler-free excitation in atomic resonance ionization offers the possibility of considerable enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of conventional mass spectrometry. In some applications of interest, e.g. carbon dating, this technique may provide sensitivity comparable to that presently attained by accelerator-based high energy mass spectrometry. The basic physics underlying the method is discussed and preliminary experimental work on three-photon ionization of atomic carbon is described. (author)

  3. Comparison of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay techniques on concentrations of atrazine in storm runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydy, Michael J.; Carter, D.S.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1996-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were used to measure concentrations of dissolved atrazine in 149 surface-water samples. Samples were collected during May 1992–September 1993 near the mouth of the White River (Indiana) and in two small tributaries of the river. GC/MS was performed on a Hewlett-Packard 5971 A, with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring of filtered water samples extracted by C-18 solid phase extraction; ELISA was performed with a magnetic-particle-based assay with photometric analysis. ELISA results compared reasonably well to GC/MS measurements at concentrations below the Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (3.0 μg/L), but a systematic negative bias was observed at higher concentrations. When higher concentration samples were diluted into the linear range of calibration, the relation improved. A slight positive bias was seen in all of the ELISA data compared to the GC/MS results, and the bias could be partially explained by correcting the ELISA data for cross reactivity with other triazine herbicides. The highest concentrations of atrazine were found during the first major runoff event after the atrazine was applied. Concentrations decreased throughout the rest of the sampling period even though large runoff events occurred during this time, indicating that most atrazine loading to surface waters in the study area occurs within a few weeks after application.

  4. Flow-injection technique for determination of uranium and thorium isotopes in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkhedda, Karima; Epov, Vladimir N; Evans, R Douglas

    2005-04-01

    A sensitive and efficient flow-injection (FI) preconcentration and matrix-separation technique coupled to sector field ICP-mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of ultra-low levels of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) in human urine. The method is based on selective retention of U and Th from a urine matrix, after microwave digestion, on an extraction chromatographic TRU resin, as an alternative to U/TEVA resin, and their subsequent elution with ammonium oxalate. Using a 10 mL sample, the limits of detection achieved for 238U and 232Th were 0.02 and 0.03 ng L(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the method was checked by spike-recovery measurements. Levels of U and Th in human urine were found to be in the ranges 1.86-5.50 and 0.176-2.35 ng L(-1), respectively, well in agreement with levels considered normal for non-occupationally exposed persons. The precision obtained for five replicate measurements of a urine sample was 2 and 3% for U and Th, respectively. The method also enables on-line measurements of the 235U/238U isotope ratios in urine. Precision of 0.82-1.04% (RSD) was obtained for 235U/238U at low ng L(-1) levels, using the FI transient signal approach. PMID:15827719

  5. Flow-injection technique for determination of uranium and thorium isotopes in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive and efficient flow-injection (FI) preconcentration and matrix-separation technique coupled to sector field ICP-mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of ultra-low levels of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) in human urine. The method is based on selective retention of U and Th from a urine matrix, after microwave digestion, on an extraction chromatographic TRU resin, as an alternative to U/TEVA resin, and their subsequent elution with ammonium oxalate. Using a 10 mL sample, the limits of detection achieved for 238U and 232Th were 0.02 and 0.03 ng L-1, respectively. The accuracy of the method was checked by spike-recovery measurements. Levels of U and Th in human urine were found to be in the ranges 1.86-5.50 and 0.176-2.35 ng L-1, respectively, well in agreement with levels considered normal for non-occupationally exposed persons. The precision obtained for five replicate measurements of a urine sample was 2 and 3% for U and Th, respectively. The method also enables on-line measurements of the 235U/238U isotope ratios in urine. Precision of 0.82-1.04% (RSD) was obtained for 235U/238U at low ng L-1 levels, using the FI transient signal approach. (orig.)

  6. Determination of Selenium in Marine Aquatic Products by Hydride Generation-atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (HG-AFS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhaohui; GAO Xin; Tashiro Yuri; Hiroo Ogawa

    2005-01-01

    A method for the analysis of selenium in marine aquatic products by HG-AFS has been investigated. The method is based on the reduction of inorganic selenium to volatile SeH2 which is bubbled out by carrier gas of pure argon, and then swept to Ar-H2 flame quarts atomizer to measure its fluorescence intensity. The hydride generation, transportation, atomization and some instrumental parameters were studied by a kind of orthogonal design. The optimum conditions selected are as follows: reactive acidity, 20% HC1; the amount of NaBH4, 4.9mL; gas flow of argon, 600mLmin-1; atomizing temperature, 200 ℃; negative high voltage, -300V; light current, 100 mA; integral time, 7s. The detection limit of the presented method is 0.072μgL-1 for selenium. The calibration curve shows a satisfactory line inthe concentration range from 0.000 to1.000μgL-1 Se. The recovery is 95.8%-102.2%.

  7. Arsenic and antimony determination in refined and unrefined table salts by means of hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry--comparison of sample decomposition and determination methods

    OpenAIRE

    AKSUNER, Nur; TİRTOM, Vedia Nüket; HENDEN, Emür

    2011-01-01

    An evaluation was made of different digestion methods for the determination of arsenic and antimony in table salt samples prior to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric analysis. Microwave acid digestion, classical wet digestion, dry ashing, and fusion were applied to the decomposition of salt samples and optimum conditions were investigated. Samples were decomposed by changing heating time, digestion techniques, and the amount and composition of acid, and then the concen...

  8. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  9. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  10. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace lead in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yu; Qiu, Bocheng; Li, Wenhua [College of Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nan Jing (China)

    2012-04-15

    The ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction (USAEME) method was combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) for the determination of trace Pb using dithizone (H{sup 2}DZ) as chelating reagent. Some effective parameters influenced the detection and microextraction, such as ashing temperature and atomization temperature, pH, extraction solvent, sample volume, extraction time, and extraction temperature were selected and optimized. After extraction, the calibration curves for Pb was in the concentration range of 0.1-10 ng mL{sup -1}, and the linear equation was y = 0.097 x + 0.023 (R = 0.99). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 20 pg mL{sup -1} with an enrichment factor of 70 and the relative standards deviation (RSD) for seven determinations of 1 ng mL{sup -1} Pb was 11%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine trace Pb in Yueya Lake water, pond water, and spiked samples. Furthermore, a certified reference material of Environment Water (GBW08607) was analyzed and the determined value was in good agreement with the certified value, which showed the accuracy, recovery, and applicability of the reported method. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Post Office Box 676, 13560-970, Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Rego, Jardes F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Post Office Box 355, 14801-970, Araraquara-SP (Brazil); Neto, Jose A. Gomes, E-mail: anchieta@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Post Office Box 355, 14801-970, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Modifiers were dispensable. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 Degree-Sign C and 2400 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Slopes of calibration curves (50-750 pg Cr, R{sup 2} > 0.999) using aqueous and solid standards coincides in 96%, indicated feasibility of aqueous calibration for solid sampling of medicinal plants. Accuracy was checked by analysis of four plant certified reference materials. Results were in agreement at 95% confidence level with certified and non-certified values. Ten samples of medicinal plants were analyzed and Cr contents were in the 1.3-17.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} Cr range. The highest RSD (n = 5) was 15.4% for the sample Melissa officinalis containing 13.9 {+-} 2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1} Cr. The limit of detection was 3.3 ng g{sup -1} Cr. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct solid sampling is first time employed for Cr in plant materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calibration curves with liquids and solids are coincident. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microanalysis of plants for Cr is validated by reference materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed HR-CS GF AAS method is environmental friendly.

  12. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Rêgo, Jardes F.; Neto, José A. Gomes

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption <