WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic number

  1. Calculations of effective atomic number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliman, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Omladinska 14, Rijeka (Croatia); Orlic, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Omladinska 14, Rijeka (Croatia)], E-mail: norlic@ffri.hr; Jelovica, I. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Omladinska 14, Rijeka (Croatia)

    2007-09-21

    We present and discuss effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) obtained by different methods of calculations. There is no unique relation between the computed values. This observation led us to the conclusion that any Z{sub eff} is valid only for given process. We illustrate calculations for different subshells of atom Z=72 and for M3 subshell of several other atoms.

  2. Effective atomic number of dental smalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic numbers Z are enough utilized for to characterize the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter. Particularly for the Z calculation in biological tissues and/or composed materials we need to know the relationship between the cross sections of the diverse radiations interactions with mattera and the atomic numbers Z of the constituent elements in the tissue or composed material. Normally the cross section by atom σ 2 is proportional to Zm. The m value depends of the iterative process type and the energy of the incident photons. In the case of the photoelectric interaction, the m vary will vary between 4,698 and 4,799 for energies between 10 to 200 keV. It was verified that constituent elements with high Z (>20) they had a major contribution. The m values for the Compton interation and the coherent scattering were calculated of similar way. Knowing the m values, we calculate the partials Z of a composed material. For the calculation of total Z, we can use alternatives starting from the equivalent atomic number corresponding to the total cross section σ d tot, mc of the composed material. In this work for the calculation of Z values corresponding to diverse interations, we applied a linear regression at the values of Ln σ a x LnZ for different energies. In general, to characterize a simulator material of a tissue or composed material we need to know the total Z in function of the photon energy applied to dental smalt increases until some hundreds of keV the partial values of Z owing to photoelectric effect and the coherent scattering this is owing to the smalt has a great concentration of elements with high Z. (Author)

  3. Analysis of the atom-number correlation function in a few-atom trap

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Woongnae; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic properties of loading and loss mechanism in a few atom trap are analyzed. An approximate formula is derived for the atom-number correlation function for the trapped atoms in the limit of reasonably small two-atom loss rate. Validity of the approximate formula is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  4. Simulated mixed absorbers and effective atomic numbers for attenuation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Karunakaran Nair; N Ramachandran; K K Abdullah; K M Varier

    2006-09-01

    The total -ray interaction crosss-sections on mixed absorbers were determined at 662 keV with a view to study the effective atomic numbers for -ray absorption under narrow beam good geometry set-up. The measurements were taken for the combination of metallic absorbers like aluminium, copper, lead and mercury and also for the simulated absorbers by rotating the targets. ORTEC HPGe and NaI(Tl) detectors were used for detection of -rays.The experimental results compare favourably with theoretical values derived from XCOM package and suggest the usefulness of the concept of effective atomic numbers and the utility of the rotating absorbers technique.

  5. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  6. Successive change regularity of actinide properties with atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and achievements on chemistry of actinide elements are summarised. The relations of properties of actinides to their electronic configurations of valence electronic shells are discussed. Some anomalies of solid properties, the radius contraction, the stable state effect of f7n-orbits (n = 0, 1, 2) and the tetrad effect of oxidation states, etc., with atomic number (Z) are described. 31 figures appended show directly the successive change regularity of actinide properties with Z

  7. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  8. Kriging atomic properties with a variable number of inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Stuart J; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-09-14

    A new force field called FFLUX uses the machine learning technique kriging to capture the link between the properties (energies and multipole moments) of topological atoms (i.e., output) and the coordinates of the surrounding atoms (i.e., input). Here we present a novel, general method of applying kriging to chemical systems that do not possess a fixed number of (geometrical) inputs. Unlike traditional kriging methods, which require an input system to be of fixed dimensionality, the method presented here can be readily applied to molecular simulation, where an interaction cutoff radius is commonly used and the number of atoms or molecules within the cutoff radius is not constant. The method described here is general and can be applied to any machine learning technique that normally operates under a fixed number of inputs. In particular, the method described here is also useful for interpolating methods other than kriging, which may suffer from difficulties stemming from identical sets of inputs corresponding to different outputs or input biasing. As a demonstration, the new method is used to predict 54 energetic and electrostatic properties of the central water molecule of a set of 5000, 4 Å radius water clusters, with a variable number of water molecules. The results are validated against equivalent models from a set of clusters composed of a fixed number of water molecules (set to ten, i.e., decamers) and against models created by using a naïve method of treating the variable number of inputs problem presented. Results show that the 4 Å water cluster models, utilising the method presented here, return similar or better kriging models than the decamer clusters for all properties considered and perform much better than the truncated models. PMID:27634248

  9. Kriging atomic properties with a variable number of inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Stuart J.; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-09-01

    A new force field called FFLUX uses the machine learning technique kriging to capture the link between the properties (energies and multipole moments) of topological atoms (i.e., output) and the coordinates of the surrounding atoms (i.e., input). Here we present a novel, general method of applying kriging to chemical systems that do not possess a fixed number of (geometrical) inputs. Unlike traditional kriging methods, which require an input system to be of fixed dimensionality, the method presented here can be readily applied to molecular simulation, where an interaction cutoff radius is commonly used and the number of atoms or molecules within the cutoff radius is not constant. The method described here is general and can be applied to any machine learning technique that normally operates under a fixed number of inputs. In particular, the method described here is also useful for interpolating methods other than kriging, which may suffer from difficulties stemming from identical sets of inputs corresponding to different outputs or input biasing. As a demonstration, the new method is used to predict 54 energetic and electrostatic properties of the central water molecule of a set of 5000, 4 Å radius water clusters, with a variable number of water molecules. The results are validated against equivalent models from a set of clusters composed of a fixed number of water molecules (set to ten, i.e., decamers) and against models created by using a naïve method of treating the variable number of inputs problem presented. Results show that the 4 Å water cluster models, utilising the method presented here, return similar or better kriging models than the decamer clusters for all properties considered and perform much better than the truncated models.

  10. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumb, D.H.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Krumrey, M.;

    2008-01-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative...... of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare...

  11. Quick-Determination of the Average Atomic Number Z by X-Ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar

    1972-01-01

    X-ray scattering ratio measurements are proposed for a quick determination of the average atomic number of rock powders.......X-ray scattering ratio measurements are proposed for a quick determination of the average atomic number of rock powders....

  12. Effective atomic numbers of some tissue substitutes by different methods: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective atomic numbers of some human organ tissue substitutes such as polyethylene terephthalate, red articulation wax, paraffin 1, paraffin 2, bolus, pitch, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, polyvinylchloride, and modeling clay have been calculated by four different methods like Auto-Z eff, direct, interpolation, and power law. It was found that the effective atomic numbers computed by Auto-Z eff , direct and interpolation methods were in good agreement for intermediate energy region (0.1 MeV < E < 5 MeV where the Compton interaction dominates. A large difference in effective atomic numbers by direct method and Auto-Z eff was observed in photo-electric and pair-production regions. Effective atomic numbers computed by power law were found to be close to direct method in photo-electric absorption region. The Auto-Z eff , direct and interpolation methods were found to be in good agreement for computation of effective atomic numbers in intermediate energy region (100 keV < E < 10 MeV. The direct method was found to be appropriate method for computation of effective atomic numbers in photo-electric region (10 keV < E < 100 keV. The tissue equivalence of the tissue substitutes is possible to represent by any method for computation of effective atomic number mentioned in the present study. An accurate estimation of Rayleigh scattering is required to eliminate effect of molecular, chemical, or crystalline environment of the atom for estimation of gamma interaction parameters.

  13. Sub-Poissonian atom number fluctuations by three-body loss in mesoscopic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Whitlock, S; Spreeuw, R J C

    2009-01-01

    We show that three-body loss of trapped atoms leads to sub-Poissonian atom number fluctuations. We prepare hundreds of dense ultracold ensembles in an array of magnetic microtraps which undergo rapid three-body decay. The shot-to-shot fluctuations of the number of atoms per trap are sub-Poissonian, for ensembles comprising 50--300 atoms. The measured relative variance or Fano factor $F=0.53\\pm 0.22$ agrees very well with the prediction by an analytic theory ($F=3/5$) and numerical calculations. These results will facilitate studies of quantum information science with mesoscopic ensembles.

  14. Sub-Poissonian atom-number fluctuations by three-body loss in mesoscopic ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, S; Ockeloen, C F; Spreeuw, R J C

    2010-03-26

    We show that three-body loss of trapped atoms leads to sub-Poissonian atom-number fluctuations. We prepare hundreds of dense ultracold ensembles in an array of magnetic microtraps which undergo rapid three-body decay. The shot-to-shot fluctuations of the number of atoms per trap are sub-Poissonian, for ensembles comprising 50-300 atoms. The measured relative variance or Fano factor F=0.53+/-0.22 agrees very well with the prediction by an analytic theory (F=3/5) and numerical calculations. These results will facilitate studies of quantum information science with mesoscopic ensembles. PMID:20366518

  15. Sub-Poissonian atom number fluctuations using light-assisted collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sortais, Y R P; Bourgain, R; Browaeys, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the number statistics of a mesoscopic ensemble of cold atoms in a microscopic dipole trap, and find that the atom number fluctuations are reduced with respect to a Poisson distribution due to light-assisted two-body collisions. For numbers of atoms larger than 2, we measure a reduction factor (Fano factor) close to 0.75. We analyze this fact by a general stochastic model describing the competition between the loading of the trap from a reservoir of cold atoms and multi-body losses, which leads to a master equation. The model indicates that we have reached the ultimate level of reduction in number fluctuations achievable in our experimental regime.

  16. Influence of the electron's anomalous magnetic dipole moment on high-atomic number atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Super heavy atoms ( Z > 100 ) are usually studied in the context of the so-called Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields. In this theory the problem of the singularity in the electron energy whenever Z > 137 is overcome. This is done by considering the finite size of the nucleus and leads to interesting phenomena, such as the spontaneous production of positrons. Here, we show that, taking into account the contribution from the Anomalous Magnetic Dipole Moment of the electron ( by means of an effective theory ), within a point nucleus model, is a sufficient condition to obtain regular wave functions and physically acceptable energy values for Z > 137. (author)

  17. Measurement of effective atomic number of gunshot residues using scattering of gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Better understanding of gunshot residues and the major elemental composition would be valuable to forensic scientists for their analysis work and interpretation of results. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues (cartridge case, bullet core, bullet jacket and gunpowder) were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The scattering of 59.54 keV gamma rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number in the 4≤Z≤82. The intensity ratio of coherent to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best-fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues are determined. - Highlights: • Values of Zeff depend on the chemical content of the investigated gunshot residues. • The agreement of measured values of effective atomic numbers with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory. • The present calculations of Zeff have thrown new light on forensic science

  18. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bioactive glasses for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work was carried out to study the nature of mass attenuation coefficient of bioactive glasses for gamma rays. Bioactive glasses are a group of synthetic silica-based bioactive materials with unique bone bonding properties. In the present study, we have calculated the effective atomic number, electron density for photon interaction of some selected bioactive glasses viz., SiO2-Na2O, SiO2-Na2O-CaO and SiO2-Na2O-P2O5 in the energy range 1 keV to 100 MeV. We have also computed the single valued effective atomic number by using XMuDat program. It is observed that variation in effective atomic number (ZPI, eff) depends also upon the weight fractions of selected bioactive glasses and range of atomic numbers of the elements. The results shown here on effective atomic number, electron density will be more useful in the medical dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose and dose rate.

  19. Quantum nondemolition measurement of photon-number distribution for a weak cavity field with resonant atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑仕标

    2003-01-01

    We propose a quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon-number distribution for a weak cavity field with no more than two photons. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with the cavity field, and thus the required interaction time is much shorter than that using dispersive interaction. This is important in view of decoherence. Our scheme can also be used to generate even and odd coherent states for a weak cavity field with resonant atoms.

  20. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM ELEMENTS HAVING AN ATOMIC NUMBER NOT LESS THAN 92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, F.T.; Russell, D.S.

    1958-09-16

    other elements having atomic numbers nnt less than 92, It has been proposed in the past to so separate plutonium by solvent extraction iato an organic solvent using triglycoldichlcride as the organic solvent. The improvement lies in the discovery that triglycoldichloride performs far more efflciently as an extractant, wher certain second organie compounds are added to it. Mentioned as satisfactory additive compounds are benzaldehyde, saturated aliphatic aldehydes containtng at least twc carbon atoms, and certain polyhydric phenols.

  1. Temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms inside a wall-coated glass cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄家强; 张建伟; 王时光; 王力军

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study on the temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms diffusively cooled inside a wall-coated glass cell by measuring the absorption profile of the 62S1/2 (F=4)→62P3/2(F0=5) transition line with a weak probe laser in the evolution process. We found that the temperature of the cold atoms first gradually decreases from 16 mK to 9 mK, and then rapidly increases. The number of cold atoms first declines slowly from 2.1 × 109 to 3.7 × 108 and then falls drastically. A theoretical model for the number evolution is built and includes the instantaneous temperature of the cold atoms and a fraction p, which represents the part of cold cesium atoms elastically reflected by the coated cell wall. The theory is overall in good agreement with the experimental result, and a nonzero value is obtained for the fraction p, which indicates that the cold cesium atoms are not all heated to the ambient temperature by a single collision with the coated cell wall. These results can provide helpful insight for precision measurements based on diffuse laser cooling.

  2. Effective atomic numbers and mass attenuation coefficients of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds for total photon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers for total gamma-ray interaction with some selected thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds such as barium acetate, barium sulfate, calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, calcium sulfate dihydrate, cadmium sulfate (anhydrous), cadmium sulfate, strontium sulfate, and lithium fluoride have been calculated in the 1-keV to 20-MeV energy region. Experimental mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for these compounds at selected photon energies of 26.3, 33.2, 59.54, and 661.6 keV have been obtained from good geometry transmission measurements and compared with theoretical values. The effect of absorption edge on effective atomic numbers and its variation with energy, and nonvalidity of the Bragg's mixture rule at incident photon energies closer to the absorption edges of constituent elements of compounds are discussed

  3. Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption of some low-Z substances of dosimetric interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption (ZPEAeff) and effective atomic numbers for photon interaction (ZPIeff) of some low-Z substances of dosimetric interest such as A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic (A150TEP), alanine, bakelite, Gafchromic sensor (GS), plastic scintillator (PS), polyethylene, mylar, polystyrene, perspex, radiochromic dye film nylon base (RDF : NB), tissue-equivalent gas-methane based (TEG : MB) and tissue-equivalent gas-propane based (TEG : PB) have been calculated by a direct method in the energy region of 1 keV-20 MeV. Experimental mass attenuation coefficients and ZPIeff of some of these substances at selected photon energies of 26.34, 33.2, and 59.54 keV have been obtained and compared with theoretical values. The ZPEAeff and ZPIeff values steadily increases up to 6-15 keV, and then they steadily decrease up to 600-1500 keV for all the substances studied. From 1.5 MeV, the values increases with increase in energy up to 20 MeV. Significant differences up to 33.68% exist between ZPIeff and the ZPEAeff in the energy region of 10-150 keV. The single effective atomic numbers obtained using the program XMuDat (ZXMUDATeff ) are found to be significantly higher compared to those of ZPEAeff and ZPIeff values in the entire energy of interest for all the substances studied. The directly calculated ZPEAeff and ZPIeff values vary with energy compared to the energy-independent effective atomic numbers predicted by various theoretical expressions. The effects of absorption edges on effective atomic numbers and their variation with photon energy and the possibility of defining two set values of effective atomic numbers below the absorption edges of elements present in the composite substances are discussed

  4. Dynamical decoherence in a cavity with a large number of two-level atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Frasca, Marco

    2003-01-01

    We consider a large number of two-level atoms interacting with the mode of a cavity in the rotating-wave approximation (Tavis-Cummings model). We apply the Holstein-Primakoff transformation to study the model in the limit of the number of two-level atoms, all in their ground state, becoming very large. The unitary evolution that we obtain in this approximation is applied to a macroscopic superposition state showing that, when the coherent states forming the superposition are enough distant, t...

  5. The splitting of atomic orbitals with a common principal quantum number revisited: np vs. ns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katriel, Jacob

    2012-04-14

    Atomic orbitals with a common principal quantum number are degenerate, as in the hydrogen atom, in the absence of interelectronic repulsion. Due to the virial theorem, electrons in such orbitals experience equal nuclear attractions. Comparing states of several-electron atoms that differ by the occupation of orbitals with a common principal quantum number, such as 1s(2) 2s vs. 1s(2) 2p, we find that although the difference in energies, ΔE, is due to the interelectronic repulsion term in the Hamiltonian, the difference between the interelectronic repulsions, ΔC, makes a smaller contribution to ΔE than the corresponding difference between the nuclear attractions, ΔL. Analysis of spectroscopic data for atomic isoelectronic sequences allows an extensive investigation of these issues. In the low nuclear charge range of pertinent isoelectronic sequences, i.e., for neutral atoms and mildly positively charged ions, it is found that ΔC actually reverses its sign. About 96% of the nuclear attraction difference between the 6p (2)P and the 6s (2)S states of the Cs atom is cancelled by the corresponding interelectronic repulsion difference. From the monotonic increase of ΔE with Z it follows (via the Hellmann-Feynman theorem) that ΔL > 0. Upon increasing the nuclear charge along an atomic isoelectronic sequence with a single electron outside a closed shell from Z(c), the critical charge below which the outmost electron is not bound, to infinity, the ratio ΔC/ΔL increases monotonically from lim(Z→Z(c)(+))ΔC/ΔL=-1 to lim(Z→∞)ΔC/ΔL=1. These results should allow for a more nuanced discussion than is usually encountered of the crude electronic structure of many-electron atoms and the structure of the periodic table. PMID:22502506

  6. The splitting of atomic orbitals with a common principal quantum number revisited: np vs. ns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katriel, Jacob

    2012-04-14

    Atomic orbitals with a common principal quantum number are degenerate, as in the hydrogen atom, in the absence of interelectronic repulsion. Due to the virial theorem, electrons in such orbitals experience equal nuclear attractions. Comparing states of several-electron atoms that differ by the occupation of orbitals with a common principal quantum number, such as 1s(2) 2s vs. 1s(2) 2p, we find that although the difference in energies, ΔE, is due to the interelectronic repulsion term in the Hamiltonian, the difference between the interelectronic repulsions, ΔC, makes a smaller contribution to ΔE than the corresponding difference between the nuclear attractions, ΔL. Analysis of spectroscopic data for atomic isoelectronic sequences allows an extensive investigation of these issues. In the low nuclear charge range of pertinent isoelectronic sequences, i.e., for neutral atoms and mildly positively charged ions, it is found that ΔC actually reverses its sign. About 96% of the nuclear attraction difference between the 6p (2)P and the 6s (2)S states of the Cs atom is cancelled by the corresponding interelectronic repulsion difference. From the monotonic increase of ΔE with Z it follows (via the Hellmann-Feynman theorem) that ΔL > 0. Upon increasing the nuclear charge along an atomic isoelectronic sequence with a single electron outside a closed shell from Z(c), the critical charge below which the outmost electron is not bound, to infinity, the ratio ΔC/ΔL increases monotonically from lim(Z→Z(c)(+))ΔC/ΔL=-1 to lim(Z→∞)ΔC/ΔL=1. These results should allow for a more nuanced discussion than is usually encountered of the crude electronic structure of many-electron atoms and the structure of the periodic table.

  7. PREPARATION OF OXALATES OF METALS OF ATOMIC NUMBER GREATER THAN 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of oxalates of metals of atomic number greater than 88. A solid peroxide of the heavy metal is contacted with an aqueous oxalic acid solution ai a temperature of about 50 C for a period of time sufficient to form the insoluble metal oxalate which is subsequentiy recovered as a pures crystalline compound.

  8. Topological Numbers and Edge State of Hierarchical State in Rapidly Rotating Ultracold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bo; CHEN Zeng-Bing

    2005-01-01

    The effective theory for the hierarchical fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect is proposed. We also derive the topological numbers K matrix and t vector and the general edge excitation from the effective theory. One can find that the two issues in rapidly rotating ultracold atoms are similar to those in electron FQH liquid.

  9. The effective atomic numbers of some biomolecules calculated by two methods: A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2009-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers Z(eff) of some fatty acids and amino acids have been calculated by two numerical methods, a direct method and an interpolation method, in the energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. The notion of Z(eff) is given a new meaning by using a modern database of photon interaction cross...

  10. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  11. Selected K and L X-Ray mass attenuation coefficients for low atomic number materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray attenuation coefficients for low atomic mumbers elements were obtained for characteristic K and L X-ray of a number of selected elements using the fitting of a third degree polynomial to the values tabulated by Storm and Israel

  12. Temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms inside a glass cell

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, J Q; Wang, S G; Wang, Z B; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study on the temperature and number evolution of the cold cesium atoms diffusively cooled inside a wall-coated glass cell by measuring the absorption profile of the 62S1/2 (F=4)-62P3/2 (F'=5) transition line with a weak probe laser in the evolution process. We found that the temperature of the cold atoms first gradually decreases from 16 mK to 9 mK, and then rapidly increases. A theoretical model of the number evolution is built, which includes the temperature of the cold atoms and the fraction p of the cold cesium atoms elastically reflected by the cell wall. The theoretical model is consistent with the experimental result very well, and the fraction p is obtained to be (0.58 +/- 0.03), which reveals that the cold cesium atoms are not all heated to the ambient temperature by a single collision with the cell wall.

  13. K-LL Auger transition probabilities for elements with low and intermediate atomic numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.

    1973-01-01

    Radiationless K-LL transition probabilities have been calculated nonrelativistically in j-j coupling and in intermediate coupling, without and with configuration interaction, for elements with atomic numbers from 13 to 47. The system is treated as a coupled two-hole configuration. The single-particle radial wave functions required in the calculation of radial matrix elements, and in the calculation of mixing coefficients in the intermediate-coupling scheme, were obtained from Green's atomic independent-particle model. Comparison with previous theoretical work and with experimental data is made. The effects of intermediate coupling, configuration interaction, and relativity are noted.

  14. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  15. Comparison of effective atomic numbers of the cancerous and normal kidney tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Ne) of normal kidney and cancerous kidney have been computed for total and partial photon interactions by computing the molecular, atomic, and electronic cross section in the wide energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV using WinXCOM. The mean Zeff and Ne of normal kidney and cancerous kidney in the various energy ranges and for total and partial photon interactions are tabulated. The variation of effective Ne with energy is shown graphically for all photon interactions. In addition to this computer tomography (CT), numbers of normal kidney and cancerous kidney for photon interaction and energy absorption is also computed. The role of Zeff in the dual-energy dividing radiography is also discussed. The values of Zeff and Ne for cancerous kidney are higher than normal kidney. This is due to the levels of elements K, Ca, Fe, Ni, and Se are lower and those of the elements Ti, Co, Zn, As, and Cd are higher in the cancer tissue of kidney than those observed in the normal tissue. The soft tissue and cancerous tissue are very similar, but their atomic number differs. The cancerous tissue exhibits a higher Zeff than the normal tissue. This fact helps in the dual-energy dividing radiography which enables to improve the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. Hence, the computed values may be useful in the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. CT numbers for normal kidney are higher than cancerous kidney. (author)

  16. Crystallization of Supercooled Liquid Elements Induced by Superclusters Containing Magic Atom Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Tournier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A few experiments have detected icosahedral superclusters in undercooled liquids. These superclusters survive above the crystal melting temperature Tm because all their surface atoms have the same fusion heat as their core atoms, and are melted by liquid homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in their core, depending on superheating time and temperature. They act as heterogeneous growth nuclei of crystallized phase at a temperature Tc of the undercooled melt. They contribute to the critical barrier reduction, which becomes smaller than that of crystals containing the same atom number n. After strong superheating, the undercooling rate is still limited because the nucleation of 13-atom superclusters always reduces this barrier, and increases Tc above a homogeneous nucleation temperature equal to Tm/3 in liquid elements. After weak superheating, the most stable superclusters containing n = 13, 55, 147, 309 and 561 atoms survive or melt and determine Tc during undercooling, depending on n and sample volume. The experimental nucleation temperatures Tc of 32 liquid elements and the supercluster melting temperatures are predicted with sample volumes varying by 18 orders of magnitude. The classical Gibbs free energy change is used, adding an enthalpy saving related to the Laplace pressure change associated with supercluster formation, which is quantified for n = 13 and 55.

  17. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The gamma shielding properties of eight shielding materials have been investigated. • We calculated the total mass attenuation coefficients by using WinXCom program. • The values of effective atomic number and electron density are also calculated. • All parameters depend on chemical content and the incident photon energy. • The Field castable Heat Resistant is the most effective shielding material. - Abstract: In this paper, the interaction of gamma rays with some shielding materials has been studied. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μt) for eight shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. Also, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and the effective electron density (Neff) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined

  18. Dynamical decoherence in a cavity with a large number of two-level atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, M

    2004-01-01

    We consider a large number of two-level atoms interacting with the mode of a cavity in the rotating-wave approximation (Tavis-Cummings model). We apply the Holstein-Primakoff transformation to study the model in the limit of the number of two-level atoms, all in their ground state, becoming very large. The unitary evolution that we obtain in this approximation is applied to a macroscopic superposition state showing that, when the coherent states forming the superposition are enough distant, then the state collapses on a single coherent state describing a classical radiation mode. This appear as a true dynamical effect that could be observed in experiments with cavities.

  19. Quantum number dimensional scaling analysis for excited states of multielectron atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, R K; Murawski, Robert K.; Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.

    2006-01-01

    A new dimensional scaling method for the calculation of excited states of multielectron atoms is introduced. By including the principle and orbital quantum numbers in the dimension parameter, we obtain an energy expression for excited states including high angular momentum states. The method is tested on He, Li, and Be. We obtain good agreement with more orthodox quantum mechanical treatments even in the zeroth order.

  20. Some new developments in the field of high atomic number semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A presentation of the main properties of high atomic number materials able to work as room temperature dectectors is made, including present status of synthesis. We summarize some applications in nuclear medical probe, tomography scanners, dosimetry and instrumentation. Mainly focused on CdTe and Hg I2 in monocrystal form the presentation will include some industrial applications. Hg I2 is also presented as a photodetector associated with scintillators

  1. The effective atomic number for gamma ray interactions with heavy metal oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), and the effective electron density, N-el,N-eff, have been calculated at photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV for CaO-SrO-B2O3, ZnO-PbO-B2O3, and CdO-PbO-B2O3 glasses with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials. Appreciable variations are note...

  2. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  3. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivalinge Gowda; S Krishnaveni; T Yashoda; T K Umesh; Ramakrishna Gowda

    2004-09-01

    Photon mass attenuation coefficients of some thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) compounds, such as LiF, CaCO3, CaSO4, CaSO4·2H2O, SrSO4, CdSO4, BaSO4, C4H6BaO4 and 3CdSO4·8H2O were determined at 279.2, 320.07, 514.0, 661.6, 1115.5, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV in a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up using a high resolution, hyper pure germanium detector. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to compute the effective atomic number and the electron density of TLD compounds. The interpolation of total attenuation cross-sections of photons of energy in elements of atomic number was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by the authors and reported earlier. The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon energy range of 279.2 to 320.07 keV, 514.0 to 661.6 keV and 1115.5 to 1332.5 keV by a piece-wise interpolation method were then used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in agreement with other available published values.

  4. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Qiang; Luo Xin-Yu; Gao Kui-Yi; Wang Xiao-Rui; Chen Dong-Min; Wang Ru-Quan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto-optical trap (MOT),which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87Rb atoms.The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams.Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT,but much longer loading time,leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms.This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss.The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required,such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments.Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique,our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems.

  5. Generation and detection of a sub-Poissonian atom number distribution in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Béguin, J -B; Christensen, S L; Sørensen, H L; Müller, J H; Appel, J; Polzik, E S

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate preparation and detection of an atom number distribution in a one-dimensional atomic lattice with the variance $-14$ dB below the Poissonian noise level. A mesoscopic ensemble containing a few thousand atoms is trapped in the evanescent field of a nanofiber. The atom number is measured through dual-color homodyne interferometry with a pW-power shot noise limited probe. Strong coupling of the evanescent probe guided by the nanofiber allows for a real-time measurement with a precision of $\\pm 8$ atoms on an ensemble of some $10^3$ atoms in a one-dimensional trap. The method is very well suited for generating collective atomic entangled or spin-squeezed states via a quantum non-demolition measurement as well as for tomography of exotic atomic states in a one-dimensional lattice.

  6. Effective atomic number of dental smalt; Numero atomico efetivo do esmalte dentario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodas D, J.E.; Nogueira, M.S. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica da FFCLRP-USP. 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The effective atomic numbers Z are enough utilized for to characterize the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter. Particularly for the Z calculation in biological tissues and/or composed materials we need to know the relationship between the cross sections of the diverse radiations interactions with mattera and the atomic numbers Z of the constituent elements in the tissue or composed material. Normally the cross section by atom {sigma} {sup 2} is proportional to Z{sup m}. The m value depends of the iterative process type and the energy of the incident photons. In the case of the photoelectric interaction, the m vary will vary between 4,698 and 4,799 for energies between 10 to 200 keV. It was verified that constituent elements with high Z (>20) they had a major contribution. The m values for the Compton interation and the coherent scattering were calculated of similar way. Knowing the m values, we calculate the partials Z of a composed material. For the calculation of total Z, we can use alternatives starting from the equivalent atomic number corresponding to the total cross section {sigma} {sup d} tot, mc of the composed material. In this work for the calculation of Z values corresponding to diverse interations, we applied a linear regression at the values of Ln {sigma} {sup a} x LnZ for different energies. In general, to characterize a simulator material of a tissue or composed material we need to know the total Z in function of the photon energy applied to dental smalt increases until some hundreds of keV the partial values of Z owing to photoelectric effect and the coherent scattering this is owing to the smalt has a great concentration of elements with high Z. (Author)

  7. Gamma attenuation characteristics and effective atomic numbers of polypropylene and polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma attenuation characteristics of polymer materials polypropylene and polystyrene are studied along with lead, iron and aluminum by subjecting them to gamma ray fields of known energies. A precise method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of gamma rays using NaI (Tl) detector with 8k MCA is described in this paper. In order to minimize the effect of multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ) value, a good geometry arrangement was setup. For standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental shields like lead, iron and aluminum were measured and then, this method is applied for polymers of interest. The total atomic cross-section (σt,a) and total electronic cross-section (σt,el) were determined and by knowing the values of (σt,a) and (σt,el) the effective atomic numbers were estimated using the NIST XCOM. The experimental values were compared with the theoretical values. The agreement of experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. (author)

  8. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Kadam; S T Alone; G K Bichile; K M Jadhav

    2007-05-01

    Pure magnesium ferrite sample was prepared by standard ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. XRD pattern revealed that the sample possess single-phase cubic spinel structure. The linear attenuation coefficient (), mass attenuation coefficient (/ρ), total atomic cross-section (tot), total electronic cross-section (ele) and the effective atomic number (eff) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4). The values of -ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy selective scintillation counter with radioactive -ray sources having energy 0.36, 0.511, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.28 MeV. The experimentally obtained values of /ρ and eff agreed fairly well with those obtained theoretically.

  9. Partial as Well as Total Photon Interaction Effective Atomic Numbers for Some Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejbir Singh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photon interaction effective atomic number (Zeff for partial as well as total photon interaction processes has been computed using logarithmic interpolation method for seven different concretes viz. (i Ordinary, (ii Hematite - Serpentine, (iii Ilmenite - Limonite, (iv Basalt - magnetite, (v Ilmenite, (vi Steel - scrap and (vii Steel - magnetite concrete in the wide energy range from 10.0 keV to 100 GeV. It has been concluded that this method has an advantage over the atomic to electronic cross-section ratio method especially for mixtures in the intermediate energy level. However, due to lack of experimental data in the higher energy region, it is difficult to discuss, its validity in these energy regions.

  10. Study of the mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers in some gemstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total mass attenuation coefficients for natural beryl, corundum, garnet, pearl, and tourmaline gemstones were measured at 81, 356.5, 661.6, 1173.2, and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 133Ba, 137Cs and 60Co radioactive point sources using gamma ray transmission method. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were determined experimentally and theoretically. The experimental values were compared with the calculated values for all samples. The calculations were extended for total photon interactions in a wide energy range (1 keV-100 GeV) using WinXCom program of the most commonly irradiated gemstones with different sources of ionized radiation. The values of these parameters have been found to vary with photon energy and chemical composition of the gemstones. All variations of these parameters against energy are shown graphically for total photon interactions. (author)

  11. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids. - Highlights: • We report the values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ). • The values of (Zeff) i.e. effective atomic number are calculated. • Measurement of effective electron density (Neff) of some amino acids. • Comparison of all μ/ρ values with XCOM programme

  12. Determination of the effective atomic and mass numbers for mixture and compound materials in high energy photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In consideration the radiological properties of materials and studying the scattering processes in atomic and nuclear physics, the effective atomic and mass numbers is widely employed. These numbers have been calculated for any mixed or composite materials in interaction with high energy photons (Linac in radiation therapy). A pair equation in terms of these numbers is obtained. The first equation has been derived from the conservation of mass energy law and the second by minimizing the binding energy from the semiempirical mass formula (Myers and Swiatecki formula) that gives a relation between atomic and mass numbers for stable nuclei approximately. By these equations one can obtain the effective atomic and mass numbers for any compound or mixed materials uniquely. These numbers are calculated for some materials and compared with the other studies. (author)

  13. Critical radius and critical number of gas atoms for cavities containing a Van der Waals gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gas on void nucleation and growth is particularly important for structural materials in fusion reactors because of the high production of helium by neutron-induced transmutation reactions. Gas reduces the critical radius for bias driven growth and there is a critical number of gas atoms, n/sub g/*, at which the critical radius is reduced essentially to zero. The significance of this is that the time interval to the accumulation of n/sub g/* gas atoms may determine the time to the onset of bias driven swelling where n/sub g/* is large. In previous papers these critical quantities were given for an ideal gas. Recently, we presented the results for a Van der Waals gas. Here the derivation of these relations is presented and further results of calculations are given. At low temperatures (high pressures) the results depart from those of the ideal gas, with the critical number affected more strongly than the critical radius. Comparisons are made with earlier calculations

  14. Estimation of effective atomic number in the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio using different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, M.; Büyükyıldız, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) is a very convenient parameter, which can be utilized in material analysis and estimating effective atomic number (Zeff). In the case for a relatively low scattering angle, for which the energy of the Compton scattered photons is not very much different from that of incident photons, the corrections due to self-absorption for Rayleigh and Compton scattering will be roughly equal. Therefore, it enables a result to be obtained which is almost independent of X-ray attenuation inside the sample and it will depend only on the material under investigation. The most frequently used method for calculation of Zeff available in literature is plotting R/C of elements as a function of atomic number and constituting the best fit curve. From this fit curve, the respective Zeff can be determined using R/C of the material. In the present study, we report Zeff of different materials using different methods such as interpolation and direct methods as possible alternatives to the most common fitting method. The results were compared with the experiments wherever possible. The agreement between interpolation method and the fitting method was found to be very satisfactory as relative changes (%) were always less than 9% while the direct method results with somehow significantly higher values of Zeff when compared to the other methods.

  15. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic, numbers (Zeff), effective electron densities (Ne) and photon interaction cross section (σa) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. (authors)

  16. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  17. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damla, N; Baltas, H; Celik, A; Kiris, E; Cevik, U

    2012-07-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic, numbers (Z(eff)), effective electron densities (N(e)) and photon interaction cross section (σ(a)) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. PMID:22128356

  18. Negative differential resistance in a one-dimensional molecular wire with odd number of atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Lakshmi; Swapan K Pati

    2005-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of electron{phonon coupling on the current-voltage characteristics of a one-dimensional molecular wire with odd number of atoms. The wire has been modelled using the Su-Schreiffer-Heeger (SSH) Hamiltonian and the current{voltage characteristics have been obtained using the Landauer's formalism. In the presence of strong electron-lattice coupling, we find that there are regions of negative differential resistance (NDR) at some critical bias, due to the degeneracy in the energies of the frontier molecular orbitals. The presence of the applied bias and the electron{lattice coupling results in the delocalization of these low-lying molecular states leading to the NDR behaviour.

  19. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90o (x=0.99 A-1). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Zeff) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Zeff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  20. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma radiation for oxides of lanthanides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Niranjan; B Rudraswamy; N Dhananjaya

    2012-03-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of lanthanides using mass attenuation coefficient from WinXCom and mass energy absorption coefficient from Hubbell and Seltzer. The values of these parameters have been found to change with energy for different oxides of lanthanides. The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology. Nano-oxides of lanthanide find applications in display and lighting industry.

  1. Study of Effective Atomic Number in Compounds Using Gamma-Ray Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraswamy, B.; Dhananjaya, N.

    2009-03-01

    In view of low cost, hydrogenous materials such as Polyethylene and CH2 have been developed and being used currently by NASA as an effective galactic cosmic radiation shields in place of aluminum for hull design of spacecraft. Lead, steel and concrete which are currently being used as effective radiation shields for the treatment of rooms equipped with Electron accelerators are found be quite expensive. Hence, it is necessary to use alternative low cost material which serves as an effective radiation shield. In the present study, an attempt has been made to measure gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and absorbed dose rate of the compounds such as NH4Cl, KCl, and CdO using various gamma sources of energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV. These parameters are expected to gives vital information on the selection of shielding materials.

  2. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90{sup o} (x=0.99 A{sup -1}). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z{sub eff} of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  3. Mass Attenuation Coefficients and Effective Atomic Numbers of Thermoluminescent Aluminum Oxide Based Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photon mass attenuation coefficient of a newly prepared 15Al2O3-35P2O5- xCaO-(50-x)Na2CO3 glass system (symbolized as APCN), where x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 all in mol%, have been calculated at photon energies of 0.662 MeV (137Cs source) and 1.25 MeV (60Co source). In addition, the photon mass attenuation coefficient of 15Al2O3-35P2O5-25CaO-25Na2CO3 glass system (symbolized as APCN25-25), all in mol%, doped with different concentrations of SiO2 have been calculated. The WinXCOM software program on the basis of mixture rule was utilized in calculations. The total atomic (σt) and electronic (σe) cross sections, effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Nel) were calculated. The results showed that the total mass attenuation coefficient showed an extremely dependence on incoherent scattering processes where it varies with Na2CO3 contents in the APCN composition while changing the concentrations of SiO2 in APCN25-25 glass showed slight changes in the values. Otherwise, the mass attenuation coefficient (µm) had higher values at 0.662 MeV than those of 1.25 MeV in both APCN and APCN25-25 glass systems. The values of Zeff showed a decrease with increasing Na2CO3 contents in the APCN composition. The should highly be considered in dealing with such prepared APCN glass system as a gamma ray detector, specially as thermoluminescence dosimeter.

  4. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  5. Effects of atomic number Z on the energy distribution of hot electrons generated by femtosecond laser interaction with metallic targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Da-Feng; Gu Yu-Qiu; Zheng Zhi-Jian; Zhou Wei-Min; Jiao Chun-Ye; Chen Hao; Wen Tian-Shu; Chunyu Shu-Tai

    2006-01-01

    The effects of atomic number Z on the energy distribution of hot electrons generated by the interaction of 60fs,130m J, 800nm, and 7×1017W/cm2 laser pulses with metallic targets have been studied experimentally. The results show that the number and the effective temperature of hot electrons increase with the atomic number Z of metallic targets, and the temperature of hot electrons are in the range of 190-230keV, which is consistent with a scaling law of hot electrons temperature.

  6. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), the effective electron density, N-el, and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the Win......XCom program. The significant variation of Z(eff) and N-el is due to the variations in the dominance of different interaction processes in different energy regions. The maximum values of Z(eff) and N-el are found in the low-energy range, where photoelectric absorption is the main interaction process...... is also made with the single values of the Z(eff) and N-el provided by the program XMuDat. It is also observed that carbohydrates have a larger kerma than fatty acids in the low-energy region, where photoelectric absorption dominates. In contrast, fatty acids have a larger kerma than carbohydrates...

  7. Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Liang, Yunfeng; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kota; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Onishi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-06-21

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquids can measure a force curve between a probe and a buried substrate. The shape of the measured force curve is related to hydration structure on the substrate. However, until now, there has been no practical theory that can transform the force curve into the hydration structure, because treatment of the liquid confined between the probe and the substrate is a difficult problem. Here, we propose a robust and practical transform theory, which can generate the number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate from the force curve. As an example, we analyzed a force curve measured by using our high-resolution AFM with a newly fabricated ultrashort cantilever. It is demonstrated that the hydration structure on muscovite mica (001) surface can be reproduced from the force curve by using the transform theory. The transform theory will enhance AFM's ability and support structural analyses of solid/liquid interfaces. By using the transform theory, the effective diameter of a real probe apex is also obtained. This result will be important for designing a model probe of molecular scale simulations.

  8. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the total mass attenuation coefficients (mm) for some homo- and hetero-chain polymers, namely polyamide-6 (PA-6), poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) were measured at 59.5, 511, 661.6, 1173.2, 1274.5 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were separately irradiated with 241Am, 22Na, 137Cs and 60Co (638 kBq) radioactive gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a '2 x 2' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector having an energy resolution of 7 % at 662 keV gamma ray from the decay of 137Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μm values for the investigated samples. Furthermore, Zeff and Neff of each polymer were computed for total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The experimental values of the selected polymers were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. (authors)

  9. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for some polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, Nil; Cakir, Merve; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the total mass attenuation coefficients (μ(m)) for some homo- and hetero-chain polymers, namely polyamide-6 (PA-6), poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) were measured at 59.5, 511, 661.6, 1173.2, 1274.5 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were separately irradiated with (241)Am, (22)Na, (137)Cs and (60)Co (638 kBq) radioactive gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″×2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector having an energy resolution of 7 % at 662 keV gamma ray from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and the effective electron densities (N(eff)) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μ(m) values for the investigated samples. Furthermore, Z(eff) and N(eff) of each polymer were computed for total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The experimental values of the selected polymers were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:22645382

  10. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities of nucleobases in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok

    2016-10-01

    Various parameters of dosimetric importance such as effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Nel) of nucleobases in DNA have been calculated for the total and partial photon interaction processes in the wide energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV. The variations of Zeff and Nel with energy are shown graphically for all partial and total interaction processes and are found to be similar. Up to 10 keV, Zeff and Nel show a sharp increase for cytosine-guanine and thymine-adenine whereas for all the other nucleobases, it is almost constant. Then there is sharp decrease in Zeff and Nel with energy up to 100 keV for all the nucleobases. From 100 keV to 6 MeV, Zeff and Nel are almost independent of energy. From 6 MeV to 100 MeV, there is regular increase in Zeff and Nel with photon energy. Above 400 MeV, Zeff and Nel remain almost constant. The obtained results are due to the dominance of photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering and pair production in different energy regions as respectively stated above and their dependences on the chemical compositions of the interacting media.

  11. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  12. A probable vacuum state containing a large number of hydrogen atom of excited state or ground state K, Rb or Cs atom

    CERN Document Server

    You, Pei-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The linear Stark effect shows that the first excited state of hydrogen atom has large permanent electric dipole moment (EDM), d(H)=3eao (ao is Bohr radius). Using special capacitors our experiments discovered that the ground state K, Rb or Cs atom is polar atom with a large EDM of the order of eao as hydrogen atom of excited state. Their capacitance(C) at different voltage (V) was measured. The C-V curve shows that the saturation polarization of K, Rb or Cs vapor has be observed when the field E more than ten to the fifth power V/m. When the saturation polarization appeared, nearly all K, Rb or Cs atoms(more than 98 percent) turned toward the direction of the field, and C is approximately equal to Co (Co is vacuum capacitance) or their dielectric constant is nearly the same as vacuum! K, Rb or Cs vapor just exist in the lowest energy state, so we see the vacuum state containing a large number of atoms! Due to the saturation polarization of hydrogen vapor of excited state is easily appears, we conjecture that ...

  13. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for Inconel 738 alloy for different energies obtained from Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mass attenuation coefficient of Inconel 738 superalloy was measured. ► Gamma-ray energies were changed by Compton scattering technique. ► Effective atomic number and electron density are also calculated. ► All parameters decrease with increased energy. ► The experimental values are in good agreement with theoretical ones. - Abstract: The mass attenuation coefficient of Inconel 738 superalloy has been measured at different gamma ray energies by using the Compton scattering technique. The theoretical values of mass attenuation coefficient of a glass sample were calculated using WinXCom program. The effective atomic number and electron density are also calculated. The results showed that the mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density increase with the decrease in gamma ray energies which is in good agreement with theoretical values (less than 2% error)

  14. Direct reconstruction of the effective atomic number of materials by the method of multi-energy radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Naydenov, S V; Smith, C F; Naydenov, Sergey V.; Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Smith, Craig F.

    2004-01-01

    A direct method is proposed for reconstruction of the effective atomic number by means of multi-energy radiography of the material. The accuracy of the method is up to 95% . Advantages over conventional radiographic methods, which ensure accuracy of just about 50%, are discussed. A physical model has been constructed, and general expressions have been obtained for description of the effective atomic number in a two-energy monitoring scheme. A universal dependence has been predicted for the effective atomic number as a function of relative (two-energy) radiographic reflex. The established theoretical law is confirmed by the experimental data presented. The proposed development can find multiple applications in non-destructive testing and related fields, including those in the civil sphere as well as anti-terrorist activities.

  15. Atomic Theory and Multiple Combining Proportions: The Search for Whole Number Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Melvyn C; Brown, Todd A

    2015-04-01

    John Dalton's atomic theory, with its postulate of compound formation through atom-to-atom combination, brought a new perspective to weight relationships in chemical reactions. A presumed one-to-one combination of atoms A and B to form a simple compound AB allowed Dalton to construct his first table of relative atomic weights from literature analyses of appropriate binary compounds. For such simple binary compounds, the atomic theory had little advantages over affinity theory as an explanation of fixed proportions by weight. For ternary compounds of the form AB2, however, atomic theory made quantitative predictions that were not deducible from affinity theory. Atomic theory required that the weight of B in the compound AB2 be exactly twice that in the compound AB. Dalton, Thomas Thomson and William Hyde Wollaston all published within a few years of each other experimental data that claimed to give the predicted results with the required accuracy. There are nonetheless several experimental barriers to obtaining the desired integral multiple proportions. In this paper I will discuss replication experiments which demonstrate that only Wollaston's results are experimentally reliable. It is likely that such replicability explains why Wollaston's experiments were so influential.

  16. Revision of single atom local density and capture number varying with coverage in uniform depletion approximation and its effect on coalescence and number of stable clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Qing-Yi; Zhang Juan

    2011-01-01

    In vapour deposition,single atoms(adatoms)on the substrate surface are the main source of growth.The change in its density plays a decisive role in the growth of thin films and quantum size islands.In the nucleation and cluster coalescence stages of vapour deposition,the growth of stable clusters occurs on the substrate surface covered by stable clusters.Nucleation occurs in the non-covered part,while the total area covered by stable clusters on the substrate surface will gradually increase.Carefully taking into account the coverage effect,a revised single atom density rate equation is given for the famous and widely used thin-film rate equation theory,but the work of solving the revised equation has not been done.In this paper,we solve the equation and obtain the single-atom density and capture number by using a uniform depletion approximation.We determine that the single atom density is much lower than that evaluated from the single atom density rate equation in the traditional rate equation theory when the stable cluster coverage fraction is large,and it goes down very fast with an increase in the coverage fraction.The revised equation gives a higher value for the 'average' capture number than the present equation. It also increases with increasing coverage.That makes the preparation of single crystalline thin film materials difficult and the size control of quantum size islands complicated.We also discuss the effect of the revision on coalescence and the number of stable clusters in vapour deposition.

  17. Chemical composition of human enamel and dentin. Preliminary results to determination of the effective atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical or practical dosimetry involving radiation interactions in humans needs the reliable elemental composition data of body tissues. The object of this research was to obtain the characterization dental hard tissues and to determine its effective atomic number. An analytical research of inorganic composition, from 30 intact human molars, extracted for periodontal reasons, was performed by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), ICP/AES, Thermogravimetric (TG) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The coronal dentin and enamel were separated by two techniques: (1) - mechanically by chipping and breaking by chirurgic hammer, allowed to dry in an electric oven for 5 hours at 160oC. (2) - through by high-running round steel burs. The samples were thoroughly cleaned with distilled deionizer water and sent for analysis in CDTN/CNEN laboratories, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The results showed concentrations of 11 elements measured in dentin and enamel. The five elements of the higher concentration by neutron activation analysis and ICP/AES were Ca, P, Na, Mg and Al. Thermogravimetric analysis of enamel showed a loss of water of hydroxyapatite to 500oC. Thermogravimetric analyses of dentin showed tree temperatures at which mass loss occur. These processes are related to superficial water loss (100oC); organic decomposition and water liberation from hydroxyapaptite (100oC to 600oC); and the beginning of hydroxyapatite decomposition (600oC to 850oC). Differences, in mineral concentration, were found between enamel and dentin, with higher concentrations in enamel. The two techniques proposed to separate dentin and enamel, did not present differences in elements concentration, statement that the high-running round steel burs technique didn't affect the samples. (author)

  18. Combining configuration interaction with perturbation theory for atoms with large number of valence electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Harabati, C; Flambaum, V V

    2016-01-01

    A version of the configuration interaction (CI) method is developed which treats highly excited many-electron basis states perturbatively, so that their inclusion does not affect the size of the CI matrix. This removes, at least in principle, the main limitation of the CI method in dealing with many-electron atoms or ions. We perform calculations of the spectra of iodine and its ions, tungsten, and ytterbium as examples of atoms with open $s$, $p$, $d$ and $f$-shells. Good agreement of the calculated data with experiment illustrates the power of the method. Its advantages and limitations are discussed.

  19. X-ray conversion efficiency as a function of atomic number for 0.26-micron-laser - Irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaterre, P.; Pepin, H.; Fabbro, R.; Faral, B.

    1986-11-01

    Soft-X-ray low-resolution experimental spectra are obtained for a large set of targets irradiated at 2 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm by 0.26-micron radiation. X-ray conversion efficiencies in various spectral ranges are studied as a function of atomic number. To calculate the emissivity, a simple, multiple-Z atomic-physics model is developed based on a screened-hydrogenic description for the atomic structure and on a non-LTE modified Saha approach to plasma-ionization properties. Experimental soft-X-ray spectra are replicated by using a discrete summation of emissivities over a few temperatures with appropriate weighting factors determined from the experiment or through a separate hydrodynamic-code simulation. The modulations in the Z dependence of the X-ray conversion efficiency in various spectral ranges are well described and interpreted.

  20. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities and mass attenuation coefficients in Au alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, I; Demir, L

    2010-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) for pure Au and Au99Be1, Au88Ge12, Au95Zn5 alloys were measured at 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 241Am and 109Cd radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The gamma- rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections (sigmat and sigmae), effective atomic and electron densities (Zeff and Nel) were determined using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated Au alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. PMID:20421703

  1. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Garcia, Luis Isaac; Pérez Azorin, José Fernando; Almansa, Julio F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ({ρ\\text{e}} ) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for {ρ\\text{e}} and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating {ρ\\text{e}} and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  2. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel; Determinacao da composicao e numero atomico efetivo do esmalte humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, M.S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN), Recife, PE (Brazil); Rodas Duran, J.E. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2001-07-01

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  3. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydın, G.; Cengiz, E.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Aylıkcı, V.; Bakkaloğlu, Ö. F.

    2009-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  4. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  5. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  6. Determination of the number of atoms present in nano contact based on shot noise measurements with highly stable nano-fabricated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryoji; Kaneko, Satoshi; Marqués-González, Santiago; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-07-22

    A highly stable experimental setup was developed for the measurement of shot noise in atomic contacts and molecular junctions to determine the number of atoms or molecules present. The use of a nano-fabricated mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrode improved the overall stability of the experimental setup. The improved stability of the system and optimization of measurement system enabled us to comprehensively investigate the shot noise as well as charge transport properties in Au atomic contacts and molecular junctions. We present a solid proof that the number of atoms (cross sectional atom) in the Au atomic contacts was exactly one. In the atomic contacts, contribution from the additional channels was under the detection limit. Furthermore, the effect of molecular adsorption on the charge transport in the Au atomic contact was investigated. Additional transport channels were opened by exposing pyrazine molecules to the Au contacts, which gave rise to an increase in the Fano factor in the shot noise. PMID:27291763

  7. Determination of the number of atoms present in nano contact based on shot noise measurements with highly stable nano-fabricated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryoji; Kaneko, Satoshi; Marqués-González, Santiago; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-07-01

    A highly stable experimental setup was developed for the measurement of shot noise in atomic contacts and molecular junctions to determine the number of atoms or molecules present. The use of a nano-fabricated mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrode improved the overall stability of the experimental setup. The improved stability of the system and optimization of measurement system enabled us to comprehensively investigate the shot noise as well as charge transport properties in Au atomic contacts and molecular junctions. We present a solid proof that the number of atoms (cross sectional atom) in the Au atomic contacts was exactly one. In the atomic contacts, contribution from the additional channels was under the detection limit. Furthermore, the effect of molecular adsorption on the charge transport in the Au atomic contact was investigated. Additional transport channels were opened by exposing pyrazine molecules to the Au contacts, which gave rise to an increase in the Fano factor in the shot noise.

  8. Analysis and theoretical description of a number of atomic systems with optical 3d-electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the investigation was to obtain knowledge of spectra of multiple ionized atoms in which 3d electrons play an important role. Two vacuum spectrographs were used: a 6.650 m normal incidence spectrograph for the region 400 A < lambda < 2400 A and a 6.600 m grazing incidence spectrograph for the region below 600 A. In the first five chapters the classification of several thousands of lines in the spectra Co V, Ni V, Cu V, Ni VI and Cu VI is given together with the determination of levels in the 3dsup(n), 3dsup(n-1)4s and 3dsup(n-1)4p configurations in these spectra. The position of the levels has been calculated by means of the parameter method. The calculated level values have been fitted to the experimentally determined values by means of a least squares fit procedure, resulting in optimum parameter values. The parameter values of this final diagonalization have been compared with each other along the sequence Cr-Cu for the 2-5 times ionized atoms. This comparison is discussed in chapter VI. In the last chapter (VII) the application of data, obtained from the analyses of spectra of Fe and Ni ions is considered in the field of astrophysics. The presence of forbidden lines, due to magnetic dipole transitions, of Fe IV, V, VI and VII and Ni IV, V, VI and VII in the spectra of the variable stars RR Telescopii and Eta Carinae is discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Measuring air core characteristics of a pressure-swirl atomizer via a transparent acrylic nozzle at various Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun J.; Oh, Sang Youp; Kim, Ho Y.; Yoon, Sam S. [Dept. of Mechanical, Korea University Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbukgu, 136-713 Seoul (Korea); James, Scott C. [Thermal/Fluid Science and Engineering, Sandia National Labs, PO Box 969, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Because of thermal fluid-property dependence, atomization stability (or flow regime) can change even at fixed operating conditions when subject to temperature change. Particularly at low temperatures, fuel's high viscosity can prevent a pressure-swirl (or simplex) atomizer from sustaining a centrifugal-driven air core within the fuel injector. During disruption of the air core inside an injector, spray characteristics outside the nozzle reflect a highly unstable, nonlinear mode where air core length, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), cone angle, and discharge coefficient variability. To better understand injector performance, these characteristics of the pressure-swirl atomizer were experimentally investigated and data were correlated to Reynolds numbers (Re). Using a transparent acrylic nozzle, the air core length, SMD, cone angle, and discharge coefficient are observed as a function of Re. The critical Reynolds numbers that distinguish the transition from unstable mode to transitional mode and eventually to a stable mode are reported. The working fluids are diesel and a kerosene-based fuel, referred to as bunker-A. (author)

  10. Tomography of atomic number and density of materials using dual-energy imaging and the Alvarez and Macovski attenuation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paziresh, M.; Kingston, A. M.; Latham, S. J.; Fullagar, W. K.; Myers, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography and the Alvarez and Macovski [Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] transmitted intensity (AMTI) model were used in this study to estimate the maps of density (ρ) and atomic number (Z) of mineralogical samples. In this method, the attenuation coefficients are represented [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] in the form of the two most important interactions of X-rays with atoms that is, photoelectric absorption (PE) and Compton scattering (CS). This enables material discrimination as PE and CS are, respectively, dependent on the atomic number (Z) and density (ρ) of materials [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)]. Dual-energy imaging is able to identify sample materials even if the materials have similar attenuation coefficients at single-energy spectrum. We use the full model rather than applying one of several applied simplified forms [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976); Siddiqui et al., SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2004); Derzhi, U.S. patent application 13/527,660 (2012); Heismann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2073-2079 (2003); Park and Kim, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 59, 2709 (2011); Abudurexiti et al., Radiol. Phys. Technol. 3, 127-135 (2010); and Kaewkhao et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 109, 1260-1265 (2008)]. This paper describes the tomographic reconstruction of ρ and Z maps of mineralogical samples using the AMTI model. The full model requires precise knowledge of the X-ray energy spectra and calibration of PE and CS constants and exponents of atomic number and energy that were estimated based on fits to simulations and calibration measurements. The estimated ρ and Z images of the samples used in this paper yield average relative errors of 2.62% and 1.19% and maximum relative errors of 2.64% and 7.85%, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the method accounts for the beam hardening effect in density (ρ) and

  11. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  12. Effective atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient of PbO-BaO-B2O3 glass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Shams A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-rays attenuation coefficient, half-value layer, mean free path, effective atomic number and electron density have been measured in glass system of xPbO-(50-x) BaO-50B2O3 (where 5≤x≤45 mol%) for gamma ray photon energies of 0.356, 0.662, 1.173 and 1.33 MeV. The emitted gamma ray was detected by 3×3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation gamma ray spectrometers. The results were found in good agreement with the theoretical values which calculated from WinXcom.

  13. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  14. Measurement of attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of oxides of lanthanides by using simplified ATM-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Measurement of linear attenuation coefficient by simplified ATM method for the oxides of Lanthanides. • Atomic parameters are calculated from linear attenuation coefficients. • Geometrical setup has been validated with metallic targets of uniform thickness. • Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results within error limits. - Abstract: The linear and mass attenuation coefficient of non-uniform thick samples of oxides of lanthanide (Pr6O11, Nd2O3, Gd2O3, Tb4O7, Ho2O3 and Er2O3) has been measured by gamma ray photons of energy 59.54 keV obtained from 100 mCi radioactive source of 241Am. Advanced Two Media (ATM) methods Gupta et al. (2013) is simplified by considering air as first medium and metallic foil as second medium. In the present measurements this consideration simplifies the mathematical complexities and laboratory work to find the attenuation coefficients of non-uniform thick samples. The values of attenuation coefficient were then used to calculate effective atomic numbers (Zeff), interaction cross-section (σ) and effective electron densities (Neff) of lanthanide oxides. The method is validated by measuring linear/mass attenuation coefficient and other parameters for Mo, Ag, Sn, W and Pb of uniform thickness. The measured results are compared with the theoretical values from WinXcom Gerward et al. (2001). It is found that measured values are in agreement within 2% of theoretical results. The measurement of linear attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers (Zeff), interaction cross-section and effective electron densities (Neff) enhances the understanding of material characteristics. Presently studied materials i.e. oxides of Lanthanide are widely used as glass colouring agent and in electronic sensing devices

  15. Measurement of attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of oxides of lanthanides by using simplified ATM-method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gurinderjeet; Gupta, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: mkgupta.sliet@gmail.com; Dhaliwal, A.S.; Kahlon, K.S.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Measurement of linear attenuation coefficient by simplified ATM method for the oxides of Lanthanides. • Atomic parameters are calculated from linear attenuation coefficients. • Geometrical setup has been validated with metallic targets of uniform thickness. • Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results within error limits. - Abstract: The linear and mass attenuation coefficient of non-uniform thick samples of oxides of lanthanide (Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been measured by gamma ray photons of energy 59.54 keV obtained from 100 mCi radioactive source of {sup 241}Am. Advanced Two Media (ATM) methods Gupta et al. (2013) is simplified by considering air as first medium and metallic foil as second medium. In the present measurements this consideration simplifies the mathematical complexities and laboratory work to find the attenuation coefficients of non-uniform thick samples. The values of attenuation coefficient were then used to calculate effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}), interaction cross-section (σ) and effective electron densities (N{sub eff}) of lanthanide oxides. The method is validated by measuring linear/mass attenuation coefficient and other parameters for Mo, Ag, Sn, W and Pb of uniform thickness. The measured results are compared with the theoretical values from WinXcom Gerward et al. (2001). It is found that measured values are in agreement within 2% of theoretical results. The measurement of linear attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}), interaction cross-section and effective electron densities (N{sub eff}) enhances the understanding of material characteristics. Presently studied materials i.e. oxides of Lanthanide are widely used as glass colouring agent and in electronic sensing devices.

  16. On the effective atomic number and electron density: A comprehensive set of formulas for all types of materials and energies above 1 keV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K.S.;

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive and consistent set of formulas is given for calculating the effective atomic number and electron density for all types of materials and for all photon energies greater than 1 keV. The are derived from first principles using photon interaction cross sections of the constituent atoms...

  17. Number distribution of multiply emitted secondary electrons (MUSE) produced by atomic and molecular ion impacts on thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number distribution of secondary electrons emitted through energetic ion impact on a thin carbon foil was measured. Projectile ions of 1-MeV/u He2+ or He+ passed through a carbon foil with thickness of 1 μ g/cm2 in a direction of 45o to its surface. Electrons emitted in the forward and backward directions were accelerated by a potential applied to the foil and detected by two solid state detectors (SSDs) in which pulses proportional to the electron number were formed. Transmitted ions were charge analyzed by an electrostatic deflector and detected by the third SSD. The measurement was performed in coincidence with transmitted He2+ ions and in the event-recording mode. For molecular ions, Coulomb explosion fragments, i.e., two He2+ ions were detected after passing an annular slit or conventional circular slit which selects incident molecules with molecular axes perpendicular to or parallel to the ion velocity. The average numbers of electrons emitted in the forward direction are about 1.5 times as large as those in the backward direction for atomic and molecular ions with both orientations. The width of the number distribution is generally wider than that of Poisson distribution with the same average number. Orientation dependence is not recognized in the backward direction but a slight enhancement is found for parallel orientation in the forward direction. The fact that the vicinage effect is observed only for the parallel orientation seems consistent with the density enhancement of the target electrons behind the leading ion. A negative correlation between numbers of electrons emitted in the forward and backward directions is found. (Author)

  18. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  19. Variation of 3s photoionization resonance structures in a serial atomic number species Ar, K, and Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subvalence 3s-shell photoionization resonances of Ca were measured with monochromatized synchrotron radiation and photoion time-of-flight spectroscopy method. Charge resolved photoion yield spectra were obtained. Broad peak structures were found in the Ca+ spectrum and shallow window structures were found in the Ca2+ spectrum. We performed MCDF calculations to assign the resonance structures. The 3s-shell photoionization of Ar and K were also measured for comparison. A systematic increase was observed in Fano-Beutler parameter and in the resonance width along with the increase of atomic number from Z=18(Ar) to 20(Ca). We discuss also the spectral structures that could be of the 3p double-shake-up satellites, which are observed in the 3s photoionization region. (author)

  20. Technical Note: Exploring the limit for the conversion of energy-subtracted CT number to electron density for high-atomic-number materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide ρ{sub e} range. The purpose of this study is to address the limitations of the conversion method with respect to atomic number (Z) by elucidating the role of partial photon interactions in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion process. Methods: The authors performed numerical analyses of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion for 105 human body tissues, as listed in ICRU Report 46, and elementary substances with Z = 1–40. Total and partial attenuation coefficients for these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross section database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 kV/Sn under well-calibrated and poorly calibrated conditions. Results: The accuracy of the resultant calibrated electron density,ρ{sub e}{sup cal}, for the ICRU-46 body tissues fully satisfied the IPEM-81 tolerance levels in radiotherapy treatment planning. If a criterion of ρ{sub e}{sup cal}/ρ{sub e} − 1 is assumed to be within ±2%, the predicted upper limit of Z applicable for the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion under the well-calibrated condition is Z = 27. In the case of the poorly calibrated condition, the upper limit of Z is approximately 16. The deviation from the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} linearity for higher Z substances is mainly caused by the anomalous variation in the photoelectric-absorption component. Conclusions: Compensation among the three partial components of the photon interactions provides for sufficient linearity of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion to be applicable for most human tissues even for poorly conditioned scans in which there exists a large variation of effective x

  1. Technical Note: Exploring the limit for the conversion of energy-subtracted CT number to electron density for high-atomic-number materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρe conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρe over a wide ρe range. The purpose of this study is to address the limitations of the conversion method with respect to atomic number (Z) by elucidating the role of partial photon interactions in the ΔHU–ρe conversion process. Methods: The authors performed numerical analyses of the ΔHU–ρe conversion for 105 human body tissues, as listed in ICRU Report 46, and elementary substances with Z = 1–40. Total and partial attenuation coefficients for these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross section database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 kV/Sn under well-calibrated and poorly calibrated conditions. Results: The accuracy of the resultant calibrated electron density,ρecal, for the ICRU-46 body tissues fully satisfied the IPEM-81 tolerance levels in radiotherapy treatment planning. If a criterion of ρecal/ρe − 1 is assumed to be within ±2%, the predicted upper limit of Z applicable for the ΔHU–ρe conversion under the well-calibrated condition is Z = 27. In the case of the poorly calibrated condition, the upper limit of Z is approximately 16. The deviation from the ΔHU–ρe linearity for higher Z substances is mainly caused by the anomalous variation in the photoelectric-absorption component. Conclusions: Compensation among the three partial components of the photon interactions provides for sufficient linearity of the ΔHU–ρe conversion to be applicable for most human tissues even for poorly conditioned scans in which there exists a large variation of effective x-ray energies owing to beam-hardening effects arising from the mismatch between the

  2. Relative level excitation in ion-atom collisions as a function of the orbital angular momentum quantum number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous study of projectile Rydberg state excitations in the collisions Be+, Mg+-He at 10-75 keV it was found, for a fixed value of the principal quantum number n, that the ratio of the s, p, and d level cross sections was close to 1:3:5, whereas the f and g level cross sections drop to approximately the same value as for s levels. Blaney and Berry (1976) found essentially the same increase in cross section for electron transfer into excited Li I states in the Li+-H2 collision. In contrast to this behavior, beam-foil excitations oscillate as a function of the orbital angular momentum quantum number with maxima at odd values of l (p, f,...) and minima at even l (s, d, g,...). Since no model is available to describe these features, the measurements have been extended to other systems to test their general validity. A large conjugated molecule (benzene) was chosen as target gas in one experiment to bridge the gap between ion-atom and ion-foil excitations. The data presented here have all been obtained by optical spectrometry. A quasi molecular approach is used to explain the results. (Auth.)

  3. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida J, A. T. [FUNDACENTRO, Centro Regional de Minas Gerais, Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, 30180-100 Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S. [Center of Development of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santos, M. A. P., E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br [Regional Center for Nuclear Science / CNEN, 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub t}) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and the effective electron density (N{sub eff}) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  4. Influence of the effective atomic number in the thermoluminescent response; Influencia del numero atomico efectivo en la respuesta termoluminiscente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P.R. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Nowadays the thermoluminescent dosimetry is one of the methods more reliable for ionizing radiation dosimetry, for that in many parts of the world, different research groups continue in the development of new TL materials. Notwithstanding, the use of these materials for dosimetric radiation purposes, should to take into account the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) to avoid an underestimate or overestimation of the measured dose, for example, in radiodiagnostic or radiotherapy. It is well known that some materials considered as equivalent to the soft biological tissue, present smaller sensitivity when being irradiated with low energy photons, while the TL material considered as not equivalent to the tissue, presents the supra sensitivity effect. In this work the results of the TL signal shown by different TL materials, when being irradiated with photons of effective energy between 24 keV and 1.25 MeV, and its relationship with their Z{sub eff} calculated by three methods are presented. (Author)

  5. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  6. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  7. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μt) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm3 collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm3 collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm3 collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and the effective electron density (Neff) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  8. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities, and tissue equivalence of some gases and mixtures for dosimetry of radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mass attenuation coefficients, µm, effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Neff, of different gases - carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene, propane, butane, and pentane used in radiation detectors, have been calculated for the photon energy of 1 keV to 100 GeV. Each gas has constant Zeff values between 0.10 to 10 MeV photon energies; however, these values are way far away from ICRU tissue. Carbon dioxide gas shows the closest tissue equivalence in the entire photon energy spectrum. Relative tissue equivalences of the mixtures of gases with respect to ICRU tissue are in the range of 0.998-1.041 for air, argon (4.5% + methane (95.5%, argon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5%, and nitrogen (5% + methane (7% + carbon dioxide (88%. The gas composition of xenon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5% shows 1.605 times higher tissue equivalence compared to the ICRU tissue. The investigated photon interaction parameters are useful for exposure and energy absorption buildup factors calculation and design, and fabrication of gaseous detectors for ambient radiation measurement by the Geiger-Muller detector, ionization chambers and proportional counters.

  9. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some biologically important compounds containing H, C, N and O in the energy range 145 1330 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunathaguru, V.; Umesh, T. K.

    2006-09-01

    A semi-empirical relation which can be used to determine the total attenuation cross sections of samples containing H, C, N and O in the energy range 145-1332 keV has been derived based on the total attenuation cross sections of several sugars, amino acids and fatty acids. The cross sections have been measured by performing transmission experiments in a narrow beam good geometry set-up by employing a high-resolution hyperpure germanium detector at seven energies of biological importance such as 145.4 keV, 279.2 keV, 514 keV, 661.6 keV, 1115.5 keV, 1173.2 keV and 1332.1 keV. The semi-empirical relation can reproduce the experimental values within 1-2%. The total attenuation cross sections of five elements carbon, aluminium, titanium, copper and zirconium measured in the same experimental set-up at the energies mentioned above have been used in a new matrix method to evaluate the effective atomic numbers and the effective electron densities of samples such as cholesterol, fatty acids, sugars and amino acids containing H, C, N and O atoms from their effective atomic cross sections. The effective atomic cross sections are the total attenuation cross sections divided by the total number of atoms of all types in a particular sample. Further, a quantity called the effective atomic weight was defined as the ratio of the molecular weight of a sample to the total number of atoms of all types in it. The variation of the effective atomic number was systematically studied with respect to the effective atomic weight and a new semi-empirical relation for Zeff has been evolved. It is felt that this relation can be very useful to determine the effective atomic number of any sample having H, C, N and O atoms in the energy range 145-1332 keV irrespective of its chemical structure.

  10. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  11. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, Ec, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below Ec. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  12. Structural properties of the titanium dioxide thin films grown by atomic layer deposition at various numbers of reaction cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dependence of structural properties of TiO2 films grown on both Si- and Ti-substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at the temperature range of 250-300 deg. C from titanium ethoxide and water on the number of reaction cycles N was investigated using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-Ray diffraction (XRD). TiO2 films grown on both Si- and Ti-substrates revealed amorphous structure at low values of N 2 with structure of anatase on both types of substrates and according to XRD-measurements the sizes of crystallites rose with the increase of N. The maximum anatase crystallite size for TiO2 grown on Ti-substrate was found to be on ∼35% lower in comparing with that for TiO2 grown on Si-substrate. A use of titanium methoxide as a Ti precursor with the ligand size smaller than in case of titanium ethoxide allowed to observe an influence of the ligand size on both the growth per cycle and structural properties of TiO2. The average growth per cycle of TiO2 deposited from titanium methoxide and water (0.052 ± 0.01 nm/cycle) was essentially higher than that for TiO2 grown from titanium ethoxide and water (0.043 ± 0.01 nm/cycle). Ligands of smaller sizes were found to promote the higher crystallinity of TiO2 in comparison with the case of using the titanium precursor with ligands of bigger sizes.

  13. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and \\mu \\big|_{140kVp}^{80kVp}. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of \\mu \\big|_{140\\;kVp}^{80\\;kVp} were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the

  14. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. 10. Reevaluation of atomic number density of JOYO Mk-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Sato, Wakaei [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arii, Yoshio [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The material composition of JOYO Mk-II core components in its initial core was reevaluated as a part of the effort for developing a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The special feature of the reevaluation is to treat the decay of Pu-241 isotope, so that the atomic number densities of Pu-241 and Am-241 in fuel assemblies can be exactly evaluated on the initial critical date, Nov. 22nd, 1982. Further, the atomic number densities of other core components were also evaluated to improve the analytical accuracy. Those include the control rods which were not so strictly evaluated in the past, and the dummy fuels and the neutron sources which were not treated in the analytical model so far. The results of the present reevaluation were as follows: (1) The changes of atomic number densities of the major nuclides such as Pu-239, U-235 and U-238 were about {+-}0.2 to 0.3%. On the other hand, the number density of Pu-241, which was the motivation of the present work, was reduced by 12%. From the fact, the number densities in the past analysis might be based on the isotope measurement of the manufacturing point of time without considering the decay of Pu-241. (2) As the other core components, the number densities of control rods and outer reflector-type A were largely improved. (author)

  15. The Mass Attenuation Coefficients, Electronic, Atomic, and Molecular Cross Sections, Effective Atomic Numbers, and Electron Densities for Compounds of Some Biomedically Important Elements at 59.5 keV

    OpenAIRE

    Burcu Akça; Erzeneoğlu, Salih Z.

    2014-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for compounds of biomedically important some elements (Na, Mg, Al, Ca, and Fe) have been measured by using an extremely narrow collimated-beam transmission method in the energy 59.5 keV. Total electronic, atomic, and molecular cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities have been obtained by using these results. Gamma-rays of 241Am passed through compounds have been detected by a high-resolution Si(Li) detector and by using energy dispers...

  16. Fidelity of quantum information for Ⅴ-type three-level atom interacting with a number state light field in Kerr medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Su-Mei; He An-Zhi; Ji Yun-Jing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the evolution characteristics of the fidelity of quantum information for the Ⅴ-type three-level atom interacting with number state light field in Kerr medium are investigated. It shows that the periodicity of the evolutions of fidelity of quantum information is influenced by the Kerr coefficient, the photon number of the initial field and intensity of light. The evolutions of the fidelity of quantum information are modulated by the initial number state field. The Rabi oscillation frequency and the modulation frequency of fidelity for the field and the system vary with the value of the Kerr coefficient. The evolutions of fidelity of quantum information obviously show the quantum collapse and revival behaviours in the system of atom interacting with light field.

  17. Spatial distribution of the temperature and the number densities of electrons and atomic and ionic species in an inductively coupled RF argon plasma, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the literature shows that the values found for the excitation parameters (temperature and electron number density) in an inductively coupled radio-frequency argon plasma at atmospheric pressure (ICP) depend on the plasma configuration and the measuring procedure. The present study proposes a novel method for measuring excitation temperatures that does not require a knowledge of transition probabilities. The experimental work concerns measurements of the spatial distributions of the temperature, the number densities of the electrons and various atomic and ionic species in a low-power (approximately o.5kW) ICP for analytical purposes operated at either of two extreme carrier gas flow rates. Observations were made at three different heights above the induction coil. At high flow rate (approximately 51/min) the familiar hollow configuration of the plasma is demonstrated by off-axis maxima for the temperature and the number densities of electrons and atomic species at all observation heights. At low flow rate (approximately 1 l./min), the radial atom number density distributions are parabolically shaped and constricted to a smaller channel at all observation heights. The authors conclude from the results that both the plasma configurations are not in a state of complete local thermal equilibrium at observation heights used for analytical work (i.e., above the coil)

  18. Effective atomic number of some sugars and amino acids for scattering of (241)Am and (137)Cs gamma rays at low momentum transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinaykumar, L; Umesh, T K

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the effective atomic number of some H, C, N and O based sugars and amino acids. These have been determined by using a handy expression which is based on the theoretical angle integrated small angle (coherent+incoherent) scattering cross sections of seven elements of Z≤13 in four angular ranges of (0-4°), (0-6°), (0-8°) and (0-10°)for (241)Am (59.54 keV) and (137)Cs (661.6 keV) gamma rays. The theoretical scattering cross sections were computed by a suitable numerical integration of the atomic form factor and incoherent scattering function compilations of Hubbell et al. (1975) which make use of the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock (NRHF) model for the atomic charge distribution of the elements in the angular ranges of interest. The angle integrated small angle scattering cross sections of the H, C, N and O based sugars and amino acids measured by a new method reported recently by the authors were used in the handy expression to derive their effective atomic number. The results are compared with the other available data and discussed. Possible conclusions are drawn based on the present study.

  19. Effective atomic numbers of some H-, C-, N- and O-based composite materials derived from differential incoherent scattering cross-sections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Prasanna Kumar; V Manjunathaguru; T K Umesh

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we have made an effort to determine whether the effective atomic numbers of H-, C-, N- and O-based composite materials would indeed remain a constant over the energy grid of 280–1200 keV wherein incoherent scattering dominates their interaction with photons. For this purpose, the differential incoherent scattering cross-sections of Be, C, Mg, Al, Ca and Ti were measured for three scattering angles 60°, 80° and 100° at 279.1, 661.6 and 1115.5 keV using which an expression for the effective atomic number was derived. The differential incoherent scattering cross-sections of the composite materials of interest measured at these three angles in the same set-up and substituted in this expression would yield their effective atomic number at the three energies. Results obtained in this manner for bakelite, nylon, epoxy, teflon, perspex and some sugars, fatty acids as well as amino acids agreed to within 2% of some of the other available values. It was also observed that for each of these samples, eff was almost a constant at the three energies which unambiguously justified the conclusions drawn by other authors earlier [Manjunathaguru and Umesh, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39, 3969 (2006); Manohara et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B266, 3906 (2008); Manohara et al Phys. Med. Biol. 53, M377 (2008)] based on total interaction cross-sections in the energy grid of interest.

  20. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Pravina P.; Bichile, Govind K.

    2013-11-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as Glycine (C2H5NO2), DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2), Proline (C5H9NO2), L-Leucine (C6H13NO2 ), L-Arginine (C6H14N4O2) and L-Arginine Monohydrochloride (C6H15ClN4O2), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 10.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities are in good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error.

  1. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities in amino acids and sugars in the energy range 30-1333 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, Shivalinge [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Krishnaveni, S. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Gowda, Ramakrishna [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India)]. E-mail: ramakrishnagowda@yahoo.com

    2005-10-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of the amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, valine, threonine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, lysine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine, arginine, tyrosine, tryptophane and the sugars arabinose, ribose, glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, rhamnose, maltose, melibiose, melezitose and raffinose at the energies 30.8, 35.0, 81.0, 145, 276.4, 302.9, 356, 383.9, 661.6, 1173 and 1332.5 keV were calculated by using the measured total attenuation cross-sections. The interpolations of total attenuation cross-sections for photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the XCOM data in the photon energy region 30-1500 keV. The best-fit coefficients obtained by a piece wise interpolation method were used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  2. Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopic analysis of graphene films grown directly on Si substrate via CVD technique for estimating the graphene atomic planes number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazmi, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Alshahrie, Ahmed; Shokr, F. S.; Mahmoud, Waleed E.

    2016-08-01

    Two reliable approaches for estimating the number of atomic planes of graphene films grown on Si substrate were demonstrated by Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopies. The first approach depends on the measurement of the ratio of the integrated Raman scattering intensity of the graphene G band to the optical phonon band of Si substrate (IG/ISi). The second approach belongs to ellipsometry measurement of the ratio of the amplitude of the reflected polarized light from the surface of the graphene films to the amplitude of reflected polarized light from the surface of the Si substrate (ΨG/ΨSi). These two approaches could efficiently recognize the number of atomic planes in the graphene films (1 ≤ n ≤ 10). The results were compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement and showed a linear regression with slope of 0.36 ± 0.01 nm/graphene layer. The Two approaches will open a new avenue to efficiently count the number of graphene layers during the preparation process.

  3. Electron density and transport in top-gated graphene nanoribbon devices: First-principles Green function algorithms for systems containing a large number of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areshkin, Denis A.; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2010-04-01

    The recent fabrication of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) field-effect transistors poses a challenge for first-principles modeling of carbon nanoelectronics due to many thousand atoms present in the device. The state of the art quantum transport algorithms, based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with the density-functional theory (NEGF-DFT), were originally developed to calculate self-consistent electron density in equilibrium and at finite bias voltage (as a prerequisite to obtain conductance or current-voltage characteristics, respectively) for small molecules attached to metallic electrodes where only a few hundred atoms are typically simulated. Here we introduce combination of two numerically efficient algorithms which make it possible to extend the NEGF-DFT framework to device simulations involving large number of atoms. Our first algorithm offers an alternative to the usual evaluation of the equilibrium part of electron density via numerical contour integration of the retarded Green function in the upper complex half-plane. It is based on the replacement of the Fermi function f(E) with an analytic function f˜(E) coinciding with f(E) inside the integration range along the real axis, but decaying exponentially in the upper complex half-plane. Although f˜(E) has infinite number of poles, whose positions and residues are determined analytically, only a finite number of those poles have non-negligible residues. We also discuss how this algorithm can be extended to compute the nonequilibrium contribution to electron density, thereby evading cumbersome real-axis integration (within the bias voltage window) of NEGFs which is very difficult to converge for systems with large number of atoms while maintaining current conservation. Our second algorithm combines the recursive formulas with the geometrical partitioning of an arbitrary multiterminal device into nonuniform segments in order to reduce the computational complexity of the retarded Green

  4. Modelling the effective atomic number and the packing factor of polyatomic compounds: Applications to refractive index and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, H.; Couto dos Santos, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, based on fundamental physics and chemistry (charge distribution, electronegativity, induced dipole moment), we are introducing an analytical expression for Zeff and a general way of calculating the crystal packing factor, p, of any ionic material. By using the average separation between the atomic and crystal(ionic) radii of the interacting ions, we are postulating an effective distance(Rij) between the positive and the negative centre of charge. When compared to the available experimental data, predictions within 20% have been obtained to Zeff of materials applied to dosimetry. In photonics, the increasing behaviour of the refractive index with Zeff is confirmed. By combining crystal field and effective charge models, we have predicted Zeff of the Eu2O3 within the range of available experimental data.

  5. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Wissam A; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-14

    The van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C6 ∝ N(2.2) as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N(2.75) as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes by fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C6 ∝ N(2.8), which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole-dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.

  6. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Wissam A.; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    The van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C6 ∝ N2.2 as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N2.75 as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes by fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C6 ∝ N2.8, which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole-dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.

  7. Measurement of atomic L shell Coster-Kronig yields (f12, f23 and f13) for some elements in the atomic number range 59≤Z≤90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-radiative transitions cause changes in the generation of the intensity of the L lines. In order to investigate the physical quantities relevant to the L lines affected by the non-radiative transitions, experimental measurements were carried out using a Si(Li) x-ray spectrometer. Atomic L shell Coster-Kronig yields (f12, f13 and f23) for some elements in the atomic number range 59≤Z≤90 were determined. These selected measured semi-empirical values were also fitted by least squares to polynomials in Z of the form ΣnanZn (except for f13) and compared with theoretical and with earlier fitted values. (author)

  8. The Mass Attenuation Coefficients, Electronic, Atomic, and Molecular Cross Sections, Effective Atomic Numbers, and Electron Densities for Compounds of Some Biomedically Important Elements at 59.5 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Akça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mass attenuation coefficients for compounds of biomedically important some elements (Na, Mg, Al, Ca, and Fe have been measured by using an extremely narrow collimated-beam transmission method in the energy 59.5 keV. Total electronic, atomic, and molecular cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities have been obtained by using these results. Gamma-rays of 241Am passed through compounds have been detected by a high-resolution Si(Li detector and by using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF. Obtained results have been compared with theoretically calculated values of WinXCom and FFAST. The relative difference between the experimental and theoretical values are −9.4% to +11.9% with WinXCom and −11.8% to +11.7% FFAST. Results have been presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. Experimental measurement of effective atomic number of composite materials for Compton effect in the -ray region 280–1115 keV by a new method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Prasanna Kumar; T K Umesh

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we report a new method to determine the effective atomic number, eff, of composite materials for Compton effect in the γ -ray region 280–1115 keV based on the theoretically obtained Klein–Nishina scattering cross-sections in the angular range 50°–100° as well as a method to experimentally measure differential incoherent (Compton) scattering cross-sections in this angular range. The method was employed to evaluate eff for different inorganic compounds containing elements in the range = 1–56, at three scattering angles 60°, 80° and 100° at three incident gamma energies 279.1 keV, 661.6 keV and 1115.5 keV and we have verified this method to be an appropriate method. Interestingly, the eff values so obtained for the inorganic compounds were found to be equal to the total number of electrons present in the sample as given by the atomic number of the elements constituting the sample in accordance with the chemical formula of the sample. This was the case at all the three energies.

  10. A comparative study on total reflection X-ray fluorescence determination of low atomic number elements in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using different excitation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of trace element determinations of low atomic number (Z) elements Na, Mg, Al, P, K and Ca in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using W Lβ1, Mo Kα and Cr Kα excitations has been made. For Mo Kα and W Lβ1 excitations a Si (Li) detector with beryllium window was used and measurements were performed in air and helium atmospheres. For Cr Kα excitation, a Si (Li) detector with an ultra thin polymer window (UTW) was used and measurements were made in vacuum and air atmospheres. The sensitivities of the elemental X-ray lines were determined using TXRF spectra of standard solutions and processing them by IAEA QXAS program. The elemental concentrations of the elements in other solutions were determined using their TXRF spectra and pre-determined sensitivity values. The study suggests that, using the above experimental set up, Mo Kα excitation is not suited for trace determination of low atomic number element. Excitation by WLβ1 and helium atmosphere, the spectrometer can be used for the determination of elements with Z = 15 (P) and above with fairly good detection limits whereas Cr Kα excitation with ultra thin polymer window and vacuum atmosphere is good for the elements having Z = 11 (Na) and above. The detection limits using this set up vary from 7048 pg for Na to 83 pg for Ti. - Highlights: • TXRF conditions are optimized for low atomic number (Z) element determinations. • Mo Kα with Be window detector can be used for elements with Z ≥ 20 (K). • W Lβ1 with Be window detector can be used for elements with Z ≥ 15 (P). • Cr Kα, UTW detector and vacuum atmosphere are suitable for elements with Z ≥ 11 (Na). • For the elements with Z ≥ 11 (Na), a separate study is needed

  11. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad W. Marashdeh; Ibrahim F. Al-Hamarneh; Eid M. Abdel Munem; A.A. Tajuddin; Alawiah Ariffin; Saleh Al-Omari

    2015-01-01

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10–60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The M...

  12. Cold Incineration of Chlorophenols in Aqueous Solution by Advanced Electrochemical Process Electro-Fenton. Effect of Number and Position of Chlorine Atoms on the Degradation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oturan, Nihal; Panizza, Marco; Oturan, Mehmet A.

    2009-09-01

    This study reports the kinetics of the degradation of several chlorophenols (CPs), such as monochlorophenols (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol), dichlorophenols (2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,6- dichlorophenol), trichlorophenols (2,3,5- trichlorophenol and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol), 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, by the electro-Fenton process using a carbon felt cathode and a Pt anode. The effect of number and the position of the chlorine atoms in the aromatic ring on the oxidative degradation rate was evaluated and discussed. The oxidation reaction of all the CPs with hydroxyl radicals evidenced a pseudo-first-order kinetics and the rate constant decreased with increasing the number of chlorine atoms. The absolute rate constant of second-order reaction kinetics between CPs and •OH was determined by the competition kinetics method in the range of (3.56-7.75) × 109 M-1 s-1 and follows the same sequence of the apparent rate constants. The mineralization of several CPs and of a mixture of all CPs under study was monitored by the total organic carbon (TOC) removal and the chlorine release during mineralization was followed by ion chromatography. Our results demonstrated that more chlorinated phenols are more difficult to mineralize; however for all the tested CPs, almost quantitative release of chloride ions was obtained after 6 h of treatment.

  13. Effective atomic numbers of different types of materials for proton interaction in the energy region 1 keV-10 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-10-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of different types of materials such as tissues, tissue equivalents, organic compounds, glasses and dosimetric materials have been calculated for total proton interactions in the energy region 1 keV-10 GeV. Also, effective atomic numbers relative to water (Zeff RW) have been presented in the entire energy region for the materials that show better water equivalent properties. Some human tissues such as adipose tissue, bone compact, muscle skeletal and muscle striated have been investigated in terms of tissue equivalency by comparing Zeff values and the better tissue equivalents have been determined for these tissues. With respect to the variation of Zeff with kinetic energy, it has been observed that Zeff seems to be more or less the same in the energy region 400 keV-10 GeV for the given materials except for the photographic emulsion, calcium fluoride, silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon. The values of Zeff have found to be constant for photographic emulsion after 1 GeV, for calcium fluoride between 1 MeV and 1 GeV and for silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon between 400 keV and 1 GeV. This constancy clearly shows the availability of using Zeff in estimating radiation response of the materials at first glance.

  14. Effective atomic numbers of different types of materials for proton interaction in the energy region 1 keV–10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) of different types of materials such as tissues, tissue equivalents, organic compounds, glasses and dosimetric materials have been calculated for total proton interactions in the energy region 1 keV–10 GeV. Also, effective atomic numbers relative to water (Z{sub eff}RW) have been presented in the entire energy region for the materials that show better water equivalent properties. Some human tissues such as adipose tissue, bone compact, muscle skeletal and muscle striated have been investigated in terms of tissue equivalency by comparing Z{sub eff} values and the better tissue equivalents have been determined for these tissues. With respect to the variation of Z{sub eff} with kinetic energy, it has been observed that Z{sub eff} seems to be more or less the same in the energy region 400 keV–10 GeV for the given materials except for the photographic emulsion, calcium fluoride, silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon. The values of Z{sub eff} have found to be constant for photographic emulsion after 1 GeV, for calcium fluoride between 1 MeV and 1 GeV and for silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide and Teflon between 400 keV and 1 GeV. This constancy clearly shows the availability of using Z{sub eff} in estimating radiation response of the materials at first glance.

  15. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some human tissues and dosimetric materials for mean energies of various radiation sources relevant to radiotherapy and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, neff, are convenient parameters used to characterise the radiation response of a multi-element material in many technical and medical applications. Accurate values of these physical parameters provide essential data in medical physics. In the present study, the effective atomic numbers and electron densities have been calculated for some human tissues and dosimetric materials such as Adipose Tissue (ICRU-44), Bone Cortical (ICRU-44), Brain Grey/White Matter (ICRU-44), Breast Tissue (ICRU-44), Lung Tissue (ICRU-44), Soft Tissue (ICRU-44), LiF TLD-100H, TLD-100, Water, Borosilicate Glass, PAG (Gel Dosimeter), Fricke (Gel Dosimeter) and OSL (Aluminium Oxide) using mean photon energies, Em, of various radiation sources. The used radiation sources are Pd-103, Tc-99, Ra-226, I-131, Ir-192, Co-60, 30 kVp, 40 kVp, 50 kVp (Intrabeam, Carl Zeiss Meditec) and 6 MV (Mohan-6 MV) sources. The Em values were then used to calculate Zeff and neff of the tissues and dosimetric materials for various radiation sources. Different calculation methods for Zeff such as the direct method, the interpolation method and Auto-Zeff computer program were used and agreements and disagreements between the used methods have been presented and discussed. It has been observed that at higher Em values agreement is quite satisfactory (Dif.<5%) between the adopted methods.

  16. Measurement of electron density and effective atomic number by dual-energy scan using a 320-detector computed tomography scanner with raw data-based analysis: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Kiguchi, Masao; Tsushima, So; Taniguchi, Akira; Kaichi, Yoko; Yamagami, Takuji; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of the electron densities and effective atomic numbers determined by raw data-based dual-energy analysis on a 320-detector computed tomography scanner. The mean (SD) errors between the measured and true electron densities and between the measured and true effective atomic numbers were 1.3% (1.5%) and 3.1% (3.2%), respectively. Electron densities and effective atomic numbers can be determined with high accuracy, which may help to improve accuracy in radiotherapy treatment planning. PMID:24983439

  17. Effective atomic number and electron density of amino acids within the energy range of 0.122-1.330 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Chaitali V.; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2016-08-01

    Photon attenuation coefficient calculation methods have been widely used to accurately study the properties of amino acids such as n-acetyl-L-tryptophan, n-acetyl-L-tyrosine, D-tryptophan, n-acetyl-L-glutamic acid, D-phenylalanine, and D-threonine. In this study, mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these amino acids for 0.122-, 0.356-, 0.511-, 0.662-, 0.884-, 1.170, 1.275-, 1.330-MeV photons are determined using the radio-nuclides Co57, Ba133, Cs137, Na22, Mn54, and Co60. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The calculated attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine total atomic cross sections (σt), molar extinction coefficients (ε), electronic cross sections (σe), effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on the XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in a good agreement (error<5%). The variations of μm, σt, ε, σe, Zeff, and Neff with energy are shown graphically. The values of μm, σt, ε, σe are higher at lower energies, and they decrease sharply as energy increases; by contrast, Zeff and Neff were found to be almost constant.

  18. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV–100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Yeow, John T.W., E-mail: jyeow@uwaterloo.ca [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10–200 keV and 1–20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  19. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV-100 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan; Yeow, John T. W.

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10-200 keV and 1-20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  20. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  1. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized deq in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  2. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Zeff of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Zeff using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  3. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some human tissues and dosimetric materials for mean energies of various radiation sources relevant to radiotherapy and medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, neff, are convenient parameters used to characterise the radiation response of a multi-element material in many technical and medical applications. Accurate values of these physical parameters provide essential data in medical physics. In the present study, the effective atomic numbers and electron densities have been calculated for some human tissues and dosimetric materials such as Adipose Tissue (ICRU-44), Bone Cortical (ICRU-44), Brain Grey/White Matter (ICRU-44), Breast Tissue (ICRU-44), Lung Tissue (ICRU-44), Soft Tissue (ICRU-44), LiF TLD-100H, TLD-100, Water, Borosilicate Glass, PAG (Gel Dosimeter), Fricke (Gel Dosimeter) and OSL (Aluminium Oxide) using mean photon energies, Em, of various radiation sources. The used radiation sources are Pd-103, Tc-99, Ra-226, I-131, Ir-192, Co-60, 30 kVp, 40 kVp, 50 kVp (Intrabeam, Carl Zeiss Meditec) and 6 MV (Mohan-6 MV) sources. The Em values were then used to calculate Zeff and neff of the tissues and dosimetric materials for various radiation sources. Different calculation methods for Zeff such as the direct method, the interpolation method and Auto-Zeff computer program were used and agreements and disagreements between the used methods have been presented and discussed. It has been observed that at higher Em values agreement is quite satisfactory (Dif.<5%) between the adopted methods. - Highlights: • Mean energies for different radiation sources have been determined. • Human tissues and dosimetric materials have been investigated according to different sources. • Different methods were applied for calculation of Eeff, Zeff and neff

  4. Evaluation of resolved resonance parameters of fission product nuclides with atomic numbers Z=46-51 for JENDL-3.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-08-01

    Resolved resonance parameters of the following fission product nuclides with atomic numbers Z=46-51 have been evaluated for JENDL-3.2: {sup 102,104,105,106,107,108,110}Pd, {sup 107,109,110m}Ag, {sup 106,108,110,111,112,113,114,116}Cd, {sup 113,115I}n, {sup 121,123}Sb. Evaluation was made on the basis of JENDL-2 for most nuclides and of the data recommended by Mughabghab et al. for the nuclides whose data have not been contained in JENDL-2. Data measured after the JENDL-2 evaluation (1982) have been taken into account in the evaluation. Spin of the resonance state and angular momentum of the incident neutron have been given for all levels. When there exist no measured data, the spin has been given tentatively on the basis of a random sampling technique using their statistical properties, and the angular momentum was also tentatively given on the basis of the Bayes`s theorem on conditional probability using the s- and p-wave strength functions and average level spacings. The resonance parameters have been evaluated so as to reproduce measured capture area of individual resonance levels, thermal cross section and resonance integral. Evaluated results have been compiled into JENDL-3.2 in the formats of ENDF-5 and ENDF-6. (author)

  5. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad W. Marashdeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff and effective electron density (Neff of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10–60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5 simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  6. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashdeh, Mohammad W.; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Abdel Munem, Eid M.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Ariffin, Alawiah; Al-Omari, Saleh

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10-60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  7. Parity oscillations and photon correlation functions in the Z2-U (1 ) Dicke model at a finite number of atoms or qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi-Xiang, Yu; Ye, Jinwu; Zhang, CunLin

    2016-08-01

    Four standard quantum optics models, that is, the Rabi, Dicke, Jaynes-Cummings, and Tavis-Cummings models, were proposed by physicists many decades ago. Despite their relative simple forms and many previous theoretical works, their physics at a finite N , especially inside the superradiant regime, remain unknown. In this work, by using the strong-coupling expansion and exact diagonalization (ED), we study the Z2-U(1 ) Dicke model with independent rotating-wave coupling g and counterrotating-wave coupling g' at a finite N . This model includes the four standard quantum optics models as its various special limits. We show that in the superradiant phase, the system's energy levels are grouped into doublets with even and odd parity. Any anisotropy β =g'/g ≠1 leads to the oscillation of parities in both the ground and excited doublets as the atom-photon coupling strength increases. The oscillations will be pushed to the infinite coupling strength in the isotropic Z2 limit β =1 . We find nearly perfect agreement between the strong-coupling expansion and the ED in the superradiant regime when β is not too small. We also compute the photon correlation functions, squeezing spectrum, and number correlation functions that can be measured by various standard optical techniques.

  8. Portable and autonomous X-ray equipment for in-situ threat materials identification by effective atomic number high-accuracy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovea, M.; Neagu, M.; Mateiasi, G.; Duliu, O.

    2011-06-01

    A novel portable and autonomous X-ray dual-energy Radioscopy equipment, developed for bomb squad interventions and NDT applications and capable of in-situ digital radiography imaging with measurement of the effective Atomic number of materials (Zeff), is presented. The system consists of a 2D dual-energy X-ray detector based on a rapidly translated linear array, a portable X-ray source and dedicated software running on a laptop or tablet PC. By measurement of the collected x-ray intensities at two different energy spectra, the system can directly compute the material Zeff value for various organic materials contained in the scanned object and then identify them from a database list. The entire system calibration has been obtained using explosive simulants with known Zeff values, the measurement error of Zeffbeing around +/-3.5 % with respect to the reference values. The excellent image resolution and the ability of the automated threat identification algorithm are presented for experiments with a briefcase and a hand-held baggage having various domestic objects and an explosive simulant inside.

  9. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoğlu, Salih Zeki

    2010-06-01

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho), photon interaction cross sections (sigma(t)), effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and effective electron densities (N(e)) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25keV and gamma-rays at 88keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition. PMID:20080413

  10. Estimation of effective atomic numbers of some solutions for photon energy absorption in the energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV: An alternative method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2011-12-01

    The effective atomic numbers (ZPEAeff), which are used to describe the composite materials in terms of equivalent elements, have been estimated in some solutions for photon energy absorption in the energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV. Since the mass energy absorption (μen/ρ) and mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) remain more or less the same for any given material in the photon energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV where Compton scattering is the main dominant photon interaction process, semi-empirical relations including both μen/ρ and μ/ρ have been constituted as a function of energy. These parameters were then used to obtain ZPEAeff with the help of a Z-wise interpolation procedure. The results were compared with the experimental as well as other theoretical estimations wherever possible. Consequently, the present method is found to be readily applicable to the given solutions in order to estimate accurate values of ZPEAeff for which it is not possible to directly obtain experimentally using the conventional gamma spectrometry system.

  11. Estimation of effective atomic numbers of some solutions for photon energy absorption in the energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV: An alternative method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic numbers (ZPEAeff), which are used to describe the composite materials in terms of equivalent elements, have been estimated in some solutions for photon energy absorption in the energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV. Since the mass energy absorption (μen/ρ) and mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) remain more or less the same for any given material in the photon energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV where Compton scattering is the main dominant photon interaction process, semi-empirical relations including both μen/ρ and μ/ρ have been constituted as a function of energy. These parameters were then used to obtain ZPEAeff with the help of a Z-wise interpolation procedure. The results were compared with the experimental as well as other theoretical estimations wherever possible. Consequently, the present method is found to be readily applicable to the given solutions in order to estimate accurate values of ZPEAeff for which it is not possible to directly obtain experimentally using the conventional gamma spectrometry system.

  12. A molecular dynamics study of the effect of thermal boundary conductance on thermal transport of ideal crystal of n-alkanes with different number of carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zeng, Yi; Khodadadi, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    Phase change materials such as n-alkanes that exhibit desirable characteristics such as high latent heat, chemical stability, and negligible supercooling are widely used in thermal energy storage applications. However, n-alkanes have the drawback of low thermal conductivity values. The low thermal conductivity of n-alkanes is linked to formation of randomly oriented nano-domains of molecules in their solid structure that is responsible for excessive phonon scattering at the grain boundaries. Thus, understanding the thermal boundary conductance at the grain boundaries can be crucial for improving the effectiveness of thermal storage systems. The concept of the ideal crystal is proposed in this paper, which describes a simplified model such that all the nano-domains of long-chain n-alkanes are artificially aligned perfectly in one direction. In order to study thermal transport of the ideal crystal of long-chain n-alkanes, four (4) systems (C20H42, C24H50, C26H54, and C30H62) are investigated by the molecular dynamics simulations. Thermal boundary conductance between the layers of ideal crystals is determined using both non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. Both NEMD and EMD simulations exhibit no significant change in thermal conductance with the molecular length. However, the values obtained from the EMD simulations are less than the values from NEMD simulations with the ratio being nearly three (3) in most cases. This difference is due to the nature of EMD simulations where all the phonons are assumed to be in equilibrium at the interface. Thermal conductivity of the n-alkanes in three structures including liquid, solid, and ideal crystal is investigated utilizing NEMD simulations. Our results exhibit a very slight rise in thermal conductivity values as the number of carbon atoms of the chain increases. The key understanding is that thermal transport can be significantly altered by how the molecules and the

  13. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122–1.330 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as Glycine (C2H5NO2), DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2), Proline (C5H9NO2), L-Leucine (C6H13NO2 ), L-Arginine (C6H14N4O2) and L-Arginine Monohydrochloride (C6H15ClN4O2), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 10.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities are in good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error. - Highlights: • Compute the Mass Attenuation Coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids. • Gamma ray attenuation studies on biologically important molecules have been carried out using narrow beam good geometry set up. • The values of Mass Attenuation Coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids are in agreement with the XCOM programme. • The measured mass attenuation coefficient for some amino acids are useful in medical field. • The data is useful in radiation dosimetry and other fields

  14. Effective atomic numbers, water and tissue equivalence properties of human tissues, tissue equivalents and dosimetric materials for total electron interaction in the energy region 10 keV–1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of 107 different materials of dosimetric interest have been calculated for total electron interactions in the wide energy region 10 keV–1 GeV. The stopping cross sections of elements and dosimetric materials were used to calculate Zeff of the materials. Differences (%) in Zeff relative to water have been calculated in the entire energy region to evaluate the water equivalency of the used materials. Moreover, the tissue equivalent materials have been compared with the tissues and dosimetric materials in terms of Zeff to reveal their ability to use as tissue substitutes. Possible conclusions were drawn based on the variation of Zeff through the entire energy region and water and tissue equivalency comparisons in terms of Zeff. - Highlights: • Effective atomic number for total electron interaction. • Water and tissue equivalences of dosimetric materials

  15. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk König

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size dNC. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms NNC(dNC[i], bonds between NC atoms Nbnd(dNC[i] and interface bonds NIF(dNC[i] for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  16. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size dNC. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms NNC(dNC[i]), bonds between NC atoms Nbnd(dNC[i]) and interface bonds NIF(dNC[i]) for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb) NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  17. Study of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some low Z compounds of dosimetry interest at 59.54 keV incident photon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Gamma-ray interaction parameters of some low Z compounds have been measured at 59.54 keV. ► Values of effective atomic numbers (Zeff) have been obtained using an alternative approach based upon interpolation method. ► Composite materials investigated behave as incoherent scatters. ► Selected compounds can be represented by single (valued) mean atomic number 〈Z〉 at incident photon energy. ► Data presented is expected to be useful in medical based applications of nuclear radiation. - Abstract: Total mass attenuation coefficient, total photon interaction cross-section, effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of Aniline (C6H5NH2), Cyclohexane (C6H12), Glycerine (C3H5(OH)3), Butyl alcohol N-(C4H9OH), DMSO – dimethyl sulfoxide (C2H6OS), Methyl ethyl-ketone (C4H8O), Xylene (C8H10), Acetophenone (C8H8O) and Triethyl amine (C6H15N) have been measured at 59.54 keV energy photon emitted by 100 mCi 241Am point source employing narrow beam transmission geometry. Obtained results have been compared with theoretically calculated values of XCOM (Berger and Hubbel, 1987) and FFAST (). Mixture rule was employed to calculated theoretical mass attenuation coefficient values for each sample. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values within experimental uncertainties.

  18. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  19. Energy dependence of effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon interaction: Studies of some biological molecules in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, Z(PEA,eff), and for photon interaction, Z(PI,eff), have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for biological molecules, such as fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic......, linolenic, arachidonic, and arachidic acids), nucleotide bases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, and thymine), and carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and starch). The Z(PEA, eff) and Z(PI, eff) values have been found to change with energy and composition of the biological molecules. The energy...

  20. Water equivalence study of some phantoms based on effective photon energy, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for clinical MV X-ray and Co-60 γ-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2013-02-01

    A previously proposed procedure has been applied to some water equivalent phantoms namely PMMA, Polystyrene, Solid Water (WT1), RW3 and ABS for the first time to compute effective photon energy (Eeff), effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (neeff) for different MV X-ray beams and Co-60 gamma beam which are heterogeneous in energy. For the purpose of the present investigation, effective atomic cross-sections of the given materials have been determined first to obtain effective photon energies which were further used for calculation of Zeff and neeff. Similar procedure was adopted for Co-60 γ-rays to check the validity of the present method. Results were found to be quite satisfactory. When it comes to the water equivalence, the Eeff results showed that the RW3 and ABS phantoms are more effective for 6 MV beam whereas RW3 and Polystyrene are more effective for 15 MV and Co-60 beams, respectively. The ABS and WT1 phantoms have better water equivalences than the others according to the Zeff and neeff results, respectively.

  1. Effective atomic number, energy loss and radiation damage studies in some materials commonly used in nuclear applications for heavy charged particles such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Commonly used nuclear physics materials such as water, concrete, Pb-glass, paraffin, freon and P 10 gases, some alloys such as brass, bronze, stainless-steel and some scintillators such as anthracene, stilbene and toluene have been investigated with respect to the heavy charged particle interaction as means of projected range and effective atomic number (Zeff) in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. Calculations were performed for heavy ions such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U. Also, the energy loss and radiation damage were studied using SRIM Monte Carlo code for anthracene for different heavy ions of 100 keV kinetic energy. It has been observed that the variation in Zeff becomes less when the atomic number of the ions increase. Glass-Pb, bronze, brass, stainless-steel and Freon gas were found to vary less than 10% in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. For total proton interaction, discrepancies up to 10% and 18% between two databases namely PSTAR and SRIM were noted in mass stopping power and Zeff of water, respectively. The range calculations resulted with a conclusion that the metal alloys and glass-Pb have lowest values of ranges confirming best shielding against energetic heavy ions whereas freon and P 10 gases have the highest values of ranges in the entire energy region. The simulation results showed that the energy loss (%) to target electrons decreases as the Z of the incident ion increases. Also, it was observed that the radiation damage first increases with Z of the ion and then keeps almost constant for ions with Z≥52.

  2. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goncalves Z, E., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Pontifice Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar 500, Belo Horizonte 30535-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  3. New magic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Kruecken, R.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear shell model is a benchmark for the description of the structure of atomic nuclei. The magic numbers associated with closed shells have long been assumed to be valid across the whole nuclear chart. Investigations in recent years of nuclei far away from nuclear stability at facilities for radioactive ion beams have revealed that the magic numbers may change locally in those exotic nuclei leading to the disappearance of classic shell gaps and the appearance of new magic numbers. Thes...

  4. Atom Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Folman, R; Cassettari, D; Hessmo, B; Maier, T; Schmiedmayer, J; Folman, Ron; Krüger, Peter; Cassettari, Donatella; Hessmo, Björn; Maier, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Atoms can be trapped and guided using nano-fabricated wires on surfaces, achieving the scales required by quantum information proposals. These Atom Chips form the basis for robust and widespread applications of cold atoms ranging from atom optics to fundamental questions in mesoscopic physics, and possibly quantum information systems.

  5. Skyscraper Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Khovanova, Tanya; Lewis, Joel Brewster

    2013-01-01

    We introduce numbers depending on three parameters which we call skyscraper numbers. We discuss properties of these numbers and their relationship with Stirling numbers of the first kind, and we also introduce a skyscraper sequence.

  6. Importance of the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of TL materials for radiation dosimetry in clinical applications; Importancia del numero atomico efectivo (Z{sub eff}) de materiales TL para dosimetria de la radiacion en aplicaciones clinicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, P.R. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: pgm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    The electric power generation, it has been one of the radiation applications of bigger weight, mainly in developed countries. Another sector of more impact is without a doubt that of the medicine. However, for a sure operation with radiations, those international organisms of radiological safety, exist every time more precise detection systems. The thermoluminescent dosimetry is one of the more reliable methods for this purpose, for that several groups of investigators from different parts of the world, they have guided its investigations in the development of new TL materials. However, to avoid underestimate or overestimation of the measured dose with the use of these materials, it should take into account it effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) it is well known that some TL materials considered as equivalent to the tissue, presents smaller TL intensity when being irradiated with low energy photons, while the TL material known as not equivalent to the tissue, they present the supra sensitivity effect for this radiation type. Nowadays, the estimate of the Z{sub eff} has not been clear, in this work the Z{sub eff} is determined by means of the traditional methods and an own method is presented for its determination. The results of the TL signal of different materials, when being irradiated with photons of effective energy between 24 keV and 1.25 MeV and their relationship with their calculated Z{sub eff} are also presented. (Author)

  7. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  8. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  9. Atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will first present a development of the fundamental principles of atom interferometers. Next we will discuss a few of the various methods now available to split and recombine atomic De Broglie waves, with special emphasis on atom interferometers based on optical pulses. We will also be particularly concerned with high precision interferometers with long measurement times such those made with atomic fountains. The application of atom interferometry to the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity will be detailed. We will also develop the atom interferometry based on adiabatic transfer and we will apply it to the measurement of the photon recoil in the case of the Doppler shift of an atomic resonance caused by the momentum recoil from an absorbed photon. Finally the outlook of future developments will be given. (A.C.)

  10. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  11. Hagen number versus Bejan number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents Hagen number vs. Bejan number. Although their physical meaning is not the same because the former represents the dimensionless pressure gradient while the latter represents the dimensionless pressure drop, it will be shown that Hagen number coincides with Bejan number in cases where the characteristic length (l is equal to the flow length (L. Also, a new expression of Bejan number in the Hagen-Poiseuille flow will be introduced. At the end, extending the Hagen number to a general form will be presented. For the case of Reynolds analogy (Pr = Sc = 1, all these three definitions of Hagen number will be the same.

  12. Pentagonal numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Lužnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    My graduate thesis contains a detailed examination of pentagonal nubers. In the beginning, I concentrate on figurate numbers and the mathematicians, who were the first to describe them. The work includes the basic characteristis of pentagonal numbers, how we can obtain them through calculating and counting of dots in graphic illustrtions and how we are able to check if a certain prime number is a pentagonal number or not.

  13. Leftist Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The leftist number system consists of numbers with decimal digits arranged in strings to the left, instead of to the right. This system fails to be a field only because it contains zerodivisors. The same construction with prime base yields the p-adic numbers.

  14. Proth Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzweller Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce Proth numbers and prove two theorems on such numbers being prime [3]. We also give revised versions of Pocklington’s theorem and of the Legendre symbol. Finally, we prove Pepin’s theorem and that the fifth Fermat number is not prime.

  15. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 23Po,2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 23Po level of helium-like krypton

  16. Fibonacci numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai Nikolaevich

    2011-01-01

    Fibonacci numbers date back to an 800-year-old problem concerning the number of offspring born in a single year to a pair of rabbits. This book offers the solution and explores the occurrence of Fibonacci numbers in number theory, continued fractions, and geometry. A discussion of the ""golden section"" rectangle, in which the lengths of the sides can be expressed as a ration of two successive Fibonacci numbers, draws upon attempts by ancient and medieval thinkers to base aesthetic and philosophical principles on the beauty of these figures. Recreational readers as well as students and teacher

  17. Sagan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We define a new class of numbers based on the first occurrence of certain patterns of zeros and ones in the expansion of irracional numbers in a given basis and call them Sagan numbers, since they were first mentioned, in a special case, by the North-american astronomer Carl E. Sagan in his science-fiction novel "Contact." Sagan numbers hold connections with a wealth of mathematical ideas. We describe some properties of the newly defined numbers and indicate directions for further amusement.

  18. Nondestructive characterization of municipal-solid-waste-contaminated surface soil by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Ghosh, Rita; Mitra, Ajoy K; Roy, Subinit; Sarkar, Manoranjan; Chowdhury, Subhajit; Bhowmik, Asit; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    The long-term environmental impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfilling is still under investigation due to the lack of detailed characterization studies. A MSW landfill site, popularly known as Dhapa, in the eastern fringe of the metropolis of Kolkata, India, is the subject of present study. A vast area of Dhapa, adjoining the current core MSW dump site and evolving from the raw MSW dumping in the past, is presently used for the cultivation of vegetables. The inorganic chemical characteristics of the MSW-contaminated Dhapa surface soil (covering a 2-km stretch of the area) along with a natural composite (geogenic) soil sample (from a small countryside farm), for comparison, were investigated using two complementary nondestructive analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) for bulk analysis and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) for single-particle analysis. The bulk concentrations of K, Rb, and Zr remain almost unchanged in all the soil samples. The Dhapa soil is found to be polluted with heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, and Pb (highly elevated) and Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Sr (moderately elevated), compared to the natural countryside soil. These high bulk concentration levels of heavy metals were compared with the Ecological Soil Screening Levels for these elements (U.S. Environment Protection Agency) to assess the potential risk on the immediate biotic environment. Low-Z particle EPMA results showed that the aluminosilicate-containing particles were the most abundant, followed by SiO2, CaCO3-containing, and carbonaceous particles in the Dhapa samples, whereas in the countryside sample only aluminosilicate-containing and SiO2 particles were observed. The mineral particles encountered in the countryside sample are solely of geogenic origin, whereas those from the Dhapa samples seem to have evolved from a mixture of raw dumped MSW, urban dust, and other contributing factors such as wind

  19. Nondestructive characterization of municipal-solid-waste-contaminated surface soil by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Ghosh, Rita; Mitra, Ajoy K; Roy, Subinit; Sarkar, Manoranjan; Chowdhury, Subhajit; Bhowmik, Asit; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    The long-term environmental impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfilling is still under investigation due to the lack of detailed characterization studies. A MSW landfill site, popularly known as Dhapa, in the eastern fringe of the metropolis of Kolkata, India, is the subject of present study. A vast area of Dhapa, adjoining the current core MSW dump site and evolving from the raw MSW dumping in the past, is presently used for the cultivation of vegetables. The inorganic chemical characteristics of the MSW-contaminated Dhapa surface soil (covering a 2-km stretch of the area) along with a natural composite (geogenic) soil sample (from a small countryside farm), for comparison, were investigated using two complementary nondestructive analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) for bulk analysis and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) for single-particle analysis. The bulk concentrations of K, Rb, and Zr remain almost unchanged in all the soil samples. The Dhapa soil is found to be polluted with heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, and Pb (highly elevated) and Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Sr (moderately elevated), compared to the natural countryside soil. These high bulk concentration levels of heavy metals were compared with the Ecological Soil Screening Levels for these elements (U.S. Environment Protection Agency) to assess the potential risk on the immediate biotic environment. Low-Z particle EPMA results showed that the aluminosilicate-containing particles were the most abundant, followed by SiO2, CaCO3-containing, and carbonaceous particles in the Dhapa samples, whereas in the countryside sample only aluminosilicate-containing and SiO2 particles were observed. The mineral particles encountered in the countryside sample are solely of geogenic origin, whereas those from the Dhapa samples seem to have evolved from a mixture of raw dumped MSW, urban dust, and other contributing factors such as wind

  20. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  1. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  2. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 system...... through using mathematical names for the numbers such as one-ten-one for 11 and five-ten-six for 56. The project combines the renaming of numbers with supporting the teaching with the new number names. Our hypothesis is that Danish children have more difficulties learning and working with numbers, because...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  3. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  4. United States History Simulations, 1925-1964: The Scopes Trial, Dropping the Atomic Bomb on Japan, United States versus Alger Hiss, Mississippi--Summer 1964. ETC Simulations Number Three.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostrop, Richard W.

    This booklet provides instructions for simulation and role play of historical events in U.S. history from 1925-1964. Included for student research and participation are: the Scopes trial in Tennessee involving supporters of the teaching of evolution in the schools and of creationism; the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan ending World War…

  5. Atomic Fock State Preparation Using Rydberg Blockade

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Matthew; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G

    2013-01-01

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected $\\sqrt{N}$ Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi $\\pi$ pulses to produce ${\\cal N}=1,2$ atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48% respectively. The ${\\cal N}=2$ Fock state shows the collective Rabi frequency enhancement without corruption from atom number fluctuations.

  6. Magic Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    THE last digit of my home phone number in Beijing is 4. “So what?” European readers might ask.This was my attitude when I first lived in China; I couldn't understand why Chinese friends were so shocked at my indifference to the number 4. But China brings new discoveries every day, and I have since seen the light. I know now that Chinese people have their own ways of preserving their well being, and that they see avoiding the number 4 as a good way to stay safe.

  7. Number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George E

    1994-01-01

    Although mathematics majors are usually conversant with number theory by the time they have completed a course in abstract algebra, other undergraduates, especially those in education and the liberal arts, often need a more basic introduction to the topic.In this book the author solves the problem of maintaining the interest of students at both levels by offering a combinatorial approach to elementary number theory. In studying number theory from such a perspective, mathematics majors are spared repetition and provided with new insights, while other students benefit from the consequent simpl

  8. Chocolate Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Caleb; Khovanova, Tanya; Park, Robin; Song, Angela

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a game played on a rectangular $m \\times n$ gridded chocolate bar. Each move, a player breaks the bar along a grid line. Each move after that consists of taking any piece of chocolate and breaking it again along existing grid lines, until just $mn$ individual squares remain. This paper enumerates the number of ways to break an $m \\times n$ bar, which we call chocolate numbers, and introduces four new sequences related to these numbers. Using various techniques, we p...

  9. Identification numbers for chemical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several identification (ID) numbers for chemical structures (connectivity ID number, prime ID number, weighted ID number) are analyzed and tested until a counterexample (a pair of structures with the same ID number) is found. The analysis is carried out for acyclic structures with up to 20 atoms, trees with up to 20 points, benzenoid graphs and polyhexes with up to 10 hexagons, and all connected graphs with up to 6 points. Although all the (chemical) ID numbers studied are highly selective for many families of (molecular) graphs, none of them are unique; in all three cases the counterexamples are found. However, the greatest discriminative power is shown by the weighted ID number

  10. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 system...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  11. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  12. Number Guessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  13. Atomic Data: Division B / Commission 14 / Working Group Atomic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Nave, Gillian; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes laboratory measurements of atomic wavelengths, energy levels, hyperfine and isotope structure, energy level lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Theoretical calculations of lifetimes and oscillator strengths are also included. The bibliography is limited to species of astrophysical interest. Compilations of atomic data and internet databases are also included. Papers are listed in the bibliography in alphabetical order, with a reference number in the text. Comprehensive lists of references for atomic spectra can be found in the NIST Atomic Spectra Bibliographic Databases http://physics.nist.gov/asbib.

  14. Atomic secrecy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An article, The H-Bomb Secret: How We Got It, Why We're Telling It, by Howard Morland was to be published in The Progressive magazine in February, 1979. The government, after learning of the author's and the editors' intention to publish the article and failing to persuade them to voluntarily delete about 20% of the text and all of the diagrams showing how an H-bomb works, requested a court injunction against publication. Acting under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, US District Court Judge Robert W. Warren granted the government's request on March 26. Events dealing with the case are discussed in this publication. Section 1, Progressive Hydrogen Bomb Case, is discussed under the following: Court Order Blocking Magazine Report; Origins of the Howard Morland Article; Author's Motives, Defense of Publication; and Government Arguments Against Disclosure. Section 2, Access to Atomic Data Since 1939, contains information on need for secrecy during World War II; 1946 Atomic Energy Act and its effects; Soviet A-Bomb and the US H-Bomb; and consequences of 1954 Atomic Energy Act. Section 3, Disputed Need for Atomic Secrecy, contains papers entitled: Lack of Studies on H-Bomb Proliferation; Administration's Position on H-Bombs; and National Security Needs vs Free Press

  15. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea). PMID:20521424

  16. Number Theories

    CERN Document Server

    St-Amant, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We will see that key concepts of number theory can be defined for arbitrary operations. We give a generalized distributivity for hyperoperations (usual arithmetic operations and operations going beyond exponentiation) and a generalization of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic for hyperoperations. We also give a generalized definition of the prime numbers that are associated to an arbitrary n-ary operation and take a few steps toward the development of its modulo arithmetic by investigating a generalized form of Fermat's little theorem. Those constructions give an interesting way to interpret diophantine equations and we will see that the uniqueness of factorization under an arbitrary operation can be linked with the Riemann zeta function. This language of generalized primes and composites can be used to restate and extend certain problems such as the Goldbach conjecture.

  17. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  18. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  19. Multiphoton ionization of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article provides an overview of the current understanding of multiphoton ionization of atoms. It begins with an introductory section to explain the background of the subject. Then the article develops the three topics which have been central themes of discussion in multiphoton ionization of atoms these past few years: multiply charged ion production, very high order harmonic generation, and above-threshold ionization, a name given to the absorption of a very large number of photons by an already ionized electron. A large part of the review is devoted to some theoretical aspects of multiphoton ionization of atoms and especially non-perturbative theories. Finally the article considers the very near future prospects of laser-electron interactions and more generally laser-matter interactions at 1018 -1019 W cm-2, an intensity range now within reach due to new short pulse laser technology. (author)

  20. Experiments in cold atom optics towards precision atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David C.

    Atom optics has been a highly active field of research with many scientific breakthroughs over the past two decades, largely due to successful advances in laser technology, microfabrication techniques, and the development of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. This dissertation details several atom optics experiments with the motivation to develop tools and techniques for precision atom wave interferometry. It provides background information about atom optics and the fundamentals behind laser cooling and trapping, including basic techniques for cold gas thermometry and absorptive detection of atoms. A brief overview of magnetic trapping and guiding in tight wire-based traps is also provided before the experimental details are presented. We developed a novel laser source of 780 nm light using frequency-doubled 1560 nm fiber amplifier. This laser system provided up to a Watt of tunable frequency stabilized light for two Rb laser cooling and trapping experiments. One system generates Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical trap while the second is based on atom chip magnetic traps. The atom chip system, detailed in this thesis, was designed and built to develop the tools necessary for transport and loading large numbers of cold atoms and explore the potential for guided atom interferometry. Techniques and results from this experiment are presented, including an efficient magnetic transport and loading method to deliver cold atom to atom chip traps. We also developed a modeling tool for the magnetic fields formed by coiled wire geometries, as well as planar wire patterns. These models helped us design traps and determine adiabatic transportation of cold atoms between macro-scale traps and micro-traps formed on atom chips. Having achieved near unity transfer efficiency, we demonstrated that this approach promises to be a consistent method for loading large numbers of atoms into micro-traps. Furthermore, we discuss an in situ imaging technique to investigate

  1. Rydberg atom in gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Aniket [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Chiao predicted the quantum incompressibility of a falling Rydberg atom. A Hydrogen-like atom was considered in a very high n,l=m=n-1 state to calculate the effects of tidal gravitational forces on these states. The high values of quantum numbers ensure that gravitational effect is measurable on the *stretch* state. We consider a similar atom and derive the energy of a particular level under the influence of Newtonian gravity. A change in the frequency of observed transition is predicted for a freely falling Hydrogen atom. This change is calculated both in Newtonian gravity and in curved space. We see that the change in energy of the electron under gravity also depends on its principal quantum number. Thus there will be a shift in the frequency of the photon emitted by an electron making an ordinary transition from the state n=100, l=99, m=99 to the state n=99, l=98, m=98. Though this shift is quite less to be observed on Earth, it is measurable in satellites in a highly elliptical orbit about the earth, by spectroscopic methods. A similar result was derived by Chiao recently using a different argument. We conclude that the effect described by Chiao will be masked to a very large extent by the effect calculated above. Such perturbations might be important in emission spectra of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  2. Atomic arias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  3. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  4. Atomic Data: Division XII / Commission 14 / Working Group Atomic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Nave, Gillian; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Fuhr, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes laboratory measurements of atomic wavelengths, energy levels, hyperfine and isotope structure, energy level lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Theoretical calculations of lifetimes and oscillator strengths are also included. The bibliography is limited to species of astrophysical interest. Compilations of atomic data and internet databases are also included. Papers are listed in the bibliography in alphabetical order, with a reference number in the text.

  5. Atomic Data: Division B / Commission 14 / Working Group Atomic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Nave, Gillian; Nahar, Sultana; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes laboratory measurements of atomic wavelengths, energy levels, hyperfine and isotope structure, energy level lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Theoretical calculations of lifetimes and oscillator strengths are also included. The bibliography is limited to species of astrophysical interest. Compilations of atomic data and internet databases are also included. Papers are listed in the bibliography in alphabetical order, with a reference number in the text. Comprehensive...

  6. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  7. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fe-52 (Iron)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fe-52 (Iron, atomic number Z = 26, mass number A = 52).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sr-71 (Strontium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sr-71 (Strontium, atomic number Z = 38, mass number A = 71).

  10. Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Labs: Reuse and Licence Termination of a Number of Facilities at the Chalk River Labs to Allow for Refurbishment of the Site. Annex A. I-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Labs is located along the Ottawa River in Ontario, Canada, approximately 200 km north-west of Ottawa. The site began construction in 1944 following the expropriation of approximately 1 500 ha of land. A number of research reactors were constructed at the site along with numerous nuclear labs, hot cells and administrative facilities in support of the research and development work planned for the site. The principal occupants of the Chalk River site are AECL employees with a strong presence from National Resources Canada (NRC) and other small research groups. The site is undergoing substantial changes with an emphasis on minimizing the impact of increasing the builtup area footprint in conjunction with site upgrades and new build projects. To accomplish this task, a number of refurbishment and decommissioning projects were planned. Decommissioning projects were initiated to make room for new development through a number of initiatives. The decommissioning mandate includes the removal of a select group of original deteriorating facilities to make room for new construction and to decommission other facilities to facilitate redevelopment and reuse of the available space. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issues nuclear licences. The licensees must demonstrate that it is safe to continue operations of the nuclear site and request a renewal of their licence. CNSC will issue a new operating licence for a specific period of time at which the licensee must demonstrate that it is safe to proceed with a licence renewal. A request to terminate a licensable activity must be submitted to the CNSC. Upon approval to proceed, it must be demonstrated that the licensable activities have ceased and the facility has been appropriately decommissioned. Licence termination requires a demonstration that the land or previous activities presents a low risk and that the process can be used to support redevelopment because it results in a scrutinized

  11. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Sherson, Jacob F; Arlt, Jan J; Hilliard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing $N \\sim 5 \\times 10^6$ atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  12. Entanglement properties between two atoms in the binomial optical field interacting with two entangled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘堂昆; 张康隆; 陶宇; 单传家; 刘继兵

    2016-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the degree of entanglement between two atoms in a system of the binomial optical field interacting with two arbitrary entangled atoms is investigated. The influence of the strength of the dipole–dipole interaction between two atoms, probabilities of the Bernoulli trial, and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the atomic entanglement are discussed. The result shows that the two atoms are always in the entanglement state. Moreover, if and only if the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the entanglement evolution is not affected by the parameters, and the degree of entanglement is always kept as 1.

  13. The entanglement evolution between two entangled atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zong-Cheng Xu; Mai-Lin Liang; Ya-Ting Zhang; Jian-Quan Yao

    2016-03-01

    The entanglement properties of two entangled atoms interacting with the field under intensity-dependent coupling are studied in detail. It is found that the degree of entanglement between the two atoms changes periodically and undergoes the entanglement sudden death (ESD) and sudden birth at some time. The entanglement properties between the field and the atom insidethe cavity are dependent on the photon number. Most interestingly, the entanglement between the field and the atom in the field is influenced significantly by manipulating the atom outside the field.

  14. Preparation of Entangled Atomic States Through Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the generation of two-atom maximally entangled states and multi-atom maximally entangled states of W class. The scheme is based on the simultaneous resonant interaction of atoms with a single-mode cavity field. It does not require accurate adjustment of the interaction time. The time needed to complete the generation does not increase with the number of the atom.

  15. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  16. Rydberg atoms in ultracold plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Ultracold plasmas are formed through the photoionization of laser-cooled atoms, or spontaneous ionization of a dense cloud of Rydberg atoms or now molecules[1]. Ultracold plasmas are inherently metastable, as the ions and electrons would be in a lower energy state bound together as atoms. The dominant process of atom formation in these plasmas is three-body recombination, a collision between two electrons and an ion that leads to the formation of a Rydberg atom. This collisional process is not only important in determining the lifetime and density of the plasma, but is also critical in determining the time evolution of the temperature. The formation of the Rydberg atoms is accompanied by an increase in electron energy for the extra electron in the collision, and is a source of heating in these plasmas. Classical three-body recombination theory scales as T-9/2, and thus as a plasma cools due to a process such as adiabatic expansion, recombination-induced heating turns on, limiting the temperature [2]. The Rydberg atoms formed live in the plasma and contribute to the temperature dynamics, as collisions with plasma electrons can change the principal quantum number of the Rydberg atom, driving it to more tightly bound states (a source of plasma heating) or to higher states (a source of plasma cooling). If the plasma is cold and dense enough to be strongly coupled, classical three-body recombination theory breaks down. Recent theoretical work [3] suggests that the rate limits as the plasma gets strongly coupled. I will review the role of Rydberg atoms in ultracold plasmas and prospects for probing Rydberg collisions in the strongly coupled environment. [4pt] [1] J. P. Morrison, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 205005 (2008 [0pt] [2] R. S. Fletcher, X. Zhang, and S. L. Rolston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 145001 (2007 [0pt] [3] T. Pohl, private communication.

  17. Complex Geometry of Nuclei and Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Atiyah, M F

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new geometrical model of matter, in which neutral atoms are modelled by compact, complex algebraic surfaces. Proton and neutron numbers are determined by a surface's Chern numbers. Equivalently, they are determined by combinations of the Hodge numbers, or the Betti numbers. Geometrical constraints on algebraic surfaces allow just a finite range of neutron numbers for a given proton number. This range encompasses the known isotopes.

  18. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  19. Number of Compositions and Convolved Fibonacci numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Janjic, Milan

    2010-01-01

    We consider two type of upper Hessenberg matrices which determinants are Fibonacci numbers. Calculating sums of principal minors of the fixed order of the first type leads us to convolved Fibonacci numbers. Some identities for these and for Fibonacci numbers are proved. We also show that numbers of compositions of a natural number with fixed number of ones appear as coefficients of characteristic polynomial of a Hessenberg matrix which determinant is a Fibonacci number. We derive the explicit...

  20. Teach us atom structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is written to teach atom structure in very easy way. It is divided into nine chapters, which indicates what is the components of matter? when we divide matter continuously, it becomes atom, what did atom look like? particles comprised of matter is not only atom, discover of particles comprised of atom, symbol of element, various radiation, form alchemy to nuclear transmutation, shape of atom is evolving. It also has various pictures in each chapters to explain easily.

  1. Teach us atom structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Suh Yeon

    2006-08-15

    This book is written to teach atom structure in very easy way. It is divided into nine chapters, which indicates what is the components of matter? when we divide matter continuously, it becomes atom, what did atom look like? particles comprised of matter is not only atom, discover of particles comprised of atom, symbol of element, various radiation, form alchemy to nuclear transmutation, shape of atom is evolving. It also has various pictures in each chapters to explain easily.

  2. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  3. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  4. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  5. A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, D.; Rohringer, W.; Fischer, D.; Wilzbach, M.; Raub, T.; Loziczky, S.; Liu, XiYuan; Groth, S.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2010-09-01

    We describe a robust and reliable fluorescence detector for single atoms that is fully integrated on an atom chip. The detector allows spectrally and spatially selective detection of atoms, reaching a single-atom detection efficiency of 66%. It consists of a tapered lensed single-mode fiber for precise delivery of excitation light and a multi-mode fiber to collect the fluorescence. The fibers are mounted in lithographically defined holding structures on the atom chip. Neutral 87Rb atoms propagating freely in a magnetic guide are detected and the noise of their fluorescence emission is analyzed. The variance of the photon distribution allows us to determine the number of detected photons per atom and from there the atom detection efficiency. The second-order intensity correlation function of the fluorescence shows near-perfect photon anti-bunching and signs of damped Rabi oscillations. With simple improvements, one can increase the detection efficiency to 95%.

  6. Efficient transfer of francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Gorelov, Alexander; Pearson, Matt; Tandecki, Michael; Collister, Robert; Gwinner, Gerald; Shiells, Kyle; Gomez, Eduardo; Orozco, Luis; Zhang, Jiehang; Zhao, Yanting; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress of the FrPNC collaboration towards Parity Non Conservation Measurements (PNC) using francium atoms at the TRIUMF accelerator. We demonstrate efficient transfer (higher than 40%) to the science vacuum chamber where the PNC measurements will be performed. The transfer uses a downward resonant push beam from the high-efficiency capture magneto optical trap (MOT) towards the science chamber where the atoms are recaptured in a second MOT. The transfer is very robust with respect to variations in the parameters (laser power, detuning, alignment, etc.). We accumulate a growing number of atoms at each transfer pulse (limited by the lifetime of the MOT) since the push beam does not eliminate the atoms already trapped in the science MOT. The number of atoms in the science MOT is on track to meet the requirements for competitive PNC measurements when high francium rates (previously demonstrated) are delivered to our apparatus. The catcher/neutralizer for the ion beam has been tested reliably to 100,000 heating/motion cycles. We present initial tests on the direct microwave excitation of the ground hyperfine transition at 45 GHz. Support from NSERC and NRC from Canada, NSF and Fulbright from USA, and CONACYT from Mexico.

  7. One-atom detection using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new measuring technique which can detect a single atom of a given kind, even in the presence of 1019 or more atoms of another kind, with good space and time resolution, was utilized to study the density fluctuation of less than 100 cesium atoms in a small volume of space filled with inert gases. Repeated measurements of the absolute number of atoms in a defined volume at an arbitrary time were recorded for the first time in order to obtain a statistical distribution giving the fluctuation of the number of atoms around the mean value. Numerous other physics applications of the one-atom detector are briefly described

  8. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied. Ki...

  9. Atomic squeezed states on an atom-chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, we describe the construction of an experiment, allowing to produce 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates on an atom chip, and then split them in a double well potential. An accurate imaging system has been developed, in order to be able to measure the absolute value of the populations of the double well within a very low noise level, almost limited by the optical shot noise. We measure atom number statistics after splitting, and directly observe number squeezed states, down to -4.9 dB at low temperatures, compared to a classical gas, of independent particles. The dependence in temperature of fluctuations has been also studied. For a thermal gas, Poissonian fluctuations are given by the probability distribution of the macroscopic configurations with a given atom number difference. In the degenerate regime, the entropy effect which favors small number differences vanishes, leading to super-Poissonian fluctuations, to more than +3.8 dB close to transition temperature. At low temperatures, the interaction energy cost associated with number fluctuations exceeds the available thermal energy, leading to sub-Poissonian fluctuations. Those two behaviours have been theoretically explained, both with a simple analytical model and a numerical one. We also measured the evolution of the relative phase between the two clouds, and its collapse due to interactions, allowing us to claim that this splitter is a coherent one. (author)

  10. Filtering single atoms from Rydberg blockaded mesoscopic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosyan, David; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We propose an efficient method to filter out single atoms from trapped ensembles with unknown number of atoms. The method employs stimulated adiabatic passage to reversibly transfer a single atom to the Rydberg state which blocks subsequent Rydberg excitation of all the other atoms within the ensemble. This triggers the excitation of Rydberg blockaded atoms to short lived intermediate states and their subsequent decay to untrapped states. Using an auxiliary microwave field to carefully engineer the dissipation, we obtain a nearly deterministic single-atom source. Our method is applicable to small atomic ensembles in individual microtraps and in lattice arrays.

  11. Detection of Chern numbers and entanglement in topological multi-component systems through subsystem winding numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de J. Lisle; S. De; E. Alba; A. Bullivant; J.J. Garcia-Ripoll; V. Lahtinen; J.K. Pachos

    2014-01-01

    Topological invariants, such as the Chern number, characterize topological phases of matter. Here we provide a method to detect Chern numbers in systems with two distinct species of fermion, such as spins, orbitals or several atomic states. We analytically show that the Chern number can be decompose

  12. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdacz, M.; Hilliard, A. J.; Kristensen, M. A.; Pedersen, P. L.; Klempt, C.; Arlt, J. J.; Sherson, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N ˜1 06 is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty Δ N below the shot noise level, i.e., Δ N Based on this measurement, feedback is applied to reduce the atom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level.

  13. Atomic coherence control on the entanglement of two atoms in two-photon processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yao-Hua; Fang Mao-Fa; Wu Qin

    2007-01-01

    Considering two identical two-level atoms interacting with a single-mode thermal field through two-photon processes, this paper studies the atomic coherence control on the entanglement between two two-level atoms, and finds that the entanglement is greatly enhanced due to the initial atomic coherence. The results show that the entanglement can be manipulated by changing the initial parameters of the system, such as the superposition coefficients and the relative phases of the initial atomic coherent state and the mean photon number of the cavity field.

  14. Exotic atoms and their electron shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, L.M.; Abbot, D.; Bach, B.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Bluem, P.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Heitlinger, K.; Horvath, D.; Kottmann, F.; Morenzoni, E.; Missimer, J.; Reidy, J.J.; Siegel, R.; Taqqu, D.; Viel, D. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland) Coll. of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States) Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany) Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. fuer Kernphysik (Germany) KFKI Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary) Univ. Pisa (Italy) INFN - Pisa (Italy) ETH Zuerich, Villigen (Switzerland) Physics Dept., Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Progress in the field of exotic atoms seems to increase proportionally with the number of exotic atoms produced and the increase in energy resolution with which the transition energies are determined. Modern experiments use high resolution crystal spectrometers or even aim at laser spectroscopy. The accuracy of these methods is limited by the interaction of the exotic atoms with their surroundings. The most important source of errors is the energy shift caused by the not well known status of the atomic electron shell. A novel method to eliminate these sources of error is presented and the possibilities for further high precision experiments is outlined. (orig.)

  15. Exotic atoms and their electron shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, L. M.; Abbot, D.; Bach, B.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Heitlinger, K.; Horváth, D.; Kottmann, F.; Morenzoni, E.; Missimer, J.; Reidy, J. J.; Siegel, R.; Taqqu, D.; Viel, D.

    1994-04-01

    Progress in the field of exotic atoms seems to increase proportionally with the number of exotic atoms produced and the increase in energy resolution with which the transition energies are determined. Modern experiments use high resolution crystal spectrometers or even aim at laser spectroscopy. The accuracy of these methods is limited by the interaction of the exotic atoms with their surroundings. The most important source of errors is the energy shift caused by the not well known status of the atomic electron shell. A novel method to eliminate these sources of error is presented and the possibilities for further high precision experiments is outlined.

  16. Cooperative phenomena in superconducting atom-chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Kubala, Bjoern; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the physics of hybrid quantum systems, where a cloud of cold atoms is coupled to superconducting microstructures, so called superconducting atom-chips. Coherent enhancement, due to the large number of atoms in the cloud, opens a path to the study of strong coupling effects, like superradiance/Dicke-physics in a decohering environment. A structured environment can be designed by embedding a Cooper pair box within the cavity. Moreover, in such a system the transfer of quantum information between the atomic cloud and the superconducting solid state system can be studied.

  17. Cooperative phenomena in superconducting atom-chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigate the physics of hybrid quantum systems, where a cloud of cold atoms is coupled to superconducting microstructures, so called superconducting atom-chips. Coherent enhancement, due to the large number of atoms in the cloud, opens a path to the study of strong coupling effects, like superradiance/Dicke-physics in a decohering environment. A structured environment can be designed by embedding a Cooper pair box within the cavity. Moreover, in such a system the transfer of quantum information between the atomic cloud and the superconducting solid state system can be studied.

  18. MULTIPHOTON IONIZATION OF ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Mainfray, G.

    1985-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization of one-electron atoms, such as atomic hydrogen and alkaline atoms, is well understood and correctly described by rigorous theoretical models. The present paper will be devoted to collisionless multiphoton ionization of many-electron atoms as rare gases. It induces removal of several electrons and the production of multiply charged ions. Up to Xe5+ ions are produced in Xe atoms. Doubly charged ions can be produced, either by simultaneous excitation of two electrons, or b...

  19. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Theoretical Calculation of Absolute Radii of Atoms and Ions. Part 1. The Atomic Radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Biswas

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A set of theoretical atomic radii corresponding to the principal maximum in the radial distribution function, 4πr2R2 for the outermost orbital has been calculated for the ground state of 103 elements of the periodic table using Slater orbitals. The set of theoretical radii are found to reproduce the periodic law and the Lother Meyer’s atomic volume curve and reproduce the expected vertical and horizontal trend of variation in atomic size in the periodic table. The d-block and f-block contractions are distinct in the calculated sizes. The computed sizes qualitatively correlate with the absolute size dependent properties like ionization potentials and electronegativity of elements. The radii are used to calculate a number of size dependent periodic physical properties of isolated atoms viz., the diamagnetic part of the atomic susceptibility, atomic polarizability and the chemical hardness. The calculated global hardness and atomic polarizability of a number of atoms are found to be close to the available experimental values and the profiles of the physical properties computed in terms of the theoretical atomic radii exhibit their inherent periodicity. A simple method of computing the absolute size of atoms has been explored and a large body of known material has been brought together to reveal how many different properties correlate with atomic size.

  1. Ghost Imaging with Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Khakimov, R I; Shin, D K; Hodgman, S S; Dall, R G; Baldwin, K G H; Truscott, A G

    2016-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a technique -- first realized in quantum optics -- in which the image emerges from cross-correlation between particles in two separate beams. One beam passes through the object to a bucket (single-pixel) detector, while the second beam's spatial profile is measured by a high resolution (multi-pixel) detector but never interacts with the object. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. However, until now ghost imaging has only been demonstrated with photons. Here we report the first realisation of ghost imaging of an object using massive particles. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms, originating from two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) via $s$-wave scattering. We use the higher-order Kapitza-Dirac effect to generate the large number of correlated atom pairs required, enabling the creation of a ghost image with good visibility and sub-millimetre resolution. Future extensions could include ghost interfe...

  2. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  3. Atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program

  4. Entanglement enhanced atomic gyroscope

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, J J; Dunningham, J A

    2010-01-01

    The advent of increasingly precise gyroscopes has played a key role in the technological development of navigation systems. Ring-laser and fibre-optic gyroscopes, for example, are widely used in modern inertial guidance systems and rely on the interference of unentangled photons to measure mechanical rotation. The sensitivity of these devices scales with the number of particles used as $1/ \\sqrt{N}$. Here we demonstrate how, by using sources of entangled particles, it is possible to do better and even achieve the ultimate limit allowed by quantum mechanics where the precision scales as 1/N. We propose a gyroscope scheme that uses ultra-cold atoms trapped in an optical ring potential.

  5. Transmission Spectrum of an Optical Cavity Containing N Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Leslie, S; Brown, K R; Stamper-Kurn, D M; Whaley, K B; Leslie, Sabrina; Shenvi, Neil; Brown, Kenneth R.; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2003-01-01

    The transmission spectrum of a high-finesse optical cavity containing an arbitrary number of trapped atoms is presented. We take spatial and motional effects into account and show that in the limit of strong coupling, the important spectral features can be determined for an arbitrary number of atoms, N. We also show that these results have important ramifications in limiting our ability to determine the number of atoms in the cavity.

  6. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  8. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  9. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  10. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  11. Defect-free atom arrays on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Harry; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alex; Anschuetz, Eric; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Endres, Manuel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Arrays of neutral, trapped atoms have proven to be an extraordinary platform for studying quantum many-body physics and implementing quantum information protocols. Conventional approaches to generate such arrays rely on loading atoms into optical lattices and require elaborate experimental control. An alternative, simpler approach is to load atoms into individual optical tweezers. However, the probabilistic nature of the loading process limits the size of the arrays to small numbers of atoms. Here we present a new method for assembling defect-free arrays of large numbers of atoms. Our technique makes use of an array of tightly focused optical tweezers generated by an acousto-optic deflector. The positions of the traps can be dynamically reconfigured on a sub-millisecond timescale. With single-site resolved fluorescence imaging, we can identify defects in the atom array caused by the probabilistic loading process and rearrange the trap positions in response. This will enable us to generate defect-free atom arrays on demand. We discuss our latest results towards reaching this goal along with schemes to implement long-range interactions between atoms in the array. Now at Caltech.

  12. Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kartavtsev, O. I.

    1995-01-01

    Metastable antiprotonic helium atoms $^{3,4}\\! H\\! e\\bar pe$ have been discovered recently in experiments of the delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium media. These exotic atoms survive for an enormous time (about tens of microseconds) and carry the extremely large total angular momentum $L\\sim 30-40$. The theoretical treatment of the intrinsic properties of antiprotonic helium atoms, their formation and collisions with atoms and molecules is discussed.

  13. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  14. Atomizing nozzle and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  15. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ra-226 (Radium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ra-226 (Radium, atomic number Z = 88, mass number A = 226).

  17. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  18. Diamond Fuzzy Number

    OpenAIRE

    T. Pathinathan; K. Ponnivalavan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we define diamond fuzzy number with the help of triangular fuzzy number. We include basic arithmetic operations like addition, subtraction of diamond fuzzy numbers with examples. We define diamond fuzzy matrix with some matrix properties. We have defined Nested diamond fuzzy number and Linked diamond fuzzy number. We have further classified Right Linked Diamond Fuzzy number and Left Linked Diamond Fuzzy number. Finally we have verified the arithmetic operations for the above men...

  19. Expansion of real numbers by algebraic numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we represent the fractional part of ξαn, where ξ is a nonzero real number and α is an algebraic number. By using this representation, we give new lower bounds for the distance from ξαn to the nearest integer.

  20. Parameterizing by the Number of Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Fellows, Michael R; Rosamond, Frances A

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of parameterized algorithmics has often depended on what Niedermeier has called, "the art of problem parameterization". In this paper we introduce and explore a novel but general form of parameterization: the number of numbers. Several classic numerical problems, such as Subset Sum, Partition, 3-Partition, Numerical 3-Dimensional Matching, and Numerical Matching with Target Sums, have multisets of integers as input. We initiate the study of parameterizing these problems by the number of distinct integers in the input. We rely on an FPT result for ILPF to show that all the above-mentioned problems are fixed-parameter tractable when parameterized in this way. In various applied settings, problem inputs often consist in part of multisets of integers or multisets of weighted objects (such as edges in a graph, or jobs to be scheduled). Such number-of-numbers parameterized problems often reduce to subproblems about transition systems of various kinds, parameterized by the size of the system descripti...

  1. Atomic clocks based on adaptive phase measurements with entangled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Axel; Sorensen, Anders; Lukin, Mikhail

    2005-05-01

    We show that the frequency stability of atomic clocks limited by local oscillator frequency fluctuations [1] can be greatly improved by using an adaptive measurement strategy with entangled atoms. Our method uses multiple atomic sub-ensembles with various degrees of spin-squeezing and sequential adaptive measurements of the Ramsey phase. With properly optimized degree of squeezing, this method reaches the Heisenberg limit for phase measurements δφ˜1/N, where N is the number of atoms. In addition, we show that multiple interrogation times for these sub-ensembles can be used to improve the long-term stability of the clock. This method allows one to use a very long interrogation time, limited only by environmental fluctuations. The combination of the above two methods leads to an ultimate long-term frequency stability of the clock scaling as σy(τ)=A. Andr'e, A. S. Sørensen, and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 230801 (2004).

  2. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.;

    2004-01-01

    at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains...

  3. On Legendre numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. Haggard

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The Legendre numbers, an infinite set of rational numbers are defined from the associated Legendre functions and several elementary properties are presented. A general formula for the Legendre numbers is given. Applications include summing certain series of Legendre numbers and evaluating certain integrals. Legendre numbers are used to obtain the derivatives of all orders of the Legendre polynomials at x=1.

  4. Number words and number symbols a cultural history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Menninger, Karl

    1992-01-01

    Classic study discusses number sequence and language and explores written numerals and computations in many cultures. "The historian of mathematics will find much to interest him here both in the contents and viewpoint, while the casual reader is likely to be intrigued by the author's superior narrative ability.

  5. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  6. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optics and interferometry with matter waves is the art of coherently manipulating the translational motion of particles like neutrons, atoms and molecules. Coherent atom optics is an extension of techniques that were developed for manipulating internal quantum states. Applying these ideas to translational motion required the development of techniques to localize atoms and transfer population coherently between distant localities. In this view position and momentum are (continuous) quantum mechanical degrees of freedom analogous to discrete internal quantum states. In our contribution we start with an introduction into matter wave optics in sect. 1, discuss coherent atom optics and atom interferometry techniques for molecular beams in sect. 2 and for trapped atoms in sect. 3. In sect. 4 we then describe tools and experiments that allow to probe the evolution of quantum states of many-body systems by atom interference.

  7. Atomic focusing by quantum fields: Entanglement properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, I.G. da [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, CEP 64049-550, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Frazão, H.M. [Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Profa. Cinobelina Elvas, CEP 64900-000, Bom Jesus, PI (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Nemes, M.C. [Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Peixoto de Faria, J.G. [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais, Av. Amazonas 7675, Belo Horizonte, MG 30510-000 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    The coherent manipulation of the atomic matter waves is of great interest both in science and technology. In order to study how an atom optic device alters the coherence of an atomic beam, we consider the quantum lens proposed by Averbukh et al. [1] to show the discrete nature of the electromagnetic field. We extend the analysis of this quantum lens to the study of another essentially quantum property present in the focusing process, i.e., the atom–field entanglement, and show how the initial atomic coherence and purity are affected by the entanglement. The dynamics of this process is obtained in closed form. We calculate the beam quality factor and the trace of the square of the reduced density matrix as a function of the average photon number in order to analyze the coherence and purity of the atomic beam during the focusing process.

  8. Preparation of ultracold atom clouds at the shot noise level

    CERN Document Server

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Arlt, Jan J; Sherson, Jacob F

    2016-01-01

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold clouds through the real-time analysis of non-destructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number ${N\\sim10^6}$ is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty $\\Delta N$ below the shot noise level, i.e., $\\Delta N <\\sqrt{N}$. Based on this measurement, feedback is applied to reduce the atom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level.

  9. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdacz, M; Hilliard, A J; Kristensen, M A; Pedersen, P L; Klempt, C; Arlt, J J; Sherson, J F

    2016-08-12

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N∼10^{6} is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty ΔN below the shot noise level, i.e., ΔNatom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level.

  10. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdacz, M; Hilliard, A J; Kristensen, M A; Pedersen, P L; Klempt, C; Arlt, J J; Sherson, J F

    2016-08-12

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N∼10^{6} is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty ΔN below the shot noise level, i.e., ΔNatom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level. PMID:27563964

  11. Similarity criterion of flood discharge atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hui; Wu Shiqiang; Chen Huiling; Zhou Jie; Wu Xiufeng

    2008-01-01

    By combining the results of prototype observation of flood discharge atomization at the Wujiangdu Hydropower Station, and by adopting the serial model test method, the model scale effect was examined, the influences of the Reynolds and Weber numbers of water flow on the rain intensity of flood discharge atomization were analyzed and a rain intensity conversion relation was established. It is demonstrated that the level of atomization follows the geometric similarity relations and it is possible to ignore the influence of the surface tension of the flow when the Weber number is greater than 500. Despite limitations such as incomplete data sets, it is undoubtedly helpful to study the scale effect of atomization flow, and it is beneficial to identify the rules of the model test results in order to extrapolate to prototype prediction.

  12. Trivializing number of knots

    OpenAIRE

    Hanaki, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a numerical invariant, called trivializing number, of knots and investigate it. The trivializing number gives an upper bound of unknotting number and canonical genus for knots. We present a table of trivializing numbers for up to 10 crossings knots. We conjecture that twice of the unknotting number of any positive knot is equal to the trivializing number of it and give a partial answer.

  13. LUHN PRIME NUMBERS

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian Cira; Florentin Smarandache

    2015-01-01

    The first prime number with the special property that its addition with reversal gives as result a prime number toois 229. The prime numbers with this property will be called Luhn prime numbers. In this article we intend to presenta performing algorithm for determining the Luhn prime numbers. Using the presented algorithm all the 50598 Luhnprime numbers have been, for p prime smaller than 2 · 107.

  14. Luhn Prime Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Cira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The first prime number with the special property that its addition with reversal gives as result a prime number toois 229. The prime numbers with this property will be called Luhn prime numbers. In this article we intend to presenta performing algorithm for determining the Luhn prime numbers. Using the presented algorithm all the 50598 Luhnprime numbers have been, for p prime smaller than 2 · 107.

  15. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  16. Atoms for peace plus fifty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of Dwight Eisenhower's most significant political legacies stemmed from his management of the nuclear question. Five decades after Eisenhower's 'Atoms for Peace' speech before the United Nations, the nuclear dilemma persists but the world is a different, and I would submit, a better place today than it might have been had that vision not been articulated, or its proposals not advanced. The 'Atoms for Peace' speech had a number of objectives, but it is over arching goal was to propose a set of ideas, a nuclear strategy, which would call on the Soviets to cooperate internationally for the betterment of mankind. This would reengage the Soviets in discussions on nuclear matters at a time when arms control talks had stalled, but it would also offer hope, and a practical set of ideas, to the developing world. 'Atoms for Peace' spawned many developments, including the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and eventually the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. While 'Atoms for Peace', as well as the institutions it created, has come under fire in recent years, it is hard to imagine what the world would have been like without it. Largely through the international Atomic Energy Agency, nations around the world have participated in research and development programs, including the use of nuclear energy in important civilian applications. Nuclear electric power accounts for nearly one-fifth of the world's electricity - reducing global tensions by replacing oil in many applications, and providing much of the world's electricity that is generated without the release of greenhouse gases or other destructive emissions. Many other nuclear and radiation-related technologies, especially radiopharmaceuticals and medical advances involving radiation, have resulted in large part from research spawned by 'Atoms for Peace'. Millions of lives have been saved in the process. While the 'nuclear dilemma' remains a challenge almost as complex as it was fifty years ago, the

  17. Those fascinating numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Koninck, Jean-Marie De

    2009-01-01

    Who would have thought that listing the positive integers along with their most remarkable properties could end up being such an engaging and stimulating adventure? The author uses this approach to explore elementary and advanced topics in classical number theory. A large variety of numbers are contemplated: Fermat numbers, Mersenne primes, powerful numbers, sublime numbers, Wieferich primes, insolite numbers, Sastry numbers, voracious numbers, to name only a few. The author also presents short proofs of miscellaneous results and constantly challenges the reader with a variety of old and new n

  18. Atomic energy levels and Grotrian diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bashkin, Stanley

    1975-01-01

    Atomic Energy Levels and Grotrian Diagrams, Volume I: Hydrogen I - Phosphorus XV presents diagrams of various elements that show their energy level and electronic transitions. The book covers the first 15 elements according to their atomic number. The text will be of great use to researchers and practitioners of fields such as astrophysics that requires pictorial representation of the energy levels and electronic transitions of elements.

  19. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend Christopher G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of a magneto-optical trap for caesium atoms is presented. Particular emphasis has been placed on achieving high spatial number densities and low temperatures. Optimizing both of these together enables efficient evaporative cooling from a conservative trap, a procedure which has recently led to the first observations of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic vapour. The behaviour of a magneto-optical trap is nomina...

  20. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  1. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  2. An atomic symmetry-controlled thermal switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Daniel; Kyoseva, Elica

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple diatomic system trapped inside an optical cavity to control the energy flow between two thermal baths. Through the action of the baths the system is driven to a non-equilibrium steady state. Using the Large Deviation theory we show that the number of photons flowing between the two baths is dramatically different depending on the symmetry of the atomic states. Here we present a deterministic scheme to prepare symmetric and antisymmetric atomic states with the use of external driving fields, thus implementing an atomic control switch for the energy flow.

  3. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    Cvitas, Marko T.; Soldan, Pavel; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  4. Atomic many-body theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, I.; Morrison, J.

    1982-01-01

    The unified description of atomic theory provided in this book bridges the gap between elementary books on quantum mechanics and present-day research in the field. Angular-momentum theory and the Hartree-Fock model are developed systematically and then applied to a number of physical problems. The treatment of many-body theory which then follows is based on a general form of the Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory, applicable to open-shell as well as closed-shell systems. The presentation in the book is based largely on graphical methods. Angular momentum graphs are used to represent the coupling between the spin and orbital angular momenta of the electrons, and the different terms in the perturbation expansion are expressed by means of 'Feynman-like' - or Goldstone - diagrams. These diagrams are evaluated using the angular-momentum graphs developed in the early part of the book. The formalism is applied to a number of problems in atomic physics, such as the electron-correlation energy, the electrostatic term structure and the spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions. The final chapter deals with the exp(S) or coupled-cluster formalism in the pair approximation, which appears to be the most promising approach for accurate calculations of the structure of real atomic and molecular systems.

  5. Dynamics in atomic signaling games

    KAUST Repository

    Fox, Michael J.

    2015-04-08

    We study an atomic signaling game under stochastic evolutionary dynamics. There are a finite number of players who repeatedly update from a finite number of available languages/signaling strategies. Players imitate the most fit agents with high probability or mutate with low probability. We analyze the long-run distribution of states and show that, for sufficiently small mutation probability, its support is limited to efficient communication systems. We find that this behavior is insensitive to the particular choice of evolutionary dynamic, a property that is due to the game having a potential structure with a potential function corresponding to average fitness. Consequently, the model supports conclusions similar to those found in the literature on language competition. That is, we show that efficient languages eventually predominate the society while reproducing the empirical phenomenon of linguistic drift. The emergence of efficiency in the atomic case can be contrasted with results for non-atomic signaling games that establish the non-negligible possibility of convergence, under replicator dynamics, to states of unbounded efficiency loss.

  6. Enriching Number Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Exploring number systems of other cultures can be an enjoyable learning experience that enriches students' knowledge of numbers and number systems in important ways. It helps students deepen mental computation fluency, knowledge of place value, and equivalent representations for numbers. This article describes how the author designed her…

  7. Building Numbers from Primes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  8. Distribution of prime numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Ouannas, Moussa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I present the distribution of prime numbers which was treated in many researches by studying the function of Riemann; because it has a remarkable property; its non trivial zeros are prime numbers; but in this work I will show that we can find the distribution of prime numbers on remaining in natural numbers only.

  9. Tropical Real Hurwitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Markwig, Hannah; Rau, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we define tropical analogues of real Hurwitz numbers, i.e. numbers of covers of surfaces with compatible involutions satisfying prescribed ramification properties. We prove a correspondence theorem stating the equality of the tropical numbers with their real counterparts. We apply this theorem to the case of double Hurwitz numbers (which generalizes our result from arXiv:1409.8095).

  10. δ-FIBONACCI NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Slota

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The scope of the paper is the definition and discussion of the polynomial generalizations of the {sc Fibonacci} numbers called here $delta$-{sc Fibonacci} numbers. Many special identities and interesting relations for these new numbers are presented. Also, different connections between $delta$-{sc Fibonacci} numbers and {sc Fibonacci} and {sc Lucas} numbersare proven in this paper.

  11. Introduction to number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vazzana, Anthony; Garth, David

    2007-01-01

    One of the oldest branches of mathematics, number theory is a vast field devoted to studying the properties of whole numbers. Offering a flexible format for a one- or two-semester course, Introduction to Number Theory uses worked examples, numerous exercises, and two popular software packages to describe a diverse array of number theory topics.

  12. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity. PMID:23146658

  13. Atomic layer epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Colin H. L.; Pessa, Markus V.

    1986-08-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is not so much a new technique for the preparation of thin films as a novel modification to existing methods of vapor-phase epitaxy, whether physical [e.g., evaporation, at one limit molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)] or chemical [e.g., chloride epitaxy or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)]. It is a self-regulatory process which, in its simplest form, produces one complete molecular layer of a compound per operational cycle, with a greater thickness being obtained by repeated cycling. There is no growth rate in ALE as in other crystal growth processes. So far ALE has been applied to rather few materials, but, in principle, it could have a quite general application. It has been used to prepare single-crystal overlayers of CdTe, (Cd,Mn)Te, GaAs and AlAs, a number of polycrystalline films and highly efficient electroluminescent thin-film displays based on ZnS:Mn. It could also offer particular advantages for the preparation of ultrathin films of precisely controlled thickness in the nanometer range and thus may have a special value for growing low-dimensional structures.

  14. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  15. Atomic homodyne detection of weak atomic transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Mevan; Elliott, D S

    2007-01-26

    We have developed a two-color, two-pathway coherent control technique to detect and measure weak optical transitions in atoms by coherently beating the transition amplitude for the weak transition with that of a much stronger transition. We demonstrate the technique in atomic cesium, exciting the 6s(2)S(1/2) --> 8s(2)S(1/2) transition via a strong two-photon transition and a weak controllable Stark-induced transition. We discuss the enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for this measurement technique over that of direct detection of the weak transition rate, and project future refinements that may further improve its sensitivity and application to the measurement of other weak atomic interactions.

  16. Helium atom scattering from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    High resolution helium atom scattering can be applied to study a number of interesting properties of solid surfaces with great sensitivity and accuracy. This book treats in detail experimental and theoretical aspects ofthis method as well as all current applications in surface science. The individual chapters - all written by experts in the field - are devoted to the investigation of surface structure, defect shapes and concentrations, the interaction potential, collective and localized surface vibrations at low energies, phase transitions and surface diffusion. Over the past decade helium atom scattering has gained widespread recognitionwithin the surface science community. Points in its favour are comprehensiveunderstanding of the scattering theory and the availability of well-tested approximation to the rigorous theory. This book will be invaluable to surface scientists wishing to make an informed judgement on the actual and potential capabilities of this technique and its results.

  17. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  18. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, 19716 Delaware (United States); Dussel, G. G. [Departamento de Fisica J.J. Giambiagi, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dukelsky, J.; Sarriguren, P. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  19. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  20. Advances in atomic physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat M. El-Sherbini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  1. Advances in atomic physics

    OpenAIRE

    Tharwat M. El-Sherbini

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research - an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  2. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2015-01-01

    When physicists began to explore the world of atoms more precisely, as they endeavoured to understand its structure and the laws governing its behaviour, they soon encountered serious difficulties. Our intuitive concepts, based on our daily experience of the macroscopic world around us, proved to be completely erroneous on the atomic scale; the atom was incomprehensible within the framework of classical physics. In order to uncover these new mysteries, after a great deal of trial and error, e...

  3. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  4. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  5. Metal atom oxidation laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  6. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  7. The Software Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Javanainen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  8. The Eudoxus Real Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Arthan, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This note describes a representation of the real numbers due to Schanuel. The representation lets us construct the real numbers from first principles. Like the well-known construction of the real numbers using Dedekind cuts, the idea is inspired by the ancient Greek theory of proportion, due to Eudoxus. However, unlike the Dedekind construction, the construction proceeds directly from the integers to the real numbers bypassing the intermediate construction of the rational numbers. The constru...

  9. Doping Scheme in Atomic Chain Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshishige, Yamada

    1997-01-01

    Due to the dramatic reduction in MOS size, there appear many unwanted effects. In these small devices, the number of dopant atoms in the channel is not macroscopic and electrons may suffer significantly different scattering from device to device since the spatial distribution of dopant atoms is no longer regarded as continuous. This prohibits integration, while it is impossible to control such dopant positions within atomic scale. A fundamental solution is to create electronics with simple but atomically precise structures, which could be fabricated with recent atom manipulation technology. All the constituent atoms are placed as planned, and then the device characteristics are deviation-free, which is mandatory for integration. Atomic chain electronics belongs to this category. Foreign atom chains or arrays form devices, and they are placed on the atomically flat substrate surface. We can design the band structure and the resultant Fermi energy of these structures by manipulating the lattice constant. Using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, it has been predicted that isolated Si chains and arrays are metallic, Mg chains are insulating, and Mg arrays have metallic and insulating phases [1]. The transport properties along a metallic chain have been studied, emphasizing the role of the contact to electrodes [2]. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along die chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome

  10. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Frazer

    2014-01-01

    The technical difficulties of algebraic number theory often make this subject appear difficult to beginners. This undergraduate textbook provides a welcome solution to these problems as it provides an approachable and thorough introduction to the topic. Algebraic Number Theory takes the reader from unique factorisation in the integers through to the modern-day number field sieve. The first few chapters consider the importance of arithmetic in fields larger than the rational numbers. Whilst some results generalise well, the unique factorisation of the integers in these more general number fields often fail. Algebraic number theory aims to overcome this problem. Most examples are taken from quadratic fields, for which calculations are easy to perform. The middle section considers more general theory and results for number fields, and the book concludes with some topics which are more likely to be suitable for advanced students, namely, the analytic class number formula and the number field sieve. This is the fi...

  11. All square chiliagonal numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aṣiru, Muniru A.

    2016-10-01

    A square chiliagonal number is a number which is simultaneously a chiliagonal number and a perfect square (just as the well-known square triangular number is both triangular and square). In this work, we determine which of the chiliagonal numbers are perfect squares and provide the indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square numbers. The study revealed that the determination of square chiliagonal numbers naturally leads to a generalized Pell equation x2 - Dy2 = N with D = 1996 and N = 9962, and has six fundamental solutions out of which only three yielded integer values for use as indices of chiliagonal numbers. The crossing/independent recurrence relations satisfied by each class of indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square numbers are obtained. Finally, the generating functions serve as a clothesline to hang up the indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square numbers for easy display and this was used to obtain the first few sequence of square chiliagonal numbers.

  12. Odd Multiperfect Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shi-Chao

    2011-01-01

    A natural number $n$ is called {\\it multiperfect} or {\\it$k$-perfect} for integer $k\\ge2$ if $\\sigma(n)=kn$, where $\\sigma(n)$ is the sum of the positive divisors of $n$. In this paper, we establish the structure theorem of odd multiperfect numbers analogous as Euler's theorem on odd perfect numbers. We prove the divisibility of the Euler part of odd multiperfect numbers and characterize the forms of odd perfect numbers $n=\\pi^\\alpha M^2$ such that $\\pi\\equiv\\alpha(\\text{mod}8)$. We also present some examples to show the nonexistence of odd perfect numbers as applications.

  13. p-adic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Grešak, Rozalija

    2015-01-01

    The field of real numbers is usually constructed using Dedekind cuts. In these thesis we focus on the construction of the field of real numbers using metric completion of rational numbers using Cauchy sequences. In a similar manner we construct the field of p-adic numbers, describe some of their basic and topological properties. We follow by a construction of complex p-adic numbers and we compare them with the ordinary complex numbers. We conclude the thesis by giving a motivation for the int...

  14. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  15. Calculation of Al-Zn diagram from central atoms model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A slightly modified central atoms model was proposed. The probabilities of various clusters with the central atoms and their nearest neighboring shells can be calculated neglecting the assumption of the param eter of energy in the central atoms model in proportion to the number of other atoms i (referred with the central atom). A parameter Pα is proposed in this model, which equals to reciprocal of activity coefficient of a component, therefore, the new model can be understood easily. By this model, the Al-Zn phase diagram and its thermodynamic properties were calculated, the results coincide with the experimental data.

  16. Atom interferometric gravitational wave detection using heterodyne laser links

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme based on a heterodyne laser link that allows for long baseline gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry. While the baseline length in previous atom-based proposals is constrained by the need for a reference laser to remain collimated as it propagates between two satellites, here we circumvent this requirement by employing a strong local oscillator laser near each atom ensemble that is phase locked to the reference laser beam. Longer baselines offer a number of potential advantages, including enhanced sensitivity, simplified atom optics, and reduced atomic source flux requirements.

  17. Preparation of two and four-atom entangled states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A scheme for preparing two and four-atom entangled states is presented. It is based on atom-cavity-field interactions. Firatly, the cav ity is prepared in the superposition of the number states through the atom under going a two-photon transition, the secondly, the two or four identical two-lev el atoms, which are all initially in their ground states, are sent through the c avity sequentially and can make resonant single-photon transition in the cavity . Then atomic entangled states are created and the cavity is left in the vacuum state.

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Computational Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Douglass E.

    1998-02-01

    The primary purpose of `Computational Atomic Structure' is to give a potential user of the Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) Atomic Structure Package an outline of the physics and computational methods in the package, guidance on how to use the package, and information on how to interpret and use the computational results. The book is successful in all three aspects. In addition, the book provides a good overview and review of the physics of atomic structure that would be useful to the plasma physicist interested in refreshing his knowledge of atomic structure and quantum mechanics. While most of the subjects are covered in greater detail in other sources, the book is reasonably self-contained, and, in most cases, the reader can understand the basic material without recourse to other sources. The MCHF package is the standard package for computing atomic structure and wavefunctions for single or multielectron ions and atoms. It is available from a number of ftp sites. When the code was originally written in FORTRAN 77, it could only be run on large mainframes. With the advances in computer technology, the suite of codes can now be compiled and run on present day workstations and personal computers and is thus available for use by any physicist, even those with extremely modest computing resources. Sample calculations in interactive mode are included in the book to illustrate the input needed for the code, what types of results and information the code can produce, and whether the user has installed the code correctly. The user can also specify the calculational level, from simple Hartree-Fock to multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock. The MCHF method begins by finding approximate wavefunctions for the bound states of an atomic system. This involves minimizing the energy of the bound state using a variational technique. Once the wavefunctions have been determined, other atomic properties, such as the transition rates, can be determined. The book begins with an

  19. History of Catalan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Pak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We give a brief history of Catalan numbers, from their first discovery in the 18th century to modern times. This note will appear as an appendix in Richard Stanley's forthcoming book on Catalan numbers.

  20. About Bernoulli's Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Bencze, Mihaly; Smarandache, Florentin

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present a simple proof of Borevich-Shafarevich's method to compute the sum of the first n natural numbers of the same power. We also prove several properties of Bernoulli's numbers.

  1. Fibonacci Numbers and Identities

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Cheng Lien; Lang, Mong Lung

    2013-01-01

    By investigating a recurrence relation about functions, we first give alternative proofs of various identities on Fibonacci numbers and Lucas numbers, and then, make certain well known identities visible via certain trivalent graph associated to the recurrence relation.

  2. Tunneling Dynamics Between Atomic and Molecular Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong

    2004-01-01

    Tunneling dynamics of multi-atomic molecules between atomic and multi-atomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with Feshbach resonance is investigated.It is indicated that the tunneling in the two Bose-Einstein condensates depends on not only the inter-atomic-molecular nonlinear interactions and the initial number of atoms in these condensates,but also the tunneling coupling between the atomic condensate and the multi-atomic molecular condensate.It is discovered that besides oscillating tunneling current between the atomic condensate and the multi-atomic molecular condensate,the nonlinear multi-atomic molecular tunneling dynamics sustains a self-locked population imbalance:a macroscopic quantum self-trapping effect.The influence of de-coherence caused by non-condensate atoms on the tunneling dynamics is studied.It is shown that de-coherence suppresses the multi-atomic molecular tunneling.Moreover,the conception of the molecular Bose-Einstein condensate,which is different from the conventional single-atomic Bose-Einstein condensate,is specially emphasized in this paper.

  3. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  4. Multiphoton ionization of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of high intensity effects which result from multiphoton ionization of atoms in a high laser intensity, ranging from 1010 to 1015 W cm-2. Resonant multiphoton ionization of atoms, the production of multiply charged ions, and electron energy spectra, are all discussed. (U.K.)

  5. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  6. Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has been prepared to provide an overview of the responsibilities and activities of the Atomic Energy Control Board. It is designed to address questions that are often asked concerning the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board, its enabling legislation, licensing and compliance activities, federal-provincial relationships, international obligations, and communications with the public

  7. Survey on fusible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Junyan

    2012-01-01

    We point out that the recursive formula that appears in Erickson's presentation "Fusible Numbers" is incorrect, and pose an alternate conjecture about the structure of fusible numbers. Although we are unable to solve the conjecture, we succeed in establishing some basic properties of fusible numbers. We suggest some possible approaches to the conjecture, and list further problems in the final chapter.

  8. Number Relationships in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myoungwhon

    2011-01-01

    When a child understands number relationships, he or she comprehends the meaning of numbers by developing multiple, flexible ways of representing them. The importance of developing number relationships in the early years has been highlighted because it helps children build a good foundation for developing a more sophisticated understanding of…

  9. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Kohji

    2002-01-01

    The book includes several survey articles on prime numbers, divisor problems, and Diophantine equations, as well as research papers on various aspects of analytic number theory such as additive problems, Diophantine approximations and the theory of zeta and L-function Audience Researchers and graduate students interested in recent development of number theory

  10. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  11. Sum-Difference Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yixun

    2010-01-01

    Starting with an interesting number game sometimes used by school teachers to demonstrate the factorization of integers, "sum-difference numbers" are defined. A positive integer n is a "sum-difference number" if there exist positive integers "x, y, w, z" such that n = xy = wz and x ? y = w + z. This paper characterizes all sum-difference numbers…

  12. Estimating Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  13. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  14. Moving Single Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Single neutral atoms are promising candidates for qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum information. We have built a set of optical tweezers for trapping and moving single Rubidium atoms. The tweezers are based on a far off-resonant dipole trapping laser focussed to a 1 μm spot with a single aspheric lens. We use a digital micromirror device (DMD) to generate dynamic holograms of the desired arrangement of traps. The DMD has a frame rate of 20 kHz which, when combined with fast algorithms, allows for rapid reconfiguration of the traps. We demonstrate trapping of up to 20 atoms in arbitrary arrangements, and the transport of a single-atom over a distance of 14 μm with continuous laser cooling, and 5 μm without. In the meantime, we are developing high-finesse fibre-tip cavities, which we plan to use to couple pairs of single atoms to form a quantum network.

  15. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act provides for the transfer of property, rights, liabilities and obligations of parts of the undertaking of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Autority, to two new Compagnies set up for this purpose: the Bristish Nuclear Fuels Limited, and the Radiochemical Centre Limited. Patents licences and registered designs owned by the Autority at the time of the transfer are not included therein. The Act also includes amendments to the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, notably as regards permits to operate granted to a body corporate. Finally, the Schedule to this Act lays down a certain number of provisions relating to security and the preservation of secrets. (NEA)

  16. Applied number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Niederreiter, Harald

    2015-01-01

    This textbook effectively builds a bridge from basic number theory to recent advances in applied number theory. It presents the first unified account of the four major areas of application where number theory plays a fundamental role, namely cryptography, coding theory, quasi-Monte Carlo methods, and pseudorandom number generation, allowing the authors to delineate the manifold links and interrelations between these areas.  Number theory, which Carl-Friedrich Gauss famously dubbed the queen of mathematics, has always been considered a very beautiful field of mathematics, producing lovely results and elegant proofs. While only very few real-life applications were known in the past, today number theory can be found in everyday life: in supermarket bar code scanners, in our cars’ GPS systems, in online banking, etc.  Starting with a brief introductory course on number theory in Chapter 1, which makes the book more accessible for undergraduates, the authors describe the four main application areas in Chapters...

  17. Ionization of H Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts from the theory of transient chaos are applied to study the classical ionization process of one dimensional model of kicked hydrogen Rydberg atoms. The phase-space dynamics is represented by a mapping T which is proved to be hyperbolic. The fraction of atoms not ionized after time t, PB(t), decays asymptotically according to PB(t)∼t-α with α ∼ 1.65. The observed algebraic decay, which seems to contradict the hyperbolicity of T, is explained by (i) the symbolic dynamics of T consists of a countably infinite number of symbols and (ii) the invariant manifold of phase-space points which never ionize is an anomalously scaling fractal. Therefore, the one-dimensional kicked hydrogen atom provides a counterexample to the hypothesis that algebraic decay marks regular dynamics, whereas hyperbolic systems decay exponentially. The algebraic decay is reproduced by an analytically solvable diffusion model which predicts α = 3/2. Replacing zero-width δ-kicks by smooth finite-width pulses, the mapping T is no longer completely hyperbolic, and a subset of phase-space is regular. For this case we observe that PB(t) shows a transition between two power-law decays with α ∼ 1.65 for short times and α ∼ 2.1 for long times where the effect of the regular domain is felt. (author)

  18. Implementing quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, V; Jendrzejewski, F; Oberthaler, M K; Berges, J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the experimental engineering of model systems for the description of QED in one spatial dimension via a mixture of bosonic $^{23}$Na and fermionic $^6$Li atoms. The local gauge symmetry is realized in an optical superlattice, using heteronuclear boson-fermion spin-changing interactions which preserve the total spin in every local collision. We consider a large number of bosons residing in the coherent state of a Bose-Einstein condensate on each link between the fermion lattice sites, such that the behavior of lattice QED in the continuum limit can be recovered. The discussion about the range of possible experimental parameters builds, in particular, upon experiences with related setups of fermions interacting with coherent samples of bosonic atoms. We determine the atomic system's parameters required for the description of fundamental QED processes, such as Schwinger pair production and string breaking. This is achieved by benchmark calculations of the atomic system and of QED itself using function...

  19. Laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ye XU; Wen-li WANG; Qing-hong ZHOU; Guo-hui LI; Hai-ling JIANG; Lin-fang CHEN; Jie YE; Zhi-hong ZHOU; Yin CAI; Hai-yao TANG; Min ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    The experiments on the laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms are reported, including the two-dimensional transversal cooling, longitudinal velocity Zeeman deceleration, and a magneto-optical trap with a broadband transition at a wavelength of 399 nm. The magnetic field distributions along the axis of a Zeeman slower were measured and in a good agreement with the calculated results. Cold ytterbium atoms were produced with a number of about 107 and a temperature of a few milli-Kelvin.In addition, using a 556-nm laser, the excitations of cold tterbium atoms at 1S0-3p1 transition were observed. The ytterbium atoms will be further cooled in a 556-nm magneto-optical trap and loaded into a three-dimensional optical lattice to make an ytterbium optical clock.

  20. Atomic model of liquid pure Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a θ-θX-ray diffractometer, the liquid structure of pure Fewas investigated and the diffraction intensity, structure factor, pair distribution function as well as the coordination number and atomic distance were obtained. The experimental results showed that there was also a pre-peak on the curve of the structure factor of liquid pure Fe. The pre-peak is a mark of medium-range order in melts. According to the characteristics of pre-peak, an atomic model of liquid pure Fe is constructed, namely, the structure of liquid pure Fe is a combination of clusters consisting of bcc cells with shared vertexes and other atoms with random dense atom distribution.

  1. Coupling ultracold atoms to mechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Hunger, David; Korppi, Maria; Jöckel, Andreas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Treutlein, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss and compare different ways to engineer an interface between ultracold atoms and micro- and nanomechanical oscillators. We start by analyzing a direct mechanical coupling of a single atom or ion to a mechanical oscillator and show that the very different masses of the two systems place a limit on the achievable coupling constant in this scheme. We then discuss several promising strategies for enhancing the coupling: collective enhancement by using a large number of atoms in an optical lattice in free space, coupling schemes based on high-finesse optical cavities, and coupling to atomic internal states. Throughout the manuscript we discuss both theoretical proposals and first experimental implementations.

  2. Formation of positron-atom bound states in collisions between Rydberg Ps and neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Swann, A R; Deller, A; Gribakin, G F

    2016-01-01

    Predicted twenty years ago, positron binding to neutral atoms has not yet been observed experimentally. A new scheme is proposed to detect positron-atom bound states by colliding Rydberg positronium (Ps) with neutral atoms. Estimates of the charge-transfer-reaction cross section are obtained using the first Born approximation for a selection of neutral atom targets and a wide range of incident Ps energies and principal quantum numbers. We also estimate the corresponding Ps ionization cross section. The accuracy of the calculations is tested by comparison with earlier predictions for Ps charge transfer in collisions with hydrogen and antihydrogen. We describe an existing Rydberg Ps beam suitable for producing positron-atom bound states and estimate signal rates based on the calculated cross sections and realistic experimental parameters. We conclude that the proposed methodology is capable of producing such states and of testing theoretical predictions of their binding energies.

  3. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  4. Signed Numbers Conversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Vijayasekhar,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Signed integers are normally represented using 2’s complement representation. Addition and subtraction of signed numbers is done in the same manner as for unsigned numbers. However carry (or borrow is simple ignored. Unlike unsigned number carry (or borrow does not mean overflow or error. Doubling of a signed number can be done by shift left. However, halving of a signed number can not be done by shift right. Hence special arithmetic instruction SAR (Shift arithmetic right is needed. We have defined an alternative representation for signed numbers. Here a positive number is represented by appended a zero (0 at right. Here a negative number is represented by inverting all bits in corresponding positive number. Two signed numbers are added by adding corresponding binary representation. After that carry is added to the result. Similarly two signed numbers are subtracted by subtracting corresponding binaryrepresentation. After that borrow is subtracted. Doubling and halving is done by ROL (Rotate left and ROR (Rotate right respectively. Following are drawbacks of our system. (A Addition is done in two stages. In the first stage the numbers are added. In the second stage carry is added. Carry can not be ignored as in 2’s complement representation. (B Same holds for subtraction. (C When an odd number is halved then error results. In 2’s complement representation approximate answer appears. The advantage of our system is that entire arithmetic can be carried using ordinary logical instructions. No special instruction is needed. In 2’s complement representation a special instruction SAR is needed. This instruction is not used for any other purpose.

  5. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  6. Atomic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    We propose that dark matter is dominantly comprised of atomic bound states. We build a simple model and map the parameter space that results in the early universe formation of hydrogen-like dark atoms. We find that atomic dark matter has interesting implications for cosmology as well as direct detection: Protohalo formation can be suppressed below $M_{proto} \\sim 10^3 - 10^6 M_{\\odot}$ for weak scale dark matter due to Ion-Radiation interactions in the dark sector. Moreover, weak-scale dark a...

  7. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  8. Atoms, molecules, solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is an introduction to modern physics for undergraduate students of physics or students of related fields. After an introduction to the wave-particle dualism the structure of atoms is considered with regards to atomic models. Then the foundations of quantum mechanics are introduced with regards to their application to atomic structure calculations. Thereafter the chemical bond and the molecular structure are discussed. Then classical and quantum statistical mechanics are introduced. Thereafter the crystal binding, the crystal structure, and the specific heat of solids are considered. Finally the band theory of solids is briefly introduced. Every chapter contains exercise problems. (HSI)

  9. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  10. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  11. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  12. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  13. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  14. The CHIANTI atomic database

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Peter R; Landi, Enrico; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The CHIANTI atomic database was first released in 1996 and has had a huge impact on the analysis and modeling of emissions from astrophysical plasmas. The database has continued to be updated, with version 8 released in 2015. Atomic data for modeling the emissivities of 246 ions and neutrals are contained in CHIANTI, together with data for deriving the ionization fractions of all elements up to zinc. The different types of atomic data are summarized here and their formats discussed. Statistics on the impact of CHIANTI to the astrophysical community are given and examples of the diverse range of applications are presented.

  15. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus Bjørn; Suetens, Sigrid; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in the way predicted by the law of small numbers as formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular......We investigate the “law of small numbers” using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto......, on average they move away from numbers that have recently been drawn, as suggested by the “gambler’s fallacy”, and move toward numbers that are on streak, i.e. have been drawn several weeks in a row, consistent with the “hot hand fallacy”....

  16. Beyond the Number Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human ...

  17. Divisibility of characteristic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Borghesi, Simone

    2009-01-01

    We use homotopy theory to define certain rational coefficients characteristic numbers with integral values, depending on a given prime number q and positive integer t. We prove the first nontrivial degree formula and use it to show that existence of morphisms between algebraic varieties for which these numbers are not divisible by q give information on the degree of such morphisms or on zero cycles of the target variety.

  18. Music By Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Cocos, Mihail

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical way of defining musical modes, we derive a formula for the total number of modes and define the musicality of a mode as the total number of harmonic chords whithin the mode. We also give an algorithm for the construction of a duet of melodic lines given a sequence of numbers and a mode. We attach the .mus files of the counterpoints obtained by using the sequence of primes and several musical modes.

  19. Quantum Random Number Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. We discuss the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multipl...

  20. Metallic Softness Influence on Magic Numbers of Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The metallic softness parameter αr0 determines the structure of the cluster and governs the rule of magic numbers. Using molecular dynamic method, the stable structures and magic numbers are determined for the clusters consisting of 13 up to 147 atoms in medium range Morse potentials, which is suitable for most of metals. As the number of atoms constituting the cluster increases, the stable structures undergo transition from face-centered (FC) to edge-centered (EC) structures. The magic numbers take ones of FC series before transition and take ones of EC series after that. The transition point from FC to EC structures depends on the value of softness parameter.

  1. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetens, Sigrid; Galbo-Jørgensen, Claus B.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2016-01-01

    as formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular, players tend to bet less on numbers that have been drawn in the preceding week, as suggested by the ‘gambler’s fallacy’, and bet more on a number if it was frequently drawn in the recent past, consistent with the ‘hot-hand fallacy’.......We investigate the ‘law of small numbers’ using a data set on lotto gambling that allows us to measure players’ reactions to draws. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week, we find that those who do change react on average as predicted by the law of small numbers...

  2. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetens, Sigrid; Galbo-Jørgensen, Claus B.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2015-01-01

    formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular, players tend to bet less on numbers that have been drawn in the preceding week, as suggested by the ‘gambler’s fallacy’, and bet more on a number if it was frequently drawn in the recent past, consistent with the ‘hot-hand fallacy’.......We investigate the ‘law of small numbers’ using a data set on lotto gambling that allows us to measure players’ reactions to draws. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week, we find that those who do change react on average as predicted by the law of small numbers as...

  3. Numbers, sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Hirst, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Number and geometry are the foundations upon which mathematics has been built over some 3000 years. This book is concerned with the logical foundations of number systems from integers to complex numbers. The author has chosen to develop the ideas by illustrating the techniques used throughout mathematics rather than using a self-contained logical treatise. The idea of proof has been emphasised, as has the illustration of concepts from a graphical, numerical and algebraic point of view. Having laid the foundations of the number system, the author has then turned to the analysis of infinite proc

  4. Intuitive numbers guide decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Peters

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring reaction times to number comparisons is thought to reveal a processing stage in elementary numerical cognition linked to internal, imprecise representations of number magnitudes. These intuitive representations of the mental number line have been demonstrated across species and human development but have been little explored in decision making. This paper develops and tests hypotheses about the influence of such evolutionarily ancient, intuitive numbers on human decisions. We demonstrate that individuals with more precise mental-number-line representations are higher in numeracy (number skills consistent with previous research with children. Individuals with more precise representations (compared to those with less precise representations also were more likely to choose larger, later amounts over smaller, immediate amounts, particularly with a larger proportional difference between the two monetary outcomes. In addition, they were more likely to choose an option with a larger proportional but smaller absolute difference compared to those with less precise representations. These results are consistent with intuitive number representations underlying: a perceived differences between numbers, b the extent to which proportional differences are weighed in decisions, and, ultimately, c the valuation of decision options. Human decision processes involving numbers important to health and financial matters may be rooted in elementary, biological processes shared with other species.

  5. Thoughts on Documentation of Atomic Power Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Hee Won; Song, Ki Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has accumulated a number of technology development and research outcomes, including its representative achievements such as atomic energy technology independence and the first export of atomic energy system, since it was established in 1959. With its long history of over 50 years, KAERI has produced a large amount of information and explicit knowledge such as experiment data, database, design data, report, instructions, and operation data at each stage of its research and development process as it has performed various researches since its establishment. Also, a lot of tacit knowledge has been produced both knowingly and not unknowingly based on the experience of researchers who have participated in many projects. However, in the research environment in Korea where they focus overly on the output, tacit knowledge has not been managed properly compared to explicit knowledge. This tacit knowledge is as an important asset as explicit knowledge for an effective research and development. Moreover, as the first generation of atomic energy independence and research manpower retire, their accumulated experience and knowledge are in danger of disappearing. Therefore, in this study, we sought how to take a whole view and to document atomic energy technology researched and developed by KAERI, from the background to achievement of each field of the technology. Comprehensive and systematic documentation of atomic energy technology will establish a comprehensive management system of national atomic energy technology record to make a foundation of technical advancement and development of atomic energy technology. Also, it is expected to be used as an important knowledge and information resource of atomic energy knowledge management system

  6. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  7. Atomic and Molecular Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field

  8. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  9. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  10. Dangerous Energy : Atomic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the disaster in Chernobyl, Russia. Through the accident It reveals the dangerous nuclear energy with a lot of problems on the nuclear power plants which includes four reasons about propelling development of atomic and criticism about that, eight reasons against development of atomic, the problem in 11 -12 nuclear power plant, the movement of antagonism towards nuclear waste in Anmyon island, cases of antinuclear in foreign country and building of new energy system.

  11. Atom laser divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Le Coq, Yann; Thywissen, Joseph H.; Rangwala, Sadiq A.; Gerbier, Fabrice; Richard, Simon; Delannoy, Guillaume; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2001-01-01

    We measure the angular divergence of a quasi-continuous, rf-outcoupled, free-falling atom laser as a function of the outcoupling frequency. The data is compared to a Gaussian-beam model of laser propagation that generalizes the standard formalism of photonic lasers. Our treatment includes diffraction, magnetic lensing, and interaction between the atom laser and the condensate. We find that the dominant source of divergence is the condensate-laser interaction.

  12. Guided Quasicontinuous Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Guerin, William; Riou, Jean-Félix; Gaebler, John,; Josse, Vincent; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2006-01-01

    version published in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 200402 (2006) International audience We report the first realization of a guided quasicontinuous atom laser by rf outcoupling a Bose-Einstein condensate from a hybrid optomagnetic trap into a horizontal atomic waveguide. This configuration allows us to cancel the acceleration due to gravity and keep the de Broglie wavelength constant at 0.5 µm during 0.1 s of propagation. We also show that our configuration, equivalent to pigtailing an optical f...

  13. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  14. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  15. The Atomic Fingerprint: Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisch, Bernard [Carnegie-Mellon University

    1972-01-01

    The nuclei of atoms are stable only when they contain certain numbers of neutrons and protons. Since nuclei can absorb additional neutrons, which in many cases results in the conversion of a stable nucleus to a radioactive one, neutron activation analysis is possible.

  16. Guide to Laboratory Practicum in Atomic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbulea, N. F.; Golban, G. N.; Scurtul, V. V.; Oleynik, V. A.

    1980-12-01

    The broshure represents a collection of 11 Laboratory works in Quantum Optics, Semiconductor, Atomic and Nuclear Physics for students of 2-nd years from Technical High Schools. A minimum of theoretical knowledges is given as well as a description of experimental installation (setup),a number of control questions and a task to be carried out is presented for every of the Laboratory work.

  17. Coherence-enhanced entanglement between two atoms at high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yao-Hua; Fang Mao-Fa; Jiang Chun-Lei; Zeng Ke

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the entanglement properties in a system of two dipole-dipole coupled two-level atoms resonantly interacting with a single-mode thermal field.The results show that,when the temperature of the cavity is high enough (corresponding to the large value of the mean photon number),the entanglement is greatly enhanced due to the initial atomic coherence.These results are helpful for controlling the atomic entanglement by changing the initial parameters of the system.

  18. Pisot Numbers and Primes

    CERN Document Server

    Vieru, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    We define and study a transform whose iterates bring to the fore interesting relations between Pisot numbers and primes. Although the relations we describe are general, they take a particular form in the Pisot limit points. We give three elegant formulae, which permit to locate on the whole semi-line all limit points that are not integer powers of other Pisot numbers.

  19. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Suetens, S.; Tyran, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the "law of small numbers" using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto number

  20. Hyperquarks and generation number

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmann, Alfons J

    2013-01-01

    In a model in which quarks and leptons are built up from two spin 1/2 preons as fundamental entities, a new class of fermionic bound states (hyperquarks) arises. It turns out that these hyperquarks are necessary to fulfill the 't Hooft anomaly constraint, which then links the number of fermionic generations to the number of colors and hypercolors.

  1. First Graders' Number Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan N.; Tabor, Pamela D.; Wright, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    As young children make sense of mathematics, they begin to see with new eyes. What once was uncertain may now be determined. Objects become countable; fingers become tools; and numbers become more than just names. Educators revel in such developments--which mark significant progress toward more sophisticated understanding of number--and work…

  2. On arithmetic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Oller-Marcén, Antonio M.

    2012-01-01

    An integer $n$ is said to be \\textit{arithmetic} if the arithmetic mean of its divisors is an integer. In this paper, using properties of the factorization of values of cyclotomic polynomials, we characterize arithmetic numbers. As an application, in Section 2, we give an interesting characterization of Mersenne numbers.

  3. Multispecies quantum Hurwitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Harnad, J.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of hypergeometric 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for quantum Hurwitz numbers is extended here to multispecies families. Both the enumerative geometrical significance of these multispecies quantum Hurwitz numbers as weighted enumerations of branched coverings of the Riemann sphere and their combinatorial significance in terms of weighted paths in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ are derived.

  4. The Fibonacci Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstad, Torgeir

    1991-01-01

    After a brief historical account of Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci, some basic results concerning the Fibonacci numbers are developed and proved, and entertaining examples are described. Connections are made between the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio, biological nature, and other combinatorics examples. (MDH)

  5. The Number Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Herta Taussig; Freitag, Arthur H.

    The development of number concepts from prehistoric time to the present day are presented. Section 1 presents the historical development, logical development, and the infinitude of numbers. Section 2 focuses on non-positional and positional numeration systems. Section 3 compares historical and modern techniques and devices for computation. Section…

  6. Theoretical atomic collision physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, N.F. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA) Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Quantum Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical atomic physics at Rice University focuses on obtaining a better understanding of the mechanisms that control inelastic collisions between excited atoms and atoms, molecules and ions. Particular attention is given to systems and processes that are of potential importance to advanced energy technologies. In the current year, significant progress has been made in quantitative studies of: quenching of low-Rydberg Na atoms in thermal energy collisions with He, Ne and Ar atoms; selective excitation resulting from charge transfer in collisions of highly stripped ions of He, Li, C, and with Li, Na and He atoms and H{sub 2} molecules at keV energies; differential elastic and single, and double electron transfer in He{sup ++} collisions with He at keV energies; inelastic electron-transfer in ultra-low-energy-energy (T=8 to 80K) collisions between {sup 3}He{sup +} and {sup 4}He and {sup 4}He{sup +} and {sup 3}He; a formalism for ionization by electron impact of ions in dense, high temperature plasmas.

  7. Safety-in-numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune; Bjørnskau, Torkel

    2016-01-01

    been to determine if there is a safety-in-numbers effect. There is safety-in-numbers if the number of accidents increases less than proportionally to traffic volume (for motor vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists). All studies reviewed in the paper are multivariate accident prediction models, estimating...... of the safety-in-numbers effect is defensible. According to a random-effects inverse-variance meta-analysis, the summary estimates of the regression coefficients for traffic volume are 0.50 for motor vehicle volume, 0.43 for cycle volume and 0.51 for pedestrian volume. Estimates are highly consistent between...... studies. It is concluded that a safety-in-numbers effect exists. It is still not clear whether this effect is causal, nor, if causal, which mechanisms generate the effect....

  8. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped A-type three-level atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a ∧-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave.We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number,peak position,and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum,but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum.

  9. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  10. Fast transport, atom sample splitting, and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays of optical microtraps

    CERN Document Server

    Schlosser, Malte; Gierl, Christian; Teichmann, Stephan; Tichelmann, Sascha; Birkl, Gerhard; 10.1088/1367-2630/14/12/123034

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of optical micro-traps created by microoptical elements present a versatile and scalable architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation, and the manipulation of ultra-cold quantum gases. In this article, we demonstrate advanced capabilities of this approach by introducing novel techniques and functionalities as well as the combined operation of previously separately implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more than one trap separation, examine the capabilities of rapid atom transport provided by acousto-optical beam steering, and analyze the adiabaticity limit for atom transport in these configurations. We implement a spatial light modulator with 8-bit transmission control for the per-site adjustment of the trap depth and the number of atoms loaded. We combine single-site addressing, trap depth control, and atom transport in one configuration for demonstrating the splitting of atom ensembles...

  11. Calculations for electron-impact ionization of beryllium in the method of interacting configurations in the complex number representation

    CERN Document Server

    Simulik, V M; Tymchyk, R V

    2016-01-01

    The beginning of the application of the method of interacting configurations in the complex number representation to the compound atomic systems has been presented. The spectroscopic characteristics of the Be atom in the problem of the electron-impact ionization of this atom are investigated. The energies and the widths of the lowest autoionizing states of Be atom are calculated.

  12. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10{sup 8}. The atoms of several tens of {mu}K degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  13. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 108. The atoms of several tens of μK degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  14. Numbers in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  15. Experimental Research of Spontaneous Evolution from Ultracold Rydberg Atoms to Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin-Jie; FENG Zhi-Gang; LI An-Ling; ZHAO Jian-Ming; LI Chang-Yong; JIA Suo-Tang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The spontaneous evolution from ultracold Rydberg atoms to plasma is investigated in a caesium MOT by using the method of field ionization. The plasma transferred from atoms in different Rydberg states (n = 22-32) are obtained experimentally. Dependence of the threshold time of evolving to plasma and the threshold number of initial Rydberg atoms on the principal quantum number of initial Rydberg states is studied. The experimental results are in agreement with hot-cold Rydberg-Rydberg atom collision ionization theory.

  16. The emergence of number

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, John N

    1987-01-01

    This book presents detailed studies of the development of three kinds of number. In the first part the development of the natural numbers from Stone-Age times right up to the present day is examined not only from the point of view of pure history but also taking into account archaeological, anthropological and linguistic evidence. The dramatic change caused by the introduction of logical theories of number in the 19th century is also treated and this part ends with a non-technical account of the very latest developments in the area of Gödel's theorem. The second part is concerned with the deve

  17. Advanced number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Harvey

    1980-01-01

    ""A very stimulating book ... in a class by itself."" - American Mathematical MonthlyAdvanced students, mathematicians and number theorists will welcome this stimulating treatment of advanced number theory, which approaches the complex topic of algebraic number theory from a historical standpoint, taking pains to show the reader how concepts, definitions and theories have evolved during the last two centuries. Moreover, the book abounds with numerical examples and more concrete, specific theorems than are found in most contemporary treatments of the subject.The book is divided into three parts

  18. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Edwin

    1998-01-01

    Careful organization and clear, detailed proofs characterize this methodical, self-contained exposition of basic results of classical algebraic number theory from a relatively modem point of view. This volume presents most of the number-theoretic prerequisites for a study of either class field theory (as formulated by Artin and Tate) or the contemporary treatment of analytical questions (as found, for example, in Tate's thesis).Although concerned exclusively with algebraic number fields, this treatment features axiomatic formulations with a considerable range of applications. Modem abstract te

  19. Elementary theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Sierpinski, Waclaw

    1988-01-01

    Since the publication of the first edition of this work, considerable progress has been made in many of the questions examined. This edition has been updated and enlarged, and the bibliography has been revised.The variety of topics covered here includes divisibility, diophantine equations, prime numbers (especially Mersenne and Fermat primes), the basic arithmetic functions, congruences, the quadratic reciprocity law, expansion of real numbers into decimal fractions, decomposition of integers into sums of powers, some other problems of the additive theory of numbers and the theory of Gaussian

  20. On powerful numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Mollin

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A powerful number is a positive integer n satisfying the property that p2 divides n whenever the prime p divides n; i.e., in the canonical prime decomposition of n, no prime appears with exponent 1. In [1], S.W. Golomb introduced and studied such numbers. In particular, he asked whether (25,27 is the only pair of consecutive odd powerful numbers. This question was settled in [2] by W.A. Sentance who gave necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such pairs. The first result of this paper is to provide a generalization of Sentance's result by giving necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of pairs of powerful numbers spaced evenly apart. This result leads us naturally to consider integers which are representable as a proper difference of two powerful numbers, i.e. n=p1−p2 where p1 and p2 are powerful numbers with g.c.d. (p1,p2=1. Golomb (op.cit. conjectured that 6 is not a proper difference of two powerful numbers, and that there are infinitely many numbers which cannot be represented as a proper difference of two powerful numbers. The antithesis of this conjecture was proved by W.L. McDaniel [3] who verified that every non-zero integer is in fact a proper difference of two powerful numbers in infinitely many ways. McDaniel's proof is essentially an existence proof. The second result of this paper is a simpler proof of McDaniel's result as well as an effective algorithm (in the proof for explicitly determining infinitely many such representations. However, in both our proof and McDaniel's proof one of the powerful numbers is almost always a perfect square (namely one is always a perfect square when n≢2(mod4. We provide in §2 a proof that all even integers are representable in infinitely many ways as a proper nonsquare difference; i.e., proper difference of two powerful numbers neither of which is a perfect square. This, in conjunction with the odd case in [4], shows that every integer is representable in

  1. Elementary number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dudley, Underwood

    2008-01-01

    Ideal for a first course in number theory, this lively, engaging text requires only a familiarity with elementary algebra and the properties of real numbers. Author Underwood Dudley, who has written a series of popular mathematics books, maintains that the best way to learn mathematics is by solving problems. In keeping with this philosophy, the text includes nearly 1,000 exercises and problems-some computational and some classical, many original, and some with complete solutions. The opening chapters offer sound explanations of the basics of elementary number theory and develop the fundamenta

  2. Projecting Livestock Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Rod; Gardiner, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) undertakes forecasts and projections of livestock numbers as part of the twice yearly contribution to The Treasury’s economic and fiscal updates. MAF’s Pastoral Supply Response Model (PSRM) was recently re-developed and used for the first time in the Budget Economic and Fiscal Update round of 2004. The PSRM projects annual inventory numbers as at 30 June, births and livestock numbers for slaughter. The paper discusses the PSRM, the post-model adj...

  3. Asymptotic Hurwitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mironov; Morozov, A; Natanzon, S.

    2012-01-01

    The classical Hurwitz numbers of degree n together with the Hurwitz numbers of the seamed surfaces of degree n give rise to the Klein topological field theory. We extend this construction to the Hurwitz numbers of all degrees at once. The corresponding Cardy-Frobenius algebra is induced by arbitrary Young diagrams and arbitrary bipartite graphs. It turns out to be isomorphic to the algebra of differential operators from arXiv:1210.6955 which serves a model for open-closed string theory. The o...

  4. Brief history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Corry, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The world around us is saturated with numbers. They are a fundamental pillar of our modern society, and accepted and used with hardly a second thought. But how did this state of affairs come to be? In this book, Leo Corry tells the story behind the idea of number from the early days of the Pythagoreans, up until the turn of the twentieth century. He presents an overview of how numbers were handled and conceived in classical Greek mathematics, in the mathematics of Islam, in European mathematics of the middle ages and the Renaissance, during the scientific revolution, all the way through to the

  5. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  6. Fundamentals of number theory

    CERN Document Server

    LeVeque, William J

    1996-01-01

    This excellent textbook introduces the basics of number theory, incorporating the language of abstract algebra. A knowledge of such algebraic concepts as group, ring, field, and domain is not assumed, however; all terms are defined and examples are given - making the book self-contained in this respect.The author begins with an introductory chapter on number theory and its early history. Subsequent chapters deal with unique factorization and the GCD, quadratic residues, number-theoretic functions and the distribution of primes, sums of squares, quadratic equations and quadratic fields, diopha

  7. Generalized Erdos Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Greg

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple real-valued generalization of the well known integer-valued Erdos number as a topological, non-metric measure of the `closeness' felt between two nodes in an undirected, weighted graph. These real-valued Erdos numbers are asymmetric and are able to distinguish between network topologies that standard distance metrics view as identical. We use this measure to study some simple analytically tractable networks, and show the utility of our measure to devise a ratings scheme based on the generalized Erdos number that we deploy on the data from the NetFlix prize, and find a significant improvement in our ratings prediction over a baseline.

  8. Numbers and computers

    CERN Document Server

    Kneusel, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    This is a book about numbers and how those numbers are represented in and operated on by computers. It is crucial that developers understand this area because the numerical operations allowed by computers, and the limitations of those operations, especially in the area of floating point math, affect virtually everything people try to do with computers. This book aims to fill this gap by exploring, in sufficient but not overwhelming detail, just what it is that computers do with numbers. Divided into two parts, the first deals with standard representations of integers and floating point numb

  9. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Suetens, S.; Tyran, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the “law of small numbers” using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in th...

  10. Coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from Raman output coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyong He; Chunjia Huang

    2009-01-01

    The coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from a Raman output coupler,in which the sodium atoms in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) intcract with two light beams consisting of a weaker squeezed coherent probe light and a stronger classical coupling light,is investigated.The results show that in the case of a large mean number of BEC atoms and a weaker probe light field,the atom laser is antibunching,and this atom laser is second-order coherent if the number of BEC atoms in traps is large enough.

  11. Gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason

    2016-05-01

    The advent of gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe. Low frequency gravitational waves below 10 Hz are expected to offer rich science opportunities both in astrophysics and cosmology, complementary to signals in LIGO's band. Detector designs based on atom interferometry have a number of advantages over traditional approaches in this band, including the possibility of substantially reduced antenna baseline length in space and high isolation from seismic noise for a terrestrial detector. In particular, atom interferometry based on the clock transition in group II atoms offers tantalizing new possibilities. Such a design is expected to be highly immune to laser frequency noise because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This would allow for a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry in a 10-meter drop tower has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 50 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  12. Atomic displacements in bcc dilute alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hitesh Sharma; S Prakash

    2007-04-01

    We present here a systematic investigation of the atomic displacements in bcc transition metal (TM) dilute alloys. We have calculated the atomic displacements in bcc (V, Cr, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta and W) transition metals (TMs) due to 3d, 4d and 5d TMs at the substitutional site using the Kanzaki lattice static method. Wills and Harrison interatomic potential is used to calculate the atomic force constants, the dynamical matrix and the impurity-induced forces. We have thoroughly investigated the atomic displacements using impurities from 3d, 4d and 5d series in the same host metal and the same impurity in different hosts. We have observed a systematic pattern in the atomic displacements for Cr-, Fe-, Nb-, Mo-, Ta- and W-based dilute alloys. The atomic displacements are found to increase with increase in the number of d electrons for all alloys considered except for V dilute alloys. The 3d impurities are found to be more easily dissolved in the 3d host metals than 4d or 5d TMs whereas 4d and 5d impurities show more solubility in 4d and 5d TMs. In general, the relaxation energy calculation suggests that impurities may be easily solvable in 5d TM hosts when compared to 3d or 4d TMs.

  13. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  14. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  15. A curved line search algorithm for atomic structure relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhanghui; Wang, Linwang; Li, Jingbo; Li, Shushen

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio atomic relaxations often take large numbers of steps and long times to converge. An atomic relaxation method based on on-the-flight force learning and a corresponding new curved line minimization algorithm is presented to dramatically accelerate this process. Results for metal clusters demonstrate the significant speedup of this method compared with conventional conjugate-gradient method.

  16. Interaction-Free Measurements, Atom Localisation and Complementarity

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anders; Bjork, Gunnar; Forsberg, Erik

    1997-01-01

    We analyse interaction-free measurements on classical and quantum objects. We show the transition from a classical interaction free measurement to a quantum non-demolition measurement of atom number, and discuss the mechanism of the enforcement of complementarity in atom interferometric interaction-free measurements.

  17. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  18. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  19. Asymmetric sequential Landau-Zener dynamics of Bose condensed atoms in a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jiahao; Qin, Xizhou; Zhong, Honghua; Lee, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    We explore the asymmetric sequential Landau-Zener (LZ) dynamics in an ensemble of interacting Bose condensed two-level atoms coupled with a cavity field. Assuming the couplings between all atoms and the cavity field are identical, the interplay between atom-atom interaction and detuning may lead to a series of LZ transitions. Unlike the conventional sequential LZ transitions, which are symmetric to the zero detuning, the LZ transitions of Bose condensed atoms in a cavity field are asymmetric and sensitively depend on the photon number distribution of the cavity. In LZ processes involving single excitation numbers, both the variance of the relative atom number and the step slope of the sequential population ladder are asymmetric, and the asymmetry become more significant for smaller excitation numbers. Furthermore, in LZ processes involving multiple excitation numbers, there may appear asymmetric population ladders with decreasing step heights. During a dynamical LZ process, due to the atom-cavity coupling, th...

  20. SEVIS By the Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — SEVIS by the Numbers is a quarterly report that highlights nonimmigrant student and exchange visitor trends, values and information using data from the Student and...

  1. Solar Indices - Sunspot Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  2. Genetics by the Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Genetics by the Numbers By Chelsea Toledo and Kirstie ... June 11, 2012 Scholars have been studying modern genetics since the mid-19th century, but even today ...

  3. Really big numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2014-01-01

    In the American Mathematical Society's first-ever book for kids (and kids at heart), mathematician and author Richard Evan Schwartz leads math lovers of all ages on an innovative and strikingly illustrated journey through the infinite number system. By means of engaging, imaginative visuals and endearing narration, Schwartz manages the monumental task of presenting the complex concept of Big Numbers in fresh and relatable ways. The book begins with small, easily observable numbers before building up to truly gigantic ones, like a nonillion, a tredecillion, a googol, and even ones too huge for names! Any person, regardless of age, can benefit from reading this book. Readers will find themselves returning to its pages for a very long time, perpetually learning from and growing with the narrative as their knowledge deepens. Really Big Numbers is a wonderful enrichment for any math education program and is enthusiastically recommended to every teacher, parent and grandparent, student, child, or other individual i...

  4. Quantum random number generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  5. Teleportation of Atomic States for Atoms in a Lambda Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss a scheme of teleportation of atomic states making use of three-level lambda atoms. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity QED involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in a coherent state. We start presenting a scheme to prepare atomic EPR states involving two-level atoms via the interaction of these atoms with a cavity. In our scheme the cavity and some atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to achieve the teleportation.

  6. Methods explained: Index numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Goodridge

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to explain the subtle differences in the methodologies used to construct index numbers.Many of the statistics produced by the Office for National Statistics,particularly economic statistics, are published in the form ofindices. However, there are a number of different forms of indices and this article attempts to explain the subtle differences in themethodologies used to construct them, and also factors that feed into the choice of which type of index to use. Hypothetical examplesare...

  7. Fibonacci's Forgotten Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ezra; Brunson, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Fibonacci's forgotten number is the sexagesimal number 1;22,7,42,33,4,40, which he described in 1225 as an approximation to the real root of x[superscript 3] + 2x[superscript 2] + 10x - 20. In decimal notation, this is 1.36880810785...and it is correct to nine decimal digits. Fibonacci did not reveal his method. How did he do it? There is also a…

  8. CT number definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of CT number plots has been found lacking in several medical applications. This is of concern since the ability to compare and evaluate results on a reproducible and standard basis is essential to long term development. Apart from the technical limitations arising from the CT scanner and the data treatment, there are fundamental issues with the definition of the Hounsfield number, namely the absence of a standard photon energy and the need to specify the attenuation mechanism for standard measurements. This paper presents calculations to demonstrate the shortcomings of the present definition with a brief discussion. The remedy is straightforward, but probably of long duration as it would require an international agreement. - Highlights: ► The dependence of the CT number definition on photon energy is examined. ► Graphical examples of the CT number variation with photon energy are given. ► The influence of absorption edges and scattering on CT numbers is discussed. ► A proposal is made for an international standard devoted to CT number evaluation.

  9. Single-atom spintronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susan Z. HUA; Matthew R. SULLIVAN; Jason N. ARMSTRONG

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on magnetic quantum point contacts (QPCs) was discussed. Complete magnetoresistance loops across Co QPCs as small as a single atom was measured. The remarkable feature of these QPCs is the rapid oscillatory decay in magnetoresistance with the increase of contact size. In addition,stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops are observed,resulting from varying transmission probability of the available discrete conductance channels because the sample is cycled between the ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) aligned states. Quantized conductance combined with spin dependent transmission of electron waves gives rise to a multi-channel system with a quantum domain wall acting as a valve,i.e.,a quantum spin-valve. Behavior of a few-atom QPC is built on the behavior of a single-atom QPC and hence the summarization of results as 'single-atom spintronics'. An evolutionary trace of spin-dependent electron transmission from a single atom to bulk is provided,the requisite hallmarks of artefact-free magnetoresistance is established across a QPC - stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops and size dependent oscillatory magnetoresistance.

  10. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  11. Quantum magnetism through atomic assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinelli, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of magnetic structures, composed of only a few atoms. Those structures are first built atom-by-atom and then locally probed, both with a low-temperature STM. The technique that we use to assemble them is vertical atom manipulation, while to study their phy

  12. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  13. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  14. Report number codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name

  15. Report number codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  16. Atoms in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this book the history of development of using of nuclear energy in the Slovak Republic as well as in the Czechoslovakia (before 1993 year) is presented. The aim of the book is to preserve the memory of the period when the creation and development of nuclear physics, technology, nuclear medicine, radioecology and energetics in Slovakia occurred - as witnessed by people who experienced this period and to adapt it to future generations. The Editorial board of the SNUS collected the views of 60 contributors and distinguished workers - Slovakian experts in nuclear science, education and technology. Calling upon a wide spectrum of experts ensured an objective historical description of the period. A huge amount of subjective views on recent decades were collected and supported by a wealth of photographic documentation. This created a synthesised reflection on the history of the 'atoms' in Slovakia. The book contains 15 tables, 192 black and white and 119 colour pictures from around the world and from places involved in the compilation of the study and with the study of atomic science in Slovakia. The main chapters are as follows: Atoms in the world, Atoms in Slovakia, Atoms in the educational system, Atoms in health services (Radiology, Nuclear medicine, Radiation protection, the Cyclotron centre of the Slovak Republic), Radioecology, Other applications of irradiation, Nuclear energetics (Electric energy in the second half of the 20th century, NPP Bohunice, NPP Mochovce, the back-end of Nuclear energetics, Big names in Nuclear energetics in Slovakia), Chronology and an Appendix entitled 'Slovak companies in nuclear energetics'

  17. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, the same cloud can be imaged up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This paves the way towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  18. Atomic and molecular collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    530Accomplishments during the course of a 44-month program of code development and high precision calculations for electron collisions with atoms, atomic ions, and molecules are summarized. In electron-atom and -ion collisions, we were primarily concerned with the fundamental physics of the process that controls excitation in high temperature plasmas. In the molecular work, we pursued the development of techniques for accurate calculations of ro-vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules, to the modeling of gas-phase laser systems. Highlights from the seven technical paper published as a result of this contract include: The resolution of a long history of unexplained anomalies and experimental/theoretical discrepancies by a demonstration that the Coulomb phase must be included in scattering amplitudes for electron-ion collisions. Definitive close-coupling calculations of cross sections for electron impact excitation of Be+, using a very elaborate expansion for the collision system and inclusion of both one- and two-body terms for the effect of core polarization. Detailed state-of-the-art calculations for electron-impact excitation of the sodium-like ion A ell 2+ that included core-polarization interactions, and which also produced new data on bound-state energy levels for the magnesium-like ion A ell + and oscillator strengths for A ell 2+. Partial cross sections for excitation of the 3p level of sodium at energies just above threshold calculated using a four-state close-coupling approach, including both total cross sections and those for excitation as a function of the change in the spin and orbital angular momentum projection quantum numbers of the target electron. Generalization of our electron-molecule scattering code to carry out full vibrational close-coupling calculations with an exact treatment of exchange and with a parameter-free representation of correlation and polarization interactions, and application to HF and H2

  19. Polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, N.; Crowe, D.M.; Lubell, M.S.; Tang, F.C.; Vasilakis, A.; Mulligan, F.J.; Slevin, J.

    1988-12-01

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the beam at all points along its path. As a subsidiary result, we also present measurements of the relative and absolute efficiencies of the V/G Supavac mass analyzer for masses 1 and 2.

  20. D^- mesic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    García Recio, Carmen; Nieves Pamplona, Juan Miguel; Salcedo, Lorenzo Luis; Tolós Rigueiro, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The anti-D meson self-energy is evaluated self-consistently, using unitarized coupled-channel theory, by computing the in-medium meson-baryon T-matrix in the C=-1,S=0 sector. The heavy pseudo-scalar and heavy vector mesons, anti-D and anti-D^*, are treated on equal footing as required by heavy quark spin symmetry. Results for energy levels and widths of D^- mesic atoms in 12C, 40Ca, 118Sn and 208Pb are presented. The spectrum contains states of atomic and of nuclear types for all nuclei. anti...

  1. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  2. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  3. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  4. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  5. Drawing a random number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Jørgen Bundgaard; Sørensen, Majken Vildrik

    2006-01-01

    Random numbers are used for a great variety of applications in almost any field of computer and economic sciences today. Examples ranges from stock market forecasting in economics, through stochastic traffic modelling in operations research to photon and ray tracing in graphics. The construction...... of a model or a solution method requires certain characteristics of the random numbers used. This is usually a distribution classification, which the sequence of random numbers must fulfill; of these some are very hard to fulfill and others are next to impossible. Today mathematics allows us to transform...... distributions into others with most of the required characteristics. In essence, a uniform sequence which is transformed into a new sequence with the required distribution. The subject of this article is to consider the well known highly uniform Halton sequence and modifications to it. The intent is to generate...

  6. The LHC in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    What makes the LHC the biggest particle accelerator in the world? Here are some of the numbers that characterise the LHC, and their equivalents in terms that are easier for us to imagine.   Feature Number Equivalent Circumference ~ 27 km   Distance covered by beam in 10 hours ~ 10 billion km a round trip to Neptune Number of times a single proton travels around the ring each second 11 245   Speed of protons first entering the LHC 299 732 500 m/s 99.9998 % of the speed of light Speed of protons when they collide 299 789 760 m/s 99.9999991 % of the speed of light Collision temperature ~ 1016 °C ove...

  7. Cavity-aided magnetic-resonance microscopy of atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, Tom P; Brooks, Daniel W C; Botter, Thierry; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for investigating the microscopic properties and dynamics of physical systems. In this work we demonstrate state-sensitive MRI of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Single-shot spatial resolution is 120 nm, well below the lattice spacing, and number sensitivity is +/-2.4 for 150 atoms on a single site, well below Poissonian atom-number fluctuations. We achieve this by combining high-spatial-resolution control over the atomic spin using an atom chip, together with nearly quantum-limited spin measurement, obtained by dispersively coupling the atoms to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. The MRI is minimally disruptive of the atoms' internal state, preserving the magnetisation of the gas for subsequent experiments. Using this technique, we observe the nonequilibrium transport dynamics of the atoms among individual lattice sites. We see the atom cloud initially expand ballistically, followed by the onset of interaction-inhibited transport.

  8. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  9. Algebraic theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Algebraic number theory introduces students not only to new algebraic notions but also to related concepts: groups, rings, fields, ideals, quotient rings and quotient fields, homomorphisms and isomorphisms, modules, and vector spaces. Author Pierre Samuel notes that students benefit from their studies of algebraic number theory by encountering many concepts fundamental to other branches of mathematics - algebraic geometry, in particular.This book assumes a knowledge of basic algebra but supplements its teachings with brief, clear explanations of integrality, algebraic extensions of fields, Gal

  10. CONFUSION WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Telecom Service

    2002-01-01

    he area code is now required for all telephone calls within Switzerland. Unfortunately this is causing some confusion. CERN has received complaints that incoming calls intended for CERN mobile phones are being directed to private subscribers. This is caused by mistakenly dialing the WRONG code (e.g. 022) in front of the mobile number. In order to avoid these problems, please inform your correspondents that the correct numbers are: 079 201 XXXX from Switzerland; 0041 79 201 XXXX from other countries. Telecom Service

  11. CONFUSION WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Telecom Service

    2002-01-01

    The area code is now required for all telephone calls within Switzerland. Unfortunately this is causing some confusion. CERN has received complaints that incoming calls intended for CERN mobile phones are being directed to private subscribers. This is caused by mistakenly dialing the WRONG code (e.g. 022) in front of the mobile number. In order to avoid these problems, please inform your correspondents that the correct numbers are: 079 201 XXXX from Switzerland; 0041 79 201 XXXX from other countries. Telecom Service  

  12. Geometry of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Peter M

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains a fairly complete picture of the geometry of numbers, including relations to other branches of mathematics such as analytic number theory, diophantine approximation, coding and numerical analysis. It deals with convex or non-convex bodies and lattices in euclidean space, etc.This second edition was prepared jointly by P.M. Gruber and the author of the first edition. The authors have retained the existing text (with minor corrections) while adding to each chapter supplementary sections on the more recent developments. While this method may have drawbacks, it has the definit

  13. Fluorescence detection at the atom shot noise limit for atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Emanuele; Valenzuela, Tristan; Boyer, Vincent; Freise, Andreas; Bongs, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Atom interferometers are promising tools for precision measurement with applications ranging from geophysical exploration to tests of the equivalence principle of general relativity, or the detection of gravitational waves. Their optimal sensitivity is ultimately limited by their detection noise. We review resonant and near-resonant methods to detect the atom number of the interferometer outputs and we theoretically analyze the relative influence of various scheme dependent noise sources and the technical challenges affecting the detection. We show that for the typical conditions under which an atom interferometer operates, simultaneous fluorescence detection with a CCD sensor is the optimal imaging scheme. We extract the laser beam parameters such as detuning, intensity, and duration, required for reaching the atom shot noise limit.

  14. Equilibrium vortex lattices of a binary rotating atomic Bose-Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Chen, Guang-Ping; Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang; Zhang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-10-01

    We perform a detailed numerical study of the equilibrium ground-state structures of a binary rotating Bose-Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses. Our results show that the ground-state distribution and its related vortex configurations are complex events that differ markedly depending strongly on the strength of rotation frequency, as well as on the ratio of atomic masses. We also discuss the structures and radii of the clouds, the number and the size of the core region of the vortices, as a function of the rotation frequency, and of the ratio of atomic masses, and the analytical results agree well with our numerical simulations. This work may open an alternate way in the quantum control of the binary rotating quantum gases with unequal atomic masses.

  15. Atoms, molecules and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hertel, Ingolf V

    2015-01-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginner...

  16. Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2007-08-04

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial

  17. Baryon Number Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, K S; Al-Binni, U; Banerjee, S; Baxter, D V; Berezhiani, Z; Bergevin, M; Bhattacharya, S; Brice, S; Brock, R; Burgess, T W; Castellanos, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M-C; Church, E; Coppola, C E; Cowen, D F; Cowsik, R; Crabtree, J A; Davoudiasl, H; Dermisek, R; Dolgov, A; Dutta, B; Dvali, G; Ferguson, P; Perez, P Fileviez; Gabriel, T; Gal, A; Gallmeier, F; Ganezer, K S; Gogoladze, I; Golubeva, E S; Graves, V B; Greene, G; Handler, T; Hartfiel, B; Hawari, A; Heilbronn, L; Hill, J; Jaffe, D; Johnson, C; Jung, C K; Kamyshkov, Y; Kerbikov, B; Kopeliovich, B Z; Kopeliovich, V B; Korsch, W; Lachenmaier, T; Langacker, P; Liu, C-Y; Marciano, W J; Mocko, M; Mohapatra, R N; Mokhov, N; Muhrer, G; Mumm, P; Nath, P; Obayashi, Y; Okun, L; Pati, J C; Pattie, R W; Phillips, D G; Quigg, C; Raaf, J L; Raby, S; Ramberg, E; Ray, A; Roy, A; Ruggles, A; Sarkar, U; Saunders, A; Serebrov, A; Shafi, Q; Shimizu, H; Shiozawa, M; Shrock, R; Sikdar, A K; Snow, W M; Soha, A; Spanier, S; Stavenga, G C; Striganov, S; Svoboda, R; Tang, Z; Tavartkiladze, Z; Townsend, L; Tulin, S; Vainshtein, A; Van Kooten, R; Wagner, C E M; Wang, Z; Wehring, B; Wilson, R J; Wise, M; Yokoyama, M; Young, A R

    2013-01-01

    This report, prepared for the Community Planning Study - Snowmass 2013 - summarizes the theoretical motivations and the experimental efforts to search for baryon number violation, focussing on nucleon decay and neutron-antineutron oscillations. Present and future nucleon decay search experiments using large underground detectors, as well as planned neutron-antineutron oscillation search experiments with free neutron beams are highlighted.

  18. The magic of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Eric Temple

    1991-01-01

    From one of the foremost interpreters for lay readers of the history and meaning of mathematics: a stimulating account of the origins of mathematical thought and the development of numerical theory. It probes the work of Pythagoras, Galileo, Berkeley, Einstein, and others, exploring how ""number magic"" has influenced religion, philosophy, science, and mathematics

  19. Safety in glomerular numbers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    A low nephron number is, according to Brenner's hyperfiltration hypothesis, associated with hypertension, glomerular damage and proteinuria, and starts a vicious cycle that ends in renal failure over the long term. Nephron endowment is set during foetal life, and there is no formation of nephrons af

  20. Surveys in Number Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alladi, Krishnaswami

    2008-01-01

    Contains chapters on number theory and related topics. This title covers topics that focus on multipartitions, congruences and identities, the formulas of Koshliakov and Guinand in Ramanujan's "Lost Notebook", alternating sign matrices and the Weyl character formulas, theta functions in complex analysis, and elliptic functions

  1. Are Occupation Numbers Observable?

    OpenAIRE

    Furnstahl, R. J.; Hammer, H. -W.

    2001-01-01

    The question of whether occupation numbers and momentum distributions of nucleons in nuclei are observables is considered from an effective field theory perspective. Field redefinitions lead to variations that imply the answer is negative, as illustrated in the interacting Fermi gas at low density. Implications for the interpretation of (e,e'p) experiments with nuclei are discussed.

  2. ALARA notes, Number 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the 'tyranny' of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment

  3. Extracting Atoms on Demand with Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mohring, B; Haug, F; Morigi, G; Schleich, W P; Raizen, M G; Mohring, Bernd; Bienert, Marc; Haug, Florian; Morigi, Giovanna; Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Raizen, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a scheme that allows to coherently extract cold atoms from a reservoir in a deterministic way. The transfer is achieved by means of radiation pulses coupling two atomic states which are object to different trapping conditions. A particular realization is proposed, where one state has zero magnetic moment and is confined by a dipole trap, whereas the other state with non-vanishing magnetic moment is confined by a steep microtrap potential. We show that in this setup a predetermined number of atoms can be transferred from a reservoir, a Bose-Einstein condensate, into the collective quantum state of the steep trap with high efficiency in the parameter regime of present experiments.

  4. Secondary laser cooling of strontium-88 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Khabarova, K. Yu., E-mail: kseniakhabarova@gmail.com; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise “All-Russia Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements” (VNIIFTRI) (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The secondary laser cooling of a cloud of strontium-88 atoms on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) intercombination transition captured into a magneto-optical trap has been demonstrated. We describe in detail the recapture of atoms from the primary trap operating on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 1}P{sub 1} (461 nm) transition and determine the recapture coefficient κ, the number of atoms, and their temperature in the secondary trap as a function of experimental parameters. A temperature of 2 µK has been reached in the secondary trap at the recapture coefficient κ = 6%, which confirms the secondary cooling efficiency and is sufficient to perform metrological measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (698 nm) clock transition in an optical lattice.

  5. Realization of Green MOT for Ytterbium Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LONG Yun; HE Ling-Xiang; L(U) Bao-Long

    2009-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of 174Yb atoms operating on the 1S0-3p1 intercombination transition at 555.8 nm.The green MOT is loaded by a Zeeman-slowed atomic beam.In order to increase the capture velocity of the MOT,we use the trapping laser beams consisting of five discrete frequency components obtained by modulating the laser light through an electro-optic modulator.The trapped atomic number of the 174 Yb isotope is about 6.2×105,and the temperature of the cold atowic cloud is estimated to be about 100 μK.The success of the green MOT is an important step towards the goad of an ytterbium optical dock.

  6. Quantum state control of trapped Holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James; Yip, Christopher; Milner, William; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey; Saffman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Neutral Holmium with its large number of hyperfine ground states provides a promising approach for collective encoding of a multi-qubit register. A prerequisite for collective encoding is the ability to prepare different states in the 128 state hyperfine ground manifold. We report progress towards optical pumping and control of the hyperfine Zeeman state of trapped Ho atoms. Atoms are transferred from a 410.5 nm MOT into a 455 nm optical dipole trap. The atoms can be optically pumped using light driving the ground 6s2 , F = 11 to 6 s 6 p ,F' = 11 transition together with a F = 10 to F' = 11 repumper. Microwave fields are then used to drive transitions to hyperfine levels with 4 <= F <= 11 . Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  7. Enhanced atom interferometry through quantum information science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark; Benton, Brandon; Krygier, Michael; Clark, Charles

    2011-05-01

    New designs for atom interferometers can be inspired by quantum information science (QIS). QIS-inspired atom interferometer (AI) designs have the potential for producing AIs with enhanced sensitivity and robustness. We compare the sensitivity of a standard Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) Bragg AI with an AI whose design is based on the idea of decoherence-free subspaces (DFS). We studied the performance of both atom interferometers using an enhanced version of a previously developed Bragg interferometer prototyping model. This model approximates the effect on the condensate of multiple Bragg pulses separated by time delays using two elements: the effect of a single pulse and condensate evolution between pulses. The overall effect is rapidly approximated by following the steps of the interferometric process. We describe this model and then present the comparison of the performance of the M-Z interferometer with that of the DFS-inspired interferometer. Support provided by NSF grant number PHY-0758111.

  8. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  9. Standard Model tests with trapped radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A; 10.1088/0954-3899/36/3/033101

    2009-01-01

    We review the use of laser cooling and trapping for Standard Model tests, focusing on trapping of radioactive isotopes. Experiments with neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques are testing several basic predictions of electroweak unification. For nuclear $\\beta$ decay, demonstrated trap techniques include neutrino momentum measurements from beta-recoil coincidences, along with methods to produce highly polarized samples. These techniques have set the best general constraints on non-Standard Model scalar interactions in the first generation of particles. They also have the promise to test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, to search for tensor interactions, and to search for new sources of time reversal violation. There are also possibilites for exotic particle searches. Measurements of the strength of the weak neutral current can be assisted by precision atomic experiments using traps of small numbers of radioactive atoms, and sensitivity to possible time-reversal violating elec...

  10. Mie resonances in inhomogeneous atomic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, Romain; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Despite the quantum nature of the process, collective scattering by dense cold samples of two-level atoms can be interpreted classically describing the sample as a macroscopic object with a complex refractive index. We demonstrate that Mie resonances can be easily observable in the cooperative scattering by tuning the frequency of the incident laser field or the atomic number. The solution of the scattering problem is obtained for spherical atomic clouds who have the parabolic density characteristic of BECs, and the cooperative radiation pressure force calculated exhibits resonances in the cloud displacement for dense clouds. Reminescent to uniform clouds which show a complex structure of narrow peaks, these densities show resonances, yet under the form of quite regular and contrasted oscillations.

  11. Superposition of Stationary Wave Fields Via Atom Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizbullah; Ali, khan Anwar; Khan, Naveed; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Amin Bacha, Bakht

    2015-03-01

    We investigate one-dimensional position microscopy of a three-level atom moving through a stationary wave region under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency. The precise position information of an atom is observed on the resonance absorption and dispersion distribution spectrum of a weak probe field. Single and multiple localization peaks are observed in specific directions of the corresponding wave numbers and phase of the standing wave fields. The strength of space-independent Rabi frequency reduces the position uncertainty in the localized peaks without disturbing the probability of the atom. In a hot atomic medium the localized probability of an atom is reduced which depends upon the temperature of that medium. Our results provide useful applications in the development of laser cooling, atom nanolithography and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  12. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  13. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure and collision phenomena of highly stripped ions in the range Z = 6 to 35 were studied. Charge-transfer and multiple-electron-loss cross sections were determined. Absolute x-ray-production cross sections for incident heavy ions were measured. 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Conformal atoms in Supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we summarize recent attempts to construct holographic models of atoms and lattices in the context of applications to solid state physics. The simplest setup turned out to impose strong constraints on the choice of matter interactions of dual gravitational theory.

  15. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  16. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  17. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  18. Chiral atomically thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  19. Bonds Between Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  20. Transition probabilities for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current status of advanced theoretical methods for transition probabilities for atoms and ions is discussed. An experiment on the f values of the resonance transitions of the Kr and Xe isoelectronic sequences is suggested as a test for the theoretical methods

  1. An Atom Counting QSPR Protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, S; Chattaraj, P K; Roy, D R; Subramanian, V

    2006-01-01

    A deceptively simple descriptor, viz. the number of carbon / non-hydrogenic atoms present in a molecule, is proposed for the development of useful quantitative-structure-property-relationship (QSPR) models. It is tested in models pertaining to the estimation of boiling point of alcohols, enthalpy of vaporization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), n-octanol / water partition coefficient of PCBs and chloroanisoles, pKa values of carboxylic acids, phenols and alcohols etc. Very high values of various regression coefficients (R2, R2CV, R2Ad) suggest the significance of this descriptor which further improves in the resulting two-parameter QSPR models with electrophilicity or its local variant as an additional descriptor.

  2. Halo Tracing with Atomic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Merrifield, M R

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the constraints that can be placed on the shapes of disk galaxies' dark halos using the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen. These data indicate that dark halos are close to axisymmetric, with their axes of symmetry co-aligned with their disk axes. They also appear to be oblate, with shortest-to-longest axis ratios displaying quite a broad range of values from ~0.2 to ~0.8. These results are consistent with the predicted shapes of halos in cold dark matter scenarios, but rule out some of the more exotic dark matter candidates. However, the total number of measurements is still depressingly small, and more data are required if halo shape is to become a powerful diagnostic for theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  3. Two Symmetric Properties of Mersenne Numbers and Fermat Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Yongjin, Shi

    2013-01-01

    Mersenne numbers and Fermat numbers are two hot and difficult issues in number theory. This paper constructs a special group for every positive odd number other than 1, and discovers an algorithm for determining the multiplicative order of 2 modulo q for each positive odd number q. It is worth mentioning that this paper discovers two symmetric properties of Mersenne numbers and Fermat numbers.

  4. Coherent and incoherent dipole-dipole interactions between atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2016-05-01

    Results will be presented on the collective interaction between atoms due to the electric dipole-dipole coupling between states of different parity on two different atoms. A canonical example of this effect is when the electronic state of one atom has S-character and the state of another atom has P-character. The energy difference between the two states plays an important role in the interaction since the change in energy determines the wave number of a photon that would cause a transition between the states. If the atoms are much closer than the wave length of this photon, then the dipole-dipole interaction is in the near field and has a 1 /r3 dependence on atomic separation. If the atoms are farther apart than the wave length, then the interaction is in the far field and has a 1 / r dependence. When many atoms interact, collective effects can dominate the system with the character of the collective effect depending on whether the atomic separation leads to near field or far field coupling. As an example of the case where the atoms are in the far field, the line broadening of transitions and strong deviations from the Beer-Lambert law in a diffuse gas will be presented. As an example of near field collective behavior, the radiative properties of a Rydberg gas will be presented. Based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1404419-PHY in collaboration with R.T. Sutherland.

  5. Million atom DFT calculations using coarse graining and petascale computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Don; Odbadrakh, Kh.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stoller, R. E.; Zhang, X. G.; Stocks, G. M.

    2014-03-01

    Researchers performing classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) on defect structures often find it necessary to use millions of atoms in their models. It would be useful to perform density functional calculations on these large configurations in order to observe electron-based properties such as local charge and spin and the Helmann-Feynman forces on the atoms. The great number of atoms usually requires that a subset be ``carved'' from the configuration and terminated in a less that satisfactory manner, e.g. free space or inappropriate periodic boundary conditions. Coarse graining based on the Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering method (LSMS) and petascale computing can circumvent this problem by treating the whole system but dividing the atoms into two groups. In Coarse Grained LSMS (CG-LSMS) one group of atoms has its charge and scattering determined prescriptively based on neighboring atoms while the remaining group of atoms have their charge and scattering determined according to DFT as implemented in the LSMS. The method will be demonstrated for a one-million-atom model of a displacement cascade in Fe for which 24,130 atoms are treated with full DFT and the remaining atoms are treated prescriptively. Work supported as part of Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, used Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, Oak Ridge National Lab, of DOE Office of Science.

  6. General model of depolarization and transfer of polarization of singly ionized atoms by collisions with hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of the generation of the atomic polarization is necessary for interpreting the second solar spectrum. For this purpose, it is important to rigorously determine the effects of the isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen on the atomic polarization of the neutral atoms, ionized atoms and molecules. Our aim is to treat in generality the problem of depolarizing isotropic collisions between singly ionized atoms and neutral hydrogen in its ground state. Using our numerical code, we computed the collisional depolarization rates of the $p$-levels of ions for large number of values of the effective principal quantum number $n^{*}$ and the Uns\\"old energy $E_p$. Then, genetic programming has been utilized to fit the available depolarization rates. As a result, strongly non-linear relationships between the collisional depolarization rates, $n^{*}$ and $E_p$ are obtained, and are shown to reproduce the original data with accuracy clearly better than 10\\%. These relationships allow quick calculations of the ...

  7. Calling Dunbar's Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    MacCarron, Pádraig; Dunbar, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The social brain hypothesis predicts that humans have an average of about 150 relationships at any given time. Within this 150, there are layers of friends of an ego, where the number of friends in a layer increases as the emotional closeness decreases. Here we analyse a mobile phone dataset, firstly, to ascertain whether layers of friends can be identified based on call frequency. We then apply different clustering algorithms to break the call frequency of egos into clusters and compare the number of alters in each cluster with the layer size predicted by the social brain hypothesis. In this dataset we find strong evidence for the existence of a layered structure. The clustering yields results that match well with previous studies for the innermost and outermost layers, but for layers in between we observe large variability.

  8. Homoroot integer numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Hooshmand

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we first define homorooty between two integer numbers and study some of their properties. There after we shall state some applications of the homorooty in studying and solving some Diophantine equations and systems, as an interesting anduseful elementary method. Also by the homorooty, we state and prove the necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of finite solutions in a special case of the quartic equation and evaluate the bounds of its solutions.

  9. Permutation-invariant distance between atomic configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferré, Grégoire; Maillet, Jean-Bernard [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Stoltz, Gabriel [Université Paris-Est, CERMICS (ENPC), INRIA, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2015-09-14

    We present a permutation-invariant distance between atomic configurations, defined through a functional representation of atomic positions. This distance enables us to directly compare different atomic environments with an arbitrary number of particles, without going through a space of reduced dimensionality (i.e., fingerprints) as an intermediate step. Moreover, this distance is naturally invariant through permutations of atoms, avoiding the time consuming associated minimization required by other common criteria (like the root mean square distance). Finally, the invariance through global rotations is accounted for by a minimization procedure in the space of rotations solved by Monte Carlo simulated annealing. A formal framework is also introduced, showing that the distance we propose verifies the property of a metric on the space of atomic configurations. Two examples of applications are proposed. The first one consists in evaluating faithfulness of some fingerprints (or descriptors), i.e., their capacity to represent the structural information of a configuration. The second application concerns structural analysis, where our distance proves to be efficient in discriminating different local structures and even classifying their degree of similarity.

  10. Atomic processes in matter-antimatter interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic processes dominate antiproton stopping in matter at nearly all energies of interest. They significantly influence or determine the antiproton annihilation rate at all energies around or below several MeV. This article reviews what is known about these atomic processes. For stopping above about 10 eV the processes are antiproton-electron collisions, effective at medium keV through high MeV energies, and elastic collisions with atoms and adiabatic ionization of atoms, effective from medium eV through low keB energies. For annihilation above about 10 eV is the enhancement of the antiproton annihilation rate due to the antiproton-nucleus coulomb attraction, effective around and below a few tens of MeV. At about 10 eV and below, the atomic rearrangement/annihilation process determines both the stopping and annihilation rates. Although a fair amount of theoretical and some experimental work relevant to these processes exist, there are a number of energy ranges and material types for which experimental data does not exist and for which the theoretical information is not as well grounded or as accurate as desired. Additional experimental and theoretical work is required for accurate prediction of antiproton stopping and annihilation for energies and material relevant to antiproton experimentation and application

  11. THz Detection and Imaging using Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Christopher; Sibalic, Nikola; Kondo, Jorge; de Melo, Natalia; Adams, Charles; Weatherill, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Atoms make excellent electromagnetic field sensors because each atom of the same isotope is identical and has well-studied, permanent properties allowing calibration to SI units. Thus far, atoms have not generally been exploited for terahertz detection because transitions from the atomic ground state are constrained to a limited selection of microwave and optical frequencies. In contrast, highly excited `Rydberg' states allow us access to many strong, electric dipole transitions from the RF to THz regimes. Recent advances in the coherent optical detection of Rydberg atoms have been exploited by a number of groups for precision microwave electrometry Here we report the demonstration of a room-temperature, cesium Rydberg gas as a THz to optical interface. We present two configurations: First, THz-induced fluorescence offers non-destructive and direct imaging of the THz field, providing real-time, single shot images. Second, we convert narrowband terahertz photons to infrared photons with 6% quantum efficiency allowing us to use nano-Watts of THz power to control micro-Watts of laser power on microsecond timescales. Exploiting hysteresis and a room-temperature phase transition in the response of the medium, we demonstrate a latching optical memory for sub pico-Joule THz pulses.

  12. Quantum Effects of Many Atoms in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; LIANG Jiu-Qing; JIAO Zhi-Yong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We have studied the evolutions of the population transfer, tunnelling current and antibunching effects between spin-(+1) and spin-(-1) in the case of the strong laser pulses. It is found that the population transfer and tunnelling current exhibit periodical oscillation. For the same Rabi frequency, the larger the atom number, the longer the oscillation period is. For the spin-(-1) component, when the atomic numbers are N = 4 and 10, the antibunching effect can appear. For different atomic numbers, the appearing regions are very different. For spin component +1, the antibunching effect can always appear for different atomic numbers.

  13. Rydberg atom ionization by slow collisions with alkali element atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanism for ionization of highexcited atoms due to the electron capture into the autoionization state of a negative ion is suggested. Calculations of cross-sections and the ionization rate for sodium and lithium atoms collisions are performed

  14. Versatile compact atomic source for high resolution dual atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T; Gilowski, M; Jentsch, C; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2007-01-01

    We present a compact $^{87}$Rb atomic source for high precision dual atom interferometers. The source is based on a double-stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) design, consisting of a 2-dimensional (2D)-MOT for efficient loading of a 3D-MOT. The accumulated atoms are precisely launched in a horizontal moving molasses. Our setup generates a high atomic flux ($>10^{10}$ atoms/s) with precise and flexibly tunable atomic trajectories as required for high resolution Sagnac atom interferometry. We characterize the performance of the source with respect to the relevant parameters of the launched atoms, i.e. temperature, absolute velocity and pointing, by utilizing time-of-flight techniques and velocity selective Raman transitions.

  15. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  16. Microtraps and Atom Chips: Toolboxes for Cold Atom Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Feenstra, L.; Andersson, L. M.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic microtraps and Atom Chips are safe, small-scale, reliable and flexible tools to prepare ultra-cold and degenerate atom clouds as sources for various atom-optical experiments. We present an overview of the possibilities of the devices and indicate how a microtrap can be used to prepare and launch a Bose-Einstein condensate for use in an atom clock or an interferometer.

  17. Dynamics of atom-atom correlations in the Fermi problem

    OpenAIRE

    Borrelli, Massimo; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Plastina, Francesco; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed perturbative study of the dynamics of several types of atom-atom correlations in the famous Fermi problem. This is an archetypal model to study micro-causality in the quantum domain, where two atoms, one initially excited and the other prepared in its ground state, interact with the vacuum electromagnetic field. The excitation can be transferred to the second atom via a flying photon, and various kinds of quantum correlations between the two are generated during this pro...

  18. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  19. Carlitz q-Bernoulli numbers and q-Stirling numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taekyun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we consider carlitz q-Bernoulli numbers and q-stirling numbers of the first and the second kind. From these numbers we derive many interesting formulae associated with q-Bernoulli numbers.

  20. Generalizations of Euler Numbers and Euler Numbers of Higher Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUOQiu-ming; QIFeng

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the generalized Euler numbers and the generalized Euler numbers of higher order, their recursion formula and some properties were established, accordingly Euler numbers and Euler numbers of higher order were extended.