WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic mass difference

  1. New discovery: Quantization of atomic and nuclear rest mass differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei + atoms + condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize [1] phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula: ΔΔ M = n1/n2 x 0.0076294 (in MeV/c2 ), ni=1,2,3,... Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized open systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence on the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes grounded on the fundamental low of physics - conservation law of energy. The results of these research fields can provide new ecologically pure mobile sources of energy independent from oil, gas and coal, new substances, and technologies. For example, this discovery gives us a simple and cheep method for utilization of nuclear waste. References [1] F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0610002 2006

  2. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The gamma shielding properties of eight shielding materials have been investigated. • We calculated the total mass attenuation coefficients by using WinXCom program. • The values of effective atomic number and electron density are also calculated. • All parameters depend on chemical content and the incident photon energy. • The Field castable Heat Resistant is the most effective shielding material. - Abstract: In this paper, the interaction of gamma rays with some shielding materials has been studied. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μt) for eight shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. Also, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and the effective electron density (Neff) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined

  3. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for Inconel 738 alloy for different energies obtained from Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mass attenuation coefficient of Inconel 738 superalloy was measured. ► Gamma-ray energies were changed by Compton scattering technique. ► Effective atomic number and electron density are also calculated. ► All parameters decrease with increased energy. ► The experimental values are in good agreement with theoretical ones. - Abstract: The mass attenuation coefficient of Inconel 738 superalloy has been measured at different gamma ray energies by using the Compton scattering technique. The theoretical values of mass attenuation coefficient of a glass sample were calculated using WinXCom program. The effective atomic number and electron density are also calculated. The results showed that the mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density increase with the decrease in gamma ray energies which is in good agreement with theoretical values (less than 2% error)

  4. Direct determination of the atomic mass difference of Re187 and Os187 for neutrino physics and cosmochronology

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, D A; Blaum, K; Block, M; Chenmarev, S; Doerr, A; Droese, C; Filianin, P E; Goncharov, M; Ramirez, E Minaya; Novikov, Yu N; Schweikhard, L; Simon, V V

    2016-01-01

    For the first time a direct determination of the atomic mass difference of 187Re and 187Os has been performed with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP applying the novel phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance technique. The obtained value of 2492(30stat)(15sys) eV is in excellent agreement with the Q values determined indirectly with microcalorimetry and thus resolves a long-standing discrepancy with older proportional counter measurements. This is essential for the determination of the neutrino mass from the beta-decay of 187Re as planned in future microcalorimetric measurements. In addition, an accurate mass difference of 187Re and 187Os is also important for the assessment of 187Re for cosmochronology.

  5. Atomic masses 1995. The 1995 atomic mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1995 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment or systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge. (author)

  6. Atomic masses 1993. The 1993 atomic mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1993 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment of systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge. (author)

  7. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida J, A. T. [FUNDACENTRO, Centro Regional de Minas Gerais, Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, 30180-100 Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S. [Center of Development of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santos, M. A. P., E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br [Regional Center for Nuclear Science / CNEN, 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub t}) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and the effective electron density (N{sub eff}) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  8. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μt) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm3 collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm3 collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm3 collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and the effective electron density (Neff) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  9. Observables in neutrino mass spectroscopy using atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP

  10. The 1986-87 atomic mass predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, P. E.

    1987-12-01

    A project to perform a comprehensive update of the atomic mass predictions has recently been concluded and will be published shortly in Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables. The project evolved from an ongoing comparison between available mass predictions and reports of newly measured masses of isotopes throughout the mass surface. These comparisons have highlighted a variety of features in current mass models which are responsible for predictions that diverge from masses determined experimentally. The need for a comprehensive update of the atomic mass predictions was therefore apparent and the project was organized and began at the last mass conference (AMCO-VII). Project participants included: Pape and Anthony; Dussel, Caurier and Zuker; Möller and Nix; Möller, Myers, Swiatecki and Treiner; Comay, Kelson, and Zidon; Satpathy and Nayak; Tachibana, Uno, Yamada and Yamada; Spanier and Johansson; Jänecke and Masson; and Wapstra, Audi and Hoekstra. An overview of the new atomic mass predictions may be obtained by written request.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation by atomic mass weighting

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Boryeu; Friedman, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    A molecular dynamics-based simulation method in which atomic masses are weighted is described. Results from this method showed that the capability for conformation search in molecular dynamics simulation of a short peptide (FMRF-amide) is significantly increased by mass weighting.

  12. The 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation and the Mass Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audi, G., E-mail: amdc.audi@gmail.com [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Wang, M. [CSNSM-Orsay, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); MPI-K, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wapstra, A.H. [NIKHEF, 1009DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); MacCormick, M. [IPN, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Xu, X. [IMP, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2014-06-15

    The new evaluation of the Atomic Masses, Ame2012, has just been released. It represents a major step in the history of the 60 year old Atomic Mass Evaluation based on the method developed by Wapstra. This new publication includes all material available to date. Some of the policies and procedures used in our evaluation are reported, together with an illustration of one specially difficult case, the energy available for the {sup 102}Pd double-electron capture. The observation of the mass surface reveals many important new features. We illustrate this statement by the double magicity of {sup 270}Hs at N = 162 and Z = 108.

  13. Precise atomic mass measurements by deflection mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, R C

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception nearly 90 years ago by J.J. Thomson, the precise determination of atomic masses by the classical technique of deflecting charged particles in electric and magnetic fields has provided a large body of data on naturally occurring nuclides. Currently, such measurements on stable nuclides have frequently achieved a precision of better than two parts in 10 sup 9 of the mass. A review of the technique, together with a brief summary of the important historical developments in the field of precise atomic mass measurements, will be given. The more recent contributions to this field by the deflection mass spectrometer at the University of Manitoba will be provided as illustrations of the culmination of the techniques used and the applications that have been studied. A brief comparison between this and newer techniques using Penning traps will be presented.

  14. Precise atomic mass measurements by deflection mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, R. C.; Sharma, K. S.

    2003-05-01

    Since its inception nearly 90 years ago by J.J. Thomson, the precise determination of atomic masses by the classical technique of deflecting charged particles in electric and magnetic fields has provided a large body of data on naturally occurring nuclides. Currently, such measurements on stable nuclides have frequently achieved a precision of better than two parts in 10 9 of the mass. A review of the technique, together with a brief summary of the important historical developments in the field of precise atomic mass measurements, will be given. The more recent contributions to this field by the deflection mass spectrometer at the University of Manitoba will be provided as illustrations of the culmination of the techniques used and the applications that have been studied. A brief comparison between this and newer techniques using Penning traps will be presented.

  15. Atomic mass determinations for 183W and 199Hg and the mercury problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent modifications to the 'Manitoba II' high resolution mass spectrometer are described. Mass differences among the members of the triplet 199 Hg -183W 16O- 12C 235 Cl 5 have been measured. These self-consistent mass differences give masses for 183W and 199Hg, as well as the mass difference across the W to Hg region of the mass table. These masses and the mass difference provide important constraints for the least squares atomic mass evaluation

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fe-52 (Iron)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fe-52 (Iron, atomic number Z = 26, mass number A = 52).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sr-71 (Strontium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sr-71 (Strontium, atomic number Z = 38, mass number A = 71).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-318 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-318 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 318).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-356 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-356 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 356).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-322 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-322 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 322).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-351 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-351 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 351).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-310 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-310 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 310).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-336 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-336 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 336).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-299 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-299 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 299).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-288 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-288 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 288).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-359 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-359 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 359).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-343 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-343 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 343).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-304 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-304 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 304).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-280 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-280 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 280).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-349 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-349 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 349).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-325 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-325 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 325).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-332 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-332 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 332).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-306 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-306 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 306).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-324 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-324 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 324).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-293 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-293 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 293).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-327 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-327 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 327).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-350 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-350 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 350).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-308 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-308 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 308).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-358 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-358 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 358).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-321 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-321 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 321).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-345 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-345 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 345).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-286 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-286 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 286).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-307 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-307 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 307).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-303 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-303 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 303).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-312 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-312 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 312).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-294 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-294 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 294).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-326 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-326 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 326).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-273 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-273 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 273).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-284 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-284 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 284).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-315 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-315 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 315).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-328 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-328 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 328).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-311 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-311 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 311).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-353 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-353 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 353).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-348 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-348 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 348).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-360 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-360 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 360).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-347 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-347 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 347).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-277 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-277 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 277).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-309 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-309 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 309).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-340 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-340 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 340).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-285 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-285 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 285).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-341 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-341 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 341).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-283 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-283 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 283).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-305 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-305 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 305).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-331 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-331 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 331).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-342 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-342 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 342).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-300 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-300 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 300).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-330 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-330 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 330).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-296 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-296 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 296).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-338 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-338 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 338).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-270 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-270 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 270).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-320 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-320 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 320).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-346 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-346 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 346).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-274 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-274 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 274).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-357 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-357 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 357).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-319 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-319 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 319).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-337 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-337 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 337).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-329 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-329 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 329).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-276 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-276 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 276).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-335 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-335 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 335).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-314 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-314 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 314).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-281 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-281 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 281).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-282 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-282 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 282).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-339 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-339 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 339).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-275 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-275 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 275).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-289 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-289 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 289).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-316 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-316 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 316).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-354 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-354 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 354).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-355 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-355 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 355).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-295 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-295 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 295).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-272 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-272 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 272).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-334 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-334 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 334).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-279 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-279 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 279).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-323 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-323 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 323).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-352 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-352 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 352).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-298 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-298 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 298).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-317 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-317 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 317).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-344 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-344 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 344).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-302 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-302 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 302).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-292 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-292 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 292).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-287 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-287 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 287).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-301 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-301 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 301).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-291 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-291 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 291).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-278 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-278 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 278).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-290 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-290 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 290).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-333 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-333 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 333).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-268 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-268 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 268).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-313 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-313 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 313).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-271 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-271 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 271).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-269 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-269 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 269).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-297 (Bohrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-297 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 297).

  11. On-Line Mass Separator of Superheavy Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Oganessian, Yu T

    2002-01-01

    The concept is presented of an on-line Mass Analyzer of SuperHeavy Atoms (MASHA) dedicated to the separation and determination of the mass and decay properties of new elements and isotopes produced in heavy-ion induced reactions. The new nuclides with half-lives T_{1/2}\\ge 1 s are transported to an ECR-source working at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and are separated by mass with a mass resolution of M/\\Delta M\\sim 1500. In the focal plane of the magnetic analyzer a front strip detector surrounded by side detectors will be placed to determine the mass according to the signals from the detected alpha-particles or fission fragments with efficiency of about 90 %. In comparison to other existing in-flight recoil separators, the present setup will be characterized by higher efficiency and high selectivity relative to background reaction products. The setup MASHA may be used also in the investigation of nuclear reactions of different type induced by stable and radioactive beams.

  12. Mass cancer survey of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an outcome of mass screening for breast and uterine cancers performed in A-bomb survivors during the period from August 1988 through March 1990. Among 1,770 participants in mass screening for breast cancer, detailed examination was judged to be necessary in 6.1%. The rate of participation in the subsequent examination was 81.5%. Breast cancer was detected in 6 patients, which was all invasive ductal carcinoma. The estimated detection rate for breast cacer was 0.47%. There were 1,648 participants in mass screening for uterine cancer. The rate of detailed examination required was 2.0%, and the rate of participation was 66.7%. Uterine cancer was detected in 5 A-bomb survivors, one of whom had metastasis of rectal cancer. The estimated detection rate was 0.45%. (N.K.)

  13. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Disordered cold atoms in different symmetry classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Fernanda; Larson, Jonas

    2015-08-01

    We consider an experimentally realizable model of noninteracting but randomly coupled atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice. By choosing appropriate real or complex-valued random fields and species-dependent energy offsets, this system can be used to analyze effects of disorder in four different symmetry classes: the chiral BDI and AIII and the nonchiral A and AI. These chiral classes are known to support a metallic phase at zero energy, which here, due to the inevitable finite size of the system, should also persist in a neighborhood of nonzero energies. As we discuss, this is of particular interest for experiments involving quenches. Away from the center of the spectrum, we find that excitations appear as domain walls in the cases with time-reversal symmetry or as vortices in the cases where time-reversal symmetry is absent. Therefore, a quench in a system with uniform density would lead to the formation of either vortices or domain walls depending on the symmetry class. For the nonchiral models in classes A and AI, a population imbalance between the two atomic species naturally occurs. In these cases, one of the two species is seen to favor a more uniform density. We also study the onset of localization as the disorder strength is increased for the different classes, and by deriving an effective model for the nonchiral cases we show how their eigenstates remain extended for larger values of the coupling with the disorder when compared to the nonchiral ones.

  15. Surpassing the mass restriction of buffer gas cooling: Cooling of low mass ions by localized heavier atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of trapped ions has resulted in fascinating science including the realization of some of the most accurate atomic clocks. It has also found widespread application, for example, in mass spectrometry and cold chemistry. Among the different methods for cooling ions, cooling by elastic collisions with ultracold neutral atoms is arguably the most generic. However, in spite of its widespread application, there is confusion with regards the collisional heating/cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms. We address the question experimentally and demonstrate, for the first time, cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms. We show that trapped 39 K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85 Rb atoms. The atom-ion mass ratio (= 2.18) is well beyond any theoretical predictions so far. We further argue that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. The result opens up the possibility of reaching the elusive s-wave collision regime in atom-ion collisions. S.D. is supported by DST-INSPIRE Faculty Fellowship, India.

  16. Quantification of steroid conjugates using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast atom bombardment/mass spectrometry or liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry provides the capability for direct analysis of steroid conjugates (sulfates, glucuronides) without prior hydrolysis or derivatization. During the analysis of biologic extracts, limitations on the sensitivity of detection arise from the presence of co-extracted material which may suppress or obscure the analyte signal. A procedure is described for the quantitative determination of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in serum which achieved selective isolation of the analyte using immunoadsorption extraction and highly specific detection using tandem mass spectrometry. A stable isotope-labeled analog [( 2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) was used as internal standard. Fast atom bombardment of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate yielded abundant [M-H]- ions that fragmented following collisional activation to give HSO4-; m/z 97. During fast atom bombardment/tandem mass spectrometry of serum extracts, a scan of precursor ions fragmenting to give m/z 97 detected dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and the [2H2]-labeled analog with a selectivity markedly superior to that observed using conventional mass spectrometry detection. Satisfactory agreement was observed between quantitative data obtained in this way and data obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the heptafluorobutyrates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and [2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate obtained by direct derivatization. 21 refs

  17. 4th International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Carl J; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P; The European Physical Journal A : Volume 25, Supplement 1, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses (ENAM) has gained the status of the premier meeting for the physics of nuclei far from stability. The selected and refereed papers presenting the main results constitute valuable proceedings that offer everyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  18. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  19. Moving to atomic tritium for neutrino mass measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazkaz, Kareem; Project8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    For direct measurements of the neutrino mass, the tritium-based experiments Mainz and Troitsk have provided the most sensitive measurements to date, with upper limits near 2200 meV. The KATRIN experiment, beginning its first science run in 2016, also uses tritium as its source and has an anticipated ultimate sensitivity of 200 meV. The largest single systematic effect limiting the mass sensitivity beyond KATRIN is the energy sharing between the emitted beta particle and the resulting T-3He molecule. It therefore behooves all future tritium-based experiments to use atomic, rather than molecular, tritium. In this presentation we will outline experimental considerations of atomic tritium: production, purification, inhibiting recombination, and cooling. We will discuss these considerations within the context of Project8, a tritium-based, cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy neutrino mass measurement with an ultimate target sensitivity of 50 meV. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Atomic masses around 146Gd derived from decay properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic masses in a region around 146Gd were derived from partial decay constants of individual β-transitions resulting from γ-spectroscopic investigations. The β-decay energies were obtained by comparing experimental values of relative Psub(K)-ratios and EC/β+ ratios with energy-dependent theoretical ratios. Decay-energy determinations for the nuclei sup(145,147)Eu, sup(147,149)Gd, sup(147g),sup(147m)Tb, sup(148g),sup(148m)Tb, sup(149m)Tb, 148Dy and sup(150m,152m)Ho are summarized. Based on this new mass information, systematic trends of the nucleon separation energies around 146Gd are discussed. In contrast to level structures of earlier studies, the mass data offer only weak evidence for a double magicity of 146Gd. (orig.)

  1. Atomic mass prediction from the mass formula with empirical shell terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass-excess prediction of about 8000 nuclides was calculated from two types of the atomic mass formulas with empirical shell terms of Uno and Yamada. The theoretical errors to accompany the calculated mass excess are also presented. These errors have been obtained by a new statistical method. The mass-excess prediction includes the term of the gross feature of a nuclear mass surface, the shell terms and a small correction term for odd-odd nuclei. Two functional forms for the shell terms were used. The first is the constant form, and the sencond is the linear form. In determining the values of shell parameters, only the data of even-even and odd-A nuclei were used. A new statistical method was applied, in which the error inherent to the mass formula was taken account. The obtained shell parameters and the values of mass excess are shown in tables. (Kato, T.)

  2. Ballistic thermal transport in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: Role of atomic mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlong; Li, Wu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the ballistic thermal transport of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which is crucial for the thermal management of their potential applications in nanoelectronics. We find the thermal conductance is mainly affected by the atomic masses of TMDs. As a consequence, the temperature dependences of thermal conductances of different TMDs cross: At low temperatures below ˜50 K, the thermal conductance increases with the atomic mass, while it exhibits the opposite trend at high temperatures. The crossing behavior of temperature dependent thermal conductance is characteristic of the atomic mass effect, and TMDs provide a model system demonstrating that the thermal conductance can be effectively manipulated via the atomic mass by selecting appropriate atom. In addition, we clarify that in any two dimensional system such as monolayer TMDs and graphene, due to quadratic dispersion of the out-of-plane modes, the thermal conductance and specific heat in the low temperature limit are proportional to T3/2 and T, respectively. Mainly because of much smaller group velocities of in-plane acoustic phonons, the high temperature thermal conductances of monolayer TMDs are much smaller than graphene. However, due to comparable group velocities of out-of-plane acoustic phonons, below 100 K thermal conductances of monolayer TMDs are rather comparable to graphene if taking the same layer thickness for comparison.

  3. Effects of the Centre-of-Mass Motion on the Population Trapping of Ultracold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊锦; 张智明

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the atomic centre-of-mass motion on atomic population trapping in a two-mode micromaser injected with ultracold A-type three-level atoms.We find that in the mazer regime(the case in which the atomic kinetic energy is much smaller than the atom-field interaction energy),the interplay between reflection and transmission of the ultracold atom leads to the destruction of the atomic population trapping.

  4. Nucleosynthesis yields from different mass stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Stellar nucleosynthesis yield is a vital factor of galactic chemical evolution model. With different yields, various evolutionary behavior of elements can be predicted, hence different scenarios of galactic chemical evolution can be shown. Investigators calculated different yields adopting different parameters of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. The corresponding parameters and the resulting yields of elements are compared for low-, intermediate-mass stars and massive stars, so that these analyses can provide valuable information and guidance to stellar nucleosynthesis and galactic chemical evolution studies.

  5. Satellite virtual atomic clock with pseudorange difference function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Satellite atomic clocks are the basis of GPS for the control of time and frequency of navigation signals. In the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS), a satellite navigation system without the satellite atomic clocks onboard is successfully developed. Thus, the method of time synchronization based on satellite atomic clocks in GPS is not suitable. Satellite virtual atomic clocks are used to implement satellite navigation. With the satellite virtual atomic clocks, the time at which the signals are transmitted from the ground can be delayed into the time that the signals are transmitted from the satellites and the pseudorange measuring can be fulfilled as in GPS. Satellite virtual atomic clocks can implement the navigation, make a pseudorange difference, remove the ephemeris error, and improve the accuracy of navigation positioning. They not only provide a navigation system without satellite clocks, but also a navigation system with pseudorange difference.

  6. Ub-library of Atomic Masses and Nuclear Ground States Deformations (CENPL.AMD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The atomic mass is one of basic data of a nuclear. There are the atomic masses in all nuclear reaction model formulas and motion equations. For any reaction calculations atomic masses are basic data for getting binding energies or Q-values. In some applications, it is important also to have atomic masses even for exotic nuclei quite far from the valley of stability. In addition, nuclear ground state deformations and abundance values are also requisite in the nuclear data calculations. For this purpose, A data file on atomic masses and nuclear ground states deformations (AMD) were constructed, which

  7. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-269(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-269 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 269).

  8. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-335(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-335 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 335).

  9. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-332(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-332 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 332).

  10. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-326(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-326 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 326).

  11. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-259(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-259 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 259).

  12. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-300(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-300 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 300).

  13. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-317(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-317 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 317).

  14. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-304(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-304 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 304).

  15. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-276(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-276 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 276).

  16. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-271(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-271 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 271).

  17. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-321(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-321 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 321).

  18. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-294(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-294 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 294).

  19. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-277(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-277 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 277).

  20. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-310(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-310 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 310).

  1. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-306(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-306 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 306).

  2. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-323(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-323 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 323).

  3. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-299(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-299 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 299).

  4. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-286(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-286 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 286).

  5. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-282(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-282 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 282).

  6. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-338(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-338 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 338).

  7. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-324(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-324 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 324).

  8. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-322(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-322 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 322).

  9. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-305(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-305 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 305).

  10. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-336(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-336 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 336).

  11. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-308(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-308 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 308).

  12. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-291(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-291 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 291).

  13. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-320(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-320 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 320).

  14. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-261(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-261 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 261).

  15. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-296(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-296 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 296).

  16. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-272(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-272 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 272).

  17. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-258(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-258 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 258).

  18. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-273(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-273 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 273).

  19. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-302(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-302 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 302).

  20. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-289(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-289 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 289).

  1. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-334(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-334 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 334).

  2. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-316(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-316 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 316).

  3. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-309(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-309 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 309).

  4. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-262(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-262 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 262).

  5. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-319(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-319 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 319).

  6. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-314(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-314 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 314).

  7. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-281(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-281 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 281).

  8. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-267(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-267 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 267).

  9. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-329(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-329 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 329).

  10. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-264(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-264 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 264).

  11. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-298(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-298 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 298).

  12. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-339(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-339 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 339).

  13. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-278(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-278 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 278).

  14. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-312(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-312 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 312).

  15. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-318(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-318 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 318).

  16. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-270(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-270 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 270).

  17. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-263(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-263 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 263).

  18. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-313(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-313 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 313).

  19. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-337(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-337 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 337).

  20. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-287(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-287 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 287).

  1. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-279(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-279 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 279).

  2. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-275(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-275 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 275).

  3. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-333(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-333 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 333).

  4. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-280(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-280 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 280).

  5. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-266(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-266 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 266).

  6. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-330(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-330 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 330).

  7. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-265(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-265 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 265).

  8. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-283(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-283 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 283).

  9. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-297(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-297 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 297).

  10. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-268(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-268 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 268).

  11. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-274(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-274 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 274).

  12. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-260(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-260 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 260).

  13. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-307(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-307 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 307).

  14. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-293(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-293 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 293).

  15. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-284(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-284 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 284).

  16. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-292(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-292 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 292).

  17. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-328(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-328 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 328).

  18. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-331(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-331 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 331).

  19. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-311(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-311 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 311).

  20. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-285(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-285 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 285).

  1. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-315(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-315 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 315).

  2. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-288(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-288 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 288).

  3. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-295(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-295 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 295).

  4. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-301(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-301 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 301).

  5. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-303(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-303 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 303).

  6. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-290(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-290 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 290).

  7. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-327(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-327 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 327).

  8. Atomic Mass and NuclearBinding Energy for Uup-325(Ununpentium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uup-325 (Ununpentium, atomic number Z = 115, mass number A = 325).

  9. Ab initio calculation of the neutron-proton mass difference

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The existence and stability of atoms relies on the fact that neutrons are more massive than protons. The mass difference is only 0.14% of the average and has significant astrophysical and cosmological implications. A slightly smaller or larger value would have led to a dramatically different universe. After an introduction to the problem and to lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD), I will show how this difference can be computed precisely by carefully accounting for electromagnetic and mass isospin breaking effects in lattice computations. I will also report on results for splittings in the \\Sigma, \\Xi, D and \\Xi_{cc} isospin multiplets, some of which are predictions. The computations are performed in lattice QCD plus QED with four, non-degenerate quark flavors.

  10. Comment on "Atomic mass compilation 2012" by B. Pfeiffer, K. Venkataramaniah, U. Czok, C. Scheidenberger

    CERN Document Server

    Audi, Georges; Block, Michael; Bollen, Georg; Herfurth, Frank; Goriely, Stéphane; Hardy, John C; Kondev, Filip G; Kluge, Juergen H; Lunney, David; Pearson, Mike J; Savard, Guy; Sharma, Kumar; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yuhu

    2014-01-01

    This "Comment" submitted to ADNDT on December 13, 2013 concerns a publication entitled "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012", which is due to appear in the March 2014 issue of the journal Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables (available online on September 6, 2013). We would like to make it clear that this paper is not endorsed by the Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) international collaboration. The AME provides carefully recommended evaluated data, published periodically. The "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012" is not to be associated with the latest publication, AME2012, nor with any of the previously published mass evaluations that were developed under the leadership of Prof. A.H. Wapstra. We found the data presented in "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012" to be misleading and the approach implemented to be lacking in rigour since it does not allow to unambiguously trace the original published mass values. Furthermore, the method used in "Atomic Mass Compilation 2012" is not valid and leads to erroneous and contradictory outputs,...

  11. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  12. Stronger phonon scattering by larger differences in atomic mass and size in p-type half-Heuslers Hf[subscript 1−x]Ti[subscript x]CoSb[subscript 0.8]Sn[subscript 0.2

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiao; Liu, Weishu; Wang, Hui; Chen, Shuo; Shiomi, Junichiro; Esfarjani, Keivan; Wang, Hengzhi; Wang, Dezhi; Gang CHEN; Ren, Zhifeng

    2012-01-01

    High lattice thermal conductivity has been the bottleneck for further improvement of the thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) of half-Heuslers (HHs) Hf[subscript 1−x]Zr[subscript x]CoSb[subscript 0.8]Sn[subscript 0.2]. Theoretically, the lattice thermal conductivity can be reduced by exploring larger differences in the atomic mass and size in the crystal structure, leading to higher ZT. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated that a lower thermal conductivity in p-type half-Heuslers can ...

  13. Trigger and control entanglement by atoms with different interaction times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Jie; Hao Xiang; Zhu Shi-Qun

    2007-01-01

    The generation of the entanglement between two two-level atoms interacting with the third atom driven by white noise is investigated when the coupling between atoms is modulated by a pulse function.This paper finds that the initial triggering time and the width of the pulse call generate a peak in the entanglement.There is an optimal width of the pulse for which the entanglement can reach a maximum.The asymmetry of the coupling between atoms can generate different entanglement in the system.The multiple triggers can generate multiple peaks in the entanglement.The separation between two peaks is increased as the width of the pulse is increased.

  14. Wall loss of atomic nitrogen determined by ionization threshold mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the afterglow of an inductively coupled N2 plasma, relative N atom densities are measured by ionization threshold mass spectrometry as a function of time in order to determine the wall loss time twN from the exponential decay curves. The procedure is performed with two mass spectrometers on different positions in the plasma chamber. twN is determined for various pressures, i.e., for 3.0, 5.0, 7.5, and 10 Pa. For this conditions also the internal plasma parameters electron density ne and electron temperature Te are determined with the Langmuir probe and the rotational temperature TrotN2 of N2 is determined with the optical emission spectroscopy. For TrotN2, a procedure is presented to evaluate the spectrum of the transition υ′=0→υ″=2 of the second positive system (C3Πu→B3Πg) of N2. With this method, a gas temperature of 610 K is determined. For both mass spectrometers, an increase of the wall loss times of atomic nitrogen with increasing pressure is observed. The wall loss time measured with the first mass spectrometer in the radial center of the cylindrical plasma vessel increases linearly from 0.31 ms for 3 Pa to 0.82 ms for 10 Pa. The wall loss time measured with the second mass spectrometer (further away from the discharge) is about 4 times higher. A model is applied to describe the measured twN. The main loss mechanism of atomic nitrogen for the considered pressure is diffusion to the wall. The surface loss probability βN of atomic nitrogen on stainless steel was derived from twN and is found to be 1 for the present conditions. The difference in wall loss times measured with the mass spectrometers on different positions in the plasma chamber is attributed to the different diffusion lengths

  15. Atomic scale mass delivery driven by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of atomic scale mass delivery by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube was investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics simulation. By keeping the bending angle while moving the tube end, the encapsulated atomic scale mass such as atom, molecule and atom group were successfully delivered through the nanotube. The van der Waals interaction between the encapsulated mass and the tube wall provided the driving force for the delivery. There were no dramatic changes in the van der Waals interaction, and a smooth and steady delivery was achieved when constant loading rate was applied. The influence of temperature on the atom group delivery was also analyzed. It is found raising temperature is harmful to the smooth movement of the atom group. However, the delivery rate can be promoted under higher temperature when the atom group is situated before the kink during the delivery.

  16. Correlated ion analysis and the interpretation of atom probe mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques are presented for extracting information from atom probe mass spectra by investigating correlations within multiple-ion detector events. Analyses of this kind can provide insights into the origins of noise, the shape of mass peaks, or unexpected anomalies within the spectrum. Data can often be recovered from within the spectrum noise by considering the time-of-flight differences between ions within a multiple event. Correlated ion detection, particularly when associated with shifts in ion energies, may be used to probe the phenomenon of molecular ion dissociation, including the questions of data loss due to ion pile-up or the generation of neutrals in the dissociation process. -- Research Highlights: → Multiple-ion detection events may contain information not seen in the mass spectrum. → Analysis of multiple events can yield information on molecular ion dissociation. → Neutral species may be generated by dissociation subsequent to field evaporation.

  17. Atomic masses of fission product nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques for measuring fission product masses far from stability are discussed and recent progress in experimental measurements is reviewed. A comparison of new mass values with predictions of 10 mass equations suggests that most theories predict far-from-stability fission product nuclei to be more bound than is found experimentally. A closer look at several isotopic chains is used to identify regions of structural change where mass equations encounter difficulty. 31 references

  18. Photon "mass" and atomic levels in a superstrong magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Vysotsky, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of atomic levels originating from the lowest Landau level in a superstrong magnetic field is analyzed. The influence of the screening of the Coulomb potential on the values of critical nuclear charge is studied.

  19. Anharmonicity of internal atomic oscillation and effective antineutrino mass evaluation from gaseous molecular tritium \\beta -decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    Data analysis of the next generation effective antineutrino mass measurement experiment KATRIN requires reliable knowledge of systematic corrections. In particular, the width of the daughter molecular ion excitation spectrum rovibrational band should be known with a better then 1% precision. Very precise ab initio quantum calculations exist, and we compare them with the well known tritium molecule parameters within the framework of a phenomenological model. The rovibrational band width with accuracy of a few percent is interpreted as a result of the zero-point atomic oscillation in the harmonic potential. The Morse interatomic potential is used to investigate the impact of anharmonic atomic oscillations. The calculated corrections cannot account for the difference between the ab initio quantum calculations and the phenomenological model.

  20. Study of the mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers in some gemstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total mass attenuation coefficients for natural beryl, corundum, garnet, pearl, and tourmaline gemstones were measured at 81, 356.5, 661.6, 1173.2, and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 133Ba, 137Cs and 60Co radioactive point sources using gamma ray transmission method. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were determined experimentally and theoretically. The experimental values were compared with the calculated values for all samples. The calculations were extended for total photon interactions in a wide energy range (1 keV-100 GeV) using WinXCom program of the most commonly irradiated gemstones with different sources of ionized radiation. The values of these parameters have been found to vary with photon energy and chemical composition of the gemstones. All variations of these parameters against energy are shown graphically for total photon interactions. (author)

  1. Comment on “Atomic mass compilation 2012” by B. Pfeiffer, K. Venkataramaniah, U. Czok, C. Scheidenberger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audi, G., E-mail: amdc.audi@gmail.com [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d’Astronomie et d’Astrophysique, CP-226, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Hardy, J.C. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lunney, D. [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Pearson, J.M. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Savard, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sharma, K.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); and others

    2015-05-15

    In order to avoid errors and confusion that may arise from the recent publication of a paper entitled “Atomic Mass Compilation 2012”, we explain the important difference between a compilation and an evaluation; the former is a necessary but insufficient condition for the latter. The simple list of averaged mass values offered by the “Atomic Mass Compilation” uses none of the numerous links and correlations present in the large body of input data that are carefully maintained within the “Atomic Mass Evaluation”. As such, the mere compilation can only produce results of inferior accuracy. Illustrative examples are given.

  2. Skyrme Model with Different Mass Terms

    CERN Document Server

    Piette, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    We consider a one parameter family of mass terms for the Skyrme model that disfavours shell-like configurations for multi-baryon classical solutions. We argue that a model with such mass terms can provide a better description of nuclei as shell like configurations are now less stable than in the traditional massive Skyrme model

  3. Skyrme model with different mass terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a one parameter family of mass terms for the Skyrme model that disfavors shell-like configurations for multibaryon classical solutions. We argue that a model with such mass terms can provide a better description of nuclei as shell-like configurations are now less stable than in the traditional massive Skyrme model.

  4. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system. PMID:25623487

  5. Mass Attenuation Coefficients and Effective Atomic Numbers of Thermoluminescent Aluminum Oxide Based Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photon mass attenuation coefficient of a newly prepared 15Al2O3-35P2O5- xCaO-(50-x)Na2CO3 glass system (symbolized as APCN), where x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 all in mol%, have been calculated at photon energies of 0.662 MeV (137Cs source) and 1.25 MeV (60Co source). In addition, the photon mass attenuation coefficient of 15Al2O3-35P2O5-25CaO-25Na2CO3 glass system (symbolized as APCN25-25), all in mol%, doped with different concentrations of SiO2 have been calculated. The WinXCOM software program on the basis of mixture rule was utilized in calculations. The total atomic (σt) and electronic (σe) cross sections, effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Nel) were calculated. The results showed that the total mass attenuation coefficient showed an extremely dependence on incoherent scattering processes where it varies with Na2CO3 contents in the APCN composition while changing the concentrations of SiO2 in APCN25-25 glass showed slight changes in the values. Otherwise, the mass attenuation coefficient (µm) had higher values at 0.662 MeV than those of 1.25 MeV in both APCN and APCN25-25 glass systems. The values of Zeff showed a decrease with increasing Na2CO3 contents in the APCN composition. The should highly be considered in dealing with such prepared APCN glass system as a gamma ray detector, specially as thermoluminescence dosimeter.

  6. Different Mass Processing Services in a Bit Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Bolette; Zierau, Eld

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates how a general bit repository mass processing service using different programming models and platforms can be specified. Such a service is needed in large data archives, especially libraries, where different ways of doing mass processing is needed for different digital...... library tasks. Different hardware platforms as basis for mass processing will usually already exist for libraries as part of a bit preservation solution for long term bit preservation. The investigation of a general mass processing service shows that different aspects of mass processing are too dependent...

  7. Nuclear shell energies and deformations in atomic mass formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group has for several years been studying a method of calculating nuclear shell energies and incorporating them into a mass formula. This method is characterized by the calculation of single-particle levels in an extended spherical Woods-Saxon potential, the extraction of crude shell energy, the refinement of crude shell energy due to residual interactions, and the incorporation into a mass formula. Here, we report the advance of this work focusing especially on nuclear deformations, and give some preliminary results and remarks. (author)

  8. Photoassociative Cooling and Trapping of Center-of-Mass Motion of Atom-Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Subrata; Deb, Bimalendu

    2015-01-01

    We show that it is possible to cool and trap the center-of-mass (COM) motion of atom-pairs by a lin$\\perp$lin Sisyphus-like method using counter-propagating photoassociation lasers. This method relies on the photoassociative coupling between an excited molecular bound state and a single-channel continuum of states of scattering between ground-state atoms. We demonstrate that one can generate molecular spin-dependent periodic potentials by this method for trapping the COM motion of pairs of ground-state atoms. We illustrate this with numerical calculations using fermionic $^{171}$Yb atoms as an example.

  9. Direct Measurement of the Mass Difference of Ho163 and Dy163 Solves the Q-Value Puzzle for the Neutrino Mass Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Eliseev, S; Block, M; Chenmarev, S; Dorrer, H; Duellmann, Ch E; Enss, C; Filianin, P E; Gastaldo, L; Goncharov, M; Koester, U; Lautenschlaeger, F; Novikov, Yu N; Rischka, A; Schuessler, R X; Schweikhard, L; Tuerler, A

    2016-01-01

    The atomic mass difference of 163Ho and 163Dy has been directly measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP applying the novel phase imaging ion cyclotron resonance technique. Our measurement has solved the long standing problem of large discrepancies in the Q value of the electron capture in 163Ho determined by different techniques. Our measured mass difference shifts the current Q value of 2555(16) eV evaluated in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012 [G. Audi et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1157 (2012)] by more than 7 sigma to 2833(30stat)(15sys) eV/c2. With the new mass difference it will be possible, e.g., to reach in the first phase of the ECHo experiment a statistical sensitivity to the neutrino mass below 10 eV, which will reduce its present upper limit by more than an order of magnitude.

  10. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  11. Multipole moments for embedding potentials: Exploring different atomic allocation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Nørby, Morten; Magnus Haugaard Olsen, Jógvan; Kongsted, Jacob; Aagard Jensen, Hans Jørgen

    2016-07-01

    Polarizable quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanics (MM)-embedding methods are currently among the most promising methods for computationally feasible, yet reliable, production calculations of localized excitations and molecular response properties of large molecular complexes, such as proteins and RNA/DNA, and of molecules in solution. Our aim is to develop a computational methodology for distributed multipole moments and their associated multipole polarizabilities which is accurate, computationally efficient, and with smooth convergence with respect to multipole order. As the first step toward this goal, we herein investigate different ways of obtaining distributed atom-centered multipole moments that are used in the construction of the electrostatic part of the embedding potential. Our objective is methods that not only are accurate and computationally efficient, but which can be consistently extended with site polarizabilities including internal charge transfer terms. We present a new way of dealing with well-known problems in relation to the use of basis sets with diffuse functions in conventional atomic allocation algorithms, avoiding numerical integration schemes. Using this approach, we show that the classical embedding potential can be systematically improved, also when using basis sets with diffuse functions, and that very accurate embedding potentials suitable for QM/MM embedding calculations can be acquired. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27187063

  12. BRAMA, a Broad Range Atomic Mass Analyzer for the ISL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    An alternative to conventional on-line isotope separators for use in radioactive beam facilities is described. It consists of an analyzer with a static magnetic field that is capable of separating a wide mixture of (radioactive) ions into mass bins ranging from 6 to 240 u. If incorporated into the ISL, BRAMA would make several low-energy radioactive beams available for experiments simultaneously, in addition to the beam that is being delivered to the post-accelerator. A preliminary ion-optical geometry is discussed.

  13. BRAMA, a Broad Range Atomic Mass Analyzer for the ISL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative to conventional on-line isotope separators for use in radioactive beam facilities is described. It consists of an analyzer with a static magnetic field that is capable of separating a wide mixture of (radioactive) ions into mass bins ranging from 6 to 240 u. If incorporated into the ISL, BRAMA would make several low-energy radioactive beams available for experiments simultaneously, in addition to the beam that is being delivered to the post-accelerator. A preliminary ion-optical geometry is discussed

  14. Kaon mass by critical absorption of kaonic atom x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy of the kaonic 6h → 5g transition has been determined using the calculated μ/rho curve. Because the detectors used could not resolve the noncircular transitions, the predictions from a calculated cascade program were used. According to the cascade results for potassium, the number of noncircular x-rays was about 10% of all the transitions between n = 6 to n = 5. Based on the available information, the mass of the kaon was measured to be 493.576/sub -0.069//sup +0.044/ MeV

  15. Crossed-second-order specific-mass isotope shift in the Nickel atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. L. A.; Bauche, J.

    1983-10-01

    The crossed-second-order corrections to the specific mass shifts of the lowest terms of the two lowest configurations of the Nickel atom are evaluated ab initio in the Multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock scheme. The excitations towards the nf( l=3) empty subshells play the major role. If the contributions obtained are added to the Hartree-Fock values, the discrepancy between experiment and theory for the 3 d 8 4 s 2-3 d 9 4 s (virtual) transition is only reduced by one third. As concerns the differences between the specific shifts of the five Russell-Saunders terms of 3 d 8 4 s 2, the crossed-second-order contributions are predicted to be practically as large as the Hartree-Fock values, which makes the total definitely measurable.

  16. Crossed-second-order specific-mass isotope shift in the nickel atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crossed-second-order corrections to the specific mass shifts of the lowest terms of the two lowest configurations of the Nickel atom are evaluated ab initio in the Multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock scheme. The excitations towards the nf(l=3) empty subshells play the major role. If the contributions obtained are added to the Hartree-Fock values, the discrepancy between experiment and theory for the 3d8 4s2-3d9 4s (virtual) transition is only reduced by one third. As concerns the differences beteen the specific shifts of the five Russell-Saunders terms of 3d8 4d2, the crossed-second-order contributions are predicted to be practically as large as the Hartree-Fock values, which makes the total definitely measurable. (orig.)

  17. Difference-frequency combs in cold atom physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kliese, Russell; Puppe, Thomas; Rohde, Felix; Sell, Alexander; Zach, Armin; Leisching, Patrick; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Keegan, Niamh C; Bounds, Alistair D; Bridge, Elizabeth M; Leonard, Jack; Adams, Charles S; Cornish, Simon L; Jones, Matthew P A

    2016-01-01

    Optical frequency combs provide the clockwork to relate optical frequencies to radio frequencies. Hence, combs allow to measure optical frequencies with respect to a radio frequency where the accuracy is limited only by the reference signal. In order to provide a stable link between the radio and optical frequencies, the two parameters of the frequency comb must be fixed: the carrier envelope offset frequency $f_{\\rm ceo}$ and the pulse repetition-rate $f_{\\rm rep}$. We have developed the first optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation (DFG) that eliminates $f_{\\rm ceo}$ by design - specifically tailored for applications in cold atom physics. An $f_{\\rm ceo}$-free spectrum at 1550 nm is generated from a super continuum spanning more than an optical octave. Established amplification and frequency conversion techniques based on reliable telecom fiber technology allow generation of multiple wavelength outputs. In this paper we discuss the frequency comb design, characterization, and optical...

  18. Meta-atom cluster acoustic metamaterial with broadband negative effective mass density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We design a resonant meta-atom cluster, via which a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with broadband negative effective mass density from 1560 Hz to 5580 Hz is fabricated. Experimental results confirm that there is only weak interaction among the meta-atoms in the cluster. And then the meta-atoms in the cluster independently resonate, resulting in the cluster becoming equivalent to a broadband resonance unit. Extracted effective refractive indices from reflection and transmission measurements of the 2D AM appear to be negative from 1500 Hz to 5480 Hz. The broadband negative refraction has also been demonstrated by our further experiments. We expect that this meta-atom cluster AM will significantly contribute to the design of broadband negative effective mass density AM

  19. Octet baryon mass splittings from up-down quark mass differences

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, R; Nakamura, Y; Pleiter, D; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Zanotti, J M

    2012-01-01

    Using an SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in the quark mass, we determine the QCD component of the neutron-proton, Sigma and Xi mass splittings of the baryon octet due to up-down (and strange) quark mass differences. Provided the average quark mass is kept constant, the expansion coefficients in our procedure can be determined from computationally cheaper simulations with mass degenerate sea quarks and partially quenched valence quarks. Full details and numerical results are given in ref 1.

  20. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on ...

  1. Immobilization of different biomolecules by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hölzel Ralph

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micrometer resolution placement and immobilization of probe molecules is an important step in the preparation of biochips and a wide range of lab-on-chip systems. Most known methods for such a deposition of several different substances are costly and only suitable for a limited number of probes. In this article we present a flexible procedure for simultaneous spatially controlled immobilization of functional biomolecules by molecular ink lithography. Results For the bottom-up fabrication of surface bound nanostructures a universal method is presented that allows the immobilization of different types of biomolecules with micrometer resolution. A supporting surface is biotinylated and streptavidin molecules are deposited with an AFM (atomic force microscope tip at distinct positions. Subsequent incubation with a biotinylated molecule species leads to binding only at these positions. After washing streptavidin is deposited a second time with the same AFM tip and then a second biotinylated molecule species is coupled by incubation. This procedure can be repeated several times. Here we show how to immobilize different types of biomolecules in an arbitrary arrangement whereas most common methods can deposit only one type of molecules. The presented method works on transparent as well as on opaque substrates. The spatial resolution is better than 400 nm and is limited only by the AFM's positional accuracy after repeated z-cycles since all steps are performed in situ without moving the supporting surface. The principle is demonstrated by hybridization to different immobilized DNA oligomers and was validated by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The immobilization of different types of biomolecules in high-density microarrays is a challenging task for biotechnology. The method presented here not only allows for the deposition of DNA at submicrometer resolution but also for proteins and other molecules of biological relevance that

  2. The atomic and molecular content of disks around very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascucci, I. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Herczeg, G. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Carr, J. S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7211, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Bruderer, S., E-mail: pascucci@lpl.arizona.edu [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    There is growing observational evidence that disk evolution is stellar-mass-dependent. Here, we show that these dependencies extend to the atomic and molecular content of disk atmospheres. We analyze a unique dataset of high-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra from eight very low mass star and brown dwarf disks. We report the first detections of Ne{sup +}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and tentative detections of H{sub 2}O toward these faint and low-mass disks. Two of our [Ne II] 12.81 μm emission lines likely trace the hot (≥5000 K) disk surface irradiated by X-ray photons from the central stellar/sub-stellar object. The H{sub 2} S(2) and S(1) fluxes are consistent with arising below the fully or partially ionized surface traced by the [Ne II] emission in gas at ∼600 K. We confirm the higher C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/HCN flux and column density ratio in brown dwarf disks previously noted from low-resolution IRS spectra. Our high-resolution spectra also show that the HCN/H{sub 2}O fluxes of brown dwarf disks are on average higher than those of T Tauri disks. Our LTE modeling hints that this difference extends to column density ratios if H{sub 2}O lines trace warm ≥600 K disk gas. These trends suggest that the inner regions of brown dwarf disks have a lower O/C ratio than those of T Tauri disks, which may result from a more efficient formation of non-migrating icy planetesimals. An O/C = 1, as inferred from our analysis, would have profound implications on the bulk composition of rocky planets that can form around very low mass stars and brown dwarfs.

  3. Fast atom bombardment and field desorption mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both FD and FAB have been developed to methods of high sensitivity to bioanalytical applications, which so far has been comparable in most cases, if estimated by the amount of material required in sample preparations for measurement. Unequivocal molecular weight determinations as the primary goal for an unknown compound from biological material are greatly facilitated by comparison of FD and FAB spectra, thus minimizing the risk of mis-information e.g. by molecular-cluster or other artifact ions which have been shown to occur by both techniques, and may be especially a problem in FAB spectra. The differences in the fragmentation behaviour as evident from some studies also suggest that the FAB method may be particularly suited for the analysis of compounds of extreme thermal lability, while FD may be the preferential method in cases where chemical lability and solubility present problems in the matrix preparation for FAB analysis. (orig./EF)

  4. The Atomic Mass Unit, the Avogadro Constant, and the Mole: A Way to Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published that address problems encountered in teaching basic concepts of chemistry such as the atomic mass unit, Avogadro's number, and the mole. The origin of these problems is found in the concept definitions. If these definitions are adjusted for teaching purposes, understanding could be improved. In the present…

  5. A NEW GENERATION OF INSTRUMENTATION AND CAPABILITIES FOR ATOMIC MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Atomic mass spectrometry,embodied usually as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS),has become a widely accepted tool for trace and ultra-trace elemental analysis.ICPMS offers detection limits below 1 ppt in solution,a dynamic concentration levels,isotope-analysis and isotope-dilution capabilities,modest matrix interferences,understandable spectral interferences (isobaric overlaps),precision in range of 2—5%,and rapid measurements (typically 10 seconds per isotope).

  6. Atomic mass and characteristic constant of nuclear ground state (CENPL.MCC). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic mass and characteristic constants for nuclear ground states are basic data for nuclear physics, and necessary ones for basic researches, theoretical calculations, as well as many applied researches. The atomic mass of exotic nuclei quite far from the valley stability are also very important for astrophysics researches. The above-requirement is paid attention to in our setting up this file. The recent and as many as possible data (such as the half-lives of the new nuclides 202Pt, 208Hg and 185Hf and the mass excess of 199Ir, which were produced and distinguished by Chinese scientists) have been collected, and put into the computer-based data file in brief table format. (1 fig.)

  7. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities and mass attenuation coefficients in Au alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, I; Demir, L

    2010-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) for pure Au and Au99Be1, Au88Ge12, Au95Zn5 alloys were measured at 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 241Am and 109Cd radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The gamma- rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections (sigmat and sigmae), effective atomic and electron densities (Zeff and Nel) were determined using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated Au alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. PMID:20421703

  8. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  9. "Pseudo-invariant Eigen-operator" Method for Deriving Energy-Gap of an Atom-Cavity Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian with Atomic Centre-of-Mass Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; TANG Xu-Bing

    2006-01-01

    Using the "Pseudo-invariant eigen-operator" method we find the energy-gap of the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian model of an atom-cavity system. This model takes the atomic centre-of-mass motion into account. The supersymmetric structure is involved in the Hamiltonian of an atom-cavity system. By selecting suitable supersymmetric generators and using supersymmetric transformation the Hamiltonian is diagonalized and energy eigenvectors are obtained.

  10. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  11. Evaluation of Steadiness and Drop Size Distribution in Sprays Generated by Different Twin-Fluid Atomizers

    OpenAIRE

    Zaremba Matouš; Mlkvik Marek; Malý Milan; Jedelský Jan; Jícha Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Twin-fluid atomizers underwent a significant development during the last few decades. They are common in many industrial applications such as fuel spraying, melt atomization and food processing. This paper is focused on the evaluation of four different twin-fluid atomizers. The aim is to compare the quality of sprays generated by various atomizers with similar dimensions and in the same operating regimes. A phase- Doppler anemometry (PDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to meas...

  12. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  13. Effective atomic numbers and mass attenuation coefficients of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds for total photon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers for total gamma-ray interaction with some selected thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds such as barium acetate, barium sulfate, calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, calcium sulfate dihydrate, cadmium sulfate (anhydrous), cadmium sulfate, strontium sulfate, and lithium fluoride have been calculated in the 1-keV to 20-MeV energy region. Experimental mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for these compounds at selected photon energies of 26.3, 33.2, 59.54, and 661.6 keV have been obtained from good geometry transmission measurements and compared with theoretical values. The effect of absorption edge on effective atomic numbers and its variation with energy, and nonvalidity of the Bragg's mixture rule at incident photon energies closer to the absorption edges of constituent elements of compounds are discussed

  14. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Kadam; S T Alone; G K Bichile; K M Jadhav

    2007-05-01

    Pure magnesium ferrite sample was prepared by standard ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. XRD pattern revealed that the sample possess single-phase cubic spinel structure. The linear attenuation coefficient (), mass attenuation coefficient (/ρ), total atomic cross-section (tot), total electronic cross-section (ele) and the effective atomic number (eff) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4). The values of -ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy selective scintillation counter with radioactive -ray sources having energy 0.36, 0.511, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.28 MeV. The experimentally obtained values of /ρ and eff agreed fairly well with those obtained theoretically.

  15. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  16. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  17. Kaonic mass by critical absorption of kaonic-atom x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lum, G.K.; Wiegand, C.E.; Kessler, E.G. Jr.; Deslattes, R.D.; Jacobs, L.; Schwitz, W.; Seki, R.

    1981-06-01

    The energy of x rays from the transition 6h..-->..5g in kaonic atoms of potassium falls on the K absorption edge of erbium. Measurement of the kaonic-x-ray attenuation in a precisely calibrated set of Er foils yields the x-ray energy 57 458.8 +- 6.3 eV. The kaon mass is related to energy through the Klein-Gordon equation plus corrections for radiative effects, electron screening, and other effects. The negative-kaon mass was found to be 493.640 +- 0.054 MeV/c/sup 2/ in agreement with the currently accepted value 493.669 +- 0.018 MeV/c/sup 2/ which was determined from x rays emitted by high-Z atoms where the corrections were larger than for Z = 19.

  18. A mass conserving level set method for detailed numerical simulation of liquid atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Kun; Shao, Changxiao [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Turbulence and Complex Systems, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fan, Jianren, E-mail: fanjr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-10-01

    An improved mass conserving level set method for detailed numerical simulations of liquid atomization is developed to address the issue of mass loss in the existing level set method. This method introduces a mass remedy procedure based on the local curvature at the interface, and in principle, can ensure the absolute mass conservation of the liquid phase in the computational domain. Three benchmark cases, including Zalesak's disk, a drop deforming in a vortex field, and the binary drop head-on collision, are simulated to validate the present method, and the excellent agreement with exact solutions or experimental results is achieved. It is shown that the present method is able to capture the complex interface with second-order accuracy and negligible additional computational cost. The present method is then applied to study more complex flows, such as a drop impacting on a liquid film and the swirling liquid sheet atomization, which again, demonstrates the advantages of mass conservation and the capability to represent the interface accurately.

  19. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Morzyński, Piotr; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S.; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J.; Killian, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered ...

  20. The investigation on the mass media reports on the JCO accident in the major atomic energy countries and Asian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JCO (Japan Conversion Organization) accident is the worst one in the history of the atomic energy developments in Japan. The many reports about the accident appeared in the 44 mass media in the world from Sep. 30 to Oct. 14, 1999. Chronological statistics of issued 522 articles are listed under particular criteria. Some of them were based on wrong knowledge and/or overestimations about the accident based on delivered articles by the news agency. Some of others gave critics over the total atomic energy industries of Japan, especially on safety managements and so-called similar Japan syndromes. This investigation gives emphasis on the articles based on wrong knowledge. We identified the countries and the newspaper publishers and the news agencies those gave wrong descriptions. Total 25 articles used the words [explosion] and [fire], which were delivered from the Kyodo News Service. Some of the Asian newspaper wrote that a large quantity of radioactivity, radioactive material and/or nuclear fuels was released. Some other news publishers said the accident was happened at fuel reprocessing facilities, when the waste fuel rods were under cutting. Critics delivered in the individual countries were summarized, i.e. USA, Canada, France, UK, German, Russia, Australia, China, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Taiwan and the news agencies. One of the key issues is the exact information release for the press corps on the early stage of the accidents. The second point is to recognize the different status on atomic energy in the individual countries, when Japan want to explain their domestic situations. Accidents of atomic energy gave many impacts on various aspects to other countries. Japan should understand the neighborhood by collecting world information on atomic energy and analyzing them. Summaries of 522 articles appeared in the mass media were attached in this investigation among the report of 180 pages. (Tanaka, Y.)

  1. A comparison of different cluster mass estimates: consistency or discrepancy ?

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiang-Ping; Chiueh, Tzihong; Fang, Li-Zhi; Xue, Yan-Jie

    1998-01-01

    Rich and massive clusters of galaxies at intermediate redshift are capable of magnifying and distorting the images of background galaxies. A comparison of different mass estimators among these clusters can provide useful information about the distribution and composition of cluster matter and their dynamical evolution. Using a hitherto largest sample of lensing clusters drawn from literature, we compare the gravitating masses of clusters derived from the strong/weak gravitational lensing phen...

  2. Improved statistical determination of absolute neutrino masses via radiative emission of neutrino pairs from atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The atomic transition from an excited state |e ⟩ to the ground state |g ⟩ by emitting a neutrino pair and a photon, i.e., |e ⟩→|g ⟩+|γ ⟩+|νi⟩+|ν¯j⟩ with i , j =1 , 2, 3, has been proposed by Yoshimura and his collaborators as an alternative way to determine the absolute scale m0 of neutrino masses. More recently, a statistical analysis of the fine structure of the photon spectrum from this atomic process has been performed [N. Song et al. Phys. Rev. D 93, 013020 (2016)] to quantitatively examine the experimental requirements for a realistic determination of absolute neutrino masses. In this paper, we show how to improve the statistical analysis and demonstrate that the previously required detection time can be reduced by one order of magnitude for the case of a 3 σ determination of m0˜0.01 eV with an accuracy better than 10%. Such an improvement is very encouraging for further investigations on measuring absolute neutrino masses through atomic processes.

  3. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. - Highlights: • The effective atomic numbers and electron densities determined for some samarium compounds from total mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge. • The measurements performed using secondary excitation geometry and a Si(Li) detector. • The experimental results compared with the theoretical calculation

  4. Two measured completely different electron affinities for atomic Eu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the electron affinity (EA) of atomic Eu was measured to be 0.116?eV. This value is in outstanding agreement with the theoretically calculated values using the Regge pole and MCDF-RCI methods. Previously, the EA of Eu was measured to be 1.053 eV. In an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between the two measured values, we have adopted the complex angular momentum (CAM) method and investigated in the electron energy range 0.11 eV methane to methanol without CO2 emission. These new results call for immediate experimental and theoretical verification.

  5. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  6. Anharmonicity of internal atomic oscillation and effective antineutrino mass evaluation from gaseous molecular tritium β-decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhov, Alexey V.; Titov, Nikita A.

    2016-07-01

    Data analysis of the next-generation effective antineutrino mass measurement experiment KATRIN requires reliable knowledge of systematic corrections. In particular, the width of the daughter molecular ion excitation spectrum rovibrational band should be known with better than 1% precision. Very precise ab initio quantum calculations exist, and we compare them with the well-known tritium molecule parameters within the framework of a phenomenological model. The rovibrational band width with accuracy of a few percent is interpreted as a result of the zero-point atomic oscillation in the harmonic potential. The Morse interatomic potential is used to investigate the impact of anharmonic atomic oscillations. The calculated corrections cannot account for the difference between the ab initio quantum calculations and the phenomenological model.

  7. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  8. Underground atom gradiometer array for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, B.

    2015-12-01

    After more than 20 years of fundamental research, atom interferometers have reached sensitivity and accuracy levels competing with or beating inertial sensors based on different technologies. Atom interferometers offer interesting applications in geophysics (gravimetry, gradiometry, Earth rotation rate measurements), inertial sensing (submarine or aircraft autonomous positioning), metrology (new definition of the kilogram) and fundamental physics (tests of the standard model, tests of general relativity). Atom interferometers already contributed significantly to fundamental physics by, for example, providing stringent constraints on quantum-electrodynamics through measurements of the hyperfine structure constant, testing the Equivalence Principle with cold atoms, or providing new measurements for the Newtonian gravitational constant. Cold atom sensors have moreover been established as key instruments in metrology for the new definition of the kilogram or through international comparisons of gravimeters. The field of atom interferometry (AI) is now entering a new phase where very high sensitivity levels must be demonstrated, in order to enlarge the potential applications outside atomic physics laboratories. These applications range from gravitational wave (GW) detection in the [0.1-10 Hz] frequency band to next generation ground and space-based Earth gravity field studies to precision gyroscopes and accelerometers. The Matter-wave laser Interferometric Gravitation Antenna (MIGA) presented here is a large-scale matter-wave sensor which will open new applications in geoscience and fundamental physics. The MIGA consortium gathers 18 expert French laboratories and companies in atomic physics, metrology, optics, geosciences and gravitational physics, with the aim to build a large-scale underground atom-interferometer instrument by 2018 and operate it till at least 2023. In this paper, we present the main objectives of the project, the status of the construction of the

  9. Thermal Casimir-Polder interaction of different atoms with graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Chaichian, M; Mostepanenko, V M; Tureanu, A

    2012-01-01

    The thermal correction to the energy of Casimir-Polder interaction of atoms with a suspended graphene membrane described by the Dirac model is investigated. We show that a major impact on the thermal correction is made by the size of the gap in the energy spectrum of graphene quasiparticles. Specifically, if the temperature is much smaller than the gap parameter (alternatively, larger or of the order of the gap parameter), the thermal correction is shown to be relatively small (alternatively, large). We have calculated the free energy of the thermal Casimir-Polder interaction of atoms of He, Na, Rb, and Cs with graphene described by both the hydrodynamic and Dirac models. It is shown that in exact computations using the Dirac model, one should use the polarization operator at nonzero temperature. The computational results for the Casimir-Polder free energy obtained in the framework of hydrodynamic model of graphene are several times larger than in the Dirac model within the separation region below 2$\\mu$m. We...

  10. Universal charge-mass relation: From black holes to atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar, E-mail: shaharhod@gmail.co [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2010-10-04

    The cosmic censorship hypothesis, introduced by Penrose forty years ago, is one of the corner stones of general relativity. This conjecture asserts that spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes. The elimination of a black-hole horizon is ruled out by this principle because that would expose naked singularities to distant observers. We test the consistency of this prediction in a gedanken experiment in which a charged object is swallowed by a charged black hole. We find that the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture requires the existence of a charge-mass bound of the form q{<=}{mu}{sup 2/3}E{sub c}{sup -1/3}, where q and {mu} are the charge and mass of the physical system respectively, and E{sub c} is the critical electric field for pair-production. Applying this bound to charged atomic nuclei, one finds an upper limit on the number Z of protons in a nucleus of given mass number A: Z{<=}Z{sup *}={alpha}{sup -1/3}A{sup 2/3}, where {alpha}=e{sup 2}/h is the fine structure constant. We test the validity of this novel bound against the (Z,A)-relation of atomic nuclei as deduced from the Weizsaecker semi-empirical mass formula.

  11. Neutron-proton mass difference in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Meißner, Ulf-G; Wirzba, A; Yakhshiev, U T

    2007-01-01

    Isospin-breaking effects in the baryonic sector are studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The neutron-proton mass difference in infinite, asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. In order to describe the influence of the nuclear environment on the skyrmions, we include energy-dependent charged and neutral pion optical potentials in the s- and p-wave channels. The present approach predicts that the neutron-proton mass difference is mainly dictated by its strong part and that it strongly decreases in neutron matter.

  12. Atomic structure of cascades of atomic displacements in metals and alloys after different types of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Using the methods of field ion microscopy, we studied radiation induced defects on an atomically clean surface and within a subsurface volume of platinum initiated by the interaction of neutron (E > 0.1MeV) and Ar+ beams (E = 30 keV). It is shown that the interaction of fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) F = 6.7-1021 m-2, F = 3.5-1022 m-2 with matter leads to the formation in the amount of platinum such as radiation damage which occur after ion irradiation by beams of charged Ar+ ions with E = 30 keV, F = 1020 ion/m2. They are observed at a depth of about 1.5-2 nm irradiated under the surface of Pt by ions Ar+. Thus, we have carried out modeling of neutron impact with matter when replacing the neutron beam by an ion beam that causes the same radiation damage in the bulk of the material. Experimental results on atomic-spatial investigation of radiative defect formation in surface layers of materials, initiated by neutron bombardment (of Pt, E > 0.1 MeV) and ion implantation (in Cu3Au: E = 40 keV, F = 1020 ion/m2, j = 10-3 A/cm2), are considered. Quantitative estimates obtained for the size, shape, and volume fraction of cascades of atomic displacements formed under various types of irradiation in the surface layers of the materials. It is showing that the average size of radiation clusters after irradiation of platinum to a fast neutron fluence of 6.7-1022 m-2 (E > 0.1 MeV) is about 3.2 nm. The experimentally established average size of a radiation cluster (disordered zone) in the alloy after ion bombardment is 4×4×1.5 nm.

  13. Determination of the effective atomic and mass numbers for mixture and compound materials in high energy photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In consideration the radiological properties of materials and studying the scattering processes in atomic and nuclear physics, the effective atomic and mass numbers is widely employed. These numbers have been calculated for any mixed or composite materials in interaction with high energy photons (Linac in radiation therapy). A pair equation in terms of these numbers is obtained. The first equation has been derived from the conservation of mass energy law and the second by minimizing the binding energy from the semiempirical mass formula (Myers and Swiatecki formula) that gives a relation between atomic and mass numbers for stable nuclei approximately. By these equations one can obtain the effective atomic and mass numbers for any compound or mixed materials uniquely. These numbers are calculated for some materials and compared with the other studies. (author)

  14. Effective mass of 4He atom in superfluid and normal phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formula for the temperature dependence of the effective mass of a 4He atom in the superfluid and normal phases is obtained. This expression for the effective mass allows one to eliminate infra-red divergences, being applicable at all temperatures, except for a narrow fluctuation region 0.97<< approx T/Tc<=1. In the high and low temperature limits, as well as in the interactionless limit, the obtained expression reproduces the well known results. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity and the phase transition temperature Tc∼2.18 K are calculated, by using the formula obtained for the effective mass. In the framework of the approach proposed in this work, the small critical index η is determined in the random phase approximation. The obtained value corresponds to the well known result

  15. Controllable irregular melting induced by atomic segregation in bimetallic clusters with fabricating different initial configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The melting process of Co, Co-Cu and Co-Ni clusters with different initial configurations is studied in molecular dynamics by a general embedded atom method. An irregular melting, at which energy decreases as the temperature increase near the melting point, is found in the onion-like Co-Cu-Co clusters, but not in the mixed Co-Cu and onion-like Co-Ni-Co clusters. From the analysis of atomic distributions and energy variation, the results indicate the irregular melting is induced by Cu atomic segregation. Furthermore, this melting can be controlled by doping hetero atoms with different surface energies and controlling their distributions.

  16. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  17. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  18. Mass and orientation effects in dissociative collisions between rare gas atoms and alkali halide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collision induced dissociation of alkali halide molecules to ion pairs upon impact with hyperthermal rare gas atoms has been investigated using the crossed molecular beam method. Relative total cross sections for the dissociation of CsI, CsBr, RbI, and KI to ion pairs upon collision with xenon and krypton have been measured over a relative collision energy range from threshold to 10 and 8 eV, respectively. In addition, complete angular and energy distributions of both dissociated ions from Xe+CsI, CsBr, and RbI collisions and from Kr+CsI and CsBr collisions have been obtained at several collision energies within the above energy range. Mass, collision orientation, and energy dependence effects observed throughout this work define two limiting case dissociation mechanisms for the Xe(Kr)+MX→Xe(Kr)+M++X- processes. The dominant dissociation configuration consists of the rare gas atom incident on the light atom end of the alkali halide molecule in a near collinear collision. The less preferred dissociation mechanism results when the rare gas atom is incident in a near collinear configuration on the heavy atom end of the alkali halide molecule. Experimental measurements of the percentage of energy transfer from the relative kinetic energy between Xe(Kr) and MX to the relative motion of M+--X- range as high as 95%; these percentage energy transfers correlate well with the predictions of an impulsive collision model. Three-dimensional classical trajectory calculations using realistic interaction potentials have been performed and they verify the dynamical interpretation suggested by the experiments

  19. Chloride isolation for accelerator mass spectrometry of 36Cl produced by atomic bomb neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry was performed at the Munich tandem laboratory to determine the ratio of 36Cl/Cl in silicate rock samples exposed to neutrons of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chloride was chemically separated from silicate rock for this purpose. Five grams of silicate rock was fused with 30 g of sodium hydroxide and dissolved in 900 ml of water. The chloride in the resulting solution was spectrophotometrically determined. Chloride was precipitated as silver chloride by addition of appropriate amounts of silver nitrate, and silver chloride was then collected on a membrane filter. The chloride in the rock samples was thus isolated quantitatively. (author)

  20. Neutron-proton mass difference in nuclear matter

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, U.G.; Rakhimov, A. M.; Wirzba, A.; Yakhshiev, U.T.

    2006-01-01

    Isospin-breaking effects in nuclear matter are studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The proposed effective Lagrangian incorporates both the medium influence of the surrounding nuclear environment on the single nucleon properties and an explicit isospin-breaking effect in the mesonic sector. The approach predicts that the neutron-proton mass difference decreases in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter but by a very small amount only.

  1. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some thermoluminescent dosimetric compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivalinge Gowda; S Krishnaveni; T Yashoda; T K Umesh; Ramakrishna Gowda

    2004-09-01

    Photon mass attenuation coefficients of some thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) compounds, such as LiF, CaCO3, CaSO4, CaSO4·2H2O, SrSO4, CdSO4, BaSO4, C4H6BaO4 and 3CdSO4·8H2O were determined at 279.2, 320.07, 514.0, 661.6, 1115.5, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV in a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up using a high resolution, hyper pure germanium detector. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to compute the effective atomic number and the electron density of TLD compounds. The interpolation of total attenuation cross-sections of photons of energy in elements of atomic number was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by the authors and reported earlier. The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon energy range of 279.2 to 320.07 keV, 514.0 to 661.6 keV and 1115.5 to 1332.5 keV by a piece-wise interpolation method were then used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in agreement with other available published values.

  2. Atomic force microscopy fishing and mass spectrometry identification of gp120 on immobilized aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov YD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuri D Ivanov,1 Natalia S Bukharina,1 Tatyana O Pleshakova,1 Pavel A Frantsuzov,1 Elena Yu Andreeva,1 Anna L Kaysheva,1,2 Victor G Zgoda,1 Alexander A Izotov,1 Tatyana I Pavlova,1 Vadim S Ziborov,1 Sergey P Radko,1 Sergei A Moshkovskii,1 Alexander I Archakov1 1Department of Personalized Medicine, Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia; 2PostgenTech Ltd., Moscow, Russia Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM was applied to carry out direct and label-free detection of gp120 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein as a target protein. This approach was based on the AFM fishing of gp120 from the analyte solution using anti-gp120 aptamers immobilized on the AFM chip to count gp120/aptamer complexes that were formed on the chip surface. The comparison of image contrasts of fished gp120 against the background of immobilized aptamers and anti-gp120 antibodies on the AFM images was conducted. It was shown that an image contrast of the protein/aptamer complexes was two-fold higher than the contrast of the protein/antibody complexes. Mass spectrometry identification provided an additional confirmation of the target protein presence on the AFM chips after biospecific fishing to avoid any artifacts. Keywords: gp120 HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, aptamer, atomic force microscopy, mass spectrometry

  3. The different baryonic Tully-Fisher relations at low masses

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, C B; Stinson, G

    2016-01-01

    We compare the Baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) of simulations and observations of galaxies ranging from dwarfs to spirals, using various measures of rotational velocity Vrot. We explore the BTFR when measuring Vrot at the flat part of the rotation curve, Vflat, at the extent of HI gas, Vlast, and using 20% (W20) and 50% (W50) of the width of HI line profiles. We also compare with the maximum circular velocity of the parent halo, Vmax, within dark matter only simulations. The different BTFRs increasingly diverge as galaxy mass decreases. Using Vlast one obtains a power law over four orders of magnitude in baryonic mass, with slope similar to the observed BTFR. Measuring Vflat gives similar results as Vlast when galaxies with rising rotation curves are excluded. However, higher rotation velocities would be found for low mass galaxies if the cold gas extended far enough for Vrot to reach a maximum. W20 gives a similar slope as Vlast but with slightly lower values of Vrot for low mass galaxies, although thi...

  4. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids. - Highlights: • We report the values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ). • The values of (Zeff) i.e. effective atomic number are calculated. • Measurement of effective electron density (Neff) of some amino acids. • Comparison of all μ/ρ values with XCOM programme

  5. Atomic Mineral Characteristics of Indonesian Osteoporosis by High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zairin Noor; Sutiman Bambang Sumitro; Mohammad Hidayat; Agus Hadian Rahim; Akhmad Sabarudin; Tomonari Umemura

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research indicates that negative calcium balance is associated with low bone mass, rapid bone loss, and high fracture rates. However, some studies revealed that not only calcium is involved in bone strengthening as risk factor of fracture osteoporosis. Thus, in this report, the difference of metallic and nonmetallic elements in osteoporosis and normal bones was studied by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). The influence of these elements on bone...

  6. Long distance contribution to the KL-KS mass difference

    CERN Document Server

    Christ, N H; Sachrajda, C T; Soni, A; Yu, J

    2012-01-01

    We develop and demonstrate techniques needed to compute the long distance contribution to the $K_{L}$-$K_{S}$ mass difference, $\\Delta M_K$, in lattice QCD and carry out a first, exploratory calculation of this fundamental quantity. The calculation is performed on 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion, $16^3\\times32$ configurations with a 421 MeV pion mass. We include only current-current operators and drop all disconnected and double penguin diagrams. The short distance part of the mass difference in a 2+1 flavor calculation contains a quadratic divergence cut off by the lattice spacing. Here, this quadratic divergence is eliminated through the GIM mechanism by introducing a valence charm quark. The inclusion of the charm quark makes the complete calculation accessible to lattice methods provided the discretization errors associated with the charm quark can be controlled. The long distance effects are discussed for each parity channel separately. While we can see a clear signal in the parity odd channel, the signa...

  7. Differences between application of some basic principles of quantum mechanics on atomic and mesoscopic levels

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulov, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Formalism of the quantum mechanics developed for microscopic (atomic) level comes into collision with some logical difficulties on mesoscopic level. Some fundamental differences between application of its basic principles on microscopic and mesoscopic levels are accentuated.

  8. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  9. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-06-01

    A measurement of the mass difference between the top and the antitop quark (Delta m(t) = m(t) - m(anti-t)) is performed using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.96 +/- 0.11 inverse femtobarns, and yields the value of Delta m(t) = -0.44 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) GeV. This result is consistent with equality of particle and antiparticle masses required by CPT invariance, and provides a significantly improved precision relative to existing measurements.

  10. Measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cerny, Karel; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Fischer, David; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Krajczar, Krisztian; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Visca, Lorenzo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Nelson, Randy; Pellett, Dave; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lueking, Lee; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Chung, Kwangzoo; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Richards, Alan; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the mass difference between the top and the antitop quark (Delta m(t) = m(t) - m(anti-t)) is performed using events with a muon or an electron and at least four jets in the final state. The analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.96 +/- 0.11 inverse femtobarns, and yields the value of Delta m(t) = -0.44 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.27 (syst) GeV. This result is consistent with equality of particle and antiparticle masses required by CPT invariance, and provides a significantly improved precision relative to existing measurements.

  11. Multigroup cross sections of resonant nuclei considering moderator mass differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multigroup constants library MGCL in the nuclear criticality safety evaluation code system JACS has been produced by the Bondarenko method to treat self-shielding effects. For estimating errors of this treatment, the multigroup cross sections of MGCL are compared with those obtained by precise treatment, i.e. with the weighted cross sections by ultra-fine spectra of neutron. The precise calculations are made for homogeneous mixtures of a resonant nucleus (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu or 56Fe) and a fictitious moderator nucleus with mass number 1, 12 or 200. The ultra-fine spectrum is calculated by the RABBLE code. Distinct differences are found in the self-shielding factors by comparisons between both treatments. Moreover, as the mass number increases, depressions of the self-shielding factor at the resonance peaks and its enhancements at the window of resonances are observed. (author)

  12. Prediction of mass excess, β-decay energy and neutron separation energy from the atomic mass formula with empirical shell terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we proposed two types of atomic mass formula (constant-shell-term formula, linear-shell-term formula). With use of these formulas, we calculate and tabulate mass excesses, neutron separation energies, and β-decay energies (β-decay and/or electron capture) for about 5000 nuclides. The mass excess values and their errors in the 1977 atomic mass evaluation by A.H. Wapstra and K. Bos which we used in constructing our formulas, are also tabulated for reference. The constant-shell-term formula is fitted to 1468 input mass data with the standard deviation of 626 keV and the linear-shell-term formula with 394 keV

  13. Universal charge-mass relation: From black holes to atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic censorship hypothesis, introduced by Penrose forty years ago, is one of the corner stones of general relativity. This conjecture asserts that spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes. The elimination of a black-hole horizon is ruled out by this principle because that would expose naked singularities to distant observers. We test the consistency of this prediction in a gedanken experiment in which a charged object is swallowed by a charged black hole. We find that the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture requires the existence of a charge-mass bound of the form $q\\leq\\mu^{2/3}E^{-1/3}_c$, where $q$ and $\\mu$ are the charge and mass of the physical system respectively, and $E_c$ is the critical electric field for pair-production. Applying this bound to charged atomic nuclei, one finds an upper limit on the number $Z$ of protons in a nucleus of given mass number $A$: $Z\\leq Z^*={\\alpha}^{-1/3}A^{2/3}$, where $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar$ is the ...

  14. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J; Killian, T C

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered avoided crossing between the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ $0_u$ ($^3\\Pi^+_u$) and $^1S_0$$+$$^1D_2$ $0_u$ ($^1\\Sigma^+_u$) potential curves at short range and we build a mass scaled interaction model that quantitatively reproduces the available $0_u$ bound state energies for the three stable bosonic isotopes. We also provide a two-channel model that incorporates the rotational (Coriolis) mixing between the $0_u$ and $1_u$ curves which, while not mass scaled, is capable of quantitatively describing the vibrational splittings observed...

  15. Test of the universality of free fall with atoms in different spin Orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Xiao-Chun; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Yao, Hui-Bin; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Luo, Jun; Hu, and Zhong-Kun

    2015-01-01

    We report a test of the universality of free fall (UFF) related to spin-gravity coupling effects by comparing the gravity acceleration of the $^{87}$Rb atoms in $m_F=+1$ versus that in $m_F=-1$, where the corresponding spin orientations are opposite. A Mach-Zehnder-type atom interferometer is exploited to sequentially measure the free fall acceleration of the atoms in these two sublevels, and the resultant E$\\rm{\\ddot{o}}$tv$\\rm{\\ddot{o}}$s ratio determined by this work is ${\\eta_S} =(-0.2\\pm1.5)\\times 10^{-5}$. The interferometer using atoms in $m_F=+1$ or $m_F=-1$ is highly sensitive to magnetic field inhomogeneity, which limits the current experimental precision of our UFF test. The work here provides a stepping stone for future higher precision UFF test related to different spin orientations on atomic basis.

  16. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  17. Phonon effects on the double mass differences in magic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Baldo, M.; Gnezdilov, N. V.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Odd-even double mass differences (DMDs) of magic nuclei are found within an approach starting from the free N N interaction, accounting for particle-phonon coupling (PC) effects. We consider three PC effects: the phonon-induced effective interaction, the renormalization of the "ends" due to the pole PC contribution to the nucleon mass operator, and the change of the single-particle energies. The perturbation theory in gL2, where gL is the vertex of the creation of the L -multipole phonon, is used for PC calculations. PC corrections to single-particle energies are found with an approximate accounting for the tadpole diagram. Results for magic Ca,4840, Ni,7856, Sn,132100, and 208Pb nuclei are presented. For the lighter part of this set of nuclei, from 40Ca to 56Ni, the cases divide approximately in half, between those where the PC corrections to DMD values are in good agreement with the data and the ones with the opposite result. In the major part of the cases of worsening description of DMD, a poor applicability of the perturbation theory for the induced interaction is the most probable reason of the phenomenon. For intermediate nuclei, 78Ni and 100Sn, there are no sufficiently accurate data on masses of nuclei necessary for finding DMD values. Finally, for heavier nuclei, 132Sn and 208Pb, PC corrections always result in better agreement with experiment.

  18. Influence of the atomic mass of the background gas on laser ablation plume propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of time-of-flight ion probe measurements and gas dynamical modeling has been used to investigate the propagation of a laser ablation plume in gases of different atomic/molecular weight. The pressure variation of the ion time-of-flight was found to be well described by the gas...... dynamical model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (Appl. Supercond. 1:2011, 1993). In particular, the model describes how the pressure required to stop the plume in a given distance depends on the atomic/molecular weight of the gas, which is a feature that cannot be explained by standard point......-blast-wave descriptions of laser ablation plume expansion in gas....

  19. Atomic mass dependence of hadron production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li-Hua; LIU Na; DUAN Chun-Gui

    2013-01-01

    Hadron production in lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering is studied in a quark energy loss model.The leading-order computations for hadron multiplicity ratios are presented and compared with the selected HERMES pions production data with the quark hadronization occurring outside the nucleus by means of the hadron formation time.It is found that the obtained energy loss per unit length is 0.440±0.013 GeV/fm for an outgoing quark by the global fit.It is confirmed that the atomic mass number dependence of hadron attenuation is theoretically and experimentally in good agreement with the A2/3 power law for quark hadronization occurring outside the nucleus.

  20. Test of the Pauli exclusion principle for nucleons and atomic electrons by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pauli exclusion principle was tested by searching with accelerator mass spectrometry for non-Paulian atoms with three electrons in the K-shell and for non-Paulian nuclei with three protons or three neutrons in the nuclear 1 s1/2 shell. For non-Paulian atoms of 20Ne and 36Ar the following limits have been obtained: N(20Ne)/N(20Ne)-21 and N(36Ar)/N(36Ar)-17. For non-Paulian nuclei of 5Li and 5He with three protons or three neutrons, respectively, in the nuclear 1 s1/2 shell the following limits have been measured: N(5Li)/N(6Li)-17 for a range of proton separation energies of 5Li between 0 and 50 MeV and N(5He)/N(4He)-15 for neutron separation energies between 0 and 32 MeV. The result for 5Li is used to deduce a limit for the probability β2/2 of finding two colliding protons in the symmetric state with respect to exchange to be β2/2-32. (orig.)

  1. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  2. An ab initio theory of double odd-even mass differences in nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lombardo U.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two aspects of the problem of evaluating double odd-even mass differences D2 in semi-magic nuclei are studied related to existence of two components with different properties, a superfluid nuclear subsystem and a non-superfluid one. For the superfluid subsystem, the difference D2 is approximately equal to 2Δ, the gap Δ being the solution of the gap equation. For the non-superfluid subsystem, D2 is found by solving the equation for two-particle Green function for normal systems. Both equations under consideration contain the same effective pairing interaction. For the latter, the semi-microscopic model is used in which the main term calculated from the first principles is supplemented with a small phenomenological addendum containing one phenomenological parameter supposed to be universal for all medium and heavy atomic nuclei.

  3. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification of cosmetic samples prior to elemental analysis by different atomic spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, I; Cabaleiro, N; Costas, M; de la Calle, I; Bendicho, C

    2009-11-15

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted emulsification with a probe system is proposed as a rapid and simple sample treatment for atomic spectrometric determinations (Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry, Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn) in cosmetic samples such as shampoos, gel (hair gel), crèmes (body milk, hair conditioner) and oil (body oil). The type of dispersion medium, the sample mass-to-dispersion medium volume ratio, as well as the parameters related to the ultrasound-assisted emulsification (sonication amplitude and treatment time) were exhaustively studied. Only 1 min of ultrasonic shaking and a dispersion medium containing 0.5% (w/v) of SDS+3% (v/v) of HNO(3) or HCl allows obtaining a stable emulsion at least for 3 months. Thermal programs, nebulization of emulsions, speed of pumps and concentration of reagents used in cold vapour generation were optimized. Calibration using aqueous standards was feasible in all cases. Calibration by the standard addition method and recovery studies was also applied for validation. Microwave-assisted digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry were used for comparison purposes. Relative standard deviations from analysis of five independent emulsions were less than 9% in all cases. PMID:19782199

  4. Effective atomic numbers of some tissue substitutes by different methods: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective atomic numbers of some human organ tissue substitutes such as polyethylene terephthalate, red articulation wax, paraffin 1, paraffin 2, bolus, pitch, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, polyvinylchloride, and modeling clay have been calculated by four different methods like Auto-Zeff, direct, interpolation, and power law. It was found that the effective atomic numbers computed by Auto-Zeff, direct and interpolation methods were in good agreement for intermediate energy region (0.1 MeV eff was observed in photo-electric and pair-production regions. Effective atomic numbers computed by power law were found to be close to direct method in photo-electric absorption region. The Auto-Zeff, direct and interpolation methods were found to be in good agreement for computation of effective atomic numbers in intermediate energy region (100 keV < E < 10 MeV). The direct method was found to be appropriate method for computation of effective atomic numbers in photo-electric region (10 keV < E < 100 keV). The tissue equivalence of the tissue substitutes is possible to represent by any method for computation of effective atomic number mentioned in the present study. An accurate estimation of Rayleigh scattering is required to eliminate effect of molecular, chemical, or crystalline environment of the atom for estimation of gamma interaction parameters. (author)

  5. A two-frequency ion trap confining ions with widely different charge-to-mass ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Trypogeorgos, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    We describe the theory of two-frequency operation of an ion trap and solve the equations of motion for two species of ions with molecular mass, charge: $M_A,+1$ and $M_B, +33$ respectively, where $M_A = \\SI{138}{amu}$ is an isotope of barium and $M_B = \\SI{1.4e6}{amu}$, e.g., a large protein or molecular complex. The quadrupole electric field is created by RF radiation with angular frequencies $\\omega_1$ and $\\omega_2$ (with $\\omega_2 = 100 \\omega_1$). For such very different charge-to-mass ratios, and radio-frequencies, the heavy ions (molecular mass $M_B$) are confined most strongly by the field at the lower frequency $\\omega_1$, and trapping of ions of atomic mass $M_A$ arises from the field at $\\omega_2$. Thus we obtain a superposition of two almost independent Paul traps whose centres can be made coincident or moved apart. Importantly the effective spring constants can be adjusted to be the same for both species so that all the ions interact strongly. This allows efficient sympathetic cooling of the heav...

  6. Quark Coulomb Interactions and the Mass Difference of Mirror Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J

    2001-01-01

    We study the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer (ONS) anomaly in the binding energy of mirror nuclei at high density by adding a single neutron or proton to a quark gluon plasma. In this high-density limit we find an anomaly equal to two-thirds of the Coulomb exchange energy of a proton. This effect is dominated by quark electromagnetic interactions---rather than by the up-down quark mass difference. At normal density we calculate the Coulomb energy of neutron matter using a string-flip quark model. We find a nonzero Coulomb energy because of the neutron's charged constituents. This effect could make a significant contribution to the ONS anomaly.

  7. INVESTIGATIONS OF SUPERCONDUCTING AND NON-SUPERCONDUCTING YBa2 Cu3 O7-x BY FIELD ION MICROSCOPY, ATOM-PROBE MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND FIELD ELECTRON EMISSION

    OpenAIRE

    Kellogg, G.; Brenner, S

    1988-01-01

    The structure and composition of superconducting and non-superconducting samples of YBa2Cu3O7-x were examined by field ion microscopy, atom-probe mass spectroscopy and field-electron emission techniques. Field ion microscope images from both types of material exhibited ring structures associated with atomic or multiatomic layers and uniform, layer-by-layer field evaporation was possible. Atom-probe mass spectra contained signals corresponding to atomic and molecular oxygen, all three metals, ...

  8. Different platform and tube geometries and atomization temperatures in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: Cadmium determination in whole blood as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the performance of different platform and tube geometries and atomization temperatures in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated, using the determination of Cd in whole blood as an example. Grooved, integrated and fork platforms as well as atomization temperatures between 1200 deg. C and 2200 deg. C were investigated in a longitudinally heated graphite atomizer and compared with the performance of a transversely heated furnace. In the longitudinally heated furnace the increase of the atomization temperature in the studied range resulted in an increase of matrix effects for all platform geometries. The integrated platform exhibited slightly lower sensitivity and increased multiplicative interferences in comparison to the other two platform designs. Interference-free Cd determination was possible with all types of platforms and 1200 deg. C as the atomization temperature as well as with grooved and fork platforms at 1700 deg. C. On the other hand, lower atomization temperatures resulted in poorer limits of detection, due to the longer integration time needed. No matrix effect was observed at any atomization temperature using the transversely heated atomizer; in addition, limits of detection were better than those observed with the longitudinally heated atomizer. Best values were around 0.02 μg L-1 with the latter atomizer compared to values around 0.02 μg L-1 with the former one

  9. Mass spectrometric determination of atomization energies of inorganic molecules and their correlation by empirical models of bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the Knudsen effusion method combined with mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomization energies of inorganic molecules is described. Recent results with emphasis on molecular metals, intermetallic molecules and metal carbides are presented. The use and limitations of various empirica models of bonding are illustrated by comparing experimental values with those calculated by the various models

  10. Neutrino masses from SUSY: Different contributions and their implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhir K Vempati

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the various sources of neutrino masses in supersymmetric standard models with explicit lepton number violation. We show that the bilinear lepton number violating soft terms in models with either bilinear or trilinear lepton number violating couplings in the superpotential, play an important role in determining the neutrino mass spectrum. A comparative study of the neutrino mass spectrum and its implications for the present neutrino anomalies in these models is presented.

  11. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the total mass attenuation coefficients (mm) for some homo- and hetero-chain polymers, namely polyamide-6 (PA-6), poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) were measured at 59.5, 511, 661.6, 1173.2, 1274.5 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were separately irradiated with 241Am, 22Na, 137Cs and 60Co (638 kBq) radioactive gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a '2 x 2' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector having an energy resolution of 7 % at 662 keV gamma ray from the decay of 137Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μm values for the investigated samples. Furthermore, Zeff and Neff of each polymer were computed for total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The experimental values of the selected polymers were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. (authors)

  12. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for some polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, Nil; Cakir, Merve; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the total mass attenuation coefficients (μ(m)) for some homo- and hetero-chain polymers, namely polyamide-6 (PA-6), poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) were measured at 59.5, 511, 661.6, 1173.2, 1274.5 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were separately irradiated with (241)Am, (22)Na, (137)Cs and (60)Co (638 kBq) radioactive gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″×2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector having an energy resolution of 7 % at 662 keV gamma ray from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and the effective electron densities (N(eff)) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μ(m) values for the investigated samples. Furthermore, Z(eff) and N(eff) of each polymer were computed for total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The experimental values of the selected polymers were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:22645382

  13. EPR, FTIR, and FAB mass spectrometric investigation of reaction of H atoms with C 60 in a cyclohexane matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. A.

    1993-03-01

    Hydrogen atoms have been reacted with C 60 in a cyclohexane matrix at 77 K in a rotating cryostat. Species HC 60, H 2 n + 1 C 60, and H 2 nC 60 have been identified by EPR, FTIR and FAB mass spectrometry. HC 60 has the magnetic parameters aH(1) = 92.9 ± 0.5 MHz and g = 2.00218 ± 0.00004. These values are compared to the deuterium and muonium analogs. Reasons for the isotope effect in the hydrogen and muon hyperfine interactions of HC 60 and MuC 60 are discussed. The narrow line widths of the EPR transitions of H 2 n + 1C 60 may be associated with globe-trotting hydrogen atoms. C 60 acts as a H atom sponge at high atom fluxes and H 2 nC 60s with n as large as 17 have been identified.

  14. Effects of a static electric field on two-color photoassociation between different atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashree Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study non-perturbative effects of a static electric field on two-color photoassociation of different atoms. A static electric field induces anisotropy in scattering between two different atoms and hybridizes field-free rotational states of heteronuclear dimers or polar molecules. In a previous paper [D. Chakraborty et al., J. Phys. B 44, 095201 (2011], the effects of a static electric field on one-color photoassociation between different atoms has been described through field-modified ground-state scattering states, neglecting electric field effects on heteronuclear diatomic bound states. To study the effects of a static electric field on heteronuclear bound states, and the resulting influence on Raman-type two-color photoassociation between different atoms in the presence of a static electric field, we develop a non-perturbative numerical method to calculate static electric field-dressed heteronuclear bound states. We show that the static electric field induced scattering anisotropy as well as hybridization of rotational states strongly influence two-color photoassociation spectra, leading to significant enhancement in PA rate and large shift. In particular, for static electric field strengths of a few hundred kV/cm, two-color PA rate involving high-lying bound states in electronic ground-state increases by several orders of magnitude even in the weak photoassociative coupling regime.

  15. The temperature of optical molasses for two different atomic angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the temperature of laser-cooled Rb atoms in optical molasses as a function of laser intensity and detuning. For both 85Rb and 87Rb, cooled on the F=3→F'=4 and F=2→F'=3 transitions, respectively, the temperatures are proportional to the ratio of laser power and detuning for a wide range of these parameters. We observe a small but significant difference betwee the two isotopes. We also show the results of three-dimensional semi-classical numerical calculations. Our results favor a model which includes atomic localization in optical standing waves. (orig.)

  16. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Farinas, M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Barciela Garcia, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Garcia Martin, S. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Pena Crecente, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Herrero Latorre, C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain)]. E-mail: cherrero@lugo.usc.es

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1}), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  17. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO3)2 and (NH4)H2PO4-Mg(NO3)2] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 μg L-1), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged -1

  18. The dependence of scattering length on van derWaals interaction and reduced mass of the system in two-atomic collision at cold energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAY HASI

    2016-07-01

    The static exchange model (SEM) and the modified static exchange model (MSEM) recently introduced by Ray in {\\it Pramana – J. Phys.} 83, 907 (2014) are used to study the elastic collision between two hydrogen-like atoms when both are in ground states by considering the system as a four-body Coulomb system in the centre of mass frame, in which all the Coulomb interaction terms in direct and exchange channels are treated exactly. The SEM includes the non-adiabatic short-range effect due to electron exchange. The MSEM added init, the long-range effect due to induced dynamic dipole polarizabilities between the atoms e.g., the van der Waals interaction. Applying the SEM code in different H-like two-atomic systems, a reduced mass $(\\mu)$ dependence on the scattering length is observed. Again, applying the MSEM code on H(1s)–H(1s) elastic scattering and varying the minimum values of interatomic distance $R_0$, the dependence of scattering length on the effective interatomic potential consistent with the existing physics is observed. Both these basic findings in low and cold energy atomic collision physics are quite useful and are being reported for the first time.

  19. The dependence of scattering length on van der Waals interaction and reduced mass of the system in two-atomic collision at cold energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAY, HASI

    2016-06-01

    The static-exchange model (SEM) and the modified static-exchange model (MSEM) recently introduced by Ray [1] is applied to study the elastic collision between two hydrogen-like atoms when both are in ground states considering the system as a four-body Coulomb problem in the center of mass frame, in which all the Coulomb interaction terms in direct and exchange channels are treated exactly. The SEM includes the non-adiabatic short-range effect due to electron-exchange. The MSEM added in it, the long-range effect due to induced dynamic dipole polarizabilities between the atoms e.g. the Van der Waals interaction. Applying the SEM code in different H-like two-atomic systems, a reduced mass dependence on scattering length is observed. Again applying the MSEM code on H(1s)-H(1s) elastic scattering and varying the minimum values of interatomic distance, the dependence of scattering length on the effective interatomic potential consistent with the existing physics are observed. Both these basic findings in low and cold energy atomic collision physics are quite useful and are being reported for the first time.

  20. Dispersion coefficients for the interaction of Cs atom with different material media

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K; Arora, Bindiya

    2015-01-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interaction of a Cs atom with different material media such as Au (metal), Si (semiconductor) and various dielectric surfaces like SiO$_2$, SiN$_{\\rm{x}}$, sapphire and YAG are determined using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the Cs atom obtained employing the relativistic coupled-cluster approach and the dynamic dielectric constants of the walls. Moreover, we also give the retardation coefficients in the graphical representation as functions of separation distances to describe the interaction potentials between the Cs atom with the above considered material media. For the easy access to the interaction potentials at a given distance of separation, we devise a simple working functional fitting form for the retarded coefficients in terms of two parameters that are quoted for each medium.

  1. Measurement of the magnetic moment of the negative muon bound in different atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical calculations show that the magnetic moment of the electron and the negative muon in the bound state in an atom should be different from the magnetic moment of the free particle due to their relativistic motion. There are also additional radiative corrections to the magnetic moment of a bound electron (muon) due to the presence of the strong Coulomb field of the atomic nucleus. The results of the measurements of the magnetic moment of the negative muon in carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, and zinc are presented. The accuracy of the measurements makes it possible to prove the dependence of the relativistic correction to the magnetic moment of a bound muon on Z of the atom

  2. The Direct-Zeff software for direct calculation of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and effective electron number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Determination of effective atomic and effective electron number is very important. • The Direct-Zeff software calculates effective atomic and effective electron number. • The Direct-Zeff software calculates for total and partial photon interactions. • Calculations of The Direct-Zeff are in good agreement with experimental results. - Abstract: Determination of the mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ, the effective atomic number, Zeff, and the effective electron number, Neff, is very important in the fields of nuclear diagnostics, radiation protection, nuclear medicine and radiation dosimetry. In this work, the Direct-Zeff software was developed for the computation of the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number and the effective electron number per unit mass in the energy range 1 keV–100 GeV. The values of the Zeff, Neff and μ/ρ can be determined for total photon interaction with and without coherent interaction as well as partial photon interactions such as coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production by using the Direct-Zeff software. The accuracy of the Direct-Zeff software has been demonstrated by comparing the calculated data and the experimental values for the various materials. The Direct-Zeff software can be freely obtained by contacting with the authors

  3. Data file and management-retrieval code system of sub-library of atomic masses and characteristics constants of nuclear ground state (CENPL·MCC-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The library of atomic masses and characteristic constants for nuclear ground states, a sub-library of Chinese Evaluated Nuclear Parameter Library (CENPL), consists of two parts: the data file and management-retrieval code system. The former stores the nuclear basic data, such as the mass excesses, abundances and half-lives, spines and parities of the nuclear ground states. The latter is developed to retrieve the data stored in the data file. It can also derive the separation energies of some particles and particle groups and β-decay energies; nuclear reaction energies and the corresponding threshold energies for some neutron reaction channels including the third reaction process could also be obtained as combinations of different mass excesses. The function, feature and operation instruction of the code system are described briefly

  4. The Mass Attenuation Coefficients, Electronic, Atomic, and Molecular Cross Sections, Effective Atomic Numbers, and Electron Densities for Compounds of Some Biomedically Important Elements at 59.5 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Akça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mass attenuation coefficients for compounds of biomedically important some elements (Na, Mg, Al, Ca, and Fe have been measured by using an extremely narrow collimated-beam transmission method in the energy 59.5 keV. Total electronic, atomic, and molecular cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities have been obtained by using these results. Gamma-rays of 241Am passed through compounds have been detected by a high-resolution Si(Li detector and by using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF. Obtained results have been compared with theoretically calculated values of WinXCom and FFAST. The relative difference between the experimental and theoretical values are −9.4% to +11.9% with WinXCom and −11.8% to +11.7% FFAST. Results have been presented and discussed in this paper.

  5. Hypernuclei formation probability as a function of the atomic mass number A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, G.; Finuda Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    The creation of a hypernucleus [2], that is a nucleus in which a nucleon is replaced by an hyperon, requires the injection of strangeness into the nucleus. This is possible in different ways [3], mainly using π+ or K- beams on nuclear targets; recently, also electron beams have been used. The FINUDA experiment at the DAΦNE Φ factory of the INFN "Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati" produced Λ-hypernuclei by stopping, in thin nuclear targets (0.1-0.2 g/cm2), the negative kaons originating from the Φ decay through the strangeness-exchange reaction Kstop-+AZ→A/ΛZ+π-, where AZ indicates the target nucleus and A/ΛZ the Λ hypernucleus in which a Λ particle replaced a neutron. FINUDA, an unconventional and innovative apparatus, allowed the positioning of 8 different target modules around the interaction region. In this way different targets could be studied contemporaneously, with the same apparatus and with the same analysis technique, allowing for a direct comparison between different nuclei. In particular FINUDA could study the production of Λ-hypernuclei on 7Li, 9Be, 12C, 13C and 16O targets. Both the Λ binding energy and the hypernuclei production probabilities have been measured [1]. The new measurements on 7/ΛLi, 9/ΛBe, 13/ΛC and 16/ΛO, along with previous measurements on 12/ΛC, allowed for a meaningful study of the formation of p-shell hypernuclei from the two-body capture of K- at rest, giving for the first time the possibility of disentangling the effects due to atomic wave-function of the captured K- from those due to the pion optical nuclear potential and from those due to the specific hypernuclear states [4].

  6. Shifting atomic patterns: on the origin of the different atomic-scale patterns of graphite as observed using scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an in-depth study of the myriad atomically resolved patterns observed on graphite using the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) over the past three decades. Through the use of highly resolved atomic resolution images, we demonstrate how the interactions between the different graphene layers comprising graphite affect the local surface atomic charge density and its resulting symmetry orientation, with particular emphasis on interactions that are thermodynamically unstable. Moreover, the interlayer graphene coupling is controlled experimentally by varying the tip–surface interaction, leading to associated changes in the atomic patterns. The images are corroborated by first-principles calculations, further validating our claim that surface graphene displacement, coming both from lateral and vertical displacement of the top graphene layer, forms the basis of the rich variety of atomic patterns observed in STM experiments on graphite. (paper)

  7. Performance evaluation of indigenous thermal ionization mass spectrometer for determination of 235U/238U atom ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnetic sector based Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) designed and developed at Technical Physics Division, B.A.R.C., was evaluated for its performance for the determination of 235U/238U atom ratios in uranium samples. This consisted of evaluating the precision and accuracy on the 235U/238U atom ratios in various isotopic reference materials as well as indigenously generated uranium samples. The results obtained by the indigenous TIMS were also compared with those obtained using a commercially available TIMS system. The internal and external precision were found to be around 0.1% for determining 235U/238U atom ratios close to those of natural uranium ( i.e. 0.00730). (author)

  8. Structure and Thermodynamic Properties of Liquid Transition Metals with Different Embedded-Atom Method Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金照; 陈民; 过增元

    2002-01-01

    Pair distribution functions and constant-volume heat capacities of liquid copper, silver and nickel have been calculated by molecular dynamics simulations with four different versions of the embedded-atom method (EAM) model, namely, the versions of Johnson, Mei, Cai and Pohlong. The simulated structural properties with the four potential models show reasonable agreement with experiments and have little difference with each other, while the calculated heat capacities with the different EAM versions show remarkable discrepancies. Detailed analyses of the energy of the liquid metallic system show that, to predict successfully the heat capacity, an EAM model should match the state equation first proposed by Rose.

  9. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydın, G.; Cengiz, E.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Aylıkcı, V.; Bakkaloğlu, Ö. F.

    2009-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  10. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  11. Pion correlations as a function of atomic mass in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of two pion interferometry was used to obtain source-size and lifetime parameters for the pions produced in heavy ion collisions. The systems used were 1.70 · A GeV 56Fe + Fe, 1.82 · A GeV 40Ar + KCl and 1.54 · A GeV 93Nb + Nb, allowing for a search for dependences on the atomic number. Two acceptances (centered, in the lab., at ∼ 0 degrees and 45 degrees) were used for each system, allowing a search for dependences on the viewing angle. The correlation functions were calculated by comparing the data samples to background (or reference) samples made using the method of event mixing, where pions from different events are combined to produce a data sample in which the Bose-Einstein correlation effect is absent. The effect of the correlation function on the background samples is calculated, and a method for weighting the events to remove the residual correlation effect is presented. The effect of the spectrometer design on the measured correlation functions is discussed, as are methods for correcting for these effects during the data analysis. 58 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs

  12. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  13. Measurement of the lifetime difference between Bs mass eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for Bs0 → J/ψφ and Bd0 → J/ψ K*0 decays. Lifetimes of the heavy (H) and light (L) mass eigenstates in the Bs0 system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time

  14. The dependence of scattering length on van der Waals interaction and on the reduced-mass of the system in two-atomic collision at cold energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Hasi

    2015-01-01

    The static-exchange model (SEM) and the modified static-exchange model (MSEM) recently introduced by Ray [1] is applied to study the elastic collision between two hydrogen-like atoms when both are in ground states considering the system as a four-body Coulomb problem in the center of mass frame, in which all the Coulomb interaction terms in direct and exchange channels are treated exactly. The SEM includes the non-adiabatic short-range effect due to electron-exchange. The MSEM added in it, the long-range effect due to induced dynamic dipole polarizabilities between the atoms e.g. the Van der Waals interaction. Applying the SEM code in different H-like two-atomic systems, a reduced mass dependence on scattering length is observed. Again applying the MSEM code on H(1s)-H(1s) elastic scattering and varying the minimum values of interatomic distance, the dependence of scattering length on the effective interatomic potential consistent with the existing physics are observed. Both these basic findings in low and co...

  15. Tensile manipulation of ultrathin gold nanowires at different sizes and atomic vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenying; Fu, Yingqiang; Chi, Baozhu; Dai, Yanfeng; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-09-01

    The fractures of ultrathin metallic nanowires usually exhibit their uncertainties at small scales. Here, statistics was used to study the uniaxial tension-induced deformation of ultrathin gold nanowires. With the same cross section of gold nanowires (5a × 5a × Ha), different sizes show various deformation mechanisms due to the moving styles of slipped crystalline planes. However, the deformations at different sizes (5a × 5a × 5a) and (5a × 5a × 25a) both show the sensitivity to one atomic vacancy, attributed to the dominant role of the same cross section. The statistical broken position distributions further provide that the deformation fracture is size dependent and sensitive to atomic vacancies, which is explained with the relationship between broken bonds and tensile wave propagation. For the size dependence of mechanical property, the nanowire height (H) of 10a is observed to be a transitional point, when the height is less than 10a, the mechanical strength is unstable, while above this transitional point, mechanical strengths decrease with the nanowire size increasing. Our work provides mechanistic insights into enhancing the reliability of metallic nanostructures by engineering the internal atomic imperfection and structural dimensions.

  16. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad W. Marashdeh; Ibrahim F. Al-Hamarneh; Eid M. Abdel Munem; A.A. Tajuddin; Alawiah Ariffin; Saleh Al-Omari

    2015-01-01

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10–60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The M...

  17. Efficient mass-selective three-photon ionization of zirconium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an AVLIS process, 91Zr is selectively removed from natural zirconium by a three-step photoionization wherein Zr atoms are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength λ1, selectively raising 91Zr atoms to an odd-parity E1 energy level in the range of 16000-19000 cm-1, are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength λ2 to raise the atoms from an E1 level to an even-parity E2 energy level in the range of 35000-37000 cm-1, and are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength λ3 to cause a resonant transition of atoms from an E2 level to an autoionizing level above 53506 cm-1. λ3 wavelengths of 5607, 6511 or 5756 A will excite a zirconium atom from an E2 energy state of 36344 cm-1 to an autoionizing level; a λ3 wavelength of 5666 A will cause an autoionizing transition from an E2 level of 36068 cm-1; and a λ3 wavelength of 5662 A will cause an ionizing resonance of an atom at an E2 level of 35904 cm-1. (author)

  18. Efficient mass-selective three-photon ionization of zirconium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.

    1994-01-01

    In an AVLIS process, .sup.91 Zr is selectively removed from natural zirconium by a three-step photoionization wherein Zr atoms are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength .lambda..sub.1, selectively raising .sup.91 Zr atoms to an odd-parity E.sub.1 energy level in the range of 16000-19000 cm.sup.-1, are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 to raise the atoms from an E.sub.l level to an even-parity E.sub.2 energy level in the range of 35000-37000 cm.sup.-1 and are irradiated by a laser beam having a wavelength .lambda..sub.3 to cause a resonant transition of atoms from an E.sub.2 level to an autoionizing level above 53506 cm.sup.-1. .lambda..sub.3 wavelengths of 5607, 6511 or 5756 .ANG. will excite a zirconium atom from an E.sub.2 energy state of 36344 cm.sup.-1 to an autoionizing level; a .lambda..sub.3 wavelength of 5666 .ANG. will cause an autoionizing transition from an E.sub.2 level of 36068 cm.sup.-1 ; and a .lambda. .sub.3 wavelength of 5662 .ANG. will cause an ionizing resonance of an atom at an E.sub.2 level of 35904 cm.sup.-1.

  19. Simulation of Chromium Atom Deposition Pattern in a Gaussain Laser Standing Wave with Different Laser Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of a neutral chromium atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field is discussed by using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The deposition pattern of neutral chromium atoms in a laser standing wave with different laser power is discussed and the simulation result shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a nanometer stripe is 115nm and the contrast is 2.5:1 with laser power 3.93mW; the FWHM is 0.Snm and the contrast is 27:1 with laser power 16mW, the optimal laser power; but with laser power increasing to 50mW, the nanometer structure forms multi-crests and the quality worsens quickly with increasing laser power.

  20. Seasonal differences of urban organic aerosol composition - an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, A. G.; Calvo, A. I.; Dietzel, M.; Kalberer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The understanding of the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, their properties and reactivity are important for assessing aerosol effects upon both global climate change and human health. The composition of organic aerosols is poorly understood mainly due to their highly complex chemical composition with several thousand compounds. In the present study the water-soluble organic fraction of ambient particles collected at an urban site in Cambridge, UK, during different seasons were analysed with ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. For several thousand peaks in the mass specta (between 3000-6000) an elemental composition could be assigned and summer samples generally contained more components than winter samples. Up to 80% of the peaks in the mass spectra contain nitrogen and/or sulphur functional groups and only about 20% of the compounds contain only C, H and O atoms. In summer the fraction of compounds with oxidized nitrogen and sulphur groups increases compared to winter indicating a photo-chemical formation route of these multifunctional compounds. In addition to oxidized nitrogen compounds a large number of highly unsaturated reduced nitrogen-containing compounds were detected, corresponding likely to cyclic amines. A significant number of oxidized PAHs have been detected in summer samples, which were not present in winter, indicating again photo-chemical aging processes. Both, amines and long-chain aliphatic acids (also frequently observed in these urban samples) are likely signatures of biomass burning and primary biological sources. Potential biomass burning markers are discussed. Particle-phase oligomerisation reactions have only been observed to a very limited degree. Compounds larger than m/z 350 almost exclusively contained N and/or S functional groups indicating that the high molecular weight compounds in these organic aerosol extracts might be mainly due to particle-phase heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds with inorganic

  1. A note on black-hole physics, cosmic censorship, and the charge-mass relation of atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-02-01

    Arguing from the cosmic censorship principle, one of the fundamental cornerstones of black-hole physics, we have recently suggested the existence of a universal upper bound relating the maximal electric charge of a weakly self-gravitating system to its total mass: Z(A)≤slant {Z}*(A)\\equiv {α }-1/3{A}2/3, where Z is the number of protons in the system, A is the total baryon (mass) number, and α ={e}2/{{\\hslash }}c is the dimensionless fine-structure constant. In order to test the validity of this suggested bound, we here explore the Z(A) functional relation of atomic nuclei as deduced from the Weizsäcker semi-empirical mass formula. It is shown that all atomic nuclei, including the meta-stable maximally charged ones, conform to the suggested charge-mass upper bound. Our results support the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture in black-hole physics.

  2. Hybrid quantum logic and a test of Bell’s inequality using two different atomic isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, C. J.; Schäfer, V. M.; Home, J. P.; Szwer, D. J.; Webster, S. C.; Allcock, D. T. C.; Linke, N. M.; Harty, T. P.; Aude Craik, D. P. L.; Stacey, D. N.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Entanglement is one of the most fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, and is the key resource for quantum information processing (QIP). Bipartite entangled states of identical particles have been generated and studied in several experiments, and post-selected or heralded entangled states involving pairs of photons, single photons and single atoms, or different nuclei in the solid state, have also been produced. Here we use a deterministic quantum logic gate to generate a ‘hybrid’ entangled state of two trapped-ion qubits held in different isotopes of calcium, perform full tomography of the state produced, and make a test of Bell’s inequality with non-identical atoms. We use a laser-driven two-qubit gate, whose mechanism is insensitive to the qubits’ energy splittings, to produce a maximally entangled state of one 40Ca+ qubit and one 43Ca+ qubit, held 3.5 micrometres apart in the same ion trap, with 99.8 ± 0.6 per cent fidelity. We test the CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) version of Bell’s inequality for this novel entangled state and find that it is violated by 15 standard deviations; in this test, we close the detection loophole but not the locality loophole. Mixed-species quantum logic is a powerful technique for the construction of a quantum computer based on trapped ions, as it allows protection of memory qubits while other qubits undergo logic operations or are used as photonic interfaces to other processing units. The entangling gate mechanism used here can also be applied to qubits stored in different atomic elements; this would allow both memory and logic gate errors caused by photon scattering to be reduced below the levels required for fault-tolerant quantum error correction, which is an essential prerequisite for general-purpose quantum computing.

  3. Hybrid quantum logic and a test of Bell's inequality using two different atomic isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, C J; Schäfer, V M; Home, J P; Szwer, D J; Webster, S C; Allcock, D T C; Linke, N M; Harty, T P; Aude Craik, D P L; Stacey, D N; Steane, A M; Lucas, D M

    2015-12-17

    Entanglement is one of the most fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, and is the key resource for quantum information processing (QIP). Bipartite entangled states of identical particles have been generated and studied in several experiments, and post-selected or heralded entangled states involving pairs of photons, single photons and single atoms, or different nuclei in the solid state, have also been produced. Here we use a deterministic quantum logic gate to generate a 'hybrid' entangled state of two trapped-ion qubits held in different isotopes of calcium, perform full tomography of the state produced, and make a test of Bell's inequality with non-identical atoms. We use a laser-driven two-qubit gate, whose mechanism is insensitive to the qubits' energy splittings, to produce a maximally entangled state of one (40)Ca(+) qubit and one (43)Ca(+) qubit, held 3.5 micrometres apart in the same ion trap, with 99.8 ± 0.6 per cent fidelity. We test the CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) version of Bell's inequality for this novel entangled state and find that it is violated by 15 standard deviations; in this test, we close the detection loophole but not the locality loophole. Mixed-species quantum logic is a powerful technique for the construction of a quantum computer based on trapped ions, as it allows protection of memory qubits while other qubits undergo logic operations or are used as photonic interfaces to other processing units. The entangling gate mechanism used here can also be applied to qubits stored in different atomic elements; this would allow both memory and logic gate errors caused by photon scattering to be reduced below the levels required for fault-tolerant quantum error correction, which is an essential prerequisite for general-purpose quantum computing. PMID:26672554

  4. Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and $\\bar{t}$ quarks

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and $\\bar{t}$ quarks using $\\ttbar$ candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron \\ppbar Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\invfb{5.6}, we measure a mass difference, $\\dmt = \\mathrm{M}_{t} - \\mathrm{M}_{\\bar{t}} = -3.3 \\pm 1.4(stat) \\pm 1.0(syst)}$, approximately two standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference. This is the most precise measurement of a mass difference between $t$ and its $\\bar{t}$ partner to date.

  5. Estimation of effective atomic number in the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio using different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, M.; Büyükyıldız, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) is a very convenient parameter, which can be utilized in material analysis and estimating effective atomic number (Zeff). In the case for a relatively low scattering angle, for which the energy of the Compton scattered photons is not very much different from that of incident photons, the corrections due to self-absorption for Rayleigh and Compton scattering will be roughly equal. Therefore, it enables a result to be obtained which is almost independent of X-ray attenuation inside the sample and it will depend only on the material under investigation. The most frequently used method for calculation of Zeff available in literature is plotting R/C of elements as a function of atomic number and constituting the best fit curve. From this fit curve, the respective Zeff can be determined using R/C of the material. In the present study, we report Zeff of different materials using different methods such as interpolation and direct methods as possible alternatives to the most common fitting method. The results were compared with the experiments wherever possible. The agreement between interpolation method and the fitting method was found to be very satisfactory as relative changes (%) were always less than 9% while the direct method results with somehow significantly higher values of Zeff when compared to the other methods.

  6. Improved Statistical Determination of Absolute Neutrino Masses via Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pairs from Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    The atomic transition from an excited state $|{\\rm e}\\rangle$ to the ground state $|{\\rm g}\\rangle$ by emitting a neutrino pair and a photon, i.e., $|{\\rm e}\\rangle \\to |{\\rm g}\\rangle + |\\gamma\\rangle + |\

  7. Selected K and L X-Ray mass attenuation coefficients for low atomic number materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray attenuation coefficients for low atomic mumbers elements were obtained for characteristic K and L X-ray of a number of selected elements using the fitting of a third degree polynomial to the values tabulated by Storm and Israel

  8. Production of intense beams of mass-selected water cluster ions and theoretical study of atom-water interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z P; Reinhard, P -G; Suraud, E; Bruny, G; Montano, C; Feil, S; Eden, S; Abdoul-Carime, H; Farizon, B; Farizon, M; Ouaskit, S; Maerk, T D

    2009-01-01

    The influences of water molecules surrounding biological molecules during irradiation with heavy particles (atoms,ions) are currently a major subject in radiation science on a molecular level. In order to elucidate the underlying complex reaction mechanisms we have initiated a joint experimental and theoretical investigation with the aim to make direct comparisons between experimental and theoretical results. As a first step, studies of collisions of a water molecule with a neutral projectile (C atom) at high velocities (> 0.1 a.u.), and with a charged projectile (proton) at low velocities (< 0.1 a.u.) have been studied within the microscopic framework. In particular, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was applied to the valence electrons and coupled non-adiabatically to Molecular dynamics (MD) for ionic cores. Complementary experimental developments have been carried out to study projectile interactions with accelerated (< 10 keV) and mass-selected cluster ions. The first size distributio...

  9. Non-constant relative atomic masses due to varying isotopic abundance of polynuclidic elements and their effect on the accuracy of analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alterations of actual relative atomic masses occur in natural samples by natural isotope ratio shifts of polynuclidic elements. Therefore, using nuclear properties for gaining a measuring signal, isotopic shifts of certain elements may lead to significant measuring errors

  10. Exploiting flow injection and sequential injection for trace metal determinations in conjunction with detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    Despite their excellent analytical chemical capacities, Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETAAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS), nevertheless, often require suitable pretreatment of the sample material in order to obtain the necessary sensitivity and...

  11. Angular distribution of atoms ejected by laser ablation of different metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions of 13 different metals ejected by laser ablation using fourth harmonics (wavelength=266 nm) of neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser and a fluence close to near-threshold value (2.3 J/cm2) have been investigated with a high angular resolution. The angular distribution which is characterized by the exponent n of cosn θ distribution showed very broad range of values between 3 and 24 for different metals. A simple relation that the exponent n is proportional to the square root of particle atomic weight as reported previously has not been observed. Instead, a general trend has been found that the metals with higher sublimation energy such as Ta and Zr show narrower angular distribution than those with lower sublimation energy such as Sn and In. While the sublimation energy of metals has a great influence on the angular distribution of ejected atoms, a simple consideration suggests that their thermal conductivity and specific heat have little effect on it.

  12. Data correlation in on-line solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography-atomic emission/mass spectrometric detection of unknown microcontaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankemeier, Th.; Rozenbrand, J.; Abhadur, M.; Vreuls, J.J.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure is described for the (non-target) screening of hetero-atom-containing compounds in tap and waste water by correlating data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) using atomic emission (AED) and mass selective (MS) detection. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was coupled on-line to both GC system

  13. ANALYSES OF QUINOLONE ANTIMICROBIALS IN HUMAN PLASMA BY CAPILLARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/FAST ATOM BOMBARDMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Hideki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seno, Hiroshi; Ishii, Akira; Yamada, Takamichi

    1993-01-01

    Capillary high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was combined with frit fast atom bombardment (FAB)-mass spectrometry (MS) , and a detailed procedure has been established for on-line analysis of ten quinolone antimicrobials in human plasma by the HPLC/FAB-MS. A special column switching device for concentration enabled injection of as large as a 500 μl sample; and the capillary column (0.5 mm i. d.) enabled introduction of its entire effluent to the frit interface of FAB-MS. These condi...

  14. Mass media differences in ''nuclear news'' reporting: implications for public opinions and acceptable safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical and political issues of diversion safeguards are at best confusing to the general public, who derive most of their information about nuclear science from the mass media. This investigation compared ''nuclear news'' of all kinds in three national mass media for thirty-three months of 1972-1974 to examine the quantity and quality of atom-related news they provide. Findings from The New York Times, U. S. News and World Report, and the ABC, CBS, and NBC evening news indicate grounds for low public familiarity with essential concepts of safeguards, and consequently, for consumer value conflicts and weak popular supports for safeguards-related policy

  15. Rapid diagnosis of Zellweger syndrome and infantile Refsum's disease by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry of urine bile salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for the rapid determination of urinary bile salt profiles by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). Negative ion FAB spectra could be obtained from the equivalent of 10 μl of urine loaded onto the target probe with glycerol as matrix. In samples from infants and children with cholestasis the major peaks were produced by the taurine and glycine conjugates of di-, tri- and tetrahydroxycholanoic acids. In samples from patients with Zellweger syndrome and infantile Refsum's disease, a unique ion at m/z 572 indicated the presence of taurine-conjugated tetrahydroxycholestanoic acid(s). Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the bile acids liberated by alkaline hydrolysis indicated the presence of at least two nuclear-tetrahydroxylated cholestanoic acids, probably the 6α- and 1β-hydroxylated derivatives of 3α, 7α, 12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-26-oic acid. (Auth.)

  16. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data. - Highlights: • Compute the values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of some carbohydrates. • The values of (μen/ρ) i.e. mass energy-absorption coefficient are calculated. • Effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections (σa,en). • Comparison of all (μ/ρ), (μen/ρ), (σa,en) values with XCOM program. • The measured data for carbohydrates are useful in radiation dosimetry and other fields

  17. On the degeneracies of the mass-squared differences for three-neutrino oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Latimer, D. C.; Ernst, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Using an algebraic formulation, we explore two well-known degeneracies involving the mass-squared differences for three-neutrino oscillations assuming CP symmetry is conserved. For vacuum oscillation, we derive the expression for the mixing angles that permit invariance under the interchange of two mass-squared differences. This symmetry is most easily expressed in terms of an ascending mass order. This can be used to reduce the parameter space by one half in the absence of the MSW effect. Fo...

  18. Hybrid quantum logic and a test of Bell's inequality using two different atomic species

    CERN Document Server

    Ballance, C J; Home, J P; Szwer, D J; Webster, S C; Allcock, D T C; Linke, N M; Harty, T P; Craik, D P L Aude; Stacey, D N; Steane, A M; Lucas, D M

    2015-01-01

    Entanglement is one of the most fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, and is the key resource for quantum information processing. Bipartite entangled states of identical particles have been generated and studied in several experiments, and post-selected entangled states involving pairs of photons, or single photons and single atoms, have also been produced. Here, we deterministically generate a "hybrid" entangled state of two different species of trapped-ion qubit, perform full tomography of the state produced, and make the first test of Bell's inequality with non-identical atoms. We use a laser-driven two-qubit quantum logic gate, whose mechanism is insensitive to the qubits' energy splittings, to produce a maximally-entangled state of one Ca40 qubit and one Ca43 qubit, held in the same ion trap, with 99.8(5)% fidelity. We make a test of Bell's inequality for this novel entangled state, and find that it is violated by 15 sigma. Mixed-species quantum logic is an essential technique for the construction...

  19. On the mass of atoms in molecules: Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Scherrer, Arne; Sebastiani, Daniel; Gross, E K U; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Describing the dynamics of nuclei in molecules requires a potential energy surface, which is traditionally provided by the Born-Oppenheimer or adiabatic approximation. However, we also need to assign masses to the nuclei. There, the Born-Oppenheimer picture does not account for the inertia of the electrons and only bare nuclear masses are considered. Nowadays, experimental accuracy challenges the theoretical predictions of rotational and vibrational spectra and requires to include the participation of electrons in the internal motion of the molecule. More than 80 years after the original work of Born and Oppenheimer, this issue still is not solved in general. Here, we present a theoretical and numerical framework to address this problem in a general and rigorous way. Starting from the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we include electronic effects beyond the Born-Oppenheimer regime in a perturbative way via position-dependent corrections to the bare nuclear masses. This maintains an a...

  20. Effect of the smaller mass-squared difference for the long base-line neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Okamura, N

    2004-01-01

    Usually, neutrino oscillation experiments are analyzed within the two-flavor framework which is governed by 1 mass-squared difference and 1 mixing angle. But there are 6 parameters,2 mass-squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase within the three-flavor framework.In this article,we estimate the effect from the smaller mass-squared difference,the other mixing angles, and the CP phase, which we call three-flavor effect, for the determination of the mass-squared difference and the mixing angle from the nu_mu's survival and transition probability with the two-flavor analysis.It is found that the mass-squared difference from the two-flavor analysis is slightly shifted from the larger mass-squared difference by the three-flavor effect.The order of magnitude of the three-flavor effect for the mass-squared difference is comparable with that of the expected error for the mass-squared difference of the two-flavor analysis in the future long base-line neutrino oscillation experiments.The CP phase dependence o...

  1. Measurement of the charged pion mass using X-ray spectroscopy of exotic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, M; Borchert, G; Dax, A; Egger, J P; Gotta, D; Hennebach, M; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Nelms, N; Simons, L M; Wells, A

    2016-01-01

    The $5g-4f$ transitions in pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen were measured simultaneously by using a gaseous nitrogen-oxygen mixture at 1.4\\,bar. Due to the precise knowledge of the muon mass the muonic line provides the energy calibration for the pionic transition. A value of (139.57077\\,$\\pm$\\,0.00018)\\,MeV/c$^{2}$ ($\\pm$\\,1.3ppm) is derived for the mass of the negatively charged pion, which is 4.2ppm larger than the present world average.

  2. Determination of toxic elements in different brands of cigarette by atomic absorption spectrometry using ultrasonic assisted acid digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Arain, Muhammad Balal; Jamali, Muhammad Khan; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a sample preparation method based on ultrasonic assisted acid extraction (UAE) of Al, As, Cd, Ni and Pb from filler tobacco (FT) of different local branded (LBCs) and imported branded cigarettes (IBCs) consumed in Pakistan. Acid extracts obtained upon sonication were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Parameters influencing extraction such as pre-sonication time 10-15 min, sonication time 2-10 min, mass of sample 0.1-0.5 g, particle size VTL-2), and also applied a conventional acid digestion method (CDM) on same CRM, for comparative purpose. The average relative standard deviation of UAE method of CRM, ranged as 1.64-8.42% for N = 6, depending on the analytes. Extraction efficiencies for CRM were close to 97.1, 97.5, 98.5, 97.8 and 96.7 for Al, As, Cd, Ni and Pb, respectively. The concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Ni and Pb in cigarettes were present in all branded cigarettes, there is no any significance difference among LBCs and IBCs, except in few cases of LBCs, have high level of Cd and Al. Our results were compared with other worldwide studies. PMID:18600465

  3. Atomic mass identification of CF-252 fission fragments using an NE-102 thin film detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of atomic number of low energy Cf-252 fission products using a three element thin film scintillation detector in conjunction with a residual energy solid state detector is described. Critical comparison of the separate spectra yielded by the three thin film elements is used to show both quantitative and qualitative consistency. Through the use of simple data handling techniques, increased resolution between peaks is easily obtained; the resultant spectrum for the distribution of both heavy and light fragments of Cf-252 is presented. The anticipated application of thin film scintillation techniques for event-by-event illucidation of decay schemes will also be discussed

  4. Differences among skeletal muscle mass indices derived from height-, weight-, and body mass index-adjusted models in assessing sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Aging processes are inevitably accompanied by structural and functional changes in vital organs. Skeletal muscle, which accounts for 40% of total body weight, deteriorates quantitatively and qualitatively with aging. Skeletal muscle is known to play diverse crucial physical and metabolic roles in humans. Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by significant loss of muscle mass and strength. It is related to subsequent frailty and instability in the elderly population. Because muscle tissue is involved in multiple functions, sarcopenia is closely related to various adverse health outcomes. Along with increasing recognition of the clinical importance of sarcopenia, several international study groups have recently released their consensus on the definition and diagnosis of sarcopenia. In practical terms, various skeletal muscle mass indices have been suggested for assessing sarcopenia: appendicular skeletal muscle mass adjusted for height squared, weight, or body mass index. A different prevalence and different clinical implications of sarcopenia are highlighted by each definition. The discordances among these indices have emerged as an issue in defining sarcopenia, and a unifying definition for sarcopenia has not yet been attained. This review aims to compare these three operational definitions and to introduce an optimal skeletal muscle mass index that reflects the clinical implications of sarcopenia from a metabolic perspective. PMID:27334763

  5. Atomic force microscopy study of the rabbit skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors in different functional states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏青青; 程晓阳; 陈克樱; 胡钧; 李民乾; 朱培闳

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscope was applied to investigate the effect of extrinsic phospholipid on the structure of rabbit skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel (RyR1). In addition, in the presence of extrinsic phospholipid, the height and elasticity of the RyR1s in different functional states were also measured. The results indicate: (i) most of the RyR1s showed a normal structure only in the presence of extrinsic phospholipid; (ii) treatment of the RyR1s with AMP and Ca2+ together could increase their Young's Modulus but not change their apparent height; (iii) no detectable change in either height or Young's Modulus of the RyR1s appeared, if the RyR1s were treated with other activators or inhibitors.

  6. Atomic force microscopy imaging of polyurethane nanoparticles onto different solid substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); POLIMAT, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: maurifritzen@hotmail.com; Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficies, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [POLIMAT, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficies, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique suited for characterizing nanoparticles on solid surfaces because it offers the capability of 3D visualization and quantitative information about the topography of the samples. In the present work, contact-mode AFM has been applied to imaging polyurethane nanoparticles formulated from a natural triol and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The colloidal polymeric system was deposited on mica, hydrophilic and hydrophobic silicon solid substrates to evaluate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Our data showed that the nanoparticles were better distributed on mica and hydrophilic silicon. From the analysis of line-scan profiles we obtained different values for the ratio between the diameter and the height of the nanoparticles, indicating that the shape of the particles depends on the interaction between the nanoparticles and the substrate.

  7. Levels of trace elements in different varieties of wheat determined by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements Ag, Au, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were determined in six wheat samples purchased from the open market in different localities (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, Dubai and Australia). The dried powdered samples were decomposed in HNO3-HClO4 acids mixtures and elements were determined using recording atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results were within the safety baseline of all the assayed elements. Certified biological standards, Brown's Kale (BK), Orchard Leaves (OL) and tomato leaves (TOML) were used to assure the accuracy of results. However, Co, Pb and Sr were absent from samples except the Egyptian samples. The obtained databases were statistically treated. Several significant and strong positive correlation coefficients (r=0.506-1.00) between the groups of elements were observed. On the other hand, strong negative correlations (r=0.492-0.873) between another group of elements were also shown. (author)

  8. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  9. Mass Predictions of Atomic Nuclei in the Infinite Nuclear Matter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, R C

    2012-01-01

    We present here the mass excesses, binding energies, one- and two- neutron, one and two- proton and \\alpha-particle separation energies of 6727 nuclei in the ranges 4 \\leq Z \\leq 120 and 8 \\leq A \\leq 303 calculated in the infinite nuclear matter model. Compared to our predictions of 1999 mass table, the present ones are obtained using larger data base of 2003 mass table of Wapstra and Audi and resorting to higher accuracy in the solutions of the \\eta-differential equations of the INM model. The local energy \\eta's supposed to carry signature of the characteristic properties of nuclei are found to possess the predictive capability. In fact \\eta-systematics reveal new magic numbers in the drip-line regions giving rise to new islands of stability supported by relativistic mean field theoretic calculations. This is a manifestation of a new phenomenon where shell-effect overcomes the instability due to repulsive components of the nucleon-nucleon force broadening the stability peninsula. The two-neutron separation...

  10. The calculus and the design of a miniature quadrupole mass filter: a selected solution from different types of mass analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass spectrometers are very precise tools used in chemical and isotopic analysis for environmental surveillance. Traditionally environmental analysis is done by sampling the soil, air or water and taking the sample back to the laboratory for analysis. To avoid the difficulties related with the sample alteration during the sampling process and the transport the analysis 'in situ' is to be preferred. This type of analysis combines the sampling and analysis and produces an analytical result almost instantly. Fast-response detection methods are highly desirable in cases where relatively short-lived species are to be examined. Theoretically, any type of mass analyzers can be miniaturized, but some are better suited for miniaturization than others. We studied comparatively different types of mass analyzers that can be miniaturized, especially quadrupole, magnetic sector and time of flight types, in view to select from all these, the best solution for our purpose, the application to the 'in situ' environmental monitoring and inspection, analytical process control. We investigated and calculated the properties of some geometrical arrangements that we reported, one of these being a double focusing mass analyzer with electric deflector and magnetic deflector combined in a reversed geometry. From the different calculated versions we selected the following one, with the characteristic parameters: n = 62, f = 2 MHz, L = 0.07 m, r0 = 2.616 x 10-3 m, Ez = 5 V, Rhousing = 3.5 r0, Vm = 1000 V, Rmax = 200, Mmax = 200 u. Starting from these mechanical and electrical parameters we calculated and designed a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer. A theoretical study of the ion trajectories in the quadrupole analyzer by matrix formalism as well as by using Mathieu functions was made. Using the program SIMION 6, the trajectories inside the quadrupole filter were also simulated. The calculus of the ion trajectories starts by numerically solving of the Mathieu type equation. Inside the

  11. Measurements of the $\\tau$ Mass and Mass Difference of the $\\tau^{+}$ and $\\tau^{-}$} at BaBar

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B

    2009-01-01

    We present the result from a precision measurement of the mass of the $\\tau$ lepton, $M_\\tau$, based on $423 fb^{-1}$ of data recorded at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the BaBar detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, we determine the mass to be $1776.68 \\pm 0.12 (stat) \\pm 0.41 (syst) MeV$. We also measure the mass difference between the $\\tau^+$ and $\\tau^-$, and obtain $(M_{\\tau^{+}}-M_{\\tau^{-}})/M^\\tau_{AVG} = (-3.4 \\pm 1.3 (stat) \\pm 0.3 (syst)) \\times 10^{-4}$, where $M^\\tau_{AVG}$ is the average value of $M_{\\tau^+}$ and $M_{\\tau^-}$.

  12. Ag films grown by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition on different substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusan, Akinwumi A., E-mail: akinwumi.amusan@ovgu.de; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P. [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Gargouri, Hassan; Wandel, Klaus; Pinnow, Cay [SENTECH Instruments GmbH, Schwarzschildstraße 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lisker, Marco [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Silver (Ag) layers were deposited by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PALD) using Ag(fod)(PEt{sub 3}) (fod = 2,2-dimethyl-6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluorooctane-3,5-dionato) as precursor and hydrogen plasma on silicon substrate covered with thin films of SiO{sub 2}, TiN, Ti/TiN, Co, Ni, and W at different deposition temperatures from 70  to 200 °C. The deposited silver films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, four point probe measurement, ellipsometric measurement, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XPS revealed pure Ag with carbon and oxygen contamination close to the detection limit after 30 s argon sputtering for depositions made at 120 and 200 °C substrate temperatures. However, an oxygen contamination was detected in the Ag film deposited at 70 °C after 12 s argon sputtering. A resistivity of 5.7 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm was obtained for approximately 97 nm Ag film on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The thickness was determined from the SEM cross section on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and also compared with XRF measurements. Polycrystalline cubic Ag reflections were identified from XRD for PALD Ag films deposited at 120 and 200 °C. Compared to W surface, where poor adhesion of the films was found, Co, Ni, TiN, Ti/TiN and SiO{sub 2} surfaces had better adhesion for silver films as revealed by SEM, TEM, and AFM images.

  13. Ag films grown by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition on different substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver (Ag) layers were deposited by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PALD) using Ag(fod)(PEt3) (fod = 2,2-dimethyl-6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluorooctane-3,5-dionato) as precursor and hydrogen plasma on silicon substrate covered with thin films of SiO2, TiN, Ti/TiN, Co, Ni, and W at different deposition temperatures from 70  to 200 °C. The deposited silver films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, four point probe measurement, ellipsometric measurement, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XPS revealed pure Ag with carbon and oxygen contamination close to the detection limit after 30 s argon sputtering for depositions made at 120 and 200 °C substrate temperatures. However, an oxygen contamination was detected in the Ag film deposited at 70 °C after 12 s argon sputtering. A resistivity of 5.7 × 10−6 Ω cm was obtained for approximately 97 nm Ag film on SiO2/Si substrate. The thickness was determined from the SEM cross section on the SiO2/Si substrate and also compared with XRF measurements. Polycrystalline cubic Ag reflections were identified from XRD for PALD Ag films deposited at 120 and 200 °C. Compared to W surface, where poor adhesion of the films was found, Co, Ni, TiN, Ti/TiN and SiO2 surfaces had better adhesion for silver films as revealed by SEM, TEM, and AFM images

  14. The Sun is a plasma diffuser that sorts atoms by mass

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, S. A.; Mozina, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Sun is a magnetic plasma diffuser that selectively moves light elements like H and He and the lighter isotopes of each element to its surface. The Sun formed on the collapsed core of a supernova. It consists mostly of iron, oxygen, nickel, silicon and sulfur made near the SN core, like the rocky planets and ordinary meteorites. H ions, generated by emission and decay of neutrons at the core, are accelerated upward by deep magnetic fields, thus acting as a carrier gas that maintains mass s...

  15. The ρ - ω mass difference in a relativistic potential model with pion corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the ρ - ω mass difference is studied in the framework of the relativistic, harmonic, S+V independent quark model implemented by center-of-mass, one-gluon exchange and plon-cloud corrections stemming from the requirement of chiral symmetry in the (u,d) SU(2) flavour sector of the model. The plonic self-energy corrections with different intermediate energy states are instrumental of the analysis of the problem, which requires and appropriate parametrization of the mesonic sector different from that previously used to calculate the mass spectrum of the S-wave baryons. The right ρ - ω mass splitting is found, together with a satisfactory value for the mass of the pion, calculated as a bound-state of a quark-antiquark pair. An analogous discussion based on the cloudy-bag model is also presented. (author)

  16. Energy Cost of Walking in Boys Who Differ in Adiposity but Are Matched For Body Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Beatriz Volpe; Bar-Or, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Compared the energy cost of treadmill walking in pairs of obese and lean adolescent boys matched for total body mass. Results found no intergroup differences in the net energy cost at the two lower speeds, but obese boys expended more energy at a higher speed. Heart rate was considerably higher in obese boys. Body mass, rather than adiposity, was…

  17. Atomic transport at charged graphene: why hydrogen and oxygen are so different

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong

    2015-01-01

    Using density-functional calculations, we show that electron or hole doped graphene can strongly change the mobility of adsorbed atoms H and O. Interestingly, charge doping affects the diffusion of H and O in the opposite way, namely, electron doping increases/reduces while hole doping reduces/increases the diffusion barrier of H/O, respectively. Specifically, on neutral graphene the diffusion barriers of O and H are 0.74 and 1.01 eV, which are, upon a hole doping of $+5.9\\times10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$, 0.90 and 0.77 eV, and upon an electron doping of $-5.9\\times10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$, 0.38 and 1.36 eV, respectively. This means, within the harmonic transition state theory, at room temperature, the diffusion rate of O can be decreased or increased by 470 or 2.2$\\times 10^7$ times, and that of H can be increased or decreased by $10^5$ or $7\\times 10^7$ times, by that hole or electron doping level. The difference between the H and O cases is interpreted in terms of the difference in geometric and bonding changes upon char...

  18. Toxic metals distribution in different components of Pakistani and imported cigarettes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, T G; Jalbani, N; Arain, M B; Jamali, M K; Afridi, H I; Sarfraz, R A; Shah, A Q

    2009-04-15

    It was extensively investigated that a significant flux of toxic metals, along with other toxins, reaches the lungs through smoking. In present study toxic metals (TMs) (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb) were determined in different components of Pakistani local branded and imported cigarettes, including filler tobacco (FT), filter (before and after normal smoking by a single volunteer) and ash by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS). Microwave-assisted digestion method was employed. The validity and accuracy of methodology were checked by using certified sample of Virginia tobacco leaves (ICHTJ-cta-VTL-2). The percentages (%) of TMs in different components of cigarette were calculated with respect to their total contents in FT of all branded cigarettes before smoking, while smoke concentration has been calculated by subtracting the filter and ash contents from the filler tobacco content of each branded cigarette. The highest percentage (%) of Al was observed in ash of all cigarettes, with range 97.3-99.0%, while in the case of Cd, a reverse behaviour was observed, as a range of 15.0-31.3% of total contents were left in the ash of all branded cigarettes understudy. PMID:18657905

  19. Toxic metals distribution in different components of Pakistani and imported cigarettes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was extensively investigated that a significant flux of toxic metals, along with other toxins, reaches the lungs through smoking. In present study toxic metals (TMs) (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb) were determined in different components of Pakistani local branded and imported cigarettes, including filler tobacco (FT), filter (before and after normal smoking by a single volunteer) and ash by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS). Microwave-assisted digestion method was employed. The validity and accuracy of methodology were checked by using certified sample of Virginia tobacco leaves (ICHTJ-cta-VTL-2). The percentages (%) of TMs in different components of cigarette were calculated with respect to their total contents in FT of all branded cigarettes before smoking, while smoke concentration has been calculated by subtracting the filter and ash contents from the filler tobacco content of each branded cigarette. The highest percentage (%) of Al was observed in ash of all cigarettes, with range 97.3-99.0%, while in the case of Cd, a reverse behaviour was observed, as a range of 15.0-31.3% of total contents were left in the ash of all branded cigarettes understudy

  20. Hadron electromagnetic mass differences and a prediction of B+ - B0. (Revised version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed that the induced contribution to the hadron Electromagnetic Mass Difference (EMD) by the splitting of the up and down quark masses can be extracted phenomenologically from the quark masses interpolation, in accordance to general QCD assumptions. The results are consistent with all observed EMD. The model independent prediction B+-B0 = -2.3 +- .3 MeV will serve as a crucial test for these assumption. A useful mass formula for the s-wave hadron ground states is also presented

  1. Generation of Three-Dimensional Entangled States for Two Atoms Trapped in Different Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose a scheme for generating three-dimensional entangled states for two atoms trapped in two separate cavities. The scheme is based on the detection of photons leaking from the cavities after the atom-cavity interaction.The scheme is useful for the test of quantum nonlocality and quantum information processing.

  2. Measurement of the Mass Difference m(D_s^+) - m(D^+) at CDF II

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Ahn, M H; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alcorn, B; Alexander, C; Allen, D; Allspach, D H; Amaral, P; Ambrose, D; Amendolia, S R; Amidei, D; Amundson, J F; Anastassov, A; Anderson, J; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Avanzini, C; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Babik, M; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W F; Bailey, S; Bakken, J; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Bardi, A; Bari, M; Barker, G; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Barsotti, E; Basti, A; Bauer, G; Beckner, D; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellendir, G; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berg, B; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bogdan, M; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bowden, M; Box, D; Bromberg, C; Brown, W; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Buckley-Geer, L; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canal, P; Canepa, A; Carithers, W C; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrell, K; Carter, H; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chandler, J T; Chapman, J; Chappa, S; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Cisko, S; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Coiley, K; Colijn, A P; Colombo, R M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, G; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cudzewicz, R; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Dal Monte, L; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; Davila, R; Dawson, J; Dawson, T; De Barbaro, P; De Baun, C; De Cecco, S; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; De Maat, R; Demar, P; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Derylo, G; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donno, F; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Downing, R; Drake, G; Drennan, C; Drollinger, V; Dunietz, Isard; Dyer, A; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Engels, E; Erbacher, R D; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Fischler, M; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A D; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Frisch, H; Fromm, J; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Galet, G; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Ganel, O; García, C; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Garwacki, M; Garzoglio, G; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Gerstenslager, J; Giacchetti, L; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gillespie, G; Gingu, C; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D A; Glossen, R; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D B; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Goncharov, M; González, H; Gordon, S; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Grado, J; Gregori, M; Gresele, A; Griffin, T; Grim, G; Grimm, C; Gromoll, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Gu, C; Guarino, V; Günther, M; Guimarães da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, A; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handler, R; Haney, M; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington, J; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hawke, T; Hays, C; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herber, R; Herndon, M; Herren, M; Hicks, D; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hoff, J; Hoffman, K D; Hoftiezer, J H; Holloway, A; Holloway, L E; Holm, S; Holmgren, D; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Howell, J; Hrycyk, M; Hubbard, P; Hughes, R E; Huffman, B T; Humbert, J; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, I; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jetton, R; Johnson, M; Jones, M; Jones, T; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kallenbach, Jeff; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kasten, M; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, K; Kephart, R D; Khazins, D; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klein, R; Klimenko, S; Knapp, M; Knoblauch, D; Knuteson, B; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kononenko, W; Kordas, K; Korn, A J; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K A; Kotwal, A; Kovalev, A; Kowalkowski, J B; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I V; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kumar, A; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lamore, D; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lanfranco, G; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; LeCompte, T J; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, S W; Lei, C M; Leininger, M; Leonardi, G L; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levshina, T; Lewis, F; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Loskot, J; Loverre, P F; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; MacNerland, J; MacQueen, D; Madorsky, A; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mammini, P; Manca, G; Mandrichenko, I V; Manea, C; Marginean, R; Marrafino, J; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mayer, J; Mayers, G M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Michael, N; Miller, J S; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Mizicko, D; Moccia, S; Moggi, A; Moggi, N; Montero, S; Moore, R; Moore, T; Morris, L; Morsani, F; Moulik, T; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Necula, V; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newby, W; Newcomer, F M; Newman-Holmes, C; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nicollerat, A S; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Noe, W; Österberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S; Oh, Y D; Ohl, K; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R G C; Orava, Risto; Orejudos, W; Orr, S; Pagani, G; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Ramos, I; Panacek, S; Pantano, D; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pasetes, R; Pashapour, S; Passuello, D; Paterno, M; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pavlicek, V; Pavlon, S; Pellett, D; Penzo, Aldo L; Perington, B; Petragnani, G; Petravick, D; Phillips, T J; Photos, F; Piacentino, G; Picciolo, C; Piccoli, L; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Profeti, A; Pronko, A G; Proudfoot, J; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rafaelli, F; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Rauch, J; Ray, H; Rechenmacher, R; Reia, S; Reichold, A; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Rivetta, C; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Román, M; Rosenberg, S I; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Sadler, L; Safonov, A; Saint-Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Sanders, H; Sanders, R; Sandrew, M; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sarraj, H; Sarraj, J; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schmitt, R; Schmitz, M; Schofield, G L; Schuh, K; Schultz, K; Scodellaro, L; Scott, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shallenberger, J; Shapiro, M D; Shaw, T; Shears, T G; Shenai, A; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M J; Shon, Y; Shoun, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J L; Sieh, C; Siket, M; Sill, A; Silva, R; Simaitis, V; Sinervo, P; Sirotenko, V I; Sissakian, A N; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Stadie, H; Stanek, R; Stanfield, N; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Stuermer, W; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Syu, J; Szymulanski, A; Taffard, A C; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tang, D; Tanimoto, N; Tannenbaum, B; Tapprogge, Stefan; Taylor, R D; Teafoe, G; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Terentieva, T; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thomas, A; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R M; Timm, S; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S M; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torretta, D; Trimby, C; Trischuk, W; Trumbo, J; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, T; Van Berg, R; Varganov, A V; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vittone, M; Voirin, J; Vollmer, B; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Von der Mey, M; Votava, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N; Walter, T; Walters, A; Wan, Z; Wandersee, A; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Weems, L; Wenzel, H; Wester, W; Whitehouse, B; Wickenberg, W; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wigmans, R; Wike, C; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Wong, M; Worcester, M; Worland, R; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, J; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamashita, T; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yarema, R J; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yocum, D R; Yoh, J K; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zalokar, M; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zimmerman, T; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2003-01-01

    We present a measurement of the mass difference m(D+_s) - m(D+), where both the D+_s and D+ are reconstructed in the phi pi+ decay channel. This measurement uses 11.6 pb-1 of data collected by CDF II using the new displaced-track trigger. The mass difference is found to be: 99.41 +- 0.38 (stat) +- 0.21 (syst) MeV/c^2.

  3. Up-down quark mass difference effect in nuclear many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon-nucleon force due to the up-down quark mass difference is evaluated in the quark cluster model. It is applied to the shell-model calculation for the isovector mass shifts of isospin multiplets and the isospin-mixing matrix elements in 1s0d-shell nuclei. We find that the contribution of the quark mass difference effect is large and agrees with experiment. This contribution may explain the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, alternatively to the meson-mixing contribution, which is recently predicted to be reduced by the large off-shell correction. (author)

  4. Comparison of different atomic databases used for evaluating transport coefficients in Aditya Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen impurity transport in typical discharges of Aditya tokamak has been estimated using spatial profile of brightness of Be-like oxygen (O4+) spectral line (2p3p 3D3-2p3d 3F4) at 650.024 nm. This O4+ spectrum is recorded using a 1.0 m multi-track spectrometer (Czerny-Turner) capable of simultaneous measurements from eight lines of sights. The emissivity profile of O4+ spectral emission is obtained from the spatial profile of brightness using an Abel-like matrix inversion. The oxygen transport coefficients are then determined by reproducing the experimentally measured emissivity profiles of O4+, using a one-dimensional empirical impurity transport code, STRAHL. To calculate the emissivity, photon emissivity coefficient (PEC) is required along with electron and O4+ density, which is the output of STRAHL. The PEC values depend on both electron density and temperature and are obtained from ADAS and NIFS atomic databases. Using both the databases, much higher values of diffusion coefficient compared to the neo-classical values are observed in the high and low magnetic field edge regions of typical Aditya Ohmic plasmas. The obtained values of diffusion coefficients using PEC values from both the databases are compared with the diffusion coefficients calculated from the fluctuation induced transport in both the inboard and outboard edge regions. Although similar profiles for diffusion coefficients are obtained using PEC values from both databases, the magnitude differs considerably. (author)

  5. Precise atomic masses of 147Eu, 147Gd, and 151Tb derived from their decay properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The β-decay energies of 147Eu, 147Gd, and 151Tb were determined by using γ-spectroscopical methods. The comparison of experimental with calculated K-capture probabilities yielded the Qsub(EC) values 1.690(sub(-16)+21) MeV and 2.206(sub(-16)+18) MeV for 147Eu and 147Gd, respectively. By measuring the ratio of positron decay to electron capture for two branches in 147Eu decay, the decay energies Qsub(EC)=1.702(13) MeV and Qsub(EC)=1.709(18) MeV were derived. Also from EC/β+ ratios the values Qsub(EC)=2.225(75) MeV for 147Gd, and Qsub(EC)=2.566(12) MeV for 151Tb were obtained. Earlier discrepancies in the mass adjustment of these isotopes were removed. In course of the present studies γ-decay properties of 147Eu and 147Gd were reinvestigated. (orig.)

  6. 8. International conference on atomic masses and fundamental constants (AMCO-8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current recommended values of the fundamental physical constants are base on an adjustment carried out in 1986. Physics, however, has not stood still. New measurements have been reported for the Rydberg constant and the gas constant. Improved calculations and measurements of the electron magnetic moment anomaly, ae have provided an improved value for the fine structure constant α = μ0ce2/2h. The decision to establish uniform international representation of the volts and ohms in terms of the Josephson effect and the quantized Hall resistance, respectively, stimulated new measurements of 2e/h and e/h2. These new data have significantly changed the error-space of the adjustment of the physical constants. In the 1986 adjustments, the one-standard deviation uncertainty in α was 0.045 ppm; the university of Washington measurements of ae and the final results of Kinoshita's 20-year program of numerical evaluation of the eight order QED diagrams yield a new value with an uncertainty of 0.0069 ppm. Combined with the Rydberg constant and the proton-electron mass ratio this means that NΛh = Mpα2c/(2(mp/me)R∞) is defined with an uncertainty of 0.025 ppm

  7. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min−1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m0) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m0 of 18 analytes were calculated for stopped & mini furnace gas flows. • Experimental

  8. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  9. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  10. Quantification of differences in the effective atomic numbers of healthy and cancerous tissues: A discussion in the context of diagnostics and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. L. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovation Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3001 (Australia) and Medical Physics, WBRC, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: There are a range of genetic and nongenetic factors influencing the elemental composition of different human tissues. The elemental composition of cancerous tissues frequently differs from healthy tissue of the same organ, particularly in high-Z trace element concentrations. For this reason, one could suggest that this may be exploited in diagnostics and perhaps even influence dosimetry. Methods: In this work, for the first time, effective atomic numbers are computed for common cancerous and healthy tissues using a robust, energy-dependent approach between 10 keV and 100 MeV. These are then quantitatively compared within the context of diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: Differences between effective atomic numbers of healthy and diseased tissues are found to be typically less than 10%. Fibrotic tissues and calcifications of the breast exhibit substantial (tens to hundreds of percent) differences to healthy tissue. Expectedly, differences are most pronounced in the photoelectric regime and consequently most relevant for kV imaging/therapy and radionuclides with prominent low-energy peaks. Cancerous tissue of the testes and stomach have lower effective atomic numbers than corresponding healthy tissues, while diseased tissues of the other organ sites typically have higher values. Conclusions: As dose calculation approaches improve in accuracy, there may be an argument for the explicit inclusion of pathologies. This is more the case for breast, penile, prostate, nasopharyngeal, and stomach cancer, less so for testicular and kidney cancer. The calculated data suggest dual-energy computed tomography could potentially improve lesion identification in the aforementioned organs (with the exception of testicular cancer), with most import in breast imaging. Ultimately, however, the differences are very small. It is likely that the assumption of a generic 'tissue ramp' in planning will be sufficient for the foreseeable future, and that the Z differences do

  11. Picoplankton distribution in different water masses of the East China Sea in autumn and winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li; ZHAO Yuan; ZHANG Wuchang; ZHOU Feng; ZHANG Cuixia; REN Jingling; NI Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    Picoplankton distribution was investigated in different water masses of the East China Sea in November,2006 and February,2007.The autumn and winter cruises crossed three major water masses:the coastal water mass (CWM),the mixed water mass (MWM),which forms on the continental shelf,and the Kuroshio water mass (KWM).Picoplankton composition was resolved into four main groups by flow cytometry,namely Synechococcus,Prochlorococcus,picoeukaryotes,and heterotrophic bacteria.The average abundances of Synechococcus,picoeukaryotes,and heterotrophic bacteria were (0.63± 10.88)× 103,(1.61±1.16)×103,(3.39±1.27)×105 cells/mL in autumn and (6.45±8.60)×103,(3.23±2.63)×103,(3.76±1.37)× 105 cells/mL in winter,respectively.Prochlorococcus was not found in the CWM and seldom observed in surface samples in either season.However,Prochlorococcus was observed in the MWM and KWM (approximately l03 cells/mL) in both autumn and winter.Synechococcus distribution varied considerably among water masses,with the highest levels in KWM and lowest levels in CWM.The depth-averaged integrated abundance of Synechococcus was approximately 5-fold higher in KWM than in CWM,which may be due primarily to water temperature.In the MWM,Synechococcus was resolved as two subgroups; the presence of both subgroups was more common in autumn.Picoeukaryote abundance varied less among water masses than Synechococcus,and heterotrophic bacteria depth-averaged integrated abundance exhibited the smallest seasonal variations with respect to water mass.Correlation analysis showed that relationships between picoplankton abundances and environmental factors (temperature,nutrients,and chlorophyll a) differed among the three water masses,suggesting that the three water masses have different effects on picoplankton distribution (particularly Synechococcus).

  12. Study of K*(892) mass and width splitting caused by model difference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiu-Rong; YUAN Chang-Zheng

    2009-01-01

    According to the new K*(892)0 and K*(892)- masses reported by the BELLE experiment and the K*(892)0 mass reported by the FOCUS experiment, mass splitting between neutral and charged K*(892) becomes very small. This is significantly different from the current world average values given by the Particle Data Group 2008. We find that there are differences between models used to fit the K*(892) decay invariant mass spectra in different measurements and study the model dependence in the measurement of K*(892) parameters. We refit the K*(892)0 mass spectra of the BELLE and FOCUS experiments with the formula used by BELLE in fitting K*(892)- to get new mass and width. After refitting, the K*(892)0 mass of the BELLE experiment becomes 1.4 MeV/c2 larger than the initial value and that of the FOCUS experiment is 1 MeV/c2 smaller than the initial value. We also fit the spectra of some other experiments to extract the K*(892) parameters using the BELLE K* (892)- parametrization.

  13. Chemisorption of atomic and molecular oxygen on Au and Ag cluster anions : discrimination of different isomers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Dok; Ganteför, Gerd; Sun, Qiang; Jena, Purusottam

    2004-01-01

    Structures of coinage metal clusters reacted with atomic and molecular oxygen were studied using Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory calculations. We show that O2 partially dissociates on Ag-2, and this dissociative chemisorption is a kinetically hindered step. For Au4O-2, in addition to the previously observed molecularly adsorbed oxygen, we are now able to synthesize a second isomer using atomic oxygen reagents, in which oxygen adsorbs dissociatively. We dem...

  14. The $K_L-K_S$ mass difference from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Z; Izubuchi, T; Sachrajda, C T; Soni, A; Yu, J

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first complete calculation of the $K_L-K_S$ mass difference, $\\Delta M_K$, using lattice QCD. The calculation is performed on a 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion (DWF) ensemble with a 330~MeV pion mass and a 575~MeV kaon mass. We use a quenched charm quark with a 949~MeV mass to implement Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani (GIM) cancellation. For these heavier-than-physical particle masses, we obtain $\\Delta M_K =3.19(41)(96)\\times 10^{-12}$~MeV, quite similar to the experimental value. Here the first error is statistical and the second is an estimate of the systematic discretization error. An interesting aspect of this calculation is the importance of the disconnected diagrams, a dramatic failure of the OZI rule.

  15. Zygosity Differences in Height and Body Mass Index of Twins From Infancy to Old Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelenkovic, Aline; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Sund, Reijo;

    2015-01-01

    A trend toward greater body size in dizygotic (DZ) than in monozygotic (MZ) twins has been suggested by some but not all studies, and this difference may also vary by age. We analyzed zygosity differences in mean values and variances of height and body mass index (BMI) among male and female twins...

  16. Ethnic Differences in Eating Disorder Symptoms among College Students: The Confounding Role of Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Cecilia A.; Mann, Traci

    2001-01-01

    Explored the role of body mass index (BMI) in eating disorders among Hispanic, Asian American, and non-Hispanic white female college students. Data from student surveys indicated that after controlling for BMI, ethnic differences in eating disorder symptoms of concern about weight and shape disappeared, but differences in restrained eating…

  17. 同位素丰度绝对测量及相对原子质量测定中的不确定度评估%Uncertainty Analysis of Absolute Measurement of Isotopic Abundances and Relative Atomic Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周涛; 王同兴

    2005-01-01

    The sources of uncertainty of relative atomic mass include measurement errors and isotopic fractionation of terrestrial samples. Measurement errors are composed of measurements of atomic masses and isotopic abundances, the later includes uncertainty of correction factor K and isotopic ratios of natural samples. Through differential of seven factors to gain their propagation factors, the uncertainty of correction factors K can be calculated. With the same differential calculation, the uncertainty of relative atomic mass can be obtained.

  18. On the Degeneracies of the Mass-Squared Differences for Three-Neutrino Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, D. C.; Ernst, D. J.

    Using an algebraic formulation, we explore two well-known degeneracies involving the mass-squared differences for three-neutrino oscillations assuming CP symmetry is conserved. For vacuum oscillation, we derive the expression for the mixing angles that permit invariance under the interchange of two mass-squared differences. This symmetry is most easily expressed in terms of an ascending mass order. This can be used to reduce the parameter space by one half in the absence of the MSW effect. For oscillations in matter, we derive within our formalism the known approximate degeneracy between the standard and inverted mass hierarchies in the limit of vanishing θ13. This is done with a mass ordering that permits the map Δ31↦-Δ31. Our techniques allow us to translate mixing angles in this mass order convention into their values for the ascending order convention. Using this dictionary, we demonstrate that the vacuum symmetry and the approximate symmetry invoked for oscillations in matter are distinctly different.

  19. Study on Characteristics of Different Types of Nozzles for Coal-Water Slurry Atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Yuan; Lifang Chen; Chengkang Wu

    2001-01-01

    Three types of nozzles: a low-pressure multistage nozzle, an effervescent nozzle and a newly developed internal mixing air-blast nozzle, for atomization of Coal-Water Slurry (CWS) were investigated. Influence of CWS properties including surface tension and apparent viscosity on atomization was studied. Comparisons among the nozzles were carried out in terms of spray droplet mean diameter and fuel output. Versatility of each nozzle was investigated and atomization mechanism of each nozzle was analyzed as well. The results showed that the newly developed internal-mixing air-blast nozzle has high fuel output and small mean droplet size in the spray, but the multistage nozzle has high versatility for handling of low quality CWS.

  20. Students' Representations of the Atomic Structure--The Effect of Some Individual Differences in Particular Task Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, George; Markos, Angelos; Zarkadis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to investigate students' representations of the atomic structure in a number of student cohorts with specific characteristics concerning age, grade, class curriculum and some individual differences, such as formal reasoning and field dependence/independence. Two specific task contexts, which were designed in accordance with…

  1. Gender differences in vestibular modulation of body mass in altered force environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles; Fuller, Patrick; Hoban-Higgins, Tana; Fuller, Charles

    Body mass regulation is affected by the gravitational environment. Gravitational and linear acceleration information is transduced by the vestibular macular receptors. In addition, there are gender differences in the regulation of body mass and composition. This study therefore investigated the role of the vestibular system in the regulation of body mass in age-matched male and female rats. Four groups of male and female rats were established. A 1G and a 2G labyrinthectomized experimental group (Labx) and a 1G and 2G control group (Con). Labyrinthectomies were accomplished by trans-tympanic injection of sodium arsanilate to remove vestibular input. Control groups experienced the same surgical procedures, but with a saline control injection. Body mass and food and water consumption data were collected twice weekly. Baseline data were collected prior to surgery. There was a decrease in body mass following chemical labyrinthectomy in both male and female rats. A recovery period followed surgery to allow for the re-establishment of stable growth curves. Body mass of female experimental rats returned to the same levels as the female controls while male labyrinthectomized rats continued to regulate body mass at a lower level. All 2G groups were exposed to 8 weeks of 2G produced via centrifugation while all control groups remained at 1G. All 2G groups decreased body mass at the onset of centrifugation, with experimental groups having a smaller response than the controls. Males continued to maintain body mass at a lower level under 2G, while, again body mass of the females returned to levels similar to controls. At the conclusion of the eight week centrifugation period, all four female groups had a similar body mass while differences were evident between male groups. Overall, 1G males had a higher body mass than did males exposed to 2G. Within G levels, 1G controls were heavier than 1G Labx and, in contrast, at 2G Labx had a larger body mass than controls. (Supported by

  2. Precision measurement of the mass difference between light nuclei and anti-nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seeder, Karin Soraya; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Vargas Trevino, Aurora Diozcora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the mass differences for systems bound by the strong force has reached a very high precision with protons and anti-protons. The extension of such measurement from (anti-)baryons to (anti-)nuclei allows one to probe any difference in the interactions between nucleons and anti-nucleons encoded in the (anti-)nuclei masses. This force is a remnant of the underlying strong interaction among quarks and gluons and can be described by effective theories, but cannot yet be directly derived from quantum chromodynamics. Here we report a measurement of the difference between the ratios of the mass and charge of deuterons (d) and anti-deuterons ($\\bar{d}$), and $^{3}{\\rm He}$ and $^3\\overline{\\rm He}$ nuclei carried out with the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. Our direct measurement of the mass-over-charge differences confirm CPT invariance to an unprecedented precision in the sector of light nuclei. This funda...

  3. Does seed mass drive the differences in relative growth rate between growth forms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jennie; Thompson, Ken; Rees, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The idea that herbaceous plants have higher relative growth rates (RGRs) compared with woody plants is fundamental to many of the most influential theories in plant ecology. This difference in growth rate is thought to reflect systematic variation in physiology, allocation and leaf construction. Previous studies documenting this effect have, however, ignored differences in seed mass. As woody species often have larger seeds and RGR is negatively correlated with seed mass, it is entirely possible the lower RGRs observed in woody species is a consequence of having larger seeds rather than different growth strategies. Using a synthesis of the published literature, we explored the relationship between RGR and growth form, accounting for the effects of seed mass and study-specific effects (e.g. duration of study and pot volume), using a mixed-effects model. The model showed that herbaceous species do indeed have higher RGRs than woody species, and that the difference was independent of seed mass, thus at all seed masses, herbaceous species on average grow faster than woody ones. PMID:23677351

  4. The Mass Attenuation Coefficients, Electronic, Atomic, and Molecular Cross Sections, Effective Atomic Numbers, and Electron Densities for Compounds of Some Biomedically Important Elements at 59.5 keV

    OpenAIRE

    Burcu Akça; Erzeneoğlu, Salih Z.

    2014-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for compounds of biomedically important some elements (Na, Mg, Al, Ca, and Fe) have been measured by using an extremely narrow collimated-beam transmission method in the energy 59.5 keV. Total electronic, atomic, and molecular cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities have been obtained by using these results. Gamma-rays of 241Am passed through compounds have been detected by a high-resolution Si(Li) detector and by using energy dispers...

  5. Interfacing transitions of different alkali atoms and telecom bands using one narrowband photon pair source

    CERN Document Server

    Schunk, Gerhard; Strekalov, Dmitry V; Förtsch, Michael; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Göbelt, Manuela; Christiansen, Silke; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Photon-atom coupling, in particular for proposed quantum repeater schemes, requires pure and versatile sources of quantum light. Here we demonstrate coupling to alkali dipole transitions in the near-infrared with a tunable source of photon pairs generated via spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a whispering-gallery mode resonator (WGMR). We have developed novel wavelength tuning mechanisms, which allow for a coarse step-wise central wavelength tuning from 790 nm to 1630 nm as well as continuous tuning with MHz resolution. We demonstrate the compatibility of our source with atomic transitions, such as the D1 line of rubidium at 795 nm (idler at 1608 nm) and cesium at 895\\,nm (idler at 1312 nm). At the cesium D1 transition, we exemplarily show a continuous scanning of the signal wavelength over the Doppler-broadened absorption line, and finally a heralded single photon spectroscopy of the atomic decay. Providing this flexibility in connecting various atomic transitions with telecom wavelengths, we demonst...

  6. Interfacing transitions of different alkali atoms and telecom bands using one narrowband photon pair source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Vogl, Ulrich; Strekalov, Dmitry V.;

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information technology strongly relies on the coupling of optical photons with narrowband quantum systems, such as quantum dots, color centers, and atomic systems. This coupling requires matching the optical wavelength and bandwidth to the desired system, which presents a considerable pro...

  7. Observations on the quantitation of the phosphate content of peptides by fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, L; Ang, S G; Williams, D H; Cohen, P

    1987-07-29

    Equimolar mixtures of the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of several peptides have been subjected to fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS), to investigate whether the stoichiometry of phosphorylation can be determined from the relative molecular-ion abundances of the phospho and dephospho derivatives. It is concluded that quantitation can be achieved for peptides with large positive or negative hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity indices (delta F values) where addition of a phosphate group does not alter the distribution of the peptide within the matrix significantly. For peptides with small positive or negative delta F values, phosphopeptides tend to be partially suppressed by their dephosphorylated counterparts. Suppression can be partially or totally overcome by conversion of the peptide to a hydrophobic derivative, and by the selection of an appropriate matrix. Alternatively, addition of a very strong acid, perchloric acid, can even reverse the original suppression effect. This last effect is believed to be due to the increased ionic strength in the matrix, which forces a relatively hydrophilic analyte to the matrix surface; and the ability of such a phosphorylated analyte to form a more stable gas-phase cation. PMID:3038197

  8. Comparing the relation between star formation and galaxy mass in different environments

    CERN Document Server

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Finn, Rose A; Rudnick, Gregory; Desai, Vandana; Bamford, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing 24 mu m MIPS/Spitzer data and the [O II]3727 line of a sample of galaxies at 0.4 0.6 after removing red emission-line (REL) galaxies, to avoid possible AGN contamination. While there is overlap between the cluster and field SFR-Mass relations, we find a population of cluster galaxies (10-25%) with reduced SFR for their mass. These are likely to be in transition from star-forming to passive. Comparing separately clusters and groups at z>0.6, only cluster trends are significantly different from the field, and the average cluster SFR at a given mass is ~2 times lower than the field. We conclude that the average SFR in star-forming galaxies var ies with galaxy environment at a fixed galaxy mass.

  9. Cu determination in crude oil distillation products by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after analyte transfer to aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cu was determined in a wide range of petroleum products from crude oil distillation using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Different procedures of sample preparation were evaluated: (i) mineralization with sulfuric acid in an open system (ii) mineralization in a closed microwave system (iii) combustion in hydrogen-oxygen flame in the Wickbold's apparatus (iv) matrix evaporation followed by acid dissolution, and (v) acidic extraction. All the above procedures led to the transfer of the analyte into an aqueous solution for the analytical measurement step. It was found that application of FAAS was limited to the analysis of the heaviest petroleum products of high Cu content. In ICP-MS, the use of internal reference method (with Rh or In as internal reference element) was required to eliminate the matrix effects in the analysis of extracts and the concentrated solutions of mineralized heavy petroleum products. The detection limits (in original samples) were equal to, respectively, 10, 86, 3.3, 0.9 and 0.4 ng g-1 in procedures i-v with ETAAS detection and 10, 78, 1.1 and 0.5 ng g-1 in procedures i-iii and v with ICP-MS detection. The procedures recommended here were validated by recovery experiments, certified reference materials analysis and comparison of results, obtained for a given sample, in different ways. The Cu content in the analyzed samples was: 50-110 ng g-1 in crude oil, -1 in gasoline, -1 in atmospheric oil, -1 in heavy vacuum oil and 140-300 ng g-1 in distillation residue

  10. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  11. Mass spectrometry in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass spectrometry plays an important role in oceanography for various applications. Different types of inorganic as well as organic mass spectrometric techniques are being exploited world-wide to understand the different aspects of marine science, for palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology, for isotopic composition and concentrations of different elements as well as for speciation studies. The present paper reviews some of the applications of atomic mass spectrometric techniques in the area of oceanography

  12. Gold Dichloride and Gold Dibromide with Gold Atoms in Three Different Oxidation States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissociation and inelastic scattering of ethanol molecular ions from self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of fluorinated alkyl thiol on an Au (1 1 1) monocrystal have been studied at 28.9 and 52.9 eV collision energies. A single dynamics mechanism for quasi-inelastic scattering was found at both energies. Ions recoil nearly parallel to the surface with very small kinetic energy losses of the order of less than or equal to 2 eV. Dissociation dynamics features for the main dissociation channel, loss of methyl radical, are dramatically different from that of inelastically scattered primary ions and are different at the two collision energies studied. At 28.9 eV two energetically and angularly resolved features are observed, one corresponding to the loss of very large amounts (nearly all) of ion's translational energy and the other appearing to gain energy (superelastic scattering). This dynamics feature is interpreted as delayed dissociation of ions transmitted through the energy analyzer as molecular ions. This implies a lifetime of such excited ions of more than 5 Vs. The same dynamics features are observed at 52.9 eV ion energy except that a second inelastic process begins to compete with the nearly fully inelastic process. Moreover, at this energy the delayed ion dissociation mechanism is the dominant mechanism. The hypothesis that collision of ethanol cations with the SAM surface initially involves collision of the ion with a single end group of the SAM polymer chain provides a useful rationale for the observed dynamics. Support for this hypothesis is provided by Newton diagrams, which summarize momentum conservation relationships in terms of a common center-of-mass, CMeff, which provides a basis for describing scattering mechanisms for this system. Observation of three energetically distinct scattering processes suggests uniquely different ion- surface interactions contributing to surface-induced dissociation of ethanol ions. Preliminary experiments with Ar

  13. Atomic nitrogen: a parameter study of a micro-scale atmospheric pressure plasma jet by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute atomic nitrogen densities (N) in the effluent of a micro-scale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (µ-APPJ) operated in He with small admixtures of molecular nitrogen (N2) are measured by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry. Focusing on changes of the external plasma parameters, the dependency of the atomic nitrogen density on the admixture of molecular nitrogen to the plasma, the variation of applied electrode voltage and the variation of distance between the jet nozzle and the sampling orifice of the mass spectrometer are analysed. When varying the N2 admixture, a maximum density of atomic nitrogen of approximately 1.5  ×  1014 cm−3 (∼6 ppm) is reached at about 0.25% N2 admixture. Moreover, the N density increases approximately linearly with the applied voltage. Both results are comparable to atomic oxygen (O) behaviour of the µ-APPJ operated at equal plasma conditions except for admixing molecular O2 instead of nitrogen (Ellerweg et al 2010 New J. Phys. 12 013021). The N density decreases continuously with increasing distance, but the decrease is slower than in the case of O atoms in He/O2 plasma. N atoms with a density of 2.0  ×  1013 cm−3 (∼0.8 ppm) are still detected at 40 mm distance from the jet nozzle in controlled He/N2 atmosphere. The simple fluid simulation of N diffusion does not reproduce the measured densities of N. Nevertheless, a simulation taking into account atomic nitrogen reactions with gas impurities are able to reproduce the measured data, indicating that these reactions are an important loss mechanism of N atoms. The presented results are relevant for the future investigation of interactions of reactive nitrogen species with biological substrates. (paper)

  14. Mass distributions of star clusters for different star formation histories in a galaxy cluster environment

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Christine; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies usually contain rich populations of globular clusters (GCs). We investigate how different star formation histories (SFHs) shape the final mass distribution of star clusters. We assume that every star cluster population forms during a formation epoch of length dt at a constant star-formation rate (SFR). The mass distribution of such a population is described by the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), which is a pure power law extending to an upper limit M_max. Since the SFR determines M_max, the ECMF implicitly depends on the SFR. Starting with different SFHs, each SFH is divided into formation epochs of length dt at different SFRs. The requested mass function arises from the superposition of the star clusters of all formation epochs. An improved optimal sampling technique is introduced that allows generating number and mass distributions, both of which accurately agree with the ECMF. Moreover, for each SFH the distribution function of all involved SFRs, F(SFR), is computed. For monoton...

  15. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuschareon, S.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  16. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies

  17. Determination of the direct double-β -decay Q value of 96Zr and atomic masses of Zr 90 -92 ,94 ,96 and Mo 92 ,94 -98 ,100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyuz, K.; Ariche, J.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Novario, S. J.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Valverde, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental searches for neutrinoless double-β decay offer one of the best opportunities to look for physics beyond the standard model. Detecting this decay would confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino, and a measurement of its half-life can be used to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. Important to both tasks is an accurate knowledge of the Q value of the double-β decay. The LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometer was used for the first direct experimental determination of the 96Zr double-β decay Q value: Qβ β=3355.85 (15 ) keV. This value is nearly 7 keV larger than the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation [M. Wang et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012), 10.1088/1674-1137/36/12/003] value and one order of magnitude more precise. The 3-σ shift is primarily due to a more accurate measurement of the 96Zr atomic mass: m (96Zr ) =95.908 277 35 (17 ) u. Using the new Q value, the 2 ν β β -decay matrix element, | M2 ν| , is calculated. Improved determinations of the atomic masses of all other zirconium (Zr 90 -92 ,94 ,96 ) and molybdenum (92 ,94 -98 ,100Mo ) isotopes using both 12C8 and 87Rb as references are also reported.

  18. Atomic force microscope elastography reveals phenotypic differences in alveolar cell stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Azeloglu, Evren U.; Bhattacharya, Jahar; COSTA, KEVIN D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the connection between alveolar mechanics and key biochemical events such as surfactant secretion, one first needs to characterize the underlying mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma and its cellular constituents. In this study, the mechanics of three major cell types from the neonatal rat lung were studied; primary alveolar type I (AT1) and type II (AT2) epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts were isolated using enzymatic digestion. Atomic force microscopy indentation wa...

  19. Atomic force microscopy reveals differences in cell membrane properties in nuclear myosin I mutant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Rohožková, Jana; Kalendová, Alžběta; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : ČSMS, 2013. s. 25-25. [Mikroskopie 2013. 13.05.2013-14.05.2013, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I

  20. Bone mass in schoolchildren in Brazil: the effect of racial miscegenation, pubertal stage, and socioeconomic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Roberto Regis; Guerra-Junior, Gil; de Azevedo Barros-Filho, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone mass by phalanges ultrasound in healthy white and black schoolchildren in relationship to socioeconomic level, pubertal stage, and body composition. Included were 1,356 healthy schoolchildren aged from 6 to 11 years from different socioeconomic levels and both genders; all were placed into white and black groups. Weight, height, body mass index, fat percentage, fat mass, and lean mass were evaluated by anthropometric methods, and AD-SoS bone quantity and UBPI bone quality were evaluated using a third-generation IGEA phalanges DBM Sonic BP ultrasound. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney, chi-squared, correlation coefficient, and analyses of multiple linear regression statistical tests with 5% significance. Black schoolchildren predominated in the low socioeconomic levels. Higher values of weight and height for black boys and girls were observed in the lean mass in relation to white children of the same gender and age. An increasing variation in the bone quantity mean was observed from 6 to 11 years of age and with pubertal stage for both genders and skin color. The white schoolchildren presented higher values of bone quantity and quality in relation to the black children. The anthropometric, gender, and socioeconomic level variables explained only 16 and 11% of the variability of bone quantity and quality, respectively. As such, the present study, carried out with healthy black and white Brazilian schoolchildren, demonstrated higher bone mass, as evaluated by ultrasound, in white than in black schoolchildren. PMID:19283337

  1. Elemental composition of different air masses over Jeju Island, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeongwon; Choi, Man-Sik; Yi, Hi-Il; Jeong, Kap-Sik; Chae, Jung-Sun; Cheong, Chang-Sik

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the characteristics (concentrations and compositional changes) of atmospheric elements in total suspended particulates through source-receptor relationships using cluster analyses to classify air mass back-trajectories arriving at Gosan, Jeju Island, South Korea, from October 2003 to December 2008. Five trajectory clusters were chosen to explain the transport regimes. Continental outflows of natural and anthropogenic aerosols from Asian dust source regions and eastern China during the colder period could increase element concentrations at Gosan. Elemental levels at Gosan decreased in air masses that passed over marine regions (East China Sea, Pacific Ocean/southern side of Kyushu Island in Japan, and East Sea/southern side of South Korea) during the warmer rainy period due to lower source intensity and dilution by the marine air mass. Anthropogenic pollutants were often major components in air masses passing over marine regions. Air mass characterization by elemental concentration and composition revealed that enrichment by non-sea-salt sulfur in the air mass originated from eastern China, indicative of the main sulfur emitter in northeast Asia. The apportionment of V and Ni by principal component analysis as a marker of heavy oil combustion suggested different residence times and deposition rates from other anthropogenic components in the air. Regionally intermediate concentrations of pollutants were found in the atmosphere over the Korean peninsula.

  2. Oscillating Decay Rate in Electron Capture and the Neutrino Mass Difference

    CERN Document Server

    Peshkin, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Reported oscillations in the rate of decay of certain ions by K-electron capture have raised questions about whether and how such oscillations can arise in quantum mechanical theory and whether they can measure the neutrino mass difference. Here I show that simple principles of quantum mechanics answer some questions and clarify what must be done theoretically or experimentally to answer some others.

  3. Gluonic contribution to the nucleon-delta mass difference in a chiral soliton bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourenane, M.; Stern, J.; Clement, G.

    1988-05-01

    A generalization of the Friedberg-Lee model, which minimally incorporates soft confinement of quarks and gluons and approximate chiral symmetry, is presented and applied to the computation of the gluonic contribution to the nucleon-delta mass difference. The value of the effective strong fine structure constant is estimated to be ..cap alpha../sub s/=0.65.

  4. On atmospheric neutrino mass-squared difference in the precision era

    CERN Document Server

    Bilenky, S

    2015-01-01

    With the measurement of the small parameter $\\sin^{2}\\theta_{13}$ experiments on the study of neutrino oscillations enter into a high precision era. I discuss here the problem of the definition of the atmospheric mass-squared difference which will be important for analysis of data of future experiments.

  5. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad W. Marashdeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff and effective electron density (Neff of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10–60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5 simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  6. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashdeh, Mohammad W.; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Abdel Munem, Eid M.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Ariffin, Alawiah; Al-Omari, Saleh

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10-60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  7. Multi-element analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy for provenancing of animals at the continental scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitals, Natasha M; Watling, R John

    2014-11-01

    Chemical signatures within the environment vary between regions as a result of climatological, geochemical and anthropogenic influences. These variations are incorporated into the region's geology, soils, water and vegetation; ultimately making their way through the food chain to higher level organisms. Because the variation in chemical signatures between areas is significant, a specific knowledge of differences in elemental distribution patterns between, and within populations, could prove beneficial for provenancing animals or animal related products when applied to indigenous and feral faunal populations. The domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) was used as an investigative model to determine the feasibility of using a chemical traceability method for the provenance determination of animal tissue. Samples of pig muscle, tongue, stomach, heart, liver and kidney were collected from known farming areas around Australia. Samples were digested in 1:3 H2O2:HNO3 and their elemental composition determined using solution based Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Pigs from different growing regions in Australia could be distinguished based on the chemical signature of each individual tissue type. Discrimination was possible at a region, state and population level. This investigation demonstrates the potential for multi-element analysis of low genetic variation native and feral species of forensic relevance. PMID:25240220

  8. Mass ejection from neutron star mergers: different components and expected radio signals

    CERN Document Server

    Hotokezaka, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In addition to producing a strong gravitational signal, a short gamma-ray burst (GRB), and a compact remnant, neutron star mergers eject significant masses at significant kinetic energies. This mass ejection takes place via dynamical mass ejection and a GRB jet but other processes have also been suggested: a shock-breakout material, a cocoon resulting from the interaction of the jet with other ejecta, and viscous and neutrino driven winds from the central remnant or the accretion disk. The different components of the ejected masses include up to a few percent of a solar mass, some of which is ejected at relativistic velocities. The interaction of these ejecta with the surrounding interstellar medium will produce a long lasting radio flare, in a similar way to GRB afterglows or to radio supernovae. The relative strength of the different signals depends strongly on the viewing angle. An observer along the jet axis or close to it will detect a strong signal at a few dozen days from the radio afterglow (or the or...

  9. Occupational Class Differences in Body Mass Index and Weight Gain in Japan and Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Silventoinen, Karri; Tatsuse, Takashi; Martikainen, Pekka; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Sekine, Michikazu; Lallukka, Tea

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational class differences in body mass index (BMI) have been systematically reported in developed countries, but the studies have mainly focused on white populations consuming a Westernized diet. We compared occupational class differences in BMI and BMI change in Japan and Finland. Methods The baseline surveys were conducted during 1998–1999 among Japanese (n = 4080) and during 2000–2002 among Finnish (n = 8685) public-sector employees. Follow-up surveys were conducted among t...

  10. Ethnic differences in the relationship between body mass index and percentage body fat among Asian children from different backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ailing; Byrne, Nuala M; Kagawa, Masaharu; Ma, Guansheng; Poh, Bee Koon; Ismail, Mohammad Noor; Kijboonchoo, Kallaya; Nasreddine, Lara; Trinidad, Trinidad Palad; Hills, Andrew P

    2011-11-01

    Overweight and obesity in Asian children are increasing at an alarming rate; therefore a better understanding of the relationship between BMI and percentage body fat (%BF) in this population is important. A total of 1039 children aged 8-10 years, encompassing a wide BMI range, were recruited from China, Lebanon, Malaysia, The Philippines and Thailand. Body composition was determined using the 2H dilution technique to quantify total body water and subsequently fat mass, fat-free mass and %BF. Ethnic differences in the BMI-%BF relationship were found; for example, %BF in Filipino boys was approximately 2 % lower than in their Thai and Malay counterparts. In contrast, Thai girls had approximately 2.0 % higher %BF values than in their Chinese, Lebanese, Filipino and Malay counterparts at a given BMI. However, the ethnic difference in the BMI-%BF relationship varied by BMI. Compared with Caucasian children of the same age, Asian children had 3-6 units lower BMI at a given %BF. Approximately one-third of the obese Asian children (%BF above 25 % for boys and above 30 % for girls) in the study were not identified using the WHO classification and more than half using the International Obesity Task Force classification. Use of the Chinese classification increased the sensitivity. Results confirmed the necessity to consider ethnic differences in body composition when developing BMI cut-points and other obesity criteria in Asian children. PMID:21736824

  11. Phonon contributions to ab initio double mass differences of magic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Saperstein, E. E.; Baldo, M.; Gnezdilov, N. V.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Odd-even double mass differences (DMD) of magic nuclei are found within the approach starting from the free $NN$ interaction with account for particle-phonon coupling (PC) effects. We consider three PC effects: the phonon induced effective interaction, the renormalization of the ``ends'' due to the $Z$-factor corresponding to the pole PC contribution to the nucleon mass operator and the change of the single-particle energies. The perturbation theory in $g^2_L$, where $g_L$ is the vertex of th...

  12. Mass attenuation coefficient calculations of different detector crystals by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebru Ermis, Elif; Celiktas, Cuneyt

    2015-07-01

    Calculations of gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of various detector materials (crystals) were carried out by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) method at different gamma-ray energies. NaI, PVT, GSO, GaAs and CdWO4 detector materials were chosen in the calculations. Calculated coefficients were also compared with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) values. Obtained results through this method were highly in accordance with those of the NIST values. It was concluded from the study that FLUKA MC method can be an alternative way to calculate the gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of the detector materials.

  13. Relative yields, mass distributions and energy spectra of cluster ions sputtered from niobium under keV atomic and polyatomic gold ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belykh, S.F. E-mail: serbel@ariel.tashkent.su; Habets, B.; Rasulev, U.Kh.; Samartsev, A.V.; Stroev, L.V.; Veryovkin, I.V

    2000-04-01

    In the present work, the comparative studies of relative yields, mass distributions and kinetic energy spectra of secondary Nb{sub n}{sup +} ions (n=1-16) sputtered from niobium target by atomic and polyatomic Au{sub m}{sup -} projectiles (m=1-3) with the energy E{sub 0}=6-18 keV/atom have been carried out. The strong effect of anomalously high non-additivity of metal sputtering as positive large cluster ions under polyatomic ion bombardment was found. The comparison and discussion of the results obtained for Nb and for Ta are presented.

  14. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-09-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  15. Detection of hepatitis C virus core protein in serum by atomic force microscopy combined with mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov YD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yuri D Ivanov,1 Anna L Kaysheva,1,2 Pavel A Frantsuzov,1 Tatyana O Pleshakova,1 Nikolay V Krohin,1 Alexander A Izotov,1 Ivan D Shumov,1 Vasiliy F Uchaikin,1 Vladimir A Konev,1 Vadim S Ziborov,1 Alexander I Archakov11Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, 2PostgenTech Ltd, Moscow, RussiaAbstract: A method for detection and identification of core antigen of hepatitis C virus (HCVcoreAg-containing particles in the serum was proposed, with due account taken of the interactions of proteotypic peptides with Na+, K+, and Cl- ions. The method is based on a combination of reversible biospecific atomic force microscopy (AFM-fishing and mass spectrometry (MS. AFM-fishing enables concentration, detection, and counting of protein complexes captured on the AFM chip surface, with their subsequent MS identification. Biospecific AFM-fishing of HCVcoreAg-containing particles from serum samples was carried out using AFM chips with immobilized antibodies against HCVcoreAg (HCVcoreAgim. Formation of complexes between anti-HCVcoreAgim and HCVcoreAg-containing particles on the AFM chip surface during the fishing process was demonstrated. These complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS analysis allowed reliable identification of HCVcoreAg within the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. It was shown that MS data processing, with account taken of the interactions between HCVcoreAg peptides and Na+, K+ cations, and Cl- anions, allows an increase in the number of peptides identified.Keywords: hepatitis C virus, molecular detector, biospecific fishing

  16. Mass and Auger electron spectroscopy studies of the interactions of atomic and molecular chlorine on a plasma reactor wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the interactions of Cl and Cl2 with an anodized Al surface in an inductively coupled chlorine plasma. The cylindrical substrate is rapidly rotated within a differentially pumped wall and is exposed to the plasma 35% of the time through a conical skimmer. On the opposite side of the substrate, a second skimmer and differential pumping allows the surface and desorbing products to be analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), line-of-sight mass spectrometry (MS), and through pressure rise measurements. In a 600 W Cl2 plasma at 5 mTorr, the surface becomes covered with a layer with the overall stoichiometry of about Al2Si2O10Cl3, with Si being the result of the slow erosion of the quartz discharge tube. The surface layer composition (specifically Cl coverage) does not change as a function of the delay time (1 ms-10 min) between plasma exposure and AES characterization. In contrast to AES measurements, the MS signals from Cl2 desorption, resulting from recombination of Cl atoms, decrease by about a factor of 10 over the 1-38 ms probed by varying the substrate rotation frequency. Substantial adsorption and desorption of Cl2 are also observed with the plasma off. Cl recombination coefficients (γCl) derived from an analysis of the time-dependent MS signals range from 0.01 to 0.1 and increase with increasing Cl-to-Cl2 number density ratio, suggesting a competition for adsorption sites between Cl2 and Cl

  17. Efficiency of ablative plasma energy transfer into a massive aluminum target using different atomic number ablators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Stepniewski, W.; Jach, K.; Swierczynski, R.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Ullschmied, Jiří; Cikhart, J.; Klír, D.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 379-386. ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : ablator atomic number * crater volume * laser energy transfer * plasma ablative pressure Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2014

  18. Atomic force microscopy reveals differences in cell membrane properties in nuclear myosin I mutant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Rohožková, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : Society for Histochemistry, 2013. [55th Symposium of the Society for Histochemistry. 11.06.2013-14.06.2013, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Atomic transport at charged graphene: why hydrogen and oxygen are so different

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Phong, Pham Nam

    2015-01-01

    Using density-functional calculations, we show that electron or hole doped graphene can strongly change the mobility of adsorbed atoms H and O. Interestingly, charge doping affects the diffusion of H and O in the opposite way, namely, electron doping increases/reduces while hole doping reduces/increases the diffusion barrier of H/O, respectively. Specifically, on neutral graphene the diffusion barriers of O and H are 0.74 and 1.01 eV, which are, upon a hole doping of $+5.9\\times10^{13}$ cm$^{...

  20. Mass photosynthesis and distribution of photo assimilates of winter wheat varieties with different maturity feature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass photosynthesis rate and distribution of photoassimilates of winter wheat varieties with different maturity feature were studied using GXH-305 portable CO2 infrared ray analyzer. The mass photosynthesis rate of winter wheat varieties with better maturity feature showed little difference from the varieties with general maturity feature during the early stage of grain filling phase. However, the mass photosynthesis rate of the former was significantly higher than that of the later during the middle and late stage of grain filling. The study with 14CO2-tracing method showed that the relative activity in different organs of varieties with better maturity feature was significantly higher than that of varieties with worse maturity feature during the later growth stage of winter wheat. The rate of photoassimilates distribution in stalk and root system of winter wheat varieties with better maturity was higher than that in the others organs. The physiological mechanism of difference of grain yield and plant decay in varieties with different maturity feature were also discussed

  1. Calculation of a class of three-loop vacuum diagrams with two different mass values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of Chetyrkin, Misiak, and Muenz we calculate analytically a class of three-loop vacuum diagrams with two different mass values, one of which is one-third as large as the other. In particular, this specific mass ratio is of great interest in relation to the three-loop effective potential of the O(N) φ4 theory. All pole terms in ε=4-D (D being the space-time dimensions in a dimensional regularization scheme) plus finite terms containing the logarithm of mass are kept in our calculation of each diagram. It is shown that a three-loop effective potential calculated using the three-loop integrals obtained in this paper agrees, in the large-N limit, with the overlap part of the leading-order (in the large-N limit) calculation of Coleman, Jackiw, and Politzer [Phys. Rev. D 10, 2491 (1974)]. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Long distance contribution to $K_{L}$-$K_{S}$ mass difference

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jianglei

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to non-perturbatively determine the long-distance contribution to the $K_{L}$-$K_{S}$ mass difference. The calculation is performed on 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion, $16^3\\times32$ configurations with a 421 MeV pion mass and a kaon mass of 559 MeV . We include only current-current operators and drop all disconnected diagrams in the calculation. The largest contribution comes from quadratically divergent, short distance lattice artifacts. This quadratic divergence is eliminated through the GIM mechanism by introducing a valence charm quark. The remaining short distance effects are then removed by using RI/MOM technique which allows their exact replacement by the physical short distance part.

  3. Adsorption sites of single noble metal atoms on the rutile TiO2 (1 1 0) surface influenced by different surface oxygen vacancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic adsorption of Au and Pt on the rutile (1 1 0) surface was investigated by atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) measurements combined with density functional theory calculations. Au single atoms were deposited on the surface in a vacuum condition, and the observed results were compared with Pt single atoms on the same surface prepared by the same experimental manner. It was found that Au single atoms are stably adsorbed only at the bridging oxygen vacancy sites, which is quite different from Pt single atoms exhibiting the most frequently observed adsorption at the basal oxygen vacancy sites. Such a difference in oxygen-vacancy effect between Au and Pt can be explained by electronic structures of the surface vacancies as well as characters of outermost atomic orbitals of Au and Pt. (paper)

  4. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle

  5. Optical determination of the mass density of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon layers with different hydrogen contents

    OpenAIRE

    Remeš, Z.; Vaněček, Milan; Torres, Pedro; Kroll, U.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the density of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films using an optical method. The mass density decreases with increasing hydrogen content, consistent with a hydrogenated di-vacancy model that fits the data for amorphous silicon. Material produced by hot wire assisted chemical vapour deposition, with low hydrogen content, has a higher density and is structurally different from glow discharge material with hydrogen content around 10 at.%. The lower density microcrystalli...

  6. Comparison of body mass index in children of two different regions of welfare.

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Shapouri Moghadam; Mohammad Safarian; Rahim Vakili; Seyed Morteza Ehteshamfar

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic basis of children obesity is of high importance for preventive policies. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of obesity among children living in two different levels of welfare regions in Mashhad northeast of Iran. A total of 625 primary school girls and boys aged 78-127 months were randomly selected, and values of their body mass index (BMI) were measured. The prevalence of both overweight and obesity were higher among students of enriched area in comparison with that of...

  7. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients of gamma radiation for different fuel compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work experimental methods for determination of gamma-radiation mass attenuation coefficients by the way of attenuation curves reading is given. The gamma-spectrometric method is used for 235U content in different fuel compositions (uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium intermetallic (U(AlSi)3), uranium mononitride (UN), double uranium carbide (UC+ZrC+C). Attenuation curves for gamma-quanta with Eγ=185 keV is given

  8. Characterization of size distributions of elemental mass concentrations in atmospheric aerosols derived from different sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at six representative sites with an 8-stage cascade impactor sampler and analyzed for their elemental mass concentrations by the PIXE analytic method. Based on some indicator elements, the characteristic of size distributions of particles from different sources were obtained. According to these characteristics, we inferred the origins of the ultrafine particles around the Great Wall Station in the Antarctic. (orig.)

  9. Limits on the temporal variation of the fine structure constant, quark masses and strong interaction from quasar absorption spectra and atomic clock experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V; Thomas, A W; Young, R D

    2004-01-01

    We perform calculations of the dependence of nuclear magnetic moments on quark masses and obtain limits on the variation of $(m_q/\\Lambda_{QCD})$ from recent measurements of hydrogen hyperfine (21 cm) and molecular rotational transitions in quasar absorption systems, atomic clock experiments with hyperfine transitions in H, Rb, Cs, Yb$^+$, Hg$^+$ and optical transition in Hg$^+$. Experiments with Cd$^+$, deuterium/hydrogen, molecular SF$_6$ and Zeeman transitions in $^3$He/Xe are also discussed.

  10. Quantitation of motexafin lutetium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Dale; Mody, Tarak D.; Hatcher, Lori I.; Fiene, John; Stiles, Mark; Patrick P. Lin; Lee, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) methods were developed and validated for the evaluation of motexafin lutetium (MLu, lutetium texaphyrin, PCI-0123) pharmacokinetics in human plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was specific for MLu, whereas the ICP-AES method measured total elemental lutetium. Both methods were fast, simple, precise, and accurate. For the LC-MS/MS method, a closely related analogue (PCI-0353...

  11. Sonographic appearances of Morton's neuroma: differences from other interdigital soft tissue masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sam Soo; Rho, Myong-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Pyo; Lee, So-Yeon

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic characteristics of Morton's neuroma (MNs) and the usefulness of the "ginkgo leaf sign" for differentiating MNs from other interdigital soft tissue masses. The inclusion criteria were 27 patients with the masses in the intertarsal region with surgical proof. Fourteen masses in the 10 patients (mean age, 46) were MNs and nine cases of nine patients were ganglion cysts, seven cases (seven patients) of epidermoid tumors and one case of fibroma were included. Ultrasonographic examinations were performed by a musculoskeletal radiologist using the HDI 5000 (Philips, Bothell, WA, USA) or the Logiq E9 (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) equipped with a linear 6-15 MHz probe, and the findings were interpreted in consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The ultrasonographic findings such as margin, size, echogenicity and deepness of the MNs were compared with those for other interdigital soft tissue masses. The ginkgo leaf sign was defined as the appearance of a biconcave shape of the mass from compression by adjacent structures. The mean size of the MNs was 5.6 mm. There was a significant difference in incidence between males and females (female dominant, p = 0.003). There was no difference in incidence with regard to age (p = 0.259). All lesions were hypoechoic (100%, 14/14) and 10 cases exhibited the ginkgo leaf sign (71%, 10/14, p Morton's neuromas and more studies are needed to confirm its value as a sonographic sign. PMID:21683509

  12. On the relationship between acetone and carbon monoxide in different air masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. de Reus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide and acetone measurements are presented for five aircraft measurement campaigns at mid-latitudes, polar and tropical regions in the northern hemisphere. Throughout all campaigns, free tropospheric air masses, which were influenced by anthropogenic emissions, showed a similar linear relation between acetone and CO, with a slope of 21-25 pptv acetone/ppbv CO. Measurements in the anthropogenically influenced marine boundary layer revealed a slope of 13-16 pptv acetone/ppbv CO. The different slopes observed in the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere indicate that acetone is emitted by the ocean in relatively clean air masses and taken up by the ocean in polluted air masses. In the lowermost stratosphere, a good correlation between acetone and CO was observed as well, however, with a much smaller slope (~5 pptv acetone/ppbv CO compared to the troposphere. This is caused by the longer photochemical lifetime of CO compared to acetone in the lower stratosphere, due to the increasing photolytic loss of acetone and the decreasing OH concentration with altitude. No significant correlation between acetone and CO was observed over the tropical rain forest due to the large direct and indirect biogenic emissions of acetone. The common slopes of the linear acetone-CO relation in various layers of the atmosphere, during five field experiments, makes them useful for model calculations. Often a single observation of the acetone-CO correlation, determined from stratospheric measurements, has been used in box model applications. This study shows that different slopes have to be considered for marine boundary layer, free tropospheric and stratospheric air masses, and that the acetone-CO relation cannot be used for air masses which are strongly influenced by biogenic emissions.

  13. Mass balance performance of a 300 MW CFB boiler burning blend fuel with different mixing ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang; Chao, Junnan; Yang, Hairui; Lv, Junfu; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Qing; Yue, Guangxi [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    In order to predict the mass balance of a 300 MWe circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler under design process, the ash formation and attrition characteristic of the design fuel mixed with gangue, middling and slime were investigated with Tsinghua own process. In addition, the mass balance in this CFB boiler was simulated with 1D mass balance model, giving the ratio of the ashes, particle size distribution of circulating solid materials and solid circulating rat, Gs. By comparing the residence time distribution and the burn out time required for different size, the minimum bed pressure drop (BPD) or bed inventory in the furnace was determined for different mixing ratio among the three coals. The results show that under each mixing ratio, the solid circulating flux and solid suspension density in the upper furnace can meet the requirement of heating transfer. However, the minimum BPD or bed inventory required to meet the burn out time of the coarse solids was different. For in the case with the ratio among gangue, middling and slime as 5:3:2, the lowest value is 12 kPa, which will cause serious erosion and more power consumption. Because the middling has lower ash content, higher reactivity and better ash formation, increasing the proportion of the middling (1:5:4) will decrease the BPD greatly to 5 kPa, not only meet the requirements of material balance and burn time for coarse solids easily, but also realize the energy saving operation.

  14. The global chemical properties of high-mass star forming clumps at different evolutionary stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; He, Yu-Xin; Li, Da-Lei; Tang, Xin-Di; Ji, Wei-Guang; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    A total of 197 relatively isolated high-mass star-forming clumps were selected from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey data and their global chemical evolution investigated using four molecular lines, N2H+ (1--0), HCO+ (1--0), HCN (1-0), and HNC (1-0). The results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios I(HCO+)/I(HNC), I(HCN)/I(HNC), I(N2H+)/I(HCO+), and I(N2H+)/ I(HCN) are promising tracers for evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps. The global averaged column densities and abundances of N2H+, HCO+, HCN, and HNC increase as clumps evolve. The global averaged abundance ratios X(HCN)/X(HNC) could be used to trace evolution of high-mass star forming clumps, X(HCO+)/X(HNC) is more suitable for distinguishing high-mass star-forming clumps in prestellar (stage A) from those in protostellar (stage B) and HII/PDR region (stage C). These results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios between HCN (1-0), HNC (1-0), HCO+ (1--0) and N2H+ (1--0) are more suitable for tracing the evolution of high-mass star forming clumps. We also studied the chemical properties of the target high-mass star-forming clumps in each spiral arm of the Galaxy, and got results very different from those above. This is probably due to the relatively small sample in each spiral arm. For high-mass star-forming clumps in Sagittarius arm and Norma-Outer arm, comparing two groups located on one arm with different Galactocentric distances, the clumps near the Galactic Center appear to be younger than those far from the Galactic center, which may be due to more dense gas concentrated near the Galactic Center, and hence more massive stars being formed there.

  15. A large difference in the progenitor masses of active and passive galaxies in the EAGLE simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Clauwens, Bart; Schaye, Joop

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative number density matching of galaxies is a method to observationally connect descendent galaxies to their typical main progenitors at higher redshifts and thereby to assess the evolution of galaxy properties. The accuracy of this method is limited due to galaxy merging and scatter in the stellar mass growth history of individual galaxies. Behroozi et al. (2013) have introduced a refinement of the method, based on abundance matching of observed galaxies to the Bolshoi dark-matter-only simulation. The EAGLE cosmological hydro-simulation is well suited to test this method, because it reproduces the observed evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function and has a representative sample of passive/active galaxies. We find agreement with the Behroozi et al. (2013) method for the complete sample of main progenitors of z = 0 galaxies, but we also find a strong dependence on the current star formation rate. Passive galaxies with a stellar mass up to 10^10.75 Msun have a completely different median mass history...

  16. Differences in spring-mass characteristics between one- and two-legged hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Emika; Ogata, Toru

    2013-12-01

    Although many athletic activities and plyometric training methods involve both unilateral and bilateral movement, little is known about differences in the leg stiffness (K(leg)) experienced during one-legged hopping (OLH) and two-legged hopping (TLH) in place. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hopping frequencies on differences in K(leg) during OLH and TLH. Using a spring-mass model and data collected from 17 participants during OLH and TLH at frequencies of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 Hz, K(leg) was calculated as the ratio of maximal ground reaction force (F(peak)) to the maximum center of mass displacement (ΔCOM) at the middle of the stance phase measured from vertical ground reaction force. Both K(leg) and F(peak) were found to be significantly greater during TLH than OLH at all frequencies, but type of hopping was not found to have a significant effect on ΔCOM. These results suggest that K(leg) is different between OLH and TLH at a given hopping frequency and differences in K(leg) during OLH and TLH are mainly associated with differences in F(peak) but not ΔCOM. PMID:23271206

  17. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  18. A discussion of hyperbolicity in CATHENA 4: virtual mass and phase-to-interface pressure differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the one-dimensional equations of motion for two-phase flow are non-hyperbolic. Non-hyperbolicity can lead to numerical instabilities, destroying the solution. However, researchers in the last few decades were able to show that inclusion of virtual mass and/or phase-to-interface pressure differences in the momentum equations successfully render the equations of motion hyperbolic. In the present paper, the effect of including virtual mass and phase-to-interface pressure terms in the momentum equations on the hyperbolicity of the two-phase model in the CATHENA 4 code is discussed. The study is motivated by the fact that the inclusion of either model has been shown in the open literature to lead to a hyperbolic system separately. However, no known study exists that examine hyperbolicity in the presence of both these terms in the momentum equations. In this work, both terms are considered in the model equations simultaneously and their implications on the hyperbolicity of the two-phase model are discussed. Specifically, it is shown that in the case of mixed flow, there is a distinct region of non-hyperbolicity that developers need to be aware of when their equations include both the virtual mass and the phase-to-interface terms. Selecting the coefficients of phase-to-interface pressure difference terms properly ensures that the equations are hyperbolic for a wide range of conditions. (author)

  19. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Heringa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic aerosol (OA represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS and compared to SOA from α-pinene.

    The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production.

    Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra in the m/z range 12–250 showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the different SOA types after 5 h of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxidized OA (SV-OOA observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O : C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25–0.55 with no major increase during the first 5 h of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O : C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions based on their carbon number revealed that the SOA source with the highest O : C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. Fragment ions

  20. Dominance of long distance effects in the KL-KS mass difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue that the asymptotic behavior of the weak matrix elements involving the on-mass-shell ground-state mesons with infinite momenta, which was instrumental in explaining the |ΔI| = 1/2 rule in the K → ππ decays, actually implies the vanishing of the matrix element of the local |ΔS| = 2 quark operator arising from the box diagram, when it is taken between |K0| and |K-bar0| states. In contrast, the long distance contribution, arising from the ππ intermediate states as well as the poles of the vector and pseudoscalar mesons, may alone reproduce the observed KL-KS mass difference, in consistency with the selection rule and the rates of the K → ππ decays, depending on the values of the η-η'- · mixing. (author)

  1. The variations in Body Mass Index of different types of cigarette smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Agnihotri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of both active and second hand smoking on Body Mass Index of adult smokers in rural areas of Chandigarh. The relationship of body mass index with smoking status was also assessed in current daily and intermittent smokers. The male subjects (N=240 of 20-30 years and 30-40 years age category were divided into four groups of 30 subjects each based on Global Adult Tobacco Survey Questionnaire, India as follows: Group 1 - Current daily cigarette smokers, Group 2 - current intermittent cigarette smokers, Group 3 - Second hand cigarette smokers and Group 4 - Non-smokers (Control group. One way ANOVA test showed non-significant differences between and within all the groups in body mass index (F=1.11, p>0.05 in 20-30 years age category. In 30-40 years age category, significant differences (F=4.11, p<0.05 were observed between and within all the groups. Post hoc Scheffe test in 30-40 years category also revealed significant mean differences between current daily smokers and non-smokers. Karl Pearson’s correlation test showed a highly significant inverse linear relationship (p<0.001 between pack years and BMI in both current daily and intermittent smokers. Current smoking of moderate intensity has an effect to alter relative fatness (or BMI of the body. There may be no substantial difference in BMI with moderate and light smoking as well as exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS in younger adults. The greater the number of cigarettes smoked, the lower the adult smoker's BMI in both current moderate and intermittent light smokers.

  2. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  3. Don't Forget the Forest for the Trees: The Stellar-Mass Halo-Mass Relation in Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnesen, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The connection between dark matter halos and galactic baryons is often not well-constrained nor well-resolved in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Thus, Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models that assign galaxies to halos based on halo mass are frequently used to interpret clustering observations, even though it is well-known that the assembly history of dark matter halos is related to their clustering. In this paper we use high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulations to compare the halo and stellar mass growth of galaxies in a large-scale overdensity to those in a large-scale underdensity (on scales of about 20 Mpc). The simulation reproduces assembly bias, that halos have earlier formation times in overdense environments than in underdense regions. We find that the stellar mass to halo mass ratio is larger in overdense regions in central galaxies residing in halos with masses between 10$^{11}$-10$^{12.9}$ M$_{\\odot}$. When we force the local density (within 2 Mpc) at z=0 to be the same ...

  4. Density-Matrix Renormalization Group studies of mixture of two different ultracold bosonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the ground state phase diagram for a two species Bose mixture in a one dimensional optical lattice using the finite size density matrix renormalization group (FSDMRG) method. We present our result for different combinations of inter and intra-species repulsion strengths with a commensurate filling factor. We obtain a superfluid (SF) to Mott insulator (MI) transition when the inter species interaction term is less than the intra-species interaction term. However, when the former is slightly greater than the latter we find that the two different species reside in spatially separate regions

  5. Patterns of scaling violation and the proton-neutron mass difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that if the scaling violation appeared in the recent eN scattering experiments is explained by the theories with non-trivial anomalous dimensions the calculation of proton-neutron mass difference through the Cottingham type formula via one-photon exchange cannot give desired order of magnitude -2MeV. Only candidate to be able to produce correct order is rather an unorthodox pattern of scaling violation which is not so favoured by the eN scattering experiments. (auth.)

  6. Mass attenuation coefficient calculations of different detector crystals by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo method

    OpenAIRE

    Ermis Elif Ebru; Celiktas Cuneyt

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of various detector materials (crystals) were carried out by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) method at different gamma-ray energies. NaI, PVT, GSO, GaAs and CdWO4 detector materials were chosen in the calculations. Calculated coefficients were also compared with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) values. Obtained results through this method were highly in accordance with those of the NIST values. It was concluded f...

  7. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Pravina P.; Bichile, Govind K.

    2013-11-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as Glycine (C2H5NO2), DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2), Proline (C5H9NO2), L-Leucine (C6H13NO2 ), L-Arginine (C6H14N4O2) and L-Arginine Monohydrochloride (C6H15ClN4O2), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 10.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities are in good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error.

  8. Evolutionary Tracks of the Climate of Earth-like Planets around Different Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, S.; Tajika, E.

    2016-07-01

    The climatic evolution of the Earth depends strongly on the evolution of the insolation from the Sun and the amount of the greenhouse gasses, especially CO2 in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the evolution of the climate of hypothetical Earths around stars whose masses are different from the solar mass with a luminosity evolution model of the stars, a mantle degassing model coupled with a parameterized convection model of the planetary interiors, and an energy balance climate model of the planetary surface. In the habitable zone (HZ), the climate of the planets is initially warm or hot, depending on the orbital semimajor axes. We found that, in the inner HZ, the climate of the planets becomes hotter with time owing to the increase in the luminosity of the central stars, while, in the outer HZ, it becomes colder and eventually globally ice-covered owing to the decrease in the CO2 degassing rate of the planets. The orbital condition for maintaining the warm climate similar to the present Earth becomes very limited, and more interestingly, the planet orbiting in the outer HZ becomes globally ice-covered after a certain critical age (∼3 Gyr for the hypothetical Earth with standard parameters), irrespective of the mass of the central star. This is because the critical age depends on the evolution of the planets and planetary factors, rather than on the stellar mass. The habitability of the Earth-like planet is shown to be limited with age even though it is orbiting within the HZ.

  9. Gender differences in serum CK-MB mass levels in healthy Brazilian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, C M C; Araki, L M; Nogueira, A A R; Mansur, A P

    2011-03-01

    The creatine kinase-isoenzyme MB (CK-MB) mass assay is one of the laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. It is recommended, however, that reference limits should take gender and race into account. In the present study, we analyzed the plasma CK-MB mass and troponin levels of 244 healthy volunteers without a personal history of coronary artery disease and with no chronic diseases, muscular trauma or hypothyroidism, and not taking statins. The tests were performed with commercial kits, CK-MB mass turbo kit and Troponin I turbo kit, using the Immulite 1000 analyzer from Siemens Healthcare Diagnostic. The values were separated according to gender and showed significant differences by the Mann-Whitney test. Mean (± SD) CK-MB mass values were 2.55 ± 1.09 for women (N = 121; age = 41.20 ± 10.13 years) and 3.49 ± 1.41 ng/mL for men (N = 123; age = 38.16 ± 11.12 years). Gender-specific reference values at the 99th percentile level, according to the Medicalc statistical software, were 5.40 ng/mL for women and 7.13 ng/mL for men. The influence of race was not considered because of the high miscegenation of the Brazilian population. The CK-MB values obtained were higher than the 5.10 mg/mL proposed by the manufacturer of the laboratory kit. Therefore, decision limits should be related to population and gender in order to improve the specificity of this diagnostic tool, avoiding misclassification of patients. PMID:21271183

  10. Gender differences in serum CK-MB mass levels in healthy Braziliansubjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.C. Strunz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The creatine kinase-isoenzyme MB (CK-MB mass assay is one of the laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. It is recommended, however, that reference limits should take gender and race into account. In the present study, we analyzed the plasma CK-MB mass and troponin levels of 244 healthy volunteers without a personal history of coronary artery disease and with no chronic diseases, muscular trauma or hypothyroidism, and not taking statins. The tests were performed with commercial kits, CK-MB mass turbo kit and Troponin I turbo kit, using the Immulite 1000 analyzer from Siemens Healthcare Diagnostic. The values were separated according to gender and showed significant differences by the Mann-Whitney test. Mean (± SD CK-MB mass values were 2.55 ± 1.09 for women (N = 121; age = 41.20 ± 10.13 years and 3.49 ± 1.41 ng/mL for men (N = 123; age = 38.16 ± 11.12 years. Gender-specific reference values at the 99th percentile level, according to the Medicalc statistical software, were 5.40 ng/mL for women and 7.13 ng/mL for men. The influence of race was not considered because of the high miscegenation of the Brazilian population. The CK-MB values obtained were higher than the 5.10 mg/mL proposed by the manufacturer of the laboratory kit. Therefore, decision limits should be related to population and gender in order to improve the specificity of this diagnostic tool, avoiding misclassification of patients

  11. On comparison of γ ray internal conversion coefficients, calculated in different atomic models with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review on the tables of γ ray internal conversion coefficients (ICC) is given. Variations in methods of ICC tables calculation are discussed. Recommendations on the possibility of using nowadays ICC tables depending on the difference of ICC of various tables for the specific case and experiment error are given. It is recommended to indicate, what tables are used for calculations, and not to average ICC from different tables. Two versions of theoretical ICC are compared with experimental ICC of pure E2 transitions. The conclusion is drawn that the best are αsub(k) ICC calculated in the Fock- Dirac field with account for the K-shell hole. As an example when unsatisfactory accuracy of theoretically calculated ICC results in additional error of determined values, the 152Eu→152Sm decay is considered

  12. Dental enamel roughness with different acid etching times: Atomic force microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Bochnia Cerci; Lucimara Stolz Roman; Odilon Guariza-Filho; Elisa Souza Camargo; Orlando Motohiro Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Objective: An important characteristic of human dental enamel not yet studied in detail is its surface roughness in mesoscopic scale. This study evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively the surface topography of acid etched enamel with different etching times. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six human maxillary bicuspids were randomly distributed into three groups (n=32): T0 (control), pumiced; T15, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 15 s; T30, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 30 s. R...

  13. Influence of a Thiolate Chemical Layer on GaAs (100 Biofunctionalization: An Original Approach Coupling Atomic Force Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Bienaime

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Widely used in microelectronics and optoelectronics; Gallium Arsenide (GaAs is a III-V crystal with several interesting properties for microsystem and biosensor applications. Among these; its piezoelectric properties and the ability to directly biofunctionalize the bare surface, offer an opportunity to combine a highly sensitive transducer with a specific bio-interface; which are the two essential parts of a biosensor. To optimize the biorecognition part; it is necessary to control protein coverage and the binding affinity of the protein layer on the GaAs surface. In this paper; we investigate the potential of a specific chemical interface composed of thiolate molecules with different chain lengths; possessing hydroxyl (MUDO; for 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (HS(CH211OH or carboxyl (MHDA; for mercaptohexadecanoic acid (HS(CH215CO2H end groups; to reconstitute a dense and homogeneous albumin (Rat Serum Albumin; RSA protein layer on the GaAs (100 surface. The protein monolayer formation and the covalent binding existing between RSA proteins and carboxyl end groups were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis. Characterization in terms of topography; protein layer thickness and stability lead us to propose the 10% MHDA/MUDO interface as the optimal chemical layer to efficiently graft proteins. This analysis was coupled with in situ MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements; which proved the presence of a dense and uniform grafted protein layer on the 10% MHDA/MUDO interface. We show in this study that a critical number of carboxylic docking sites (10% is required to obtain homogeneous and dense protein coverage on GaAs. Such a protein bio-interface is of fundamental importance to ensure a highly specific and sensitive biosensor.

  14. Studies on the formation of atomic and molecular ions of uranium and thorium in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of molecular and atomic ions of U and Th as a function of the plasma conditions such as nebulizer gas flow and plasma power has been studied. The experiments performed and the results of these experiments are briefly described in this paper

  15. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    with an aqueous solution of 6 mmol L-1 of salicylate ion at pH 8.5 as the mobile phase which allowed the isocratic separation of the four selenium analytes within 8 minutes. The separated selenium species were detected on-line by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) or inductively coupled plasma mass...... spectrometry (ICP-MS). The signal-to-noise ratio of the FAAS detector was optimized using a hydrogen-argon entrained-air flame and a slotted-tube atom trap (STAT) in the flame. The limit of detection (3 sigma) achieved by the HPLC-FAAS system was 1 mg L-1 of selenium (100 mu L injections) for each of the four...

  16. Influences of different oxidants on the characteristics of HfAlOx films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Ji-Bin; Liu Hong-Xia; Ma Fei; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Hao Yue

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of two kinds of oxidants (H2O and O3) with the combinations of two metal precursors [trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium (TEMAH)] for atomic layer deposition (ALD) hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlOx) films is carried out.The effects of different oxidants on the physical properties and electrical characteristics of HfAlOx films are studied.The preliminary testing results indicate that the impurity level of HfAlOx films grown with both H2O and O3 used as oxidants can be well controlled,which has significant effects on the dielectric constant,valence band,electrical properties,and stability of HfAlOx film.Additional thermal annealing effects on the properties of HfAlOx films grown with different oxidants are also investigated.

  17. Simultaneous determination of three organophosphorus pesticides in different food commodities by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Bhaskar Reddy, Ambavaram; Yusop, Zulkifli; Jaafar, Jafariah; Bin Aris, Azmi; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Umar, Khalid; Talib, Juhaizah

    2016-06-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of three organophosphorus pesticides, namely, chlorpyrifos, malathion, and diazinon in three different food commodities (milk, apples, and drinking water) employing solid-phase extraction for sample pretreatment. Pesticide extraction from different sample matrices was carried out on Chromabond C18 cartridges using 3.0 mL of methanol and 3.0 mL of a mixture of dichloromethane/acetonitrile (1:1 v/v) as the eluting solvent. Analysis was carried out by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry using selected-ion monitoring mode. Good linear relationships were obtained in the range of 0.1-50 μg/L for chlorpyrifos, and 0.05-50 μg/L for both malathion and diazinon pesticides. Good repeatability and recoveries were obtained in the range of 78.54-86.73% for three pesticides under the optimized experimental conditions. The limit of detection ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 μg/L, and the limit of quantification ranged from 0.05 to 0.1 μg/L for all three pesticides. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the determination of three targeted pesticides in milk, apples, and drinking water samples each in triplicate. No pesticide was found in apple and milk samples, but chlorpyrifos was found in one drinking water sample below the quantification level. PMID:27095506

  18. Setting the agenda: Different strategies of a Mass Media in a model of cultural dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Sebastián; Balenzuela, Pablo; Dorso, Claudio O.

    2016-09-01

    Day by day, people exchange opinions about news with relatives, friends, and coworkers. In most cases, they get informed about a given issue by reading newspapers, listening to the radio, or watching TV, i.e., through a Mass Media (MM). However, the importance of a given new can be stimulated by the Media by assigning newspaper's pages or time in TV programs. In this sense, we say that the Media has the power to "set the agenda", i.e., it decides which new is important and which is not. On the other hand, the Media can know people's concerns through, for instance, websites or blogs where they express their opinions, and then it can use this information in order to be more appealing to an increasing number of people. In this work, we study different scenarios in an agent-based model of cultural dissemination, in which a given Mass Media has a specific purpose: To set a particular topic of discussion and impose its point of view to as many social agents as it can. We model this by making the Media has a fixed feature, representing its point of view in the topic of discussion, while it tries to attract new consumers, by taking advantage of feedback mechanisms, represented by adaptive features. We explore different strategies that the Media can adopt in order to increase the affinity with potential consumers and then the probability to be successful in imposing this particular topic.

  19. Twin's Birth-Order Differences in Height and Body Mass Index From Birth to Old Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Yoshie; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo;

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed birth order differences in means and variances of height and body mass index (BMI) in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins from infancy to old age. The data were derived from the international CODATwins database. The total number of height and BMI measures from 0.5 to 79.5 years of...... age was 397,466. As expected, first-born twins had greater birth weight than second-born twins. With respect to height, first-born twins were slightly taller than second-born twins in childhood. After adjusting the results for birth weight, the birth order differences decreased and were no longer...... statistically significant. First-born twins had greater BMI than the second-born twins over childhood and adolescence. After adjusting the results for birth weight, birth order was still associated with BMI until 12 years of age. No interaction effect between birth order and zygosity was found. Only limited...

  20. Atomic pairwise distribution function analysis of the amorphous phase prepared by different manufacturing routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetker, Johan P.; Koradia, Vishal; Rades, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    Amlodipine besilate, a calcium channel antagonist, exists in several solid forms. Processing of anhydrate and dihydrate forms of this drug may lead to solid state changes, and is therefore the focus of this study. Milling was performed for the anhydrate form, whereas the dihydrate form was...... (PDF) analysis of the XRPD pattern. When compared to XRPD and Raman spectroscopy, the PDF analysis was superior in displaying the difference between the amorphous samples prepared by milling and quench cooling approaches of the two starting materials....

  1. Does the metabolic rate-flight speed relationship vary among geometrically similar birds of different mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundle, Matthew W; Hansen, Kacia S; Dial, Kenneth P

    2007-03-01

    Based on aerodynamic considerations, the energy use-flight speed relationship of all airborne animals and aircraft should be U-shaped. However, measures of the metabolic rate-flight speed relationship in birds have been available since Tucker's pioneering experiments with budgerigars nearly forty years ago, but this classic work remains the only study to have found a clearly U-shaped metabolic power curve. The available data suggests that the energetic requirements for flight within this species are unique, yet the metabolic power curve of the budgerigar is widely considered representative of birds in general. Given these conflicting results and the observation that the budgerigar's mass is less than 50% of the next smallest species to have been studied, we asked whether large and small birds have metabolic power curves of different shapes. To address this question we measured the rates of oxygen uptake and wingbeat kinematics in budgerigars and cockatiels flying within a variable-speed wind tunnel. These species are close phylogenetic relatives, have similar flight styles, wingbeat kinematics, and are geometrically similar but have body masses that differ by a factor of two. In contrast to our expectations, we found the metabolic rate-flight speed relationship of both species to be acutely U-shaped. We also found that neither budgerigars nor cockatiels used their normal intermittent flight style while wearing a respirometric mask. We conclude that species size differences alone do not explain the previously unique metabolic power curve of the budgerigar; however, due to the absence of comparable data we cannot evaluate whether the mask-related kinematic response we document influences the metabolic rate-flight speed relationship of these parrots, or whether the energetics of flight differ between this and other avian clades. PMID:17337719

  2. Differences among skeletal muscle mass indices derived from height-, weight-, and body mass index-adjusted models in assessing sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Aging processes are inevitably accompanied by structural and functional changes in vital organs. Skeletal muscle, which accounts for 40% of total body weight, deteriorates quantitatively and qualitatively with aging. Skeletal muscle is known to play diverse crucial physical and metabolic roles in humans. Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by significant loss of muscle mass and strength. It is related to subsequent frailty and instability in the elderly population. Because muscle tissue i...

  3. Implementation of suitable flow injection/sequential-sample separation/preconcentration schemes for determination of trace metal concentrations using detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Wang, Jianhua

    Various preconditioning procedures encomprising appropriate separation/preconcentration schemes in order to obtain optimal sensitivity and selectivity characteristics when using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are...

  4. Implementation of suitable flow injection/sequential-sample separation/preconcentration schemes for determination of trace metal concentrations using detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Wang, Jianhua

    2002-01-01

    Various preconditioning procedures encomprising appropriate separation/preconcentration schemes in order to obtain optimal sensitivity and selectivity characteristics when using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are...

  5. Klaus Blaum, of GSI Darmstadt and project leader of the ISOLTRAP experiment at CERN, will receive the 2004 Gustav-Hertz-Prize for his outstanding work on the mass determination of unstable atomic nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Klaus Blaum, of GSI Darmstadt and project leader of the ISOLTRAP experiment at CERN, will receive the 2004 Gustav-Hertz-Prize for his outstanding work on the mass determination of unstable atomic nuclei

  6. Analysis of electronic properties of different configurations of CNTS with undoped and doped atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Varshali

    2016-04-01

    In this paper three types of carbon nanotubes, namely, zigzag (n, 0), armchair (n= m), and chiral (n, m) are investigated with and without doping using simulation technique. The electronic properties like band structure and density of states of these three configurations with different values of n and m vectors are analysed and compared using Atomistix Toolkit (ATK) software. When the band structures of the designed configurations, reported in this paper are compared, it is observed that when the value of (n-m) vector is divisible by three, the CNTs behave as metals, otherwise they behave as semiconductors. The density of states of carbon nanotubes depicts the energy gap around the Fermi level. For the tube with chiral chirality, density of states is zero near the Fermi level, for semiconductor behaviour there is small gap in density of states near Fermi level and gap increases as the behaviour changes to insulator.

  7. A Novel and Intuitive Method of Displaying and Interacting with Mass Difference Information: Application to Oligonucleotide Drug Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussis, Stilianos G.

    2015-07-01

    A new method is presented for determining relationships between components in complex analytical systems. The method uses the mass differences between peaks in high resolution electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra. It relates peaks that share common mass differences. The method is based on the fundamental assumption that peaks in the spectra having the same exact mass difference are related by the same chemical moiety/substructure. Moreover, the presence (or absence/loss) of the same chemical moiety from a series of molecules may reflect similarities in the mechanisms of formation of each molecule. The determined mass differences in the spectra are used to automatically differentiate the types of components in the samples. Contour plots and summary plots of the summed total ion signal as a function of the mass difference are generated, which form powerful tools for the rapid and automated determination of the components in the samples and for comparisons with other samples. For the first time, in this work a unique profile contour plot has been developed that permits the interactive interrogation of the mass range by mass difference data matrix to obtain valuable information about components that share a common mechanism of formation, and all possible mechanisms of formation linked to a selected precursor molecule. The method can be used as an additional and complementary method to the existing analytical methods to determine relationships between components in complex chemical systems.

  8. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjhangmehr, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy.

  9. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Claire E., E-mail: whitece@princeton.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Physics and Chemistry of Materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  10. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjhangmehr, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy. PMID:27004606

  11. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO2 alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C3S), blended C3S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C3S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements

  12. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography- inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Currier, J. M.; Saunders, R J; Ding, L.; Bodnar, W.; Cable, P.; Matoušek, T. (Tomáš); Creed, J. T.; Stýblo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-CT-AAS) have been frequently used for the analysis of MAsIII and DMAsIII in biological samples. While HG-CT-AAS has con...

  13. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures. PMID:27269125

  14. Testing the Gravitational Redshift with Atomic Gravimeters?

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Bordé, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Atom interferometers allow the measurement of the acceleration of freely falling atoms with respect to an experimental platform at rest on Earth's surface. Such experiments have been used to test the universality of free fall by comparing the acceleration of the atoms to that of a classical freely falling object. In a recent paper, M\\"uller, Peters and Chu [Nature {\\bf 463}, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometers also provide a very accurate test of the gravitational redshift (or universality of clock rates). Considering the atom as a clock operating at the Compton frequency associated with the rest mass, they claimed that the interferometer measures the gravitational redshift between the atom-clocks in the two paths of the interferometer at different values of gravitational potentials. In the present paper we analyze this claim in the frame of general relativity and of different alternative theories, and conclude that the interpretation of atom interferometers as testing the gravitational redshift ...

  15. Calculation of the factor of the time's relativity in quantum area for different atoms based on the `Substantial motion' theory of Mulla Sadra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Iranian Philosopher, Mulla Sadra (1571-1640) in his theory of ``Substantial motion'' emphasized that ``the universe moves in its entity'', and ``the time is the fourth dimension of the universe'' This definition of space-time is proposed by him at three hundred years before Einstein. He argued that the time is magnitude of the motion (momentum) of the matter in its entity. In the other words, the time for each atom (body) is sum of the momentums of its involved fundamental particles. The momentum for each atom is different from the other atoms. In this methodology, by proposing some formulas, we can calculate the time for involved particles' momentum (time) for each atom in a second of the Eastern Time Zone (ETZ). Due to differences between these momentums during a second in ETZ, the time for each atom, will be different from the other atoms. This is the relativity in quantum physics. On the other hand, the God communicates with elementary particles via sub-particles (see my next paper) and transfers the packages (bit) of information and laws to them for processing and selection of their next step. Differences between packages like complexity and velocity of processing during the time, is the second variable in relativity of time for each atom which may be effective on the factor.

  16. Growth and plant mass of radish fertirrigated with different doses nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ferreira da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of nitrogen doses applied via fertigation and associated with different types of crop establishment fertilization on growth and biomass of radish. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse of the Academic Unit of Agricultural Engineering, Federal University of Campina Grande, from April to May 2014. Treatments consisted of five doses of nitrogen fertilizer applied by fertigation (0, 0.7, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8g per pot and three types of crop establishment fertilization (humus 2:2; NPK and control, arranged in a 5 x 3 factor design with four repetitions. The 15 treatments were arranged in 60 plots. The nitrogen source used in the study was urea, divided in three applications: the first application was carried out eight days after transplanting, the second, on day 15, and the third, on day 22. The crop establishment fertilization significantly influenced the growth variables and plant mass of the radish on day 35 after transplanting. The highest values of the variables (number of leaves, plant height, bulb diameter, leaf area, fresh mass of the aerial part, dry mass of the aerial part and root/aerial part were observed in the treatment with humus on day 35 after transplanting. The dose of 2.8g nitrogen per pot corresponding to 6.22g of urea per plant provided the highest yield for the variable number of leafs, leaf area and root length on day 35 after transplanting.

  17. On the peak mass production of different fragments in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model, we study the system mass dependence of the peak center-of-mass energy (Ec.m. max) and maximal production (left angle N right angle max) of various mass fragments at their corresponding Ec.m. max. We studied, in particular, light clusters (LCs), medium-mass fragments (MMFs) and heavy-mass fragments (HMFs) produced in various reactions ranging from 40Ca + 40Ca to 197Au + 197Au. Our findings show that the Ec.m. max and left angle N right angle max increase with the system mass for all mass fragments except for HMFs where the peak center-of-mass energy decreases and corresponding multiplicity remains constant with the system mass. This happens due to the dominant role of Coulomb interactions in heavier colliding nuclei. Experiments are called for to verify this prediction. (orig.)

  18. On the difference between the pole and the MS masses of the top quark at the electroweak scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Kalmykov, Mikhail Yu.; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-12-15

    We argue that for a Higgs boson mass M{sub H} {proportional_to} 125 GeV, as estimated from recent Higgs searches at the LHC, the inclusion of the electroweak radiative corrections in the relationship between the pole and MS masses of the top quark reduces the difference to about 1 GeV. This fact is relevant for the scheme dependence of electroweak observables as well as for the extraction of the top quark mass from experimental data.

  19. Deflection of light due to rotating mass – a comparison among the results of different approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that light gets deflected due to mass. Value of deflection of light for static body is not same as it is in the case of rotating body. The deflection for a static body entirely depends on the gravitational mass where in case of a rotating body new terms will be included due to rotation. The bending angle of light is also not same in the equatorial plane and non equatorial plane for rotating Kerr body. The light bending angle is also direction of motion dependent i.e. if the motion of the light ray is in the direction of rotation, bending angle is greater than the static case and if the ray is in the opposite direction of rotation, the bending angle is smaller than the static case in equatorial plane. There are two approaches to obtain the bending angle, null geodesic of photon and change of effective refractive index. In this paper a comparison will be made among the results of different approaches

  20. Setting the Agenda: Different strategies of a Mass Media in a model of cultural dissemination

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Sebastián; Dorso, Claudio O

    2015-01-01

    Day by day, people exchange opinions about a given new with relatives, friends, and coworkers. In most cases, they get informed about a given issue by reading newspapers, listening to the radio, or watching TV, i.e., through a Mass Media (MM). However, the importance of a given new can be stimulated by the Media by assigning newspaper's pages or time in TV programs. In this sense, we say that the Media has the power to "set the agenda", i.e., it decides which new is important and which is not. On the other hand, the Media can know people's concerns through, for instance, websites or blogs where they express their opinions, and then it can use this information in order to be more appealing to an increasing number of people. In this work, we study different scenarios in an agent-based model of cultural dissemination, in which a given Mass Media has a specific purpose: To set a particular topic of discussion and impose its point of view to as many social agents as it can. We model this by making the Media has a ...