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Sample records for atomic layer growth

  1. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 3. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. Anu Philip Subin Thomas K Rajeev Kumar. Research Articles Volume 82 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 563-569 ...

  2. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    -k) materials as the gate oxide of MOSFET [1–3]. Aluminium oxide prepared by atomic ... adsorbed on to the substrate/previous layer in a saturating fashion. Argon/nitrogen is pulsed into the chamber to purge out any unreacted ...

  3. Growth kinetics and initial stage growth during plasma-enhanced Ti atomic layer deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the growth kinetics of plasma-enhanced Ti atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a quartz crystal microbalance. Ti ALD films were grown at temperatures from 20 to 200 deg. C using TiCl sub 4 as a source gas and rf plasma-produced atomic H as the reducing agent. Postdeposition ex situ chemical analyses of thin films showed that the main impurity is oxygen, mostly incorporated during the air exposure prior to analysis. The thickness per cycle, corresponding to the growth rate, was measured by quartz crystal microbalance as a function of various key growth parameters, including TiCl sub 4 and H exposure time, rf plasma power, and sample temperature. The growth rates were independent of TiCl sub 4 exposure above 1x10 sup 3 L, indicating typical ALD mode growth. The key kinetic parameters for Cl extraction reaction and TiCl sub 4 adsorption kinetics were obtained and the growth kinetics were modeled to predict the growth rates based upon these results. Also, the dependency of growth kinetics on d...

  4. Colloidal atomic layer deposition growth of PbS/CdS core/shell quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilowski, Michel; Nienhaus, Lea; Bertram, Sophie N; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2017-01-10

    Traditionally, PbS/CdS quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized via a cation exchange method, making fine control over shell growth challenging. We show here that colloidal atomic layer deposition (c-ALD) allows for the sequential growth of single monolayers of the shell, thus creating a 'true' CdS shell on PbS QDs.

  5. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    Mar 6, 2014 ... Abstract. In this paper a theoretical calculation is presented for the growth per cycle (GPC) of the film and the variation of GPC with OH concentration on the substrate surface. The calculated GPC range (0.179 nm–0.075 nm) agrees well with reported experimental values. The present approach yielded a ...

  6. Effect of interface layer on growth behavior of atomic-layer-deposited Ir thin film as novel Cu diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Hong Kee; Kim, Joo Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Growth and nucleation behavior of Ir films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on different interfacial layers such as SiO 2 , surface-treated TaN, and 3-nm-thick TaN were investigated. To grow Ir thin film by ALD, (1,5-cyclooctadiene) (ethylcyclopentadienyl) iridium (Ir(EtCp)(COD)) and oxygen were employed as the metalorganic precursor and reactant, respectively. To obtain optimal deposition conditions, the deposition temperature was varied from 240 to 420 deg. C and the number of deposition cycles was changed from 150 to 300. The Ir film grown on the 3-nm-thick TaN surface showed the smoothest and most uniform layer for all the deposition cycles, whereas poor nucleation and three-dimensional island-type growth of the Ir layer were observed on Si, SiO 2 , and surface-treated TaN after fewer number of deposition cycles. The uniformity of the Ir film layer was maintained for all the different substrates up to 300 deposition cycles. Therefore we suggest that the growth behavior of the Ir layer on different interface layer is related to the chemical bonding pattern of the substrate film or interface layer, resulting in better understand the growth mechanism of Ir layer as a copper diffusion barrier. The ALD-grown Ir films show the preferential direction of (1 1 1) for all the reflections, which indicates the absence of IrO 2 in metallic Ir.

  7. Analysis of layer-by-layer thin-film oxide growth using RHEED and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Eli; Sullivan, M. C.; Gutierrez-Llorente, Araceli; Joress, H.; Woll, A.; Brock, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is commonly used as an in situ analysis tool for layer-by-layer thin-film growth. Atomic force microscopy is an equally common ex situ tool for analysis of the film surface, providing visual evidence of the surface morphology. During growth, the RHEED intensity oscillates as the film surface changes in roughness. It is often assumed that the maxima of the RHEED oscillations signify a complete layer, however, the oscillations in oxide systems can be misleading. Thus, using only the RHEED maxima is insufficient. X-ray reflectivity can also be used to analyze growth, as the intensity oscillates in phase with the smoothness of the surface. Using x-ray reflectivity to determine the thin film layer deposition, we grew three films where the x-ray and RHEED oscillations were nearly exactly out of phase and halted deposition at different points in the growth. Pre-growth and post-growth AFM images emphasize the fact that the maxima in RHEED are not a justification for determining layer completion. Work conducted at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) supported by NSF Awards DMR-1332208 and DMR-0936384 and the Cornell Center for Materials Research Shared Facilities are supported through DMR-1120296.

  8. Growth and characterization of titanium oxide by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2013-09-01

    The growth of TiO2 films by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition using Star-Ti as a precursor has been systematically studied. The conversion from amorphous to crystalline TiO2 was observed either during high temperature growth or annealing process of the films. The refractive index and bandgap of TiO2 films changed with the growth and annealing temperatures. The optimization of the annealing conditions for TiO2 films was also done by morphology and density studies. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nucleation and growth of copper selective-area atomic layer deposition on palladium nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, J; Zimmerman, D T; Weisel, G J; Willis, B G

    2017-10-21

    The nucleation and growth of copper atomic layer deposition (ALD) on palladium have been investigated for applications in nanoscale devices. Palladium nanostructures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and range in size from 250 nm to 5 μm, prepared on oxidized silicon wafers. Copper ALD using Cu(thd) 2 (s) and H 2 (g) as reactants was carried out to selectively deposit copper on palladium seeded regions to the exclusion of surrounding oxide surfaces. Nuclei sizes and densities have been quantified by scanning electron microscopy for different growth conditions. It is found that growth occurs via island growth at temperatures of 150-190 °C and alloy growth at temperatures above 210 °C. In the lower temperature window, nucleation density increases with decreasing temperature, reaching a maximum of 4.8 ± 0.2 × 10 9 /cm 2 at 150 °C, but growth is too slow for significant deposition at the lowest temperatures. At higher temperatures, individual nuclei cannot be quantified due to extensive mixing of copper and palladium layers. For the lower temperatures where nuclei can be quantified, rates of nucleation and growth are enhanced at high H 2 partial pressures. At the smallest length scales, conformality of the deposited over-layers is limited by a finite nuclei density and evolving grain structure that cause distortion of the original nanostructure shape during growth.

  10. TiN films by Atomic Layer Deposition: Growth and electrical characterization down to sub-nm thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the growth and characterization of TiN thib films obtained by atomic layer deposition at 350-425 ◦C. We observe a growth of the continuous layers from the very beginning of the process, i.e. for a thickness of 0.65 nm, which is equivalent to 3 monolayers of TiN. The film growth

  11. Epitaxial Growth of Perovskite Strontium Titanate on Germanium via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Edward L; Edmondson, Bryce I; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G

    2016-07-26

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a commercially utilized deposition method for electronic materials. ALD growth of thin films offers thickness control and conformality by taking advantage of self-limiting reactions between vapor-phase precursors and the growing film. Perovskite oxides present potential for next-generation electronic materials, but to-date have mostly been deposited by physical methods. This work outlines a method for depositing SrTiO3 (STO) on germanium using ALD. Germanium has higher carrier mobilities than silicon and therefore offers an alternative semiconductor material with faster device operation. This method takes advantage of the instability of germanium's native oxide by using thermal deoxidation to clean and reconstruct the Ge (001) surface to the 2×1 structure. 2-nm thick, amorphous STO is then deposited by ALD. The STO film is annealed under ultra-high vacuum and crystallizes on the reconstructed Ge surface. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used during this annealing step to monitor the STO crystallization. The thin, crystalline layer of STO acts as a template for subsequent growth of STO that is crystalline as-grown, as confirmed by RHEED. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to verify film stoichiometry before and after the annealing step, as well as after subsequent STO growth. This procedure provides framework for additional perovskite oxides to be deposited on semiconductors via chemical methods in addition to the integration of more sophisticated heterostructures already achievable by physical methods.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of Aluminum Sulfide: Growth Mechanism and Electrochemical Evaluation in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiangbo [Department; Cao, Yanqiang [Energy; Libera, Joseph A. [Energy; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Energy

    2017-10-17

    This study describes the synthesis of aluminum sulfide (AlSx) thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tris(dimethylamido)aluminum and hydrogen sulfide. We employed a suite of in situ measurement techniques to explore the ALD AlSx growth mechanism, including quartz crystal microbalance, quadrupole mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A variety of ex situ characterization techniques were used to determine the growth characteristics, morphology, elemental composition, and crystallinity of the resultant AlSx films. This study revealed that the AlSx growth was self-limiting in the temperature range 100-250 degrees C, and the growth per cycle decreased linearly with increasing temperature from similar to 0.45 angstrom/cycle at 100 degrees C to similar to 0.1 angstrom/cycle at 250 degrees C. The AlSx films were amorphous in this temperature range. We conducted electrochemical testing to evaluate the ALD AlSx as a potential anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The ALD AlSx exhibited reliable cyclability over 60 discharge-charge cycles with a sustainable discharge capacity of 640 mAh/g at a current density of 100 mA/g in the voltage window of 0.6-3.5

  13. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Solid State Electronics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H. [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstraße 15, 48149 Münster (Germany); Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine, E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yee, Ye Sheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Clemens, Bruce M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  14. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  15. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.

  16. Cubic crystalline erbium oxide growth on GaN(0001) by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Posadas, Agham B.; Kwon, Sunah; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-12-01

    Growth of crystalline Er2O3, a rare earth sesquioxide, on GaN(0001) is described. Ex situ HCl and NH4OH solutions and an in situ N2 plasma are used to remove impurities on the GaN surface and result in a Ga/N stoichiometry of 1.02. Using atomic layer deposition with erbium tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl) [Er(iPrCp)3] and water, crystalline cubic Er2O3 (C-Er2O3) is grown on GaN at 250 °C. The orientation relationships between the C-Er2O3 film and the GaN substrate are C-Er2O3(222) ǁ GaN(0001), C-Er2O3⟨-440⟩ ǁ GaN ⟨11-20⟩, and C-Er2O3⟨-211⟩ ǁ GaN ⟨1-100⟩. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy are used to examine the microstructure of C-Er2O3 and its interface with GaN. With post-deposition annealing at 600 °C, a thicker interfacial layer is observed, and two transition layers, crystalline GaNwOz and crystalline GaErxOy, are found between GaN and C-Er2O3. The tensile strain in the C-Er2O3 film is studied with x-ray diffraction by changes in both out-of-plane and in-plane d-spacing. Fully relaxed C-Er2O3 films on GaN are obtained when the film thickness is around 13 nm. Additionally, a valence band offset of 0.7 eV and a conduction band offset of 1.2 eV are obtained using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Fabrication of Nanolaminates with Ultrathin Nanolayers Using Atomic Layer Deposition: Nucleation & Growth Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Tecnologia de Superficies y Materiales (SMCTSM), XXVII Congreso Nacional, Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico, September 26, 2007. 26. "Atomic Layer Deposition of...Nanolaminates: Fabrication and Properties" (Plenary Lecture), Sociedad Mexicana de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Superficies y Materiales (SMCTSM), XXVII

  18. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  19. The Growth of Gallium Nitride Films Via the Innovative Technique of Atomic Layer Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    of excess incident atoms. Among the materials which have been deposited by ALE to date are ZnS, ZnSe, GaAs, AlI._Ga As, SnTe, GaP, SnO2 , A12 0 3...uppermost layer ,- of the film, excess incident atoms that do not form A-B bonds in the film are allowed to re-evaporate (by making use of the larger...were subsequently polished with 0.1 um diamond paste and then oxidized at 1200°C in flowing dry oxygen for 1.5 h to consume the 50 nm of surface which

  20. Growth mechanisms for Si epitaxy on O atomic layers: Impact of O-content and surface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayachandran, Suseendran, E-mail: suseendran.jayachandran@imec.be [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Castle Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Billen, Arne [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Douhard, Bastien; Conard, Thierry; Meersschaut, Johan; Moussa, Alain; Caymax, Matty; Bender, Hugo [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandervorst, Wilfried [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heyns, Marc [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Castle Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Delabie, Annelies [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • O{sub 3} or O{sub 2} exposures on H-Si(100) result in O ALs with different surface structures. • Si-EPI on O AL using O{sub 3} process is by direct epitaxial growth mechanism. • Si-EPI on O AL using O{sub 2} process is by epitaxial lateral overgrowth mechanism. • Distortions by O AL, SiH{sub 4} flux rate and Si thickness has an impact on Si-EPI quality. - Abstract: The epitaxial growth of Si layers on Si substrates in the presence of O atoms is generally considered a challenge, as O atoms degrade the epitaxial quality by generating defects. Here, we investigate the growth mechanisms for Si epitaxy on O atomic layers (ALs) with different O-contents and structures. O ALs are deposited by ozone (O{sub 3}) or oxygen (O{sub 2}) exposure on H-terminated Si at 50 °C and 300 °C respectively. Epitaxial Si is deposited by chemical vapor deposition using silane (SiH{sub 4}) at 500 °C. After O{sub 3} exposure, the O atoms are uniformly distributed in Si-Si dimer/back bonds. This O layer still allows epitaxial seeding of Si. The epitaxial quality is enhanced by lowering the surface distortions due to O atoms and by decreasing the arrival rate of SiH{sub 4} reactants, allowing more time for surface diffusion. After O{sub 2} exposure, the O atoms are present in the form of SiO{sub x} clusters. Regions of hydrogen-terminated Si remain present between the SiO{sub x} clusters. The epitaxial seeding of Si in these structures is realized on H-Si regions, and an epitaxial layer grows by a lateral overgrowth mechanism. A breakdown in the epitaxial ordering occurs at a critical Si thickness, presumably by accumulation of surface roughness.

  1. New chemistry for the growth of first-row transition metal films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesko, Joseph Peter

    Thin films containing first-row transition metals are widely used in microelectronic, photovoltaic, catalytic, and surface-coating applications. In particular, metallic films are essential for interconnects and seed, barrier, and capping layers in integrated circuitry. Traditional vapor deposition methods for film growth include PVD, CVD, or the use of plasma. However, these techniques lack the requisite precision for film growth at the nanoscale, and thus, are increasingly inadequate for many current and future applications. By contrast, ALD is the favored approach for depositing films with absolute surface conformality and thickness control on 3D architectures and in high aspect ratio features. However, the low-temperature chemical reduction of most first-row transition metal cations to their zero-valent state is very challenging due to their negative electrochemical potentials. A lack of strongly-reducing coreagents has rendered the thermal ALD of metallic films an intractable problem for many elements. Additionally, several established ALD processes for metal films are plagued by low growth rates, impurity incorporation, poor nucleation, high surface roughness, or the need for hazardous coreagents. Finally, stoichiometric control of ternary films grown by ALD is rare, but increasingly important, with emerging applications for metal borate films in catalysis and lithium ion batteries. The research herein is focused toward the development of new ALD processes for the broader application of metal, metal oxide, and metal borate thin films to future nanoscale technologies. These processes display self-limited growth and support the facile nucleation of smooth, continuous, high-purity films. Bis(trimethylsilyl) six-membered rings are employed as strongly-reducing organic coreagents for the ALD of titanium and antimony metal films. Additionally, new processes are developed for the growth of high-purity, low-resistivity cobalt and nickel metal films by exploiting the

  2. Epitaxial growth of barium titanate thin films on germanium via atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Edward L.; Posadas, Agham B.; Wu, Hsin Wei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-10-01

    Barium titanate BaTiO3 (BTO) thin films were epitaxially grown at 225 °C on 2 × 1-reconstructed Ge(001) surfaces via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Approximately 2 nm of BTO film was grown directly on Ge(001) as an amorphous film. Electron diffraction confirmed the epitaxy of the BTO films after post-deposition annealing at 650 °C. Additional BTO layers grown on the crystalline BTO/Ge(001) film were crystalline as-deposited. X-ray diffraction indicated that the epitaxial BTO films had a c-axis out-of-plane orientation, and the abrupt BTO/Ge interface was preserved with no sign of any interfacial germanium oxide. Scanning transmission electron microscopy provided evidence of Ba atoms occupying the troughs of the dimer rows of the 2 × 1-reconstructed Ge(001) surface, as well as preservation of the 2 × 1-reconstructed Ge(001) surface. This study presents a low-temperature process to fabricate BTO/Ge heterostructures.

  3. In-situ atomic layer deposition growth of Hf-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavaev, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We have grown HfO 2 on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl 4 , TEMAHf, TDMAHf and H 2 O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si 2p, O 1s, Hf 4f, Hf 4d, and Cl 2p (for HfCl 4 experiment) core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO 2 . The investigation was carried out in situ giving the possibility to determine the properties of the grown film after every ALD cycle or even after a half cycle. This work focused on the advantages in-situ approach in comparison with ex-situ experiments. The study provides to follow the evolution of the important properties of HfO 2 : contamination level, density and stoichiometry, and influence of the experimental parameters to the interface layer formation during ALD. Our investigation shows that in-situ XPS approach for ALD gives much more information than ex-situ experiments. (orig.)

  4. In-situ atomic layer deposition growth of Hf-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, Konstantin

    2010-06-17

    We have grown HfO{sub 2} on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl{sub 4}, TEMAHf, TDMAHf and H{sub 2}O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si 2p, O 1s, Hf 4f, Hf 4d, and Cl 2p (for HfCl{sub 4} experiment) core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO{sub 2}. The investigation was carried out in situ giving the possibility to determine the properties of the grown film after every ALD cycle or even after a half cycle. This work focused on the advantages in-situ approach in comparison with ex-situ experiments. The study provides to follow the evolution of the important properties of HfO{sub 2}: contamination level, density and stoichiometry, and influence of the experimental parameters to the interface layer formation during ALD. Our investigation shows that in-situ XPS approach for ALD gives much more information than ex-situ experiments. (orig.)

  5. Nucleation and growth mechanisms of Al2O3 atomic layer deposition on synthetic polycrystalline MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Chiappe, D.; Meersschaut, J.; Conard, T.; Franquet, A.; Nuytten, T.; Mannarino, M.; Radu, I.; Vandervorst, W.; Delabie, A.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of great interest for applications in nano-electronic devices. Their incorporation requires the deposition of nm-thin and continuous high-k dielectric layers on the 2D TMDs. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-k dielectric layers is well established on Si surfaces: the importance of a high nucleation density for rapid layer closure is well known and the nucleation mechanisms have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, the nucleation of ALD on 2D TMD surfaces is less well understood and a quantitative analysis of the deposition process is lacking. Therefore, in this work, we investigate the growth of Al2O3 (using Al(CH3)3/H2O ALD) on MoS2 whereby we attempt to provide a complete insight into the use of several complementary characterization techniques, including X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. To reveal the inherent reactivity of MoS2, we exclude the impact of surface contamination from a transfer process by direct Al2O3 deposition on synthetic MoS2 layers obtained by a high temperature sulfurization process. It is shown that Al2O3 ALD on the MoS2 surface is strongly inhibited at temperatures between 125°C and 300°C, with no growth occurring on MoS2 crystal basal planes and selective nucleation only at line defects or grain boundaries at MoS2 top surface. During further deposition, the as-formed Al2O3 nano-ribbons grow in both vertical and lateral directions. Eventually, a continuous Al2O3 film is obtained by lateral growth over the MoS2 crystal basal plane, with the point of layer closure determined by the grain size at the MoS2 top surface and the lateral growth rate. The created Al2O3/MoS2 interface consists mainly of van der Waals interactions. The nucleation is improved by contributions of reversible adsorption on the MoS2 basal planes by using low

  6. Evaluation of Alternative Atomistic Models for the Incipient Growth of ZnO by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Manh-Hung; Tian, Liang; Chaker, Ahmad; Skopin, Evgenii; Cantelli, Valentina; Ouled, Toufik; Boichot, Raphaël; Crisci, Alexandre; Lay, Sabine; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Thomas, Olivier; Deschanvres, Jean-Luc; Renevier, Hubert; Fong, Dillon; Ciatto, Gianluca

    2017-03-20

    ZnO thin films are interesting for applications in several technological fields, including optoelectronics and renewable energies. Nanodevice applications require controlled synthesis of ZnO structures at nanometer scale, which can be achieved via atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the mechanisms governing the initial stages of ALD had not been addressed until very recently. Investigations into the initial nucleation and growth as well as the atomic structure of the heterointerface are crucial to optimize the ALD process and understand the structure-property relationships for ZnO. We have used a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques to investigate both the structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by ALD on two different substrates, i.e., SiO2 and Al2O3, which led us to formulate an atomistic model of the incipient growth of ZnO. The model relies on the formation of nanoscale islands of different size and aspect ratio and consequent disorder induced in the Zn neighbors' distribution. However, endorsement of our model requires testing and discussion of possible alternative models which could account for the experimental results. In this work, we review, test, and rule out several alternative models; the results confirm our view of the atomistic mechanisms at play, which influence the overall microstructure and resulting properties of the final thin film.

  7. Real-Time Observation of Atomic Layer Deposition Inhibition: Metal Oxide Growth on Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Jason R.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Farha, Omar K.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Through in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring we resolve the growth of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and subsequent metal oxide deposition with high resolution. Here, we introduce the fitting of mass deposited during each atomic layer deposition (ALD) cycle to an analytical island-growth model that enables quantification of growth inhibition, nucleation density, and the uninhibited ALD growth rate. A long-chain alkanethiol was self-assembled as a monolayer on gold-coated quartz crystals in order to investigate its effectiveness as a barrier to ALD. Compared to solution-loading, vapor-loading is observed to produce a SAM with equal or greater inhibition-ability in minutes vs. days. The metal oxide growth temperature and the choice of precursor also significantly affect the nucleation density, which ranges from 0.001 to 1 sites/nm 2 . Finally, we observe a minimum 100 cycle inhibition of an oxide ALD process, ZnO, under moderately optimized conditions.

  8. Mocvd Growth of Group-III Nitrides on Silicon Carbide: From Thin Films to Atomically Thin Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.

    Group-III nitride semiconductors (AlN, GaN, InN and their alloys) are considered one of the most important class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. This is not limited to the blue light-emitting diode (LED) used for efficient solid-state lighting, but other applications as well, such as solar cells, radar and a variety of high frequency power electronics, which are all prime examples of the technological importance of nitride based wide bandgap semiconductors in our daily lives. The goal of this dissertation work was to explore and establish new growth schemes to improve the structural and optical properties of thick to atomically thin films of group-III nitrides grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on SiC substrates for future novel devices. The first research focus of this dissertation was on the growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN). This wide bandgap semiconductor has attracted much research attention as an active layer in LEDs and recently as an absorber material for solar cells. InGaN has superior material properties for solar cells due to its wavelength absorption tunability that nearly covers the entire solar spectrum. This can be achieved by controlling the indium content in thick grown material. Thick InGaN films are also of interest as strain reducing based layers for deep-green and red light emitters. The growth of thick films of InGaN is, however, hindered by several combined problems. This includes poor incorporation of indium in alloys, high density of structural and morphological defects, as well as challenges associated with the segregation of indium in thick films. Overcoming some of these material challenges is essential in order integrate thick InGaN films into future optoelectronics. Therefore, this dissertation research investigated the growth mechanism of InGaN layers grown in the N-polar direction by MOCVD as a route to improve the structural and optical properties of thick InGaN films. The growth

  9. Vertically Oriented Growth of GaN Nanorods on Si Using Graphene as an Atomically Thin Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Martin; Munshi, A Mazid; Sarau, George; Göbelt, Manuela; Tessarek, Christian; Fauske, Vidar T; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Yang, Jianfeng; Latzel, Michael; Hoffmann, Björn; Conibeer, Gavin; Weman, Helge; Christiansen, Silke

    2016-06-08

    The monolithic integration of wurtzite GaN on Si via metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy is strongly hampered by lattice and thermal mismatch as well as meltback etching. This study presents single-layer graphene as an atomically thin buffer layer for c-axis-oriented growth of vertically aligned GaN nanorods mediated by nanometer-sized AlGaN nucleation islands. Nanostructures of similar morphology are demonstrated on graphene-covered Si(111) as well as Si(100). High crystal and optical quality of the nanorods are evidenced through scanning transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman, and cathodoluminescence measurements supported by finite-difference time-domain simulations. Current-voltage characteristics revealed high vertical conduction of the as-grown GaN nanorods through the Si substrates. These findings are substantial to advance the integration of GaN-based devices on any substrates of choice that sustains the GaN growth temperatures, thereby permitting novel designs of GaN-based heterojunction device concepts.

  10. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Jason R.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Pellin, Michael J.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  11. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  12. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, David C., E-mail: dccameron@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Krumpolec, Richard, E-mail: richard.krumpolec@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 4 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi [ASTRaL team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.homola@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko, E-mail: cernak@physics.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows initial nucleation and growth process in atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide. • Quantum confinement effects were used to measure evolution of crystallite size. • Crystallite surface density can be extracted from ellipsometric surface roughness data and crystallite size. • Pretreatment of silicon substrates by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge has only minor effects on titanium dioxide film nucleation and growth. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle{sup −1} which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle{sup −1} consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  13. Photo-irradiation effects on GaAs atomic layer epitaxial growth. GaAs no genshiso epitaxial seicho ni okeru hikari reiki koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Ishikawa, H. (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan). Research and Development Center)

    1990-08-10

    Single atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) aims at controlling a growing film at a precision of single molecular layer. In this article, it is reported that the growth temperature range of ALE was expanded by the vertical irradiation of KrF exima laser (248 nm) onto the substrate for the ALE growth of GaAs using the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. Thanks for the results of the above experiment, it was demonstrated that the irradiation effect was not thermal, but photochemical. In addition, this article studies the possibility of adsorption layer irradiation and surface irradiation as the photo-irradiation mechanism, and points out that coexistence of both irradiation mechanisms can be considered and, in case of exima laser, strong possibility of direct irradiation of the adsorption layer because of its high power density. Hereinafter, by using both optical growth ALE and thermal growth ALE jointly, the degree of freedom of combination of hetero ALE increases and its application to various material systems becomes possible. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Epitaxial Growth of MgxCa1-xO on GaN by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiabing; Zhou, Hong; Kim, Sang Bok; Alghamdi, Sami; Gong, Xian; Feng, Jun; Wang, Xinwei; Ye, Peide D; Gordon, Roy G

    2016-12-14

    We demonstrate for the first time that a single-crystalline epitaxial Mg x Ca 1-x O film can be deposited on gallium nitride (GaN) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). By adjusting the ratio between the amounts of Mg and Ca in the film, a lattice matched Mg x Ca 1-x O/GaN(0001) interface can be achieved with low interfacial defect density. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the lattice parameter of this ternary oxide nearly obeys Vegard's law. An atomically sharp interface from cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the high quality of the epitaxy. High-temperature capacitance-voltage characterization showed that the film with composition Mg 0.25 Ca 0.75 O has the lowest interfacial defect density. With this optimal oxide composition, a Mg 0.25 Ca 0.75 O/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility (MOS-HEMT) device was fabricated. An ultrahigh on/off ratio of 10 12 and a near ideal SS of 62 mV/dec were achieved with this device.

  15. Real-time growth study of plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy of InN films by synchrotron x-ray methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepal, Neeraj [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; Anderson, Virginia R. [American Society for Engineering Education, 1818 N Street NW, Washington, DC 20036; Johnson, Scooter D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; Downey, Brian P. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; Meyer, David J. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; DeMasi, Alexander [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215; Robinson, Zachary R. [Department of Physics, SUNY College at Brockport, 350 New Campus Dr, Brockport, New York 14420; Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215; Eddy, Charles R. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375

    2017-03-13

    The temporal evolution of high quality indium nitride (InN) growth by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy (ALEp) on a-plane sapphire at 200 and 248 °C was probed by synchrotron x-ray methods. The growth was carried out in a thin film growth facility installed at beamline X21 of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at beamline G3 of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University. Measurements of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) during the initial cycles of growth revealed a broadening and scattering near the diffuse specular rod and the development of scattering intensities due to half unit cell thick nucleation islands in the Yoneda wing with correlation length scale of 7.1 and 8.2 nm, at growth temperatures (Tg) of 200 and 248 °C, respectively. At about 1.1 nm (two unit cells) of growth thickness nucleation islands coarsen, grow, and the intensity of correlated scattering peak increased at the correlation length scale of 8.0 and 8.7 nm for Tg = 200 and 248 °C, respectively. The correlated peaks at both growth temperatures can be fitted with a single peak Lorentzian function, which support single mode growth. Post-growth in situ x-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a growth rate of ~0.36 Å/cycle consistent with the growth rate previously reported for self-limited InN growth in a commercial ALEp reactor. Consistent with the in situ GISAXS study, ex situ atomic force microscopy power spectral density measurements also indicate single mode growth. Electrical characterization of the resulting film revealed an electron mobility of 50 cm2/V s for a 5.6 nm thick InN film on a-plane sapphire, which is higher than the previously reported mobility of much thicker InN films grown at higher temperature by molecular beam epitaxy directly on sapphire. These early results indicated that in situ synchrotron x-ray study of the epitaxial growth kinetics of InN films is a very powerful method to

  16. Atomic layer deposition of ZrO2 for graphene-based multilayer structures: In situ and ex situ characterization of growth process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, Aile; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Aarik, Lauri; Aidla, Aleks; Kiisler, Alma-Asta; Kasikov, Aarne; Ritslaid, Peeter; Maendar, Hugo; Aarik, Jaan; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Sammelselg, Vaeino; Kukli, Kaupo

    2014-01-01

    Real time monitoring of atomic layer deposition by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was used to follow the growth of ZrO 2 thin films on graphene. The films were grown from ZrCl 4 and H 2 O on graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition method on 100-nm thick nickel film or on Cu-foil and transferred onto QCM sensor. The deposition was performed at a substrate temperature of 190 C. The growth of the dielectric film on graphene was significantly retarded compared to the process carried out on QCM without graphene. After the deposition of dielectric films, the basic structure of graphene was retained. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Lateral Growth of Composition Graded Atomic Layer MoS(2(1-x))Se(2x) Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honglai; Zhang, Qinglin; Duan, Xidong; Wu, Xueping; Fan, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xiaoli; Zhuang, Xiujuan; Hu, Wei; Zhou, Hong; Pan, Anlian; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-04-29

    Band gap engineering of transition-metal dichalcogenides is an important task for their applications in photonics, optoelectronics, and nanoelectronics. We report for the first time the continuous lateral growth of composition graded bilayer MoS(2(1-x))Se(2x) alloys along single triangular nanosheets by an improved chemical vapor deposition approach. From the center to the edge of the nanosheet, the composition can be gradually tuned from x = 0 (pure MoS2) to x = 0.68, leading to the corresponding bandgap being continuously modulated from 1.82 eV (680 nm) to 1.64 eV (755 nm). Local photoluminescence scanning from the center to the edge gives single band edge emission peaks, indicating high crystalline quality for the achieved alloy nanosheets, which was further demonstrated by the microstructure characterizations. These novel 2D structures offer an interesting system for probing the physical properties of layered materials and exploring new applications in functional nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices.

  18. Deposition of HgTe by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first instance of HgTe growth by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE). EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD), all of which are based on the growth...

  19. Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1 ± 0.01 nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300 °C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3 Ω cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

  20. Plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxial growth of aluminum nitride studied with real time grazing angle small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Virginia R.; Nepal, Neeraj; Johnson, Scooter D.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Nath, Anindya; Kozen, Alexander C.; Qadri, Syed B.; DeMasi, Alexander; Hite, Jennifer K.; Ludwig, Karl F.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2017-05-01

    Wide bandgap semiconducting nitrides have found wide-spread application as light emitting and laser diodes and are under investigation for further application in optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and efficient power switching technologies. Alloys of the binary semiconductors allow adjustments of the band gap, an important semiconductor material characteristic, which is 6.2 eV for aluminum nitride (AlN), 3.4 eV for gallium nitride, and 0.7 eV for (InN). Currently, the highest quality III-nitride films are deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Temperatures of 900 °C and higher are required to deposit high quality AlN. Research into depositing III-nitrides with atomic layer epitaxy (ALEp) is ongoing because it is a fabrication friendly technique allowing lower growth temperatures. Because it is a relatively new technique, there is insufficient understanding of the ALEp growth mechanism which will be essential to development of the process. Here, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering is employed to observe the evolving behavior of the surface morphology during growth of AlN by ALEp at temperatures from 360 to 480 °C. Increased temperatures of AlN resulted in lower impurities and relatively fewer features with short range correlations.

  1. TiO2 coatings via atomic layer deposition on polyurethane and polydimethylsiloxane substrates: Properties and effects on C. albicans growth and inactivation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, R. S.; dos Santos, V. P.; Cardoso, S. B.; Doria, A. C. O. C.; Figueira, F. R.; Rodrigues, B. V. M.; Testoni, G. E.; Fraga, M. A.; Marciano, F. R.; Lobo, A. O.; Maciel, H. S.

    2017-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) surges as an attractive technology to deposit thin films on different substrates for many advanced biomedical applications. Herein titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were successful obtained on polyurethane (PU) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates using ALD. The effect of TiO2 films on Candida albicans growth and inactivation process were also systematic discussed. TiCl4 and H2O were used as precursors at 80 °C, while the reaction cycle number ranged from 500 to 2000. Several chemical, physical and physicochemical techniques were used to evaluate the growth kinetics, elemental composition, material structure, chemical bonds, contact angle, work of adhesion and surface morphology of the ALD TiO2 thin films grown on both substrates. For microbiological analyses, yeasts of standard strains of C. albicans were grown on non- and TiO2-coated substrates. Next, the antifungal and photocatalytic activities of the TiO2 were also investigated by counting the colony-forming units (CFU) before and after UV-light treatment. Chlorine-doped amorphous TiO2 films with varied thicknesses and Cl concentration ranging from 2 to 12% were obtained. In sum, the ALD TiO2 films suppressed the yeast-hyphal transition of C. albicans onto PU, however, a high adhesion of yeasts was observed. Conversely, for PDMS substrate, the yeast adhesion did not change, as observed in control. Comparatively to control, the TiO2-covered PDMS had a reduction in CFU up to 59.5% after UV treatment, while no modification was observed to TiO2-covered PU. These results pointed out that ALD chlorine-doped amorphous TiO2 films grown on biomedical polymeric surfaces may act as fungistatic materials. Furthermore, in case of contamination, these materials may also behave as antifungal materials under UV light exposure.

  2. Growth of Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}O{sub y} films by atomic layer deposition using successive supply of metal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroval, Tõnis, E-mail: tonis.arroval@ut.ee; Aarik, Lauri; Rammula, Raul; Aarik, Jaan

    2015-09-30

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin ternary films from TiCl{sub 4}, trimethylaluminum (TMA), AlCl{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O was investigated at different successions of precursor pulses with the aim to explore passivation effect of TiCl{sub 4} to the chemisorption of TMA and AlCl{sub 3}. Concentrations of Ti and Al in the films grown on silicon substrates at 100–500 °C in different ALD precursor sequences were studied. In order to obtain additional information about the deposition mechanisms, the behavior of the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) signal during ALD cycles was characterized and analyzed at a deposition temperature of 200 °C. Post-deposition analysis revealed up to 2 times lower Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition rate in the TiCl{sub 4}-TMA-H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}-AlCl{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O processes than that in the TiCl{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O-TMA-H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O-AlCl{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O processes, respectively. Despite of the markedly reduced growth rate of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the TiCl{sub 4}-TMA-H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}-AlCl{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O processes, films with Al/(Al + Ti) ratios exceeding 0.5 were obtained. Consequently, the surface intermediate species, which stopped further adsorption of TiCl{sub 4}, limited the adsorption of AlCl{sub 3} and TMA only partially. Enhanced growth rate of TiO{sub 2} was observed in films grown in the TiCl{sub 4}-TMA-H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O-TMA-H{sub 2}O processes. QCM revealed more efficient chlorine release and thereby reduced effect of steric hindrance in those processes. In addition, marked increase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition rate was observed in the TiCl{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O-TMA-H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}-TMA-H{sub 2}O processes with the increase of deposition temperature from 300 °C to higher temperatures. As no increase of this kind was recorded in the TMA-H{sub 2}O process, the effect was related to the influence of Ti-containing surface layer on the adsorption of TMA. - Highlights:

  3. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  4. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  5. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  6. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O [Berkeley, CA; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, CA

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  7. Photoenhanced atomic layer epitaxy. Hikari reiki genshiso epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y. (Toshiba corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    The growth temperature range was greatly expanded of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) expected as the growth process of ultra-thin stacks. Ga layers and As layers were formed one after the other on a GaAs substrate in the atmosphere of trimethylgallium (TMG) or AsH{sub 2} supplied alternately, by KrF excimer laser irradiation normal to the substrate. As a result, the growth temperature range was 460-540{degree}C nearly 10 times that of 500 {plus minus} several degrees centigrade in conventional thermal growth method. Based on the experimental result where light absorption of source molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface was larger than that under gaseous phase condition, new adsorbed layer enhancement model was proposed to explain above irradiation effect verifying it by experiments. As this photoenhancement technique is applied to other materials, possible fabrication of new crystal structures as a super lattice with ultra-thin stacks of single atomic layers is expected because of a larger freedom in material combination for hetero-ALE. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Growth of transition metal oxides in 2D layers : probing and tuning the properties of matter at the atomic-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermüller, T.

    2015-01-01

    In surface science, accurate controlling and detailed characterization of metal supported ultrathin film growth of transition metal oxides (TMO) is a central requirement for collecting reliable empirical data which in turn can be used to improve and extend the existing theoretical models and approaches, such as density functional theory (DFT). In this work, the controlled growth of TMOs on the Ag(100) surface is investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in conjunction with various other surface science techniques. In addition, a novel promising experimental approach to effectively affect and control the growth of TMOs by high electric fields is presented. The investigations concerned the TMO systems MnxOy and WOx on the Ag(100) surface. The strikingly anisotropic growth of the (2x1)-MnO/Ag(100) system is characterized by long and narrow stripes which form a complex 2D surface network of MnO islands. The growth mechanism of this system has been rationalized by first-principle DFT calculations. The (WO3)3 clusters deposited at room temperature form ramified fractal islands. Above a threshold temperature of 700 K, a fully intact 2D WOx wetting layer emerges at the surface. On top of this layer, beginning 3D growth in form of sharp needles is observed. Since the area of the wetting layer exceeds the nanometer-scale (up to 1 µm), also low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) has been employed to study the growth kinetics of the WOx/Ag(100) system. Strong electric field experiments (1-2 V/nm) have been performed on both systems by employing a custom-designed UHV apparatus. Significant field-induces surface modifications have been observed in all experiments, and have been characterized by STM and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) [de

  9. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    OpenAIRE

    P. X. Zhang; H.-U. Habermeier

    2008-01-01

    New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT). Our recent studies ind...

  10. Growth of ˜5 cm2V-1s-1 mobility, p-type Copper(I) oxide (Cu2O) films by fast atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD) at 225°C and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rojas, D.; Jordan, M.; Yeoh, C.; Marin, A. T.; Kursumovic, A.; Dunlop, L. A.; Iza, D. C.; Chen, A.; Wang, H.; MacManus Driscoll, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Phase pure, dense Cu2O thin films were grown on glass and polymer substrates at 225°C by rapid atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD). Carrier mobilities of 5 cm2V-1s-1 and carrier concentrations of ˜1016 cm-3 were achieved in films of thickness 50 - 120 nm, over a >10 cm2 area. Growth rates were ˜1 nm.min-1 which is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional ALD.. The high mobilities achieved using the atmospheric, low temperature method represent a significant advance for flextronics and flexible solar cells which require growth on plastic substrates.

  11. Applications of atomic layer deposition in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenbin; Li, Xianglin; Krishna Karuturi, Siva; Wenhui Fam, Derrick; Fan, Hongjin; Shrestha, Santosh; Wong, Lydia Helena; Iing Yoong Tok, Alfred

    2015-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a unique tool for the growth of thin films with excellent conformity and thickness control down to atomic levels. The application of ALD in energy research has received increasing attention in recent years. In this review, the versatility of ALD in solar cells will be discussed. This is specifically focused on the fabrication of nanostructured photoelectrodes, surface passivation, surface sensitization, and band-structure engineering of solar cell materials. Challenges and future directions of ALD in the applications of solar cells are also discussed.

  12. Predicting synergy in atomic layer etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanarik, Keren J. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Tan, Samantha [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Yang, Wenbing [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kim, Taeseung [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Lill, Thorsten [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kabansky, Alexander [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Hudson, Eric A. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Ohba, Tomihito [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Nojiri, Kazuo [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Yu, Jengyi [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Wise, Rich [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Berry, Ivan L. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Pan, Yang [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Marks, Jeffrey [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Gottscho, Richard A. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a multistep process used today in manufacturing for removing ultrathin layers of material. In this article, the authors report on ALE of Si, Ge, C, W, GaN, and SiO2 using a directional (anisotropic) plasma-enhanced approach. The authors analyze these systems by defining an “ALE synergy” parameter which quantifies the degree to which a process approaches the ideal ALE regime. This parameter is inspired by the ion-neutral synergy concept introduced in the 1979 paper by Coburn and Winters. ALE synergy is related to the energetics of underlying surface interactions and is understood in terms of energy criteria for the energy barriers involved in the reactions. Synergistic behavior is observed for all of the systems studied, with each exhibiting behavior unique to the reactant–material combination. By systematically studying atomic layer etching of a group of materials, the authors show that ALE synergy scales with the surface binding energy of the bulk material. This insight explains why some materials are more or less amenable to the directional ALE approach. Furthermore, they conclude that ALE is both simpler to understand than conventional plasma etch processing and is applicable to metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics.

  13. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al 2 O 3 due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO 2 . • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt

  14. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  15. Disordered Nanohole Patterns in Metal-Insulator Multilayer for Ultra-broadband Light Absorption: Atomic Layer Deposition for Lithography Free Highly repeatable Large Scale Multilayer Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Amir; Hajian, Hodjat; Dereshgi, Sina Abedini; Bozok, Berkay; Butun, Bayram; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2017-11-08

    In this paper, we demonstrate a facile, lithography free, and large scale compatible fabrication route to synthesize an ultra-broadband wide angle perfect absorber based on metal-insulator-metal-insulator (MIMI) stack design. We first conduct a simulation and theoretical modeling approach to study the impact of different geometries in overall stack absorption. Then, a Pt-Al 2 O 3 multilayer is fabricated using a single atomic layer deposition (ALD) step that offers high repeatability and simplicity in the fabrication step. In the best case, we get an absorption bandwidth (BW) of 600 nm covering a range of 400 nm-1000 nm. A substantial improvement in the absorption BW is attained by incorporating a plasmonic design into the middle Pt layer. Our characterization results demonstrate that the best configuration can have absorption over 0.9 covering a wavelength span of 400 nm-1490 nm with a BW that is 1.8 times broader compared to that of planar design. On the other side, the proposed structure retains its absorption high at angles as wide as 70°. The results presented here can serve as a beacon for future performance enhanced multilayer designs where a simple fabrication step can boost the overall device response without changing its overall thickness and fabrication simplicity.

  16. Atomic layer epitaxy of compound semiconductors with metalorganic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBaars, S. P.; Dapkus, P. D.

    1989-11-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is a relatively new growth technology for depositing compound semiconductors one monolayer at a time. By employing a new regime of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth, in which saturated surface reactions control the growth, it is possible to alternately deposit monolayers of column III and column V elements so that only one monolayer of the III-V compound semiconductor is formed in every cycle of the deposition. The use of metalorganic precursors for ALE is of considerable importance since it allows the hybridization of ALE with the existing MOCVD technique. Several benefits can be realized by integrating the two technologies. Layers of critical thickness and uniformity requirements can be grown by ALE, while thicker epitaxial layers can be grown by MOCVD. Additional advantages are the "digital growth" nature of ALE which affords a high degree of thickness reproducibility, and the selective area growth potential of laser-assisted ALE (LALE). In this paper, ALE and LALE of GaAs is reviewed with an emphasis on the utilization of metalorganic precursors.

  17. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  18. Controlled growth and properties of p-type cuprous oxide films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jung-Dae [Surface Technology Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Se-Hun [National Core Research Center for Hybrid Materials Solution, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Tae-Hoon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-719 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kee-Seok [Surface Technology Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kwun-Bum [Department of Physics, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam, 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Ho, E-mail: dhkim2@kims.re.kr [Surface Technology Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Seong, E-mail: jsparklime@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-719 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Various copper oxide films were successfully grown by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) at a low temperature of 100 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis of the films indicated that phase-controlled deposition of CuO{sub x} phases (0 ≤ x < 1) was possible by controlling the number of Cu deposition steps during one PEALD cycle with a fixed oxidation step. When Cu deposition was executed in one step, an amorphous CuO{sub x} (x = 0.9) film with a smooth surface (RMS roughness of 0.97 nm) was obtained. On the other hand, when the number of Cu deposition steps was increased to three, a CuO{sub x} (x = 0.6) thin film with a polycrystalline phase (grain size: 25 nm) was obtained. The as-deposited CuO{sub 0.6} film showed p-type conductivity (Hall mobility ∼37 cm{sup 2}/V·s and hole concentration ∼5.4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}). Moreover, p-type CuO{sub 0.6}/n-type ZnO heterojunction diodes fabricated on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate exhibited electrical rectification with a threshold voltage of 1.2 V.

  19. Issues involved in the atomic layer deposition of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Robert Kimes

    Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to study the nucleation and growth of tungsten on aluminum oxide surfaces. Tungsten metal was deposited using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) techniques. ALD uses sequential surface reactions to deposit material with atomic layer control. W ALD is performed using sequential exposures of WF6 and Si2H6. The step-wise nature of W ALD allows nucleation studies to be performed by analyzing the W surface concentration after each ALD reaction. Nucleation and growth regions can be identified by quantifying the AES signal intensities from both the W surface and the Al2O3 substrate. W nucleation occurred in 3 ALD reaction cycles. The AES results yielded a nucleation rate of 1.0 A/ALD cycle and a growth rate of ≈3 A/ALD cycle. AES studies also explored the nucleation and growth of Al2O3 on W. Al2O3 nucleated in 1 ALD cycle giving a nucleation rate of 3.5 A/ALD cycle and a subsequent growth rate of 1.0 A/ALD cycle. Mass spectrometry was then used to study the ALD reaction chemistry of tungsten deposition. Because of the step-wise nature of the W ALD chemistry, each W ALD reaction could be studied independently. The gaseous mass products were identified from both the WF6 and Si2H6 reactions. H2, HF and SiF4 mass products were observed for the WF6 reaction. The Si2H6 reaction displayed a room temperature reaction and a 200°C reaction. Products from the room temperature Si2H6 reaction were H2 and SiF3H. The reaction at 200°C yielded only H2 as a reaction product. H2 desorption from the surface contributes to the 200°C Si2H6 reaction. AES was used to confirm that the gas phase reaction products are correlated with a change in the surface species. Atomic hydrogen reduction of metal halides and oganometallic compounds provides another method for depositing metals with atomic layer control. The quantity of atomic hydrogen necessary to perform this chemistry is critical to the metal ALD process. A thermocouple probe was constructed to

  20. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, T.; Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M.; Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch.; Saukkonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2–1 μm) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness (∼ 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu 3 Cp) 2 , Ti(OMe) 4 and O 3 precursors at 250 °C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO 2 /Si ∅200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 °C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {001} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {111} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O 3 ) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: ► Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. ► Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2–1 μm wide. ► Most STO grains were {001} oriented.

  1. Crystalline thin films: The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) view

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique is selected as one of the methods to prepare thin films for various applications, including electrocatalytic materials and compound....

  2. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1–20 short-period superlattices on +c-GaN template in dynamic atomic layer epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Wang, Ke; Imai, Daichi; Itoi, Takaomi; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    The growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN) 1 /(GaN) 1–20 short-period superlattices (SPSs) were investigated with their application to ordered alloys in mind. The SPSs were grown on +c-GaN template at 650 °C by dynamic atomic layer epitaxy in conventional plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It was found that coherent structured InN/GaN SPSs could be fabricated when the thickness of the GaN barrier was 4 ML or above. Below 3 ML, the formation of SPSs was quite difficult owing to the increased strain in the SPS structure caused by the use of GaN as a template. The effective or average In composition of the (InN) 1 /(GaN) 4 SPSs was around 10%, and the corresponding InN coverage in the ∼1 ML-thick InN wells was 50%. It was found that the effective InN coverage in ∼1 ML-thick InN wells could be varied with the growth conditions. In fact, the effective In composition could be increased up to 13.5%, i.e., the corresponding effective InN coverage was about 68%, by improving the capping/freezing speed by increasing the growth rate of the GaN barrier layer.

  4. Growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN){sub 1}/(GaN){sub 1–20} short-period superlattices on +c-GaN template in dynamic atomic layer epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Wang, Ke; Imai, Daichi [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Itoi, Takaomi [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akihiko, E-mail: yoshi@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Kogakuin University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan)

    2016-04-11

    The growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN){sub 1}/(GaN){sub 1–20} short-period superlattices (SPSs) were investigated with their application to ordered alloys in mind. The SPSs were grown on +c-GaN template at 650 °C by dynamic atomic layer epitaxy in conventional plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It was found that coherent structured InN/GaN SPSs could be fabricated when the thickness of the GaN barrier was 4 ML or above. Below 3 ML, the formation of SPSs was quite difficult owing to the increased strain in the SPS structure caused by the use of GaN as a template. The effective or average In composition of the (InN){sub 1}/(GaN){sub 4} SPSs was around 10%, and the corresponding InN coverage in the ∼1 ML-thick InN wells was 50%. It was found that the effective InN coverage in ∼1 ML-thick InN wells could be varied with the growth conditions. In fact, the effective In composition could be increased up to 13.5%, i.e., the corresponding effective InN coverage was about 68%, by improving the capping/freezing speed by increasing the growth rate of the GaN barrier layer.

  5. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, T., E-mail: tom.blomberg@asm.com [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M. [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Saukkonen, T. [Aalto University, Puumiehenkuja 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2012-08-31

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2-1 {mu}m) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness ({approx} 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu{sub 3}Cp){sub 2}, Ti(OMe){sub 4} and O{sub 3} precursors at 250 Degree-Sign C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si Empty-Set 200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 Degree-Sign C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {l_brace}001{r_brace} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {l_brace}111{r_brace} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O{sub 3}) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2-1 {mu}m wide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most STO grains were {l_brace}001{r_brace} oriented.

  6. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-01-01

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe 3 O 4 thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe 3 O 4 thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7 nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210 K. After post-annealing in H 2 /Ar at 400 °C, the as-grown α−Fe 2 O 3 sample is reduced to Fe 3 O 4 phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications

  8. Atomic layer deposition of copper and copper silver films using an electrochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, J.S.; Liu, Y.S.; Chin, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the formation and properties of Cu and Cu(Ag) films on a Ru/Si substrate using electrochemical atomic layer deposition. The process was performed layer-by-layer using underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox reactions. The first Cu atomic layer was deposited on the Ru/Si substrate via UPD. Using UPD, atomic layered of Pb, which acts as a sacrificial layer, was applied on the Cu layer. Then, a Cu 2+ solution was flushed into the cell at an open-circuit potential, and the Pb layer was exchanged for Cu via redox replacements. The above sequences were repeated 500 times to form a Cu film. The Cu(Ag) alloy films were formed using Cu–UPD and Ag–UPD in predetermined sequences. The lowest electrical resistivity achieved was 3.6 and 2.2 μΩ cm for the Cu film and Cu(Ag) film, respectively, after annealing at 400 °C. Due to the self-limiting reactions, the process has the ability to deposit atomic layers to meet the requirement of Cu interconnects. - Highlights: • Layer-by-layer growth of Cu and Cu(Ag) films are prepared using electrochemical atomic layer deposition. • Cu coverage is from 0.33 to 0.51 ML for each deposition cycle in different NaCl concentrations. • The process can be applied in Cu interconnections

  9. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  10. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L; Hamze, Ali K; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J; Demkov, Alexander A; Ekerdt, John G

    2017-02-07

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO 3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO 3 , SrZrO 3 , SrHfO 3 , and SrHf 0.55 Ti 0.45 O 3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  11. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert F; Weimer, Matthew S; Emery, Jonathan D; Hock, Adam S; Martinson, Alex B F

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 225 °C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low-temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150 °C, while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225 °C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  12. Oxygen-Free Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Robert F.; Weimer, Matthew S.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Hock, Adam S.; Martinson, Alex B. F.

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 200°C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150°C while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching <1 ohm-cm for films deposited at 225°C. Hall measurements reveal n-type conductivity due to free electron concentrations up to 1018 cm-3 and mobilities of order 1 cm2/(V*s). The digital synthesis of In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225°C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  13. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  14. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  15. XRD and RBS studies of quasi-amorphous zinc oxide layers produced by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guziewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: guzel@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Turos, Andrzej [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 04-500 Otwock (Poland); Stonert, Anna [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 04-500 Otwock (Poland); Snigurenko, Dmytro; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Diduszko, Ryszard [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501 Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Although zinc oxide has been widely investigated for many important applications such as laser diodes, photovoltaics, and sensors, some basic properties of this material have not been established up to now. One of these are stopping power values which are crucial for the Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry analysis. For this kind of measurements, amorphous materials should be used. In this paper we show the results of stopping power measurements for ZnO films grown by Atomic Layer Deposition. The films were grown on a silicon (100) substrate and parameters of the growth were chosen in a way that prevents crystallization of ZnO films. A series of ZnO films with thickness between 20 and 160 nm have been investigated. Extended film characterization has proven that the obtained nanopolycrystalline ZnO films can be considered as truly amorphous with respect to ion beam applications. ZnO films have been used for precise stopping power measurement of MeV He-ions in the energy range from 200 to 5000 keV. These results provide indispensable data for ion beam modification and analysis of ZnO. - Highlights: • Thin ZnO films of low crystallographic quality were obtained by Atomic Layer Deposition at 60 °C. • Nanopolycrystalline structure and atomically flat surface has been measured by X-ray diffraction. • Stopping power measurements show a very good agreement with the calculated values.

  16. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  17. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  18. Effect of substrate composition on atomic layer deposition using self-assembled monolayers as blocking layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Engstrom, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The authors have examined the effect of two molecules that form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the subsequent growth of TaN x by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on two substrate surfaces, SiO 2 and Cu. The SAMs that the authors have investigated include two vapor phase deposited, fluorinated alkyl silanes: Cl 3 Si(CH 2 ) 2 (CF 2 ) 5 CF 3 (FOTS) and (C 2 H 5 O) 3 Si(CH 2 ) 2 (CF 2 ) 7 CF 3 (HDFTEOS). Both the SAMs themselves and the TaN x thin films, grown using Ta[N(CH 3 ) 2 ] 5 and NH 3 , were analyzed ex situ using contact angle, spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and low energy ion-scattering spectroscopy (LEISS). First, the authors find that both SAMs on SiO 2 are nominally stable at T s  ∼ 300 °C, the substrate temperature used for ALD, while on Cu, the authors find that HDFTEOS thermally desorbs, while FOTS is retained on the surface. The latter result reflects the difference in the head groups of these two molecules. The authors find that both SAMs strongly attenuate the ALD growth of TaN x on SiO 2 , by about a factor of 10, while on Cu, the SAMs have no effect on ALD growth. Results from LEISS and XPS are decisive in determining the nature of the mechanism of growth of TaN x on all surfaces. Growth on SiO 2 is 2D and approximately layer-by-layer, while on the surfaces terminated by the SAMs, it nucleates at defect sites, is islanded, and is 3D. In the latter case, our results support growth of the TaN x thin film over the SAM, with a considerable delay in formation of a continuous thin film. Growth on Cu, with or without the SAMs, is also 3D and islanded, and there is also a delay in the formation of a continuous thin film as compared to growth on SiO 2 . These results highlight the power of coupling measurements from both LEISS and XPS in examinations of ultrathin films formed by ALD

  19. Formation of HgSe thin films using electrochemical atomic Layer epitaxy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of HgSe using electrochemical atomic-layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of ALE, where electrochemical surface-limited reactions referred to as underpotential deposits, generally result...

  20. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition with Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates ranging from glass, polymers, aerogels, and metals to high aspect ratio geometries. This talk will focus on the utilization of ALD for engineering applications.

  1. Interaction of GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S

    2004-08-15

    GaN surface passivation processes are still under development and among others hydrogen treatments are investigated. In this study, we use non-destructive optical and electrical probes such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and surface potential Kelvin probe microscopy (SP-KPM) in conjunction with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the study of the different reactivity of Ga-polar and N-polar GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen. The GaN epitaxial layers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates, and GaN and AlN buffer layers are used to grow N-polar and Ga-polar films, respectively. The atomic hydrogen is produced by a remote rf (13.56 MHz) H{sub 2} plasma in order to rule out any ion bombardment of the GaN surface and make the interaction chemical. It is found that the interaction of GaN surfaces with atomic hydrogen depends on polarity, with N-polar GaN exhibiting greater reactivity. Furthermore, it is found that atomic hydrogen is effective in the passivation of grain boundaries and surface defects states.

  2. Inductively coupled plasma nanoetching of atomic layer deposition alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Chang, Bingdong; Todeschini, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Al2O3 thin-film deposited by atomic layer deposition is an attractive plasma etch mask for Micro and Nano Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS and NEMS). 20-nm-thick Al2O3 mask enables through silicon wafer plasma etching. Al2O3 is also an excellent etch mask for other important MEMS materials...

  3. Atomic layer deposition for nanostructured Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, H. C. M.; Donders, M. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Notten, P. H. L.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring is targeted as a solution to achieve the improvements required for implementing Li-ion batteries in a wide range of applications. These applications range in size from electrical vehicles down to microsystems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) could be an enabling technology for

  4. Hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition of Tungsten films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to establish a novel technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the future ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) of microelectronics. We developed a hot-wire assisted ALD (HWALD), where a heated tungsten (W) filament is utilized instead of a plasma to generate radicals. HWALD is

  5. Ultrafast atomic layer deposition of alumina layers for solar cell passivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Lankhorst, A.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Tiba, V.; Spee, K.; Maas, D.; Vermeer, A.

    2010-01-01

    An ultrafast atomic layer deposition technique is presented, based on the spatial separation of the half-reactions, with which alumina layers can be deposited with deposition rates of more than 1 nm/s. The deposition rate is limited by the water half-reaction, for which a kinetic model has been

  6. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C; Mascarenhas, Artur J S

    2010-01-01

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp 2 to sp 3 transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the Γ point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  7. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; Mascarenhas, Artur J S; de Brito Mota, F; de Castilho, Caio M C

    2010-12-03

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp(2) to sp(3) transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the Γ point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  8. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Bent, Stacey F.; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.

    2015-01-01

    Partial CuInGaSe 2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnO x buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide

  9. Atomic-Layer-Confined Doping for Atomic-Level Insights into Visible-Light Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fengcai; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Yongfu; Liang, Liang; Liu, Katong; Xu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Qun; Pan, Bicai; Luo, Yi; Xie, Yi

    2015-08-03

    A model of doping confined in atomic layers is proposed for atomic-level insights into the effect of doping on photocatalysis. Co doping confined in three atomic layers of In2S3 was implemented with a lamellar hybrid intermediate strategy. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of Co ions brings about several new energy levels and increased density of states at the conduction band minimum, leading to sharply increased visible-light absorption and three times higher carrier concentration. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the electron transfer time of about 1.6 ps from the valence band to newly formed localized states is due to Co doping. The 25-fold increase in average recovery lifetime is believed to be responsible for the increased of electron-hole separation. The synthesized Co-doped In2S3 (three atomic layers) yield a photocurrent of 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.5 V vs. RHE, nearly 10 and 17 times higher than that of the perfect In2S3 (three atomic layers) and the bulk counterpart, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Underpotential deposition-mediated layer-by-layer growth of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia Xu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-05-19

    A method of depositing contiguous, conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin films with atomic-level control is described. The process involves the use of underpotential deposition of a first element to mediate the growth of a second material by overpotential deposition. Deposition occurs between a potential positive to the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element where a full monolayer of mediating element forms, and a potential which is less than, or only slightly greater than, the bulk deposition potential of the material to be deposited. By cycling the applied voltage between the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element and the material to be deposited, repeated desorption/adsorption of the mediating element during each potential cycle can be used to precisely control film growth on a layer-by-layer basis. This process is especially suitable for the formation of a catalytically active layer on core-shell particles for use in energy conversion devices such as fuel cells.

  11. Stop Band Gap in Periodic Layers of Confined Atomic Vapor/Dielectric Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan-Yuan; Li Li; Lu Yi-Xin; Zhang Yan-Peng; Xu Ke-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A stop band gap is predicted in periodic layers of a confined atomic vapor/dielectric medium. Reflection and transmission profile of the layers over the band gap can be dramatically modified by the confined atoms and the number of layer periods. These gap and line features can be ascribed to the enhanced contribution of slow atoms induced by atom-wall collision, transient behavior of atom-light interaction and Fabry—Pérot effects in a thermal confined atomic system

  12. Internal equilibrium layer growth over forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    the magnitude of the scatter. Different theoretical friction velocity profiles for the Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) are tested against the forest data. The results yield information on the Internal Equilibrium Layer (IEL) growth and an equation for the IEL height fur neutral conditions is derived. For stable...... conditions the results indicate that very long fetches are required in order to measure parameters in equilibrium with the actual surface....

  13. Oxide-based materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Marek; Pietruszka, Rafał; Kaszewski, Jarosław; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Godlewski, Michał M.; Slonska, Anna; Gajewski, Zdzisław

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of wide band-gap oxides grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) are suitable for a range of applications. Some of these applications will be presented. First of all, ALD-grown high-k HfO2 is used as a gate oxide in the electronic devices. Moreover, ALD-grown oxides can be used in memory devices, in transparent transistors, or as elements of solar cells. Regarding photovoltaics (PV), ALD-grown thin films of Al2O3 are already used as anti-reflection layers. In addition, thin films of ZnO are tested as replacement of ITO in PV devices. New applications in organic photovoltaics, electronics and optoelectronics are also demonstrated Considering new applications, the same layers, as used in electronics, can also find applications in biology, medicine and in a food industry. This is because layers of high-k oxides show antibacterial activity, as discussed in this work.

  14. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanarik, Keren J.; Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices

  15. Three-dimensional spirals of atomic layered MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; Liu, Kaihui; Wong, Andrew Barnabas; Kim, Jonghwan; Hong, Xiaoping; Liu, Chong; Cao, Ting; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Feng; Yang, Peidong

    2014-11-12

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, including graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), can exhibit novel phenomena distinct from their bulk counterparts and hold great promise for novel electronic and optoelectronic applications. Controlled growth of such 2D materials with different thickness, composition, and symmetry are of central importance to realize their potential. In particular, the ability to control the symmetry of TMD layers is highly desirable because breaking the inversion symmetry can lead to intriguing valley physics, nonlinear optical properties, and piezoelectric responses. Here we report the first chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of spirals of layered MoS2 with atomically thin helical periodicity, which exhibits a chiral structure and breaks the three-dimensional (3D) inversion symmetry explicitly. The spirals composed of tens of connected MoS2 layers with decreasing areas: each basal plane has a triangular shape and shrinks gradually to the summit when spiraling up. All the layers in the spiral assume an AA lattice stacking, which is in contrast to the centrosymmetric AB stacking in natural MoS2 crystals. We show that the noncentrosymmetric MoS2 spiral leads to a strong bulk second-order optical nonlinearity. In addition, we found that the growth of spirals involves a dislocation mechanism, which can be generally applicable to other 2D TMD materials.

  16. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotipalli R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD aluminum oxide (Al2O3 has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012−1013 cm-2 in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit. This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD. Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2 (20 nm, SiO2 (20 nm deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H (20 nm also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV. The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn, and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  17. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotipalli, R.; Delamare, R.; Poncelet, O.; Tang, X.; Francis, L. A.; Flandre, D.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012-1013 cm-2) in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit). This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm) Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD). Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) (20 nm), SiO2 (20 nm) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) (20 nm) also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G) measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV). The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit) on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn), and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  18. Carbon nanofiber growth on thin rhodium layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Smithers, Mark A.; Smithers, M.A.; Kip, Gerhardus A.M.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2012-01-01

    A thinlayer of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was synthesized on a thin polycrystalline rhodium (Rh) metal layer by decomposing ethylene in the presence of hydrogen. Interaction of Rh crystals with carbon results in fragmentation and formation of Rh-nanoparticles, facilitating CNF growth. CNFs are

  19. Review on one-dimensional nanostructures prepared by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilágyi, Imre Miklós; Nagy, Dávidné

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the various lD nanostructures, which were prepared by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD). On the one hand, electrospinning served to make sacrificial polymer templates for the ALD growth; and thus various single or multilayer inorganic nanotubes were obtained. On the other hand, polymer, polymer/inorganic or inorganic nanowire templates were produced by electrospinning. By a consecutive ALD reaction various core/shell nanowires were synthesized

  20. Highly conductive epitaxial ZnO layers deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baji, Zs., E-mail: baji.zsofia@ttk.mta.hu [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Lábadi, Z.; Molnár, Gy.; Pécz, B. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Vad, K. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001, Debrecen (Hungary); Horváth, Z.E. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Szabó, P.J. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Műegyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Nagata, T. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Volk, J. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-07-01

    The possibility of depositing conductive epitaxial layers with atomic layer deposition has been examined. Epitaxial ZnO layers were grown on GaN and doped with Al. The resistivity of the epitaxial layers is between 0.6 and 2 * 10{sup −4} Ω cm with both the mobilities and the carrier concentrations being very high. The source of the high carrier concentration was found to be a combination of Al and Ga doping, the latter resulted by Ga atoms diffusing into the ZnO from the GaN substrate. - Highlights: • High-quality epitaxial ZnO layers were deposited with ALD on GaN above 270 °C. • In the Al-doped layers, domains with different orientations also appear. • Lower-temperature epitaxy is possible with an epitaxial seed layer. • The conductivity of the epitaxial layers is between 0.6 and 2 * 10{sup −4} Ω cm. • The high carrier concentration is resulted by the Ga and Al doping.

  1. High throughput, low cost deposition of alumina passivation layers by spatial atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Gortzen, R.M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a gas phase deposition technique for depositing very high quality thin films with an unsurpassed conformality. The main drawback of ALD however is the very low deposition rate (~ 1 nm/min). Recently, record deposition rates for alumina of up to I nm/s were reached

  2. Double-atomic layer of Tl on Si(111): Atomic arrangement and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalyuk, Alexey N.; Bondarenko, Leonid V.; Tupchaya, Alexandra Y.; Gruznev, Dimitry V.; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Hsing, Cheng-Rong; Wei, Ching-Ming; Zotov, Andrey V.; Saranin, Alexander A.

    2018-02-01

    Metastable double-atomic layer of Tl on Si(111) has recently been found to display interesting electric properties, namely superconductivity below 0.96 K and magnetic-field-induced transition into an insulating phase intermediated by a quantum metal state. In the present work, using a set of experimental techniques, including low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, in a combination with density-functional-theory calculations, we have characterized atomic and electronic properties of the Tl double layer on Si(111). The double Tl layer has been concluded to contain ∼ 2.4 monolayer of Tl. A top Tl layer has a '1 × 1' basic structure and displays 6 × 6 moiré pattern which originates from various residence sites of Tl atoms. Upon cooling below ∼ 140 K, the 6 × 6 moiré pattern changes to that having a 6√{ 3} × 6√{ 3} periodicity. However, the experimentally determined electron band dispersions show a 1 × 1 periodicity. The calculated band structure unfolded into the 1 × 1 surface Brillouin zone reproduces well the main features of the photoelectron spectra.

  3. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-07

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of zinc oxide for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, M.; Abou Chaaya, A.; Bechelany, M.; Miele, P.; Robin, Y.; Briot, O.

    2014-11-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase thin film deposition technique, performed at low substrate temperatures, which enables the deposition of extremely uniform thin films. This technique is scalable up to very large substrates, making it very interesting for industrial applications. On the other hand, ZnO, both undoped and aluminum doped is commonly used as a transparent electrode in solar cells based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and is usually deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition techniques. In this paper, we investigate the potential of ALD for the deposition of ZnO windows for solar cell applications. Thin films of a few hundreds of nanometers were grown by ALD, both undoped and doped with aluminum. They were studied by X-ray diffraction, electrical transport measurements, Atomic Force Microscopy and transmittance experiments.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  6. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis.

  7. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...... dioxide (TiO2) overlayers on silicon-based photocathodes generate extremely stable electrodes. These electrodes can produce an onset potential of +0.510 V vs. RHE and a hydrogen evolution saturation current of 22 mA cm−2 using the red part of the AM1.5 solar spectrum (λ > 635 nm, 38.6 mW cm−2). A PEC...

  8. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of zinc sulfide with Zn(TMHD){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Andrew; Jewell, Leila; Doshay, Sage; Church, Carena; Keiber, Trevor; Bridges, Frank; Carter, Sue; Alers, Glenn [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnS films with Zn(TMHD){sub 2} and in situ generated H{sub 2}S as precursors was investigated, over a temperature range of 150-375 Degree-Sign C. ALD behavior was confirmed by investigation of growth behavior and saturation curves. The properties of the films were studied with atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible-infrared spectroscopy, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure. The results demonstrate a film that can penetrate a porous matrix, with a local Zn structure of bulk ZnS, and a band gap between 3.5 and 3.6 eV. The ZnS film was used as a buffer layer in nanostructured PbS quantum dot solar cell devices.

  10. Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tobias G.; Fleurence, Antoine; Warner, Ben; Prüser, Henning; Friedlein, Rainer; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko

    2017-06-01

    Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal that is formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. The 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting to the silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.

  11. Spotting 2D atomic layers on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Bharadwaj B, Krishna; Vaidyuala, Kranthi Kumar; Suran, Swathi; Bhat, Navakanta; Varma, Manoj; Srinivasan Raghavan

    2015-10-23

    Substrates for 2D materials are important for tailoring their fundamental properties and realizing device applications. Aluminum nitride (AIN) films on silicon are promising large-area substrates for such devices in view of their high surface phonon energies and reasonably large dielectric constants. In this paper epitaxial layers of AlN on 2″ Si wafers have been investigated as a necessary first step to realize devices from exfoliated or transferred atomic layers. Significant thickness dependent contrast enhancements are both predicted and observed for monolayers of graphene and MoS2 on AlN films as compared to the conventional SiO2 films on silicon, with calculated contrast values approaching 100% for graphene on AlN as compared to 8% for SiO2 at normal incidences. Quantitative estimates of experimentally measured contrast using reflectance spectroscopy show very good agreement with calculated values. Transistors of monolayer graphene on AlN films are demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of complete device fabrication on the identified layers.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    The micro direct methanol fuel cell (µDMFC) has been proposed as a candidate to power portable applications. The device can operate at room temperature on inexpensive, energy-dense methanol fuel, and it can be easily "recharged" by fuel refilling. Microfabrication techniques could be one route...... for the realization of such tiny devices. It is a mature technology, suitable for mass production, where versatile structuring is available at the micro and nano regime. Carbon black supported catalysts synthesized by wet chemistry methods are not readily applicable for standard microfabrication techniques. Atomic...... on the sample surface. Its unique growth characteristic enables conformal and uniform lms of controlled thickness and composition. In certain conditions ALD commences by island growth, resulting in discrete nanoparticle formation, which is generally preferred for catalytic applications. Pt-Ru is the best...

  13. Epitaxial growth of atomically flat gadolinia-doped ceria thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen

    the preparation of ultrathin seed layers in the first stage of the deposition process is often envisaged to control the growth and physical properties of the subsequent coating. This work suggests that the limitations of conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD), performed at moderate temperature (400°C......10 layers with a thickness of 4 nm, 13 nm and 22 nm, respectively, grown on Mg(100), were studied by atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectometry....

  14. Atomically thin heterostructures based on single-layer tungsten diselenide and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Wallace, Robert M; Mayer, Theresa S; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A

    2014-12-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF).

  15. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green\\'s function (NEGF).

  16. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A.

    2015-08-01

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  17. Atomically-Precise Layer Controlled Synthesis and Characterization of cm-Scale Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.-H.; Brar, V. W.; Jariwala, D.; Sherrott, M. C.; Tseng, W.-S.; Wu, C.-I.; Yeh, N.-C.; Atwater, H. A.

    Hexagonal boron nitride is the most promising two-dimensional insulator for device applications because of its large band gap and low density of charged impurities in addition to being isostructural and isoelectronic with graphene. Here we report the synthesis of h-BN films over cm2 area on Cu foils via chemical vapor deposition, with layer control from 1 to 20 layers. We have characterized these large-area h-BN films at both atomic and macroscopic scales. Raman and infrared spectroscopy indicate the presence of B-N bonds and reveal a linear dependence of thickness with growth time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provides the film stoichiometry, showing the B/N atom ratio to be 1 for all thicknesses. Atomically resolved STM images of monolayer h-BN films on graphene and Au substrates display both the atomic h-BN honeycomb lattice and a Moiré superlattice between h-BN and graphene. Electrical current transport in Au/h-BN/Au heterostructures indicates that these h-BN films behave like excellent tunnel barriers and also possess a high value of the hard-breakdown field strength. Our large-area h-BN films are therefore structurally, chemically and electronically uniform over cm2 areas. Department of Energy DE-FG02- 07ER46405 and DE-SC0001293.

  18. Atomic layer deposition for nanofabrication and interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Monan; Li, Xianglin; Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a tool for conformal coating on high aspect-ratio nanostructures with excellent uniformity. It has become a technique for both template-directed nanofabrications and engineering of surface properties. This Feature Article highlights the application of ALD in selected fields including photonics, SERS and energy materials. Specifically, the topics include fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures for the SERS applications, fabrication of 3-D nanoarchitectured photoanodes for solar energy conversions (dye-sensitized solar cells and photoelectrochemical cells), and coating of electrodes to enhance the cyclic stability and thus device life span of batteries. Dielectric coating for tailoring optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures is also discussed as exemplified by ZnO nanowires. Future direction of ALD in these applications is discussed at the end.

  19. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  20. Protective silicon coating for nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.; Wang, Y.H.; Zang, J.B.; Li, Y.N.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrathin silicon coating was deposited on nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition (ALD) from gaseous monosilane (SiH 4 ). The coating was performed by sequential reaction of SiH 4 saturated adsorption and in situ decomposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structural and morphological properties of the coating. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to compare the thermal stability of nanodiamonds before and after silicon coating. The results confirmed that the deposited cubic phase silicon coating was even and continuous. The protective silicon coating could effectively improve the oxidation resistance of nanodiamonds in air flow, which facilitates the applications of nanodiamonds that are commonly hampered by their poor thermal stability

  1. Nanoengineering and interfacial engineering of photovoltaics by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Jonathan R.; Pickrahn, Katie L.; Brennan, Thomas P.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2011-09-01

    Investment into photovoltaic (PV) research has accelerated over the past decade as concerns over energy security and carbon emissions have increased. The types of PV technology in which the research community is actively engaged are expanding as well. This review focuses on the burgeoning field of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for photovoltaics. ALD is a self-limiting thin film deposition technique that has demonstrated usefulness in virtually every sector of PV technology including silicon, thin film, tandem, organic, dye-sensitized, and next generation solar cells. Further, the specific applications are not limited. ALD films have been deposited on planar and nanostructured substrates and on inorganic and organic devices, and vary in thickness from a couple of angstroms to over 100 nm. The uses encompass absorber materials, buffer layers, passivating films, anti-recombination shells, and electrode modifiers. Within the last few years, the interest in ALD as a PV manufacturing technique has increased and the functions of ALD have expanded. ALD applications have yielded fundamental understanding of how devices operate and have led to increased efficiencies or to unique architectures for some technologies. This review also highlights new developments in high throughput ALD, which is necessary for commercialization. As the demands placed on materials for the next generation of PV become increasingly stringent, ALD will evolve into an even more important method for research and fabrication of solar cell devices.

  2. Measurements of electrostatic double layer potentials with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Jason

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a thorough description of the development of theory and experiment pertaining to the electrostatic double layer (EDL) in aqueous electrolytic systems. The EDL is an important physical element of many systems and its behavior has been of interest to scientists for many decades. Because many areas of science and engineering move to test, build, and understand systems at smaller and smaller scales, this work focuses on nanoscopic experimental investigations of the EDL. In that vein, atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be introduced and discussed as a tool for making high spatial resolution measurements of the solid-liquid interface, culminating in a description of the development of a method for completely characterizing the EDL. This thesis first explores, in a semi-historical fashion, the development of the various models and theories that are used to describe the electrostatic double layer. Later, various experimental techniques and ideas are addressed as ways to make measurements of interesting characteristics of the EDL. Finally, a newly developed approach to measuring the EDL system with AFM is introduced. This approach relies on both implementation of existing theoretical models with slight modifications as well as a unique experimental measurement scheme. The model proposed clears up previous ambiguities in definitions of various parameters pertaining to measurements of the EDL and also can be used to fully characterize the system in a way not yet demonstrated.

  3. Scalable synthesis of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinhua; Lyon, Lauren B.; Jiang Yingbing; Weimer, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to produce Pd/Al 2 O 3 catalysts using sequential exposures of Pd(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate and formalin at 200 °C in a fluidized bed reactor. The ALD-prepared Pd/alumina catalysts were characterized by various methods including hydrogen chemisorption, XPS, and TEM, and compared with a commercially available 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst, which was also characterized. The content of Pd on alumina support and the size of Pd nanoparticles can be controlled by the number of ALD-coating cycles and the dose time of the Pd precursor. One layer of organic component from the Pd precursor remained on the Pd particle surface. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina had greater active metal surface area and percent metal dispersion than the commercial 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst. The ALD and commercial catalysts were subjected to catalytic testing to determine their relative activities for glucose oxidation to gluconic acid in aqueous solution. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst had comparable activity as compared to the commercial 1 wt% Pd catalyst. No noticeable amount of Pd leaching was observed for the ALD-prepared catalysts during the vigorously stirred reaction.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of Bismuth Vanadates for Solar Energy Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefik, Morgan

    2016-07-07

    The fabrication of porous nanocomposites is key to the advancement of energy conversion and storage devices that interface with electrolytes. Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4 , is a promising oxide for solar water splitting where the controlled fabrication of BiVO4 layers within porous, conducting scaffolds has remained a challenge. Here, the atomic layer deposition of bismuth vanadates is reported from BiPh3 , vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide, and water. The resulting films have tunable stoichiometry and may be crystallized to form the photoactive scheelite structure of BiVO4 . A selective etching process was used with vanadium-rich depositions to enable the synthesis of phase-pure BiVO4 after spinodal decomposition. BiVO4 thin films were measured for photoelectrochemical performance under AM 1.5 illumination. The average photocurrents were 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode using a hole-scavenging sulfite electrolyte. The capability to deposit conformal bismuth vanadates will enable a new generation of nanocomposite architectures for solar water splitting. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  6. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  7. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  8. A Method for Atomic Layer Deposition of Complex Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Ge, H. Wang, M. Wang, M. Wang, Z. Liu, N. Ming , Thin Solid Films 375 (2000) 220. [15] D. Bao, X. Yao, N. Wakiya, K. Shinozaki, N. Mizutani, Mater...2008. [3] Jonathan R. Scheffe, Andrea Francés, David M. King, Xinhua Liang , Brittany A. Branch, Andrew S. Cavanagh, Steven M. George, and Alan W...atomic-layer deposition. Journal of Crystal Growth, 254(3-4):443–448, July 2003. 71 [12] Chih-Yi Pan, Dah-Shyang Tsai , and Lu-Sheng Hong. Abnormal

  9. Simulation and growing study of Cu–Al–S thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duclaux, L., E-mail: loraine-externe.duclaux@edf.fr [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF R& D/CNRS/ChimieParistech, UMR 7174, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Donsanti, F.; Vidal, J. [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF R& D/CNRS/ChimieParistech, UMR 7174, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Bouttemy, M. [Lavoisier Institute of Versailles, UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles cedex (France); Schneider, N.; Naghavi, N. [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF R& D/CNRS/ChimieParistech, UMR 7174, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2015-11-02

    In this paper, we have explored the potential of Cu–Al–S compounds as p-type transparent conducting material by means of atomistic simulation using CuAlS{sub 2} as a reference ternary compound and atomic layer deposition (ALD) growth. We have identified key intrinsic point defects acting either as shallow acceptor or deep donor which define the conductivity of CuAlS{sub 2}. Higher p-type conductivity was found to be achievable under metal-poor and chalcogen-rich growth conditions. According to this precept, ALD growth of Cu{sub x}Al{sub y}S{sub z} was attempted using Cu(acac){sub 2} and Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} as precursors for Cu and Al respectively and under H{sub 2}S atmosphere. While as grown thin films present low content of Al, it influences the band gap values as well as the obtained structures. - Highlights: • Ab-initio investigation of CuAlS{sub 2} • Indentification of two opposite main-contributive intrinsic defects on the conductivity: V{sub Cu} and Al{sub Cu} • Synthesis of Cu-Al-S ternary compound using atomic layer deposition • Impact of aluminum insertion on the optical and structural properties of the films.

  10. Thin films of In2O3 by atomic layer deposition using In(acac)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, O.; Balasundaraprabhu, R.; Monakhov, E.V.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Fjellvag, H.; Svensson, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of indium oxide have been deposited using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique using In(acac) 3 (acac = acetylacetonate, pentane-2,4-dione) and either H 2 O or O 3 as precursors. Successful growth using In(acac) 3 is contradictory to what has been reported previously in the literature [J.W. Elam, A.B.F. Martinson, M.J. Pellin, J.T. Hupp, Chem. Mater. 18 (2006) 3571.]. Investigation of the dependence of temperature on the deposition shows windows where the growth rates are relatively unaffected by temperature in the ranges 165-200 o C for In(acac) 3 and H 2 O, 165-225 o C for In(acac) 3 and O 3 . The growth rates obtained are of the order 20 pm/cycle for In(acac) 3 and H 2 O, 12 pm/cycle for In(acac) 3 .

  11. The effect of substrate temperature on atomic layer deposited zinc tin oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, Johan; Hägglund, Carl; Wätjen, J. Timo; Edoff, Marika; Törndahl, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the film properties were investigated for varying deposition temperatures in the range of 90 to 180 °C. It was found that the [Sn]/([Sn] + [Zn]) composition is only slightly temperature dependent, while properties such as growth rate, film density, material structure and band gap are more strongly affected. The growth rate dependence on deposition temperature varies with the relative number of zinc or tin containing precursor pulses and it correlates with the growth rate behavior of pure ZnO and SnO x ALD. In contrast to the pure ZnO phase, the density of the mixed ZTO films is found to depend on the deposition temperature and it increases linearly with about 1 g/cm 3 in total over the investigated range. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy suggests that zinc rich ZTO films contain small (~ 10 nm) ZnO or ZnO(Sn) crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix, and that these crystallites increase in size with increasing zinc content and deposition temperature. These crystallites are small enough for quantum confinement effects to reduce the optical band gap of the ZTO films as they grow in size with increasing deposition temperature. - Highlights: • Zinc tin oxide thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition. • The structure and optical properties were studied at different growth temperatures. • The growth temperature had only a small effect on the composition of the films. • Small ZnO or ZnO(Sn) crystallites were observed by TEM in zinc rich ZTO films. • The growth temperature affects the crystallite size, which influences the band gap

  12. Layer-by-layer growth of superparamagnetic, fluorescent barcode nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qiangbin [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Liu Yan [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Lin Chenxiang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Yan Hao [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2007-10-10

    We report a novel stepwise layer-by-layer synthesis strategy to achieve multi-component barcode nanospheres that contain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as the core and quantum dots (QDs) of different emission colors in spatially separated silica layers as the shells, with QD-free silica layers as the insulation layers. This strategy offers the following unique features: (1) the location of the MNPs and the QDs in the silica spheres are separated spatially, so that no interference of the QD photoluminescence (PL) by the magnetic particles is observed; (2) the PL spectra of barcode nanospheres can be easily tuned through the ratio of different QDs loaded in each layer; (3) the size of the silica nanospheres can range from submicron ({approx}100 nm) to micrometers depending on the number of layers and the thickness of each layer; (4) QD stability is preserved by embedding the QDs covalently in the silica matrix; (5) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different colored QDs is avoided by isolating them into separated layers with a silica spacer layer.

  13. Layer-by-layer growth of superparamagnetic, fluorescent barcode nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiangbin; Liu Yan; Lin Chenxiang; Yan Hao

    2007-01-01

    We report a novel stepwise layer-by-layer synthesis strategy to achieve multi-component barcode nanospheres that contain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as the core and quantum dots (QDs) of different emission colors in spatially separated silica layers as the shells, with QD-free silica layers as the insulation layers. This strategy offers the following unique features: (1) the location of the MNPs and the QDs in the silica spheres are separated spatially, so that no interference of the QD photoluminescence (PL) by the magnetic particles is observed; (2) the PL spectra of barcode nanospheres can be easily tuned through the ratio of different QDs loaded in each layer; (3) the size of the silica nanospheres can range from submicron (∼100 nm) to micrometers depending on the number of layers and the thickness of each layer; (4) QD stability is preserved by embedding the QDs covalently in the silica matrix; (5) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different colored QDs is avoided by isolating them into separated layers with a silica spacer layer

  14. CMUTs with High-K Atomic Layer Deposition Dielectric Material Insulation Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (SixNy) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2 such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD SixNy and 100-nm HfO2 insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure. PMID:25474786

  15. Atomic and molecular layer activation of dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, John Joseph

    Strong interaction between the material deposit and substrate is critical to stable deposits and interfaces. The work presented here focuses on the surface activation of dielectric surfaces and oxidized metal surfaces to promote the chemisorption of palladium (II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate (PdII (hfac)2). The goal is to develop reliable, robust metallization protocols, which enable strong interactions between the metal and substrate. SiO2, air exposed Ta, Trikon, and SiLK were activated with sulfur or phosphorus. Two types of activations were developed; one based on self-assembled chemistry, and the other a plasma-assisted process. Activation of the surface using self-assembly techniques was carried out using mercaptan-terminated silane and tetrasulfide silane. The resulting films were characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tetrasulfide silane sources films exhibit self-limiting behavior, even in the presence of water vapor; whereas mercaptan-terminated silane sourced films tend to be thicker. The surface activations using atomic layers of sulfur and phosphorus were carried out in a rf plasma chamber using hydrogen sulfide and phosphine sources, respectively. The activations were studied as functions of rf power, system pressure, and substrate material. Results show that higher rf powers and lower system pressures promote greater surface coverages by sulfur with a reduced oxidation state. The activated dielectrics show evidence of PdII(hfac)2 chemisorption, in contrast to non-activated surfaces. The binding energy shift of the Pd3d 5/2 XPS peak towards elemental Pd provides evidence for the dissociative chemisorption of PdII(hfac)2. The extent of dissociation depends on the substrate temperature and the activation method used. The conclusions of the work presented here have implications for metallization using highly polarizable transition metals. Specifically, it can be applied to

  16. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit; Okazaki, Ryuji; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition has been used to fabricate thin films of aluminum-doped ZnO by depositing interspersed layers of ZnO and Al 2 O 3 on borosilicate glass substrates. The growth characteristics of the films have been investigated through x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflection, and x-ray fluorescence measurements, and the efficacy of the Al doping has been evaluated through optical reflectivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The Al doping is found to affect the carrier density of ZnO up to a nominal Al dopant content of 5 at. %. At nominal Al doping levels of 10 at. % and higher, the structure of the films is found to be strongly affected by the Al 2 O 3 phase and no further carrier doping of ZnO is observed.

  18. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO 2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Robust, functional nanocrystal solids by infilling with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Gibbs, Markelle; Perkins, Craig L; Tolentino, Jason; Zarghami, Mohammad H; Bustamante, Jorge; Law, Matt

    2011-12-14

    Thin films of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are inherently metatstable materials prone to oxidative and photothermal degradation driven by their large surface-to-volume ratios and high surface energies. (1) The fabrication of practical electronic devices based on NC solids hinges on preventing oxidation, surface diffusion, ripening, sintering, and other unwanted physicochemical changes that can plague these materials. Here we use low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infill conductive PbSe NC solids with metal oxides to produce inorganic nanocomposites in which the NCs are locked in place and protected against oxidative and photothermal damage. Infilling NC field-effect transistors and solar cells with amorphous alumina yields devices that operate with enhanced and stable performance for at least months in air. Furthermore, ALD infilling with ZnO lowers the height of the inter-NC tunnel barrier for electron transport, yielding PbSe NC films with electron mobilities of 1 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). Our ALD technique is a versatile means to fabricate robust NC solids for optoelectronic devices.

  20. Continuous production of nanostructured particles using spatial atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ommen, J. Ruud van; Kooijman, Dirkjan; Niet, Mark de; Talebi, Mojgan; Goulas, Aristeidis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a novel spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) process based on pneumatic transport of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoclusters of platinum (Pt) of ∼1 nm diameter are deposited onto titania (TiO 2 ) P25 nanoparticles resulting to a continuous production of an active photocatalyst (0.12–0.31 wt. % of Pt) at a rate of about 1 g min −1 . Tuning the precursor injection velocity (10–40 m s −1 ) enhances the contact between the precursor and the pneumatically transported support flows. Decreasing the chemisorption temperature (from 250 to 100 °C) results in more uniform distribution of the Pt nanoclusters as it decreases the reaction rate as compared to the rate of diffusion into the nanoparticle agglomerates. Utilizing this photocatalyst in the oxidation reaction of Acid Blue 9 showed a factor of five increase of the photocatalytic activity compared to the native P25 nanoparticles. The use of spatial particle ALD can be further expanded to deposition of nanoclusters on porous, micron-sized particles and to the production of core–shell nanoparticles enabling the robust and scalable manufacturing of nanostructured powders for catalysis and other applications

  1. Gyroidal mesoporous multifunctional nanocomposites via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jörg G; Scherer, Maik R J; Steiner, Ullrich; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-08-07

    We demonstrate the preparation of rationally designed, multifunctional, monolithic and periodically ordered mesoporous core-shell nanocomposites with tunable structural characteristics. Three-dimensionally (3D) co-continuous gyroidal mesoporous polymer monoliths are fabricated from a solution-based triblock terpolymer-resol co-assembly and used as the functional templates for the fabrication of free-standing core-shell carbon-titania composites using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The deposition depth into the torturous gyroidal nanonetwork is investigated as a function of ALD conditions and the resulting composites are submitted to different thermal treatments. Results suggest that ALD can homogenously coat mesoporous templates with well defined pore sizes below 50 nm and thicknesses above 10 μm. Structural tunability like titania shell thickness and pore size control is demonstrated. The ordered nanocomposites exhibit triple functionality; a 3D continuous conductive carbon core that is coated with a crystalline titania shell that in turn is in contact with a 3D continuous mesopore network in a compact monolithic architecture. This materials design is of interest for applications including energy conversion and storage. Gyroidal mesoporous titania monoliths can be obtained through simultaneous titania crystallization and template removal in air.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition in Bio-Nanotechnology: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishal, Arghya K; Butt, Arman; Selvaraj, Sathees K; Joshi, Bela; Patel, Sweetu B; Huang, Su; Yang, Bin; Shukohfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos G

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique increasingly used in nanotechnology and ultrathin film deposition; it is ideal for films in the nanometer and Angstrom length scales. ALD can effectively be used to modify the surface chemistry and functionalization of engineering-related and biologically important surfaces. It can also be used to alter the mechanical, electrical, chemical, and other properties of materials that are increasingly used in biomedical engineering and biological sciences. ALD is a relatively new technique for optimizing materials for use in bio-nanotechnology. Here, after a brief review of the more widely used modes of ALD and a few of its applications in biotechnology, selected results that show the potential of ALD in bio-nanotechnology are presented. ALD seems to be a promising means for tuning the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity characteristics of biomedical surfaces, forming conformal ultrathin coatings with desirable properties on biomedical substrates with a high aspect ratio, tuning the antibacterial properties of substrate surfaces of interest, and yielding multifunctional biomaterials for medical implants and other devices.

  3. Controlled Synthesis of Pd/Pt Core Shell Nanoparticles Using Area-selective Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kun; Zhu, Qianqian; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-02-16

    We report an atomic scale controllable synthesis of Pd/Pt core shell nanoparticles (NPs) via area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a modified surface. The method involves utilizing octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify the surface. Take the usage of pinholes on SAMs as active sites for the initial core nucleation, and subsequent selective deposition of the second metal as the shell layer. Since new nucleation sites can be effectively blocked by surface ODTS SAMs in the second deposition stage, we demonstrate the successful growth of Pd/Pt and Pt/Pd NPs with uniform core shell structures and narrow size distribution. The size, shell thickness and composition of the NPs can be controlled precisely by varying the ALD cycles. Such core shell structures can be realized by using regular ALD recipes without special adjustment. This SAMs assisted area-selective ALD method of core shell structure fabrication greatly expands the applicability of ALD in fabricating novel structures and can be readily applied to the growth of NPs with other compositions.

  4. Atomic layer deposition TiO2 coated porous silicon surface: Structural characterization and morphological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor; Jancelewicz, Mariusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Kempiński, Mateusz; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Załęski, Karol; Jurga, Stefan; Smyntyna, Valentyn

    2015-01-01

    TiO 2 thin films were grown on highly-doped p-Si (100) macro- and mesoporous structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using TiCl 4 and deionized water as precursors at 300 °C. The crystalline structure, chemical composition, and morphology of the deposited films and initial silicon nanostructures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mean size of TiO 2 crystallites was determined by TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the mean crystallite size and the crystallinity of the TiO 2 are influenced dramatically by the morphology of the porous silicon, with the mesoporous silicon resulting in a much finer grain size and amorphous structure than the macroporous silicon having a partially crystal anatase phase. A simple model of the ALD layer growth inside the pores was presented. - Highlights: • The morphology and chemical composition of TiO 2 and porous Si were established. • The approximate size of TiO 2 nanocrystals was estimated. • The model of the atomic layer deposition coating in the porous Si was presented

  5. The effect of inducing uniform Cu growth on formation of electroless Cu seed layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Taeho; Kim, Myung Jun; Park, Kyung Ju; Kim, Kwang Hwan; Choe, Seunghoe; Lee, Young-Soo; Kim, Jae Jeong

    2014-01-01

    The uniformity of Cu growth on Pd nanocatalysts was controlled by using organic additives in the formation of electroless Cu seed layers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mw. 8000) not only reduced the deposition rate but also improved the uniformity of Cu growth on each Pd nanocatalyst during the seed layer formation. The stronger suppression effect of PEG on Cu than on Pd reduced the difference in the deposition rate between the two surfaces, resulting in the uniform deposition. Meanwhile, bis(3-sulfopropyl) disulfide degraded the uniformity by strong and nonselective suppression. The sheet resistance measurement and atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that the uniform Cu growth by PEG was more advantageous for the formation of a thin and smooth Cu seed layer than the non-uniform growth. The uniform Cu growth also had a positive influence on the subsequent Cu electrodeposition: the 60-nm-thick electrodeposited Cu film on the Cu seed layer showed low resistivity (2.70 μΩ·cm), low surface roughness (6.98 nm), and good adhesion strength. - Highlights: • Uniform Cu growth on Pd was achieved in formation of electroless Cu seed layer. • PEG addition to electroless bath improved the uniformity of Cu growth on Pd. • A thin, smooth and continuous Cu seed layer was obtained with PEG. • Adhesion strength of the Cu seed layer was also improved with PEG. • The uniformity improvement positively affected subsequent Cu electrodeposition

  6. Characteristics of layered tin disulfide deposited by atomic layer deposition with H2S annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjin Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tin disulfide (SnS2 has attracted much attention as a two-dimensional (2D material. A high-quality, low-temperature process for producing 2D materials is required for future electronic devices. Here, we investigate tin disulfide (SnS2 layers deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD using tetrakis(dimethylaminotin (TDMASn as a Sn precursor and H2S gas as a sulfur source at low temperature (150° C. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved by H2S gas annealing. We carried out H2S gas annealing at various conditions (250° C, 300° C, 350° C, and using a three-step method. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS results revealed the valence state corresponding to Sn4+ and S2- in the SnS2 annealed with H2S gas. The SnS2 annealed with H2S gas had a hexagonal structure, as measured via X-ray diffraction (XRD and the clearly out-of-plane (A1g mode in Raman spectroscopy. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved after H2S annealing and was confirmed using the XRD full-width at half-maximum (FWHM. In addition, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM images indicated a clear layered structure.

  7. Studies on layer growth and interfaces on Ta-base thin layers by means of XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zier, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis studies on the growth and on the formation of the interfaces of Ta and TaN layers on Si and SiO 2 were performed. In the system TaN on SiO 2 no reaction on the interface could be found. As the system with the mostly disturbed interface Ta on SiO 2 was proved. Here a reduction of the SiO 2 at simultaneous oxidation of the Ta was to be observed. Additionally tantalum silicide was formed to be considered concerning the bonding state as Ta 5 Si 3 , from which a double layer of a tantalum silicide and a tantalum suboxide resulted. A whole thickness of the double layer of above 1 nm resulted. In the system Ta on Si at the deposition of the film on the interface a tantalum silicide was formed to be characterized concerning the bonding state as TaSi 2 . The thickness of the interlayer growed thereby up to 0.8 nm in form of islands. Finally in the system TaN on Si a silicon nitride formation during the deposition was observed, which was attributed to the insertion of adsorbed nitrogen from the sputtering atmosphere by recoil implantation of the sputtered Ta atoms. The silicon nitride interlayer growed thereby up to a thickness of 0.8 nm

  8. Interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Vázquez, Gerardo; Magaña, Fernando; Sansores, Enrique

    2012-12-01

    It is known that graphene reacts with atomic hydrogen to form a hydrogenated sheet of graphene. In order to understand the nature of the interaction between hydrogen and lithium in hydrogenated samples, we have carried out first principle calculations. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster, and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom. It was found that a hydrogen atom is levitated from the graphene layer and absorbed into the cluster of Li at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, with a binding energy far exceeding that of the adsorption energy of a hydrogen atom on the graphene layer.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of metal oxide patterns on nonwoven fiber mats using localized physical compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, William J; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-06-25

    Patterning is an essential part of many industrial processes from printing to semiconductor manufacturing. In this work, we demonstrate a new method to pattern and selectively coat nonwoven textiles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using compressive mask patterning. A physical mask combined with mechanical compression allows lateral definition and fidelity of the ALD coating to be controlled. We produce features of several sizes on different nonwoven fiber materials and demonstrate the ability to limit diffusion effects to within <200 μm of the pattern edge. Lateral and vertical penetration of reactive growth species into nonwoven mats is investigated by plan-view and cross-sectional imaging. Vertical growth is also analyzed by imaging coating depth into fiber mat stacks. We develop a fully quantitative transport model that describes well the effect of fiber structure and mechanical compression on the extent of coating under the physical mask. This method could be implemented for high-volume patterning for applications including flexible electronics.

  10. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MoS{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurca, Titel; Wang, Binghao; Tan, Jeffrey M.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Marks, Tobin J. [Department of Chemistry and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Moody, Michael J.; Henning, Alex; Emery, Jonathan D.; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Wet chemical screening reveals the very high reactivity of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} with H{sub 2}S for the low-temperature synthesis of MoS{sub 2}. This observation motivated an investigation of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} as a volatile precursor for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MoS{sub 2} thin films. Herein we report that Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} enables MoS{sub 2} film growth at record low temperatures - as low as 60 C. The as-deposited films are amorphous but can be readily crystallized by annealing. Importantly, the low ALD growth temperature is compatible with photolithographic and lift-off patterning for the straightforward fabrication of diverse device structures. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-01-01

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  12. Atomic layer deposition on nanoparticles in a rotary reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jarod Alan

    Challenges are encountered during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on large quantities of nanoparticles. The particles must be agitated or vigorously mixed to perform the ALD surface reactions in reasonable times and to prevent the particles from being agglomerated by the ALD film. The high surface area of nanoparticles also demands efficient reactant usage because large quantities of reactant are required for the surface reactions to reach completion. To address these challenges, a novel rotary reactor was developed to achieve constant particle agitation during static ALD reactant exposures. In the design of this new reactor, a cylindrical drum with porous metal walls was positioned inside a vacuum chamber. The porous cylindrical drum was rotated by a magnetically coupled rotary feedthrough. By rotating the cylindrical drum to obtain a centrifugal force of less than one gravitational force, the particles were agitated by a continuous "avalanche" of particles. The effectiveness of this rotary reactor was demonstrated by Al 2O3 ALD on ZrO2 particles. A number of techniques including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning Auger spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the Al2O3 ALD film conformally coats the ZrO 2 particles. Combining static reactant exposures with a very high surface area sample in the rotary reactor also provides unique opportunities for studying the surface chemistry during ALD. Sequential, subsaturating doses can be used to examine the self-limiting behavior of the ALD reactions in the rotary reactor. This dosing method is the first demonstration of self-limiting ALD on bulk quantities of nanoparticles. By combining these sequential, subsaturating doses with quadrupole mass spectrometry, ALD reactions can be analyzed from the gas phase using full mass spectrum analysis. The reaction products are present in a high enough concentration to discern a gas phase mechanism for reactions

  13. The initial growth of ultra-thin films fabricated by a weak polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer adsorption process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shiro; Shiratori, Seimei

    2005-09-01

    A weak polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer self-assembled multilayer has several morphologies depending on solution pH, including the morphology of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) pH 7.5/poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) pH 3.5, which is called texture structure. We confirmed the initial growth of a weak polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer (LBL) multilayer in a stepwise adsorption process. The growth states of bilayers from 0.5 to 4.0 and over 4.5 were different when measured by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The texture structure appeared in 1.0 bilayer, after PAA adsorption. The initial growth was changed around 4.0 bilayers. In this phenomenon, the LBL layer of PAH pH 7.5/PAA pH 3.5 had two zones at least, similar to a strong polyelectrolyte LBL layer.

  14. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices

  15. Sealing of hard CrN and DLC coatings with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkönen, Emma; Kolev, Ivan; Díaz, Belén; Swiatowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe; Fenker, Martin; Toth, Lajos; Radnoczi, György; Vehkamäki, Marko; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-02-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that is based on alternating and saturating surface reactions of two or more gaseous precursors. The excellent conformality of ALD thin films can be exploited for sealing defects in coatings made by other techniques. Here the corrosion protection properties of hard CrN and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on low alloy steel were improved by ALD sealing with 50 nm thick layers consisting of Al2O3 and Ta2O5 nanolaminates or mixtures. In cross sectional images the ALD layers were found to follow the surface morphology of the CrN coatings uniformly. Furthermore, ALD growth into the pinholes of the CrN coating was verified. In electrochemical measurements the ALD sealing was found to decrease the current density of the CrN coated steel by over 2 orders of magnitude. The neutral salt spray (NSS) durability was also improved: on the best samples the appearance of corrosion spots was delayed from 2 to 168 h. On DLC coatings the adhesion of the ALD sealing layers was weaker, but still clear improvement in NSS durability was achieved indicating sealing of the pinholes.

  16. Monodisperse embedded nanoparticles derived from an atomic metal-dispersed precursor of layered double hydroxide for architectured carbon nanotube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Gui-Li; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Bingsen

    2014-01-01

    understood. Herein, the preparation of metal NPs with tunable areal density from layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors in which the metal cations were pre-dispersed at an atomic scale was explored. Large quantities of mesopores induced by the Kirkendall effect were formed on the as-calcined layered...... double oxide (LDO) flakes. The O atoms bonded with Fe3+ cations were easy to be extracted at a temperature higher than 750 degrees C, which greatly increased the mobility of Fe. Consequently, coalescence of the reduced Fe atoms into large NPs enhanced the Kirkendall effect, leading to the formation....... When the areal density was increased from 0.039 to 0.55, and to 2.1 x 10(15) m(-2), the Fe NPs embedded on the LDO flakes exhibited good catalytic performance for the growth of entangled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), aligned CNTs, and double helical CNTs, respectively. This work provides not only new...

  17. Atomically abrupt silicon-germanium axial heterostructure nanowires synthesized in a solvent vapor growth system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geaney, Hugh; Mullane, Emma; Ramasse, Quentin M; Ryan, Kevin M

    2013-04-10

    The growth of Si/Ge axial heterostructure nanowires in high yield using a versatile wet chemical approach is reported. Heterostructure growth is achieved using the vapor zone of a high boiling point solvent as a reaction medium with an evaporated tin layer as the catalyst. The low solubility of Si and Ge within the Sn catalyst allows the formation of extremely abrupt heterojunctions of the order of just 1-2 atomic planes between the Si and Ge nanowire segments. The compositional abruptness was confirmed using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic level electron energy loss spectroscopy. Additional analysis focused on the role of crystallographic defects in determining interfacial abruptness and the preferential incorporation of metal catalyst atoms near twin defects in the nanowires.

  18. Atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition of Al₂O₃ using trimethyl aluminum and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Moataz Bellah M; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-04-08

    High throughput spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) often uses higher reactor pressure than typical batch processes, but the specific effects of pressure on species transport and reaction rates are not fully understood. For aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ALD, water or ozone can be used as oxygen sources, but how reaction pressure influences deposition using ozone has not previously been reported. This work describes the effect of deposition pressure, between ∼2 and 760 Torr, on ALD Al2O3 using TMA and ozone. Similar to reports for pressure dependence during TMA/water ALD, surface reaction saturation studies show self-limiting growth at low and high pressure across a reasonable temperature range. Higher pressure tends to increase the growth per cycle, especially at lower gas velocities and temperatures. However, growth saturation at high pressure requires longer O3 dose times per cycle. Results are consistent with a model of ozone decomposition kinetics versus pressure and temperature. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) results confirm the trends in growth rate and indicate that the surface reaction mechanisms for Al2O3 growth using ozone are similar under low and high total pressure, including expected trends in the reaction mechanism at different temperatures.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of NiO hole-transporting layers for polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chen; Su, Heng-Wei; Hou, Cheng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-09-01

    NiO is an attractive hole-transporting material for polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to its excellent stability and electrical/optical properties. This study demonstrates, for the first time, fabrication of uniform, defect-free, and conformal NiO ultra-thin films for use as hole-transporting layers (HTLs) in PSCs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) through optimization of the ALD processing parameters. The morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ALD NiO films were determined to be favorable for their HTL application. As a result, PSCs containing an ALD NiO HTL with an optimized thickness of 4 nm achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.4%, which was comparable to that of a control device with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) HTL. The high quality and manufacturing scalability of ALD NiO films demonstrated here will facilitate the adoption of NiO HTLs in PSCs.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition for Coating of High Aspect Ratio TiO2 Nanotube Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present an optimized approach for the deposition of Al2O3 (as a model secondary material) coating into high aspect ratio (≈180) anodic TiO2 nanotube layers using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. In order to study the influence of the diffusion of the Al2O3 precursors on the resulting coating thickness, ALD processes with different exposure times (i.e., 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 s) of the trimethylaluminum (TMA) precursor were performed. Uniform coating of the nanotube interiors was achieved with longer exposure times (5 and 10 s), as verified by detailed scanning electron microscopy analysis. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements were used to monitor the deposition process and its particular features due to the tube diameter gradient. Finally, theoretical calculations were performed to calculate the minimum precursor exposure time to attain uniform coating. Theoretical values on the diffusion regime matched with the experimental results and helped to obtain valuable information for further optimization of ALD coating processes. The presented approach provides a straightforward solution toward the development of many novel devices, based on a high surface area interface between TiO2 nanotubes and a secondary material (such as Al2O3). PMID:27643411

  1. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MgO thin films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelista, S.; Mantovan, R.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.; Spiga, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition in the wide deposition temperature window of 80-350 °C by using bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium and H2O precursors. MgO thin films are deposited on both HF-last Si(1 0 0) and SiO2/Si substrates at a constant growth rate of ˜0.12 nm cycle-1. The structural, morphological and chemical properties of the synthesized MgO thin films are investigated by x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy measurements. MgO layers are characterized by sharp interface with the substrate and limited surface roughness, besides good chemical uniformity and polycrystalline structure for thickness above 7 nm. C-V measurements performed on Al/MgO/Si MOS capacitors, with MgO in the 4.6-11 nm thickness range, allow determining a dielectric constant (κ) ˜ 11. Co layers are grown by chemical vapour deposition in direct contact with MgO without vacuum-break (base pressure 10-5-10-6 Pa). The as-grown Co/MgO stacks show sharp interfaces and no elements interdiffusion among layers. C-V and I-V measurements have been conducted on Co/MgO/Si MOS capacitors. The dielectric properties of MgO are not influenced by the further process of Co deposition.

  2. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of

  3. Phosphorus atomic layer doping in SiGe using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Heinemann, Bernd; Murota, Junichi; Tillack, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe is investigated at temperatures between 100 °C to 600 °C using a single wafer reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system. SiGe(100) surface is exposed to PH 3 at different PH 3 partial pressures by interrupting SiGe growth. The impact of the SiGe buffer/cap growth condition (total pressure/SiGe deposition precursors) on P adsorption, incorporation, and segregation are investigated. In the case of SiH 4 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, steeper P spikes due to lower segregation are observed by SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric (ATM) pressure compared with reduced pressure (RP). The steepness of P spike of ∼ 5.7 nm/dec is obtained for ATM pressure without reducing deposition temperature. This result may be due to the shift of equilibrium of P adsorption/desorption to desorption direction by higher H 2 pressure. Using Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system for SiGe cap deposition in RP, lowering the SiGe growth temperature is possible, resulting in higher P incorporation and steeper P profile due to reduced desorption and segregation. In the case of Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, the P dose could be simulated assuming a Langmuir-type kinetics model. Incorporated P shows high electrical activity, indicating P is adsorbed mostly in lattice position. - Highlights: • Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe (100) is investigated using CVD. • P adsorption is suppressed by the hydrogen termination of Ge surface. • By SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric pressure, P segregation was suppressed. • By using Si 2 H 6 -based SiGe cap, P segregation was also suppressed. • The P adsorption process is self-limited and follows Langmuir-type kinetics model

  4. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition of conformal nanostructured silver films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Chalker, Sophia; Sutcliffe, Christopher J.; Potter, Richard J., E-mail: rjpott@liverpool.ac.uk

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We grow metallic silver by direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition. • Highly conformal silver nanoparticle coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces. • An ALD temperature growth window between 123 and 128 °C is established. • ALD cycles provides sub nanometre control of silver growth. • Catalytic dehydrogenation ALD mechanism has been elucidated by in-situ QCM. - Abstract: The controlled deposition of ultra-thin conformal silver nanoparticle films is of interest for applications including anti-microbial surfaces, plasmonics, catalysts and sensors. While numerous techniques can produce silver nanoparticles, few are able to produce highly conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces, together with sub-nanometre control and scalability. Here we develop a self-limiting atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for the deposition of conformal metallic silver nanoparticle films. The films have been deposited using direct liquid injection ALD with ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) and propan-1-ol. An ALD temperature window between 123 and 128 °C is identified and within this range self-limiting growth is confirmed with a mass deposition rate of ∼17.5 ng/cm{sup 2}/cycle. The effects of temperature, precursor dose, co-reactant dose and cycle number on the deposition rate and on the properties of the films have been systematically investigated. Under self-limiting conditions, films are metallic silver with a nano-textured surface topography and nanoparticle size is dependent on the number of ALD cycles. The ALD reaction mechanisms have been elucidated using in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, showing chemisorption of the silver precursor, followed by heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of the alcohol to form metallic silver and an aldehyde.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition for the Modification and Creation of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Erinn Christine

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor-phase technique for the conformal deposition of material with sub-nanometer precision, making it an ideal process for modifying and even creating nanomaterials. The focus of this dissertation is the study of how ALD precursors interact with organic materials, namely polymers, to create selectively deposited nano-scale patterns and how ALD coatings modify biological responses to nanomaterials, namely carbon nanotubes (CNT), after inhalation. Nanoscale patterning is vital to the semiconductor industry. With features becoming smaller and more complex with each passing year, new techniques are required to meet the needs of the industry. The ability to selectively pattern a material onto a wafer is of particular interest for the replacement of costly etching steps. In the first half of this dissertation, a method for the selective deposition of nano-scale patterns is presented. Patterned polymers were used as sacrificial sponges to soak up ALD precursors for the creation of metal-oxide features. Meanwhile, deposition in areas without polymer was limited to the monolayer regime. Following infiltration, the saturated polymer was burned away and the precursor oxidized to form a metal oxide reproduction of the polymer pattern. Determining the reaction between the ALD precursor, trimethylaluminum, and polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), helped to achieve patterning by informing the proper selection of reactor temperature as well as exposure and purge times. Using this technique, features from tens of nanometers to tens of microns were patterned uniformly and simultaneously across a 150 mm wafer. Finally, this technique was extended to pattern two different materials using only one patterned polymer layer. ALD was first used to deposit a metal oxide were there was no polymer. By selecting ALD precursors that do not react within or on top of the polymer, selective deposition of the first material was achieved. Following this, the

  6. Direct Observation of the Layer-by-Layer Growth of ZnO Nanopillar by In situ High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Cheng, Shaobo; Deng, Shiqing; Wei, Xianlong; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Catalyst-free methods are important for the fabrication of pure nanowires (NWs). However, the growth mechanism remains elusive due to the lack of crucial information on the growth dynamics at atomic level. Here, the noncatalytic growth process of ZnO NWs is studied through in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy. We observe the layer-by-layer growth of ZnO nanopillars along the polar [0001] direction under electron beam irradiation, while no growth is observed along the radial directions, indicating an anisotropic growth mechanism. The source atoms are mainly from the electron beam induced damage of the sample and the growth is assisted by subsequent absorption and then diffusion of atoms along the side surface to the top (0002) surface. The different binding energy on different ZnO surface is the main origin for the anisotropic growth. Additionally, the coalescence of ZnO nanocrystals related to the nucleation stage is uncovered to realize through the rotational motions and recrystallization. Our in situ results provide atomic-level detailed information about the dynamic growth and coalescence processes in the noncatalytic synthesis of ZnO NW and are helpful for understanding the vapor-solid mechanism of catalyst-free NW growth. PMID:28098261

  7. Dynamic grazing incidence fast atom diffraction during molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, P.; Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Khemliche, H.; Debiossac, M.; Mulier, M.; Lalmi, B.; Roncin, P.; Momeni, A.

    2014-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction (GIFAD) system has been mounted on a commercial molecular beam epitaxy chamber and used to monitor GaAs growth in real-time. In contrast to the conventionally used Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction, all the GIFAD diffraction orders oscillate in phase, with the change in intensity related to diffuse scattering at step edges. We show that the scattered intensity integrated over the Laue circle is a robust method to monitor the periodic change in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth, with oscillation phase and amplitude independent of incidence angle and crystal orientation. When there is a change in surface reconstruction at the start of growth, GIFAD intensity oscillations show that there is a corresponding delay in the onset of layer-by-layer growth. In addition, changes in the relative intensity of different diffraction orders have been observed during growth showing that GIFAD has the potential to provide insight into the preferential adatom attachment sites on the surface reconstruction during growth.

  8. Imposed layer by layer growth by pulsed laser interval deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Rogalla, Horst

    1999-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has become an important technique to fabricate novel materials. Although there is the general impression that, due to the pulsed deposition, the growth mechanism differs partially from continuous physical and chemical deposition techniques, it has hardly been used. Here, we

  9. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  10. Lanthanum-oxide thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Joo; Ko, Myoung-Gyun; Kim, Beom-Yong; Park, Sang-Kyun; Kim, Heon-Do; Park, Jong-Wan [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Lanthanum oxide is suited as a gate oxide that can replace SiO{sub 2} due to its high dielectric constant with a band gap of 4.3 eV [1] and its thermal stability with silicon. In this work, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films was performed on Si substrates by using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition with La(EtCp){sub 3} as the lanthanum precursor and O{sub 3} as the reactant gas. The fully saturated growth rate of lanthanum oxide films was 0.2 A/cycle at a plasma power of 500 W. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering measurements detected no carbon impurity content.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of molybdenum oxide using bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido) molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, Adam; Sundaram, Ganesh; Saly, Mark; Moser, Daniel; Kanjolia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum trioxide films have been deposited using thermal atomic layer deposition techniques with bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum. Films were deposited at temperatures from 100 to 300 °C using ozone as the oxidant for the process. The Mo precursor was evaluated for thermal stability and volatility using thermogravimetric analysis and static vapor pressure measurements. Film properties were evaluated with ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and secondary electron microscopy. The growth rate per cycle was determined to extend from 0.3 to 2.4 Å/cycle with <4% nonuniformity (1-sigma) with-in-wafer across a 150 mm wafer for the investigated temperature range

  12. Low temperature platinum atomic layer deposition on nylon-6 for highly conductive and catalytic fiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, J. Zachary; Shafiefarhood, Arya; Li, Fanxing; Khan, Saad A.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Engineering Building I, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature platinum atomic layer deposition (Pt-ALD) via (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethyl platinum and ozone (O{sub 3}) is used to produce highly conductive nonwoven nylon-6 (polyamide-6, PA-6) fiber mats, having effective conductivities as high as ∼5500–6000 S/cm with only a 6% fractional increase in mass. The authors show that an alumina ALD nucleation layer deposited at high temperature is required to promote Pt film nucleation and growth on the polymeric substrate. Fractional mass gain scales linearly with Pt-ALD cycle number while effective conductivity exhibits a nonlinear trend with cycle number, corresponding to film coalescence. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy reveals island growth mode of the Pt film at low cycle number with a coalesced film observed after 200 cycles. The metallic coating also exhibits exceptional resistance to mechanical flexing, maintaining up to 93% of unstressed conductivity after bending around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Catalytic activity of the as-deposited Pt film is demonstrated via carbon monoxide oxidation to carbon dioxide. This novel low temperature processing allows for the inclusion of highly conductive catalytic material on a number of temperature-sensitive substrates with minimal mass gain for use in such areas as smart textiles and flexible electronics.

  13. Atomic Scale Imaging of Nucleation and Growth Trajectories of an Interfacial Bismuth Nanodroplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxuan; Bunes, Benjamin R; Zang, Ling; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-02-23

    Because of the lack of experimental evidence, much confusion still exists on the nucleation and growth dynamics of a nanostructure, particularly of metal. The situation is even worse for nanodroplets because it is more difficult to induce the formation of a nanodroplet while imaging the dynamic process with atomic resolution. Here, taking advantage of an electron beam to induce the growth of Bi nanodroplets on a SrBi2Ta2O9 platelet under a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), we directly observed the detailed growth pathways of Bi nanodroplets from the earliest stage of nucleation that were previously inaccessible. Atomic scale imaging reveals that the dynamics of nucleation involves a much more complex trajectory than previously predicted based on classical nucleation theory (CNT). The monatomic Bi layer was first formed in the nucleation process, which induced the formation of the prenucleated clusters. Following that, critical nuclei for the nanodroplets formed both directly from the addition of atoms to the prenucleated clusters by the classical growth process and indirectly through transformation of an intermediate liquid film based on the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, in which the liquid film was induced by the self-assembly of the prenucleated clusters. Finally, the growth of the Bi nanodroplets advanced through the classical pathway and sudden droplet coalescence. This study allows us to visualize the critical steps in the nucleation process of an interfacial nanodroplet, which suggests a revision of the perspective of CNT.

  14. Dopant Distribution in Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO:Al Films Visualized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yizhi; Giddings, A Devin; Verheijen, Marcel A; Macco, Bart; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J; Roozeboom, Fred; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2018-02-27

    The maximum conductivity achievable in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is limited by the low doping efficiency of Al. To better understand the limiting factors for the doping efficiency, the three-dimensional distribution of Al atoms in the ZnO host material matrix has been examined on the atomic scale using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Although the Al distribution in ZnO films prepared by so-called "ALD supercycles" is often presented as atomically flat δ-doped layers, in reality a broadening of the Al-dopant layers is observed with a full-width-half-maximum of ∼2 nm. In addition, an enrichment of the Al at grain boundaries is observed. The low doping efficiency for local Al densities > ∼1 nm -3 can be ascribed to the Al solubility limit in ZnO and to the suppression of the ionization of Al dopants from adjacent Al donors.

  15. Dopant Distribution in Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO:Al Films Visualized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The maximum conductivity achievable in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is limited by the low doping efficiency of Al. To better understand the limiting factors for the doping efficiency, the three-dimensional distribution of Al atoms in the ZnO host material matrix has been examined on the atomic scale using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Although the Al distribution in ZnO films prepared by so-called “ALD supercycles” is often presented as atomically flat δ-doped layers, in reality a broadening of the Al-dopant layers is observed with a full-width–half-maximum of ∼2 nm. In addition, an enrichment of the Al at grain boundaries is observed. The low doping efficiency for local Al densities > ∼1 nm–3 can be ascribed to the Al solubility limit in ZnO and to the suppression of the ionization of Al dopants from adjacent Al donors.

  16. Controlled Synthesis of Pd/Pt Core Shell Nanoparticles Using Area-selective Atomic Layer Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Kun; Zhu, Qianqian; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    We report an atomic scale controllable synthesis of Pd/Pt core shell nanoparticles (NPs) via area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a modified surface. The method involves utilizing octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify the surface. Take the usage of pinholes on SAMs as active sites for the initial core nucleation, and subsequent selective deposition of the second metal as the shell layer. Since new nucleation sites can be effectively blocked by s...

  17. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1998-07-21

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bias layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200 C, the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 {angstrom}/sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous. 4 figs.

  18. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Haeberle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on results on the preparation of thin (2O3 films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate over 4” wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  19. Effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi; Vaehae-Nissi, Mika; Harlin, Ali; Marles, Jaana; Miikkulainen, Ville; Karppinen, Maarit

    2010-01-01

    The effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboards was studied. Both polyethylene and polylactide coated paperboards were corona treated prior to ALD. Corona treatment increased surface energies of the paperboard substrates, and this effect was still observed after several days. Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 films were grown on top of the polymer coatings at temperature of 100 deg. C using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. For SiO 2 depositions a new precursor, bis(diethylamido) silane, was used. The positive effect of the corona pre-treatment on the barrier properties of the polymer-coated paperboards with the ALD-grown layers was more significant with polyethylene coated paperboard and with thin deposited layers (shorter ALD process). SiO 2 performed similarly to Al 2 O 3 with the PE coated board when it comes to the oxygen barrier, while the performance of SiO 2 with the biopolymer-coated board was more moderate. The effect of corona pre-treatment was negligible or even negative with the biopolymer-coated board. The ALD film growth and the effect of corona treatment on different substrates require further investigation.

  20. Simulating the growth process of aromatic polyamide layer by monomer concentration controlling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yan; Liang, Songmiao; Wu, Zongce; Cai, Zhiqi; Zhao, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A concentration controlling method to simulate the growth process of polyamide layer was developed. • The surface structure features and properties of polyamide layer at its different growth stages were systematically investigated. • Structure transition from spherical aggregator to leaf-like to typical ridge-and-valley was observed. • The performance of RO membrane is closely related to the structure of polyamide. - Abstract: With the wide distribution and gradual increase of TMC concentration (C TMC ) from 1 × 10 −4 wt% to 2.5 × 10 −1 wt%, the main purpose of this work is to simulate the surface structure and properties of polyamide layer of reverse osmosis membranes at its different growth stage. The surface structure and properties of the resulted membranes were then characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, drop shape analysis system and electrokinetic analyzer. The structure growth of polyamide layer underwent in turn three different stages including spherical aggregator, leaf-like and typical ridge-valley structure. Spherical aggregator is the intrinsic structure in the inner layer of polyamide while leaf-like structure is transitional on the outmost polyamide layer. Furthermore, to clarify the effect of the structure change on the properties of polyamide layer, contact angle and zeta potential in the surface of polyamide layer were studied. Hydrophilic surface of polyamide layer is accessible at higher TMC concentration because of the presence of negative charged groups. Performances of the membranes were further measured with an emphasis on studying its structure–performance relationship during the growth process of polyamide layer

  1. Influence of substrate temperature and Zn-precursors on atomic layer deposition of polycrystalline ZnO films on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hisao; Miyake, Aki; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    Influence of substrate temperature and Zn-precursors on growth rate, crystal structure, and electrical property of undoped ZnO thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been studied. Differences between dimethylzinc (DMeZn) and diethylzinc (DEtZn) used as Zn-precursors were examined. The ZnO films grown using DMeZn showed higher electrical resistivity compared to that grown using DEtZn. However, the higher resistivity in the case of DMeZn was owing to much amount of residual impurities incorporated during the ALD growth

  2. Si submonolayer and monolayer digital growth operation techniques using Si 2H 6 as atomically controlled growth nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Naoyuki; Miki, Kazushi

    2003-06-01

    We have previously proposed a Si sub-atomic layer epitaxy (SALE) method with which Si digital epitaxy from non-cracked Si 2H 6 is realized at a growth rate of ˜0.63 ML/cycle by repeating submonolayer Si saturation adsorption and adatom migration induced by surface thermal excitation. By the use of thermally-cracked Si 2H 6 in gas phase, the Si saturation coverage on Si(0 0 1) approaches ˜1 ML and Si atomic layer epitaxy on Ge(0 0 1) has also been achieved (thermally-cracked hydride molecule (TCH)-atomic layer epitaxy (ALE)) in the initial ALE cycles. The adsorption mechanisms are analyzed by scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and hydrogen temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) techniques together with the Si coverage measurement and :SiH 2 production rate analysis. The results are systematically understood and :SiH 2 produced through gas-phase Si 2H 6 thermal cracking nearly self-limitedly adsorbs on Si(0 0 1) by ˜1 ML. From the STM image analysis, the :SiH 2 is interpreted to orderly adsorb on each of the two dangling bonds of the dimer.

  3. High performance few-layer MoS2 transistor arrays with wafer level homogeneity integrated by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianbao; Wang, Yang; Xu, Jing; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Hao; Sun, Qingqing; Ding, Shijin; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-01

    Wafer-level integration of 2D transition metal disulfide is the key factor for future large-scale integration of the continuously scaling-down devices, and has attracted great attention in recent years. Compared with other ultra-thin film growth methods, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has the advantages of excellent step coverage, uniformity and thickness controllability. In this work, we synthesized large-scale and thickness-controllable MoS2 films on sapphire substrate by ALD at 150 °C with molybdenum hexcarbonyl and hexamethyldisilathiane (HMDST) as precursors followed by high-temperature annealing in sulfur atmosphere. HMDST is introduced for the first time to enable a toxic-free process without hazardous sulfur precursors such as H2S and CH3SSCH3. The synthesized MoS2 retains the inherent benefits from the ALD process, including thickness controllability, reproducibility, wafer-level thickness uniformity, and high conformity. Finally, field-effect transistor (FET) arrays were fabricated based on the large-area ALD MoS2 films. The top-gate FETs exhibited excellent electrical performance such as high on/off current ratio over 103 and peak room-temperature mobility up to 11.56 cm2 V‑1 s‑1. This work opens up an attractive approach to realize the application of high-quality 2D materials with wafer scale homogeneity.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of copper thin film and feasibility of deposition on inner walls of waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuqing, XIONG; Hengjiao, GAO; Ni, REN; Zhongwei, LIU

    2018-03-01

    Copper thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition at low temperature, using copper(I)-N,N‧-di-sec-butylacetamidinate as a precursor and hydrogen as a reductive gas. The influence of temperature, plasma power, mode of plasma, and pulse time, on the deposition rate of copper thin film, the purity of the film and the step coverage were studied. The feasibility of copper film deposition on the inner wall of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic waveguide with high aspect ratio was also studied. The morphology and composition of the thin film were studied by atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The square resistance of the thin film was also tested by a four-probe technique. On the basis of on-line diagnosis, a growth mechanism of copper thin film was put forward, and it was considered that surface functional group played an important role in the process of nucleation and in determining the properties of thin films. A high density of plasma and high free-radical content were helpful for the deposition of copper thin films.

  5. Oxidant-Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Undoped ZnO Films by Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyunho

    2017-02-27

    Extraordinary oxidant-dependent changes in the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been observed. Specifically, deionized water and ozone oxidants are used in the growth of ZnO by ALD using diethylzinc as a zinc precursor. No substitutional atoms have been added to the ZnO films. By using ozone as an oxidant instead of water, a thermoelectric power factor (σS) of 5.76 × 10 W m K is obtained at 705 K for undoped ZnO films. In contrast, the maximum power factor for the water-based ZnO film is only 2.89 × 10 W m K at 746 K. Materials analysis results indicate that the oxygen vacancy levels in the water- and ozone-grown ZnO films are essentially the same, but the difference comes from Zn-related defects present in the ZnO films. The data suggest that the strong oxidant effect on thermoelectric performance can be explained by a mechanism involving point defect-induced differences in carrier concentration between these two oxides and a self-compensation effect in water-based ZnO due to the competitive formations of both oxygen and zinc vacancies. This strong oxidant effect on the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO films provides a pathway to improve the thermoelectric performance of this important material.

  6. Fabrication of AlN/BN bishell hollow nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, Ali; Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer; Biyikli, Necmi; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)/boron nitride (BN) bishell hollow nanofibers (HNFs) have been fabricated by successive atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlN and sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of BN on electrospun polymeric nanofibrous template. A four-step fabrication process was utilized: (i) fabrication of polymeric (nylon 6,6) nanofibers via electrospinning, (ii) hollow cathode plasma-assisted ALD of AlN at 100 °C onto electrospun polymeric nanofibers, (iii) calcination at 500 °C for 2 h in order to remove the polymeric template, and (iv) sequential CVD growth of BN at 450 °C. AlN/BN HNFs have been characterized for their chemical composition, surface morphology, crystal structure, and internal nanostructure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Measurements confirmed the presence of crystalline hexagonal BN and AlN within the three dimensional (3D) network of bishell HNFs with relatively low impurity content. In contrast to the smooth surface of the inner AlN layer, outer BN coating showed a highly rough 3D morphology in the form of BN nano-needle crystallites. It is shown that the combination of electrospinning and plasma-assisted low-temperature ALD/CVD can produce highly controlled multi-layered bishell nitride ceramic hollow nanostructures. While electrospinning enables easy fabrication of nanofibrous template, self-limiting reactions of plasma-assisted ALD and sequential CVD provide control over the wall thicknesses of AlN and BN layers with sub-nanometer accuracy

  7. Layer-by-Layer Molecular Assemblies for Dye-Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cells Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Degao [Department; Sheridan, Matthew V. [Department; Shan, Bing [Department; Farnum, Byron H. [Department; Marquard, Seth L. [Department; Sherman, Benjamin D. [Department; Eberhart, Michael S. [Department; Nayak, Animesh [Department; Dares, Christopher J. [Department; Das, Atanu K. [Center; Bullock, R. Morris [Center; Meyer, Thomas J. [Department

    2017-08-30

    In a Dye Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cell (DSPEC) the relative orientation of catalyst and chromophore play important roles. Here we introduce a new, robust, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) procedure for the preparation of assemblies on wide bandgap semiconductors. In the procedure, phosphonated metal complex precursors react with metal ion bridging to an external chromophore or catalyst to give assemblies bridged by Al(III), Sn(IV), Ti(IV), or Zr(IV) metal oxide units as bridges. The procedure has been extended to chromophore-catalyst assemblies for water oxidation catalysis. A SnO2 bridged assembly on SnO2/TiO2 core/shell electrodes undergoes water splitting with an incident photon conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 17.1% at 440 nm. Reduction of water at a Ni(II)-based catalyst on NiO films has been shown to give H2. Compared to conventional solution-based procedures, the ALD approach offers significant advantages in scope and flexibility for the preparation of stable surface structures.

  8. Effect of dual buffer layer structure on the epitaxial growth of AlN on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, D.G., E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, D.S.; Wu, L.L.; Le, L.C.; Li, L.; Chen, P.; Liu, Z.S. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, J.J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, S.M. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China); Yang, H. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A dual AlN buffer layer structure is proposed to grow AlN films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AlN films could be improved obviously by using the dual AlN buffer layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physical mechanism are discussed. - Abstract: A dual AlN buffer layer structure, including an isolated layer and a nucleation layer, is proposed to improve the growth of AlN films on sapphire substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. This method is aimed to weaken the negative nitridation effect and improve lateral growth condition in the initial growth stage. It is found that suitably increasing the thickness of the nucleation layer is in favor of a better structural quality of the AlN film. An examination of surface morphology by atomic force microscopy suggests that the thicker the dual AlN buffer layer, the rougher the surface, and a higher quality of AlN epilayer is resulted.

  9. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, S. David; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that tuning the donor density of protective TiO2 layers on a photocathode has dramatic consequences for electronic conduction through TiO2 with implications for the stabilization of oxidation-sensitive catalysts on the surface. Vacuum annealing at 400 °C for 1 hour o...

  10. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  11. Surface passivation of GaAs nanowires by the atomic layer deposition of AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtrom, I. V., E-mail: igorstrohm@mail.ru; Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Soshnikov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Reznik, R. R.; Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Dhaka, V.; Perros, A.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the atomic layer deposition of thin AlN layers can be used to passivate the surface states of GaAs nanowires synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy. Studies of the optical properties of samples by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements shows that the photoluminescence-signal intensity can be increased by a factor of up to five by passivating the nanowires with a 25-Å-thick AlN layer.

  12. Magnetic dichroism in photoemission: a new element-specific magnetometer with atomic-layer resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starke, K.; Arenholz, E.; Kaindl, G.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic coupling in layered metallic structures has become a key issue in thin-film magnetism since the observation of oscillatory exchange coupling across non-ferromagnetic spacer layers. Although this phenomenon was discovered in rare earths (RE) superlattices, mostly transition-metal systems have been studied and are now applied in data-storage industry. An understanding of the coupling mechanisms has been reached after a fabrication of high-quality interfaces became possible. It allowed, in particular, the experimental finding of induced ferromagnetic order in 'nonmagnetic' atomic layers near an interface, using element-specific probes such as magnetic circular dichroism in x-ray absorption. - In layered RE systems, by contrast, the well known intermiscibility has prevented a preparation of atomically sharp interfaces, and all RE superlattices studied so far showed interdiffusion zones of several atomic layers. In the present overview, we report the first fabrication of atomically flat heteromagnetic RE interfaces, their structural characterization and their magnetic analysis using magnetic dichroism in photoemission (MDPE). This new tool gives access to the magnetization of individual atomic layers near interfaces in favourite cases. Merits of MDPE as a magnetometer are demonstrated at the example of Eu/Gd(0001), where chemical shifts of core-level photoemission lines allow to spectroscopically separate up to four different atomic layers. The high surface sensitivity of MDPE, together with the well known dependence of the core-level binding energies on the coordination number of the photo emitting atom, opens the door to future site-specific studies of magnetism in sub-monolayer systems such as 'nanowires'

  13. Uniform Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 on Graphene by Reversible Hydrogen Plasma Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A novel method to form ultrathin, uniform Al2O3 layers on graphene using reversible hydrogen plasma functionalization followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. ALD on pristine graphene is known to be a challenge due to the absence of dangling bonds, leading to nonuniform film coverage. We show that hydrogen plasma functionalization of graphene leads to uniform ALD of closed Al2O3 films down to 8 nm in thickness. Hall measurements and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the hydrogen plasma functionalization is reversible upon Al2O3 ALD and subsequent annealing at 400 °C and in this way does not deteriorate the graphene’s charge carrier mobility. This is in contrast with oxygen plasma functionalization, which can lead to a uniform 5 nm thick closed film, but which is not reversible and leads to a reduction of the charge carrier mobility. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations attribute the uniform growth on both H2 and O2 plasma functionalized graphene to the enhanced adsorption of trimethylaluminum (TMA) on these surfaces. A DFT analysis of the possible reaction pathways for TMA precursor adsorption on hydrogenated graphene predicts a binding mechanism that cleans off the hydrogen functionalities from the surface, which explains the observed reversibility of the hydrogen plasma functionalization upon Al2O3 ALD. PMID:28405059

  14. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas-solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al2O3 films on spherical SiO2 NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  15. Atomic layer deposited cobalt oxide: An efficient catalyst for NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Dip K.; Manna, Joydev; Dhara, Arpan; Sharma, Pratibha; Sarkar, Shaibal K., E-mail: shaibal.sarkar@iitb.ac.in [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Thin films of cobalt oxide are deposited by atomic layer deposition using dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}] and ozone (O{sub 3}) at 50 °C on microscope glass substrates and polished Si(111) wafers. Self-saturated growth mechanism is verified by x-ray reflectivity measurements. As-deposited films consist of both the crystalline phases; CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} that gets converted to pure cubic-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase upon annealing at 500 °C under ambient condition. Elemental composition and uniformity of the films is examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion-mass spectroscopy. Both as-deposited and the annealed films have been successfully tested as a catalyst for hydrogen evolution from sodium borohydride hydrolysis. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction in the presence of the as-grown catalyst is found to be ca. 38 kJ mol{sup −1}. Further implementation of multiwalled carbon nanotube, as a scaffold layer, improves the hydrogen generation rate by providing higher surface area of the deposited catalyst.

  16. Highly conductive and flexible nylon-6 nonwoven fiber mats formed using tungsten atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanyan, Berç; Oldham, Christopher J; Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-12

    Low-temperature vapor-phase tungsten atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF6 and dilute silane (SiH4, 2% in Ar) can yield highly conductive coatings on nylon-6 microfiber mats, producing flexible and supple nonwovens with conductivity of ∼1000 S/cm. We find that an alumina nucleation layer, reactant exposure, and deposition temperature all influence the rate of W mass uptake on 3D fibers, and film growth rate is calibrated using high surface area anodic aluminum oxide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals highly conformal tungsten coatings on nylon fibers with complex "winged" cross-section. Using reactant gas "hold" sequences during the ALD process, we conclude that reactant species can transport readily to reactive sites throughout the fiber mat, consistent with conformal uniform coverage observed by TEM. The conductivity of 1000 S/cm for the W-coated nylon is much larger than found in other conductive nonwovens. We also find that the nylon mats maintain 90% of their conductivity after being flexed around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Metal ALD coatings on nonwovens make possible the solvent-free functionalization of textiles for electronic applications.

  17. Growth of high purity semiconductor epitaxial layers by liquid phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    operation of these devices strongly depend on the quality of the epitaxial layers. The growth system must be able to grow materials with very low unintentional impurity den- sity, high mobility and good luminescence properties. We have used LPE technique to perfect the growth of a num- ber of group III–V epitaxial materials ...

  18. Alkali-resistant low-temperature atomic-layer-deposited oxides for optical fiber sensor overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiel, K.; Dominik, M.; Ściślewska, I.; Kalisz, M.; Guziewicz, M.; Gołaszewska, K.; Niedziółka-Jonsson, J.; Bock, W. J.; Śmietana, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an investigation of properties of selected metallic oxides deposited at a low temperature (100 °C) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, relating to their applicability as thin overlays for optical fiber sensors resistant in alkaline environments. Hafnium oxide (Hf x O y with y/x approx. 2.70), tantalum oxide (Ta x O y with y/x approx. 2.75) and zirconium oxide (Zr x O y with y/x approx. 2.07), which deposition was based, respectively, on tetrakis(ethylmethyl)hafnium, tantalum pentachloride and tetrakis(ethylmethyl)zirconium with deionized water, were tested as thin layers on planar Si (100) and glass substrates. Growth per cycle (GPC) in the ALD processes was 0.133-0.150 nm/cycle. Run-to-run GPC reproducibility of the ALD processes was best for Hf x O y (0.145 ± 0.001 nm/cycle) and the poorest for Ta x O y (0.133 ± 0.003 nm/cycle). Refractive indices n of the layers were 2.00-2.10 (at the wavelength λ = 632 nm), with negligible k value (at λ for 240-930 nm). The oxides examined by x-ray diffractometry proved to be amorphous, with only small addition of crystalline phases for the Zr x O y . The surfaces of the oxides had grainy but smooth topographies with root-mean square roughness ˜0.5 nm (at 10 × 10 μm2 area) according to atomic force microscopy. Ellipsometric measurements, by contrast, suggest rougher surfaces for the Zr x O y layers. The surfaces were also slightly rougher on the glass-based samples than on the Si-based ones. Nanohardness and Young modules were 4.90-8.64 GPa and 83.7-104.4 GPa, respectively. The tests of scratch resistance revealed better tribological properties for the Hf x O y and the Ta x O y than for the Zr x O y . The surfaces were hydrophilic, with wetting angles of 52.5°-62.9°. The planar oxides on Si, being resistive even to concentrated alkali (pH 14), proved to be significantly more alkali-resistive than Al2O3. The Ta x O y overlay was deposited on long-period grating sensor induced in optical

  19. Surface passivation investigation on ultra-thin atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide layers for their potential application to form tunnel layer passivated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Nandakumar, Naomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Ke, Cangming; Liao, Baochen; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    The surface passivation performance of atomic layer deposited ultra-thin aluminium oxide layers with different thickness in the tunnel layer regime, i.e., ranging from one atomic cycle (∼0.13 nm) to 11 atomic cycles (∼1.5 nm) on n-type silicon wafers is studied. The effect of thickness and thermal activation on passivation performance is investigated with corona-voltage metrology to measure the interface defect density D it(E) and the total interface charge Q tot. Furthermore, the bonding configuration variation of the AlO x films under various post-deposition thermal activation conditions is analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Additionally, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) is used as capping layer on ultra-thin AlO x tunneling layers to further reduce the surface recombination current density to values as low as 42 fA/cm2. This work is a useful reference for using ultra-thin ALD AlO x layers as tunnel layers in order to form hole selective passivated contacts for silicon solar cells.

  20. Sub-nanometer dimensions control of core/shell nanoparticles prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M J; Verheijen, M A; Bol, A A; Kessels, W M M

    2015-03-06

    Bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) are the subject of intense research due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Accurate and independent control over the dimensions of both core and shell would allow for unprecedented catalytic performance. Here, we demonstrate that both core and shell dimensions of Pd/Pt core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Al2O3 substrates can be controlled at the sub-nanometer level by using a novel strategy based on atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results it is derived that the main conditions for accurate dimension control of these core/shell NPs are: (i) a difference in surface energy between the deposited core metal and the substrate to obtain island growth; (ii) a process yielding linear growth of the NP cores with ALD cycles to obtain monodispersed NPs with a narrow size distribution; (iii) a selective ALD process for the shell metal yielding a linearly increasing thickness to obtain controllable shell growth exclusively on the cores. For Pd/Pt core/shell NPs it is found that a minimum core diameter of 1 nm exists above which the NP cores are able to catalytically dissociate the precursor molecules for shell growth. In addition, initial studies on the stability of these core/shell NPs have been carried out, and it has been demonstrated that core/shell NPs can be deposited by ALD on high aspect ratio substrates such as nanowire arrays. These achievements show therefore that ALD has significant potential for the preparation of tuneable heterogeneous catalyst systems.

  1. Selective Passivation of GeO2/Ge Interface Defects in Atomic Layer Deposited High-k MOS Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangliang; Li, Huanglong; Guo, Yuzheng; Tang, Kechao; Woicik, Joseph; Robertson, John; McIntyre, Paul C

    2015-09-23

    Effective passivation of interface defects in high-k metal oxide/Ge gate stacks is a longstanding goal of research on germanium metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. In this paper, we use photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the formation of a GeO2 interface layer between an atomic layer deposited Al2O3 gate dielectric and a Ge(100) substrate during forming gas anneal (FGA). Capacitance- and conductance-voltage data were used to extract the interface trap density energy distribution. These results show selective passivation of interface traps with energies in the top half of the Ge band gap under annealing conditions that produce GeO2 interface layer growth. First-principles modeling of Ge/GeO2 and Ge/GeO/GeO2 structures and calculations of the resulting partial density of states (PDOS) are in good agreement with the experiment results.

  2. Effective coating of titania nanoparticles with alumina via atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizpour, H.; Talebi, M.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Sotudeh-Gharebagh, R.; Guo, J.; van Ommen, J. R.; Mostoufi, N.

    2017-12-01

    Alumina films were deposited on titania nanoparticles via atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor at 180 °C and 1 bar. Online mass spectrometry was used for real time monitoring of effluent gases from the reactor during each reaction cycle in order to determine the optimal dosing time of precursors. Different oxygen sources were used to see which oxygen source, in combination with trimethyl aluminium (TMA), provides the highest alumina growth per cycle (GPC). Experiments were carried out in 4, 7 and 10 cycles using the optimal dosing time of precursors. Several characterization methods, such as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), were conducted on the products. Formation of the alumina film was confirmed by EDX mapping and EDX line profiling, FTIR and TEM. When using either water or deuterium oxide as the oxygen source, the thickness of the alumina film was greater than that of ozone. The average GPC measured by TEM for the ALD of TMA with water, deuterium oxide and ozone was about 0.16 nm, 0.15 nm and 0.11 nm, respectively. The average GPC calculated using the mass fraction of aluminum from INAA was close to those measured from TEM images. Excess amounts of precursors lead to a higher average growth of alumina film per cycle due to insufficient purging time. XRD analysis demonstrated that amorphous alumina was coated on titania nanoparticles. This amorphous layer was easily distinguished from the crystalline core in the TEM images. Decrease in the photocatalytic activity of titania nanoparticles after alumina coating was confirmed by measuring degradation of Rhodamine B by ultraviolet irradiation.

  3. Preliminary studies in the electrodeposition of PbSe/PbTe superlattice thin films via electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ALD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Raman; Cox, Steven M; Happek, Uwe; Banga, Dhego; Mathe, Mkhulu K; Stickney, John L

    2006-12-05

    This paper concerns the electrochemical growth of compound semiconductor thin film superlattice structures using electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ALD). Electrochemical ALD is the electrochemical analogue of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and ALD, methods based on nanofilm formation an atomic layer at a time, using surface-limited reactions. Underpotential deposition (UPD) is a type of electrochemical surfaced-limited reaction used in the present studies for the formation of PbSe/PbTe superlattices via electrochemical ALD. PbSe/PbTe thin-film superlattices with modulation wavelengths (periods) of 4.2 and 7.0 nm are reported here. These films were characterized using electron probe microanalysis, X- ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and infrared reflection absorption measurements. The 4.2 nm period superlattice was grown after deposition of 10 PbSe cycles, as a prelayer, resulting in an overall composition of PbSe0.52Te0.48. The 7.0 nm period superlattice was grown after deposition of 100 PbTe cycle prelayer, resulting for an overall composition of PbSe0.44Te0.56. The primary Bragg diffraction peak position, 2theta, for the 4.2 superlattice was consistent with the average (111) angles for PbSe and PbTe. First-order satellite peaks, as well as a second, were observed, indicating a high-quality superlattice film. For the 7.0 nm superlattice, Bragg peaks for both the (200) and (111) planes of the PbSe/PbTe superlattice were observed, with satellite peaks shifted 1 degrees closer to the (111), consistent with the larger period of the superlattice. AFM suggested conformal superlattice growth on the Au on glass substrate. Band gaps for the 4.2 and 7.0 nm period superlattices were measured as 0.48 and 0.38 eV, respectively.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition Alumina-Passivated Silicon Nanowires: Probing the Transition from Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor to Electrolytic Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriau, Dorian; Boniface, Maxime; Valero, Anthony; Aldakov, Dmitry; Brousse, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Sadki, Said

    2017-04-19

    Silicon nanowires were coated by a 1-5 nm thin alumina layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to replace poorly reproducible and unstable native silicon oxide by a highly conformal passivating alumina layer. The surface coating enabled probing the behavior of symmetric devices using such electrodes in the EMI-TFSI electrolyte, allowing us to attain a large cell voltage up to 6 V in ionic liquid, together with very high cyclability with less than 4% capacitance fade after 10 6 charge/discharge cycles. These results yielded fruitful insights into the transition between an electrochemical double-layer capacitor behavior and an electrolytic capacitor behavior. Ultimately, thin ALD dielectric coatings can be used to obtain hybrid devices exhibiting large cell voltage and excellent cycle life of dielectric capacitors, while retaining energy and power densities close to the ones displayed by supercapacitors.

  5. Propagation of a videopulse through a thin layer of two-level dipolar atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyutin, Sergei O

    2007-01-01

    The excitation of a thin layer of two-level permanent dipole moment atoms by ultimately short (less than the field oscillation period) electromagnetic pulses (videopulse) is observed. The numerical analysis of the matter equations free of the rotating wave approximation and relaxation reveals a strong influence of the local field and the Stark effect on temporal behaviour of transmitted field. Specifically, it is demonstrated that a dense film irradiated by a videopulse emits a short response with a delay much longer even than the characteristic cooperative time of the atom ensemble. It is supposed that the local field in the thin layer of permanent dipole atoms is able to re-pump the atomic subsystem. A close analogy with nonlinear pendulum motion is discussed

  6. Growth morphology of {1 1 0} faces of manganese mercury thiocyanate crystals investigated by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Y.L.; Xu, D.; Wang, X.Q.; Du, W.; Liu, H.Y.; Zhang, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is employed to investigate the surface morphology of the {1 1 0} faces of MMTC crystals grown at 40 deg. C at a supersaturation of σ = 0.5. Growth hillocks generated by dislocation sources often appear in groups, which leads to faster growth of the local area and forming layers with large height difference up to 30 nm. Growth centers operate nearly equally during the growth process. Serried and sparse monolayer steps dominate alternately on the surface, which is thought to be distinct phenomenon of the two-metal-centered complex compounds family

  7. Optical properties of Al2O3 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wiedmann, Monika K; Winter, Charles H; Avrutsky, Ivan

    2009-10-01

    We employed the atomic layer deposition technique to grow Al(2)O(3) films with nominal thicknesses of 400, 300, and 200 nm on silicon and soda lime glass substrates. The optical properties of the films were investigated by measuring reflection spectra in the 400-1800 nm wavelength range, followed by numerical fitting assuming the Sellmeier formula for the refractive index of Al(2)O(3). The films grown on glass substrates possess higher refractive indices as compared to the films on silicon. Optical waveguiding is demonstrated, confirming the feasibility of high-index contrast planar waveguides fabricated by atomic layer deposition.

  8. Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0166 Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal OxideS ASHLIE MARTINI UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED Final Report 06/01/2015...TASK NUMBER 5f.  WORK UNIT NUMBER 7.  PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED 5200 N LAKE RD MERCED , CA 95343...Organization / Institution name University of California Merced Grant/Contract Title The full title of the funded effort. Atomic-scale Tuning of Layered Binary

  9. Micro-balance sensor integrated with atomic layer deposition chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Alex B. F.; Libera, Joseph A.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Riha, Shannon C.

    2018-01-02

    The invention is directed to QCM measurements in monitoring ALD processes. Previously, significant barriers remain in the ALD processes and accurate execution. To turn this exclusively dedicated in situ technique into a routine characterization method, an integral QCM fixture was developed. This new design is easily implemented on a variety of ALD tools, allows rapid sample exchange, prevents backside deposition, and minimizes both the footprint and flow disturbance. Unlike previous QCM designs, the fast thermal equilibration enables tasks such as temperature-dependent studies and ex situ sample exchange, further highlighting the feasibility of this QCM design for day-to-day use. Finally, the in situ mapping of thin film growth rates across the ALD reactor was demonstrated in a popular commercial tool operating in both continuous and quasi-static ALD modes.

  10. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    areas and high adsorptive capacities. We find that a nanoscale coating of Al2O3 formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the surface of nonwoven ...distribution is unlimited. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition The... Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition Report Title While metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show great

  11. Synthesis of indium oxi-sulfide films by atomic layer deposition: The essential role of plasma enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugot, Cathy; Schneider, Nathanaëlle; Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the atomic layer deposition of In2(S,O)3 films by using In(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate), H2S and either H2O or O2 plasma as oxygen sources. First, the growth of pure In2S3 films was studied in order to better understand the influence of the oxygen pulses. X-Ray diffraction measurements, optical analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed to characterize the samples. When H2O was used as the oxygen source, the films have structural and optical properties, and the atomic composition of pure In2S3. No pure In2O3 films could be grown by using H2O or O2 plasma. However, In2(S,O)3 films could be successfully grown by using O2 plasma as oxygen source at a deposition temperature of T = 160 °C, because of an exchange reaction between S and O atoms. By adjusting the number of In2O3 growth cycles in relation to the number of In2S3 growth cycles, the optical band gap of the resulting thin films could be tuned.

  12. Atomic-Layer-Deposition of Indium Oxide Nano-films for Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zheng, He-Mei; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Bao; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-01

    Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) of In2O3 nano-films has been investigated using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as precursors. The In2O3 films can be deposited preferentially at relatively low temperatures of 160-200 °C, exhibiting a stable growth rate of 1.4-1.5 Å/cycle. The surface roughness of the deposited film increases gradually with deposition temperature, which is attributed to the enhanced crystallization of the film at a higher deposition temperature. As the deposition temperature increases from 150 to 200 °C, the optical band gap (Eg) of the deposited film rises from 3.42 to 3.75 eV. In addition, with the increase of deposition temperature, the atomic ratio of In to O in the as-deposited film gradually shifts towards that in the stoichiometric In2O3, and the carbon content also reduces by degrees. For 200 °C deposition temperature, the deposited film exhibits an In:O ratio of 1:1.36 and no carbon incorporation. Further, high-performance In2O3 thin-film transistors with an Al2O3 gate dielectric were achieved by post-annealing in air at 300 °C for appropriate time, demonstrating a field-effect mobility of 7.8 cm2/Vṡs, a subthreshold swing of 0.32 V/dec, and an on/off current ratio of 107. This was ascribed to passivation of oxygen vacancies in the device channel.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposited Thin Films for Dielectrics, Semiconductor Passivation, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Runshen

    , ultra-thin layer of encapsulating ZnS is coated on the surface of GaSb and GaSb/InAs substrates. The 2 nm-thick ZnS film is found to provide a long-term protection against reoxidation for one order and a half longer times than prior reported passivation likely due to its amorphous structure without pinholes. Finally, a combination of binary ALD processes is developed and demonstrated for the growth of yttria-stabilized zirconia films using alkylamido-cyclopentadiengyls zirconium and tris(isopropyl-cyclopentadienyl)yttrium, as zirconium and yttrium precursors, respectively, with ozone being the oxidant. The desired cubic structure of YSZ films is apparently achieved after post-deposition annealing. Further, platinum is atomic layer deposited as electrode on YSZ (8 mol% of Yttria) within the same system. In order to control the morphology of as-deposited Pt thin structure, the nucleation behavior of Pt on amorphous and cubic YSZ is investigated. Three different morphologies of Pt are observed, including nanoparticle, porous and dense films, which are found to depend on the ALD cycle number and the structure and morphology of they underlying ALD YSZ films.

  14. Antireflective conducting nanostructures with an atomic layer deposited an AlZnO layer on a transparent substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Ji, Seungmuk; Herdini, Diptya Suci; Lim, Hyuneui; Park, Jin-Seong; Chung, Kwun-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We investigated the antireflective conducting nanostructures on a transparent substrate using atomic layer deposited AlZnO films. • The conformal AlZnO layer on a transparent nanostructured substrate exhibited 5.52 × 10 −4 Ω cm in resistivity and 88% in average visible transmittance. • The improvement of transparency was explained by the gradual changes of the refractive index in the film depth direction. • The decrease in electrical resistivity is strongly correlated to the increased surface area with the nanostructure and the change of chemical bonding states. - Abstract: The antireflective conducting nanostructures on a transparent substrate were shown to have enhanced optical and electrical properties via colloidal lithography and atomic layer deposition. The conformal AlZnO layer on a transparent nanostructured substrate exhibited 5.52 × 10 −4 Ω cm in resistivity and 88% in average visible transmittance, both of which were superior to those of a flat transparent conducting substrate. The improvement of transparency was explained by the gradual changes of the refractive index in the film depth direction. The decrease in electrical resistivity is strongly correlated to the increased surface area with the nanostructure and the change of chemical bonding states.

  15. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  16. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Direct Measurements of Half-Cycle Reaction Heats during Atomic Layer Deposition by Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lownsbury, James M. [Department; Gladden, James A. [Department; Campbell, Charles T. [Department; Department; Kim, In Soo [Materials; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials

    2017-10-05

    We introduce a new high-temperature adsorption calorimeter that approaches the ideal limit of a heat detector whereby the signal at any time is proportional to the heat power being delivered to the sample and prove its sensitivity for measuring pulse-to-pulse heats of half-reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 400 K. The heat dynamics of amorphous Al2O3 growth via sequential self-limiting surface reaction of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O is clearly resolved. Calibration enables quantitation of the exothermic TMA and H2O half-reactions with high precision, -343 kJ/mol TMA and -251 kJ/mol H2O, respectively. A time resolution better than 1 ms is demonstrated, allowing for the deconvolution of at least two distinct surface reactions during TMA microdosing. It is further demonstrated that this method can provide the heat of reaction versus extent of reaction during each precursors half-reaction, thus providing even richer mechanistic information on the surface processes involved. The broad applicability of this novel calorimeter is demonstrated through excellent signal-to-noise ratios of less exothermic ALD half-reactions to produce TiO2 and MnO.

  18. Fluidized-bed atomic layer deposition reactor for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didden, Arjen P; Middelkoop, Joost; Besling, Wim F A; Nanu, Diana E; van de Krol, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The design of a fluidized bed atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor is described in detail. The reactor consists of three parts that have all been placed in one protective cabinet: precursor dosing, reactor, and residual gas treatment section. In the precursor dosing section, the chemicals needed for the ALD reaction are injected into the carrier gas using different methods for different precursors. The reactor section is designed in such a way that a homogeneous fluidized bed can be obtained with a constant, actively controlled, reactor pressure. Furthermore, no filters are required inside the reactor chamber, minimizing the risk of pressure increase due to fouling. The residual gas treatment section consists of a decomposition furnace to remove residual precursor and a particle filter and is installed to protect the pump. In order to demonstrate the performance of the reactor, SiO2 particles have been coated with TiO2 using tetrakis-dimethylamino titanium (TDMAT) and H2O as precursors. Experiments with varying pulse times show that saturated growth can be obtained with TDMAT pulse times larger than 600 s. Analysis of the powder with High-Angle Annular Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that after 50 cycles, all SiO2 particles were coated with a 1.6 nm homogenous shell of TiO2.

  19. α-Ga2O3 grown by low temperature atomic layer deposition on sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. W.; Jarman, J. C.; Johnstone, D. N.; Midgley, P. A.; Chalker, P. R.; Oliver, R. A.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.

    2018-04-01

    α-Ga2O3 is a metastable phase of Ga2O3 of interest for wide bandgap engineering since it is isostructural with α-In2O3 and α-Al2O3. α-Ga2O3 is generally synthesised under high pressure (several GPa) or relatively high temperature (∼500 °C). In this study, we report the growth of α-Ga2O3 by low temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) on sapphire substrate. The film was grown at a rate of 0.48 Å/cycle, and predominantly consists of α-Ga2O3 in the form of (0001) -oriented columns originating from the interface with the substrate. Some inclusions were also present, typically at the tips of the α phase columns and most likely comprising ε-Ga2O3. The remainder of the Ga2O3 film - i.e. nearer the surface and between the α-Ga2O3 columns, was amorphous. The film was found to be highly resistive, as is expected for undoped material. This study demonstrates that α-Ga2O3 films can be grown by low temperature ALD and suggests the possibility of a new range of ultraviolet optoelectronic and power devices grown by ALD. The study also shows that scanning electron diffraction is a powerful technique to identify the different polymorphs of Ga2O3 present in multiphase samples.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of metal tellurides and selenides using alkylsilyl compounds of tellurium and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pore, Viljami; Hatanpää, Timo; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2009-03-18

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal selenide and telluride thin films has been limited because of a lack of precursors that would at the same time be safe and exhibit high reactivity as required in ALD. Yet there are many important metal selenide and telluride thin film materials whose deposition by ALD might be beneficial, for example, CuInSe2 for solar cells and Ge2Sb2Te5 for phase-change random-access memories. Especially in the latter case highly conformal deposition offered by ALD is essential for high storage density. By now, ALD of germanium antimony telluride (GST) has been attempted only using plasma-assisted processes owing to the lack of appropriate tellurium precursors. In this paper we make a breakthrough in the development of new ALD precursors for tellurium and selenium. Compounds with a general formula (R3Si)2Te and (R3Si)2Se react with various metal halides forming the corresponding metal tellurides and selenides. As an example, we show that Sb2Te3, GeTe, and GST films can be deposited by ALD using (Et3Si)2Te, SbCl3, and GeCl2 x C4H8O2 compounds as precursors. All three precursors exhibit a typical saturative ALD growth behavior and GST films prepared at 90 degrees C show excellent conformality on a high aspect-ratio trench structure.

  1. Low-temperature crystalline titanium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Yella, Aswani; Stefik, Morgan; Heiniger, Leo-Philipp; Comte, Pascal; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Grätzel, Michael

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 °C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator.

  2. Controllable atomic layer deposition of one-dimensional nanotubular TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangbo; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Geng, Dongsheng; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed at synthesizing one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of TiO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The precursors used are titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti(OCH(CH3)2)4) and deionized water. It was found that the morphologies and structural phases of as-deposited TiO2 are controllable through adjusting cycling numbers of ALD and growth temperatures. Commonly, a low temperature (150 °C) produced amorphous TiO2 while a high temperature (250 °C) led to crystalline anatase TiO2 on both AAO and CNTs. In addition, it was revealed that the deposition of TiO2 is also subject to the influences of the applied substrates. The work well demonstrated that ALD is a precise route to synthesize 1D nanostructures of TiO2. The resultant nanostructured TiO2 can be important candidates in many applications, such as water splitting, solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, and gas sensors.

  3. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. G.; Cuevas, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga 2 O 3 ) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga 2 O 3 films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O 3 ) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1 cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5 nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2 Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga 2 O 3 interface has been found to be approximately 0.5 eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9 eV.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles for catalysis: on the mechanisms of nanoparticle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackus, Adriaan J M; Weber, Matthieu J; Thissen, Nick F W; Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Vervuurt, René H J; Assali, Simone; Bol, Ageeth A; Verheijen, Marcel A; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been studied extensively in recent years for the synthesis of nanoparticles for catalysis. For these applications, it is essential to synthesize nanoparticles with well-defined sizes and a high density on large-surface-area supports. Although the potential of ALD for synthesizing active nanocatalysts for various chemical reactions has been demonstrated, insight into how to control the nanoparticle properties (i.e. size, composition) by choosing suitable processing conditions is lacking. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the reaction mechanisms during the nucleation stage of metal ALD. In this work, nanoparticles synthesized with four different ALD processes (two for Pd and two for Pt) were extensively studied by transmission electron spectroscopy. Using these datasets as a starting point, the growth characteristics and reaction mechanisms of Pd and Pt ALD relevant for the synthesis of nanoparticles are discussed. The results reveal that ALD allows for the preparation of particles with control of the particle size, although it is also shown that the particle size distribution is strongly dependent on the processing conditions. Moreover, this paper discusses the opportunities and limitations of the use of ALD in the synthesis of nanocatalysts. (paper)

  5. Superconductivity in thallium double atomic layer and transition into an insulating phase intermediated by a quantum metal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinokura, S.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Gruznev, D. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.; Hasegawa, S.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the first observation of superconductivity in a double atomic layer of Tl on Si(1 1 1) using in situ electrical resistivity measurements in ultrahigh vacuum. The structure of the Tl bilayer was characterized by a set of techniques, including scanning tunneling microscopy, electron diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy, which confirmed the metastability and metallic nature of the Tl bilayer. The epitaxial growth of atomically thin ‘soft’ metallic film over the entire surface of substrate enabled us to find a macroscopic superconducting transition at 0.96 K, accompanied by thermal and quantum fluctuations of order parameter. The system also demonstrates a perpendicular-magnetic-field-induced superconductor-insulator transition, together with an intermediate metallic state. We have found that the magnetoresitivity at the lowest temperature is consistent with the Bose metal picture, which is a consequence of strong quantum fluctuations.

  6. Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael; Steinmann, Vera; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Chakraborty, Rupak; Poindexter, Jeremy R; Castillo, Mariela Lizet; Gordon, Roy; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-05-22

    Tin sulfide (SnS) is a candidate absorber material for Earth-abundant, non-toxic solar cells. SnS offers easy phase control and rapid growth by congruent thermal evaporation, and it absorbs visible light strongly. However, for a long time the record power conversion efficiency of SnS solar cells remained below 2%. Recently we demonstrated new certified record efficiencies of 4.36% using SnS deposited by atomic layer deposition, and 3.88% using thermal evaporation. Here the fabrication procedure for these record solar cells is described, and the statistical distribution of the fabrication process is reported. The standard deviation of efficiency measured on a single substrate is typically over 0.5%. All steps including substrate selection and cleaning, Mo sputtering for the rear contact (cathode), SnS deposition, annealing, surface passivation, Zn(O,S) buffer layer selection and deposition, transparent conductor (anode) deposition, and metallization are described. On each substrate we fabricate 11 individual devices, each with active area 0.25 cm(2). Further, a system for high throughput measurements of current-voltage curves under simulated solar light, and external quantum efficiency measurement with variable light bias is described. With this system we are able to measure full data sets on all 11 devices in an automated manner and in minimal time. These results illustrate the value of studying large sample sets, rather than focusing narrowly on the highest performing devices. Large data sets help us to distinguish and remedy individual loss mechanisms affecting our devices.

  7. Growth of high-crystalline, single-layer hexagonal boron nitride on recyclable platinum foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwangwoo; Jang, A-Rang; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Zonghoon; Kang, Dae Joon; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2013-04-10

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is gaining significant attention as a two-dimensional dielectric material, along with graphene and other such materials. Herein, we demonstrate the growth of highly crystalline, single-layer h-BN on Pt foil through a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method that allowed h-BN to be grown over a wide area (8 × 25 mm(2)). An electrochemical bubbling-based method was used to transfer the grown h-BN layer from the Pt foil onto an arbitrary substrate. This allowed the Pt foil, which was not consumed during the process, to be recycled repeatedly. The UV-visible absorption spectrum of the single-layer h-BN suggested an optical band gap of 6.06 eV, while a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of the same showed the presence of distinct hexagonal arrays of B and N atoms, which were indicative of the highly crystalline nature and single-atom thickness of the h-BN layer. This method of growing single-layer h-BN over large areas was also compatible with use of a sapphire substrate.

  8. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of in-doped ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition at atmospheric pressure (spatial-ALD). Trimethyl indium (TMIn), diethyl zinc (DEZ) and deionized water have been used as In, Zn and O precursor, respectively. The metal content of the films is controlled in the range

  9. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition delivers more active and stable Pt-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.V.; Grillo, F.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Bevaart, Ronald; Nguyên, V.T.; van der Linden, B.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We tailored the size distribution of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene nanoplatelets at a given metal loading by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition carried out in a fluidized bed reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. The Pt NPs deposited at low temperature (100 °C) after 10 cycles

  10. A simple model for atomic layer doped field-effect transistor (ALD-FET) electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora R, M.E.; Gaggero S, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a simple potential model based on the Thomas-Fermi approximation to reproduce the main properties of the electronic structure of an atomic layer doped field effect transistor. Preliminary numerical results for a Si-based ALD-FET justify why bound electronic states are not observed in the experiment. (Author)

  11. Density Effects on Incompressible Shear-Driven Mixing Layer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Our preliminary simulations of shear-driven turbulent mixing layers involving two streams of fluids with different densities have revealed that the growth rates of mixing layer thickness are reduced when the density difference is increased, even in the absence of high-speed effects. To assess a wide range of densities, we have performed a suite of incompressible temporal Direct Numerical Simulations involving two miscible fluids, with Atwood numbers of up to 0.87. Large domains involving up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536 points provide accurate statistics of growth and budgets. For the variable density case, there is no unique definition of the layer thickness (e.g., momentum thickness may defined traditionally or on a per-mass basis). Yet, the thickness definition used can substantially affect the growth rate change due to density effects. We analyze the equations describing the growth rates and relate density effects to asymmetries that develop in the flow with increasing Atwood number. Most importantly, mixing layers are found to grow preferentially towards the lower-density stream, which has significant implications for the momentum balance.

  12. Crack Growth along Interfaces in Porous Ceramic Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    Crack growth along porous ceramic layers was studied experimentally. Double cantilever beam sandwich specimens were loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope enabling in situ observations...... of various mechanisms associated with crack growth. The macroscopic fracture energy of the interface between dense lanthanum strontium chromite and a porous lanthanum strontium manganite was measured to lie in the range of 1.4-3.8 J/m(2). Several micromechanisms were observed ahead of, or in the wake of...

  13. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt nanostructures on fuel cell gas diffusion layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available technologies including gasoline internal combustion engines. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) consists of a membrane, two dispersed catalyst layers, and two gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The electrochemical performance of the fuel cells is strongly...+ (small Overpotential Deposition (OPD) - to produce sacrificial Cu adlayer on active sites of the substrate; Rinse with BE Cu 2+ Cu 2+ S S S S S S S Cu Cu Cu Cu Cu -2e S S S S S S S Pt Cu Pt Cu Cu (3) Inject H 2PtCl 6 solution and allow...

  14. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2017-07-06

    Recently there have been many research breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, boron nitride (h-BN), black phosphors (BPs), and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). The unique electrical, optical, and thermal properties in 2D materials are associated with their strictly defined low dimensionalities. These materials provide a wide range of basic building blocks for next-generation electronics. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches has also given rise to fascinating new physics, which could lead to exciting new applications. In this Review, we introduce the latest development of TMDC synthesis by CVD approaches and provide further insight for the controllable and reliable synthesis of atomically thin TMDCs. Understanding of the vapor-phase growth mechanism of 2D TMDCs could benefit the formation of complicated heterostructures and novel artificial 2D lattices.

  15. Atom probe tomography characterization of thin copper layers on aluminum deposited by galvanic displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Ai, Jiahe; Hillier, Andrew C; Hebert, Kurt R

    2012-01-24

    ″Ultrathin″ metallization layers on the order of nanometers in thickness are increasingly used in semiconductor interconnects and other nanostructures. Aqueous deposition methods are attractive methods to produce such layers due to their low cost, but formation of ultrathin layers has proven challenging, particularly on oxide-coated substrates. This work focused on the formation of thin copper layers on aluminum, by galvanic displacement from alkaline aqueous solutions. Analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) showed that continuous copper films of approximately 1 nm thickness were formed, apparently the first demonstration of deposition of ultrathin metal layers on oxidized substrates from aqueous solutions. The APT reconstructions indicate that deposited copper replaced a portion of the surface oxide film on aluminum. The results are consistent with mechanisms in which surface hydride species on aluminum mediate deposition, either by directly reducing cupric ions or by inducing electronic conduction in the oxide, thus enabling cupric ion reduction by Al metal.

  16. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  17. Few-atomic-layered boron carbonitride nanosheets prepared by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Yu, Jie; Kuang, Shengyong; Xiao, Chang; Bai, Xuedong

    2012-01-07

    Few-atomic-layered boron carbonitride (BCN) nanosheets have been grown on Si substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of CH(4)-N(2)-H(2)-BF(3). The grown BCN nanosheets are oriented with their base planes perpendicular to the substrate surface. Ultrathin BCN nanosheets with thickness from 2 to a few atomic layers account for a considerable portion of the products, although many of them have more than 10 layers. Photoluminescence is measured for the BCN nanosheets and intense emission at 3.27 eV with very weak defect-related emission is observed for the nanosheets with the composition of B(0.38)C(0.27)N(0.35). The present BCN nanosheets are promising for applications in nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, gas adsorption, etc.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  19. The Mechanical Robustness of Atomic-Layer- and Molecular-Layer-Deposited Coatings on Polymer Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    represent the ceramic and poly- merlike spacer layers, respectively. The numerical analysis ABAQUS , Dassault Systèmes Inc. was conducted using an automated...routine PYTHON , Python Software Foundation. Analysis here was solely limited to the linear elastic regime for all materials considered. IV. RESULTS

  20. Surfactant-induced layered growth in homoepitaxy of Fe on Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiko, Masao; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Chihaya, Hiroaki; Xu, Junhua; Kojima, Isao; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of several surfactants (Pb, Bi, and Ag) on the homoepitaxial growth of Fe(100) were studied and compared. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements clearly reveal that these surfactants enhance the layer-by-layer growth of Fe on an Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface. The dependence of growth on the surfactant layer thickness suggests that there exists a suitable amount of surfactant layer that induces a smoother layer-by-layer growth. Comparisons between the atomic force microscopy images reveal that the root-mean-square surface roughness of Fe films mediated by Pb and Bi surfactants are considerably smaller than those of the films mediated by Ag surfactant. The Auger electron spectra show that Pb and Bi segregate at the top of the surface. It has been concluded that Pb and Bi are effective surfactants for enhancing layer-by-layer growth in Fe homoepitaxy. Ag has the same effect, but it is less efficient due to the weak surface segregation of Ag

  1. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  2. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Kim, H. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kippelen, B. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Cullen, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Graham, S., E-mail: sgraham@gatech.edu [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})/hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiN{sub x} layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers.

  3. Atomic layer deposition TiO{sub 2} coated porous silicon surface: Structural characterization and morphological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor, E-mail: igoyat@amu.edu.pl [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Experimental Physics, Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, 42, Pastera str., 65023 Odessa (Ukraine); Jancelewicz, Mariusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Kempiński, Mateusz [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poland (Poland); Peplińska, Barbara [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Jarek, Marcin; Załęski, Karol [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Jurga, Stefan [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Smyntyna, Valentyn [Department of Experimental Physics, Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, 42, Pastera str., 65023 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2015-08-31

    TiO{sub 2} thin films were grown on highly-doped p-Si (100) macro- and mesoporous structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using TiCl{sub 4} and deionized water as precursors at 300 °C. The crystalline structure, chemical composition, and morphology of the deposited films and initial silicon nanostructures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mean size of TiO{sub 2} crystallites was determined by TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the mean crystallite size and the crystallinity of the TiO{sub 2} are influenced dramatically by the morphology of the porous silicon, with the mesoporous silicon resulting in a much finer grain size and amorphous structure than the macroporous silicon having a partially crystal anatase phase. A simple model of the ALD layer growth inside the pores was presented. - Highlights: • The morphology and chemical composition of TiO{sub 2} and porous Si were established. • The approximate size of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals was estimated. • The model of the atomic layer deposition coating in the porous Si was presented.

  4. Electrical and mechanical stability of aluminum-doped ZnO films grown on flexible substrates by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luka, G.; Witkowski, B.S.; Wachnicki, L.; Jakiela, R.; Virt, I.S.; Andrzejczuk, M.; Lewandowska, M.; Godlewski, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Transparent and conductive ZnO:Al films were grown by atomic layer deposition. • The films were grown on flexible substrates at low growth temperatures (110–140 °C). • So-obtained films have low resistivities, of the order of 10 −3 Ω cm. • Bending tests indicated a critical bending radius of ≈1.2 cm. • Possible sources of the film resistivity changes upon bending are proposed. - Abstract: Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were grown on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at low deposition temperatures (110–140 °C). The films have low resistivities, ∼10 −3 Ω cm, and high transparency (∼90%) in the visible range. Bending tests indicated a critical bending radius of ≈1.2 cm, below which the resistivity changes became irreversible. The films deposited on PET with additional buffer layer are more stable upon bending and temperature changes

  5. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 on crystalline silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Song, Hee Eun; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al 2 O 3 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al 2 O 3 passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al 2 O 3 growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al 2 O 3 passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al 2 O 3 shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al 2 O 3 surface passivation

  6. Development of inverted organic solar cells with TiO₂ interface layer by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenhua; Jiang, Changyun; Zhu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) with inverted structure have attracted much attention in recent years because of their improved device air stability due to the use of stable materials for electrodes and interface layers. In this work, TiO(2) films, fabricated using low temperature (e.g., 130-170 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) on ITO substrates, are used as electron selective interface layers to investigate inverted OSCs. It is found that though the as-deposited TiO(2) films are high resistive due to the presence of oxygen defects, the defects can be significantly reduced by light soaking. PV cells with 15-nm-thick amorphous-TiO(2) layers fabricated at low temperature show better performance than those with poly crystal TiO(2) with same thickness deposited at 250 °C. The low temperature ALD-grown TiO(2) films are dense, stable and robust with capability of conformal coating on nanostructural surfaces, showing a promising interface layer for achieving air-stable plastic OSCs with roll-to-roll mass production potential.

  7. Dimensional crossover of electron weak localization in ZnO/TiOx stacked layers grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Misra, P.; Bhartiya, S.; Gupta, M.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the dimensional crossover of electron weak localization in ZnO/TiOx stacked layers having well-defined and spatially-localized Ti dopant profiles along film thickness. These films were grown by in situ incorporation of sub-monolayer TiOx on the growing ZnO film surface and subsequent overgrowth of thin conducting ZnO spacer layer using atomic layer deposition. Film thickness was varied in the range of ˜6-65 nm by vertically stacking different numbers (n = 1-7) of ZnO/TiOx layers of nearly identical dopant-profiles. The evolution of zero-field sheet resistance (R⊙) versus temperature with decreasing film thickness showed a metal to insulator transition. On the metallic side of the metal-insulator transition, R⊙(T) and magnetoresistance data were found to be well corroborated with the theoretical framework of electron weak localization in the diffusive transport regime. The temperature dependence of both R⊙ and inelastic scattering length provided strong evidence for a smooth crossover from 2D to 3D weak localization behaviour. Results of this study provide deeper insight into the electron transport in low-dimensional n-type ZnO/TiOx stacked layers which have potential applications in the field of transparent oxide electronics.

  8. ZnO: Hydroquinone superlattice structures fabricated by atomic/molecular layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynell, Tommi; Karppinen, Maarit

    2014-01-01

    Here we employ atomic layer deposition in combination with molecular layer deposition to deposit crystalline thin films of ZnO interspersed with single layers of hydroquinone in an effort to create hybrid inorganic–organic superlattice structures. The ratio of the ZnO and hydroquinone deposition cycles is varied between 199:1 and 1:1, and the structure of the resultant thin films is verified with X-ray diffraction and reflectivity techniques. Clear evidence of the formation of a superlattice-type structure is observed in the X-ray reflectivity patterns and the presence of organic bonds in the films corresponding to the structure of hydroquinone is confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. We anticipate that hybrid superlattice structures such as the ones described in this work have the potential to be of great importance for future applications where the precise control of different inorganic and organic layers in hybrid superlattice materials is required. - Highlights: • Inorganic–organic superlattices can be made by atomic/molecular layer deposition. • This is demonstrated here for ZnO and hydroquinone (HQ). • The ratio of the ZnO and HQ layers is varied between 199:1 and 14:1. • The resultant thin films are crystalline

  9. Integration of atomic layer deposition CeO{sub 2} thin films with functional complex oxides and 3D patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll, M., E-mail: mcoll@icmab.es; Palau, A.; Gonzalez-Rosillo, J.C.; Gazquez, J.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.

    2014-02-28

    We present a low-temperature, < 300 °C, ex-situ integration of atomic layer deposition (ALD) ultrathin CeO{sub 2} layers (3 to 5 unit cells) with chemical solution deposited La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) functional complex oxides for multilayer growth without jeopardizing the morphology, microstructure and physical properties of the functional oxide layer. We have also extended this procedure to pulsed laser deposited YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) thin films. Scanning force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and macroscopic magnetic measurements were used to evaluate the quality of the perovskite films before and after the ALD process. By means of microcontact printing and ALD we have prepared CeO{sub 2} patterns using an ozone-robust photoresist that will avoid the use of hazardous lithography processes directly on the device components. These bilayers, CeO{sub 2}/LSMO and CeO{sub 2}/YBCO, are foreseen to have special interest for resistive switching phenomena in resistive random-access memory. - Highlights: • Integration of atomic layer deposition (ALD) CeO{sub 2} layers on functional complex oxides • Resistive switching is identified in CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} bilayers. • Study of the robustness of organic polymers for area-selective ALD • Combination of ALD and micro-contact printing to obtain 3D patterns of CeO{sub 2}.

  10. Integration of atomic layer deposition CeO2 thin films with functional complex oxides and 3D patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, M.; Palau, A.; Gonzalez-Rosillo, J.C.; Gazquez, J.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.

    2014-01-01

    We present a low-temperature, < 300 °C, ex-situ integration of atomic layer deposition (ALD) ultrathin CeO 2 layers (3 to 5 unit cells) with chemical solution deposited La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) functional complex oxides for multilayer growth without jeopardizing the morphology, microstructure and physical properties of the functional oxide layer. We have also extended this procedure to pulsed laser deposited YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) thin films. Scanning force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and macroscopic magnetic measurements were used to evaluate the quality of the perovskite films before and after the ALD process. By means of microcontact printing and ALD we have prepared CeO 2 patterns using an ozone-robust photoresist that will avoid the use of hazardous lithography processes directly on the device components. These bilayers, CeO 2 /LSMO and CeO 2 /YBCO, are foreseen to have special interest for resistive switching phenomena in resistive random-access memory. - Highlights: • Integration of atomic layer deposition (ALD) CeO 2 layers on functional complex oxides • Resistive switching is identified in CeO 2 /La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 and CeO 2 /YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 bilayers. • Study of the robustness of organic polymers for area-selective ALD • Combination of ALD and micro-contact printing to obtain 3D patterns of CeO 2

  11. High-speed spatial atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide layers for solar cell passivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Lankhorst, A.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Spee, C.I.M.A.; Maas, D.; Vermeer, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this Communication we show that with spatially separated ALD of Al2O3 growth rates of 1.2 nm s-1 can be achievd, showing excellent surface passivation (surface recombination velocities of <2 cm s-1). This implies a revolutionary breakthrough in industrial throughput ALD of Al2O3 passivation of

  12. Atomic layer deposition of transparent semiconducting oxide CuCrO2 thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, T.S.; Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vital gas-phase technique for atomic-level thickness-controlled deposition of high-quality thin films on various substrate morphologies owing to its self-limiting gas-surface reaction mechanism. Here we report the ALD fabrication of thin films of the semiconducting CuCrO2 oxide that is a highly prospective candidate for transparent electronics applications. In our process, copper 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate (Cu(thd)2) and chromium acetyl acetonate...

  13. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2 n...... nanoparticles synthesized on Au(lll), and establishes a new picture of the active edge sires of the nanoclusters. The results demonstrate a way to get detailed atomic-scale information on catalysts in general....

  14. Epitaxial TiO 2/SnO 2 core-shell heterostructure by atomic layer deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2012-01-01

    Taking TiO 2/SnO 2 core-shell nanowires (NWs) as a model system, we systematically investigate the structure and the morphological evolution of this heterostructure synthesized by atomic layer deposition/epitaxy (ALD/ALE). All characterizations, by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Raman spectra, reveal that single crystalline rutile TiO 2 shells can be epitaxially grown on SnO 2 NWs with an atomically sharp interface at low temperature (250 °C). The growth behavior of the TiO 2 shells highly depends on the surface orientations and the geometrical shape of the core SnO 2 NW cross-section. Atomically smooth surfaces are found for growth on the {110} surface. Rough surfaces develop on {100} surfaces due to (100) - (1 × 3) reconstruction, by introducing steps in the [010] direction as a continuation of {110} facets. Lattice mismatch induces superlattice structures in the TiO 2 shell and misfit dislocations along the interface. Conformal epitaxial growth has been observed for SnO 2 NW cores with an octagonal cross-section ({100} and {110} surfaces). However, for a rectangular core ({101} and {010} surfaces), the shell also derives an octagonal shape from the epitaxial growth, which was explained by a proposed model based on ALD kinetics. The surface steps and defects induced by the lattice mismatch likely lead to improved photoluminescence (PL) performance for the yellow emission. Compared to the pure SnO 2 NWs, the PL spectrum of the core-shell nanostructures exhibits a stronger emission peak, which suggests potential applications in optoelectronics. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  15. Scalable control program for multiprecursor flow-type atomic layer deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the development and implementation of a scalable control program to control flow type atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor with multiple precursor delivery lines. The program logic is written and tested in LABVIEW environment to control ALD reactor with four precursor delivery lines to deposit up to four layers of different materials in cyclic manner. The programming logic is conceived such that to facilitate scale up for depositing more layers with multiple precursors and scale down for using single layer with any one precursor in the ALD reactor. The program takes precursor and oxidizer exposure and purging times as input and controls the sequential opening and closing of the valves to facilitate the complex ALD process in cyclic manner. The program could be used to deposit materials from any single line or in tandem with other lines in any combination and in any sequence.

  16. Surface Recombination of Crystalline Silicon Substrates Passivated by Atomic-Layer-Deposited AlOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafune, Koji; Miki, Shohei; Matsutani, Ryosuke; Hamano, Junpei; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ogura, Atsuhi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    2012-04-01

    AlOx films as passivation layers for p-type crystalline silicon were prepared by atomic layer deposition with ozone as an oxidant, and the effects of the AlOx film thickness and deposition temperature on the maximum recombination velocity (Smax) were evaluated. Smax is improved by increasing the layer thickness but saturates at a layer thickness of about 30 nm. In the case of samples deposited at room temperature, Smax is improved fivefold when the thickness is increased from 20 to 33 nm. Smax also improved as the deposition temperature was increased to 300 °C then deteriorated when it was further increased to 350 °C. After postdeposition annealing, we obtained an Smax of 8.5 cm/s.

  17. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  18. ALD Buffer Layer Growth and Interface Formation on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cell Absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Sterner, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells contain a thin layer of CdS. To avoid toxic heavy-metal-containing waste in the module production the development of a cadmium-free buffer layer is desirable. This thesis considers alternative Cd-free buffer materials deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Conditions of the CIGS surface necessary for ALD growth are investigated and the heterojunction interface is characterized by band alignment studies of ZnO/CIGS and In2S3/CIGS interfaces. The t...

  19. Morphology and atomic-scale structure of single-layer WS2 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtbauer, Henrik G; Tuxen, Anders K; Moses, Poul G; Topsøe, Henrik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Lauritsen, Jeppe V

    2013-10-14

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal (Mo and W) sulfides are attracting strong attention due to the unique electronic and optical properties associated with the material in its single-layer form. The single-layer MoS2 and WS2 are already in widespread commercial use in catalytic applications as both hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts. Consequently, characterization of the morphology and atomic structure of such particles is of utmost importance for the understanding of the catalytic active phase. However, in comparison with the related MoS2 system only little is known about the fundamental properties of single-layer WS2 (tungstenite). Here, we use an interplay of atom-resolved Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) studies of Au(111)-supported WS2 nanoparticles and calculated edge structures using Density Functional Theory (DFT) to reveal the equilibrium morphology and prevalent edge structures of single-layer WS2. The STM results reveal that the single layer S-W-S sheets adopt a triangular equilibrium shape under the sulfiding conditions of the synthesis, with fully sulfided edges. The predominant edge structures are determined to be the (101[combining macron]0) W-edge, but for the smallest nanoclusters also the (1[combining macron]010) S-edges become important. DFT calculations are used to construct phase diagrams of the WS2 edges, and describe their sulfur and hydrogen coordination under different conditions, and in this way shed light on the catalytic role of WS2 edges.

  20. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  1. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  2. A brief review of atomic layer deposition: from fundamentals to applications

    OpenAIRE

    Richard W. Johnson; Adam Hultqvist; Stacey F. Bent

    2014-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase technique capable of producing thin films of a variety of materials. Based on sequential, self-limiting reactions, ALD offers exceptional conformality on high-aspect ratio structures, thickness control at the Angstrom level, and tunable film composition. With these advantages, ALD has emerged as a powerful tool for many industrial and research applications. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to ALD and highlight select applications, ...

  3. Dynamic Modeling for the Design and Cyclic Operation of an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Travis, Curtisha; Adomaitis, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory-scale atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor system model is derived for alumina deposition using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Model components describing the precursor thermophysical properties, reactor-scale gas-phase dynamics and surface reaction kinetics derived from absolute reaction rate theory are integrated to simulate the complete reactor system. Limit-cycle solutions defining continuous cyclic ALD reactor operation are computed with a fixed point algorithm ...

  4. Single-Atom Pd₁/Graphene Catalyst Achieved by Atomic Layer Deposition: Remarkable Performance in Selective Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Cheng, Hao; Yi, Hong; Lin, Yue; Yao, Tao; Wang, Chunlei; Li, Junjie; Wei, Shiqiang; Lu, Junling

    2015-08-26

    We reported that atomically dispersed Pd on graphene can be fabricated using the atomic layer deposition technique. Aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy both confirmed that isolated Pd single atoms dominantly existed on the graphene support. In selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene, the single-atom Pd1/graphene catalyst showed about 100% butenes selectivity at 95% conversion at a mild reaction condition of about 50 °C, which is likely due to the changes of 1,3-butadiene adsorption mode and enhanced steric effect on the isolated Pd atoms. More importantly, excellent durability against deactivation via either aggregation of metal atoms or carbonaceous deposits during a total 100 h of reaction time on stream was achieved. Therefore, the single-atom catalysts may open up more opportunities to optimize the activity, selectivity, and durability in selective hydrogenation reactions.

  5. Atomic control of substrate termination and heteroepitaxial growth of SrTiO sub 3 /LaAlO sub 3 films

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D W; Choi, C; Lim, K D; Noh, T W; Lee, D R; Park, J H; Lee, K B

    2000-01-01

    The roles of substrate termination in the growth behaviors of SrTiO sub 3 (STO) films were investigated. With heat treatment and an atomic layer deposition technique, LaAlO sub 3 (LAO) substrates with two kinds of terminations, i.e., LaO- and AlO sub 2 -terminated ones, could be prepared. On top of them STO films were grown by using laser molecular beam epitaxy. In the case of the STO/LaO-LAO film, a transition from layer-by-layer growth to island growth was observed after growth of about 10 monolayers (ML). On the other hand, the STO/AlO sub 2 -LAO film could be grown in a layer-by-layer mode with a flat surface up to 40 ML. We suggest that defects induced by charge compensation influence the strain states and the physical properties of oxide heterostructures significantly.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of environmentally benign SnTiO{sub x} as a potential ferroelectric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Siliang; Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Seungbum [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nakhmanson, Serge M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Department of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Inspired by the need to discover environmentally friendly, lead-free ferroelectric materials, here the authors report the atomic layer deposition of tin titanate (SnTiO{sub x}) aiming to obtain the theoretically predicted perovskite structure that possesses ferroelectricity. In order to establish the growth conditions and probe the film structure and ferroelectric behavior, the authors grew SnTiO{sub x} films on the commonly used Si(100) substrate. Thin films of SnTiO{sub x} have been successfully grown at a deposition temperature of 200 °C, with a Sn/Ti atomic layer deposition (ALD) cycle ratio of 2:3 and postdeposition heat treatments under different conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed excellent composition tunability of ALD. X-ray diffraction spectra suggested anatase phase for all films annealed at 650 and 350 °C, with peak positions shifted toward lower 2-theta angles indicating enlarged unit cell volume. The film annealed in O{sub 2} at 350 °C exhibited piezoresponse amplitude and phase hysteresis loops, indicative of the existence of switchable polarization.

  7. Enhancement of Electrical Conductance for Pentacene Thin Film Transistor by Controlling an Initial Layer-by-Layer Growth Mode Directly on SiO2 Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qiong; Jiang, Yeping; Yu, Aifang; Qiu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Chao

    2009-04-01

    Initial nucleation and growth of pentacene films on various pre-cleaning treated SiO2 gate insulators were systematically examined by atomic force microscope. The performance of fabricated pentacene thin film transistor devices was found to be highly related to the initial film growth modes. In contrast to the film in the three-dimensional island-like growth mode on SiO2 under an organic cleaning process, a layer-by-layer initial growth mode occurred on the SiO2 insulator cleaned with ammonia solution which has shown much improved electrical properties of the thin film transistors. Field effect mobility of the thin film transistor devices could be achieved as high as 1.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 on the bared SiO2/Si substrate and the on/off ratio was over 106. The enhanced electrical conductance was further confirmed by an electrostatic force microscopic observation of quantized electrical potentials via charge-injection to the submonolayer pentacene islands with layer-by-layer growth mode.

  8. Structural characterization of ZnTe grown by atomic-layer-deposition regime on GaAs and GaSb (100) oriented substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Ojeda, Roberto Saúl [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca (Mexico); Díaz-Reyes, Joel; Peralta-Clara, María de la Cruz; Veloz-Rendón, Julieta Salomé, E-mail: joel_diaz_reyes@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Biotecnología Aplicada, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Tlaxcala, (Mexico); Galván-Arellano, Miguel [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Anda-Salazar, Francisco de [Instituto de Investigación en Comunicación Óptica, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Contreras-Rascon, Jorge Indalecio [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    This work presents the characterization of ZnTe nano layers grown on GaAs and GaSb (100) substrates by the Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) regime. Under certain conditions, the alternating exposition of a substrate surface to the element vapours makes possible the growth of atomic layers in a reactor where the atmosphere is high-purity hydrogen. ZnTe was grown simultaneously on GaAs and GaSb at the same run, allowing, a comparison between the effects produced by the superficial processes due to the different used substrates, thereby eliminating possible unintended changes of growth parameters. Nano layers on GaSb maintained their shiny appearance even at temperatures near 420°C. It was found that for exposure times below 2.5 s there was not growth on GaAs, while for GaSb the shortest time was 1.5 s at 385°C. By HRXRD the peak corresponding to (004) diffraction plane of ZnTe was identified and investigated, the FWHM resulted very wide (600-800 arcsec) indicating a highly distorted lattice mainly due to mosaicity. Raman scattering shows the peak corresponding to LO-ZnTe, which is weak and slightly shifted in comparison with the reported for the bulk ZnTe at 210 cm{sup -1}. Additionally, the measurements suggest that the crystalline quality have a dependence with the growth temperature. (author)

  9. Atomic layer deposition of high performance ultrathin TiO₂ blocking layers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Han; Woodroof, Mariah; Lee, Kyoungmi; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) often use a thin insulating or semiconducting layer (typically TiO₂) between the transparent conductive oxide and the mesoporous TiO₂ to block electron/hole recombination at the conducting oxide/electrolyte interface. The blocking layer (BL) is essential to maintain efficient charge generation under low light conditions, at which DSSCs perform well compared to common semiconductor-based photovoltaic devices. In this work, we show that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can produce ultrathin (ALD BLs are the thinnest optimized DSSC BLs reported to date. The BL retards the open-circuit voltage decay and extends the electron lifetime from ≈0.2 s to more than 10 s at 0.3 V, confirming that the ALD films significantly impede photogenerated charge recombination. By preparing BLs through other deposition techniques, we directly demonstrate that ALD results in better performance, even with thinner films, which is ascribed to the lower pinhole density of ALD materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Epitaxial Growth of Cadmium Selenide Films on Silicon with a Silicon Carbide Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.; Rubets, V. P.

    2018-03-01

    An epitaxial cubic 350-nm-thick cadmium selenide has been grown on silicon for the first time by the method of evaporation and condensation in a quasi-closed volume. It is revealed that, in this method, the optimum substrate temperature is 590°C, the evaporator temperature is 660°C, and the growth time is 2 s. To avoid silicon etching by selenium with formation of amorphous SiSe2, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer has been synthesized on the silicon surface by substituting atoms. The powder diffraction pattern and the Raman spectrum unambiguously correspond to cubic cadmium selenide crystal. The ellipsometric, Raman, and electron diffraction analyses demonstrate high structural perfection of the cadmium selenide layer and the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  11. Growth of hydrated gel layers in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.; Machiels, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The hydration kinetics of waste glasses in contact with an aqueous solution has been studied by using three different approaches. Emphasis has been placed on modeling processes in the transition zone defined as the region in which the nature of the glass changes from the original dry glass to an open hydrated structure. The first model relies on concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients to obtain a transition zone in which the ions mobility is extremely low compared to that in the gel layer. In the second model, the transition zone and hydrated layer are treated as distinct phases and it is assumed that ion exchange at their common boundary is the rate-controlling process. The third model treats the transition zone as a thin film of constant thickness and low diffusivity. In the absence of appreciable network dissolution, all three models indicate that growth of the gel layer becomes eventually proportional to the square root of time; however, as long as processes in the transition zone are rate controlling, growth is linearly proportional to time

  12. Growth of micrometric oxide layers to explore laser decontamination of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear industry produces a wide range of radioactive waste in terms of hazard level, contaminants and material. For metallic equipment like steam generators, the radioactivity is mainly located in the oxide surface. In order to study and develop safe techniques for dismantling and for decontamination, it is important to have access to oxide layers with a representative distribution of non-radioactive contaminants. In this paper we propose a method for the creation of oxide layers on stainless steel 304L with europium (Eu as contaminant. This technique consists in spraying an Eu-solution on stainless steel samples. The specimens are firstly treated with a pulsed nanosecond laser after which the steel samples are placed in a 873 K furnace for various durations in order to grow an oxide layer. The oxide structure and in-depth distribution of Eu in the oxide layer were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, as well as by glow discharge optical emission or mass spectrometry. The oxide layers were grown to thicknesses in the range of 200 nm–4.5 μm depending on the laser treatment parameters and the heating duration. These contaminated oxides had a ‘duplex structure’ with a mean concentration of the order of 6 × 1016 atoms/cm2 (15 μg/cm2 of europium in the volume of the oxide layer. It appears that europium implementation prevented the oxide growth in the furnace. Nevertheless, the presence of the contamination had no impact on the thickness of the oxide layers obtained by preliminary laser treatment. These oxide layers were used to study the decontamination of metallic surfaces such as stainless steel 304L using a nanosecond pulsed laser.

  13. Quantum Hall states of atomic Bose gases: Density profiles in single-layer and multilayer geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N. R.; Lankvelt, F. J. M. van; Reijnders, J. W.; Schoutens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the density profiles of confined atomic Bose gases in the high-rotation limit, in single-layer and multilayer geometries. We show that, in a local-density approximation, the density in a single layer shows a landscape of quantized steps due to the formation of incompressible liquids, which are analogous to fractional quantum Hall liquids for a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field. In a multilayered setup we find different phases, depending on the strength of the interlayer tunneling t. We discuss the situation where a vortex lattice in the three-dimensional condensate (at large tunneling) undergoes quantum melting at a critical tunneling t c 1 . For tunneling well below t c 1 one expects weakly coupled or isolated layers, each exhibiting a landscape of quantum Hall liquids. After expansion, this gives a radial density distribution with characteristic features (cusps) that provide experimental signatures of the quantum Hall liquids

  14. Atomic layer deposited high-k dielectric on graphene by functionalization through atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong Woo; Kang, Myung Hoon; Oh, Seongkook; Yang, Byung Chan; Seong, Kwonil; Ahn, Hyo-Sok; Lee, Tae Hoon; An, Jihwan

    2018-05-01

    Atomic layer-deposited (ALD) dielectric films on graphene usually show noncontinuous and rough morphology owing to the inert surface of graphene. Here, we demonstrate the deposition of thin and uniform ALD ZrO2 films with no seed layer on chemical vapor-deposited graphene functionalized by atmospheric oxygen plasma treatment. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the ALD ZrO2 films were highly crystalline, despite a low ALD temperature of 150 °C. The ALD ZrO2 film served as an effective passivation layer for graphene, which was shown by negative shifts in the Dirac voltage and the enhanced air stability of graphene field-effect transistors after ALD of ZrO2. The ALD ZrO2 film on the functionalized graphene may find use in flexible graphene electronics and biosensors owing to its low process temperature and its capacity to improve device performance and stability.

  15. Aluminum oxide barrier coating on polyethersulfone substrate by atomic layer deposition for barrier property enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Kim, Sung Soo

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum oxide layers were deposited on flexible polyethersulfone (PES) substrates via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and oxygen as precursor and reactant materials. Several process parameters in PEALD process were investigated in terms of refractive index and layer thickness. Number of process cycle increased the thickness and refractive index of the layer to enhance the barrier properties. Non-physisorbed TMA and unreacted oxygen were purged before and after the plasma reaction, respectively. Identical purge time was applied to TMA and oxygen and it was optimized for 10 s. Thinner and denser layer was formed as substrate temperature increased. However, the PES substrate could be deformed above 120 o C. Aluminum oxide layer formed on PES at optimized conditions have 11.8 nm of thickness and reduced water vapor transmission rate and oxygen transmission rate to below 4 x 10 -3 g/m 2 day and 4 x 10 -3 cm 3 /m 2 day, respectively. Polycarbonate and polyethylene naphthalate films were also tested at optimized conditions, and they also showed quite appreciable barrier properties to be used as plastic substrates.

  16. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  17. Interface control of atomic layer deposited oxide coatings by filtered cathodic arc deposited sublayers for improved corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, Emma, E-mail: emma.harkonen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka [DIARC-Technology Inc., Espoo (Finland); Díaz, Belén; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS (UMR 7075) – Chimie ParisTech (ENSCP), F-75005 Paris (France); Fenker, Martin [FEM Research Institute, Precious Metals and Metals Chemistry, D-73525 Schwäbisch Gmünd (Germany); Tóth, Lajos; Radnóczi, György [Research Centre for Natural Sciences HAS, (MTA TKK), Budapest (Hungary); Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Sublayers grown with filtered cathodic arc deposition (FCAD) were added under atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide coatings for interface control and improved corrosion protection of low alloy steel. The FCAD sublayer was either Ta:O or Cr:O–Ta:O nanolaminate, and the ALD layer was Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanolaminate, Al{sub x}Ta{sub y}O{sub z} mixture or graded mixture. The total thicknesses of the FCAD/ALD duplex coatings were between 65 and 120 nm. Thorough analysis of the coatings was conducted to gain insight into the influence of the FCAD sublayer on the overall coating performance. Similar characteristics as with single FCAD and ALD coatings on steel were found in the morphology and composition of the duplex coatings. However, the FCAD process allowed better control of the interface with the steel by reducing the native oxide and preventing its regrowth during the initial stages of the ALD process. Residual hydrocarbon impurities were buried in the interface between the FCAD layer and steel. This enabled growth of ALD layers with improved electrochemical sealing properties, inhibiting the development of localized corrosion by pitting during immersion in acidic NaCl and enhancing durability in neutral salt spray testing. - Highlights: • Corrosion protection properties of ALD coatings were improved by FCAD sublayers. • The FCAD sublayer enabled control of the coating-substrate interface. • The duplex coatings offered improved sealing properties and durability in NSS. • The protective properties were maintained during immersion in a corrosive solution. • The improvements were due to a more ideal ALD growth on the homogeneous FCAD oxide.

  18. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  19. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of Zn(O,S) buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Poodt, P.; Illeberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxysulfide has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) and successfully applied as buffer layer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. S-ALD combines high deposition rates (up to nm/s) with the advantages of conventional ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and superior

  20. Uniform coating of Ta2O5 on vertically aligned substrate: A prelude to forced flow atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Mrinalini; Kei, Chi-Chung; Yu, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Wei-Szu; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2017-06-01

    Uniform tantalum oxide thin films, with a growth rate of 0.6 Å/cycle, were fabricated on vertically aligned, 10 cm-long, silicon substrates using an innovative atomic layer deposition (ALD) design. The ALD system, with a reaction chamber depth of 13.3 cm and 18 vertical enclosed channels (inner diameter 1.3 cm), was coupled with a shower-head type precursor conduit plate bearing 6 radial channels. This design enabled deposition on 6 silicon substrates at a time. The degrees of non-uniformity of deposits along the length of the silicon wafer and across different positions in the ALD chamber were found to be 1.77%-6.21% and 3.27%-5.45%, respectively. A further advantage of the design is that the conduit plate may be modified and the number of channels increased to process 18 substrates simultaneously, thus moving toward efficient and expedited ALD systems.

  1. Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation by GaAs Nanowire Arrays Protected with Atomic Layer Deposited NiO x Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Joy; Xu, Xiaoqing; Parameshwaran, Vijay; Baker, Jon; Bent, Stacey; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Clemens, Bruce

    2018-02-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production makes possible the direct conversion of solar energy into chemical fuel. In this work, PEC photoanodes consisting of GaAs nanowire (NW) arrays were fabricated, characterized, and then demonstrated for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Uniform and periodic GaAs nanowire arrays were grown on a heavily n-doped GaAs substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition selective area growth. The nanowire arrays were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in a non-aqueous electrochemical system using ferrocene/ferrocenium (Fc/Fc+) as a redox couple, and a maximum oxidation photocurrent of 11.1 mA/cm2 was measured. GaAs NW arrays with a 36 nm layer of nickel oxide (NiO x ) synthesized by atomic layer deposition were then used as photoanodes to drive the OER. In addition to acting as an electrocatalyst, the NiO x layer served to protect the GaAs NWs from oxidative corrosion. Using this strategy, GaAs NW photoanodes were successfully used for the oxygen evolution reaction. This is the first demonstration of GaAs NW arrays for effective OER, and the fabrication and protection strategy developed in this work can be extended to study any other nanostructured semiconductor materials systems for electrochemical solar energy conversion.

  2. Electrical and materials properties of ZrO2 gate dielectrics grown by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Charles M.; Triplett, Baylor B.; McIntyre, Paul C.; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Haukka, Suvi; Tuominen, Marko

    2001-04-01

    Structural and electrical properties of gate stack structures containing ZrO2 dielectrics were investigated. The ZrO2 films were deposited by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD) after different substrate preparations. The structure, composition, and interfacial characteristics of these gate stacks were examined using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ZrO2 films were polycrystalline with either a cubic or tetragonal crystal structure. An amorphous interfacial layer with a moderate dielectric constant formed between the ZrO2 layer and the substrate during ALCVD growth on chemical oxide-terminated silicon. Gate stacks with a measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of 1.3 nm showed leakage values of 10-5 A/cm2 at a bias of -1 V from flatband, which is significantly less than that seen with SiO2 dielectrics of similar EOT. A hysteresis of 8-10 mV was seen for ±2 V sweeps while a midgap interface state density (Dit) of ˜3×1011 states/cm eV was determined from comparisons of measured and ideal capacitance curves.

  3. Evidence for the Diffusion of Au Atoms into the Te UPD Layer Formed on a Au(111) Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Takahasi, Masamitu; Hojo, Nobuhiko; Miyake, Masao; Murase, Kuniaki; Tamura, Kazuhisa; Uosaki, Kohei; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2002-01-01

    The structure of a Te layer formed on a Au(111) substrate by underpotential deposition (UPD) in an electrolytic solution has been studied using in situ surface X-ray diffraction technique. The measurements were carried out for a series of samples which were kept at UPD potential for 4 to 59 h. The results revealed that the Te UPD layer is unstable. The top layer is analyzed to consist of the UPD Te atoms and Au atoms which diffuse from the Au(111) substrate. Also, the Te UPD layer does not ha...

  4. Fabrication and magnetic properties of FePt/Al2O3 composite film by atomic-layer-deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Ji-Zhou; Gao, Mo-Yun; Zhai, Hai-Fa; Yan, Qing-Yu; Li, Ai-Dong; Li, Hui; Wu, Di

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembled face-centered cubic FePt nanoparticles were capped by a amorphous Al 2 O 3 capping layer with the thickness of 10 nm using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology, and transmission electron microscopy indicates that the FePt nanocrystals are well-separated. After annealing the composite film at 700 °C, well-monodispersed face-centered tetragonal FePt particles can be obtained, yielding a coercivity value Hc=5.9 kOe with the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 3.86 MJ/m 3 . The thermal factor for the composite film is 68.5, meeting the industry requirement (K u V/k B T ≥ 50). The protection of amorphous Al 2 O 3 matrix can effectively inhibit grain growth and particle aggregation, and preserve the ordered domains of FePt nanoparticles during the L1 0 ordering transition. The combination of ALD-capping layer and self-assembled FePt nanoparticles provides a new potential approach to fabricate patterned magnetic recording media with ultrahigh areal density. - Highlights: • Well-monodispersed fcc-FePt NPs were prepared via chemical reduction. • Self-assembled fcc-FePt NPs were capped by Al 2 O 3 layer via ALD. • Al 2 O 3 capping layer can prevent particles from agglomerating and sintering. • A coercivity of 5.9 kOe with the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 3.86 MJ/m 3 was obtained. • The thermal factor of the composite film is 68.5, meeting the industry requirement

  5. The Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on Ni foam for the electrooxidation of alcohols

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of Pt and Pd metal by surface limited redox replacement reactions was performed using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substrates for metal deposition. Supported Pt and Pd...

  6. Triboelectric charge generation by semiconducting SnO2 film grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, No Ho; Yoon, Seong Yu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, Seong Keun; Choi, Byung Joon

    2017-07-01

    Improving the energy harvesting efficiency of triboelectric generators (TEGs) requires exploring new types of materials that can be used, and understanding their properties. In this study, we have investigated semiconducting SnO2 thin films as friction layers in TEGs, which has not been explored thus far. Thin films of SnO2 with various thicknesses were grown by atomic layer deposition on Si substrates. Either polymer or glass was used as counter friction layers. Vertical contact/separation mode was utilized to evaluate the TEG efficiency. The results indicate that an increase in the SnO2 film thickness from 5 to 25 nm enhances the triboelectric output voltage of the TEG. Insertion of a 400-nm-thick Pt sub-layer between the SnO2 film and Si substrate further increased the output voltage up to 120 V in a 2 cm × 2 cm contact area, while the enhancement was cancelled out by inserting a 10-nm-thick insulating Al2O3 film between SnO2 and Pt films. These results indicate that n-type semiconducting SnO2 films can provide triboelectric charge to counter-friction layers in TEGs.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Atomic layer deposition for photovoltaics: applications and prospects for solar cell manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft, J. A.; Garcia-Alonso, D.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapour-phase deposition technique capable of depositing high quality, uniform and conformal thin films at relatively low temperatures. These outstanding properties can be employed to face processing challenges for various types of next-generation solar cells; hence, ALD for photovoltaics (PV) has attracted great interest in academic and industrial research in recent years. In this review, the recent progress of ALD layers applied to various solar cell concepts and their future prospects are discussed. Crystalline silicon (c-Si), copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) benefit from the application of ALD surface passivation layers, buffer layers and barrier layers, respectively. ALD films are also excellent moisture permeation barriers that have been successfully used to encapsulate flexible CIGS and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Furthermore, some emerging applications of the ALD method in solar cell research are reviewed. The potential of ALD for solar cells manufacturing is discussed, and the current status of high-throughput ALD equipment development is presented. ALD is on the verge of being introduced in the PV industry and it is expected that it will be part of the standard solar cell manufacturing equipment in the near future.

  8. Surface passivation of efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells using thermal atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Che-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Jui; Chang, Che-Wei; Huang, Jhih-Jie; Yang, Ming-Jui; Tjahjono, Budi; Huang, Jian-Jia; Hsu, Wen-Ching; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2013-10-09

    Efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells passivated by an Al2O3 layer are demonstrated. The broadband antireflection of the nanotextured black silicon solar cells was provided by fabricating vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays on the n(+) emitter. A highly conformal Al2O3 layer was deposited upon the SiNW arrays by the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) based on the multiple pulses scheme. The nanotextured black silicon wafer covered with the Al2O3 layer exhibited a low total reflectance of ∼1.5% in a broad spectrum from 400 to 800 nm. The Al2O3 passivation layer also contributes to the suppressed surface recombination, which was explored in terms of the chemical and field-effect passivation effects. An 8% increment of short-circuit current density and 10.3% enhancement of efficiency were achieved due to the ALD Al2O3 surface passivation and forming gas annealing. A high efficiency up to 18.2% was realized in the ALD Al2O3-passivated nanotextured black silicon solar cells.

  9. Atomic Layer-Deposited TiO2 Coatings on NiTi Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokoun, D.; Racek, J.; Kadeřávek, L.; Kei, C. C.; Yu, Y. S.; Klimša, L.; Šittner, P.

    2018-02-01

    NiTi shape-memory alloys may release poisonous Ni ions at the alloys' surface. In an attempt to prepare a well-performing surface layer on an NiTi sample, the thermally grown TiO2 layer, which formed during the heat treatment of NiTi, was removed and replaced with a new TiO2 layer prepared using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was found that the ALD layer prepared at as low a temperature as 100 °C contained Ti in oxidation states + 4 and + 3. As for static corrosion properties of the ALD-coated NiTi samples, they further improved compared to those covered by thermally grown oxide. The corrosion rate of samples with thermally grown oxide was 1.05 × 10-5 mm/year, whereas the corrosion rate of the ALD-coated samples turned out to be about five times lower. However, cracking of the ALD coating occurred at about 1.5% strain during the superelastic mechanical loading in tension taking place via the propagation of a localized martensite band.

  10. Atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide optical modulator for visible coherent light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Shuxian; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    Coherent light sources in the visible range are playing important roles in our daily life and modern technology, since about 50% of the capability of the our human brains is devoted to processing visual information. Visible lasers can be achieved by nonlinear optical process of infrared lasers and direct lasing of gain materials, and the latter has advantages in the aspects of compactness, efficiency, simplicity, etc. However, due to lack of visible optical modulators, the directly generated visible lasers with only a gain material are constrained in continuous-wave operation. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of a visible optical modulator and pulsed visible lasers based on atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), a ultrathin two-dimensional material with about 9–10 layers. By employing the nonlinear absorption of the modulator, the pulsed orange, red and deep red lasers were directly generated. Besides, the present atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulator has broadband modulating properties and advantages in the simple preparation process. The present results experimentally verify the theoretical prediction for the low-dimensional optoelectronic modulating devices in the visible wavelength region and may open an attractive avenue for removing a stumbling block for the further development of pulsed visible lasers. PMID:26067821

  11. Observation of anomalous Stokes versus anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    We grow hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor, with chemical vapor transport methods and investigate its atomic layers with Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. We report observation of all six types of zone center optical phonons. Quite remarkably, the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, creating an illusion of 'negative temperature'. This effect is tunable, and can be switched from anti-Stokes enhancement to suppression by varying the excitation wavelength. We interpret this observation to be a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center, which are robust even for multiple layers of MoTe2. The intense anti-Stokes Raman scattering provides a cooling channel for the crystal and opens up opportunities for laser cooling of atomically thin TMDC semiconductor devices. Supported by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the National Science Foundation Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CMMI-1025020) and Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-1433496).

  12. Ionic double layer of atomically flat gold formed on mica templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcott, Terry C.; Wong, Elicia L.S.; Coster, Hans G.L.; Coster, Adelle C.F.; James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy characterisations of gold surfaces formed on mica templates in contact with potassium chloride electrolytes were performed at the electric potential of zero charge over a frequency range of 6 x 10 -3 to 100 x 10 3 Hz. They revealed constant-phase-angle (CPA) behaviour with a frequency exponent value of 0.96 for surfaces that were also characterised as atomically flat using atomic force microscopy (AFM). As the frequency exponent value was only marginally less than unity, the CPA behaviour yielded a realistic estimate for the capacitance of the ionic double layer. The retention of the CPA behaviour was attributed to specific adsorption of chloride ions which was detected as an adsorption conductance element in parallel with the CPA impedance element. Significant variations in the ionic double layer capacitance as well as the adsorption conductance were observed for electrolyte concentrations ranging from 33 μM to 100 mM, but neither of these variations correlated with concentration. This is consistent with the electrical properties of the interface deriving principally from the inner or Stern region of the double layer.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition of SnO2 on MXene for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2017-02-24

    In this report, we show that oxide battery anodes can be grown on two-dimensional titanium carbide sheets (MXenes) by atomic layer deposition. Using this approach, we have fabricated a composite SnO2/MXene anode for Li-ion battery applications. The SnO2/MXene anode exploits the high Li-ion capacity offered by SnO2, while maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity by the conductive MXene platform. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) conditions used to deposit SnO2 on MXene terminated with oxygen, fluorine, and hydroxyl-groups were found to be critical for preventing MXene degradation during ALD. We demonstrate that SnO2/MXene electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as Li-ion battery anodes, where conductive MXene sheets act to buffer the volume changes associated with lithiation and delithiation of SnO2. The cyclic performance of the anodes is further improved by depositing a very thin passivation layer of HfO2, in the same ALD reactor, on the SnO2/MXene anode. This is shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to also improve the structural integrity of SnO2 anode during cycling. The HfO2 coated SnO2/MXene electrodes demonstrate a stable specific capacity of 843 mAh/g when used as Li-ion battery anodes.

  14. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT–ZnO Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD. Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT–inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials.

  16. (Invited) Atomic Layer Deposition for Novel Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present the latest fabrication and characterization techniques for atomic layer deposition of Al 2O 3, ZnO, SnO 2, Nb 2O 5, HfO 2, Ga 2O 3 and TiO 2 for research on dye-sensitized solar cell. In particular, we review the fabrication of state-of-the-art 3D host-passivation-guest photoanodes and ZnO nanowires as well as characterize the deposited thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction, Hall effect, J-V curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  17. Improvement and protection of niobium surface superconductivity by atomic layer deposition and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, T.; /IIT, Chicago /Argonne; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Moore, J.; Pellin, M.; Elam, J.; /Argonne; Cooley, L.; /Fermilab; Antoine, C.; /Saclay

    2008-11-01

    A method to treat the surface of Nb is described, which potentially can improve the performance of superconducting rf cavities. We present tunneling and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements at the surface of cavity-grade niobium samples coated with a 3 nm alumina overlayer deposited by atomic layer deposition. The coated samples baked in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperature degraded superconducting surface. However, at temperatures above 450 C, the tunneling conductance curves show significant improvements in the superconducting density of states compared with untreated surfaces.

  18. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt–Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta; Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Verheijen, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    (ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (Ru(EtCp)2), respectively. O2 was used as the reactant in both processes. The composition of the catalysts was easily tuned by varying the Pt-to-Ru ALD cycle ratio. The catalysts were tested toward the CO oxidation and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in a three-electrode electrochemical set......Pt–Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250°C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and bis...

  19. Atomic layer epitaxy of hematite on indium tin oxide for application in solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Riha, Shannon; Guo, Peijun; Emery, Jonathan D.

    2016-07-12

    A method to provide an article of manufacture of iron oxide on indium tin oxide for solar energy conversion. An atomic layer epitaxy method is used to deposit an uncommon bixbytite-phase iron (III) oxide (.beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3) which is deposited at low temperatures to provide 99% phase pure .beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 thin films on indium tin oxide. Subsequent annealing produces pure .alpha.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 with well-defined epitaxy via a topotactic transition. These highly crystalline films in the ultra thin film limit enable high efficiency photoelectrochemical chemical water splitting.

  20. Metallic nanoparticle-based strain sensors elaborated by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyoo, E.; Malhaire, C.; Thomas, D.; Rafaël, R.; R'Mili, M.; Malchère, A.; Roiban, L.; Koneti, S.; Bugnet, M.; Sabac, A.; Le Berre, M.

    2017-03-01

    Platinum nanoparticle-based strain gauges are elaborated by means of atomic layer deposition on flexible polyimide substrates. Their electro-mechanical response is tested under mechanical bending in both buckling and conformational contact configurations. A maximum gauge factor of 70 is reached at a strain level of 0.5%. Although the exponential dependence of the gauge resistance on strain is attributed to the tunneling effect, it is shown that the majority of the junctions between adjacent Pt nanoparticles are in a short circuit state. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of an all-plastic pressure sensor integrating Pt nanoparticle-based strain gauges in a Wheatstone bridge configuration.

  1. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  2. Fluorine contamination in yttrium-doped barium zirconate film deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An Jihwan; Beom Kim, Young; Sun Park, Joong; Hyung Shim, Joon; Guer, Turgut M.; Prinz, Fritz B. [Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Korea University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Stanford University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The authors have investigated the change of chemical composition, crystallinity, and ionic conductivity in fluorine contaminated yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BYZ) fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). It has been identified that fluorine contamination can significantly affect the conductivity of the ALD BYZ. The authors have also successfully established the relationship between process temperature and contamination and the source of fluorine contamination, which was the perfluoroelastomer O-ring used for vacuum sealing. The total removal of fluorine contamination was achieved by using all-metal sealed chamber instead of O-ring seals.

  3. Fluorine contamination in yttrium-doped barium zirconate film deposited by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Jihwan; Beom Kim, Young; Sun Park, Joong; Hyung Shim, Joon; Guer, Turgut M.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have investigated the change of chemical composition, crystallinity, and ionic conductivity in fluorine contaminated yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BYZ) fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). It has been identified that fluorine contamination can significantly affect the conductivity of the ALD BYZ. The authors have also successfully established the relationship between process temperature and contamination and the source of fluorine contamination, which was the perfluoroelastomer O-ring used for vacuum sealing. The total removal of fluorine contamination was achieved by using all-metal sealed chamber instead of O-ring seals.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of Cu( i ) oxide films using Cu( ii ) bis(dimethylamino-2-propoxide) and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, J. R.; Peters, A. W.; Li, Zhanyong; Ortuño, M. A.; Martinson, A. B. F.; Cramer, C. J.; Hupp, J. T.; Farha, O. K.

    2017-01-01

    To grow fIlms of Cu2O, bis-(dimethylamino-2-propoxide)Cu(II), or Cu(dmap), is used as an atomic layer deposition precursor using only water vapor as a co-reactant. Between 110 and 175 °C, a growth rate of 0.12 ± 0.02 Å per cycle was measured using an in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the growth of metal– oxide films featuring Cu(I).

  5. Atomic layer deposited borosilicate glass microchannel plates for large area event counting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmund, O.H.W.; McPhate, J.B.; Tremsin, A.S.; Jelinsky, S.R.; Hemphill, R.; Frisch, H.J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 40 μm pores have been deposited with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Device formats of 32.7 mm and 20 cm square have been fabricated and tested in analog and photon counting modes. The tests show amplification, imaging, background rate, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area microchannel plates of this type facilitate the construction of 20 cm format sealed tube sensors with strip-line readouts that are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Complementary work has resulted in Na 2 KSb bialkali photocathodes with peak quantum efficiency of 25% being made on borosilicate glass. Additionally GaN (Mg) opaque photocathodes have been successfully made on borosilicate microchannel plates.

  6. Atomic layer deposited borosilicate glass microchannel plates for large area event counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A. S.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Hemphill, R.; Frisch, H. J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Lappd Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 40 μm pores have been deposited with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Device formats of 32.7 mm and 20 cm square have been fabricated and tested in analog and photon counting modes. The tests show amplification, imaging, background rate, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area microchannel plates of this type facilitate the construction of 20 cm format sealed tube sensors with strip-line readouts that are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Complementary work has resulted in Na2KSb bialkali photocathodes with peak quantum efficiency of 25% being made on borosilicate glass. Additionally GaN (Mg) opaque photocathodes have been successfully made on borosilicate microchannel plates.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of lead sulfide quantum dots on nanowire surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Jung, Hee Joon; Trejo, Orlando; McDowell, Matthew T; Hryciw, Aaron; Brongersma, Mark; Sinclair, Robert; Prinz, Fritz B

    2011-03-09

    Quantum dots provide unique advantages in the design of novel optoelectronic devices owing to the ability to tune their properties as a function of size. Here we demonstrate a new technique for fabrication of quantum dots during the nucleation stage of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of PbS. Islands with sub-10 nm diameters were observed during the initial ALD cycles by transmission electron microscopy, and in situ observations of the coalescence and sublimation behavior of these islands show the possibility of further modifying the size and density of dots by annealing. The ALD process can be used to cover high-aspect-ratio nanostructures, as demonstrated by the uniform coating of a Si nanowire array with a single layer of PbS quantum dots. Photoluminescence measurements on the quantum dot/nanowire composites show a blue shift when the number of ALD cycles is decreased, suggesting a route to fabricate unique three-dimensional nanostructured devices such as solar cells.

  8. Synthesis of metal-oxide nanotubular structures by using atomic layer deposition on nanotemplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Daekyun; Lee, Jinwoo; Shin, Hyunjung; Lee, Jaegab; Kim, Jiyoung; Sung, Myungmo [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-15

    Nanotube fabrication processes through modification of conventional nanotemplate methods are investigated. In order to fabricate the nanotubes by using nanotemplates, we treated surfacemodification self-assembled monolayers on the nanotemplates in order to achieve selective deposition. We used commercially available polycarbonate nanotemplates, supplying uniform nano-scale pores and selective removal of the templates. We deposited conformal and uniform thin tube walls by using atomic layer deposition for oxide layers such as titania and zirconia. The wall thickness was precisely controlled by the number of deposition cycles of the ALD process. The shapes of nanotubes were controlled by template pore sizes and thicknesses. The various properties of the resultant metal-oxide nanotube were examined using by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and a selective area electron-diffraction pattern.

  9. Atomic layer deposited TiO2 for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianci, E.; Lattanzio, S.; Seguini, G.; Vassanelli, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 °C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al 2 O 3 buffer layer between TiO 2 and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  10. Coking- and sintering-resistant palladium catalysts achieved through atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Fu, Baosong; Kung, Mayfair C; Xiao, Guomin; Elam, Jeffrey W; Kung, Harold H; Stair, Peter C

    2012-03-09

    We showed that alumina (Al(2)O(3)) overcoating of supported metal nanoparticles (NPs) effectively reduced deactivation by coking and sintering in high-temperature applications of heterogeneous catalysts. We overcoated palladium NPs with 45 layers of alumina through an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process that alternated exposures of the catalysts to trimethylaluminum and water at 200°C. When these catalysts were used for 1 hour in oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene at 650°C, they were found by thermogravimetric analysis to contain less than 6% of the coke formed on the uncoated catalysts. Scanning transmission electron microscopy showed no visible morphology changes after reaction at 675°C for 28 hours. The yield of ethylene was improved on all ALD Al(2)O(3) overcoated Pd catalysts.

  11. Atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianci, E., E-mail: elena.cianci@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Lattanzio, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Seguini, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vassanelli, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 Degree-Sign C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer between TiO{sub 2} and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  12. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  13. The influence of tertiary butyl hydrazine as a co-reactant on the atomic layer deposition of silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Marshall, Paul A.; Romani, Simon [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering,The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Rushworth, Simon [EpiValence, The Wilton Centre, Redcar, Cleveland, TS10 4RF (United Kingdom); Chalker, Paul R. [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering,The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Potter, Richard J., E-mail: rjpott@liverpool.ac.uk [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering,The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • We demonstrate metallic silver growth by direct liquid injection thermal ALD. • A substituted hydrazine is used as a powerful reducing agent for the first time. • The hydrazine extends the ALD temperature window compared with alcohol. • Hydrazine promotes a more planar growth mode compared to alcohol. • Film adhesion is improved using hydrazine compared with alcohol. - Abstract: Ultra-thin conformal silver films are the focus of development for applications such as anti-microbial surfaces, optical components and electronic devices. In this study, metallic silver films have been deposited using direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) using (hfac)Ag(1,5-COD) ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) as the metal source and tertiary butyl hydrazine (TBH) as a co-reactant. The process provides a 23 °C wide ‘self-limiting’ ALD temperature window between 105 and 128 °C, which is significantly wider than is achievable using alcohol as a co-reactant. A mass deposition rate of ∼20 ng/cm{sup 2}/cycle (∼0.18 Å/cycle) is observed under self-limiting growth conditions. The resulting films are crystalline metallic silver with a near planar film-like morphology which are electrically conductive. By extending the temperature range of the ALD window by the use of TBH as a co-reactant, it is envisaged that the process will be exploitable in a range of new low temperature applications.

  14. The influence of tertiary butyl hydrazine as a co-reactant on the atomic layer deposition of silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Marshall, Paul A.; Romani, Simon; Rushworth, Simon; Chalker, Paul R.; Potter, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrate metallic silver growth by direct liquid injection thermal ALD. • A substituted hydrazine is used as a powerful reducing agent for the first time. • The hydrazine extends the ALD temperature window compared with alcohol. • Hydrazine promotes a more planar growth mode compared to alcohol. • Film adhesion is improved using hydrazine compared with alcohol. - Abstract: Ultra-thin conformal silver films are the focus of development for applications such as anti-microbial surfaces, optical components and electronic devices. In this study, metallic silver films have been deposited using direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) using (hfac)Ag(1,5-COD) ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) as the metal source and tertiary butyl hydrazine (TBH) as a co-reactant. The process provides a 23 °C wide ‘self-limiting’ ALD temperature window between 105 and 128 °C, which is significantly wider than is achievable using alcohol as a co-reactant. A mass deposition rate of ∼20 ng/cm 2 /cycle (∼0.18 Å/cycle) is observed under self-limiting growth conditions. The resulting films are crystalline metallic silver with a near planar film-like morphology which are electrically conductive. By extending the temperature range of the ALD window by the use of TBH as a co-reactant, it is envisaged that the process will be exploitable in a range of new low temperature applications.

  15. Consequences of atomic layer etching on wafer scale uniformity in inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Chad M.; Lanham, Steven J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2018-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) typically divides the etching process into two self-limited reactions. One reaction passivates a single layer of material while the second preferentially removes the passivated layer. As such, under ideal conditions the wafer scale uniformity of ALE should be independent of the uniformity of the reactant fluxes onto the wafers, provided all surface reactions are saturated. The passivation and etch steps should individually asymptotically saturate after a characteristic fluence of reactants has been delivered to each site. In this paper, results from a computational investigation are discussed regarding the uniformity of ALE of Si in Cl2 containing inductively coupled plasmas when the reactant fluxes are both non-uniform and non-ideal. In the parameter space investigated for inductively coupled plasmas, the local etch rate for continuous processing was proportional to the ion flux. When operated with saturated conditions (that is, both ALE steps are allowed to self-terminate), the ALE process is less sensitive to non-uniformities in the incoming ion flux than continuous etching. Operating ALE in a sub-saturation regime resulted in less uniform etching. It was also found that ALE processing with saturated steps requires a larger total ion fluence than continuous etching to achieve the same etch depth. This condition may result in increased resist erosion and/or damage to stopping layers using ALE. While these results demonstrate that ALE provides increased etch depth uniformity, they do not show an improved critical dimension uniformity in all cases. These possible limitations to ALE processing, as well as increased processing time, will be part of the process optimization that includes the benefits of atomic resolution and improved uniformity.

  16. Piezoelectricity of single-atomic-layer MoS2 for energy conversion and piezotronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Lei; Li, Yilei; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Long; Niu, Simiao; Chenet, Daniel; Zhang, Xian; Hao, Yufeng; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-10-23

    The piezoelectric characteristics of nanowires, thin films and bulk crystals have been closely studied for potential applications in sensors, transducers, energy conversion and electronics. With their high crystallinity and ability to withstand enormous strain, two-dimensional materials are of great interest as high-performance piezoelectric materials. Monolayer MoS2 is predicted to be strongly piezoelectric, an effect that disappears in the bulk owing to the opposite orientations of adjacent atomic layers. Here we report the first experimental study of the piezoelectric properties of two-dimensional MoS2 and show that cyclic stretching and releasing of thin MoS2 flakes with an odd number of atomic layers produces oscillating piezoelectric voltage and current outputs, whereas no output is observed for flakes with an even number of layers. A single monolayer flake strained by 0.53% generates a peak output of 15 mV and 20 pA, corresponding to a power density of 2 mW m(-2) and a 5.08% mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the output increases with decreasing thickness and reverses sign when the strain direction is rotated by 90°. Transport measurements show a strong piezotronic effect in single-layer MoS2, but not in bilayer and bulk MoS2. The coupling between piezoelectricity and semiconducting properties in two-dimensional nanomaterials may enable the development of applications in powering nanodevices, adaptive bioprobes and tunable/stretchable electronics/optoelectronics.

  17. Crystal growth mechanisms and morphological control of the prototypical metal-organic framework MOF-5 revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillas, Pablo; Anderson, Michael W; Attfield, Martin P

    2012-11-26

    Crystal growth of the metal-organic framework MOF-5 was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Growth under low supersaturation conditions was found to occur by a two-dimensional or spiral crystal growth mechanism. Observation of developing nuclei during the former reveals growth occurs through a process of nucleation and spreading of metastable and stable sub-layers revealing that MOFs may be considered as dense phase structures in terms of crystal growth, even though they contain sub-layers consisting of ordered framework and disordered non-framework components. These results also support the notion this may be a general mechanism of surface crystal growth at low supersaturation applicable to crystalline nanoporous materials. The crystal growth mechanism at the atomistic level was also seen to vary as a function of the growth solution Zn/H(2)bdc ratio producing square terraces with steps parallel to the direction or rhombus-shaped terraces with steps parallel to the direction when the Zn/H(2)bdc ratio was >1 or about 1, respectively. The change in relative growth rates can be explained in terms of changes in the solution species concentrations and their influence on growth at different terrace growth sites. These results were successfully applied to the growth of as-synthesized cube-shaped crystals to increase expression of the {111} faces and to grow octahedral crystals of suitable quality to image using AFM. This modulator-free route to control the crystal morphology of MOF-5 crystals should be applicable to a wide variety of MOFs to achieve the desired morphological control for performance enhancement in applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Quantifying the growth of individual graphene layers by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2016-01-01

    The growth dynamics of layered carbon is studied by means of in situ transmission electron microscopy in order to obtain a deeper insight into the growth by chemical vapor deposition, which at present is the technique of choice for growing layered carbon. In situ growth of layered carbon structures...... on nickel using acetylene as carbon precursor gas is studied in the electron microscope at various gas pressures. By following the growth of individual graphene layers on the Ni surface, local growth rates are determined as a function of precursor pressure. Two growth regimes are identified, an initial...

  19. Investigation of MOS Interfaces with Atomic-Layer-Deposited High-k Gate Dielectrics on III-V Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rahul

    The purpose of this research work was to investigate the surface passivation methods and metal gate/high-k dielectric gate stacks for metal-oxide-semiconductor devices (MOS) on III-V compound semiconductor materials -- (i) GaAs for future high-speed low-power logic devices and (ii) AlGaN/GaN heterostructure for future high-speed high-power devices. GaAs is a candidate material for high-mobility channel in a NMOS transistor to extend the CMOS scaling up to and beyond the 16-nm technology node. AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is useful in a MOS-high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) device for providing a high current-carrying two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channel. The interaction of GaAs surface with atomic layer deposition of high- k dielectrics was investigated to gain fundamental insights into the chemical properties of GaAs surface oxides and high-k/GaAs interface. Electrical characterization of devices was performed to understand the impact of high-k/GaAs interface on MOS device characteristics in order to form a suitable metal/high-k/GaAs gatestack for future high-speed logic and power devices. Reduction of native oxides on GaAs was found to occur during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-k dielectrics- HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO 2 nanolaminates on GaAs. Reaction between ALD metal precursor and native oxides on GaAs was identified to be the cause for consumption of native oxides. It was established that the ALD growth temperature has a strong impact on this phenomenon. During post-dielectric annealing the residual arsenic oxides at the interface decomposed leading to an increase in the interfacial gallium oxides. Presence of gallium oxide, Ga2O3 was identified as a cause for observed frequency dispersion in MOS capacitance-voltage curves indicative of a high interface state density. The chemical properties of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure surface prepared by wet chemical treatment using HCl/HF and NH4OH solutions were investigated and compared. Both HCl and

  20. Chromophore-Catalyst Assembly for Water Oxidation Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibabaei, Leila; Dillon, Robert J; Reilly, Caroline E; Brennaman, M Kyle; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Marquard, Seth L; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2017-11-08

    Visible-light-driven water splitting was investigated in a dye sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell (DSPEC) based on a photoanode with a phosphonic acid-derivatized donor-π-acceptor (D-π-A) organic chromophore, 1, and the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(bda)(4-O(CH 2 ) 3 P(O 3 H 2 ) 2 -pyr) 2 ], 2, (pyr = pyridine; bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate). The photoanode was prepared by using a layering strategy beginning with the organic dye anchored to an FTO|core/shell electrode, atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a thin layer (core/shell photoanodes, with either SnO 2 or nanoITO core materials, in acetate-buffered, aqueous solutions at pH 4.6 or 5.7. The absolute magnitudes of photocurrent changes with the core material, TiO 2 spacer layer thickness, or pH, observed photocurrents were 2.5-fold higher in the presence of catalyst. The results of transient absorption measurements and DFT calculations show that electron injection by the photoexcited organic dye is ultrafast promoted by electronic interactions enabled by orientation of the dye's molecular orbitals on the electrode surface. Rapid injection is followed by recombination with the oxidized dye which is 95% complete by 1.5 ns. Although chromophore decomposition limits the efficiency of the DSPEC devices toward O 2 production, the flexibility of the strategy presented here offers a new approach to photoanode design.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of absorbing thin films on nanostructured electrodes for short-wavelength infrared photosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jixian; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Fan, Fengjia; Sargent, Edward H.; Kinge, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), prized for its high-quality thin-film formation in the absence of high temperature or high vacuum, has become an industry standard for the large-area deposition of a wide array of oxide materials. Recently, it has shown promise in the formation of nanocrystalline sulfide films. Here, we demonstrate the viability of ALD lead sulfide for photodetection. Leveraging the conformal capabilities of ALD, we enhance the absorption without compromising the extraction efficiency in the absorbing layer by utilizing a ZnO nanowire electrode. The nanowires are first coated with a thin shunt-preventing TiO 2 layer, followed by an infrared-active ALD PbS layer for photosensing. The ALD PbS photodetector exhibits a peak responsivity of 10 −2  A W −1 and a shot-derived specific detectivity of 3 × 10 9  Jones at 1530 nm wavelength

  2. Hollow inorganic nanospheres and nanotubes with tunable wall thicknesses by atomic layer deposition on self-assembled polymeric templates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ras, Robin H. A.; Kemell, Marianna; de Wit, Joost; Ritala, Mikko; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Leskela, Markku; Ikkala, Olli; Leskelä, Markku

    2007-01-01

    The construction of inorganic nanostructures with hollow interiors is demonstrated by coating self-assembled polymeric nano-objects with a thin Al2O3 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD), followed by removal of the polymer template upon heating. The morphology of the nano-object (i.e., spherical

  3. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris, E-mail: cyuan@uwm.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Jen, Tien Chien [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 and School of Engineering, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, Alaska 99508 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  4. MoS2 solid-lubricating film fabricated by atomic layer deposition on Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yazhou; Liu, Lei; Lv, Jun; Yang, Junjie; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2018-04-01

    How to reduce friction for improving efficiency in the usage of energy is a constant challenge. Layered material like MoS2 has long been recognized as an effective surface lubricant. Due to low interfacial shear strengths, MoS2 is endowed with nominal frictional coefficient. In this work, MoS2 solid-lubricating film was directly grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si substrate using MoCl5 and H2S. Various methods were used to observe the grown MoS2 film. Moreover, nanotribological properties of the film were observed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Results show that MoS2 film can effectively reduce the friction force by about 30-45% under different loads, indicating the huge application value of the film as a solid lubricant. Besides the interlayer-interfaces-sliding, the smaller capillary is another reason why the grown MoS2 film has smaller friction force than that of Si.

  5. ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.

    2009-05-05

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  6. Atomic Layer Co3O4Nanosheets: The Key to Knittable Zn-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Zhong, Cheng; Liu, Bin; Liu, Zhi; Bi, Xuanxuan; Zhao, Naiqing; Han, Xiaopeng; Deng, Yida; Lu, Jun; Hu, Wenbin

    2018-02-01

    Flexible, wearable, and portable energy storage devices with high-energy density are crucial for next-generation electronics. However, the current battery technologies such as lithium ion batteries have limited theoretical energy density. Additionally, battery materials with small scale and high flexibility which could endure the large surface stress are highly required. In this study, a yarn-based 1D Zn-air battery is designed, which employs atomic layer thin Co 3 O 4 nanosheets as the oxygen reduction reaction/oxygen evolution reaction catalyst. The ultrathin nanosheets are synthesized by a high-yield and facile chemical method and show a thickness of only 1.6 nm, corresponding to few atomic layers. The 1D Zn-air battery shows high cycling stability and high rate capability. The battery is successfully knitted into clothes and it shows high stability during the large deformation and knotting conditions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Selective deposition contact patterning using atomic layer deposition for the fabrication of crystalline silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Shin, Woong-Chul; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2014-01-01

    Selective deposition contact (SDC) patterning was applied to fabricate the rear side passivation of crystalline silicon (Si) solar cells. By this method, using screen printing for contact patterning and atomic layer deposition for the passivation of Si solar cells with Al 2 O 3 , we produced local contacts without photolithography or any laser-based processes. Passivated emitter and rear-contact solar cells passivated with ozone-based Al 2 O 3 showed, for the SDC process, an up-to-0.7% absolute conversion-efficiency improvement. The results of this experiment indicate that the proposed method is feasible for conversion-efficiency improvement of industrial crystalline Si solar cells. - Highlights: • We propose a local contact formation process. • Local contact forms a screen print and an atomic layer deposited-Al 2 O 3 film. • Ozone-based Al 2 O 3 thin film was selectively deposited onto patterned silicon. • Selective deposition contact patterning method can increase cell-efficiency by 0.7%

  8. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  9. Modular injector integrated linear apparatus with motion profile optimization for spatial atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Yun; Lin, Jilong; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2017-11-01

    A spatial atomic layer deposition apparatus integrated with a modular injector and a linear motor has been designed. It consists of four parts: a precursor delivery manifold, a modular injector, a reaction zone, and a driving unit. An injector with multi-layer structured channels is designed to help improve precursor distribution homogeneity. During the back and forth movement of the substrate at high speed, the inertial impact caused by jerk and sudden changes of acceleration will degrade the film deposition quality. Such residual vibration caused by inertial impact will aggravate the fluctuation of the gap distance between the injector and the substrate in the deposition process. Thus, an S-curve motion profile is implemented to reduce the large inertial impact, and the maximum position error could be reduced by 84%. The microstructure of the film under the S-curve motion profile shows smaller root-mean-square and scanning voltage amplitude under an atomic force microscope, which verifies the effectiveness of the S-curve motion profile in reducing the residual vibration and stabilizing the gap distance between the injector and the substrate. The film deposition rate could reach 100 nm/min while maintaining good uniformity without obvious periodic patterns on the surface.

  10. Advanced Materials Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Energy Density Rechargeable Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin

    In order to meet the ever increasing energy needs of society and realize the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s target for energy storage, acquiring a fundamental understanding of the chemical mechanisms in batteries for direct guidance and searching novel advanced materials with high energy density are critical. To realize rechargeable batteries with superior energy density, great cathodes and excellent anodes are required. LiMn2O4 (LMO) has been considered as a simpler surrogate for high energy cathode materials like NMC. Previous studies demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) improved the capacity of LMO cathodes. This improvement was attributed to a reduction in surface area and diminished Mn dissolution. However, here we propose a different mechanism for ALD Al 2O3 on LMO based on in-situ and ex-situ investigations coupled with density functional theory calculations. We discovered that Al2O 3 not only coats the LMO, but also dopes the LMO surface with Al leading to changes in the Mn oxidation state. Different thicknesses of Al2O 3 were deposited on nonstoichiometric LiMn2O4 for electrochemical measurements. The LMO treated with one cycle of ALD Al2O3 (1xAl 2O3 LMO) to produce a sub-monolayer coating yielded a remarkable initial capacity, 16.4% higher than its uncoated LMO counterpart in full cells. The stability of 1xAl2O3 LMO is also much better as a result of stabilized defects with Al species. Furthermore, 4xAl 2O3 LMO demonstrates remarkable capacity retention. Stoichiometric LiMn2O4 was also evaluated with similar improved performance achieved. All superior results, accomplished by great stability and reduced Mn dissolution, is thanks to the synergetic effects of Al-doping and ALD Al2O 3 coating. Turning our attention to the anode, we again utilized aluminum oxide ALD to form conformal films on lithium. We elaborately designed and studied, for the first time, the growth mechanism during Al2O3 ALD on lithium metal in

  11. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of TiO2 thin layers for the processing of memristive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porro, Samuele; Conti, Daniele; Guastella, Salvatore; Ricciardi, Carlo; Jasmin, Alladin; Pirri, Candido F.; Bejtka, Katarzyna; Perrone, Denis; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) represents one of the most fundamental techniques capable of satisfying the strict technological requirements imposed by the rapidly evolving electronic components industry. The actual scaling trend is rapidly leading to the fabrication of nanoscaled devices able to overcome limits of the present microelectronic technology, of which the memristor is one of the principal candidates. Since their development in 2008, TiO 2 thin film memristors have been identified as the future technology for resistive random access memories because of their numerous advantages in producing dense, low power-consuming, three-dimensional memory stacks. The typical features of ALD, such as self-limiting and conformal deposition without line-of-sight requirements, are strong assets for fabricating these nanosized devices. This work focuses on the realization of memristors based on low-temperature ALD TiO 2 thin films. In this process, the oxide layer was directly grown on a polymeric photoresist, thus simplifying the fabrication procedure with a direct liftoff patterning instead of a complex dry etching process. The TiO 2 thin films deposited in a temperature range of 120–230 °C were characterized via Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical current–voltage measurements taken in voltage sweep mode were employed to confirm the existence of resistive switching behaviors typical of memristors. These measurements showed that these low-temperature devices exhibit an ON/OFF ratio comparable to that of a high-temperature memristor, thus exhibiting similar performances with respect to memory applications

  12. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

    2007-12-01

    Reaction pathways are presented for hydrogen-mediated isomerization of a five and six member carbon ring complex on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction sequence that reverses orientation of the ring complex, or 'flips' it, was identified. Competition between the flip reaction and 'ring separation' was examined. Ring separation is the reverse of the five and six member ring complex formation reaction, previously reported as 'ring collision'. The elementary steps of the pathways were analyzed using density-functional theory (DFT). Rate coefficients were obtained by solution of the energy master equation and classical transition state theory utilizing the DFT energies, frequencies, and geometries. The results indicate that the flip reaction pathway dominates the separation reaction and should be competitive with other pathways important to the graphene zigzag edge growth in high temperature environments.

  13. The generation and detection of high flux atomic oxygen for physical vapor deposition thin film growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingle, N.J.C.; Hammond, R.H.; Beasley, M.R.; Blank, David H.A.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of many epitaxial thin-film oxides is significantly enhanced with the use of an oxidizing agent such as atomic oxygen, ozone, or NO2. We developed a flow-through microwave plasma source to generate large atomic oxygen fluxes while maintaining vacuum pressures of less that 1×10¿4 Torr.

  14. Dynamic change in the surface and layer structures during epitaxial growth of Si on a Si(111)-7x7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Y.; Shigeta, Y.; Maki, K.

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic process during growth of a Si layer on the Si(111)-7x7 surface held at 380 deg. C, the rocking curve of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is continuously measured at 0.5 deg. to 6 deg. at intervals of 0.05 deg. to the glancing angle of the incident electron beam which takes 18 sec. At the initial growth stage, the multilayer islands are grown on the native 7x7 surface with broader Bragg peaks in the rocking curve than those from the native surface. The sharpness of the Bragg peak is subsequently recovered after the thickness of the Si layer reaches 3 BL (1 BL=0.31 nm), at which the growth transforms to layer-by-layer growth. The comparison of the measured rocking curve with the calculated one based on the dynamical theory of RHEED intensity is also performed by optimizing each atomic position in the growing layer so as to minimize the difference between both curves. The space of the double layer of the (111) plane in the multilayer islands expands and is restored to the normal spacing after the growth mode transforms to the layer-by-layer mode. The broadening of the Bragg peaks at the initial growth stage relates to the rearrangement process of a stacking-fault layer in the 7x7 structure on the substrate surface

  15. Influence of surface relaxation of strained layers on atomic resolution ADF imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-10-01

    Surface relaxation of thin transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens of strained layers results in a severe bending of lattice planes. This bending significantly displaces atoms from their ideal channeling positions which has a strong impact on the measured annular dark field (ADF) intensity. With the example of GaAs quantum wells (QW) embedded in a GaP barrier, we model the resulting displacements by elastic theory using the finite element (FE) formalism. Relaxed and unrelaxed super cells served as input for state of the art frozen phonon simulation of atomic resolution ADF images. We systematically investigate the dependencies on the sample´s geometric parameters, i.e. QW width and TEM sample thickness, by evaluating the simulated intensities at the atomic column´s positions as well as at the background positions in between. Depending on the geometry the ADF intensity can be affected in a range several nm from the actual interface. Moreover, we investigate the influence of the surface relaxation on the angular distribution of the scattered intensity. At high scattering angles we observe an intensity reduction at the interface as well as in the GaP barrier due to de-channeling. The amount of intensity reduction at an atomic column is directly proportional to its mean square displacement. On the contrary we find a clearly increased intensity at low angles caused by additional diffuse scattering. We discuss the implications for quantitative evaluations as well as strategies to compensate for the reduced intensities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of Nickel on ZnO Nanowire Arrays for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Yong-Ping; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ji, Xin-Ming; Devi, Anjana; Jiang, An-Quan; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-10

    A novel hybrid core-shell structure of ZnO nanowires (NWs)/Ni as a pseudocapacitor electrode was successfully fabricated by atomic layer deposition of a nickel shell, and its capacitive performance was systemically investigated. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the NiO was formed at the interface between ZnO and Ni where the Ni was oxidized by ZnO during the ALD of the Ni layer. Electrochemical measurement results revealed that the Ti/ZnO NWs/Ni (1500 cycles) electrode with a 30 nm thick Ni-NiO shell layer had the best supercapacitor properties including ultrahigh specific capacitance (∼2440 F g -1 ), good rate capability (80.5%) under high current charge-discharge conditions, and a relatively better cycling stability (86.7% of the initial value remained after 750 cycles at 10 A g -1 ). These attractive capacitive behaviors are mainly attributed to the unique core-shell structure and the combined effect of ZnO NW arrays as short charge transfer pathways for ion diffusion and electron transfer as well as conductive Ni serving as channel for the fast electron transport to Ti substrate. This high-performance Ti/ZnO NWs/Ni hybrid structure is expected to be one of a promising electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications.

  18. Analysis of arrayed nanocapacitor formed on nanorods by flow-rate interruption atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-12-01

    Flow-rate interruption (FRI) atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was adopted to fabricate AZO/Al2O3/AZO thin film on a ZnO nanorod array template at low temperature. The high quality amorphous dielectric Al2O3 layer was deposited at 50 °C. The template with an average of 0.73 μm in length was made by a simple hydrothermal method on a c-plane sapphire with an AZO seed layer. Using Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were served as a mask to form vertical and well-aligned ZnO nanostructures. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show ALD to have achieved good step coverage and thickness control in the thin films structure coating. The capacitance density of the arrayed template nanocapacitor increased more than 100% than those of the thin film capacitor at an applied frequency of 10 kHz. These results suggest that the ZnO-arrayed template could enhance energy storage capability by providing significant surface area. This structure provides a concept for high surface-area nanocapacitor applications.

  19. Atomically thin two-dimensional materials as hole extraction layers in organolead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Geun; Kwon, Ki Chang; Le, Quyet Van; Hong, Kootak; Jang, Ho Won; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and graphene oxide (GO) are used as hole extraction layers (HEL) in organolead halide perovskites solar cells (PSCs) instead of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HEL. MoS2 and WS2 layers with a polycrystalline structure were synthesized by a chemical deposition method using a uniformly spin-coated (NH4)MoS4 and (NH4)WS4 precursor solution. GO was synthesized by the oxidation of natural graphite powder using Hummers' method. The work functions of MoS2, WS2, and GO are measured to be 5.0, 4.95, and 5.1 eV, respectively. The X-ray diffraction spectrum indicated that the synthesized perovskite material is CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. The PSCs with the p-n junction structure were fabricated based on the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite layer. The power conversion efficiencies of the MoS2, WS2, and GO-based PSCs were 9.53%, 8.02%, and 9.62%, respectively, which are comparable to those obtained from PEDOT:PSS-based devices (9.93%). These results suggest that two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and GO can be promising candidates for the formation of HELs in the PSCs.

  20. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. MBE growth of Topological Isolators based on strained semi-metallic HgCdTe layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grendysa, J.; Tomaka, G.; Sliz, P.; Becker, C. R.; Trzyna, M.; Wojnarowska-Nowak, R.; Bobko, E.; Sheregii, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    Particularities of Molecular Beam Epitaxial (MBE) technology for the growth of Topological Insulators (TI) based on the semi-metal Hg1-xCdx Te are presented. A series of strained layers grown on GaAs substrates with a composition close to the 3D Dirac point were studied. The composition of the layers was verified by means of the position of the E1 maximum in optical reflectivity in the visible region. The surface morphology was determined via atomic force and electron microscopy. Magneto-transport measurements show quantized Hall resistance curves and Shubnikov de Hass oscillations (up to 50 K). It has been demonstrated that a well-developed MBE technology enables one to grow strained Hg1-xCdx Te layers on GaAs/CdTe substrates with a well-defined composition near the 3D Dirac point and consequently allows one to produce a 3D topological Dirac semimetal - 3D analogy of graphene - for future applications.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of NiS and its application as cathode material in dye sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahuli, Neha [Center for Research in Nanotechnology and Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Sarkar, Shaibal K., E-mail: shaibal.sarkar@iitb.ac.in [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Nickel sulfide (NiS) is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using sequential exposures of bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dionate)nickel(II) [Ni(thd){sub 2}] and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) at 175 °C. Complementary combinations of in situ and ex situ characterization techniques are used to understand the deposition chemistry and the nature of film growth. The saturated growth rate of ca. 0.21 Å per ALD cycle is obtained, which is constant within the ALD temperature window (175–250 °C). As deposited films on glass substrates are found polycrystalline without any preferred orientation. Electrical transport measurement reveals degenerative/semimetallic characteristics with a carrier concentration of ca. 9 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} at room temperature. The ALD grown NiS thin film demonstrates high catalytic activity for the reduction of I{sup −}/I{sub 3}{sup −} electrolyte that opens its usage as cost-effective counter electrode in dye sensitized solar cells, replacing Pt.

  3. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide films using plasma-activated triisopropylsilane as a precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Ki-Moon; Shin, Jae-Su; Yun, Ju-Young; Jun Lee, Sang; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process was developed as a growth technique of SiO 2 thin films using a plasma-activated triisopropylsilane [TIPS, ((iPr) 3 SiH)] precursor. TIPS was activated by an argon plasma at the precursor injection stage of the process. Using the activated TIPS, it was possible to control the growth rate per cycle of the deposited films by adjusting the plasma ignition time. The PEALD technique allowed deposition of SiO 2 films at temperatures as low as 50 °C without carbon impurities. In addition, films obtained with plasma ignition times of 3 s and 10 s had similar values of root-mean-square surface roughness. In order to evaluate the suitability of TIPS as a precursor for low-temperature deposition of SiO 2 films, the vapor pressure of TIPS was measured. The thermal stability and the reactivity of the gas-phase TIPS with respect to water vapor were also investigated by analyzing the intensity changes of the C–H and Si–H peaks in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of TIPS

  4. Atomic layer deposition of molybdenum disulfide films using MoF 6 and H 2 S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, Anil U. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Letourneau, Steven [Micron School of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, Idaho 83725; Mandia, David J. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Liu, Jian [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208; Libera, Joseph A. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Lei, Yu [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Peng, Qing [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439; Graugnard, Elton [Micron School of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise Idaho 83725; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, Illinois 60439

    2018-01-01

    Molybdenum sulfide films were grown by atomic layer deposition on silicon and fused silica substrates using molybdenum hexafluoride (MoF6) and hydrogen sulfide at 200 degrees C. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements confirmed linear growth at 0.46 angstrom/cycle and self-limiting chemistry for both precursors. Analysis of the QCM step shapes indicated that MoS2 is the reaction product, and this finding is supported by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showing that Mo is predominantly in the Mo(IV) state. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements failed to identify crystalline MoS2 in the as-deposited films, and this might result from unreacted MoFx residues in the films. Annealing the films at 350 degrees C in a hydrogen rich environment yielded crystalline MoS2 and reduced the F concentration in the films. Optical transmission measurements yielded a bandgap of 1.3 eV. Finally, the authors observed that the MoS2 growth per cycle was accelerated when a fraction of the MoF6 pulses were substituted with diethyl zinc. Published by the AVS

  5. Characterization of surface electrochemical reactions used in electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy and digital etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Thomas Allen

    Surface analytical techniques have been used to characterize electrochemical reactions to be used in semiconductor processing technologies. Studies have been performed using UHV-EC methodology to determine conditions for the surface limited dissolution of CdTe(100). Electrochemical conditions were identified which resulted in the reduction of the top layer of tellurium atoms, leaving behind a cadmium enriched surface. Attempts to find an electrochemical potential for the oxidative dissolution of the cadmium surface were complicated by the simultaneous oxidation of the compound CdTe. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy has also been used to characterize the formation of tellurium atomic layers formed on Au(111) and Au(100) by underpotential deposition. On Au(100), the following sequence of surface structures was observed prior to bulk electrodeposition: a p(2x2), a (2x✓10), a (2x4), and a (✓2x✓5). The transitions between these structures was observed by STM and mechanisms for the phase transitions are presented. The results are correlated to UHV-EC studies of tellurium UPD on Au(100). On Au(111), the following sequence of structures was observeḑ: a (✓3 x✓3), a (✓7x✓13), and a (3x3). The (✓3x✓3) was shown to exist with a network of domain walls, forming long range triangular and diamond shaped superstructures. Conversion of the (✓3x✓3) to higher coverage structure resulted in roughening of the underlying Au surface and a mechanism is hypothesized to explain this transition. The STM results are also correlated to low energy electron diffraction (LEED) results obtained by UHV-EC studies. The surface structures formed by reductive UPD of the chalcogenide elements and Se on both Au(100) and Au(111) are compared. Both elements initially resulted in structures consisting of isolated atoms separated by distances close to the reported van der Waals diameter. Higher coverage structures resulted in interatomic chalcogenide bonding and the structures

  6. Tribological Properties of Nanometric Atomic Layer Depositions Applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Layer Deposition ( ALD is a modern technique that Allows to deposit nanometric, conformal coatings on almost any kind of substrates, from plastics to ceramic, metals or even composites. ALD coatings are not dependent on the morphology of the substrate and are only regulated by the composition of the precursors, the chamber temperature and the number of cycles. In this work, mono- and bi -layer nanometric, protective low-temperature ALD Coatings, based on Al2O3 and TiO2 were applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel in orderto enhance its relatively low corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments. Tribological testing were also performed on the ALD coated AISI 420 in order to evaluate the wear and scratch resistance of these nanometric layers and thus evaluate their durability. Scratch tests were performed using a standard Rockwell C indenter, under a variable load condition, in order to evaluate the critical loading condition for each coating. Wear testing were performed using a stainless steel counterpart, in ball-on-discconfiguration, in order to measure the friction coefficient and wear to confront the resistance. All scratch tests scars and wear tracks were then observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM in order to understand the wear mechanisms that occurred on the sample surfaces. Corrosion testing, performed under immersion in 0.2 M NaCl solutions, clearly showed that the ALD coatings have a strong effect in protecting the Stainless Steel Substrate against corrosion, reducing the corrosion current density by two orders of magnitude.Tribological The preliminary results showed that ALD depositions obtained at low Temperatures have a brittle behavior caused by the amorphous nature of their structure, and thus undergo delamination phenomena during Scratch Testing at relatively low applied loads. During ball-on-disc testing, the coatings were removed from the substrate, in particular for monolayer ALD configurations

  7. Al2 O3 Underlayer Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinbao; Hultqvist, Adam; Zhang, Tian; Jiang, Liangcong; Ruan, Changqing; Yang, Li; Cheng, Yibing; Edoff, Marika; Johansson, Erik M J

    2017-10-09

    Perovskite solar cells, as an emergent technology for solar energy conversion, have attracted much attention in the solar cell community by demonstrating impressive enhancement in power conversion efficiencies. However, the high temperature and manually processed TiO 2 underlayer prepared by spray pyrolysis significantly limit the large-scale application and device reproducibility of perovskite solar cells. In this study, lowtemperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used to prepare a compact Al 2 O 3 underlayer for perovskite solar cells. The thickness of the Al 2 O 3 layer can be controlled well by adjusting the deposition cycles during the ALD process. An optimal Al 2 O 3 layer effectively blocks electron recombination at the perovskite/fluorine-doped tin oxide interface and sufficiently transports electrons through tunneling. Perovskite solar cells fabricated with an Al 2 O 3 layer demonstrated a highest efficiency of 16.2 % for the sample with 50 ALD cycles (ca. 5 nm), which is a significant improvement over underlayer-free PSCs, which have a maximum efficiency of 11.0 %. Detailed characterization confirms that the thickness of the Al 2 O 3 underlayer significantly influences the charge transfer resistance and electron recombination processes in the devices. Furthermore, this work shows the feasibility of using a high band-gap semiconductor such as Al 2 O 3 as the underlayer in perovskite solar cells and opens up pathways to use ALD Al 2 O 3 underlayers for flexible solar cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Synthesis and stabilization of supported metal catalysts by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W; Stair, Peter C

    2013-08-20

    Supported metal nanoparticles are among the most important catalysts for many practical reactions, including petroleum refining, automobile exhaust treatment, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The catalytic performance strongly depends on the size, composition, and structure of the metal nanoparticles, as well as the underlying support. Scientists have used conventional synthesis methods including impregnation, ion exchange, and deposition-precipitation to control and tune these factors, to establish structure-performance relationships, and to develop better catalysts. Meanwhile, chemists have improved the stability of metal nanoparticles against sintering by the application of protective layers, such as polymers and oxides that encapsulate the metal particle. This often leads to decreased catalytic activity due to a lack of precise control over the thickness of the protective layer. A promising method of catalyst synthesis is atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a variation on chemical vapor deposition in which metals, oxides, and other materials are deposited on surfaces by a sequence of self-limiting reactions. The self-limiting character of these reactions makes it possible to achieve uniform deposits on high-surface-area porous solids. Therefore, design and synthesis of advanced catalysts on the nanoscale becomes possible through precise control over the structure and composition of the underlying support, the catalytic active sites, and the protective layer. In this Account, we describe our advances in the synthesis and stabilization of supported metal catalysts by ALD. After a short introduction to the technique of ALD, we show several strategies for metal catalyst synthesis by ALD that take advantage of its self-limiting feature. Monometallic and bimetallic catalysts with precise control over the metal particle size, composition, and structure were achieved by combining ALD sequences, surface treatments, and deposition temperature control. Next, we describe

  9. Eddy turbulence, the double mesopause, and the double layer of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Vlasov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we consider the impact of eddy turbulence on temperature and atomic oxygen distribution when the peak of the temperature occurs in the upper mesosphere. A previous paper (Vlasov and Kelley, 2010 considered the simultaneous impact of eddy turbulence on temperature and atomic oxygen density and showed that eddy turbulence provides an effective mechanism to explain the cold summer and warm winter mesopause observed at high latitudes. Also, the prevalent role of eddy turbulence in this case removes the strong contradiction between seasonal variations of the O density distribution and the impact of upward/downward motion corresponding to adiabatic cooling/heating of oxygen atoms. Classically, there is a single minimum in the temperature profile marking the location of the mesopause. But often, a local maximum in the temperature is observed in the height range of 85–100 km, creating the appearance of a double mesopause (Bills and Gardner, 1993; Yu and She, 1995; Gusev et al., 2006. Our results show that the relative temperature maximum in the upper mesosphere (and thus the double mesopause can result from heating by eddy turbulence. According to our model, there is a close connection between the extra temperature peak in the mesosphere and the oxygen atom density distribution. The main feature of the O density height profile produced by eddy turbulence in our model is a double peak instead of a single peak of O density. A rocket experiment called TOMEX confirms these results (Hecht et al., 2004. Applying our model to the results of the TOMEX rocket campaign gives good agreement with both the temperature and oxygen profiles observed. Climatology of the midlatitude mesopause and green line emission shows that the double mesopause and the double layers of the green line emission, corresponding to the double O density height profile, are mainly observed in spring and fall (Yu and She, 1995; Liu and Shepherd, 2006. Further observations of

  10. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  11. Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2014-05-13

    Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or “boundary electrode” bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

  12. Enhancing the platinum atomic layer deposition infiltration depth inside anodic alumina nanoporous membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaish, Amit, E-mail: anv@udel.edu; Krueger, Susan; Dimitriou, Michael; Majkrzak, Charles [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8313 (United States); Vanderah, David J. [Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, NIST, Rockville, Maryland 20850 (United States); Chen, Lei, E-mail: lei.chen@nist.gov [NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8313 (United States); Gawrisch, Klaus [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Nanoporous platinum membranes can be straightforwardly fabricated by forming a Pt coating inside the nanopores of anodic alumina membranes (AAO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the high-aspect-ratio of AAO makes Pt ALD very challenging. By tuning the process deposition temperature and precursor exposure time, enhanced infiltration depth along with conformal coating was achieved for Pt ALD inside the AAO templates. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering were employed to analyze the Pt coverage and thickness inside the AAO nanopores. Additionally, one application of platinum-coated membrane was demonstrated by creating a high-density protein-functionalized interface.

  13. An atomic-force-microscopy study of the structure of surface layers of intact fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalisov, M. M.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Nyapshaev, I. A.; Kipenko, A. V.; Timoshchuk, K. I.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2017-02-01

    Intact embryonic fibroblasts on a collagen-treated substrate have been studied by atomic-force microscopy (AFM) using probes of two types: (i) standard probes with tip curvature radii of 2-10 nm and (ii) special probes with a calibrated 325-nm SiO2 ball radius at the tip apex. It is established that, irrespective of probe type, the average maximum fibroblast height is on a level of 1.7 μm and the average stiffness of the probe-cell contact amounts to 16.5 mN/m. The obtained AFM data reveal a peculiarity of the fibroblast structure, whereby its external layers move as a rigid shell relative to the interior and can be pressed inside to a depth dependent on the load only.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on graphene through controlled ion beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Oh, Il-Kwon; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Hyungjun; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2016-01-01

    The polymer residue generated during the graphene transfer process to the substrate tends to cause problems (e.g., a decrease in electron mobility, unwanted doping, and non-uniform deposition of the dielectric material). In this study, by using a controllable low-energy Ar + ion beam, we cleaned the polymer residue without damaging the graphene network. HfO 2 grown by atomic layer deposition on graphene cleaned using an Ar + ion beam showed a dense uniform structure, whereas that grown on the transferred graphene (before Ar + ion cleaning) showed a non-uniform structure. A graphene–HfO 2 –metal capacitor fabricated by growing 20-nm thick HfO 2 on graphene exhibited a very low leakage current (<10 −11 A/cm 2 ) for Ar + ion-cleaned graphene, whereas a similar capacitor grown using the transferred graphene showed high leakage current.

  15. Atomic-layer-deposited WNxCy thin films as diffusion barrier for copper metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Oh, Su Suk; Kim, Ki-Bum; Kang, Dae-Hwan; Li, Wei-Min; Haukka, Suvi; Tuominen, Marko

    2003-06-01

    The properties of WNxCy films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF6, NH3, and triethyl boron as source gases were characterized as a diffusion barrier for copper metallization. It is noted that the as-deposited film shows an extremely low resistivity of about 350 μΩ cm with a film density of 15.37 g/cm3. The film composition measured from Rutherford backscattering spectrometry shows W, C, and N of ˜48, 32, and 20 at. %, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy analyses show that the as-deposited film is composed of face-centered-cubic phase with a lattice parameter similar to both β-WC1-x and β-W2N with an equiaxed microstructure. The barrier property of this ALD-WNxCy film at a nominal thickness of 12 nm deposited between Cu and Si fails only after annealing at 700 °C for 30 min.

  16. Building a Better Capacitor with Thin-Film Atomic Layer Deposition Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Christopher [North Seattle College, WA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The goal of this research is to determine procedures for creating ultra-high capacity supercapacitors by using nanofabrication techniques and high k-value dielectrics. One way to potentially solve the problem of climate change is to switch the source of energy to a source that doesn’t release many tons of greenhouse gases, gases which cause global warming, into the Earth’s atmosphere. These trap in more heat from the Sun’s solar energy and cause global temperatures to rise. Atomic layer deposition will be used to create a uniform thin-film of dielectric to greatly enhance the abilities of our capacitors and will build them on the nanoscale.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of MnS: Phase Control and Electrochemical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riha, Shannon C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin−Stevens Point, Stevens Point, Wisconsin 54481, United States; Koegel, Alexandra A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin−Stevens Point, Stevens Point, Wisconsin 54481, United States; Meng, Xiangbo [Energy; Kim, In Soo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Cao, Yanqiang [Energy; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Energy; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2016-01-19

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) using gaseous manganese bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl) and hydrogen sulfide as precursors. At deposition temperatures ≤150 °C phase-pure γ-MnS thin films were deposited, while at temperatures >150 °C, a mixed phase consisting of both γ- and α-MnS resulted. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies validate the self-limiting behavior of both ALD half-reactions and, combined with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS), allow the derivation of a self-consistent reaction mechanism. Finally, MnS thin films were deposited on copper foil and tested as a Li-ion battery anode. The MnS coin cells showed exceptional cycle stability and near-theoretical capacity.

  18. Activating Carrier Multiplication in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids by Infilling with Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Sybren; Liu, Yao; Suchand Sandeep, C S; Kinge, Sachin; Houtepen, Arjan J; Savenije, Tom J; Schins, Juleon M; Law, Matt; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2013-06-06

    Carrier multiplication-the generation of multiple electron-hole pairs by a single photon-is currently of great interest for the development of highly efficient photovoltaics. We study the effects of infilling PbSe quantum-dot solids with metal oxides by atomic layer deposition on carrier multiplication. Using time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, we find, for the first time, that carrier multiplication occurs in 1,2-ethanedithiol-linked PbSe quantum-dot solids infilled with Al2O3 or Al2O3/ZnO, while it is negligible or absent in noninfilled films. The carrier-multiplication efficiency of the infilled quantum-dot solids is close to that of solution-dispersed PbSe quantum dots, and not significantly limited by Auger recombination.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposition of Electron Selective SnOx and ZnO Films on Mixed Halide Perovskite: Compatibility and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Aitola, Kerttu; Sveinbjörnsson, Kári; Saki, Zahra; Larsson, Fredrik; Törndahl, Tobias; Johansson, Erik; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edoff, Marika

    2017-09-06

    The compatibility of atomic layer deposition directly onto the mixed halide perovskite formamidinium lead iodide:methylammonium lead bromide (CH(NH 2 ) 2 , CH 3 NH 3 )Pb(I,Br) 3 (FAPbI 3 :MAPbBr 3 ) perovskite films is investigated by exposing the perovskite films to the full or partial atomic layer deposition processes for the electron selective layer candidates ZnO and SnO x . Exposing the samples to the heat, the vacuum, and even the counter reactant of H 2 O of the atomic layer deposition processes does not appear to alter the perovskite films in terms of crystallinity, but the choice of metal precursor is found to be critical. The Zn precursor Zn(C 2 H 5 ) 2 either by itself or in combination with H 2 O during the ZnO atomic layer deposition (ALD) process is found to enhance the decomposition of the bulk of the perovskite film into PbI 2 without even forming ZnO. In contrast, the Sn precursor Sn(N(CH 3 ) 2 ) 4 does not seem to degrade the bulk of the perovskite film, and conformal SnO x films can successfully be grown on top of it using atomic layer deposition. Using this SnO x film as the electron selective layer in inverted perovskite solar cells results in a lower power conversion efficiency of 3.4% than the 8.4% for the reference devices using phenyl-C 70 -butyric acid methyl ester. However, the devices with SnO x show strong hysteresis and can be pushed to an efficiency of 7.8% after biasing treatments. Still, these cells lacks both open circuit voltage and fill factor compared to the references, especially when thicker SnO x films are used. Upon further investigation, a possible cause of these losses could be that the perovskite/SnO x interface is not ideal and more specifically found to be rich in Sn, O, and halides, which is probably a result of the nucleation during the SnO x growth and which might introduce barriers or alter the band alignment for the transport of charge carriers.

  20. Angular behavior of the Berreman effect investigated in uniform Al2O3 layers formed by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarel, Giovanna; Na, Jeong-Seok; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-04-21

    Experimental transmission absorbance infrared spectra of γ-Al(2)O(3) showing evidence of the angular dependence of the peaks of surface modes appearing next to the longitudinal optical phonon frequency ω(LO) (the Berreman effect) are collected from heat-treated thin oxide films deposited with thickness uniformity on Si(100) using atomic layer deposition. The peak area of the most intense surface longitudinal optical mode is plotted versus the infrared beam incidence angle θ(0). The experimental points closely follow the sin(4)(θ(0)) function in a broad thickness range. The best match occurs at a critical thickness, where a linear relationship exists between the surface longitudinal optical mode intensity and film thickness. Simulations suggest that below the critical thickness the sin(4)(θ(0)) behavior can be explained by refraction phenomena at the air/thin film and thin film/substrate interfaces. Above the critical thickness, the experimentally obtained result is derived from field boundary conditions at the air/thin film interface. The sin(4)(θ(0)) functional trend breaks down far above the critical thickness. This picture indicates that infrared radiation has a limited penetration depth into the oxide film, similarly to electromagnetic waves in conductors. Consequently, surface longitudinal optical modes are viewed as bulk phonons excited down to the penetration depth of the infrared beam. Comparison with simulated data suggests that the infrared radiation absorptance of surface longitudinal optical modes tends to approach the sin(2)(θ(0)) trend. Reflection phenomena are considered to be the origin of the deviation from the sin(4)(θ(0)) trend related to refraction.

  1. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria, E-mail: maria.berdova@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore [STMicroelectronics, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, 20126, Milano (Italy); Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me or Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and ozone for potential applications in microelectromechanical systems. • ALD HfO{sub 2} protects aluminum substrates from degradation in moist environment and at the same time retains good reflectance properties of the underlying material. • The resistance of hafnium dioxide to moist environment is independent of chosen precursors. - Abstract: This work presents the investigation of HfO{sub 2} deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO{sub 2} films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO{sub 2} films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80–90% to 76–85% in 400–800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO{sub 2} films grown with Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and no shift (remained in the range of 68–83%) for films grown from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me.

  2. Wetting Layer Super-Diffusive Motion and QSE Growth in Pb/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringides, M. C.; Hupalo, M.; Man, K. L.; Loy, M. M. T.; Altman, M. S.

    The unusual growth mode of uniform height islands discovered in Pb/Si was related to the electronic energy modulation with island height due to quantum size effects (QSEs). In addition to these energetic reasons provided by QSE, there is also the question of kinetics, i.e., how atoms move at relatively low temperatures (as low as 150 K) to build the islands in the short time of minutes. Controlled experiments with different techniques have shown the intriguing role of the dense wetting layer in transporting mass. STM experiments monitoring how unstable islands transform into stable islands have shown that the wetting layer between the islands moves selectively to the unstable islands, climbs over their sides, forms quickly rings of constant width ˜ 20 nm, and finally it completes the island top, but at a slower rate than the ring completion. This growth is independent of the starting interface, whether it is the amorphous wetting layer on the Si(111) (7 × 7) or the well-ordered Si(111)-Pb α (surd 3× surd 3) surface (except Pb diffusion on the latter interface is faster by a factor of ˜ 5). Real-time low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) observations of mass transport phenomena have confirmed the fast mobility of the wetting layer in Pb/Si and in addition have revealed some unusual features that are unexpected from classical diffusion behavior. The experiment monitors the refilling of a circular vacant area generated by a laser pulse. The concentration profile does not disperse as in normal diffusion, the refilling speed Δ x/Δ t is constant (instead of Δ x/surd Δ t = constant), and the equilibration time diverges below a critical coverage, θ c, as 1/tau ˜ (θ c - θ)^{-kappa}. The absolute value of the refilling speed 0.05 nm/s at 190 K is orders of magnitude higher than what is expected from Pb diffusion on Pb crystals at higher temperatures. These results are compared with predictions of three candidate models: (i) a conventional diffusion model with a

  3. Atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition of Zn(O, S) buffer layer for flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells: From lab-scale to large area roll to roll processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Bolt, P.J.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Knaapen, R.; Brink, J. van den; Ruth, M.; Bremaud, D.; Illiberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we present the first successful application of a spatial atomic-layer-deposition process to thin film solar cells. Zn(O,S) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) at atmospheric pressure and applied as buffer layer in rigid and flexible CIGS cells by a lab-scale

  4. Electron Beam-Induced Deposition for Atom Probe Tomography Specimen Capping Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Mulders, Johannes J L

    2017-04-01

    Six precursors were evaluated for use as in situ electron beam-induced deposition capping layers in the preparation of atom probe tomography specimens with a focus on near-surface features where some of the deposition is retained at the specimen apex. Specimens were prepared by deposition of each precursor onto silicon posts and shaped into sub-70-nm radii needles using a focused ion beam. The utility of the depositions was assessed using several criteria including composition and uniformity, evaporation behavior and evaporation fields, and depth of Ga+ ion penetration. Atom probe analyses through depositions of methyl cyclopentadienyl platinum trimethyl, palladium hexafluoroacetylacetonate, and dimethyl-gold-acetylacetonate [Me2Au(acac)] were all found to result in tip fracture at voltages exceeding 3 kV. Examination of the deposition using Me2Au(acac) plus flowing O2 was inconclusive due to evaporation of surface silicon from below the deposition under all analysis conditions. Dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co2(CO)8] and diiron nonacarbonyl [Fe2(CO)9] depositions were found to be effective as in situ capping materials for the silicon specimens. Their very different evaporation fields [36 V/nm for Co2(CO)8 and 21 V/nm for Fe2(CO)9] provide options for achieving reasonably close matching of the evaporation field between the capping material and many materials of interest.

  5. Recent Development of Advanced Electrode Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Wang, John

    2016-10-01

    Electrode materials play a decisive role in almost all electrochemical energy storage devices, determining their overall performance. Proper selection, design and fabrication of electrode materials have thus been regarded as one of the most critical steps in achieving high electrochemical energy storage performance. As an advanced nanotechnology for thin films and surfaces with conformal interfacial features and well controllable deposition thickness, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been successfully developed for deposition and surface modification of electrode materials, where there are considerable issues of interfacial and surface chemistry at atomic and nanometer scale. In addition, ALD has shown great potential in construction of novel nanostructured active materials that otherwise can be hardly obtained by other processing techniques, such as those solution-based processing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. This review focuses on the recent development of ALD for the design and delivery of advanced electrode materials in electrochemical energy storage devices, where typical examples will be highlighted and analyzed, and the merits and challenges of ALD for applications in energy storage will also be discussed.

  6. Atomic layer lithography of wafer-scale nanogap arrays for extreme confinement of electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Pelton, Matthew; Piao, Xianji; Lindquist, Nathan C; Im, Hyungsoon; Kim, Yun Jung; Ahn, Jae Sung; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Park, Namkyoo; Kim, Dai-Sik; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Squeezing light through nanometre-wide gaps in metals can lead to extreme field enhancements, nonlocal electromagnetic effects and light-induced electron tunnelling. This intriguing regime, however, has not been readily accessible to experimentalists because of the lack of reliable technology to fabricate uniform nanogaps with atomic-scale resolution and high throughput. Here we introduce a new patterning technology based on atomic layer deposition and simple adhesive-tape-based planarization. Using this method, we create vertically oriented gaps in opaque metal films along the entire contour of a millimetre-sized pattern, with gap widths as narrow as 9.9 Å, and pack 150,000 such devices on a 4-inch wafer. Electromagnetic waves pass exclusively through the nanogaps, enabling background-free transmission measurements. We observe resonant transmission of near-infrared waves through 1.1-nm-wide gaps (λ/1,295) and measure an effective refractive index of 17.8. We also observe resonant transmission of millimetre waves through 1.1-nm-wide gaps (λ/4,000,000) and infer an unprecedented field enhancement factor of 25,000.

  7. Computer simulations of an oxygen inductively coupled plasma used for plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinck, S; Bogaerts, A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an O 2 inductively coupled plasma used for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of Al 2 O 3 thin films is investigated by means of modeling. This work intends to provide more information about basic plasma properties such as species densities and species fluxes to the substrate as a function of power and pressure, which might be hard to measure experimentally. For this purpose, a hybrid model developed by Kushner et al is applied to calculate the plasma characteristics in the reactor volume for different chamber pressures ranging from 1 to 10 mTorr and different coil powers ranging from 50 to 500 W. Density profiles of the various oxygen containing plasma species are reported as well as fluxes to the substrate under various operating conditions. Furthermore, different orientations of the substrate, which can be placed vertically or horizontally in the reactor, are taken into account. In addition, special attention is paid to the recombination process of atomic oxygen on the different reactor walls under the stated operating conditions. From this work it can be concluded that the plasma properties change significantly in different locations of the reactor. The plasma density near the cylindrical coil is high, while it is almost negligible in the neighborhood of the substrate. Ion and excited species fluxes to the substrate are found to be very low and negligible. Finally, the orientation of the substrate has a minor effect on the flux of O 2 , while it has a significant effect on the flux of O. In the horizontal configuration, the flux of atomic oxygen can be up to one order of magnitude lower than in the vertical configuration.

  8. Imaging Pulsed Laser Deposition oxide growth by in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, W. A.; Bollmann, T. R. J.; Post, D.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, G.

    2017-01-01

    To visualize the topography of thin oxide films during growth, thereby enabling to study its growth behavior quasi real-time, we have designed and integrated an atomic force microscope (AFM) in a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) vacuum setup. The AFM scanner and PLD target are integrated in a single

  9. Crossover from layering to island formation in Langmuir-Blodgett growth: role of long-range intermolecular forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Smita; Datta, Alokmay

    2011-04-01

    Combined studies by atomic force microscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on transition-metal stearate (M-St, M = Mn, Co, Zn, and Cd) Langmuir-Blodgett films clearly indicate association of bidentate coordination of the metal-carboxylate head group to layer-by-layer growth as observed in MnSt and CoSt and partially in ZnSt. Crossover to islandlike growth, as observed in CdSt and ZnSt, is associated with the presence of unidentate coordination in the head group. Morphological evolutions as obtained from one, three, and nine monolayers (MLs) of M-St films are consistent with Frank van der Merwe, Stranski-Krastanov, and Volmer Weber growth modes for M=Mn/Co, Zn, and Cd, respectively, as previously assigned, and are found to vary with number (n) of metal atoms per head group, viz. n=1 (Mn/Co), n=0.75 (Zn), and n=0.5 (Cd). The parameter n is found to decide head-group coordination such that n=1.0 corresponds to bidentate and n=0.5 corresponds to unidentate coordination; the intermediate value in Zn corresponds to a mixture of both. The dependence of the growth mode on head-group structure is explained by the fact that in bidentate head groups, with the in-plane dipole moment being zero, intermolecular forces between adjacent molecules are absent and hence growth proceeds via layering. On the other hand, in unidentate head groups, the existence of a nonzero in-plane dipole moment results in the development of weak in-plane intermolecular forces between adjacent molecules causing in-plane clustering leading to islandlike growth. ©2011 American Physical Society

  10. High aspect ratio iridescent three-dimensional metal–insulator–metal capacitors using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Micheal, E-mail: micheal.burke@tyndall.ie; Blake, Alan; Djara, Vladimir; O' Connell, Dan; Povey, Ian M.; Cherkaoui, Karim; Monaghan, Scott; Scully, Jim; Murphy, Richard; Hurley, Paul K.; Pemble, Martyn E.; Quinn, Aidan J., E-mail: aidan.quinn@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    The authors report on the structural and electrical properties of TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiN metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitor structures in submicron three-dimensional (3D) trench geometries with an aspect ratio of ∼30. A simplified process route was employed where the three layers for the MIM stack were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a single run at a process temperature of 250 °C. The TiN top and bottom electrodes were deposited via plasma-enhanced ALD using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor. 3D trench devices yielded capacitance densities of 36 fF/μm{sup 2} and quality factors >65 at low frequency (200 Hz), with low leakage current densities (<3 nA/cm{sup 2} at 1 V). These devices also show strong optical iridescence which, when combined with the covert embedded capacitance, show potential for system in package (SiP) anticounterfeiting applications.

  11. Inorganic hollow nanotube aerogels by atomic layer deposition onto native nanocellulose templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juuso T; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Malm, Jari; Karppinen, Maarit; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-03-22

    Hollow nano-objects have raised interest in applications such as sensing, encapsulation, and drug-release. Here we report on a new class of porous materials, namely inorganic nanotube aerogels that, unlike other aerogels, have a framework consisting of inorganic hollow nanotubes. First we show a preparation method for titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and aluminum oxide nanotube aerogels based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) on biological nanofibrillar aerogel templates, that is, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), also called microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulose. The aerogel templates are prepared from nanocellulose hydrogels either by freeze-drying in liquid nitrogen or liquid propane or by supercritical drying, and they consist of a highly porous percolating network of cellulose nanofibrils. They can be prepared as films on substrates or as freestanding objects. We show that, in contrast to freeze-drying, supercritical drying produces nanocellulose aerogels without major interfibrillar aggregation even in thick films. Uniform oxide layers are readily deposited by ALD onto the fibrils leading to organic-inorganic core-shell nanofibers. We further demonstrate that calcination at 450 °C removes the organic core leading to purely inorganic self-supporting aerogels consisting of hollow nanotubular networks. They can also be dispersed by grinding, for example, in ethanol to create a slurry of inorganic hollow nanotubes, which in turn can be deposited to form a porous film. Finally we demonstrate the use of a titanium dioxide nanotube network as a resistive humidity sensor with a fast response.

  12. An Experiment to Study Sporadic Atom Layers in the Earth's Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (SAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The Sudden Atom Layer (SAL) Rocket was successfully launched in February 1998. All instruments worked well except those supplied by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. (A dummy weight was launched for the neutral mass spectrometer and the ion version died shortly after lift-off.) A paper has already been published in GRL concerning the dust layer detected by an on board instrument and compared to ground-based observations made at the Arecibo Observatory by Cornell graduate student S. Collins (lidar) and Q. Zhou (radar). Collins presented a comparison of the sodium lidar data and onboard observations with a theoretical model by Plane and Cox at the Fan AGU Meeting. In addition Gelinas and Kelley presented a review paper dealing with the entire SAL instrument complement at the same meeting. An unexpected new explanation for the outer scale of E region plasma irregularities has come out of the data set. We anticipate at least a total of four papers will be published within a year of launch.

  13. Atomic layer deposition in nanostructured photovoltaics: tuning optical, electronic and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmstrom, Axel F.; Santra, Pralay K.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials offer key advantages for third-generation photovoltaics, such as the ability to achieve high optical absorption together with enhanced charge carrier collection using low cost components. However, the extensive interfacial areas in nanostructured photovoltaic devices can cause high recombination rates and a high density of surface electronic states. In this feature article, we provide a brief review of some nanostructured photovoltaic technologies including dye-sensitized, quantum dot sensitized and colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We then introduce the technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a vapor phase deposition method using a sequence of self-limiting surface reaction steps to grow thin, uniform and conformal films. We discuss how ALD has established itself as a promising tool for addressing different aspects of nanostructured photovoltaics. Examples include the use of ALD to synthesize absorber materials for both quantum dot and plasmonic solar cells, to grow barrier layers for dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, and to infiltrate coatings into colloidal quantum dot solar cell to improve charge carrier mobilities as well as stability. We also provide an example of monolayer surface modification in which adsorbed ligand molecules on quantum dots are used to tune the band structure of colloidal quantum dot solar cells for improved charge collection. Finally, we comment on the present challenges and future outlook of the use of ALD for nanostructured photovoltaics.

  14. Antireflection Coatings for Strongly Curved Glass Lenses by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Pfeiffer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antireflection (AR coatings are indispensable in numerous optical applications and are increasingly demanded on highly curved optical components. In this work, optical thin films of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2 and Ta2O5 were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD, which is based on self-limiting surface reactions leading to a uniform film thickness on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Al2O3/TiO2/SiO2 and Al2O3/Ta2O5/SiO2 AR coatings were successfully applied in the 400–750 nm and 400–700 nm spectral range, respectively. Less than 0.6% reflectance with an average of 0.3% has been measured on a fused silica hemispherical (half-ball lens with 4 mm diameter along the entire lens surface at 0° angle of incidence. The reflectance on a large B270 aspherical lens with height of 25 mm and diameter of 50 mm decreased to less than 1% with an average reflectance < 0.3%. The results demonstrate that ALD is a promising technology for deposition of uniform optical layers on strongly curved lenses without complex in situ thickness monitoring.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics on graphene using reversibly physisorbed ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandhyala, Srikar; Mordi, Greg; Lee, Bongki; Lee, Geunsik; Floresca, Carlo; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Ahn, Jinho; Wallace, Robert M; Chabal, Yves J; Kim, Moon J; Colombo, Luigi; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2012-03-27

    Integration of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) requires the ability to grow or deposit high-quality, ultrathin dielectric insulators on graphene to modulate the channel potential. Here, we study a novel and facile approach based on atomic layer deposition through ozone functionalization to deposit high-κ dielectrics (such as Al(2)O(3)) without breaking vacuum. The underlying mechanisms of functionalization have been studied theoretically using ab initio calculations and experimentally using in situ monitoring of transport properties. It is found that ozone molecules are physisorbed on the surface of graphene, which act as nucleation sites for dielectric deposition. The physisorbed ozone molecules eventually react with the metal precursor, trimethylaluminum to form Al(2)O(3). Additionally, we successfully demonstrate the performance of dual-gated GFETs with Al(2)O(3) of sub-5 nm physical thickness as a gate dielectric. Back-gated GFETs with mobilities of ~19,000 cm(2)/(V·s) are also achieved after Al(2)O(3) deposition. These results indicate that ozone functionalization is a promising pathway to achieve scaled gate dielectrics on graphene without leaving a residual nucleation layer. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  16. Atomic layer deposition in nanostructured photovoltaics: tuning optical, electronic and surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmstrom, Axel F; Santra, Pralay K; Bent, Stacey F

    2015-08-07

    Nanostructured materials offer key advantages for third-generation photovoltaics, such as the ability to achieve high optical absorption together with enhanced charge carrier collection using low cost components. However, the extensive interfacial areas in nanostructured photovoltaic devices can cause high recombination rates and a high density of surface electronic states. In this feature article, we provide a brief review of some nanostructured photovoltaic technologies including dye-sensitized, quantum dot sensitized and colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We then introduce the technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a vapor phase deposition method using a sequence of self-limiting surface reaction steps to grow thin, uniform and conformal films. We discuss how ALD has established itself as a promising tool for addressing different aspects of nanostructured photovoltaics. Examples include the use of ALD to synthesize absorber materials for both quantum dot and plasmonic solar cells, to grow barrier layers for dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, and to infiltrate coatings into colloidal quantum dot solar cell to improve charge carrier mobilities as well as stability. We also provide an example of monolayer surface modification in which adsorbed ligand molecules on quantum dots are used to tune the band structure of colloidal quantum dot solar cells for improved charge collection. Finally, we comment on the present challenges and future outlook of the use of ALD for nanostructured photovoltaics.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-09

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times.

  18. Formation and characterization of Sb2Te3 nanofilms on Pt by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyou; Zhu, Wen; Gao, Xianhui; Bao, Siqian; Fan, Xian; Duan, Xingkai; Hou, Jie

    2006-03-16

    A nanocrystalline Sb2Te3 VA-VIA group compound thin film was grown via the route of electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (ECALE) in this work for the first time. The electrochemical behavior of Te and Sb on Pt, Te on Sb-covered Pt, and Sb on Te-covered Pt was studied by methods of cyclic voltammetry, anode potentiodynamic scanning, and coulometry. A steady deposition of the Sb2Te3 compound could be attained after negatively stepped adjusting of the UPD potentials of Sb and Te on Pt in each of the first 40 depositing cycles. The structure of the deposit was proven to be the Sb2Te3 compound by X-ray diffraction. The 2:3 stoichiometric ratio of Sb to Te was verified by EDX quantitative analysis, which is consistent with the result of coulometric analysis. A nanocystalline microstructure was observed for the Sb2Te3 deposits, and the average grain size is about 20 nm. Cross-sectional SEM observation shows an interface layer about 19 nm in thickness sandwiched between the Sb2Te3 nanocrystalline deposit and the Pt substrate surface. The optical band gap of the deposited Sb2Te3 film was determined as 0.42 eV by FTIR spectroscopy and it is blueshifted in comparison with that of the bulk Sb2Te3 single crystal because of its nanocrystalline microstructure.

  19. Reaction Mechanisms of the Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Tributyltin Ethoxide and Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Charith E; Liu, Guo; Vega, Abraham; Dezelah, Charles L; Kanjolia, Ravindra K; Chabal, Yves J

    2017-06-20

    Uniform and conformal deposition of tin oxide thin films is important for several applications in electronics, gas sensing, and transparent conducting electrodes. Thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) is often best suited for these applications, but its implementation requires a mechanistic understanding of the initial nucleation and subsequent ALD processes. To this end, in situ FTIR and ex situ XPS have been used to explore the ALD of tin oxide films using tributyltin ethoxide and ozone on an OH-terminated, SiO 2 -passivated Si(111) substrate. Direct chemisorption of tributyltin ethoxide on surface OH groups and clear evidence that subsequent ligand exchange are obtained, providing mechanistic insight. Upon ozone pulse, the butyl groups react with ozone, forming surface carbonate and formate. The subsequent tributyltin ethoxide pulse removes the carbonate and formate features with the appearance of the bands for CH stretching and bending modes of the precursor butyl ligands. This ligand-exchange behavior is repeated for subsequent cycles, as is characteristic of ALD processes, and is clearly observed for deposition temperatures of 200 and 300 °C. On the basis of the in situ vibrational data, a reaction mechanism for the ALD process of tributyltin ethoxide and ozone is presented, whereby ligands are fully eliminated. Complementary ex situ XPS depth profiles confirm that the bulk of the films is carbon-free, that is, formate and carbonate are not incorporated into the film during the deposition process, and that good-quality SnO x films are produced. Furthermore, the process was scaled up in a cross-flow reactor at 225 °C, which allowed the determination of the growth rate (0.62 Å/cycle) and confirmed a self-limiting ALD growth at 225 and 268 °C. An analysis of the temperature-dependence data reveals that growth rate increases linearly between 200 and 300 °C.

  20. Highly efficient computer algorithm for identifying layer thickness of atomically thin 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jekwan; Cho, Seungwan; Park, Soohyun; Bae, Hyemin; Noh, Minji; Kim, Beom; In, Chihun; Yang, Seunghoon; Lee, Sooun; Seo, Seung Young; Kim, Jehyun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Shim, Woo-Young; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kim, Dohun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2018-03-01

    The fields of layered material research, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have demonstrated that the optical, electrical and mechanical properties strongly depend on the layer number N. Thus, efficient and accurate determination of N is the most crucial step before the associated device fabrication. An existing experimental technique using an optical microscope is the most widely used one to identify N. However, a critical drawback of this approach is that it relies on extensive laboratory experiences to estimate N; it requires a very time-consuming image-searching task assisted by human eyes and secondary measurements such as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are necessary to ensure N. In this work, we introduce a computer algorithm based on the image analysis of a quantized optical contrast. We show that our algorithm can apply to a wide variety of layered materials, including graphene, MoS2, and WS2 regardless of substrates. The algorithm largely consists of two parts. First, it sets up an appropriate boundary between target flakes and substrate. Second, to compute N, it automatically calculates the optical contrast using an adaptive RGB estimation process between each target, which results in a matrix with different integer Ns and returns a matrix map of Ns onto the target flake position. Using a conventional desktop computational power, the time taken to display the final N matrix was 1.8 s on average for the image size of 1280 pixels by 960 pixels and obtained a high accuracy of 90% (six estimation errors among 62 samples) when compared to the other methods. To show the effectiveness of our algorithm, we also apply it to TMD flakes transferred on optically transparent c-axis sapphire substrates and obtain a similar result of the accuracy of 94% (two estimation errors among 34 samples).

  1. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhaka, Veer, E-mail: veer.dhaka@aalto.fi; Perros, Alexander; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Haggren, Tuomas; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 (Finland); Naureen, Shagufta; Shahid, Naeem [Research School of Physics & Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko [Department of Applied Physics and Nanomicroscopy Center, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 (Finland); Srinivasan, Anand [School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature (∼200 °C) grown atomic layer deposition (ALD) films of AlN, TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaN, and TiO{sub 2} were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP) nanowires (NWs), and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL) at low temperatures (15K), and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å) film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL) was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars) to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  2. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Dhaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (∼200 °C grown atomic layer deposition (ALD films of AlN, TiN, Al2O3, GaN, and TiO2 were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP nanowires (NWs, and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL at low temperatures (15K, and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al2O3. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al2O3 provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  3. Continuous growth of low-temperature Si epitaxial layer with heavy phosphorous and boron doping using photoepitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Minakata, H.; Ito, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors grew p + -n + silicon epitaxial layers, heavily doped with phosphorus and boron, continuously at 650 degrees C using low-temperature photoepitaxy. Then N + photoepitaxial layer with a phosphorus concentration above 10 17 cm -3 grown on p - substrate shows high-density surface pits, and as a result, poor crystal quality. However, when this n + photoepitaxial layer is grown continuously on a heavily boron-doped p + photoepitaxial layer, these surface pits are drastically decreased, disappearing completely above a hole concentration of 10 19 cm -3 in the p + photoepitaxial layer. The phosphorus activation ratio and electron Hall mobility in the heavily phosphorus-doped n + photoexpitaxial layer were also greatly improved. The authors investigated the cause of the surface pitting using a scanning transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. They characterized the precipitation of phosphorus atoms on the crystal surface at the initial stage of the heavily phosphorus-doped n + photoexpitaxial layer growth

  4. Electrochemical layer by layer growth and characterization of copper sulfur thin films on Ag(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocenti, M.; Bencistà, I.; Bellandi, S.; Bianchini, C.; Di Benedetto, F.; Lavacchi, A.; Vizza, F.; Foresti, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) thin films were grown on a single crystal Ag(1 1 1) substrate by Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition (ECALD) method, i.e., by alternated surface limited deposition of copper and sulfur. A detailed investigation of deposition of Cu on S allowed to find the best conditions for copper deposition. The electrochemical characterization of deposits obtained with different deposition cycles suggests a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio between Cu and S corresponding to Cu monosulfide. The compositional analysis was performed by X-rays Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and the morphological was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for deposits formed with 20 ECALD cycles.

  5. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multi-density layer structure as a moisture permeation barrier deposited by radio frequency remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Ham, Giyul; Shin, Seokyoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-21

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition have been used for thin film encapsulation of organic light emitting diode. In this study, a multi-density layer structure consisting of two Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with different densities are deposited with different deposition conditions of O{sub 2} plasma reactant time. This structure improves moisture permeation barrier characteristics, as confirmed by a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) test. The lowest WVTR of the multi-density layer structure was 4.7 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2} day{sup −1}, which is one order of magnitude less than WVTR for the reference single-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. This improvement is attributed to the location mismatch of paths for atmospheric gases, such as O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, in the film due to different densities in the layers. This mechanism is analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection, and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results confirmed that the multi-density layer structure exhibits very good characteristics as an encapsulation layer via location mismatch of paths for H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} between the two layers.

  6. Numerical investigation of metal-semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor passivated hole contacts based on atomic layer deposited AlO x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Cangming; Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    Excellent c-Si tunnel layer surface passivation has been obtained recently in our lab, using atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide (ALD AlO x ) in the tunnel layer regime of 0.9 to 1.5 nm, investigated to be applied for contact passivation. Using the correspondingly measured interface properties, this paper compares the theoretical collection efficiency of a conventional metal-semiconductor (MS) contact on diffused p+ Si to a metal-semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (MSIS) contact on diffused p+ Si or on undoped n-type c-Si. The influences of (1) the tunnel layer passivation quality at the tunnel oxide interface (Q f and D it), (2) the tunnel layer thickness and the electron and hole tunnelling mass, (3) the tunnel oxide material, and (4) the semiconductor capping layer material properties are investigated numerically by evaluation of solar cell efficiency, open-circuit voltage, and fill factor.

  7. Atomic layer-deposited Al–HfO2/SiO2 bi-layers towards 3D charge trapping non-volatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congedo, Gabriele; Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Cianci, Elena; Molle, Alessandro; Volpe, Flavio G.; Spiga, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    A metal/oxide/high-κ dielectric/oxide/silicon (MOHOS) planar charge trapping memory capacitor including SiO 2 as tunnel oxide, Al–HfO 2 as charge trapping layer, SiO 2 as blocking oxide and TaN metal gate was fabricated and characterized as test vehicle in the view of integration into 3D cells. The thin charge trapping layer and blocking oxide were grown by atomic layer deposition, the technique of choice for the implementation of these stacks into 3D structures. The oxide stack shows a good thermal stability for annealing temperature of 900 °C in N 2 , as required for standard complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor processes. MOHOS capacitors can be efficiently programmed and erased under the applied voltages of ± 20 V to ± 12 V. When compared to a benchmark structure including thin Si 3 N 4 as charge trapping layer, the MOHOS cell shows comparable program characteristics, with the further advantage of the equivalent oxide thickness scalability due to the high dielectric constant (κ) value of 32, and an excellent retention even for strong testing conditions. Our results proved that high-κ based oxide structures grown by atomic layer deposition can be of interest for the integration into three dimensionally stacked charge trapping devices. - Highlights: ► Charge trapping device with Al–HfO 2 storage layer is fabricated and characterized. ► Al–HfO 2 and SiO 2 blocking oxides are deposited by atomic layer deposition. ► The oxide stack shows a good thermal stability after annealing at 900 °C. ► The device can be efficiently programmed/erased and retention is excellent. ► The oxide stack could be used for 3D-stacked Flash non-volatile memories

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of CdS Quantum Dots for Solid-State Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2011-10-04

    Functioning quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells have been fabricated using the vacuum deposition technique atomic layer deposition (ALD). Utilizing the incubation period of CdS growth by ALD on TiO 2, we are able to grow QDs of adjustable size which act as sensitizers for solid-state QDsensitized solar cells (ssQDSSC). The size of QDs, studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), varied with the number of ALD cycles from 1-10 nm. Photovoltaic devices with the QDs were fabricated and characterized using a ssQDSSC device architecture with 2,2\\',7,7\\'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p methoxyphenylamine) 9,9\\'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) as the solid-state hole conductor. The ALD approach described here can be applied to fabrication of quantum-confined structures for a variety of applications, including solar electricity and solar fuels. Because ALD provides the ability to deposit many materials in very high aspect ratio substrates, this work introduces a strategy by which material and optical properties of QD sensitizers may be adjusted not only by the size of the particles but also in the future by the composition. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  10. An iron(II) diketonate–diamine complex as precursor for thin film fabrication by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratvold, Jon E., E-mail: j.e.bratvold@kjemi.uio.no [Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology (SMN)/Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Carraro, Giorgio [Department of Chemistry, University of Padova and INSTM, via F. Marzolo 1, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Barreca, Davide [CNR-IENI and INSTM, Department of Chemistry, University of Padova, via F. Marzolo 1, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nilsen, Ola [Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology (SMN)/Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • First report of Fe(hfa){sub 2}TMEDA as precursor in ALD and MLD. • Hybrid organic–inorganic films with oxalic acid as co-reactant between 125 and 350 °C. • Surface saturation evidenced by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. • XPS confirms complete preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film. • Deposition of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} when using ozone as co-reactant. - Abstract: A new divalent Fe precursor has been explored for deposition of iron-containing thin films by atomic layer deposition and molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD). The Fe(II) β-diketonate-diamine complex, Fe(hfa){sub 2}TMEDA, (hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionate, TMEDA = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethylenediamine) can be handled in air, and sublimation at 60 °C ensures a satisfactory vaporization rate. The reactivity of the precursor does not allow for direct reaction with water as co-reactant. Nevertheless, it reacts with carboxylic acids, resulting in organic–inorganic hybrid materials, and with ozone, yielding α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The divalent oxidation state of iron was maintained during deposition when oxalic acid was used as co-reactant, demonstrating the first preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film during an MLD process. A self-saturating growth mode was proven by in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, and the films were further characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  11. Resolving Iron(II) Sorption and Oxidative Growth on Hematite (001) Using Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Sandra D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Liu, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Arey, Bruce W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Perea, Daniel E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2018-02-13

    The distribution of iron resulting from the autocatalytic interaction of aqueous Fe(II) with the hematite (001) surface was directly mapped in three dimensions (3D) for the first time, using iron isotopic labelling and atom probe tomography (APT). Analyses of the mass spectrum showed that natural abundance ratios in 56Fe-dominant hematite are recovered at depth with good accuracy, whereas at the relict interface with 57Fe(II) solution evidence for hematite growth by oxidative adsorption of Fe(II) was found. 3D reconstructions of the isotope positions along the surface normal direction showed a zone enriched in 57Fe, which was consistent with an average net adsorption of 3.2 – 4.3 57Fe atoms nm–2. Statistical analyses utilizing grid-based frequency distribution analyses show a heterogeneous, non-random distribution of oxidized Fe on the (001) surface, consistent with Volmer-Weber-like island growth. The unique 3D nature of the APT data provides an unprecedented means to quantify the atomic-scale distribution of sorbed 57Fe atoms and the extent of segregation on the hematite surface. This new ability to spatially map growth on single crystal faces at the atomic scale will enable resolution to long-standing unanswered questions about the underlying mechanisms for electron and atom exchange involved in a wide variety of redox-catalyzed processes at this archetypal and broadly relevant interface.

  12. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingfeng; Li, Meicheng; Gu, TianSheng; Bai, Fan; Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya; Yu, Yangxin

    2013-01-01

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon–copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  13. One-dimensional Si-in-Si(001) template for single-atom wire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J. H. G.; Bianco, F.; Köster, S. A.; Mazur, D.; Bowler, D. R.; Renner, Ch.

    2010-08-01

    Single atom metallic wires of arbitrary length are of immense technological and scientific interest. We present atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscope data of a silicon-only template, which modeling predicts to enable the self-organized growth of isolated micrometer long surface and subsurface single-atom chains. It consists of a one-dimensional, defect-free Si reconstruction four dimers wide—the Haiku core—formed by hydrogenation of self-assembled Bi-nanolines on Si(001) terraces, independent of any step edges. We discuss the potential of this Si-in-Si template as an appealing alternative to vicinal surfaces for nanoscale patterning.

  14. Electrode surface engineering by atomic layer deposition: A promising pathway toward better energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2016-04-29

    Research on electrochemical energy storage devices including Li ion batteries (LIBs), Na ion batteries (NIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs) has accelerated in recent years, in part because developments in nanomaterials are making it possible to achieve high capacities and energy and power densities. These developments can extend battery life in portable devices, and open new markets such as electric vehicles and large-scale grid energy storage. It is well known that surface reactions largely determine the performance and stability of electrochemical energy storage devices. Despite showing impressive capacities and high energy and power densities, many of the new nanostructured electrode materials suffer from limited lifetime due to severe electrode interaction with electrolytes or due to large volume changes. Hence control of the surface of the electrode material is essential for both increasing capacity and improving cyclic stability of the energy storage devices.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) which has become a pervasive synthesis method in the microelectronics industry, has recently emerged as a promising process for electrochemical energy storage. ALD boasts excellent conformality, atomic scale thickness control, and uniformity over large areas. Since ALD is based on self-limiting surface reactions, complex shapes and nanostructures can be coated with excellent uniformity, and most processes can be done below 200. °C. In this article, we review recent studies on the use of ALD coatings to improve the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices, with particular emphasis on the studies that have provided mechanistic insight into the role of ALD in improving device performance. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. ATOMIC PHYSICS PROCESSES IMPORTANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCRAPE-OFF LAYER OF TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEST, W.P.; GOLDSMITH,; B. EVANS,T.E.; OLSON, R.J.

    2002-05-01

    The region between the well-confined plasma and the vessel walls of a magnetic confinement fusion research device, the scrape-off layer (SOL), is typically rich in atomic and molecular physics processes. The most advanced magnetic confinement device, the magnetically diverted tokamak, uses a magnetic separatrix to isolate the confinement zone (closed flux surfaces) from the edge plasma (open field lines). Over most of their length the open field lines run parallel to the separatrix, forming a thin magnetic barrier with the nearby vessel walls. In a poloidally-localized region, the open field lines are directed away from the separatrix and into the divertor, a region spatially separated from the separatrix where intense plasma wall interaction can occur relatively safely. Recent data from several tokamaks indicate that particle transport across the field lines of the SOL can be somewhat faster than previously thought. In these cases, the rate at which particles reach the vessel wall is comparable to the rate to the divertor from parallel transport. The SOL can be thin enough that the recycling neutrals and sputtered impurities from the wall may refuel or contaminate the confinement zone more efficiently than divertor plasma wall interaction. Just inside the SOL is a confinement barrier that produces a sharp pedestal in plasma density and temperature. Understanding neutral transport through the SOL and into the pedestal is key to understanding particle balance and particle and impurity exhaust. The SOL plasma is sufficiently hot and dense to excite and ionize neutrals. Ion and neutral temperatures are high enough that charge exchange between the neutrals and fuel and impurity ions is fast. Excitation of neutrals can be fast enough to lead to nonlinear behavior in charge exchange and ionization processes. In this paper the detailed atomic physics important to the understanding of the neutral transport through the SOL will be discussed.

  16. SnO{sub 2} thin films grown by atomic layer deposition using a novel Sn precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min-Jung [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Cheol Jin [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chon; Pyeon, Jung Joon [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Suk; Han, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Chung, Taek-Mo [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Joo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Beomjin [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Doo Seok; Baek, Seung-Hyub [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chong-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sang [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Keun, E-mail: s.k.kim@kist.re.kr [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • We developed a new ALD process for SnO{sub 2} films using dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy-tin(II) as a novel Sn precursor. • The SnO{sub 2} films grown from Sn(dmamp){sub 2} has negligible impurity contents. • Sn ions in the films had a single binding state corresponding to Sn{sup 4+} in SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy-tin(II) (Sn(dmamp){sub 2}) and O{sub 3} in a temperature range of 100–230 °C. The ALD window was found to be in the range of 100–200 °C. The growth per cycle of the films in the ALD window increased with temperature in the range from 0.018 to 0.042 nm/cycle. Above 230 °C, the self-limiting behavior which is a unique characteristic of ALD, was not observed in the growth because of the thermal decomposition of the Sn(dmamp){sub 2} precursor. The SnO{sub 2} films were amorphous in the ALD window and exhibited quite a smooth surface. Sn ions in all films had a single binding state corresponding to Sn{sup 4+} in SnO{sub 2}. The concentration of carbon and nitrogen in the all SnO{sub 2} films was below the detection limit of the auger electron spectroscopy technique and a very small amount of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen was detected by secondary ions mass spectroscopy only. The impurity contents decreased with increasing the growth temperature. This is consistent with the increase in the density of the SnO{sub 2} films with respect to the growth temperature. The ALD process with Sn(dmamp){sub 2} and O{sub 3} shows excellent conformality on a hole structure with an aspect ratio of ∼9. This demonstrates that the ALD process with Sn(dmamp){sub 2} and O{sub 3} is promising for growth of robust and highly pure SnO{sub 2} films.

  17. Highly reproducible planar Sb2S3-sensitized solar cells based on atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    KimThese Two Authors Have Equally Contributed To This Work., Dae-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ju; Park, Mi Sun; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk; Sung, Shi-Joon

    2014-11-01

    A high-quality Sb2S3 thin-absorber with controllable thickness was reproducibly formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Compared with conventional chemical bath deposition (CBD), the Sb2S3 absorber deposited by ALD did not contain oxide or oxygen impurities and showed a very uniform thickness of Sb2S3 absorbers formed on a rough surface of dense blocking TiO2/F-doped SnO2 (bl-TiO2/FTO) substrate. The planar ALD-Sb2S3 solar cells comprised of Au/Poly-3-hexylthiophene/ALD-Sb2S3/bl-TiO2/FTO showed significantly improved power conversion efficiency of 5.77% at 1 sun condition and narrow efficiency deviation, whereas the planar CBD-Sb2S3 solar cells exhibited 2.17% power conversion efficiency. The high efficiency and good reproducibility of ALD-Sb2S3 solar cell devices is attributed to reduced backward recombination because of the inhibition of oxide defects within ALD-Sb2S3 absorber and the conformal deposition of very uniform Sb2S3 absorbers on the blocking TiO2 surface by ALD process.A high-quality Sb2S3 thin-absorber with controllable thickness was reproducibly formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Compared with conventional chemical bath deposition (CBD), the Sb2S3 absorber deposited by ALD did not contain oxide or oxygen impurities and showed a very uniform thickness of Sb2S3 absorbers formed on a rough surface of dense blocking TiO2/F-doped SnO2 (bl-TiO2/FTO) substrate. The planar ALD-Sb2S3 solar cells comprised of Au/Poly-3-hexylthiophene/ALD-Sb2S3/bl-TiO2/FTO showed significantly improved power conversion efficiency of 5.77% at 1 sun condition and narrow efficiency deviation, whereas the planar CBD-Sb2S3 solar cells exhibited 2.17% power conversion efficiency. The high efficiency and good reproducibility of ALD-Sb2S3 solar cell devices is attributed to reduced backward recombination because of the inhibition of oxide defects within ALD-Sb2S3 absorber and the conformal deposition of very uniform Sb2S3 absorbers on the blocking TiO2

  18. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show...... as passivation in fluorescent SiC based white LEDs applications....

  19. Dielectric Properties of Thermal and Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, K. B.; van Hemmen, J. L.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Besling, W. F. A.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative electrical characterization study of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) deposited by thermal and plasma-assisted atomic layer depositions (ALDs) in a single reactor is presented. Capacitance and leakage current measurements show that the Al2O3 deposited by the plasma-assisted ALD shows excellent

  20. Atomic layer deposition synthesis of platinum-tungsten carbide core-shell catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Irene J; Kimmel, Yannick C; Jiang, Xiaoqiang; Willis, Brian G; Chen, Jingguang G

    2012-01-25

    Pt was deposited onto tungsten carbide powders using atomic layer deposition to produce core-shell catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The Pt loading on these catalysts was reduced nearly ten-fold compared to a bulk Pt catalyst while equivalent HER activities were observed. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and

  2. Piezophototronic Effect in Single-Atomic-Layer MoS 2 for Strain-Gated Flexible Optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenzhuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332-0245 USA; Wang, Lei [Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York NY 10027 USA; Yu, Ruomeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332-0245 USA; Liu, Yuanyue [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden CO 80401 USA; Wei, Su-Huai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden CO 80401 USA; Hone, James [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York NY 10027 USA; Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332-0245 USA; Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100083 Beijing China

    2016-08-03

    Strain-gated flexible optoelectronics are reported based on monolayer MoS2. Utilizing the piezoelectric polarization created at metal-MoS2 interface to modulate the separation/transport of photogenerated carriers, the piezophototronic effect is applied to implement atomic-layer-thick phototransistor. Coupling between piezoelectricity and photogenerated carriers may enable the development of novel optoelectronics.

  3. Role of grains in protocrystalline silicon layers grown at very low substrate temperatures and studied by atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mates, Tomáš; Fejfar, Antonín; Drbohlav, Ivo; Rezek, Bohuslav; Fojtík, Petr; Luterová, Kateřina; Kočka, Jan; Koch, C.; Schubert, M. B.; Ito, M.; Ro, K.; Uyama, H.

    299-302, - (2002), s. 767-771 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : protocrystalline silicon layers * atomic force microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.435, year: 2002

  4. Atomic force microscopy imaging of transition metal layered compounds : A two-dimensional stick–slip system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssemakers, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1995-01-01

    Various layered transition metal dichalcogenides were scanned with an optical-lever atomic force microscope (AFM). The microscopic images indicate the occurrence of strong lateral stick–slip effects. In this letter, two models are presented to describe the observations due to stick–slip, i.e.,

  5. ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF TRANSITION-METAL LAYERED COMPOUNDS - A 2-DIMENSIONAL STICK-SLIP SYSTEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssemakers, J.W J; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Various layered transition metal dichalcogenides were scanned with an optical-lever atomic force microscope (AFM). The microscopic images indicate the occurrence of strong lateral stick-slip effects. In this letter, two models are presented to describe the observations due to stick-slip, i.e.,

  6. Electrical transport and Al doping efficiency in nanoscale ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; Hermkens, P.M.; Loo, B.W.H. van de; Knoops, H.C.M.; Potts, S.E.; Verheijen, M.A.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the structural, electrical, and optical properties as well as chemical bonding state of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition have been investigated to obtain insight into the doping and electrical transport mechanisms in the films. The range in doping levels from 0%

  7. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoye, R.L.Z.; Muñoz-Rojas, D.; Nelson, S.F.; Illiberi, A.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.; Macmanus-Driscoll, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants

  8. Enhanced Kinetics of Electrochemical Hydrogen Uptake and Release by Palladium Powders Modified by Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David M; Tsang, Chu F; Sugar, Joshua D; Jagannathan, Kaushik; Robinson, David B; El Gabaly, Farid; Cappillino, Patrick J; Stickney, John L

    2017-05-31

    Electrochemical atomic layer deposition (E-ALD) is a method for the formation of nanofilms of materials, one atomic layer at a time. It uses the galvanic exchange of a less noble metal, deposited using underpotential deposition (UPD), to produce an atomic layer of a more noble element by reduction of its ions. This process is referred to as surface limited redox replacement and can be repeated in a cycle to grow thicker deposits. It was previously performed on nanoparticles and planar substrates. In the present report, E-ALD is applied for coating a submicron-sized powder substrate, making use of a new flow cell design. E-ALD is used to coat a Pd powder substrate with different thicknesses of Rh by exchanging it for Cu UPD. Cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate an increasing Rh coverage with increasing numbers of deposition cycles performed, in a manner consistent with the atomic layer deposition (ALD) mechanism. Cyclic voltammetry also indicated increased kinetics of H sorption and desorption in and out of the Pd powder with Rh present, relative to unmodified Pd.

  9. Optimization studies of HgSe thin film deposition by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the optimization of HgSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) are reported. Cyclic voltammetry was used to obtain approximate deposition potentials for each element. These potentials were then coupled...

  10. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface...

  11. Optimization of parameters in the simulation of the interdiffusion layer growth in Al-U couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniznik, Laura; Alonso, Paula R.; Gargano, Pablo H.; Rubiolo, Gerardo H.

    2009-01-01

    U-Mo alloy dispersed in aluminum is considered as a high U density fuel for research reactors. In and out of pile experiments showed a reaction layer in U-Mo/Al interphase with formation of intermetallics compounds: Al 2 U, Al 3 U and Al 4 U. Under irradiation, porosities originate an unacceptable swelling of the fuel plate. The kinetics of growth of the intermetallic compounds in the U-Mo/Al interphase is treated in the Al 3 U/Al couple as a planar moving boundary problem due to diffusion of Al and U atoms in the direction perpendicular to the interphase surface. Using data from literature, we built a thermodynamic database to be read by the Thermocalc code to calculate phase equilibria. The diffusion problem was carried out by the DICTRA simulation package which articulates data evaluated by Thermocalc with a mobility database. In a previous work we built preliminary databases, for both free energy and mobilities. In the present work, we adjust the parameters from experimental thermodynamic equilibria and concentration profiles existing in literature, and we simulate satisfactorily the growth of the Al 4 U phase. (author)

  12. Evaluation of atomic layer deposited alumina as a protective layer for domestic silver articles: Anti-corrosion test in artificial sweat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suk Won; Han, Gwon Deok; Choi, Hyung Jong; Prinz, Fritz B.; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of alumina fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a protective coating for silver articles against the corrosion caused by body contact. An artificial sweat solution was used to simulate body contact. ALD alumina layers of varying thicknesses ranging from 20 to 80 nm were deposited on sputtered silver samples. The stability of the protective layer was evaluated by immersing the coated samples in the artificial sweat solution at 25 and 35 °C for 24 h. We confirmed that a sufficiently thick layer of ALD alumina is effective in protecting the shape and light reflectance of the underlying silver, whereas the uncoated bare silver is severely degraded by the artificial sweat solution. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used for in-depth analyses of the chemical stability of the ALD-coated silver samples after immersion in the sweat solution.

  13. Impacts of Thermal Atomic Layer-Deposited AlN Passivation Layer on GaN-on-Si High Electron Mobility Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sheng-Xun; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Lin-Qing; Huang, Hong-Fan; Shi, Jin-Shan; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD)-grown AlN passivation layer is applied on AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMT, and the impacts on drive current and leakage current are investigated. The thermal ALD-grown 30-nm amorphous AlN results in a suppressed off-state leakage; however, its drive current is unchanged. It was also observed by nano-beam diffraction method that thermal ALD-amorphous AlN layer barely enhanced the polarization. On the other hand, the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-deposited SiN layer enhanced the polarization and resulted in an improved drive current. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement also indicates that thermal ALD passivation results in a better interface quality compared with the SiN passivation.

  14. Impacts of Thermal Atomic Layer-Deposited AlN Passivation Layer on GaN-on-Si High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sheng-Xun; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Lin-Qing; Huang, Hong-Fan; Shi, Jin-Shan; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD)-grown AlN passivation layer is applied on AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMT, and the impacts on drive current and leakage current are investigated. The thermal ALD-grown 30-nm amorphous AlN results in a suppressed off-state leakage; however, its drive current is unchanged. It was also observed by nano-beam diffraction method that thermal ALD-amorphous AlN layer barely enhanced the polarization. On the other hand, the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-deposited SiN layer enhanced the polarization and resulted in an improved drive current. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement also indicates that thermal ALD passivation results in a better interface quality compared with the SiN passivation.

  15. Growth mechanism, surface and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures deposited on various Au-seeded thickness obtained by mist-atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afaah, A. N., E-mail: afaahabdullah@yahoo.com; Aadila, A., E-mail: aadilaazizali@gmail.com; Asib, N. A. M., E-mail: amierahasib@yahoo.com; Khusaimi, Z., E-mail: zurai142@salam.uitm.edu.my [NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, R., E-mail: ruzianamohd@pahang.uitm.edu.my [NANO-Electronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M., E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-Electronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    In this paper, growth mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures on non-seeded glass, 6 nm and 12 nm Au seed layer obtained by mist-atomization was proposed. ZnO films were successfully deposited on glass substrate with different thickness of Au seed layer i.e. 6 nm and 12 nm. The surface and optical properties of the prepared samples were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and photoluminescence (PL). FESEM micrograph show that ZnO nanostructure deposited on 6 nm Au seed layer has uniform formation and well distributed. From PL spectroscopy, the UV emission shows that ZnO deposited on 6 nm Au seed layer has the more intense UV intensity which proved that high crystal quality of nanostructured ZnO deposited on 6 nm Au seed layer.

  16. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-08-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm2 V-1 s-1 and electron mobility of 0.17 cm2 V-1 s-1 in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically

  17. Growth of thick p-type SiC epitaxial layers by halide chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, M. A.; Weiland, B. E.; Redwing, J. M.

    2008-08-01

    The halide chemical vapor deposition process for single-crystal SiC achieves growth rates over 200 μm/h at temperatures approaching 2000 °C. This work examines the conditions required to produce 80-100-μm-thick heavily p-type doped layers on 4H-SiC substrates by using boron trichloride and trimethylaluminum at high growth temperatures. Dopant incorporation as a function of the dopant concentration in the growth ambient was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The maximum Al and B concentrations achieved were 5×10 17 and 4×10 19 atoms/cm 3, respectively. Low Al incorporation efficiency was attributed to the high growth temperature and reaction of Al with Cl to form volatile chloride species. Aluminum incorporation was consistent with incorporation as a simple solid solution, while B incorporation exhibited a much stronger interaction with the SiC matrix. Aluminum incorporation was found to be an order of magnitude higher on the Si-face of the substrate, while B incorporation was essentially the same on both the Si-face and C-face. Aluminum incorporation was increased by a factor of five as the C/Si ratio increased from 0.42 to 0.86, while boron incorporation showed no sensitivity to the C/Si ratio. The B concentrations measured by SIMS were of the same magnitude as the net acceptor concentrations estimated from capacitance-voltage measurements, indicating a significant fraction of the B dopant was activated.

  18. Influence of Different Annealing Ambients on the Properties of Zinc Sulfide Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dongjun; Heo, Seung Chan; Choi, Moon Suk; Kim, Dohyung; Chung, Chulwon; Choi, Hag Young; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Choi, Changhwan

    2013-10-01

    The effects of different post annealing ambients (vacuum, O2, and H2S gases) on the chemical, structural, and optical properties of zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated. Diethylzinc [DEZ, Zn(C2H5)2] and H2S gas were used as precursor and reactant gas, respectively. Compared to as-deposited 50-nm-thick ZnS film, the optical energy band gap (Eg) of ZnS annealed under vacuum and H2S conditions increased from 3.73 to 3.85 eV, while it decreased down to 3.23 eV for the O2 annealing case. The change in the Eg of the thicker ZnS is similar to that of the thinner ZnS case. This behavior is related to the change in the Zn to S ratio. The vacuum and H2S anneals increases the Zn/S ratio, leading to higher Zn interstitial defects or S vacancy sites in the films. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that ZnS thin film has a preferred orientation of hexagonal wurtizte (002) and cubic zinc blend (111) at ˜28.2°, and its grain size changes in a range from 18.79 to 28.14 nm after annealing. However, for O2 annealing, the patterns of both the newly formed ZnO phase and the reduced ZnS phase appear at 34.04°. This result suggests that change in the composition and crystal structure during the process significantly affects the optical properties of ZnS thin film, which should be taken into consideration in searching for an alternative buffer layer for Cu2InGaSe(S)4 (CIGS) thin film solar cell systems.

  19. Atomic layer deposition on polymer fibers and fabrics for multifunctional and electronic textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Textile materials, including woven cotton, polymer knit fabrics, and synthetic nonwoven fiber mats, are being explored as low-cost, flexible, and light-weight platforms for wearable electronic sensing, communication, energy generation, and storage. The natural porosity and high surface area in textiles is also useful for new applications in environmental protection, chemical decontamination, pharmaceutical and chemical manufacturing, catalytic support, tissue regeneration, and others. These applications raise opportunities for new chemistries, chemical processes, biological coupling, and nanodevice systems that can readily combine with textile manufacturing to create new “multifunctional” fabrics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has a unique ability to form highly uniform and conformal thin films at low processing temperature on nonuniform high aspect ratio surfaces. Recent research shows how ALD can coat, modify, and otherwise improve polymer fibers and textiles by incorporating new materials for viable electronic and other multifunctional capabilities. This article provides a current overview of the understanding of ALD coating and modification of textiles, including current capabilities and outstanding problems, with the goal of providing a starting point for further research and advances in this field. After a brief introduction to textile materials and current textile treatment methods, the authors discuss unique properties of ALD-coated textiles, followed by a review of recent electronic and multifunctional textiles that use ALD coatings either as direct functional components or as critical nucleation layers for active materials integration. The article concludes with possible future directions for ALD on textiles, including the challenges in materials, manufacturing, and manufacturing integration that must be overcome for ALD to reach its full potential in electronic and other emerging multifunctional textile systems.

  20. Vertically aligned GaAs nanowires on graphite and few-layer graphene: generic model and epitaxial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, A Mazid; Dheeraj, Dasa L; Fauske, Vidar T; Kim, Dong-Chul; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Weman, Helge

    2012-09-12

    By utilizing the reduced contact area of nanowires, we show that epitaxial growth of a broad range of semiconductors on graphene can in principle be achieved. A generic atomic model is presented which describes the epitaxial growth configurations applicable to all conventional semiconductor materials. The model is experimentally verified by demonstrating the growth of vertically aligned GaAs nanowires on graphite and few-layer graphene by the self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid technique using molecular beam epitaxy. A two-temperature growth strategy was used to increase the nanowire density. Due to the self-catalyzed growth technique used, the nanowires were found to have a regular hexagonal cross-sectional shape, and are uniform in length and diameter. Electron microscopy studies reveal an epitaxial relationship of the grown nanowires with the underlying graphitic substrates. Two relative orientations of the nanowire side-facets were observed, which is well explained by the proposed atomic model. A prototype of a single GaAs nanowire photodetector demonstrates a high-quality material. With GaAs being a model system, as well as a very useful material for various optoelectronic applications, we anticipate this particular GaAs nanowire/graphene hybrid to be promising for flexible and low-cost solar cells.

  1. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    A slab model is proposed for developing the height of the mixed layer capped by stable air aloft. The model equations are closed by relating the consumption of energy (potential and kinetic) at the top of the mixed layer to the production of convective and mechanical turbulent kinetic energy with...

  2. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O(3Pj) from 1.3 × 1016 to 2.3 × 1017 cm-2 s-1. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O(3Pj) ranging from 6 × 1016 to 2 × 1017 cm-3, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 1017 to 1 × 1018 cm-3; cells were inactivated by O(3Pj) doses exceeding 1 × 1018 cm-3, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O(3Pj).

  3. Highly resolving Rutherford-scattering spectrometry for the study of ZrO2 layer growth in the beginning stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieluf, Maik

    2010-06-01

    By means of High Resolution Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (HR-RBS) the diffusion behaviour and layer growth of ZrO 2 on SiO 2 and TiN in the initial regime were investigated. The analysis of concentration profiles in ultrathin layers and interfaces was the focus of this work, made possible by the excellent depth resolution of less than 0.3 nm near the surface. For the first time a two-dimensional position sensitive semiconductor detector was implemented and characterized in the setup of the HR-RBS for the improvement of the quality of the measurement results. Furthermore, a measurement procedure was put into operation that allowed the reduction of ion induced damage. Through the optimization of the experimental conditions and the development of a program package for the support of the analyst, an efficient measurement procedure could be routinely ensured. At the time of a binary collision between the incident ion and the target element with a small impact factor, the charge state changes frequently, especially due to the abruptly decreasing ion velocity of the projectile and the overlapping of the electron clouds. For HR-RBS with an energy-separating dipole magnet, the charge state distribution of the scattered ions must be known for the interpretation of the measured spectra. For the first time a significant dependence of the charge state distribution of the scattered C ions on the layer thickness as well as atomic number of the detected target elements, here from the fourth subgroup, was demonstrated. This new knowledge allowed systematic investigations of the ZrO 2 layer growth in the initial regime. The ZrO 2 layers were produced by means of the atomic layer deposition (ALD). Based on the evidence for agglomeration of ZrO 2 on SiO 2 a method was introduced, which takes local thickness variations into account during the simulation of the HR-RBS spectra. An accurate statement about the ZrO 2 /SiO 2 interface was possible due to the extraction of the

  4. Atomic layer deposition of a high-k dielectric on MoS2 using trimethylaluminum and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lanxia; Qin, Xiaoye; Lucero, Antonio T; Azcatl, Angelica; Huang, Jie; Wallace, Robert M; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-08-13

    We present an Al2O3 dielectric layer on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) with ozone/trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water/TMA as precursors. The results of atomic force microscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy show that using TMA and ozone as precursors leads to the formation of uniform Al2O3 layers, in contrast to the incomplete coverage we observe when using TMA/H2O as precursors. Our Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate minimal variations in the MoS2 structure after ozone treatment at 200 °C, suggesting its excellent chemical resistance to ozone.

  5. Comparative study on electrical properties of atomic layer deposited high-permittivity materials on silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duenas, S.; Castan, H.; Garcia, H.; Barbolla, J.; Kukli, K.; Ritala, M.; Leskelae, M.

    2005-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage and conductance transient measurement techniques have been applied in order to evaluate the electrical quality of thin high-permittivity oxide layers on silicon. The oxides studied included HfO 2 film grown from two different oxygen-free metal precursors and Ta 2 O 5 and Nb 2 O 5 nanolaminates. The interface trap densities correlated to the oxide growth chemistry and semiconductor substrate treatment. No gap state densities induced by structural disorder were measured in the films grown on chemical SiO 2 . Trap densities were also clearly lower in HfO 2 films compared to Ta 2 O 5 -Nb 2 O 5

  6. Study of atomic layer deposition of indium oxy-sulfide films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugot, Cathy, E-mail: cathy-externe.bugot@edf.fr [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France); Schneider, Nathanaelle [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France); Bouttemy, Muriel; Etcheberry, Arnaud [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 (CNRS-UVSQ), Versailles (France); Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France)

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores the growth mechanism of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} films. The films were deposited using indium acetylacetonate (In(acac){sub 3}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and Ar/O{sub 2} plasma as oxygen precursor. The films were characterized using X-ray reflectometry, spectrophotometry, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To understand the growth mechanism and especially the interactions between Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} growing film, in-situ analyses were performed using quadrupole mass spectrometry. In-situ qualitative analysis revealed good correlation between the species detected in vapor phase and thin film properties. High concentrations of atomic and molecular oxygen were measured in the vapor phase during O{sub 2} plasma pulses. Significant decrease of these species could be observed by varying the plasma power from 2600 to 300 W, while the optical band gap remained at high values (> 2.6 eV). The analysis of the O{sub 2}-free/Ar plasma process showed that some of these oxygen species originate either from the indium precursor or from the substrate surface. This study explains the high oxygen content of the films, and allows us to reduce and control it. Generally, this report provides keys to understand the effect of plasma reactivity for the elaboration of oxide based materials. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} films were synthesized by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. • Growth mechanism was studied via gas phase analysis by Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry. • Good correlation between the vapor phase species and thin films properties was observed. • The film compositions and band gaps can be controlled by varying the plasma power.

  7. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of TiO2 compact layers for flexible mesostructured perovskite solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardetto, V.; Di Giacomo, F.; Lucarelli, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Brown, T.M.; Creatore, M.

    2017-01-01

    In mesostructured perovskite solar cell devices, charge recombination processes at the interface between the transparent conductive oxide, perovskite and hole transport layer are suppressed by depositing an efficient compact TiO2 blocking layer. In this contribution we investigate the role of the

  8. Atomic Layer Etching of Silicon to Solve ARDE-Selectivity-Profile-Uniformity Trade-Offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingmei; Ranjan, Alok; Ventzek, Peter; Koshiishi, Akira

    2014-10-01

    With shrinking critical dimensions, dry etch faces more and more challenges. Minimizing each of aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE), bowing, undercut, selectivity, and within die uniformly across a wafer are met by trading off one requirement against another. At the root of the problem is that roles radical flux, ion flux and ion energy play may be both good and bad. Increasing one parameter helps meeting one requirement but hinders meeting the other. Self-limiting processes like atomic layer etching (ALE) promise a way to escape the problem of balancing trade-offs. ALE was realized in the mid-1990s but the industrial implementation has been slow. In recent years interest in ALE has revived. We present how ARDE, bowing/selectivity trade-offs may be overcome by varying radical/ion ratio, byproduct re-deposition. We overcome many of the practical implementation issues associated with ALE by precise passivation process control. The Monte Carlo Feature Profile Model (MCFPM) is used to illustrate realistic scenarios built around an Ar/Cl2 chemistry driven etch of Si masked by SiO2. We demonstrate that ALE can achieve zero ARDE and infinite selectivity. Profile control depends on careful management of the ion energies and angles. For ALE to be realized in production environment, tight control of IAD is a necessary. Experimental results are compared with simulation results to provide context to the work.

  9. Boron Nitride Nanoporous Membranes with High Surface Charge by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matthieu; Koonkaew, Boonprakrong; Balme, Sebastien; Utke, Ivo; Picaud, Fabien; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Coy, Emerson; Miele, Philippe; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-05-17

    In this work, we report the design and the fine-tuning of boron nitride single nanopore and nanoporous membranes by atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, we developed an ALD process based on the use of BBr 3 and NH 3 as precursors in order to synthesize BN thin films. The deposited films were characterized in terms of thickness, composition, and microstructure. Next, we used the newly developed process to grow BN films on anodic aluminum oxide nanoporous templates, demonstrating the conformality benefit of BN prepared by ALD, and its scalability for the manufacturing of membranes. For the first time, the ALD process was then used to tune the diameter of fabricated single transmembrane nanopores by adjusting the BN thickness and to enable studies of the fundamental aspects of ionic transport on a single nanopore. At pH = 7, we estimated a surface charge density of 0.16 C·m -2 without slip and 0.07 C·m -2 considering a reasonable slip length of 3 nm. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with experimental conditions confirmed the conductivities and the sign of surface charges measured. The high ion transport results obtained and the ability to fine-tune nanoporous membranes by such a scalable method pave the way toward applications such as ionic separation, energy harvesting, and ultrafiltration devices.

  10. Rational Design of Hyperbranched Nanowire Systems for Tunable Superomniphobic Surfaces Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Boban, Mathew; He, Yang; Kazyak, Eric; Lee, Duck H.; Wang, Chongmin; Tuteja, Anish; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2017-01-24

    A method for tunable control of geometry in hyperbranched ZnO nanowire (NW) systems is reported, which enables the rational design and fabrication of superomniphobic surfaces. Branched NWs with tunable density and orientation were grown via a sequential hydrothermal process, in which atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used for NW seeding, disruption of epitaxy, and selective blocking of NW nucleation. This approach allows for the rational design and optimization of three-level hierarchical structures, in which the geometric parameters of each level of hierarchy can be individually controlled. We demonstrate the coupled relationships between geometry and contact angle for a variety of liquids, which is supported by mathematical models of structural superomniphobicity. The highest performing superomniphobic surface was designed with three levels of hierarchy and achieved the following advancing/receding contact angles, water: 172°/170°, hexadecane: 166°/156°, octane: 162°/145°, and heptane: 160°/130°. Low surface tension liquids were shown to bounce off the surface from a height of 7 cm without breaking through and wetting. This approach demonstrates the power of ALD as an enabling technique for hierarchical materials by design, spanning the macro, micro, and nano length scales.

  11. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Chi, Dongzhi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO x ) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO x films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO x films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO x films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO x has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO x in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings.

  13. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Chi, Dongzhi; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiOx) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiOx films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiOx films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiOx films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiOx has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiOx in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  14. Improvement of carrier diffusion length in silicon nanowire arrays using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Yuya; Yamada, Akira; Ohta, Yoshimi; Niwa, Yusuke; Hirota, Masaki

    2013-08-01

    To achieve a high-efficiency silicon nanowire (SiNW) solar cell, surface passivation technique is very important because a SiNW array has a large surface area. We successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) high-quality aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film for passivation on the whole surface of the SiNW arrays. The minority carrier lifetime of the Al2O3-depositedSiNW arrays with bulk silicon substrate was improved to 27 μs at the optimum annealing condition. To remove the effect of bulk silicon, the effective diffusion length of minority carriers in the SiNW array was estimated by simple equations and a device simulator. As a result, it was revealed that the effective diffusion length in the SiNW arrays increased from 3.25 to 13.5 μm by depositing Al2O3 and post-annealing at 400°C. This improvement of the diffusion length is very important for application to solar cells, and Al2O3 deposited by ALD is a promising passivation material for a structure with high aspect ratio such as SiNW arrays.

  15. Interface Engineering through Atomic Layer Deposition towards Highly Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Tian, Wei; Guo, Jun; Li, Liang

    2015-08-01

    A composite photoanode comprising ultralong ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles was prepared and its performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was optimized and compared to the photoanode consisting of conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. The ultralong ZnO nanobelts were synthesized in high yield by a facile solution approach at 90 oC followed by annealing at 500 oC. The effect of the ratio of ZnO nanobelts to TiO2 nanoparticles on the light scattering, specific surface area, and interface recombination were investigated. An optimum amount of ZnO nanobelts enhanced the photon-conversion efficiency by 61.4% compared to that of the conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. To further reduce the recombination rate and increase the carrier lifetime, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to coat a continuous TiO2 film surrounding the ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles, functioning as a barrier-free access of all electrons to conductive electrodes. This ALD treatment improved the interface contact within the whole photoanode system, finally leading to significant enhancement (137%) in the conversion efficiency of DSSCs.

  16. Highly reproducible planar Sb₂S₃-sensitized solar cells based on atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ju; Park, Mi Sun; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk; Sung, Shi-Joon

    2014-11-06

    A high-quality Sb₂S₃ thin-absorber with controllable thickness was reproducibly formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Compared with conventional chemical bath deposition (CBD), the Sb₂S₃ absorber deposited by ALD did not contain oxide or oxygen impurities and showed a very uniform thickness of Sb₂S₃ absorbers formed on a rough surface of dense blocking TiO₂/F-doped SnOv (bl-TiO₂/FTO) substrate. The planar ALD-Sb₂S₃ solar cells comprised of Au/Poly-3-hexylthiophene/ALD-Sb₂S₃/bl-TiO₂/FTO showed significantly improved power conversion efficiency of 5.77% at 1 sun condition and narrow efficiency deviation, whereas the planar CBD-Sb₂S₃ solar cells exhibited 2.17% power conversion efficiency. The high efficiency and good reproducibility of ALD-Sb₂S₃ solar cell devices is attributed to reduced backward recombination because of the inhibition of oxide defects within ALD-Sb₂S₃ absorber and the conformal deposition of very uniform Sb₂S₃ absorbers on the blocking TiO₂ surface by ALD process.

  17. Electrical properties of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide on gallium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposto, Michele; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Bajaj, Sanyam; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Rajan, Siddharth

    2011-01-01

    We report on our investigation of the electrical properties of metal/Al 2 O 3 /GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors. We determined the conduction band offset and interface charge density of the alumina/GaN interface by analyzing the capacitance-voltage characteristics of atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 films on GaN substrates. The conduction band offset at the Al 2 O 3 /GaN interface was calculated to be 2.13 eV, in agreement with theoretical predications. A non-zero field of 0.93 MV/cm in the oxide under flat-band conditions in the GaN was inferred, which we attribute to a fixed net positive charge density of magnitude 4.60 x 10 12 cm -2 at the Al 2 O 3 /GaN interface. We provide hypotheses to explain the origin of this charge by analyzing the energy band line-up.

  18. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  19. Thermal stability of atomic layer deposited WCxNy electrodes for metal oxide semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonensain, Oren; Fadida, Sivan; Fisher, Ilanit; Gao, Juwen; Danek, Michal; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2018-01-01

    This study is a thorough investigation of the chemical, structural, and electrical stability of W based organo-metallic films, grown by atomic layer deposition, for future use as gate electrodes in advanced metal oxide semiconductor structures. In an earlier work, we have shown that high effective work-function (4.7 eV) was produced by nitrogen enriched films (WCxNy) dominated by W-N chemical bonding, and low effective work-function (4.2 eV) was produced by hydrogen plasma resulting in WCx films dominated by W-C chemical bonding. In the current work, we observe, using x-ray diffraction analysis, phase transformation of the tungsten carbide and tungsten nitride phases after 900 °C annealing to the cubic tungsten phase. Nitrogen diffusion is also observed and is analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. After this 900 °C anneal, WCxNy effective work function tunability is lost and effective work-function values of 4.7-4.8 eV are measured, similar to stable effective work function values measured for PVD TiN up to 900 °C anneal. All the observed changes after annealing are discussed and correlated to the observed change in the effective work function.

  20. Electrical Characterization of Ti-Silicate Films Grown by Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjae; Yong, Kijung

    2007-08-01

    Electrical characterization was performed for Ti-silicate films, which were deposited by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). Before the deposition of Ti-silicate films, the silicon substrates were pretreated differently using hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching, chemical oxidation, and thermal oxidation. Regardless of the pretreatment methods, the grown films showed a highly smooth surface with rms below 0.52 nm. The electrical properties of the grown Ti-silicate films showed a strong dependence on the substrate pretreatments. The 5-nm-thick Ti-silicate films grown on hydrogen-passivated Si and chemically oxidized Si showed rather high leakage currents, whereas the films grown on thermally oxidized Si showed low leakage currents below 1× 10-7 A/cm2 at a bias of -1 V. All of the films showed a positive shift in the flatband voltage (VFB) upon annealing. Also, each film showed low a hysteresis below 180 mV and the hysteresis decreased upon annealing.

  1. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Vuorinen, Vesa [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University. P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  2. Atomic layer deposition as pore diameter adjustment tool for nanoporous aluminum oxide injection molding masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Rasilainen, Tiina; Puukilainen, Esa; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A

    2008-05-06

    The wetting properties of polypropylene (PP) surfaces were modified by adjusting the dimensions of the surface nanostructure. The nanostructures were generated by injection molding with nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as the mold insert. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of molybdenum nitride film was used to control the pore diameters of the AAO inserts. The original 50-nm pore diameter of AAO was adjusted by depositing films of thickness 5, 10, and 15 nm on AAO. Bis(tert-butylimido)-bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum and ammonia were used as precursors in deposition. The resulting pore diameters in the nitride-coated AAO inserts were 40, 30, and 20 nm, respectively. Injection molding of PP was conducted with the coated inserts, as well as with the non-coated insert. Besides the pore diameter, the injection mold temperature was varied with temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 degrees C tested. Water contact angles of PP casts were measured and compared with theoretical contact angles calculated from Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter theories. The highest contact angle, 140 degrees , was observed for PP molded with the AAO mold insert with 30-nm pore diameter. The Cassie-Baxter theory showed better fit than the Wenzel theory to the experimental values. With the optimal AAO mask, the nanofeatures in the molded PP pieces were 100 nm high. In explanation of this finding, it is suggested that some sticking and stretching of the nanofeatures occurs during the molding. Increase in the mold temperature increased the contact angle.

  3. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K.K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HfO 2 films using thermal ALD are studied for silicon surface passivation. • As-deposited thin film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with surface recombination velocity (SRV) <100 cm/s. • Annealing improves passivation quality with SRV ∼20 cm/s for ∼8 nm film. - Abstract: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO 2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (D it ) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  4. Atomic-layer-deposited WNxCy thin films as diffusion barrier for copper metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Oh, Su Suk; Kim, Ki-Bum; Kang, Dae-Hwan; Li, Wei-Min; Haukka, Suvi; Tuominen, Marko

    2003-01-01

    The properties of WN x C y films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF 6 , NH 3 , and triethyl boron as source gases were characterized as a diffusion barrier for copper metallization. It is noted that the as-deposited film shows an extremely low resistivity of about 350 μΩ cm with a film density of 15.37 g/cm 3 . The film composition measured from Rutherford backscattering spectrometry shows W, C, and N of ∼48, 32, and 20 at. %, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy analyses show that the as-deposited film is composed of face-centered-cubic phase with a lattice parameter similar to both β-WC 1-x and β-W 2 N with an equiaxed microstructure. The barrier property of this ALD-WN x C y film at a nominal thickness of 12 nm deposited between Cu and Si fails only after annealing at 700 deg. C for 30 min

  5. Atomic layer deposition-A novel method for the ultrathin coating of minitablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautala, Jaana; Kääriäinen, Tommi; Hoppu, Pekka; Kemell, Marianna; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Cameron, David; George, Steven; Juppo, Anne Mari

    2017-10-05

    We introduce atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a novel method for the ultrathin coating (nanolayering) of minitablets. The effects of ALD coating on the tablet characteristics and taste masking were investigated and compared with the established coating method. Minitablets containing bitter tasting denatonium benzoate were coated by ALD using three different TiO 2 nanolayer thicknesses (number of deposition cycles). The established coating of minitablets was performed in a laboratory-scale fluidized-bed apparatus using four concentration levels of aqueous Eudragit ® E coating polymer. The coated minitablets were studied with respect to the surface morphology, taste masking capacity, in vitro disintegration and dissolution, mechanical properties, and uniformity of content. The ALD thin coating resulted in minimal increase in the dimensions and weight of minitablets in comparison to original tablet cores. Surprisingly, ALD coating with TiO 2 nanolayers decreased the mechanical strength, and accelerated the in vitro disintegration of minitablets. Unlike previous studies, the studied levels of TiO 2 nanolayers on tablets were also inadequate for effective taste masking. In summary, ALD permits a simple and rapid method for the ultrathin coating (nanolayering) of minitablets, and provides nanoscale-range TiO 2 coatings on porous minitablets. More research, however, is needed to clarify its potential in tablet taste masking applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Catalyst synthesis and evaluation using an integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis–catalysis testing tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Shou, Heng; Marshall, Christopher L. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Aich, Payoli [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Beaulieu, David R.; Klotzsch, Helmut; Bachman, Stephen [Arradiance Inc., Sudbury, Massachusetts 01776 (United States); Hock, Adam [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Stair, Peter [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An integrated atomic layer deposition synthesis-catalysis (I-ALD-CAT) tool was developed. It combines an ALD manifold in-line with a plug-flow reactor system for the synthesis of supported catalytic materials by ALD and immediate evaluation of catalyst reactivity using gas-phase probe reactions. The I-ALD-CAT delivery system consists of 12 different metal ALD precursor channels, 4 oxidizing or reducing agents, and 4 catalytic reaction feeds to either of the two plug-flow reactors. The system can employ reactor pressures and temperatures in the range of 10{sup −3} to 1 bar and 300–1000 K, respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer unit for the detection and quantification of volatile species from ALD and catalytic reactions. In this report, we demonstrate the use of the I-ALD-CAT tool for the synthesis of platinum active sites and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overcoats, and evaluation of catalyst propylene hydrogenation activity.

  7. Toward 3D Solid-State Batteries via Atomic Layer Deposition Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available 3D solid-state batteries are receiving great attentions as on-board power supply systems for small-dimension devices, due to their high power and energy densities. However, the fabrication of 3D solid-state batteries has been a formidable challenge due to the limitation of conventional thin-film techniques. Recently, atomic layer deposition (ALD has emerged as a powerful approach toward 3D solid-state batteries, because of its exclusive advantage of coating uniform, pinhole-free, and conformal functional thin films on high-aspect-ratio substrates. Herein, we review the most recent progress in the utilization of ALD for fabricating 3D solid-state batteries. Specifically, two aspects will be highlighted: the development of glassy solid-state electrolytes (especially lithium phosphorus oxynitride, and the fabrication of 3D solid-state batteries in half-cell and full-cell configurations via ALD approach. Based on this, the perspectives for further research will be discussed.

  8. Tuning of undoped ZnO thin film via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition and its application for an inverted polymer solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-jin Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the tuning of structural and optical properties of ZnO thin film and its correlation to the efficiency of inverted solar cell using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD. The sequential injection of DEZn and O2 plasma was employed for the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin film. As the growth temperature of ZnO film was increased from 100 °C to 300 °C, the crystallinity of ZnO film was improved from amorphous to highly ordered (002 direction ploy-crystal due to self crystallization. Increasing oxygen plasma time in PEALD process also introduces growing of hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO nanocrystal. Excess of oxygen plasma time induces enhanced deep level emission band (500 ∼ 700 nm in photoluminescence due to Zn vacancies and other defects. The evolution of structural and optical properties of PEALD ZnO films also involves in change of electrical conductivity by 3 orders of magnitude. The highly tunable PEALD ZnO thin films were employed as the electron conductive layers in inverted polymer solar cells. Our study indicates that both structural and optical properties rather than electrical conductivities of ZnO films play more important role for the effective charge collection in photovoltaic device operation. The ability to tune the materials properties of undoped ZnO films via PEALD should extend their functionality over the wide range of advanced electronic applications.

  9. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on crystalline silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Joon [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hee Eun, E-mail: hsong@kier.re.kr [Photovoltaic Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Sik, E-mail: hschang@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation.

  10. Fabrication of metallic single electron transistors featuring plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasian, Golnaz

    The continuing increase of the device density in integrated circuits (ICs) gives rise to the high level of power that is dissipated per unit area and consequently a high temperature in the circuits. Since temperature affects the performance and reliability of the circuits, minimization of the energy consumption in logic devices is now the center of attention. According to the International Technology Roadmaps for Semiconductors (ITRS), single electron transistors (SETs) hold the promise of achieving the lowest power of any known logic device, as low as 1x10-18 J per switching event. Moreover, SETs are the most sensitive electrometers to date, and are capable of detecting a fraction of an electron charge. Despite their low power consumption and high sensitivity for charge detection, room temperature operation of these devices is quite challenging mainly due to lithographical constraints in fabricating structures with the required dimensions of less than 10 nm. Silicon based SETs have been reported to operate at room temperature. However, they all suffer from significant variation in batch-to-batch performance, low fabrication yield, and temperature-dependent tunnel barrier height. In this project, we explored the fabrication of SETs featuring metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions. While Si-based SETs suffer from undesirable effect of dopants that result in irregularities in the device behavior, in metal-based SETs the device components (tunnel barrier, island, and the leads) are well-defined. Therefore, metal SETs are potentially more predictable in behavior, making them easier to incorporate into circuits, and easier to check against theoretical models. Here, the proposed fabrication method takes advantage of unique properties of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). Chemical mechanical polishing provides a path for tuning the dimensions of the tunnel junctions, surpassing the limits imposed by electron beam

  11. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  12. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi, E-mail: hashizume@plasma.engg.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) from 1.3 × 10{sup 16} to 2.3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} to 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}; cells were inactivated by O({sup 3}P{sub j}) doses exceeding 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O({sup 3}P{sub j})

  13. Thin films of copper oxide and copper grown by atomic layer deposition for applications in metallization systems of microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waechtler, Thomas

    2010-05-25

    Copper-based multi-level metallization systems in today's ultralarge-scale integrated electronic circuits require the fabrication of diffusion barriers and conductive seed layers for the electrochemical metal deposition. Such films of only several nanometers in thickness have to be deposited void-free and conformal in patterned dielectrics. The envisaged further reduction of the geometric dimensions of the interconnect system calls for coating techniques that circumvent the drawbacks of the well-established physical vapor deposition. The atomic layer deposition method (ALD) allows depositing films on the nanometer scale conformally both on three-dimensional objects as well as on large-area substrates. The present work therefore is concerned with the development of an ALD process to grow copper oxide films based on the metal-organic precursor bis(trin- butylphosphane)copper(I)acetylacetonate [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)]. This liquid, non-fluorinated {beta}-diketonate is brought to react with a mixture of water vapor and oxygen at temperatures from 100 to 160 C. Typical ALD-like growth behavior arises between 100 and 130 C, depending on the respective substrate used. On tantalum nitride and silicon dioxide substrates, smooth films and selfsaturating film growth, typical for ALD, are obtained. On ruthenium substrates, positive deposition results are obtained as well. However, a considerable intermixing of the ALD copper oxide with the underlying films takes place. Tantalum substrates lead to a fast self-decomposition of the copper precursor. As a consequence, isolated nuclei or larger particles are always obtained together with continuous films. The copper oxide films grown by ALD can be reduced to copper by vapor-phase processes. If formic acid is used as the reducing agent, these processes can already be carried out at similar temperatures as the ALD, so that agglomeration of the films is largely avoided. Also for an integration with subsequent

  14. Amorphous-tetrahedral diamondlike carbon layered structures resulting from film growth energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M. P.; Barbour, J. C.; Provencio, P. N.; Tallant, D. R.; Friedmann, T. A.

    1998-08-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that amorphous-tetrahedral diamondlike carbon (a-tC) films grown by pulsed-laser deposition on Si(100) consist of three-to-four layers, depending on the growth energetics. We estimate the density of each layer using both HRTEM image contrast and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The first carbon layer and final surface layer have relatively low density. The bulk of the film between these two layers has higher density. For films grown under the most energetic conditions, there exists a superdense a-tC layer between the interface and bulk layers. The density of all four layers, and the thickness of the surface and interfacial layers, correlate well with the energetics of the depositing carbon species.

  15. Electrical properties of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal–organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Aoki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD, with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD. The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm−2 eV−1. Using a (111A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  16. Electrical properties of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal-organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  17. Growth characteristics of (100)HgCdTe layers in low-temperature MOVPE with ditertiarybutyltelluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K.; Hatano, H.; Ferid, T.; Minamide, M.; Maejima, T.; Kawamoto, K.

    1996-09-01

    Low-temperature growth of (100)HgCdTe (MCT) layers in MOVPE has been studied using ditertiarybutyltelluride (DtBTe), dimethylcadmium (DMCd), and elementary mercury as precursors. MCT layers were grown at 275°C on (100)GaAs substrates. Growths were carried out in a vertical growth cell which has a narrow spacing between the substrate and cell ceiling. Using the growth cell, the Cd-composition ( x) of MCT layers was controlled over a wide range from 0 to 0.98 by the DMCd flow. The growth rate of the MCT layers was constant at 5 μm h -1 for the increased DMCd flow. Preferential Cd-incorporation into MCT layers and an increase of the growth rate were observed in the presence of mercury vapor. The growth characteristics were considered to be due to the alkyl-exchange reaction between DMCd and mercury. The electrical properties and crystallinity of grown layers were also evaluated, which showed that layers with high quality can be grown at 275°C.

  18. Polyaminoacid-Induced Growth of Metal Nanoparticles on Layer-by-Layer Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-21

    fungus ,28 or silk fiber-templated29 reduction of gold and silver nanostructures. However, despite the increas- ing interest in using organic substrates...and antimicrobial coatings.30-34 In this paper, we report on preparation of redox-active nanoscale layer-by-layer (LbL) films 35-40 with polyami

  19. Interface engineering for oxide electronics: tuning electronic properties by atomically controlled growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijben, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to develop a controlled growth with atomic precision for the realization of artificial perovskite structures, to exploit the exceptional physical properties of complex oxide materials such as high-temperature superconductors and conducting interfaces between band

  20. Growth mechanisms of GaSb heteroepitaxial films on Si with an AlSb buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2013-09-21

    The initial growth stages of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates and the role of the AlSb buffer layer were studied by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Heteroepitaxy of GaSb and AlSb on Si both occur by Volmer-Weber (i.e., island mode) growth. However, the AlSb and GaSb islands have distinctly different characteristics as revealed through an atomic-resolution structural study using Z-contrast of HAADF-STEM imaging. While GaSb islands are sparse and three dimensional, AlSb islands are numerous and flattened. The introduction of 3D island-forming AlSb buffer layer facilitates the nucleation of GaSb islands. The AlSb islands-assisted nucleation of GaSb islands results in the formation of drastically higher quality planar film at a significantly smaller thickness of films. The interface of the AlSb and GaSb epilayers with the Si substrate was further investigated with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the key role of the AlSb buffer layer in the growth of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates.

  1. Growth mechanisms of GaSb heteroepitaxial films on Si with an AlSb buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    The initial growth stages of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates and the role of the AlSb buffer layer were studied by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Heteroepitaxy of GaSb and AlSb on Si both occur by Volmer-Weber (i.e., island mode) growth. However, the AlSb and GaSb islands have distinctly different characteristics as revealed through an atomic-resolution structural study using Z-contrast of HAADF-STEM imaging. While GaSb islands are sparse and three dimensional, AlSb islands are numerous and flattened. The introduction of 3D island-forming AlSb buffer layer facilitates the nucleation of GaSb islands. The AlSb islands-assisted nucleation of GaSb islands results in the formation of drastically higher quality planar film at a significantly smaller thickness of films. The interface of the AlSb and GaSb epilayers with the Si substrate was further investigated with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the key role of the AlSb buffer layer in the growth of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates

  2. Hydrogen–argon plasma pre-treatment for improving the anti-corrosion properties of thin Al2O3 films deposited using atomic layer deposition on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Härkönen, Emma; Potts, Stephen E.; Kessels, Wilhelmus M.M.; Díaz, Belén; Seyeux, Antoine; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Marcus, Philippe; Radnóczi, György; Tóth, Lajos; Kariniemi, Maarit; Niinistö, Jaakko; Ritala, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    The effect of H 2 –Ar plasma pre-treatment prior to thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) and plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of Al 2 O 3 films on steel for corrosion protection was investigated. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy were used to observe the changes in the interface. The electrochemical properties of the samples were studied with polarization measurements, and the coating porosities were calculated from the polarization results for easier comparison of the coatings. Prior to thermal ALD the plasma pre-treatment was observed to reduce the amount of impurities at the interface and coating porosity by 1–3 orders of magnitude. The anti-corrosion properties of the PEALD coatings could also be improved by the pre-treatment. However, exposure of the pre-treatment plasma activated steel surface to oxygen plasma species in PEALD led to facile oxide layer formation in the interface. The oxide layer formed this way was thicker than the native oxide layer and appeared to be detrimental to the protective properties of the coating. The best performance for PEALD Al 2 O 3 coatings was achieved when, after the plasma pre-treatment, the surface was given time to regrow a thin protective interfacial oxide prior to exposure to the oxygen plasma. The different effects that thermal and plasma-enhanced ALD have on the substrate-coating interface were compared. The reactivity of the oxygen precursor was shown to have a significant influence on substrate surface in the early stages of film growth and thereafter also on the overall quality of the protective film. - Highlights: • Influence of H 2 –Ar plasma pre-treatment to ALD coatings on steel was studied. • The pre-treatment modified the coating–substrate interface composition and thickness. • The pre-treatment improved the barrier properties of the coatings

  3. Influence of titanium-substrate roughness on Ca–P–O thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananda Sagari, A.R., E-mail: arsagari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Malm, Jari [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Rahkila, Paavo [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Hongqiang, Ma [Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 35 (L), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Putkonen, Matti [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Beneq Oy, P.O. Box 262, FI-01511 Vantaa (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Whitlow, Harry J.; Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous Ca–P–O films were deposited on titanium substrates using atomic layer deposition, while maintaining a uniform Ca/P pulsing ratio of 6/1 with varying number of atomic layer deposition cycles starting from 10 up to 208. Prior to film deposition the titanium substrates were mechanically abraded using SiC abrasive paper of 600, 1200, 2000 grit size and polished with 3 μm diamond paste to obtain surface roughness R{sub rms} values of 0.31 μm, 0.26 μm, 0.16 μm, and 0.10 μm, respectively. The composition and film thickness of as-deposited amorphous films were studied using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The results showed that uniform films could be deposited on rough metal surfaces with a clear dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films. The in vitro cell-culture studies using MC3T3 mouse osteoblast showed a greater coverage of cells on the surface polished with diamond paste in comparison to rougher surfaces after 24 h culture. No statistically significant difference was observed between Ca–P–O coated and un-coated Ti surfaces for the measured roughness value. The deposited 50 nm thick films did not dissolve during the cell culture experiment. - Highlights: ► Atomic layer deposition of Ca–P–O films on abraded Ti substrate ► Surface analysis using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis ► Dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films ► An increase in Ca/P atomic ratio with decreasing roughness ► Mouse osteoblast showed greater coverage of cells in polished surface.

  4. Large-area atomic layer deposition and characterization of Al sub 2 O sub 3 film grown using AlCl sub 3 and H sub 2 O

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Paek, M C; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of Al sub 2 O sub 3 films in a large area traveling wave reactor was studied as well as the materials and electrical characteristics of the films. The precursors used in the deposition of Al sub 2 O sub 3 were AlCl sub 3 and H sub 2 O. The dependence of growth rate and Cl content of Al sub 2 O sub 3 films on the growth temperature was investigated at the reactor temperature ranging from 300 .deg. C to 500 .deg. C. The growth rate decreased from 0.66 to 0.45 A/cycle as the reactor temperature increased from 330 .deg. C to 500 .deg. C. The etch rate of the films and the annealing effect on the crystallinity of Al sub 2 O sub 3 films were also studied. The dependence of characteristics of Al sub 2 O sub 3 on the growth conditions was discussed according to the growth mechanism. The electrical characteristics including breakdown electric field and leakage current of the Al sub 2 O sub 3 films were measured to determine the effect of growth temperature on electrical proper...

  5. Studies of void growth in a thin ductile layer between ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    growth by a ductile mechanism along the thin layer. Plastic flow in the layer is highly constrained by the ceramics, so that a high. level of triaxial tension develops, leading in some cases to cavitation instabilities. The computations are continued to a state near the occurrence of void coalescence.......The growth of voids in a thin ductile layer between ceramics is analysed numerically, using an axisymmetric cell model to represent an array of uniformly distributed spherical voids at the central plane of the layer. The purpose is to determine the full traction-separation law relevant to crack...

  6. CMOS-compatible dense arrays of Ge quantum dots on the Si(001) surface: hut cluster nucleation, atomic structure and array life cycle during UHV MBE growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapkina, Larisa V; Yuryev, Vladimir A

    2011-04-15

    We report a direct observation of Ge hut nucleation on Si(001) during UHV molecular beam epitaxy at 360°C. Nuclei of pyramids and wedges were observed on the wetting layer (WL) (M × N) patches starting from the coverage of 5.1 Å and found to have different structures. Atomic models of nuclei of both hut species have been built as well as models of the growing clusters. The growth of huts of each species has been demonstrated to follow generic scenarios. The formation of the second atomic layer of a wedge results in rearrangement of its first layer. Its ridge structure does not repeat the nucleus. A pyramid grows without phase transitions. A structure of its vertex copies the nucleus. Transitions between hut species turned out to be impossible. The wedges contain point defects in the upper corners of the triangular faces and have preferential growth directions along the ridges. The derived structure of the {105} facet follows the paired dimer model. Further growth of hut arrays results in domination of wedges, and the density of pyramids exponentially drops. The second generation of huts arises at coverages >10 Å; new huts occupy the whole WL at coverages ~14 Å. Nanocrystalline Ge 2D layer begins forming at coverages >14 Å.

  7. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kuang Liao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD and chemical bath deposition (CBD as used by the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  8. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Kuang; Liu, Yung-Tsung; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Shen, Tien-Lin; Hsieh, Ming-Yang; Tzou, An-Jye; Chen, Shih-Chen; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Chan, Sheng-Wen; Shen, Yen-Ping; Cheng, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Chen, Hao-Ming; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Charlton, Martin D B; Hsieh, Tung-Po; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-04-06

    Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new "paradigm shift" non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) as used by the Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  9. Wide-Gap Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells with Zn(O,S) Buffer Layers Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kumazawa, Toyokazu; Kobayashi, Taizo; Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2012-10-01

    Wide-gap Cu(In0.4,Ga0.6)Se2 solar cells with Zn(O,S) buffer layers deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique have been investigated. The band-gap energy (Eg) of the Zn(O,S) layer estimated by optical transmission and reflection measurements was varied from 3.2 to 3.6 eV. The solar cells with sulfur (S)-poor Zn(O,S) buffer layers showed a low open-circuit voltage (VOC) owing to the cliff nature of the conduction band offset (CBO). In contrast, the solar cells with S-rich Zn(O,S) buffer layers showed a low short-circuit current density (JSC) owing to the spike nature of CBO. Even if the CBO values were adequate, the best solar cell efficiencies were considerably low. These results suggest that the main cause for the low efficiencies is not interface recombination at the Zn(O,S)/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface, but mainly bulk recombination in the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layer.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide and zinc tin oxide using tetraethyltin and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Ellis J.; Gladfelter, Wayne L., E-mail: wlg@umn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Johnson, Forrest; Campbell, Stephen A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Silicon or glass substrates exposed to sequential pulses of tetraethyltin (TET) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were coated with thin films of SnO{sub 2}. Self-limiting deposition was found using 8 s pulse times, and a uniform thickness per cycle (TPC) of 0.2 nm/cycle was observed in a small, yet reproducible, temperature window from 290 to 320 °C. The as-deposited, stoichiometric SnO{sub 2} films were amorphous and transparent above 400 nm. Interspersing pulses of diethylzinc and O{sub 3} among the TET:O{sub 3} pulses resulted in deposition of zinc tin oxide films, where the fraction of tin, defined as [at. % Sn/(at. % Sn + at. % Zn)], was controlled by the ratio of TET pulses, specifically n{sub TET}:(n{sub TET} + n{sub DEZ}) where n{sub TET} and n{sub DEZ} are the number of precursor/O{sub 3} subcycles within each atomic layer deposition (ALD) supercycle. Based on film thickness and composition measurements, the TET pulse time required to reach saturation in the TPC of SnO{sub 2} on ZnO surfaces was increased to >30 s. Under these conditions, film stoichiometry as a function of the TET pulse ratio was consistent with the model devised by Elliott and Nilsen. The as-deposited zinc tin oxide (ZTO) films were amorphous and remained so even after annealing at 450 °C in air for 1 h. The optical bandgap of the transparent ZTO films increased as the tin concentration increased. Hall measurements established that the n-type ZTO carrier concentration was 3 × 10{sup 17} and 4 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} for fractional tin concentrations of 0.28 and 0.63, respectively. The carrier mobility decreased as the concentration of tin increased. A broken gap pn junction was fabricated using ALD-deposited ZTO and a sputtered layer of cuprous oxide. The junction demonstrated ohmic behavior and low resistance consistent with similar junctions prepared using sputter-deposited ZTO.

  11. Effect of H, O intentionally doping on photoelectric properties in MOVPE-growth GaN layers

    KAUST Repository

    Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-10-24

    GaN crystal growth requires higher purity of materials. Some contaminants in NH3 gas could be the causal factor of defects in GaN crystals. These atoms act as donor or acceptor. In order to clearly demonstrate the effect of gaseous impurities such as H2O on the properties of undoped-GaN layer, high purity NH3 (N70) was used as NH3 source. The concentration of H2O in NH3 was varied at 32, 49, 75, 142, 266, 489, and 899 ppb, respectively. Under the same recipe, we deposited undoped-GaN epitaxial layer with purifier, and H2O-doped GaN series layers. As similar to the results of CO and CO2-doped GaN series, the increase tendency of carrier density changing with increasing H2O concentration. The FWHMs of XRC around (0002) remain stable, witnessing that the crystal quality of GaN layer remain good. LT (15K) PL of undoped-GaN and H2O-doped GaN were measured, the D0X emission peak intensity of all H2O-doped GaN are decreased drastically compared with undoped-GaN. H2O impurity was doped into GaN layer, which not only effects electrical properties and but also effects the radiative emission and furthermore effects PL intensity, its mechanism is discussed.

  12. Effect of H2O intentionally doping on photoelectric properties in MOVPE-growth GaN layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxin; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-10-01

    GaN crystal growth requires higher purity of materials. Some contaminants in NH3 gas could be the causal factor of defects in GaN crystals. These atoms act as donor or acceptor. In order to clearly demonstrate the effect of gaseous impurities such as H2O on the properties of undoped-GaN layer, high purity NH3 (N70) was used as NH3 source. The concentration of H2O in NH3 was varied at 32, 49, 75, 142, 266, 489, and 899 ppb, respectively. Under the same recipe, we deposited undoped-GaN epitaxial layer with purifier, and H2O-doped GaN series layers. As similar to the results of CO and CO2-doped GaN series, the increase tendency of carrier density changing with increasing H2O concentration. The FWHMs of XRC around (0002) remain stable, witnessing that the crystal quality of GaN layer remain good. LT (15K) PL of undoped-GaN and H2O-doped GaN were measured, the D0X emission peak intensity of all H2O-doped GaN are decreased drastically compared with undoped-GaN. H2O impurity was doped into GaN layer, which not only effects electrical properties and but also effects the radiative emission and furthermore effects PL intensity, its mechanism is discussed.

  13. Stabilizing small molecules on metal oxide surfaces using atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kenneth; Losego, Mark D; Kalanyan, Berç; Parsons, Gregory N; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-10-09

    Device lifetimes and commercial viability of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs) are dependent on the stability of the surface bound molecular chromophores and catalysts. Maintaining the integrity of the solution-metal oxide interface is especially challenging in DSPECs for water oxidation where it is necessary to perform high numbers of turnovers, under irradiation in an aqueous environment. In this study, we describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 on nanocrystalline TiO2 prefunctionalized with the dye molecule [Ru(bpy)2(4,4'-(PO3H2)bpy)](2+) (RuP) as a strategy to stabilize surface bound molecules. The resulting films are over an order of magnitude more photostable than untreated films and the desorption rate constant exponentially decreases with increased thickness of ALD TiO2 overlayers. However, the injection yield for TiO2-RuP with ALD TiO2 also decreases with increasing overlayer thickness. The combination of decreased injection yield and 95% quenched emission suggests that the ALD TiO2 overlayer acts as a competitive electron acceptor from RuP*, effectively nonproductively quenching the excited state. The ALD TiO2 also increases back electron transfer rates, relative to the untreated film, but is independent of overlayer thickness. The results for TiO2-RuP with an ALD TiO2 overlayer are compared with similar films having ALD Al2O3 overlayers.

  14. Interface characterization of atomic layer deposited high-k on non-polar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ye; Zeng, Ke; Singisetti, Uttam

    2017-10-01

    The interface properties between dielectrics and semiconductors are crucial for electronic devices. In this work, we report the electrical characterization of the interface properties between atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on non-polar a-plane ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) and m-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) GaN grown by hybrid vapor phase epitaxy. A metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) structure was used to evaluate the interface properties. The impact of annealing on the interface properties was also investigated. The border trap in the oxide, characterized by the capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis loop, was low. The interface state density (Dit), extracted using the ac conductance method, is in the range of 0.5 × 1012/cm2 eV to 7.5 × 1011/cm2 eV within an energy range from 0.2 eV to 0.5 eV below the conduction band minimum. The m-plane GaN MOSCAPs exhibited better interface properties than the a-plane GaN MOSCAPs after annealing. Without annealing, Al2O3 dielectrics had higher border trap density and interface state density compared to HfO2 dielectrics. However, the annealing had different impacts on Al2O3 dielectrics as compared to HfO2. Our results showed that the annealing degraded the quality of the interface in HfO2, but it improved the quality of the interface in Al2O3 devices. The annealing also reduced the positive trapped oxide charge, resulting in a shift of C-V curves towards the positive bias region.

  15. Atomic layer deposited nanocrystalline tungsten carbides thin films as a metal gate and diffusion barrier for Cu metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Beom; Kim, Soo-Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Won Seok [UP Chemical 576, Chilgoedong, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do 459-050 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Do-Joong [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Tungsten carbides (WC{sub x}) thin films were deposited on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a fluorine- and nitrogen-free W metallorganic precursor, tungsten tris(3-hexyne) carbonyl [W(CO)(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}C ≡ CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 3}], and N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} plasma as the reactant at deposition temperatures between 150 and 350 °C. The present ALD-WC{sub x} system showed an ALD temperature window between 200 and 250 °C, where the growth rate was independent of the deposition temperature. Typical ALD characteristics, such as self-limited film growth and a linear dependency of the film grown on the number of ALD cycles, were observed, with a growth rate of 0.052 nm/cycle at a deposition temperature of 250 °C. The ALD-WC{sub x} films formed a nanocrystalline structure with grains, ∼2 nm in size, which consisted of hexagonal W{sub 2}C, WC, and nonstoichiometric cubic β-WC{sub 1−x} phase. Under typical deposition conditions at 250 °C, an ALD-WC{sub x} film with a resistivity of ∼510 μΩ cm was deposited and the resistivity of the ALD-WC{sub x} film could be reduced even further to ∼285 μΩ cm by further optimizing the reactant pulsing conditions, such as the plasma power. The step coverage of ALD-WC{sub x} film was ∼80% on very small sized and dual trenched structures (bottom width of 15 nm and aspect ratio of ∼6.3). From ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, the work function of the ALD-WC{sub x} film was determined to be 4.63 eV. Finally, the ultrathin (∼5 nm) ALD-WC{sub x} film blocked the diffusion of Cu, even up to 600 °C, which makes it a promising a diffusion barrier material for Cu interconnects.

  16. Studies on layer growth and interfaces on Ta-base thin layers by means of XPS; Untersuchungen zu Schichtwachstum und Grenzflaechen an Ta-basierten Duennschichten mittels XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zier, M.

    2007-11-02

    In this thesis studies on the growth and on the formation of the interfaces of Ta and TaN layers on Si and SiO{sub 2} were performed. In the system TaN on SiO{sub 2} no reaction on the interface could be found. As the system with the mostly disturbed interface Ta on SiO{sub 2} was proved. Here a reduction of the SiO{sub 2} at simultaneous oxidation of the Ta was to be observed. Additionally tantalum silicide was formed to be considered concerning the bonding state as Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, from which a double layer of a tantalum silicide and a tantalum suboxide resulted. A whole thickness of the double layer of above 1 nm resulted. In the system Ta on Si at the deposition of the film on the interface a tantalum silicide was formed to be characterized concerning the bonding state as TaSi{sub 2}. The thickness of the interlayer growed thereby up to 0.8 nm in form of islands. Finally in the system TaN on Si a silicon nitride formation during the deposition was observed, which was attributed to the insertion of adsorbed nitrogen from the sputtering atmosphere by recoil implantation of the sputtered Ta atoms. The silicon nitride interlayer growed thereby up to a thickness of 0.8 nm.

  17. Epitaxial growth of atomically flat gadolinia-doped ceria thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial growth of Ce0.8Gd0.2O2(CGO) films on (001) TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition was investigated using in situ reflective high energy electron diffraction. The initial film growth shows a Stransky–Krastanov growth mode. However, this three-dimensional island...... formation is replaced by a two-dimensional island nucleation during further deposition, which results in atomically smooth CGO films. The obtained high-quality CGO films may be attractive for the electrolyte of solid-oxide fuel cells operating at low temperature....

  18. Controllable growth of stable germanium dioxide ultra-thin layer by means of capacitively driven radio frequency discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarnas, P., E-mail: svarnas@ece.upatras.gr [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26 504, Patras (Greece); Botzakaki, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, Rion 26 504 (Greece); Skoulatakis, G.; Kennou, S.; Ladas, S. [Surface Science Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26 504 (Greece); Tsamis, C. [NCSR “Demokritos”, Institute of Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology & Microsystems, Aghia Paraskevi 15 310, Athens (Greece); Georga, S.N.; Krontiras, C.A. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, Rion 26 504 (Greece)

    2016-01-29

    It is well recognized that native oxide of germanium is hygroscopic and water soluble, while germanium dioxide is thermally unstable and it is converted to volatile germanium oxide at approximately 400 °C. Different techniques, implementing quite complicated plasma setups, gas mixtures and substrate heating, have been used in order to grow a stable germanium oxide. In the present work a traditional “RF diode” is used for germanium oxidation by cold plasma. Following growth, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that traditional capacitively driven radio frequency discharges, using molecular oxygen as sole feedstock gas, provide the possibility of germanium dioxide layer growth in a fully reproducible and controllable manner. Post treatment ex-situ analyses on day-scale periods disclose the stability of germanium oxide at room ambient conditions, offering thus the ability to grow (ex-situ) ultra-thin high-k dielectrics on top of germanium oxide layers. Atomic force microscopy excludes any morphological modification in respect to the bare germanium surface. These results suggest a simple method for a controllable and stable germanium oxide growth, and contribute to the challenge to switch to high-k dielectrics as gate insulators for high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and to exploit in large scale the superior properties of germanium as an alternative channel material in future technology nodes. - Highlights: • Simple one-frequency reactive ion etcher develops GeO{sub 2} thin layers controllably. • The layers remain chemically stable at ambient conditions over day-scale periods. • The layers are unaffected by the ex-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics onto them. • GeO{sub 2} oxidation and high-k deposition don't affect the Ge morphology significantly. • These conditions contribute to improved Ge-based MOS structure fabrication.

  19. Effect of atomic layer deposited Al2O3:ZnO alloys on thin-film silicon photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hadi, Sabina; Dushaq, Ghada; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we present the effects of the Al2O3:ZnO ratio on the optical and electrical properties of aluminum doped ZnO (AZO) layers deposited by atomic layer deposition, along with AZO application as the anti-reflective coating (ARC) layer and in heterojunction configurations. Here, we report complex refractive indices for AZO layers with different numbers of aluminum atomic cycles (ZnO:Al2O3 = 1:0, 39:1, 19:1, and 9:1) and we confirm their validity by fitting models to experimental data. Furthermore, the most conductive layer (ZnO:Al2O3 = 19:1, conductivity ˜4.6 mΩ cm) is used to fabricate AZO/n+/p-Si thin film solar cells and AZO/p-Si heterojunction devices. The impact of the AZO layer on the photovoltaic properties of these devices is studied by different characterization techniques, resulting in the extraction of recombination and energy band parameters related to the AZO layer. Our results confirm that AZO 19:1 can be used as a low cost and effective conductive ARC layer for solar cells. However, AZO/p-Si heterojunctions suffer from an insufficient depletion region width (˜100 nm) and recombination at the interface states, with an estimated potential barrier of ˜0.6-0.62 eV. The work function of AZO (ZnO:Al2O3 = 19:1) is estimated to be in the range between 4.36 and 4.57 eV. These material properties limit the use of AZO as an emitter in Si solar cells. However, the results imply that AZO based heterojunctions could have applications as low-cost photodetectors or photodiodes, operating under relatively low reverse bias.

  20. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  1. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  2. Global instabilities and transient growth in Blasius boundary-layer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop a hybrid of computational and theoretical approaches suited to study the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) of a compliant panel, flush between rigid upstream and downstream wall sections, with a Blasius boundary-layer flow. The ensuing linear-stability analysis is focused upon global instability and transient ...

  3. The effect of crop residue layers on evapotranspiration, growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A layer of harvest residues from the previous crop can reduce wasteful evaporation from the soil surface and thereby increase the efficiency of use of limited water resources for agricultural production. The practice of harvesting sugarcane green and leaving crop residues in the field, as opposed to burning the residue, has ...

  4. Atomic-Layer Deposition of Single-Crystalline BeO Epitaxially Grown on GaN Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Yum, Jung Hwan; Yoon, Seonno; Larsen, Eric S; Lee, Woo Chul; Kim, Seong Keun; Shervin, Shahab; Wang, Weijie; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Bielawski, Christopher W; Oh, Jungwoo

    2017-12-06

    We have grown a single-crystal beryllium oxide (BeO) thin film on a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate by atomic-layer deposition (ALD) for the first time. BeO has a higher thermal conductivity, bandgap energy, and dielectric constant than SiO 2 . As an electrical insulator, diamond is the only material on earth whose thermal conductivity exceeds that of BeO. Despite these advantages, there is no chemical-vapor-deposition technique for BeO-thin-film deposition, and thus, it is not used in nanoscale-semiconductor-device processing. In this study, the BeO thin films grown on a GaN substrate with a single crystal showed excellent interface and thermal stability. Transmission electron microscopy showed clear diffraction patterns, and the Raman shifts associated with soft phonon modes verified the high thermal conductivity. The X-ray scan confirmed the out-of-plane single-crystal growth direction and the in-plane, 6-fold, symmetrical wurtzite structure. Single-crystalline BeO was grown on GaN despite the large lattice mismatch, which suggested a model that accommodated the strain of hexagonal-on-hexagonal epitaxy with 5/6 and 6/7 domain matching. BeO has a good dielectric constant and good thermal conductivity, bandgap energy, and single-crystal characteristics, so it is suitable for the gate dielectric of power semiconductor devices. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) results of BeO on a GaN-metal-oxide semiconductor exhibited low frequency dispersion, hysteresis, and interface-defect density.

  5. Layer-by-Layer Method for the Synthesis and Growth of Surface Mounted Metal-Organic Frameworks (SURMOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shekhah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A layer-by-layer method has been developed for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs and their deposition on functionalized organic surfaces. The approach is based on the sequential immersion of functionalized organic surfaces into solutions of the building blocks of the MOF, i.e., the organic ligand and the inorganic unit. The synthesis and growth of different types of MOFs on substrates with different functionalization, like COOH, OH and pyridine terminated surfaces, were studied and characterized with different surface characterization techniques. A controlled and highly oriented growth of very homogenous films was obtained using this method. The layer-by-layer method offered also the possibility to study the kinetics of film formation in more detail using surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance. In addition, this method demonstrates the potential to synthesize new classes of MOFs not accessible by conventional methods. Finally, the controlled growth of MOF thin films is important for many applications like chemical sensors, membranes and related electrodes.

  6. Engendering Long-Term Air and Light Stability of a TiO2-Supported Porphyrinic Dye via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffeditz, William L; Son, Ho-Jin; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-12-21

    Organic and porphyrin-based chromophores are prevalent in liquid-junction photovoltaic and photocatalytic solar-cell chemistry; however, their long-term air and light instability may limit their practicality in real world technologies. Here, we describe the protection of a zinc porphyrin dye, adsorbed on nanoparticulate TiO 2 , from air and light degradation by a protective coating of alumina grown with a previously developed post-treatment atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The protective Al 2 O 3 ALD layer is deposited using dimethylaluminum isopropoxide as an Al source; in contrast to the ubiquitous ALD precursor trimethylaluminum, dimethylaluminum isopropoxide does not degrade the zinc porphyrin dye, as confirmed by UV-vis measurements. The growth of this protective ALD layer around the dye can be monitored by an in-reactor quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Furthermore, greater than 80% of porphyrin light absorption is retained over ∼1 month of exposure to air and light when the protective coating is present, whereas almost complete loss of porphyrin absorption is observed in less than 2 days in the absence of the ALD protective layer. Applying the Al 2 O 3 post-treatment technique to the TiO 2 -adsorbed dye allows the dye to remain in electronic contact with both the semiconductor surface and a surrounding electrolyte solution, the combination of which makes this technique promising for numerous other electrochemical photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications, especially those involving the dye-sensitized evolution of oxygen.

  7. Al2O3 on WSe2 by ozone based atomic layer deposition: Nucleation and interface study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcatl, Angelica; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the atomic layer deposition process using ozone and trimethylaluminum (TMA) for the deposition of Al2O3 films on WSe2 was investigated. It was found that the ozone-based atomic layer deposition enhanced the nucleation of Al2O3 in comparison to the water/TMA process. In addition, the chemistry at the Al2O3/WSe2 interface and the surface morphology of the Al2O3 films exhibited a dependence on the deposition temperature. A non-covalent functionalizing effect of ozone on WSe2 at low deposition temperatures 30 °C was identified which prevented the formation of pinholes in the Al2O3 films. These findings aim to provide an approach to obtain high-quality gate dielectrics on WSe2 for two-dimensional transistor applications.

  8. Iridium-coated micropore x-ray optics using dry etching of a silicon wafer and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Moriyama, Teppei; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Kakiuchi, Takuya; Ohashi, Takaya; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Putkonen, Matti

    2013-08-20

    To enhance x-ray reflectivity of silicon micropore optics using dry etching of silicon (111) wafers, iridium coating is tested by use of atomic layer deposition. An iridium layer is successfully formed on sidewalls of tiny micropores with a pore width of 20 μm and depth of 300 μm. The film thickness is ∼20  nm. An enhanced x-ray reflectivity compared to that of silicon is confirmed at Ti Kα 4.51 keV, for what we believe to be the first time, with this type of optics. Some discrepancies from a theoretical reflectivity curve of iridium-coated silicon are noticed at small incident angles rms is consistent with atomic force microscope measurements of the sidewalls.

  9. Iced photochemical reduction to synthesize atomically dispersed metals by suppressing nanocrystal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hehe; Huang, Kai; Wang, Da; Zhang, Ruoyu; Ge, Binghui; Ma, Jingyuan; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Qunyang; Lei, Ming; Zhang, Cheng; Irawan, Joshua; Liu, Li-Min; Wu, Hui

    2017-11-14

    Photochemical solution-phase reactions have been widely applied for the syntheses of nanocrystals. In particular, tuning of the nucleation and growth of solids has been a major area of focus. Here we demonstrate a facile approach to generate atomically dispersed platinum via photochemical reduction of frozen chloroplatinic acid solution using ultraviolet light. Using this iced-photochemical reduction, the aggregation of atoms is prevented, and single atoms are successfully stabilized. The platinum atoms are deposited on various substrates, including mesoporous carbon, graphene, carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide nanoparticles, and zinc oxide nanowires. The atomically dispersed platinum on mesoporous carbon exhibits efficient catalytic activity for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction, with an overpotential of only 65 mV at a current density of 100 mA cm -2 and long-time durability (>10 h), superior to state-of-the-art platinum/carbon. This iced-photochemical reduction may be extended to other single atoms, for example gold and silver, as demonstrated in this study.

  10. Study on growth factors of intermetallic layer within hot-dipped

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Al-Zn-Si coating with regard to general seawater corrosion protection. This study deals with the interfacial intermetallic layer's growth, which affects considerably the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of 25%Al-Zn alloy coatings, ...

  11. Efficient Process for Direct Atomic Layer Deposition of Metallic Cu Thin Films Based on an Organic Reductant

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Tripurari S.; Karppinen, Maarit

    2017-01-01

    The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013) / ERC Grant Agreement n. 339478. Acronym LAYERENG-HYBMAT. | openaire: EC/FP7/339478/EU//LAYERENG-HYBMAT We report a promising approach to use an organic reductant for in situ atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metallic copper films. The process is based on sequentially pulsed precursors copper acetyl acetonate (acac), water, and h...

  12. Two-Dimensional SnO Anodes with a Tunable Number of Atomic Layers for Sodium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fan

    2017-01-18

    We have systematically changed the number of atomic layers stacked in 2D SnO nanosheet anodes and studied their sodium ion battery (SIB) performance. The results indicate that as the number of atomic SnO layers in a sheet decreases, both the capacity and cycling stability of the Na ion battery improve. The thinnest SnO nanosheet anodes (two to six SnO monolayers) exhibited the best performance. Specifically, an initial discharge and charge capacity of 1072 and 848 mAh g-1 were observed, respectively, at 0.1 A g-1. In addition, an impressive reversible capacity of 665 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.1 A g-1 and 452 mAh g-1 after 1000 cycles at a high current density of 1.0 A g-1 was observed, with excellent rate performance. As the average number of atomic layers in the anode sheets increased, the battery performance degraded significantly. For example, for the anode sheets with 10-20 atomic layers, only a reversible capacity of 389 mAh g-1 could be obtained after 100 cycles at 0.1 A g-1. Density functional theory calculations coupled with experimental results were used to elucidate the sodiation mechanism of the SnO nanosheets. This systematic study of monolayer-dependent physical and electrochemical properties of 2D anodes shows a promising pathway to engineering and mitigating volume changes in 2D anode materials for sodium ion batteries. It also demonstrates that ultrathin SnO nanosheets are promising SIB anode materials with high specific capacity, stable cyclability, and excellent rate performance.

  13. Early stages of growth of gold layers sputter deposited on glass and silicon substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Slepička, P.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Švorčík, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 241 (2012), s. 1-7 ISSN 1931-7573 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : sputtering * gold layer * glass * silicon * RBS Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.524, year: 2012

  14. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  15. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N

    2014-05-16

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures were simulated by varying the deposition energy of carbon atoms in the range of 1-120 eV. Intrinsic film characteristics (e.g. density and internal stress) were determined after the system reached equilibrium. Short- and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering is examined in the context of atomic hybridization and ring connectivity simulation results. It is shown that relatively high deposition energy (i.e., 80 eV) yields a multilayer film structure consisting of an intermixing layer, bulk film and surface layer, consistent with the classical subplantation model. The highest film density (3.3 g cm-3), sp3 fraction (∼43%), and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering correspond to a deposition energy of ∼80 eV, which is in good agreement with experimental findings. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Monolithic growth of partly cured polydimethylsiloxane thin film layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2014-01-01

    at different curing times. The monolithic films are investigated by rheology, scanning electron microscope, mechanical testing, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology, mechanical and dielectric properties, as well...... to enable interlayer crosslinking reactions either by application of an adhesion promoter or by ensuring that there are reactive, complementary sites available on the two surfaces. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used polymer for DEAPs. In this work, two-layered PDMS films are adhered together...... as thermal stabilities of the bilayer elastomer films are observed to change with the curing time of the monolayers before lamination. The objective of this work is to create adhesion of two layers without destroying the original viscoelastic properties of the PDMS films, and hence enable, for example...

  17. Defect Reduction in Epitaxial Growth Using Superlattice Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    R. Shealy, Appl. Phys. Lett. 48, 925 (1986). "M. Razeghi and J. I’. Duchenin, J. Cryst (irokl 70. 145 ’H. Temkin , M. B. Panish, P.M. Petroff, K. A...exposure time, it is possible 500-A GaAso9 P00 y cap. The GaAs 97 P 0 3 layers were that the adsorption process is controlled by surface kinetics grown

  18. Unusual stoichiometry control in the atomic layer deposition of manganese borate films from manganese bis(tris(pyrazolyl)borate) and ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klesko, Joseph P.; Bellow, James A.; Saly, Mark J.; Winter, Charles H.; Julin, Jaakko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of films with the approximate compositions Mn 3 (BO 3 ) 2 and CoB 2 O 4 is described using MnTp 2 or CoTp 2 [Tp = tris(pyrazolyl)borate] with ozone. The solid state decomposition temperatures of MnTp 2 and CoTp 2 are ∼370 and ∼340 °C, respectively. Preparative-scale sublimations of MnTp 2 and CoTp 2 at 210 °C/0.05 Torr afforded >99% recoveries with <0.1% nonvolatile residues. Self-limited ALD growth was demonstrated at 325 °C for MnTp 2 or CoTp 2 with ozone as the coreactant. The growth rate for the manganese borate process was 0.19 Å/cycle within the ALD window of 300–350 °C. The growth rate for the cobalt borate process was 0.39–0.42 Å/cycle at 325 °C. X-ray diffraction of the as-deposited films indicated that they were amorphous. Atomic force microscopy of 35–36 nm thick manganese borate films grown within the 300–350 °C ALD window showed root mean square surface roughnesses of 0.4–0.6 nm. Film stoichiometries were assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight-elastic recoil detection analysis. The differing film stoichiometries obtained from the very similar precursors MnTp 2 and CoTp 2 are proposed to arise from the oxidizing ability of the intermediate high valent manganese oxide layers and lack thereof for cobalt.

  19. Effect of Al 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition in Solid-State CdS Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2013-03-21

    Despite the promise of quantum dots (QDs) as a light-absorbing material to replace the dye in dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) efficiencies remain low, due in part to high rates of recombination. In this article, we demonstrate that ultrathin recombination barrier layers of Al2O3 deposited by atomic layer deposition can improve the performance of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with spiro-OMeTAD as the solid-state hole transport material. We explored depositing the Al2O3 barrier layers either before or after the QDs, resulting in TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO 2/QD/Al2O3 configurations. The effects of barrier layer configuration and thickness were tracked through current-voltage measurements of device performance and transient photovoltage measurements of electron lifetimes. The Al2O3 layers were found to suppress dark current and increase electron lifetimes with increasing Al 2O3 thickness in both configurations. For thin barrier layers, gains in open-circuit voltage and concomitant increases in efficiency were observed, although at greater thicknesses, losses in photocurrent caused net decreases in efficiency. A close comparison of the electron lifetimes in TiO2 in the TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO2/QD/Al2O3 configurations suggests that electron transfer from TiO2 to spiro-OMeTAD is a major source of recombination in ss-QDSSCs, though recombination of TiO2 electrons with oxidized QDs can also limit electron lifetimes, particularly if the regeneration of oxidized QDs is hindered by a too-thick coating of the barrier layer. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Growth and microstructure of iron nitride layers and pore formation in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, C.; Mader, W. [Univ. Bonn, Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie, Bonn (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Layers of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N and {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N on ferrite were produced by nitriding iron single crystals or rolled sheets of iron in flowing ammonia at 520 C. The nitride layers were characterised using X-ray diffraction, light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The compound layer consists of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N at the surface and of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N facing the ferrite. After 4 h of nitriding, pores develop in the near surface region of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N showing more or less open porosity. Growth of the entire compound layer as well as of the massive and the porous {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N sublayer is diffusion-controlled and follows a parabolic growth rate. The {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N layer is formed as a transition phase within a narrow interval of nitrogen activity, and it shows little growth in thickness. The transformation of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N to {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N is topotactic, where the orientation of the closed-packed iron layers of the crystal structures is preserved. Determination of lattice plane spacings was possible by X-ray diffraction, and this was correlated to the nitrogen content of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N. While the porous layer exhibits an enhanced nitrogen content corresponding to the chemical composition Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.1}, the massive e Fe{sub 3}N layer corresponds to Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.0}. The pore formation in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.1} is concluded to be the result of excess nitrogen atoms on non-structural sites, which have a high mobility. Therefore, recombination of excess nitrogen to molecular N{sub 2} at lattice defects is preferred in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N with high nitrogen content compared to stoichiometric {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.0} with nitrogen on only structural sites. (orig.)